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Sample records for irritated seborrheic keratosis

  1. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  2. Giant perigenital seborrheic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Mishra, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a very common benign epidermal proliferation that is prevalent in all races. Most commonly occurring on the trunk, face, scalp, and the extremities, they can occur anywhere on the body except the palms and soles. The most common appearance is that of a very superficial verrucous plaque which appears to be stuck on the surface. Giant lesions are very rare, and their location on the genital area is rarer still. We report here a case of multiple giant SK lesions in a 59-year-old man. PMID:25657917

  3. Dermatofibroma simulating seborrheic keratosis dermoscopically*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Daniel Holanda; Leite, Camila Pinon Zoby; Araujo, Gabriela Diniz de Souza; Teixeira, Márcia Almeida Galvão; Alencar, Eliane Ruth Barbosa; Cavalcanti, Silvana Maria de Morais

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a frequent benign tumor of easy clinical diagnosis in most cases, but that can mimic other dermatoses. Dermoscopy may help to define the diagnosis and its classical pattern is a central white area, similar to a scar, surrounded by a discrete pigment network. However, dermoscopic findings are not always typical. We describe here a case of dermatofibroma exhibiting ridges, furrows and pseudocomedos, a pattern which is typical of seborrheic keratosis, in dermoscopy. PMID:27438205

  4. Giant Seborrheic Keratosis of the Genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Amiya Kumar; Kumari, Rashmi; Rajesh, G; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Basu, Debdatta

    2012-01-01

    Genital seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a rare entity, which can be easily misdiagnosed as genital warts. Dermoscopy is a useful tool to make diagnosis of SK in such cases. We report a 50-year-old woman with a large polypoidal growth on the external genitalia. Dermoscopic examination showed fissures and ridges, cerebriform appearance, and comedo-like openings consistent with SK. The histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of SK. PMID:22837573

  5. Clinical and Histopathological Investigation of Seborrheic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Hahn, Hyung Jin; Lee, Yang Won; Choe, Yong Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is one of the most common epidermal tumors of the skin. However, only a few large-scale clinicohistopathological investigations have been conducted on SK or on the possible correlation between histopathological SK subtype and location. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and histopathological features of a relatively large number of cases of diagnosed SK. Methods Two hundred and seventy-one pathology slides of skin tissue from patients with clinically diagnosed SK and 206 cases of biopsy-proven SK were analyzed. The biopsy-proven cases of SK were assessed for histopathological subclassification. The demographic, clinical, and histopathological data of the patients were collected for analysis of associated factors. Results The most frequent histopathological subtype was the acanthotic type, followed by mixed, hyperkeratotic, melanoacanthoma, clonal, irritated, and adenoid types; an unexpectedly high percentage (9.2%) of the melanoacanthoma variant was observed. The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites than in sun-protected sites (p=0.028). Premalignant and malignant entities together represented almost one-quarter (24.2%) of the clinicopathological mismatch cases (i.e., mismatch between the clinical and histopathological diagnoses). Regarding the location of SK development, the frequency of mismatch for the sun-exposed areas was significantly higher than that for sun-protected areas (p=0.043). Conclusion The adenoid type was more common in sun-exposed sites. Biopsy sampling should be performed for lesions situated in sun-exposed areas to exclude other premalignant or malignant diseases. PMID:27081260

  6. Seborrheic keratosis over genitalia masquerading as Buschke Lowenstein tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, N.; Venkatesan, S.; Mohanasundari, P. S.; Thilagavathy, S.; Elangovan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a common benign condition of the skin. It does not usually appear before middle age. Upper trunk and face are the sites most commonly involved. Lesions are also frequently seen on the extremities. SK of the genitalia is a rare entity. It has been frequently mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is made only on histopathology. We report a case of SK with polypoidal lesions restricted to the skin on and around the genitalia since 10 years. SK should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision is diagnostic. PMID:26392661

  7. Seborrheic keratosis over genitalia masquerading as Buschke Lowenstein tumor.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Venkatesan, S; Mohanasundari, P S; Thilagavathy, S; Elangovan, P

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratosis (SK) is a common benign condition of the skin. It does not usually appear before middle age. Upper trunk and face are the sites most commonly involved. Lesions are also frequently seen on the extremities. SK of the genitalia is a rare entity. It has been frequently mistaken as genital warts and differentiation is made only on histopathology. We report a case of SK with polypoidal lesions restricted to the skin on and around the genitalia since 10 years. SK should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pedunculated lesions of the penis. The histopathology after shave excision is diagnostic. PMID:26392661

  8. Association of Dowling-Degos disease and multiple seborrheic keratosis in a "Christmas tree pattern"

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Vitorino Modesto; Pereira, Nayanne Lays dos Santos; Silva, Renata Faria; Silva, Fabio Henrique de Oliveira; Garcia, Cacilda Joyce Ferreira da Silva; Sousa, Maria Aparecida Alves de Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease is a rare sporadic or autosomal dominant pigmentary entity, in which clusters of papules and reticulate macules slowly develop with predominance in flexural regions. This entity is due to mutations in the keratin 5 gene, and is related with other cutaneous disorders. We report the sporadic form of Dowling-Degos disease in an elderly man with multiple seborrheic keratosis in a "Christmas tree" pattern. Worthy of note in this case study is the lesions evolved for over than 30 years. The aim is to describe the association of these keratoses with Dowling-Degos disease in a healthy man. PMID:25405133

  9. [Intraepidermal mass of M. leprae in a case of seborrheic keratosis due to Hansen's disease (LLs)].

    PubMed

    Yajima, M; Suzuki, K; Wen, M; Yamada, N; Asano, G

    1995-11-01

    A 67-year-old patient has had exanthema in the lower right limb since 51 years ago (16 years old at onset), which underwent repeated remission and recurrence. At present, he has bilateral symmetrical widespread infiltrating exanthema and asymmetrical marked neuralhypertrophy, and has been diagnosed typical LLs (His father had the same disease). The exanthema recurred several years ago, and the patient is being treated for Hansen's disease. He had a dark brown flat elevation with a rough surface and the size of a small finger tip in his right abdominal skin for approximately 20 years. A biopsy was performed, and the specimen was fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin sections were prepared for histopathologic examination. A part of the specimen was processed forscanning electron microscopic examination. Seborrheic keratosis was diagnosed by H & E staining. Acid-fast (FITE) staining, immunohistochemical staining (keratin, S-100 protein, anti-PGL antibody and anti-BCG antibody) and scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of bacteria (M. leprae) in the dermal foam cells, the matrix with a banded structure and the squamous epithelial cells which normally lack phagocytosis function. Compared to the basal cells of normal epidermis, the basal cells located adjacent to the dermis affected with seborrheic keratosis showed increased proliferation and more marked characteristics of a germinative cell. The degree of differentiation of the basal cells appeared regressed, and they probably possessed augmented phagocytic activity. The phagocytosed bacteria were probably carried by the epidermal cell cycle toward the surface layer. However, bacteria could not be found in the stratum corneum, probably due to an association with the lysosome. PMID:8582883

  10. Seborrheic Keratoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... a typical seborrheic keratosis. Your growth is dry, flat, rough, and scaly. It could be an actinic ... AAD Product catalog Store customer service Publications Dermatology World JAAD JAAD Case Reports Aspire All Publications Connect ...

  11. Nodulocystic Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising Directly from a Seborrheic Keratosis: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shibao, Kana; Okiyama, Naoko; Tanaka, Ryota; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses (SKs) are common epidermal tumors composed of benign keratinocytes. Malignant skin tumors including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) rarely arise within SKs. We report a rare case of an 82-year-old man with nodulocystic BCC that appeared at the center of a scaly hyperpigmented SK that had been presented for more than 10 years. It was histologically confirmed that CK19-positive BCC arose directly from the wall of the pseudohorn cyst, a part of the SK. Nodular and/or cystic BCC also rarely arise within SKs while the most common histologic type of BCC within SKs is the superficial type. Careful observation of SKs is important even though it is rarely a background condition for malignant transformation. PMID:27512194

  12. Sustained Akt Activity Is Required to Maintain Cell Viability in Seborrheic Keratosis, a Benign Epithelial Tumor.

    PubMed

    Neel, Victor A; Todorova, Kristina; Wang, Jun; Kwon, Eunjeong; Kang, Minjeong; Liu, Qingsong; Gray, Nathanael; Lee, Sam W; Mandinova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Seborrheic keratoses (SKs) are common benign skin tumors that share many morphological features with their malignant counterpart, squamous cell carcinoma. SKs frequently have acquired oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascade. We developed a reliable culture system to study SKs in vitro and screened these cells using a library of selective kinase inhibitors to evaluate effects on cell survival. These benign tumors are sensitive to inhibition by ATP-competitive Akt inhibitors, including A-443654 and GSK690693. RNA interference-mediated Akt suppression mimicked the effects of enzyme inhibition in cultured cells. Akt inhibition suppressed phosphorylation of downstream targets of Akt kinase that are critical for cell survival, including MDM2 and FOXO3a, and induced apoptosis. Cell death was also dependent on p53, mutations in which, although common in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, have not been identified in SKs. Intact explants of SKs were also sensitive to Akt inhibition. In addition to the obvious therapeutic implications of these findings, identifying the signaling characteristics that differentiate benign and malignant tumors may inform our understanding of the malignant state. PMID:26739095

  13. Inverted follicular keratosis successfully treated with imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Ozlu, Emin; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Oman, Berkant

    2016-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis is a rare benign tumor of the follicular infundibulum characterized by exo-endophytic growing. It is thought to be a rare variant of the seborrheic keratosis. The diagnosis of inverted follicular keratosis is generally established histopathologically because clinical differentiation from other lesions is difficult. Herein, we present one such rare case, successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod cream. PMID:27294052

  14. Inverted follicular keratosis successfully treated with imiquimod

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Ozlu, Emin; Uzuncakmak, Tugba Kevser; Akdeniz, Necmettin; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Oman, Berkant

    2016-01-01

    Inverted follicular keratosis is a rare benign tumor of the follicular infundibulum characterized by exo-endophytic growing. It is thought to be a rare variant of the seborrheic keratosis. The diagnosis of inverted follicular keratosis is generally established histopathologically because clinical differentiation from other lesions is difficult. Herein, we present one such rare case, successfully treated with topical 5% imiquimod cream. PMID:27294052

  15. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    Solar keratosis; Sun-induced skin changes - keratosis; Keratosis - actinic (solar) ... Some actinic keratoses become squamous cell skin cancer . Have your health care provider look at all skin growths as soon as you find them. Your provider will ...

  16. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... might want you to use a prescription steroid lotion once or twice daily. Seborrheic dermatitis of the skin creases in adolescents and adults. Steroid lotions may be used in adolescents and adults. Seborrheic ...

  17. Seborrheic dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dandruff; Seborrheic eczema; Cradle cap ... Weidman AK, Williams JDL, Coulson I. Seborrheic eczema. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  18. Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Actinic Keratosis (Solar Keratosis) Information for adults A A A Actinic ... the touch. Overview Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, are small rough or scaly areas of ...

  19. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms. This condition is known as steroid-induced rosacea. Treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp may include ... Information for Patients All About Rosacea Faces of Rosacea Treatment Photos Rosacea FAQ Management Options Medical Therapy When ...

  20. Seborrheic dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin condition that causes flaky, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas such as the ... symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis include: Skin lesions with scales Plaques over large area Greasy, oily areas of ...

  1. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... red patches on the skin. The normal skin yeast, Pityrosporum ovale, lives in oil-rich skin regions ... due to the body's inflammatory response to the yeast found on the skin. Seborrheic dermatitis seems to ...

  2. Actinic keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... example, if you work outdoors) Had many severe sunburns early in life Are older Symptoms Actinic keratosis ... and tanning salons. Other things to know about sun exposure: Sun exposure is stronger in or near surfaces ...

  3. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Thomas; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition, characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. It may be associated with pruritus, and it primarily affects sebum-rich areas, such as the scalp, face, upper chest, and back. Although its pathogenesis is not completely understood, some postulate that the condition results from colonization of the skin of affected individuals with species of the genus Malassezia (formerly, Pityrosporum). A variety of treatment modalities are available, including eradication of the fungus, reducing or treating the inflammatory process, and decreasing sebum production. PMID:20592880

  4. Seborrheic dermatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Kralj, Martina; Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Lakoš Jukić, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder clinically characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. The prevalence of adult seborrheic dermatitis is estimated at 5%. Although the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis has yet to be understood, Malassezia yeasts, hormones (androgens), sebum levels and immune response are known to play important roles in its development. Additional factors including drugs, winter temperatures and stress may exacerbate seborrheic dermatitis. A variety of treatment modalities are available, including antifungal agents, topical low-potency steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (immunomodulators). This review summarizes current knowledge on the etiopathogenesis and therapy of adult seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:22726283

  5. A segmental neurofibromatosis case with eruptive seborrheic keratoses.

    PubMed

    Takci, Zennure; Simsek, Gulcin Guler; Tekin, Ozlem

    2012-09-01

    Segmental neurofibromatosis (SNF) is a rare variant of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 characterized by a restricted distribution of cafe-au-lait macules, and/or neurofibromas, and rarely freckling to a single dermatomal segment. Patients with NF type 1 have an associated increased risk for benign or malignant tumours. The prevalence of typical NF type 1 complications including malignancies in SNF is much lower than the generalized form. Seborrheic keratosis is one of the more common benign epidermal tumour which can be a paraneoplastic syndrome when it arises with an eruptive appearance. To our knowledge in the literature no case of SNF associated with eruptive seborrheic keratoses has been defined. We report the case of a man, aged 51, who had SNF and abruptly developed eruptive seborrheic keratoses. PMID:23139984

  6. [Actinic Keratosis].

    PubMed

    Dejaco, D; Hauser, U; Zelger, B; Riechelmann, H

    2015-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is a cutaneous lesion characterized by proliferation of atypical epidermal keratinocytes due to prolonged exposure to exogenous factors such as ultraviolet radiation. AKs are in-situ-squamous cell carcinomas (PEC) of the skin. AK typically presents as erythematous, scaly patch or papule (classic AK), occasionally as thick, adherent scale on an erythematous base. Mostly fair-skinned adults are affected. AKs typically occur in areas of frequent sun exposure (balding scalp, face, "H-region", lateral neck, décolleté, dorsum of the hand and lower extremities). Actinic Cheilitis is the term used for AKs appearing on the lips. The diagnosis of AK is based on clinical examination including inspection and palpation. The typical palpable rough surface of AK often precedes a visible lesion. Dermoscopy may provide additional information. If diagnosis is uncertain and invasion suspected, biopsy and histopathologic evaluation should be performed. The potential for progression to invasive PECs mandates therapeutic intervention. Treatment options include topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies are classified into physical, medical and combined physical-chemical approaches and a sequential combination of treatment modalities is possible. Topical-physical cryotherapy is the treatment of choice for isolated, non-hypertrophic AK. Topical-medical treatment, e. g. 5-fluoruracil (5FU) cream or Imiquomod or Ingenolmebutat application is used for multiple, non-hypertrophic AKs. For hypertrophic AKs, a dehorning pretreatment with salicinated vaseline is recommended. Isolated hypertrophic AKs often need cryotherapy with prolonged freezing time or several consecutive applications. Sequentially combined approaches are recommended for multiple, hypertrophic AKs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as example for a combined physical-chemical approach is an established treatment for multiple, non-hypertrophic and hypertrophic AKs. Prevention includes avoidance of sun and

  7. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  8. [Chronic lichenoid keratosis].

    PubMed

    Skorupka, M; Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G

    1992-02-01

    We report on a 41-year-old woman with keratosis lichenoides chronica, a disorder first described by Kaposi in 1886 as "lichen moniliformis", who later also developed chronic lymphatic leukaemia. Since Kaposi's original report, 38 additional cases have been reported. Occurrence of keratosis lichenoides chronica associated with malignant disorders has not previously been described. PMID:1548136

  9. Optimizing Treatment Approaches in Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring, cutaneous condition that causes erythema and flaking, sometimes appearing as macules or plaques with dry white or moist oily scales. In adults, it commonly occurs in areas with high concentrations of sebaceous glands. The face and scalp are the most frequently affected areas, and involvement of multiple sites is common. Dandruff is regarded as a mild noninflammatory form of seborrheic dermatitis. There is a high incidence of seborrheic dermatitis among persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection or Parkinson’s disease. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not well understood, but appears to be related to the composition of the sebaceous gland secretions, the proliferation of Malessezia yeasts, and the host immune response. Treatment options for nonscalp and scalp seborrheic dermatitis include topical agents and shampoos containing antifungal agents, anti-inflammatory agents, keratolytic agents, and calcineurin inhibitors. Because multiple body sites are usually involved, the physician should examine all commonly affected areas. Patients should be made aware that seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that will probably recur even after successful treatment. PMID:23441240

  10. Keratosis lichenoides chronica: Case-based review of treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pistoni, Federica; Peroni, Anna; Colato, Chiara; Schena, Donatella; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2016-08-01

    Keratosis lichenoides chronica (KLC) is a rare dermatological condition characterized by keratotic papules arranged in a parallel linear or reticular pattern and facial lesions resembling seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea. The clinical, histological and therapeutic information on 71 patients with KLC retrieved through a PubMed search plus one our new case were analyzed. KLC affects patients of all ages, with a modest male predominance. Pediatric cases represent about one quarter of patients. Diagnosis is usually delayed and histologically confirmed. All patients have thick, rough and scaly papules and plaques arranged in a linear or reticular pattern, on limbs (>80%) and trunk (about 60%). Face involvement is described in two-thirds of patients. Lesions are usually asymptomatic or mildly pruritic. Other manifestations, such as palmoplantar keratoderma, mucosal involvement, ocular manifestations, nail dystrophy, are reported in 20-30% of patients. Children present more frequently alopecia. No controlled trials are available. Results from small case series or single case reports show that the best treatment options are phototherapy and systemic retinoids, alone or in combination, with nearly half of patients reaching complete remission. Systemic corticosteroids as well as antibiotics and antimalarials are not effective. PMID:26652284

  11. The heterogeneity of tumours associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Sandbank, M; Hodak, E; Rotem, A; Ben-David, E

    1987-01-01

    A patient with epidermodysplasia verruciformis also had lesions of seborrheic keratosis, irritated seborrheic keratosis, and intraepidermal and invasive squamous cell carcinoma as well as infiltrating squamous cell carcinoma associated with eccrine poroma. Electron microscope studies revealed intranuclear virus particles. Immunoperoxidase studies using rabbit anti-bovine papilloma virus serum showed a positive reaction. PMID:2436421

  12. Solar keratosis: epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Cara; Foley, Peter; Freeman, Michael; Chong, Alvin H

    2007-05-01

    Solar keratosis is a common problem encountered by dermatologists, particularly in Australia. Solar keratosis is most commonly found on sun-exposed areas such as the scalp, face and forearms. UV radiation is thought to be the major aetiological factor, with age, immunosuppression and human papillomavirus being important contributing factors. Solar keratosis usually presents as a discrete, variably erythematous and irregular lesion with a scaly surface. Although the exact rate of malignant transformation to squamous cell carcinoma is unknown, the majority of squamous cell carcinomas appear to arise from within solar keratosis. For this reason, solar keratosis is commonly treated and, consequently, an increasing number of therapeutic options is now available. Traditional therapies, such as liquid nitrogen cryotherapy, are still popular, but newer choices, such as photodynamic therapy and imiquimod cream, are now providing further options with similar efficacy and superior adverse effect profiles, albeit at a higher cost. PMID:17535191

  13. Nilotinib-Induced Keratosis Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Wai Mun Sean; Aw, Chen Wee Derrick

    2016-01-01

    Nilotinib is a second-generation Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is approved for the treatment of imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia expressing the Bcr-Abl mutation. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions occur more frequently in patients using this medication. We present a case of nilotinib-induced keratosis pilaris that did not have accompanying symptoms of alopecia or pruritus. Greater recognition of this association is needed so that appropriate treatment can be instituted to ensure a good oncologic outcome. PMID:27194977

  14. Malassezia furfur in infantile seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tollesson, A; Frithz, A; Stenlund, K

    1997-01-01

    Malassezia furfur is important in the pathogenesis of a number of dermatologic diseases including seborrheic dermatitis in adults. It has also recently been suggested that M. furfur might be the etiologic agent in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). We studied the presence of M. furfur in 21 children with the clinical diagnosis of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. Laboratory analyses showed aberrant patterns of essential fatty acids (EFA) in serum characterized by elevated levels of 18:1w9 and 20:2w6. Samples for M. furfur were taken from the foreheads and chests of children with infantile seborrheic dermatitis at the time of diagnosis, directly after treatment to complete healing, and after 1 year with no signs of infantile seborrheic dermatitis. All the patients were treated topically with borage oil containing 25% gammalinolenic acid (GLA). No reduced growth of M. furfur was seen on contact plates prepared with borage oil. The growth of M. furfur seems not to be related to the clinical symptoms in ISD. PMID:9436835

  15. Seborrheic Dermatitis and Dandruff: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Luis J.; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C.

    2016-01-01

    Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) and dandruff are of a continuous spectrum of the same disease that affects the seborrheic areas of the body. Dandruff is restricted to the scalp, and involves itchy, flaking skin without visible inflammation. SD can affect the scalp as well as other seborrheic areas, and involves itchy and flaking or scaling skin, inflammation and pruritus. Various intrinsic and environmental factors, such as sebaceous secretions, skin surface fungal colonization, individual susceptibility, and interactions between these factors, all contribute to the pathogenesis of SD and dandruff. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on SD and dandruff, including epidemiology, burden of disease, clinical presentations and diagnosis, treatment, genetic studies in humans and animal models, and predisposing factors. Genetic and biochemical studies and investigations in animal models provide further insight on the pathophysiology and strategies for better treatment. PMID:27148560

  16. Nilontinib induced keratosis pilaris atrophicans.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Shilpi; Sood, Apra; Billings, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a disorder of follicular keratinization that is characterized by keratin plugs in the hair follicles with surrounding erythema. A 46-year-old man with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was started on nilotinib, a second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Two months later the patient noticed red bumps on the skin and patchy hair loss on the arms, chest, shoulders, back, and legs. Cutaneous reactions to nilotinib are the most frequent non-hematologic adverse effects reported. However, it is important to distinguish KP-like eruptions from more severe drug hypersensitivity eruptions, which can necessitate discontinuing the medication. Also, it is important to classify the cutaneous eruptions in patients on TKI according to the morphology instead of labeling them all as "chemotherapy eruption" to be able to better manage these adverse effects. PMID:27617940

  17. Epidermal permeability barrier in the treatment of keratosis pilaris.

    PubMed

    Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt; Kampirapap, Kowit; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy, safety, hydrating properties, and tolerability of 10% lactic acid (LA) and 5% salicylic acid (SA) in the therapy of keratosis pilaris (KP). Material and Method. Patients with KP were randomized for treatment with either 10% LA or 5% SA creams being applied twice daily for 3 months. The patients were clinically assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The functional properties of the stratum corneum (SC) were determined before treatment, 12 weeks, and follow-up phase by high-frequency conductance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Results. At the end of the trial, the mean reduction of the lesions from baseline was statistically significant for 10% LA (66%) and 5% SA (52%). During the treatment, higher conductance values were found on both group and this improvement was maintained until the follow up period. No significant differences in transepidermal water loss were observed after treatment. The adverse effects were limited to mild irritation localized on the skin without systemic side effect. Conclusion. The study demonstrated that 10% LA and 5% SA are beneficial to treat KP with the significantly clearance and marked improvement as by instrumental evaluation. PMID:25802513

  18. Epidermal Permeability Barrier in the Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris

    PubMed Central

    Kootiratrakarn, Tanawatt; Kampirapap, Kowit; Chunhasewee, Chakkrapong

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the efficacy, safety, hydrating properties, and tolerability of 10% lactic acid (LA) and 5% salicylic acid (SA) in the therapy of keratosis pilaris (KP). Material and Method. Patients with KP were randomized for treatment with either 10% LA or 5% SA creams being applied twice daily for 3 months. The patients were clinically assessed at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment and 4 weeks after treatment. The functional properties of the stratum corneum (SC) were determined before treatment, 12 weeks, and follow-up phase by high-frequency conductance and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Results. At the end of the trial, the mean reduction of the lesions from baseline was statistically significant for 10% LA (66%) and 5% SA (52%). During the treatment, higher conductance values were found on both group and this improvement was maintained until the follow up period. No significant differences in transepidermal water loss were observed after treatment. The adverse effects were limited to mild irritation localized on the skin without systemic side effect. Conclusion. The study demonstrated that 10% LA and 5% SA are beneficial to treat KP with the significantly clearance and marked improvement as by instrumental evaluation. PMID:25802513

  19. Role of antifungal agents in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Nicol, Karyn; Batra, Roma

    2004-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a superficial fungal disease of the skin, occurring in areas rich in sebaceous glands. It is thought that an association exists between Malassezia yeasts and seborrheic dermatitis. This may, in part, be due to an abnormal or inflammatory immune response to these yeasts. The azoles represent the largest class of antifungals used in the treatment of this disease to date. In addition to their antifungal properties, some azoles, including bifonazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, which may be beneficial in alleviating symptoms. Other topical antifungal agents, such as the allylamines (terbinafine), benzylamines (butenafine), hydroxypyridones (ciclopirox), and immunomodulators (pimecrolimus and tacrolimus), have also been effective. In addition, recent studies have revealed that tea tree oil (Melaleuca oil), honey, and cinnamic acid have antifungal activity against Malassezia species, which may be of benefit in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In cases where seborrheic dermatitis is widespread, the use of an oral therapy, such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine, may be preferred. Essentially, antifungal therapy reduces the number of yeasts on the skin, leading to an improvement in seborrheic dermatitis. With a wide availability of preparations, including creams, shampoos, and oral formulations, antifungal agents are safe and effective in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:15663338

  20. Topical Pimecrolimus 1% Cream in the Treatment of Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a multifactorial skin disease characterized by a chronic course with periods of exacerbation and remission. Although topical corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment, alternative therapies are often needed to avoid protracted use of topical corticosteroid therapy in order to avert side effects and to sustain control of the disorder. Topical pimecrolimus, a calcinuerin inhibitor, is a safe alternative for seborrheic dermatitis and is more ideal for long-term use. More specifically, topical pimecrolimus not only has an attractive safety profile with no risk of many of the potential side effects seen with topical corticosteroids, but also has favorable efficacy data, including more data on long-term use. This is a review of literature evaluating the efficacy and safety profile of topical pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:23441238

  1. Topical pimecrolimus 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace K; Rosso, James Del

    2013-02-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a multifactorial skin disease characterized by a chronic course with periods of exacerbation and remission. Although topical corticosteroids have been the mainstay of treatment, alternative therapies are often needed to avoid protracted use of topical corticosteroid therapy in order to avert side effects and to sustain control of the disorder. Topical pimecrolimus, a calcinuerin inhibitor, is a safe alternative for seborrheic dermatitis and is more ideal for long-term use. More specifically, topical pimecrolimus not only has an attractive safety profile with no risk of many of the potential side effects seen with topical corticosteroids, but also has favorable efficacy data, including more data on long-term use. This is a review of literature evaluating the efficacy and safety profile of topical pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:23441238

  2. Seborrheic dermatitis treatment with stellate ganglion block: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun Woo; Mun, Ki Ho; Song, Jeong Yun; Kim, Byung Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Lee, Choon Soo; Cha, Young Deog

    2016-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disorder presumed to be caused by increased sebaceous gland secretion, metabolic changes in the cutaneous microflora, and changes in the host immune function. Stellate ganglion block (SGB) is known to increase the blood flow rate without altering the blood pressure, heart rate, or cardiac output, to stabilize hypertonic conditions of the sympathetic nerves, and to affect the endocrine and immune systems. It is used in the differential diagnosis and treatment of autonomic nervous system disorders of the head, neck, and upper limbs. The authors report the first case of successful treatment of a patient with seborrheic dermatitis through repeated SGB trials. PMID:27064785

  3. Seborrheic dermatitis treatment with stellate ganglion block: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gun Woo; Mun, Ki Ho; Song, Jeong Yun; Kim, Byung Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Lee, Choon Soo; Cha, Young Deog; Song, Jang Ho

    2016-04-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disorder presumed to be caused by increased sebaceous gland secretion, metabolic changes in the cutaneous microflora, and changes in the host immune function. Stellate ganglion block (SGB) is known to increase the blood flow rate without altering the blood pressure, heart rate, or cardiac output, to stabilize hypertonic conditions of the sympathetic nerves, and to affect the endocrine and immune systems. It is used in the differential diagnosis and treatment of autonomic nervous system disorders of the head, neck, and upper limbs. The authors report the first case of successful treatment of a patient with seborrheic dermatitis through repeated SGB trials. PMID:27064785

  4. Treating seborrheic dermatitis: review of mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Neal

    2013-07-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is one of those conditions that dermatologists and patients alike tend to find a routine for, and in many cases those routines are hard to break. And, unlike the new treatment paradigms for eczema, acne, and even actinic keratoses, combination therapies for addressing the disease process typically have not been a part of the approach to treating seborrheic dermatitis. However, with the advent of new therapies and vehicles as well as a better understanding of how neutrophils and free oxygen radicals impact inflammation,1 there are new options to maintain and control the disease process of seborrheic dermatitis to minimize flares. Although the needs of the scalp, face and chest are different, as are the variations in skin types, the fundamental mechanisms of the inflammatory process are often the same. If it is understood that seborrheic dermatitis is histologically classified as a papulosquamous disorder with paucineutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrates, and if the trigger and etiologic agent most likely is Malassezia furfur, then the ideal mechanisms of action of therapies should be directed as such PMID:23884493

  5. Clinical Evaluation of a New-Formula Shampoo for Scalp Seborrheic Dermatitis Containing Extract of Rosa centifolia Petals and Epigallocatechin Gallate: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Ri; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hong-Ju; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2014-01-01

    Background Scalp seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic type of inflammatory dermatosis that is associated with sebum secretion and proliferation of Malassezia species. Ketoconazole or zinc-pyrithione shampoos are common treatments for scalp seborrheic dermatitis. However, shampoos comprising different compounds are required to provide patients with a wider range of treatment options. Objective This study was designed to evaluate a new-formula shampoo that contains natural ingredients-including extract of Rosa centifolia petals and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-that exert antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and sebum secretion inhibitory effects, and antifungal agents for the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. Methods Seventy-five patients were randomized into three treatment groups; new-formula shampoo, 2% ketoconazole shampoo, and 1% zinc- pyrithione shampoo. The clinical severity scores and sebum levels were assessed by the same dermatologists at baseline (week 0), and at 2 and 4 weeks after using the shampoo. User satisfaction and irritation were also assessed with the aid of a questionnaire. Results The efficacy of the new-formula shampoo was comparable to that of both the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo and the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. Furthermore, it was found to provide a more rapid response than the 1% zinc-pyrithione shampoo for mild erythema lesions and was associated with greater user satisfaction compared with the 2% ketoconazole shampoo. However, the new-formula shampoo did not exhibit the previously reported sebum inhibitory effect. Conclusion Extract of R. centifolia petals or EGCG could be useful ingredients in the treatment of scalp seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:25473226

  6. Conventional treatment of actinic keratosis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Peris, Ketty; Fargnoli, Maria Concetta

    2015-01-01

    Nonsurgical procedures are the first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). The choice of therapy is based on AK features and patient characteristics. Numerous randomized clinical trials and open-label studies have provided robust data on the efficacy and tolerability of conventional topical therapies, such as cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy, or treatment with 5-fluorouracil, diclofenac, or imiquimod. Cryotherapy is recommended to treat single AK lesions (lesion-directed therapy), while topical medical therapies are used to treat multiple lesions on an entire sun-damaged area (field therapy) and have the advantage of highlighting and treating both visible and invisible lesions. Combined or sequential therapies have been proposed to improve treatment efficacy, while medication breaks between treatment cycles or lowering drug concentrations is used to increase treatment tolerability/adherence. The use of a field therapy to treat multiple lesions on a large area (the entire face or a balding scalp), followed by a lesion-targeted therapy for a specific recurrent or resistant AK lesion, is becoming an increasingly popular approach. Regarding surgical procedures, curettage with or without electrodessication and dermabrasion are seldom used, while excision is indicated when AK progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma is clinically suspected. Despite the availability of most such treatments for more than a decade and their common use in clinical practice, there is still a need for long-term follow-up studies to better determine the recurrence rate and for comparative studies to develop a truly patient-tailored therapy. PMID:25561214

  7. Retinoids for prevention and treatment of actinic keratosis*

    PubMed Central

    Ianhez, Mayra; Fleury, Luiz Fernando Fróes; Miot, Hélio Amante; Bagatin, Edileia

    2013-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common cause of dermatological consultations and it presents a strong association with squamous cell carcinoma. Many substances are used for treatment and prevention, such as retinoids. Nevertheless, many studies on retinoids emphasize their application in treating and preventing non melanoma skin cancers. In this article, we reviewed studies about systemic and topical retinoids used with immunocompetent patients and organ transplant recipients with actinic keratosis, as primary or secondary outcomes. The majority of these papers pointed to a reduction in actinic keratosis count after treatment with retinoids. However, studies need to be better-defined in order to address the lack of a standardized dose, the absence of control groups, the low number of patients and short follow-up periods. Blind, randomized and controlled clinical trials with adequate sample sizes, specifically focused on actinic keratosis, are needed to clarify the real benefit of topical and/or oral retinoids. Comparison of efficacy and safety between oral and topical retinoids in the prevention and treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and actinic keratosis is an essential pre requisite to establish new strategies to control these conditions. PMID:24068130

  8. [Irritable colon].

    PubMed

    Madsen, J R

    2001-08-20

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic, relapsing functional bowel disorder of unknown aetiology. Methods of studying intestinal motor function, nociception, and interactions of the central nervous system and enteric nervous system are not applicable for clinical use. The diagnosis is therefore made on the symptoms, but it is necessary to exclude relevant organic disease. Establishment of the diagnosis, information about the disorder, elimination of foods and other factors that provoke the symptoms, and a change in life-style are sufficient in most cases. Treatment is hampered by the lack of effective treatment and the psychological aspects. The therapeutic gain of drug administration is modest and the rate of response to placebo is high. Fibre supplementation, magnesium oxide or cisapride may be tried for constipation, diphenoxylate or loperamide for diarrhoea, and low dose tricyclic antidepressants or serotonin reuptake blockers for severe pain. The introduction of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists seems promising. PMID:11530562

  9. [Lithium gluconate 8% in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Dréno, B; Blouin, E; Moyse, D

    2007-04-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic from of inflammatory dermatitis characterized by erythema and desquamation with predominant localization on the face (nasolabial folds, eyebrows, hair-line and ears). It appears to be caused by proliferation of Malassezia yeasts. Lithium gluconate 8% gel (Lithioderm 8% gel) is the only drug containing topical lithium salt commercially available in France for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. The mechanism of action of topical lithium is not well known; it may act through anti-inflammatory and antifungal action. Efficacy and safety were assessed in 2 clinical studies, one versus placebo and the other versus ketoconazole 2% foaming gel using the same principal criterion defined as the rate of patients showing complete remission after 2 months of treatment (complete disappearance of both erythema and desquamation). Lithium gluconate 8% was significantly more effective than placebo and than ketoconazole 2% foaming gel and was well tolerated. Adverse events observed were cutaneous (burning sensation, erythema and pruritus), for the most part of mild severity. No cutaneous side effects contributed to those reported with the use of systemic lithium in psychiatric disorders were noted. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that systemic absorption after topical application is low. Lithioderm 8% gel is applied twice daily over a recommended period of 2 months. It constitutes a new alternative in the treatment of facial seborrheic dermatitis, regardless of severity. PMID:17483754

  10. Seborrheic dermatitis: etiology, risk factors, and treatments: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Katsambas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common skin condition seen frequently in clinical practice. The use of varying terms such as sebopsoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, seborrheic eczema, dandruff, and pityriasis capitis reflects the complex nature of this condition. Despite its frequency, much controversy remains regarding the pathogenesis of SD. This controversy extends to its classification in the spectrum of cutaneous diseases, having being classified as a form of dermatitis, a fungal disease, or an inflammatory disease, closely related with psoriasis. Some have postulated that SD is caused by Malassezia yeasts, based on the observation of their presence in affected skin and the therapeutic response to antifungal agents. Others have proposed that Malassezia is incidental to a primary inflammatory dermatosis that resulted in increased cell turnover, scaling, and inflammation in the epidermis, similar to psoriasis. The presence of host susceptibility factors, permitting the transition of M furfur to its pathogenic form, may be associated with immune response and inflammation. Metabolites produced by Malassezia species, including oleic acid, malssezin, and indole-3-carbaldehyde, have been implicated. SD also has been traditionally considered to be a form of dermatitis based on the presence of Malassezia in healthy skin, the absence the pathogenic mycelial form of Malassezia yeasts in SD, and its chronic course. As a result, proposed treatments vary, ranging from topical corticosteroids to topical antifungals and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:23806151

  11. Keratosis Follicularis Spinulosa Decalvans: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Malvankar, Dipali D; Sacchidanand, S

    2015-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans is a disorder affecting the hair follicles characterized by scarring alopecia of the scalp, eyebrows, and axillae, sometimes associated with photophobia and keratoderma. Being X-linked, it is more commonly seen in males but can be rarely seen in females also. We report three cases of this rare disorder including one in a female. PMID:26622157

  12. Histopathological Differential Diagnosis of Psoriasis and Seborrheic Dermatitis of the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Park, Young Joon; Kim, Sue Kyoung; Kwon, Ji Eun; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So; Choi, Jee Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The differential diagnosis of psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis can be difficult when both conditions are localized to the scalp without the involvement of other skin sites. Objective We aimed to evaluate the histopathological differences between psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp and identify favorable criteria for their differential diagnosis. Methods We evaluated 15 cases of psoriasis and 20 cases of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp that had been clinicopathologically diagnosed. Skin biopsy sections stained with H&E were examined. Additional immunohistochemistry was performed, including Ki-67, keratin 10, caspase-5, and GLUT-1. Results On histopathological examination, mounds of parakeratosis with neutrophils, spongiform micropustules of Kogoj, and clubbed and evenly elongated rete ridges were significantly more frequently observed in psoriasis. Follicular plugging, shoulder parakeratosis and prominent lymphocytic exocytosis were significantly more common in seborrheic dermatitis. Moreover, significantly higher mitotic figures were observed in psoriatic lesions than in seborrheic dermatitis. Immunohistochemistry did not show any difference between psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis. Conclusion Histopathological features favoring psoriasis include mounds of parakeratosis with neutrophils, spongiform micropustules of Kogoj, clubbed and evenly elongated rete ridges, and increased mitotic figures (≥6/high-powered field). Features indicating seborrheic dermatitis are follicular plugging, shoulder parakeratosis and prominent lymphocytic exocytosis. Immunohistochemistry was not helpful in differentiating psoriasis from seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:27489423

  13. Irritant Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Irritant Contact Dermatitis Information for adults A A A This ... severe involvement in the patient's armpit. Overview Irritant contact dermatitis is an inflammatory rash caused by direct ...

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  15. Pimecrolimus 1% cream for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Ang-Tiu, Charlene U; Meghrajani, Chandra F; Maano, Clarita C

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin disorder that manifests as erythema, scaling and pruritus in sebum gland-rich areas of the skin. The objective of this article is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of pimecrolimus 1% cream in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis compared with corticosteroids, antimycotics, placebo or no intervention. Pimecrolimus 1% cream appears to be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for seborrheic dermatitis. It has comparable efficacy, in terms of decreasing severity of erythema, scaling and pruritus, to the standard treatments: topical corticosteroids and antimycotics. However, future studies with more standardized measures of treatment outcome are recommended. More studies may also be conducted to further evaluate pimecrolimus 1% cream as a long-term maintenance therapy for seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:22142161

  16. Topical therapies for skin cancer and actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasnuva; Rahman, Khondaker M; Thurston, David E; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2015-09-18

    The global incidence of skin cancer and actinic keratosis (AK) has increased dramatically in recent years. Although many tumours are treated with surgery or radiotherapy topical therapy has a place in the management of certain superficial skin neoplasms and AK. This review considers skin physiology, non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the relationship between AK and skin cancer and drugs administered topically for these conditions. The dermal preparations for management of NMSC and AK are discussed in detail. Notably few studies have examined drug disposition in cancerous skin or in AK. Finally, recent novel approaches for targeting of drugs to skin neoplasms and AK are discussed. PMID:26091570

  17. Oral nicotinamide and actinic keratosis: a supplement success story.

    PubMed

    Kim, Burcu; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide has shown potential as a safe and effective intervention for the prevention of malignant and premalignant skin lesions. Recent studies have shown that nicotinamide, in both oral and topical forms, is able to prevent ultraviolet-induced immunosuppression in humans [1,2,3] and mice [4,5]. Immunosuppression is a known factor for the progression of premalignant lesions, such as actinic keratosis [6]. Murine studies have shown that nicotinamide is also able to protect against photocarcinogenesis [4,5]. Preliminary human studies suggest that nicotinamide may help prevent skin cancers and enhance the regression of actinic keratoses. PMID:25561219

  18. Professors' Irritating Behavior Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malikow, Max

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the irritating behaviors of professors as experienced and reported by 232 Le Moyne College students. In this study, "irritating behavior" was understood as "actions that vex, annoy, bother, pester, frustrate, or provoke anger." The survey used in this study was developed by Larry M. Ludewig, Ph.D.,…

  19. 21 CFR 358.750 - Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. 358.750 Section 358.750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Dermatitis, and Psoriasis § 358.750 Labeling of drug products for the control of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, or psoriasis. (a) Statement of identity. The labeling of the product contains the...

  20. New therapeutic options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sligh, James E

    2014-06-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common premalignant skin lesion that is frequently treated by cryosurgery. Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy of man, and early-stage lesions are usually cured via surgery. Advanced basal cell carcinoma may require more extensive surgery resulting in deformity, and many advanced lesions cannot be treated surgically. Several recent developments have improved therapeutic options for both conditions. Cryosurgery is still a mainstay of treatment for AK, but the introduction of effective topical agents, imiquimod cream and ingenol mebutate, has provided alternatives to cryosurgery. For advanced basal cell carcinoma, the small-molecule inhibitor vismodegib has proven to be an effective therapy for lesions that are not amenable to surgery and has demonstrated ability to achieve dramatic improvement in advanced, potentially disfiguring cancer. PMID:25268601

  1. Understanding irritant napkin dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Atherton, David J

    2016-07-01

    Irritant napkin dermatitis (IND, often referred to as irritant diaper dermatitis) is an exceedingly common problem in the first 2 years of life. It is now established that a number of factors are considered important in the etiology of IND. The principal irritants are fecal enzymes, which damage infant skin and are further amplified by a number of factors, including skin maceration and friction, high pH, the presence of urine, and the duration of contact with feces. In recent years, the decreasing incidence and severity of IND reflects improvements in the design and performance of diapers, diaper skin care products, and overall awareness about maintaining infant skin health. PMID:27311779

  2. Clinical Characteristics and Quality of Life of Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients in a Tropical Country

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Manapajon; Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Jiamton, Sukhum

    2015-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition that can have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life. Few studies have been conducted to assess the clinical characteristics of the disease and quality of life of the patients, especially in tropical countries. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical characteristics and quality of life of patients with seborrheic dermatitis in Thailand. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at a university-based hospital and tertiary referral center in Bangkok, Thailand. The validated Thai version of the dermatology life quality index (DLQI) was used to evaluate patients’ quality of life. Results: A total of 166 participants were included. One hundred and forty-seven patients (88.6%) experienced multiple episodes of the eruption. The mean of outbreaks was 7.8 times per years, ranging from once every 4 years to weekly eruption. The most common factor reported to aggravate seborrheic dermatitis was seasonality (34.9%), especially hot climate. The mean (SD) of the total DLQI score was 8.1 (6.0) with a range of 0 to 27. There was no statistically significant difference between the two DLQI categories regarding duration of disease, extent of involvement, symptoms or course of the disease. Conclusion: Although mild and asymptomatic, seborrheic dermatitis can have a great impact on the quality of life. Youth, female gender, and scalp lesions were significantly associated with higher DLQI scores. PMID:26538714

  3. Irritants and corrosives.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Richard; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2015-02-01

    This article reviews toxic chemicals that cause irritation and damage to single and multiple organ systems (corrosion) in an acute fashion. An irritant toxic chemical causes reversible damage to skin or other organ system, whereas a corrosive agent produces irreversible damage, namely, visible necrosis into integumentary layers, following application of a substance for up to 4 hours. Corrosive reactions can cause coagulation or liquefaction necrosis. Damaged areas are typified by ulcers, bleeding, bloody scabs, and eventual discoloration caused by blanching of the skin, complete areas of alopecia, and scars. Histopathology should be considered to evaluate questionable lesions. PMID:25455665

  4. Irritants in cigarette smoke plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, H.E.; Yeager, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Concentrations of the irritants formaldehyde and acrolein in side stream cigarette smoke plumes are up to three orders of magnitude above occupational limits, readily accounting for eye and nasal irritation. ''Low-tar'' cigarettes appear at least as irritating as other cigarettes. More than half the irritant is associated with the particulate phase of the smoke, permitting deposition throughout the entire respiratory tract and raising the issue of whether formaldehyde in smoke is associated with bronchial cancer.

  5. A consensus approach to improving patient adherence and persistence with topical treatment for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Stockfleth, Eggert; Peris, Ketty; Guillen, Carlos; Cerio, Rino; Basset-Seguin, Nicole; Foley, Peter; Sanches, José; Culshaw, Alex; Erntoft, Sandra; Lebwohl, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical therapy is important in the treatment of actinic keratosis, but guidance for improving adherence/persistence during topical therapy is still lacking. Objectives To utilize expert consensus to generate a list of recommendations to improve real-world efficacy when prescribing topical therapy for actinic keratosis. Methods An expert panel of eight dermatologists was convened to generate recommendations based on facilitated discussion and consensus generation using a modified Delphi session. The recommendations were ratified with the expert panel. Results Facilitated discussion generated 31 issues within five themes, which were prioritized using expert voting. Consensus was achieved on the importance of short and simple treatment regimens for maximizing patient compliance, physician awareness of the progression of actinic keratosis to squamous cell carcinoma, provision of appropriate patient information, and the use of effective communication strategies to educate physicians about actinic keratosis. Based on these key findings, eight recommendations were generated. Conclusions The recommendations will assist physicians when prescribing topical actinic keratosis therapy. Further research should focus on the types of patient outcomes that are influenced by the characteristics of topical field therapy. PMID:25865875

  6. Irritant-induced airway disorders.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Stuart M; Bernstein, I Leonard

    2011-11-01

    Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors. PMID:21978855

  7. [Irritable colon and constipation].

    PubMed

    Meyenberger, C

    1993-04-20

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a very common clinical problem with a broad spectrum of severity. The management includes a combination of positive diagnosis of typical symptoms with limited investigations to exclude underlying structural or biochemical disorders. Therapeutic trials focus on the relief of predominant symptoms. Identification and modification of factors exacerbating symptoms, behavioural techniques and pharmacologic agents directed to the presumed gastrointestinal motor dysfunction are required. Psychological support by the physician is the most important part of treatment. Chronic constipation may be the predominant symptom of irritable bowel syndrome. Underlying organic disorders must be excluded by clinical examination and endoscopy. Severe chronic constipation requires further investigation of colonic motility and defecation. High fibre diet, osmotic laxatives and procinetic agents may lead to an improvement. In rare cases surgery may be indicated. PMID:8488351

  8. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Bav; Zokaie, Simon; Carr, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Background There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK). Objectives To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05). Conclusion This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates. PMID:24379656

  9. Chemosensory irritation and the lung.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis

    2002-06-01

    Airway irritation involves a variety of reflex mechanisms. Tracheal and bronchial C fibres and rapidly adapting fibres mediate cough, bronchoconstriction, and mucosal vasodilation. Workplace respiratory irritants can have a variety of effects in relation to asthma. Very high exposures can cause new-onset asthma, clinically presenting as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome or irritant-induced asthma. Symptoms after exposure to irritants depend on aggregate characteristics, water solubility and dose. Measurement of pulmonary function in response to irritants includes baseline spirometry, monitoring of across-shift changes and changes in non-specific bronchial responsiveness as well as bronchial responsiveness to inhaled allergens. Following irritant exposure, inflammatory changes within the airways are monitored by bronchoalveolar lavage or - less invasively - by sputum markers. A completely non-invasive approach not limited in repeatability is the investigation of inflammatory markers in exhaled air. However, the diagnostic and prognostic values of these novel markers have still to be demonstrated. PMID:11981671

  10. Menthol attenuates respiratory irritation responses to multiple cigarette smoke irritants

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Daniel N.; Liu, Boyi; Ha, Michael A.; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Morris, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Menthol, the cooling agent in peppermint, is added to almost all commercially available cigarettes. Menthol stimulates olfactory sensations, and interacts with transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) ion channels in cold-sensitive sensory neurons, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an irritant-sensing channel. It is highly controversial whether menthol in cigarette smoke exerts pharmacological actions affecting smoking behavior. Using plethysmography, we investigated the effects of menthol on the respiratory sensory irritation response in mice elicited by smoke irritants (acrolein, acetic acid, and cyclohexanone). Menthol, at a concentration (16 ppm) lower than in smoke of mentholated cigarettes, immediately abolished the irritation response to acrolein, an agonist of TRPA1, as did eucalyptol (460 ppm), another TRPM8 agonist. Menthol's effects were reversed by a TRPM8 antagonist, AMTB. Menthol's effects were not specific to acrolein, as menthol also attenuated irritation responses to acetic acid, and cyclohexanone, an agonist of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1. Menthol was efficiently absorbed in the respiratory tract, reaching local concentrations sufficient for activation of sensory TRP channels. These experiments demonstrate that menthol and eucalyptol, through activation of TRPM8, act as potent counterirritants against a broad spectrum of smoke constituents. Through suppression of respiratory irritation, menthol may facilitate smoke inhalation and promote nicotine addiction and smoking-related morbidities.— Willis, D. N., Liu, B., Ha, M. A., Jordt, S.-E., Morris, J. B. Menthol attenuates respiratory irritation responses to multiple cigarette smoke irritants. PMID:21903934

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beck, E; Hurwitz, B

    1992-12-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdominal pain and/or distension and altered bowel habit. Nausea, dyspepsia, gynaecological or bladder symptoms are also common. About a third of patients may give a family history of recurrent abdominal pain. 4. Clinical signs include general anxiety, scars on the abdomen (from previous laparotomies for severe abdominal pain), a palpable and tender left colon or generalized abdominal tenderness, and loud borborygmi. 5. Absolute indications for a specialist assessment are: weight loss rectal bleeding onset of symptoms after the age of 40 a mass. Even in the absence of any of these findings referral is frequently necessary to allay patient anxiety and reinforce the diagnosis. 6. Blood tests are usually non-contributory. Stool specimens should be sent if diarrhoea is a feature. 7. A full explanation emphasizing the benign and often recurrent nature of the condition should be given to help patients understand the nature of their symptoms. Only after review of lifestyle and advice about diet have been provided should drug therapy be tried. PMID:1345152

  12. Review of photodynamic therapy in actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Marica B; Wennberg, Ann-Marie; Larkö, Olle

    2008-01-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide, and so also the demand for effective treatment modalities. Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) using aminolaevulinic acid or its methyl ester has recently become good treatment options for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma; especielly when treating large areas and areas with field cancerization. The cure rates are usually good, and the cosmetic outcomes excellent. The only major side effect reported is the pain experienced by the patients during treatment. This review covers the fundamental aspects of topical PDT and its application for treatment of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma. Both potentials and limitations will be reviewed, as well as some recent development within the field. PMID:18728698

  13. Menthol attenuates respiratory irritation responses to multiple cigarette smoke irritants.

    PubMed

    Willis, Daniel N; Liu, Boyi; Ha, Michael A; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Morris, John B

    2011-12-01

    Menthol, the cooling agent in peppermint, is added to almost all commercially available cigarettes. Menthol stimulates olfactory sensations, and interacts with transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) ion channels in cold-sensitive sensory neurons, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an irritant-sensing channel. It is highly controversial whether menthol in cigarette smoke exerts pharmacological actions affecting smoking behavior. Using plethysmography, we investigated the effects of menthol on the respiratory sensory irritation response in mice elicited by smoke irritants (acrolein, acetic acid, and cyclohexanone). Menthol, at a concentration (16 ppm) lower than in smoke of mentholated cigarettes, immediately abolished the irritation response to acrolein, an agonist of TRPA1, as did eucalyptol (460 ppm), another TRPM8 agonist. Menthol's effects were reversed by a TRPM8 antagonist, AMTB. Menthol's effects were not specific to acrolein, as menthol also attenuated irritation responses to acetic acid, and cyclohexanone, an agonist of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1. Menthol was efficiently absorbed in the respiratory tract, reaching local concentrations sufficient for activation of sensory TRP channels. These experiments demonstrate that menthol and eucalyptol, through activation of TRPM8, act as potent counterirritants against a broad spectrum of smoke constituents. Through suppression of respiratory irritation, menthol may facilitate smoke inhalation and promote nicotine addiction and smoking-related morbidities. PMID:21903934

  14. Follicular keratosis of the chin treated with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Makoto; Takeda, Kiminobu; Tanabe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinya; Ishizaki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    In follicular keratosis of the chin, keratotic follicular papules occur on the chin and jaw due to localized prolonged pressure and friction on the naked skin. We present one patient with this disorder. The dermatoscopic examination revealed many well-demarcated yellow spindle bodies in the patchy lesion. Therapy with 1.24R-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ointment was effective during the treatment but had no residual positive effect. PMID:17845168

  15. New developments in the treatment of actinic keratosis: focus on ingenol mebutate gel

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Actinic keratosis is a common disease in older, fair-skinned people, and is a consequence of cumulative ultraviolet exposure. It is part of a disease continuum in photodamaged skin that may lead to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Treatment options frequently used include cryosurgery and topical pharmacologic agents, which are examples of lesion-directed and field-directed strategies. Ingenol mebutate gel was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for topical treatment of actinic keratosis. While the mechanism of action of ingenol mebutate is not fully understood, in vitro and in vivo studies using tumor models indicate it has multiple mechanisms. Ingenol mebutate directly induces cell death by mitochondrial swelling and loss of cell membrane integrity preferentially in transformed keratinocytes. It promotes an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils and other immunocompetent cells that kills remaining tumor cells. The ability of ingenol mebutate to eliminate mutant p53 patches in ultraviolet-irradiated mouse skin suggests that it may have the potential to treat chronically ultraviolet-damaged skin. In human studies, ingenol mebutate achieved high clearance of actinic keratosis on the head and body after 2–3 consecutive daily treatments when measured by complete or partial clearance of lesions. Localized inflammatory skin responses were generally mild to moderate and resolved in less than a month. PMID:22956883

  16. Workplace respiratory irritants and asthma.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, S M

    2000-01-01

    Workplace respiratory irritants can have a variety of effects in relation to asthma. Very high exposures can cause new-onset asthma (reactive airways dysfunction syndrome or irritant-induced asthma) with or without concurrent sensitization, e.g., to diisocyanate. Aggravation of underlying asthma can result from moderate exposures. Adjuvant or other effects enhancing the risk of sensitization to high molecular weight allergens have occurred with chronic low-moderate exposures. Enhancement of airway responsiveness on a short-term basis can be produced by ozone and biological irritants such as endotoxin and beta 1-3 glucans. Production of nonasthmatic responses such as hyperventilation and vocal cord dysfunction can mimic asthma symptoms. Controversy exists as to whether moderate irritant exposures can cause asthma or long-term worsening of underlying asthma. PMID:10769351

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  19. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Pallotti, Francesca; De Giorgio, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, not sustained by structural changes. There is now consistent evidence indicating that IBS may be the adverse outcome of an acute episode of infectious gastroenteritis, the so-called postinfectious (PI) IBS. The infectious agents involved in the development of PI-IBS include pathogenic bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Abdominal pain and diarrhea are the most common symptoms of PI-IBS. Several studies identified a number of risk factors increasing the susceptibility for PI-IBS development. These include the virulence of the pathogen, the severity, and duration of the acute enteritis, younger age, female sex, and psychological disturbances. Several mucosal abnormalities in the colon or ileum of patients who develop PI-IBS have been described. These changes include increased mucosal permeability, an increased amount of intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria T cells, and mast cells, as well as serotonin-containing enteroendocrine cells. The mediators released by these activated cells may evoke enteric nervous system responses, excite sensory afferent pathways, and induce visceral hyperalgesia. Little is known about the prognosis of PI-IBS, although it is likely better than that of nonspecific IBS. There is little evidence about a specific treatment for PI-IBS. Although probiotics and antibiotics may be promising in the prevention of PI-IBS, the efficacy of these treatments should be assessed in an ad hoc designed study. PMID:19300138

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  2. Comparative study of actinic keratosis treatment with 3% diclofenac sodium and 5% 5-fluorouracil*

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Majoriê Mergen; Dornelles, Sérgio Ivan Torres; Silveira, Vera Bauer; Frantz, Gabriela de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Actinic keratosis is a frequent lesion which occurs in sunlight exposed areas. Diclofenac sodium and 5-Fluorouracil are effective, non-invasive and easy-to-apply topical treatment options. OBJECTIVES To assess and compare the effectiveness of 3% diclofenac sodium associated with 2.5% hyaluronic acid and of 5% 5-Fluorouracil for the treatment of actinic keratosis, as well as the patient's degree of satisfaction and tolerability. METHODS 28 patients with a clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis were randomized to receive diclofenac sodium or 5-Fluorouracil and were clinically assessed before and after treatment as well as 8 weeks after the end of treatment. Modified versions of the Investigator and Patient Global Improvement Scores were used. RESULTS The average number of lesions in the diclofenac sodium group before and after treatment was 13.6 and 6.6 (p<0,001), respectively, while it was 17.4 and 3.15 (p<0.001) in the 5-Fluorouracil group. There was a significant reduction in the number of lesions in the 5-Fluorouracil group in relation to the diclofenac sodium group (p<0.001). To the non-blinded physician, there was a higher satisfactory therapeutic response in the 5-Fluorouracil group (p<0.001); to the blinded physician, there was a higher satisfactory response in this same group, although not statistically significant (p=0.09). There was a high degree of satisfaction in both groups (73% in the diclofenac sodium group and 77% in the 5-Fluorouracil group; p=0.827). Regarding adverse effects, the diclofenac sodium group presented a higher degree of satisfaction (93.3% vs 38.4%; p=0.008). Erythema, edema, crusts and itching were significantly higher in the 5-Fluorouracil group. CONCLUSION We concluded that 5-Fluorouracil was more effective; however, it showed lower tolerability than diclofenac sodium. PMID:24173178

  3. Evaluation of the therapeutic results of actinic keratosis treated with topical 5% fluorouracil by reflectance confocal laser microscopy: preliminary study*

    PubMed Central

    Ishioka, Priscila; Maia, Marcus; Rodrigues, Sarita Bartholomei; Marta, Alessandra Cristina; Hirata, Sérgio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Topical treatment for actinic keratosis with 5% fluorouracil has a recurrence rate of 54% in 12 months of follow-up. This study analyzed thirteen actinic keratoses on the upper limbs through confocal microscopy, at the time of clinical diagnosis and after 4 weeks of treatment with fluorouracil. After the treatment was established and evidence of clinical cure was achieved, in two of the nine actinic keratoses, confocal microscopy enabled visualization of focal areas of atypical honeycomb pattern in the epidermis indicating therapeutic failure. Preliminary data suggest the use of confocal microscopy as a tool for diagnosis and therapeutic control of actinic keratosis. PMID:26131881

  4. Seborrheic Keratoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  5. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... active ingredients in dandruff shampoos are: Zinc pyrithione Salicylic acid and sulfur Coal tar Selenium sulfide Ketoconazole African ... as a cream that contains coal tar or salicylic acid and sulfur Petroleum jelly is NOT recommended if ...

  6. Comparison of three light doses in the photodynamic treatment of actinic keratosis using mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Betrouni, Nacim; Tylcz, Jean-Baptiste; Vermandel, Maximilien; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2015-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for cancer therapy. Although high efficacy is demonstrated for PDT using standardized protocols in nonhyperkeratotic actinic keratoses, alternative light doses expected to increase efficiency, to reduce adverse effects or to expand the use of PDT, are still being evaluated and refined. We propose a comparison of the three most common light doses in the treatment of actinic keratosis with 5-aminolevulinic acid PDT through mathematical modeling. The proposed model is based on an iterative procedure that involves determination of the local fluence rate, updating of the local optical properties, and estimation of the local damage induced by the therapy. This model was applied on a simplified skin sample model including an actinic keratosis lesion, with three different light doses (red light dose, 37 J/cm2, 75 mW/cm2, 500 s blue light dose, 10 J/cm2, 10 mW/cm2, 1000 s and daylight dose, 9000 s). Results analysis shows that the three studied light doses, although all efficient, lead to variable local damage. Defining reference damage enables the nonoptimal parameters for the current light doses to be refined and the treatment to be more suitable.

  7. Evaluation of a Topical Anti-inflammatory/Antifungal Combination Cream in Mild-to-moderate Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Oglio, Federica; Tedeschi, Aurora; Guardabasso, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate if nonprescription topical agents may provide positive outcomes in the management of mild-to-moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis by reducing inflammation and scale production through clinical evaluation and erythema-directed digital photography. Setting: Open-label, prospective, not-blinded, intra-patient, controlled, clinical trial (target area). Participants: Twenty adult subjects affected by mild-to-moderate facial seborrheic dermatitis were enrolled and instructed to apply the study cream two times daily, initially on a selected target area only for seven days. If the subject developed visible improvement, it was advised to extend the application to all facial affected area for 21 additional days. Measurement: Efficacy was evaluated by measuring the grade of erythema (by clinical examination and by erythema-directed digital photography), desquamation (by clinical examination), and pruritus (by subject-completed visual analog scale). Additionally, at the end of the protocol, a Physician Global Assessment was carried out. Results: Eighteen subjects completed the study, whereas two subjects were lost to follow-up for nonadherence and personal reasons, respectively. Day 7 data from target areas showed a significant reduction in erythema. At the end of study, a significant improvement was recorded for erythema, desquamation, and pruritus compared to baseline. Physician Global Assessment showed improvement in 89 percent of patients, with a complete response in 56 percent of cases. Conclusion: These preliminary results indicate that the study cream may be a viable nonprescription therapeutic option for patients affected by facial seborrheic dermatitis able to determine early and significant improvement. This study also emphasizes the advantages of using an erythema-directed digital photography system for assisting in a simple, more accurate erythema severity grading and therapeutic monitoring in patients affected by seborrheic dermatitis. PMID

  8. Comparative analysis of the frequency, distribution and population sizes of yeasts associated with canine seborrheic dermatitis and healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Yurayart, Chompoonek; Chindamporn, Ariya; Suradhat, Sanipa; Tummaruk, Padet; Kajiwara, Susumu; Prapasarakul, Nuvee

    2011-03-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of yeast associated with the degree of canine seborrheic dermatitis (SD) by anatomical sites. Fifty-seven samples were divided as 17 healthy skin, 20 with primary seborrheic dermatitis (PSD), and 20 with secondary seborrheic dermatitis (SSD). Yeast isolation and characterization were carried out based on microscopical features and biochemical properties. DNA analysis at the internal transcribed spacer I of 26S rDNA region was utilized for species confirmation. Four species of yeast consisting Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia furfur, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis recovered from examined dogs. M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis were isolated from all dogs, but C. tropicalis and M. furfur were recovered from 3 healthy dogs and one diseased dog, respectively. The number of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis in diseased dogs was higher than that of healthy specimens (P<0.01). High frequency and population size of C. parapsilosis were closely associated to PSD, while those of M. pachydermatis were associated with both PSD and SSD (P<0.01). C. parapsilosis were predominant at the perianal area. This study demonstrated the co-colonization of M. pachydermatis and C. parapsilosis in large amounts and frequency associated with stage of disease and anatomical site. PMID:20961712

  9. [Irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Takano, M

    1992-11-01

    We studied seventy patients, 23 males and 47 females with irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence aged 13-19 yrs, who visited the department of psychosomatic medicine in Takano Hospital during about six year period of April, 1986-July, 1992. Takano Hospital is a coloproctological center in Kumamoto. In the clinical pattern of adolescent patients with irritable bowel syndrome the "gas" pattern was dominant (51.4%). Patients with the gas pattern have severe symptoms of flatus, fullness, rumbling sound and abdominal pain as well as bowel dysfunction, constipation and diarrhea in a classroom. Next, the diarrheal pattern occurred in 20.0%. Diarrheal patients complained of frequent bowel movements and retention feelings before attending school. Recurrent abdominal pain-like pattern was found in 7.1% patients. Clinical symptoms in the adolescent patients seem to derived from a mental tension and stress in a close classroom or before attending school. Many adolescenct patients (67.1%) with irritable bowel syndrome are embarrassed in school-maladjustment; leaving class early, late coming, a long absence, and a withdrawal. PMID:1363122

  10. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild−moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex© camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1–3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  11. MAL Daylight Photodynamic Therapy for Actinic Keratosis: Clinical and Imaging Evaluation by 3D Camera.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Paolino, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Didona, Dario; Scarno, Marco; Faina, Valentina; Gobello, Tommaso; Calvieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most common skin cancer with an incidence that varies widely worldwide. Among them, actinic keratosis (AK), considered by some authors as in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are the most common and reflect an abnormal multistep skin cell development due to the chronic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. No ideal treatment exists, but the potential risk of their development in a more invasive form requires prompt treatment. As patients usually present with multiple AK on fields of actinic damage, there is a need for effective, safe, simple and short treatments which allow the treatment of large areas. To achieve this, daylight photodynamic therapy (DL-PDT) is an innovative treatment for multiple mild actinic keratosis, well tolerated by patients. Patients allocated to the PDT unit, affected by multiple mild-moderate and severe actinic keratosis on sun-exposed areas treated with DL-PDT, were clinically evaluated at baseline and every three months with an Antera 3D, Miravex(©) camera. Clinical and 3D images were performed at each clinical check almost every three months. In this retrospective study, 331 patients (56.7% male, 43.3% female) were treated with DL-PDT. We observed a full clearance in more than two-thirds of patients with one or two treatments. Different responses depend on the number of lesions and on their severity; for patients with 1-3 lesions and with grade I or II AK, a full clearance was reached in 85% of cases with a maximum of two treatments. DL-PDT in general improved skin tone and erased sun damage. Evaluating each Antera 3D images, hemoglobin concentration and pigmentation, a skin color and tone improvement in 310 patients was observed. DL-PDT appears as a promising, effective, simple, tolerable and practical treatment for actinic damage associated with AK, and even treatment of large areas can be with little or no pain. The 3D imaging allowed for quantifying in real time the aesthetic benefits of DL

  12. Comprehensive pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial microbiota of the skin of patients with seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiomi; Cho, Otomi; Saito, Chie; Saito, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sugita, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic inflammatory dermatologic condition in which erythema and itching develop on areas of the body with sebaceous glands, such as the scalp, face and chest. The inflammation is evoked directly by oleic acid, which is hydrolyzed from sebum by lipases secreted by skin microorganisms. Although the skin fungal genus, Malassezia, is thought to be the causative agent of SD, analysis of the bacterial microbiota of skin samples of patients with SD is necessary to clarify any association with Malassezia because the skin microbiota comprises diverse bacterial and fungal genera. In the present study, bacterial microbiotas were analyzed at non-lesional and lesional sites of 24 patients with SD by pyrosequencing and qPCR. Principal coordinate analysis revealed clear separation between the microbiota of non-lesional and lesional sites. Acinetobacter, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were abundant at both sites. Propionibacterium was abundant at non-lesional sites, whereas Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus predominated at lesional sites; however, the extent of Propionibacterium colonization did not differ significantly between lesional and non-lesional sites according to qPCR. Given that these abundant bacteria hydrolyze sebum, they may also contribute to SD development. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial microbiotas of the skin of SD patients. PMID:27301664

  13. Recurrent presumed herpes simplex keratitis and episcleritis in keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease).

    PubMed

    Radia, Meera; Gilhooley, Michael James; Panos, Chris; Claoué, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis (Darier's disease) is an autosomal dominant dermatological disorder characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation and loss of normal cell-to-cell adhesion. Cardinal features include diffuse hyperkeratotic warty papules with scaly plaques in seborrhoeic regions with associated mucous membrane changes. Darier's disease is rare (prevalence 2.7 in 100,000), with few ocular sequelae reported: commonly dry eye with or without Sjögren's syndrome. This is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, to describe a case of recurrent herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis and episcleritis in a 47-year-old man suffering from Darier's disease. The patient's condition predisposed him towards developing ocular complications due to several factors: impaired desmosome function leading to poor cell-to-cell adhesion in the corneal epithelium, dry eye and HSV invasion of inflamed periocular skin presumably combining to allow viral colonisation of a poorly protected cornea. PMID:26184361

  14. Keratosis pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). The condition is generally worse in winter and ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Eczema Skin Conditions Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  15. Keratosis Pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... alpha-hydroxy acids such as glycolic acid or lactic acid Creams containing urea Over-the-counter cortisone cream ( ... strength alpha- or beta-hydroxy acids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid) Prescription-strength urea A retinoid such ...

  16. [Irritable colon and psychosomatic disease].

    PubMed

    Morini, A; Mauceri, P; Pallotta, P; Pelliccia, G

    1984-08-25

    The authors, after having considered the close likeness between the collateral clinical picture described by others in regard to the irritable colon syndrome and the outstanding one pointed out by them in many cases of psychosomatic disorders, have analyzed again a large number of personal cases diagnosed as "psychosomatic" in order to find possible relations between these two unwholesome conditions. At the end of their examination, after having ascertained that the "Irritable colon" has not to be considered an isolated disease but a syndrome caused by many factors, hinged on a predisposing condition likely of constitutional nature, the authors remark how it may nest in the folds of a psychosomatic disorder and sometimes be its outbreaking feature. The authors by this way, don't want to conclude identifying the I.C. with a psychosomatic disorder and suggest that in such cases one may take this syndrome as the main manifestation of a condition marked by an impairment of the digestive tract motility inside a psychosomatic disorder with a somatic expression of this apparatus. PMID:6483246

  17. A multicenter randomized trial of ketoconazole 2% and zinc pyrithione 1% shampoos in severe dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Goffin, Véronique; Decroix, Jacques; Piérard, Gérald E

    2002-01-01

    Ketoconazole (KET) and zinc pyrithione (ZPT) are compounds active against the Malassezia spp. yeasts, which are believed to play a major role in dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. We compared the efficacy and safety of KET 2% and ZPT 1% in shampoo formulations for the alleviation of severe dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. This open randomized, parallel-group trial began with a 2-week run-in phase during which subjects applied a neutral non-antidandruff shampoo. It was followed by a 4-week randomized treatment phase and a subsequent 4-week follow-up phase without treatment. Shampooing during the treatment period was carried out twice weekly for the KET group and at least twice weekly for the ZPT group in accordance with the label instructions. A total of 343 subjects were recruited to enter the trial. Of the 331 eligible volunteers, 171 were randomized to KET 2% and 160 to ZPT 1%. Clinical assessments were performed. Beneficial effects were evidenced for both medicated shampoos, but the effect was significantly better for KET 2%, which achieved a 73% improvement in the total dandruff severity score compared with 67% for ZPT 1% at week 4 (p < 0.02). The recurrence rate of the disease was also significantly lower following KET 2% treatment than following ZPT 1% treatment. As a consequence, the overall clearing of the skin condition at the end of treatment and follow-up phase was in favor of the KET 2% formulation (p = 0.004). Side effects were minimal. It is concluded that after a 4-week treatment, KET 2% shampoo was significantly superior to ZPT 1% shampoo in the treatment of subjects with severe dandruff or seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp. It is our assumption that this difference is noticeable for the patient and as a consequence relevant. Both formulations were well tolerated. PMID:12476017

  18. Efficacy and Safety of a Low-Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid Topical Gel in the Treatment of Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rowland Powell, Callie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Hyaluronic acid sodium salt gel 0.2% is a topical device effective in reducing skin inflammation. Facial seborrheic dermatitis, characterized by erythema and or flaking/scaling in areas of high sebaceous activity, affects up to five percent of the United States population. Despite ongoing studies, the cause of the condition is yet unknown, but has been associated with yeast colonization and resultant immune-derived inflammation. First-line management typically is with topical steroids as well as the immunosuppressant agents pimecrolimus and tacrolimus. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a topical anti-inflammatory containing low-molecular weight hyaluronic acid. Design and setting: Prospective, observational, non-blinded safety and efficacy study in an outpatient setting. Participants: Individuals 18 to 75 years of age with facial seborrheic dermatitis. Measurements: Outcome measures included scale, erythema, pruritus, and the provider global assessment, which were all measured on a five-point scale. Subjects were assessed at Baseline, Week 2, Week 4, and Week 8. Results: Interim data for 7 of 15 subjects are presented. Hyaluronic acid sodium salt gel 0.2% was shown through visual grading assessments to improve the provider global assessment by 47.62 percent from Baseline to Week 4. Reductions in scale, erythema, and pruritus were 66.67, 50, and 60 percent, respectively at Week 4. At Week 8, the provider global assessment was improved from baseline in 100 percent of subjects. Conclusion: Treatment with topical low-molecular weight hyaluronic acid resulted in improvement in the measured endpoints. Topical low-molecular weight hyaluronic acid is another option that may be considered for the treatment of facial seborrheic dermatitis in the adult population. Compliance and tolerance were excellent. PMID:23125886

  19. Natural history and management of keratosis, atypia, carcinoma-in situ, and microinvasive cancer of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Gillis, T M; Incze, J; Strong, M S; Vaughan, C W; Simpson, G T

    1983-10-01

    Keratosis, atypia, carcinoma in situ, and microinvasive cancer occurring as white or red patches on the vocal cords are part of the diathesis of cancer of the aerodigestive tract and represented a sequential continuum. Excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment for identification and potential cure of the lesion. If the margins of excision are inadequate, further treatment options are either reexcision or radiotherapy. Radiotherapy should be used only when the need for voice conservation prevails. Cessation of smoking does not remove the potential for progression of the disease, therefore, all patients must be followed indefinitely. Excisional biopsy of keratosis, carcinoma in situ, and microinvasive cancer of the larynx offers an excellent prognosis for voice preservation and survival. PMID:6625098

  20. Maintenance Therapy of Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis with 0.1% Tacrolimus Ointment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye One; Yang, Yoon Seok; Ko, Hyun Chang; Kim, Gyung Moon; Cho, Sang Hyun; Seo, Young Joon; Son, Sang Wook; Lee, Jong Rok; Lee, Joong Sun; Chang, Sung Eun; Che, Jae We

    2015-01-01

    Background Topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs) have been successfully used to treat seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Meanwhile, treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) with low-dose, intermittent TCI has been proved to reduce disease flare-ups. This regimen is known as a maintenance treatment. Objective The aim of this trial was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of a maintenance treatment with tacrolimus ointment in patients with facial SD. Methods During the initial stabilization period, patients with facial SD or AD applied 0.1% tacrolimus ointment twice daily for up to 4 weeks. Clinical measurements were evaluated on either in the whole face or on separate facial regions. When an investigator global assessment score 1 was achieved, the patient applied tacrolimus twice weekly for 20 weeks. We also compared our results with recent published data of placebo controlled study to allow an estimation of the placebo effect. Results The time to the first relapse during phase II was similar in both groups otherwise significantly longer than the placebo group. The recurrence-free curves of two groups were not significantly different from each other; otherwise the curve of the placebo group was significantly different. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the number of DEs, and treatment days for disease exacerbations (DEs). The adverse event profile was also similar between the 2 groups. During the 20 weeks of treatment, the study population tolerated tacrolimus ointment well. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that maintenance treatment with tacrolimus may be effective in preventing the occurrence of facial SD exacerbations. PMID:26512166

  1. Irritant exposure, bronchial reactivity and asthma.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S B; Morice, A H

    1997-10-01

    The role of irritant exposure in the pathogenesis of bronchial reactivity and asthma is uncertain. This paper reviews the evidence from environmental epidemiological surveys, studies of occupationally exposed populations and chamber studies of asthmatic and nonasthmatic subjects exposed to irritant fumes. The reactive airways dysfunction syndrome and occupational asthma due to irritant exposure are considered in the context of these results. Although several irritants cause acute bronchoconstriction by a number of mechanisms in chamber studies, there is little convincing evidence to suggest that irritant exposure without pulmonary injury is a risk factor for the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This is the case both in relatively intense concentrations, such as those experienced in industrial or chamber exposure, and at the levels experienced by the general population. PMID:9510667

  2. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:24106397

  3. Genetics of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henström, Maria; D'Amato, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition with a complex and largely unknown etiology. There is no cure, and treatment options are mainly directed to the amelioration of symptoms. IBS causes reduced quality of life and poses considerable repercussions on health and socioeconomic systems. There is a heritable component in IBS, and genetic research is a valuable tool for the identification of causative pathways, which will provide important insight into the pathophysiology. However, although some gene-hunting efforts have been conducted and a few risk genes proposed, IBS genetic research is lagging behind compared to other complex diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize existing genetic studies, discuss the main challenges in IBS genetic research, and propose strategies to overcome these challenges for IBS gene discovery. PMID:26873717

  4. [Allergic and irritative textile dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Elsner, P

    1994-01-22

    Textile dermatitis is only one example of adverse health effects due to clothing. It may present with a wide spectrum of clinical features, but the main mechanisms are irritant dermatitis, often observed in atopics intolerant to wool and synthetic fibers, and allergic contact dermatitis, usually caused by textile finishes and dyes. The newer azo dyes Disperse Blue 106 and 124 in particular are potent sensitizers that have caused significant problems, most recently in the form of "leggins dermatitis". Although severe textile dermatitis appears to be a rare event, more systematic population-based research is needed since many oligosymptomatic cases are probably overlooked. Criteria for healthy textiles are an optimum combination of efficacy (regulation of skin temperature and humidity and protection from environmental damage) and safety (lack of carcinogenicity, toxicity and allergenicity). If potentially allergenic substances are used in textiles, they should be declared as in the case of cosmetics. PMID:8115841

  5. Tolerability of Ingenol Mebutate Gel, 0.05%, for Treating Patients with Actinic Keratosis on the Scalp in a Community Dermatology Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of treatment of actinic keratosis on the scalp with two consecutive, once-daily applications of ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%. Design: Retrospective chart review. Setting: Community dermatology practice. Participants: Male patients (N=78) with a long history of recurrent and relapsed scalp actinic keratosis. Measurements: This chart review extracted non-identifying information on patients’ medical history, pertinent history of actinic keratosis and skin cancer, and prior actinic keratosis treatments. Also collected was information on patients’ treatment of scalp actinic keratosis with ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, including the occurrence of local skin reactions and their treatment, adverse events, and efficacy results at short-term and additional follow-up. Results: In these patients, a significant proportion of the scalp had numerous actinic keratoses that were often recurrent and/or hyperkeratotic. Most patients (83%) received cryosurgery to visible scalp actinic keratoses two weeks before ingenol mebutate treatment. Local skin reactions developed on the first day of topical treatment, were predominantly mild or moderate in intensity, and generally were resolved by 10 to 14 days. Local skin reactions were treated with a topical moisturizing product in 44 percent of the patients. Nearly half (45%) of the patients experienced application-site reactions, described as a combination of burning, itching, pain, and/or tenderness; the reactions were mild or moderate in intensity and lasted only a few days. Conclusions: Ingenol mebutate gel, 0.05%, had a good safety and tolerability profile when used to treat scalp actinic keratosis in patients who had a prolonged history of actinic keratosis. PMID:27354884

  6. Evaulation of irritation potential of surfactant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, M; Sakr, A

    1999-12-01

    Irritation potential of sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) alone, and in combination with lauryl glucoside (LG), polysorbate 20 (PS) and cocoamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) was tested in 13 human subjects. Four main and six sub-formulations were prepared and evaluated. Formulations were applied to the forearm as a 24 h close patch study. Irritation was scored by two different methods using an in vivo clinical protocol based on visual scoring and on the stratum corneum capacitance measurement. Irritation was found to be dose dependent. At 2 mg/patch level ten subjects did not show any skin reaction. At 20 mg/patch level eleven subjects showed a broad range of skin irritation. The highest irritation was observed with the formula that contained SLES, LG, and cocamide DEA together. Among the sub-formulations, cocamide DEA showed the highest irritation grade. A statistically significant correlation was observed between visual, clinical and corneometer scores. It was concluded that the irritation potential of surfactants was related to the total surfactant concentration, application mode, and the thermodynamic activity of molecules in the solution as well as the chemical structure of the surfactant molecules. PMID:18503452

  7. IN VIVO EVALUATION OF SKIN IRRITATION POTENTIAL, MELASMA AND SEBUM CONTENT FOLLOWING LONG TERM APPLICATION OF SKIN CARE CREAM IN HEALTHY ADULTS, USING NON-INVASIVE BIOMETROLOGICAL TECHNIQUES.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Atif I; Khan, Shoaib H M; Akhtar, Naveed; Mahmood, Asif; Sarfraz, Rai Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to evaluate non-invasively, various functional skin parameters i.e., irritation potential, melasma and sebum contents following long term application of topical cream (w/o) loaded with 2% methanolic extract of Ananas comosus L. versus placebo control (base) in healthy adults. Healthy human volunteers (n = 11, aged 20-30 years) were recruited for investigation and written informed consent was taken from each volunteer. In this single blinded study every volunteer applied formulation on one side of face and placebo on the other side of face twice daily for a period of 12 weeks (three months). Different skin parameters i.e., skin irritancy, melasma, and sebum contents were measured on both sides of face at baseline and after two weeks interval, using photometric device Mexameter and Sebumeter in a draught free room with modulated conditions of temperature (22-25°C) and humidity (55-60%). It was evident from the results that no primary skin irritancy was observed with patch test. Besides, statistical interpretation indicates that treatment with formulation is superior to placebo because it significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced the skin irritancy, melasma and sebum secretions throughout the study and reaching maximum -20.76 ± 0.89, -54.2 ± 0.37 and -40.71 ± 0.75%, respectively, at the end of study period. Antioxidant activity of extract was 92% compared to standard antioxidant. Conclusively, active cream loaded with fruit extract was well tolerated by all the volunteers and suitable to treat contact dermatitis, greasy skin, acne and seborrheic dermatitis and augmenting beauty and attraction by depigmentation of human skin. So, in the future, there is need to clinically evaluate these formulations in patients with compromised skin functions i.e., contact dermatitis, melasma, and acne vulgaris in order to explore the actual potential of this fruit. PMID:27008816

  8. Irritability in Pediatric Patients: Normal or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Usman; Dellasega, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the concept of irritability in children and youth, which has been revisited in the DSM-5. Traditionally, this behavior has been more commonly associated with mood disorders, which may account for the rising incidence of bipolar disorder diagnosis and overuse of mood-stabilizing medications in pediatric patients. While not predictive of mania, persistent nonepisodic irritability, if undetected, may escalate to violent behavior with potentially serious outcomes. It is therefore important to educate clinicians about how to accurately assess irritability in pediatric patients. PMID:27486529

  9. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser for Keratosis Pilaris: A Single-Blind, Randomized, Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Anusaksathien, Pattarin; Kanokrungsee, Silada; Chanprapaph, Kumutnart

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a common condition which can frequently be cosmetically disturbing. Topical treatments can be used with limited efficacy. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of fractional carbon dioxide (CO2) laser for the treatment of KP. Patients and Methods. A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, intraindividual comparative study was conducted on adult patients with KP. A single session of fractional CO2 laser was performed to one side of arm whereas the contralateral side served as control. Patients were scheduled for follow-up at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment. Clinical improvement was graded subjectively by blinded dermatologists. Patients rated treatment satisfaction at the end of the study. Results. Twenty patients completed the study. All patients stated that the laser treatment improved KP lesions. At 12-week follow-up, 30% of lesions on the laser-treated side had moderate to good improvement according to physicians' global assessment (p = 0.02). Keratotic papules and hyperpigmentation appeared to respond better than the erythematous component. Four patients with Fitzpatrick skin type V developed transient pigmentary alteration. Conclusions. Fractional CO2 laser treatment may be offered to patients with KP. Dark-skinned patients should be treated with special caution. PMID:27247936

  10. The continued use of sunscreen prevents the development of actinic keratosis in aged Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Kayo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Uede, Mikiko; Mizuno, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuki

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the trigger for actinic keratosis (AK) mainly depends on UV exposure. We evaluated the effects of long-term use of sunscreen on the histopathological and dermoscopic changes of AK in aged patients. Eighteen months use of sunscreen produced no change in the number of actinic keratoses or the advancement of histological grade. Although a significant decrease was not observed in the number of positive cells of p53, Ki-67 and COX-2 of the subjects who used sunscreen for 18 months, the downward tendencies of these proteins were observed. The continued use of sunscreen decreased the number of CD31-positive vessels significantly using the Chalkley method, and a significant improvement in scaling and vessel dots was found by dermoscopic study. Moreover, a relationship was found in the amount of sunscreen use and the number of actinic keratoses. Considering these results, it was thought that application of sunscreen reduces the risk of advancement of AK to higher grade AK and squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27539900

  11. Italian expert consensus for the management of actinic keratosis in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Peris, K; Calzavara-Pinton, P G; Neri, L; Girolomoni, G; Malara, G; Parodi, A; Piaserico, S; Rossi, R; Pellacani, G

    2016-07-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common skin disease which can potentially progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (iSCC). Given that mortality rates and health-care cost associated with iSCC are substantial, the management of AK represents an important public health issue. Several effective lesion-directed and field-directed treatments are available. Ablative procedures (e.g. cryosurgery, excision, laser ablation, curettage alone or with electrodessication) are considered cost-effective options for solitary lesions. Field-directed therapies (e.g. Ingenol Mebutate, imiquimod, PDT, 5-Fluorouracile, diclofenac 3%, 5-FU + Salicylic acid) can be used over large epidermal surfaces and are directed to treat both individual visible lesions and cancerization fields. In order to provide guidance for management choice in clinical practice, several guidelines concerning the diagnosis and treatment of AK have been published in the past decade. However, the introduction of novel therapeutic options requires continuous updates of recommendations and adaptation to national contexts. The present review summarizes the existing evidence and reports the results of a consensus workshop on the management of AK. PMID:27060910

  12. Comparison of morphologic criteria for actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma using in vivo multiphoton tomography.

    PubMed

    Klemp, Marisa; Meinke, Martina C; Weinigel, Martin; Röwert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; König, Karsten; Ulrich, Martina; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2016-03-01

    The routine diagnostic procedure of actinic keratosis (AK) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a histological examination after taking a biopsy. In the past decades, non-invasive optical methods for skin examination have been developed. Patients with clinical diagnosis of AK or SCC were examined. The morphological criteria were determined for healthy, AK and SCC skin and compared for statistically significant differences. In this study, the applicability of multiphoton tomography (MPT) as an in vivo diagnostic tool for AK and SCC was evaluated. Changes in the morphology of the keratinocytes such as broadened epidermis, large intercellular spaces, enlarged nucleus and a large variance in cell shape could easily be recognized. The cell nuclei of AK and SCC were significantly larger compared to healthy skin cells in all cell layers. The nucleus-cytoplasm ratio was also significantly higher for AK and SCC than for the healthy skin cells. It was even higher in SCC compared to spinous and basal cell layer of AK. The cell density in AK and SCC was significantly lower than in the basal and spinous cell layers of healthy skin. In SCC, the cell density was significantly lower than in AK. Concerning the intercellular spaces, significant differences were found for AK and healthy skin in spinous and basal cell layer and for SCC compared to AK and healthy skin. In this study, MPT proved to be a valuable non-invasive imaging method for in vivo detection and discrimination of AK and SCC from healthy skin. PMID:26659897

  13. Cytokeratin 17 immunoexpression in actinic keratosis (bowenoid and nonbowenoid) and in Bowen disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Flores, Angel

    2016-02-01

    Cytokeratin (CK) 17 immunoexpression has been investigated in nonmelanoma skin cancer as well as in many preinvasive epithelial malignancies. However, there is not any previous study of CK17 immunoexpression in actinic keratosis (AK) or Bowen disease in nonimmunocompromised patients. We evaluated CK17 immunoexpression in 20 cases of AK (10 nonbowenoid and 10 bowenoid) as well as in 10 cases of Bowen disease. We identified expression of CK17 in the superficial layers above the atypical foci. In some cases, there were foci of expression by the full thickness of the epidermis, which was the predominant pattern in very few cases (1 Bowen disease and 1 bowenoid AK). In addition, 1 case of bowenoid AK showed CK17 expression in a "skyline" pattern in the basal layer of the epidermis. Cytokeratin 17 immunostaining did not allow us to distinguish between the 3 entities studied. However, the immunostaining allowed us to distinguish atypical foci in the biopsies, even if atypicality was minimal. In addition, CK17 was useful in identifying surgical borders involved by disease in cases in which the hematoxylin-eosin was difficult to evaluate. Cytokeratin 17 immunoexpression might have a role in evaluating surgical borders in some cases of AK and Bowen disease. PMID:26740287

  14. Photodynamic Therapy with Ablative Carbon Dioxide Fractional Laser in Treatment of Actinic Keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Dong Jun; Shin, Jaeyoung; Kang, Hee Young; Lee, Eun-So

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective first-line treatment for actinic keratosis (AK). However, a major limitation of PDT is the long incubation time required to allow penetration of the photosensitizer. Objective The aim of this study was to assess if pretreatment with an ablative carbon dioxide (CO2) fractional laser can reduce the incubation time of the photosensitizer. Methods Initially, 29 patients with a total of 34 AK lesions were treated with an ablative CO2 fractional laser at Ajou University Hospital between January and December 2010. Immediately after the laser treatment, topical 20% 5-aminolevulinic acid or methyl-aminolevulinate was applied to the AK lesions and incubated for 70 to 90 minutes. Then, the treated areas were illuminated with a red light source. Improvement was clinically or histologically assessed eight weeks after the treatment. Results In spite of the short incubation time, 24 lesions (70.6%) showed a complete response (CR) within three sessions of PDT (10 lesions a clinical CR and 14 lesions a clinical/histological CR). There were no significant side effects associated with the combination of ablative CO2 fractional laser and PDT. Conclusion Ablative CO2 fractional laser may be considered an additional treatment option for reducing the incubation time of the photosensitizer in PDT. PMID:24371387

  15. Irritant-induced asthma in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Tarlo, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Irritant-induced asthma in the workplace has been the focus of several articles in the past few years, and reviewed here. A clinical case definition is most readily associated with a single acute/accidental exposure to a presumed high concentration of an agent or agents expected to be irritant to the airways, as was initially reported with the subgroup Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS). When most but not all criteria for RADS are met, then a diagnosis of irritant-induced asthma may also be considered to be "more probable than not". However, in addition, there is evolving understanding from epidemiological studies that chronic exposures may be associated with an increased risk of developing asthma. Despite this recognition, the mechanisms and clinical case definitions of work-related asthma that might be caused by chronic exposures to irritants (vs. new-onset asthma that begins coincidentally to work exposures), remain unclear at present. PMID:24343122

  16. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS. PMID:27598274

  17. Focus on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scalera, A; Loguercio, C

    2012-09-01

    The Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic abdominal dis-comfort associated with changes in bowel habits and these symptoms can't be explained by any biochemical or organic abnormalities. The review summarizes the relevant findings that have emerged in recent years on the pathogenesis of this syndrome. The most important mechanisms recently implicated in the genesis of IBS symptoms are the abnormal intestinal motility, the incongruous intestinal gas production and the enhanced intestinal nociception. A lot evidence confirms the presence of dysfunction of the intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS) as demonstrated by the presence of altered expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3), putinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3r), tetrodoxin-sensitive receptor 2 (TTRX2), protease activated receptors (PPARs) and others. There are different assumption that explain these phenomena, and the impairment of the immune system is one of the most reliable. In IBS subjects it was found that the immune system is altered in both the cellular composition and its activation. Many studies have shown that inflammation and immune dysregulation affect the sensitivity of nerve fibers so it is vital to build on this argument for the development of effective therapies to control the symptoms of this syndrome. PMID:23047498

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome: aeromedical considerations.

    PubMed

    Rayman, Russell B

    2011-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder diagnosed in accordance with the Rome III criteria. The pathophysiology of this illness is not well defined and there are no known structural abnormalities, biomedical markers, nor inflammatory causes to explain the symptoms. There are a number of serious illnesses, such as colon cancer, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease that mimic IBS. If the Rome III criteria are satisfied and there are no alarm features of more serious illness, an in-depth workup is not necessary. There are numerous treatment regimens for IBS, none of which are curative nor offer universal relief. Some of the treatment regimens, such as antispasmodics and antidiarrheals, are not suitable for aviators because of anticholinergic effects and sedation. The aeromedical disposition decision is always challenging because of the vagaries of this illness. In general, a more liberal policy for pilots in civil aviation would be in order as long as symptoms are not frequent nor severe and not requiring antispasmodics or antidiarrheals while flying. A more conservative policy is in order for military pilots, possibly requiring restriction to multiseat aircraft. PMID:22097642

  19. Management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torii, Akira; Toda, Gotaro

    2004-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. The prevalence rate is 10-20% and women have a higher prevalence. IBS adversely affects quality of life and is associated with health care use and costs. IBS comprises a group of functional bowel disorders in which abdominal discomfort or pain is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit, and with features of disordered defecation. The consensus definition and criteria for IBS have been formalized in the "Rome II criteria". Food, psychiatric disorders, and gastroenteritis are risk factors for developing IBS. The mechanism in IBS involves biopsychosocial disorders; psychosocial factors, altered motility, and heightened sensory function. Brain-gut interaction is the most important in understanding the pathophysiology of IBS. Effective management requires an effective physician-patient relationship. Dietary treatment, lifestyle therapy, behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic therapy play a major role in treating IBS. Calcium polycarbophil can benefit IBS patients with constipation or alternating diarrhea and constipation. PMID:15206545

  20. [Contemporary dietotherapy of the irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pilipenko, V I; Burliaeva, E A; Isakov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional disease of the gastrointestinal tract. This highly prevalent condition is best diagnosed by assessing the constellation of symptoms with which patients present to their physicians. Because some critics have previously questioned whether irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal disorders truly exist because they do not have defining structural features, the Rome Foundation fostered the use of symptom-based criteria for universal use. In most cases treatment is reduced to symptomatic therapy because a lot of unknown in pathogenesis by irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome leads to decrease of quality of life of the patients and could be one of the reasons of patients' disability. Food is believed by patients promotes symptoms and the diet or avoiding specific food can reduce symptoms. Possible role of different food and microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome, as well as the data from randomized, controlled clinical trials dedicated to the effects of diet in irritable bowel syndrome are summarized and discussed in this review. The efficacy of the diet, enriched by fiber, prebiotics, probiotics, peppermint oil, curcumin and vitamin B6 in irritable bowel syndrome patients was shown in numerous studies. In some studies restriction in consumption of fermented carbohydrates, coffee and alcohol, as well as diet with elimination IgG-sensed food was also shown to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome. Food intolerances, defined as non-toxic non-immune adverse reactions to food, include reactions to bioactive chemicals in foods and metabolic reactions to poorly absorbed dietary carbohydrates. New dietary approaches like polyunsaturated fatty acids intake correction and the low tryptophan intake are discussed. PMID:23808281

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome: Is it “irritable brain” or “irritable bowel”?

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Mahajan, Sonali; Sinha, Saroj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been recognized as one of the most common and best studied disorders among the group of functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit. In the Western world, IBS appears to affect up to 20% of the population at any given time but in Asian countries, the median value of IBS prevalence defined by various criteria ranges between 6.5% and 10.1%, and community prevalence of 4% is found in North India. Those attending gastroenterology clinics represent only the tip of the iceberg. The disorder substantially impairs the quality of life, and the overall health-care costs are high. IBS has therefore gained increased attention from clinicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical industries. It is often frustrating to both patients and physicians as the disease is usually chronic in nature and difficult to treat. However, the understanding of IBS has been changing from time to time and still most of its concepts are unknown. In this review we have discussed, debated, and synthesized the evidence base, focusing on underlying mechanisms in the brain and bowel. We conclude that it is both brain and bowel mechanisms that are responsible. The clinical implication of such mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26752904

  2. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients. PMID:25880820

  3. Histopathologic Distinguishing Features Between Lupus and Lichenoid Keratosis on the Face

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Amanda F.; Dacso, Mara; High, Whitney A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of lichenoid keratosis (LK) on the face is not well characterized, and the histopathologic distinction between LK and lupus erythematosus (LE) occurring on the face is often indeterminate. The authors aimed to describe differences between LE and LK occurring on the face by hematoxylin and eosin alone. Methods: Cases of LK and LE were obtained using computer-driven queries. Clinical correlation was obtained for each lupus case. Other diagnoses were excluded for the LK cases. Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections were reviewed. Results: Forty-five cases of LK and 30 cases of LE occurring on the face were identified. Shared features included follicular involvement, epidermal atrophy, pigment incontinence, paucity of eosinophils, and basket-weave orthokeratosis. Major differences between LK and LE, respectively, included perivascular inflammation (11%, 90%), high Civatte bodies (44%, 7%), solar elastosis (84%, 33%), a predominate pattern of cell-poor vacuolar interface dermatitis (7%, 73%), compact follicular plugging (11%, 50%), hemorrhage (22%, 70%), mucin (0%, 77%), hypergranulosis (44%, 17%), and edema (7%, 60%). A predominate pattern of band-like lichenoid interface was seen more commonly in LK as compared with LE (93% vs. 27%). Conclusions: The authors established the occurrence of LK on the face and identified features to help distinguish LK from LE. Follicular involvement, basket-weave orthokeratosis, pigment incontinence, paucity of eosinophils, and epidermal atrophy were not reliable distinguishing features. Perivascular inflammation, cell-poor vacuolar interface, compact follicular plugging, mucin, hemorrhage, and edema favored LE. High Civatte bodies, band-like lichenoid interface, and solar elastosis favored LK. PMID:26588332

  4. Chronology of lichen planus-like keratosis features by dermoscopy: a summary of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Soko; Sawada, Mizuki; Dekio, Itaru; Ishizaki, Sumiko; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Dermoscopic findings for 17 cases of lichen planus-like keratosis (LPLK) were chronologically evaluated. Three males and 14 females were included in the study and the ages ranged from 43 to 85 years (median 65 years). Three cases were diagnosed based on stereotypical dermoscopic findings, while the other 14 cases were histopathologically diagnosed as LPLK. Dermoscopy photographs were divided into four groups depending on the number of days (D) from the initial visit: 1) D = 0 (initial visit or biopsy day); 2) D = 61 to 180; 3) D = 181 to 270; 4) D = 271 to 360. Dermoscopic findings, described as light brown pseudonetwork, pinkish area, gray pseudonetwork, annular granular structures, and blue-gray fine dots, were evaluated at every visit to the hospital. Initial dermoscopy features included light brown pseudonetworks due to residual solar lentigo and overlapping pinkish areas attributed to lichenoid inflammation. Annular granular structures and gray pseudonetwork appeared to be the main features of the regressing stage; these features seemed to progress to “blue-gray fine dots” in the late regressing stage. Blue-gray dots or globules reflecting melanophages, the hallmark dermoscopic features of LPLK, were believed to resolve in approximately one to two years. Based on the clinical and dermoscopic observations, we have specified five stages of evolution of LPLK, namely 1) pre-existing solar lentigo, 2) early inflammatory stage, 3) early regressing stage, 4) regressing stage, and 5) late regressing stage. The limitations of the study are that this is a small-sized, retrospective, observational study and that ethnicity of participants is limited to Japanese patients with skin phototype III. PMID:27222769

  5. The Brief Irritability Test (BITe): a measure of irritability for use among men and women.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Susan; O'Connor, Brian P; Barata, Paula C; Stewart, Donna E

    2015-02-01

    Elevated levels of irritability have been reported across a range of psychiatric and medical conditions. However, research on the causes, consequences, and treatments of irritability has been hindered by limitations in existing measurement tools. This study aimed to develop a brief, reliable, and valid self-report measure of irritability that is suitable for use among both men and women and that displays minimal overlap with related constructs. First, 63 candidate items were generated, including items from two recent irritability scales. Second, 1,116 participants (877 university students and 229 chronic pain outpatients) completed a survey containing the irritability item pool and standardized measures of related constructs. Item response theory was used to develop a five-item scale (the Brief Irritability Test) with a strong internal structure. All five items displayed minimal conceptual overlap with related constructs (e.g., depression, anger), and test scores displayed negligible gender bias. The Brief Irritability Test shows promise in helping to advance the burgeoning field of irritability research. PMID:24830513

  6. The Brief Irritability Test (BITe): A Measure of Irritability for Use Among Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Susan; O’Connor, Brian P.; Barata, Paula C.; Stewart, Donna E.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of irritability have been reported across a range of psychiatric and medical conditions. However, research on the causes, consequences, and treatments of irritability has been hindered by limitations in existing measurement tools. This study aimed to develop a brief, reliable, and valid self-report measure of irritability that is suitable for use among both men and women and that displays minimal overlap with related constructs. First, 63 candidate items were generated, including items from two recent irritability scales. Second, 1,116 participants (877 university students and 229 chronic pain outpatients) completed a survey containing the irritability item pool and standardized measures of related constructs. Item response theory was used to develop a five-item scale (the Brief Irritability Test) with a strong internal structure. All five items displayed minimal conceptual overlap with related constructs (e.g., depression, anger), and test scores displayed negligible gender bias. The Brief Irritability Test shows promise in helping to advance the burgeoning field of irritability research. PMID:24830513

  7. A shortened psychophysical task to quantify irritability: the Reactive Irritability Scale II (RIS-II).

    PubMed

    Faraday, Martha M; Scheufele, Peter M; Vander Ley, Kelly J; Grunberg, Neil E

    2005-02-01

    The Reactive Irritability Scale (RIS) uses magnitude estimation to measure reactive irritability. Respondents rate target sounds in comparison to a neutral reference sound. The RIS proved more sensitive than self-report measures to detect irritability associated with withdrawal from cigarette smoking and with exposure to a stressful environment, but was too long (30 min) for routine use. We report here on a shortened version (13 min)--RIS-II. The RIS-II exhibited robust test-retest reliability and correlated strongly with the original RIS (Study 1). In Study 2, the RIS-II was administered to subjects who experienced psychological stress and then were exposed to progressive relaxation, music, cognitive tasks, or silence; the Progressive Relaxation group was the most irritable. In Study 3, the RIS-II was administered to chronic pain patients. Pain patients found the sounds less irritating than did controls with the exception of the reference sound; repeated presentation of the reference sound increased irritability. These studies indicate that the RIS-II is a reliable instrument that may have utility for the measurement of irritability in laboratory and clinical settings. In addition, these studies indicate that the RIS-II is understandable by individuals of different ages who are from educationally- and culturally-diverse backgrounds and individuals who are healthy as well as individuals suffering from chronic medical conditions who are on multiple medications. PMID:15887872

  8. Genetic heterogeneity in families with non-epidermolytic palmar plantar keratosis

    SciTech Connect

    Spurr, N.K.; Kelshell, D.P.; Stevens, H.

    1994-09-01

    Following reports of linkage close to the keratin gene cluster in families with tylosis and the detection of mutations in the keratin 9 gene cosegregating in families with epidermolytic palmar plantar keratoderma (EPPK, and EPPK associated with breast and ovarian cancer), we have identified families with three phenotypically distinct forms of non-epidermolytic keratosis with either punctate, diffuse or focal keratoderma, one with diffuse lesions and one with punctate and malignancies. Initially we typed these families with 17q markers close to the keratin gene cluster; this included a dinucleotide repeat marker within the keratin 9 gene. Two point linkage analysis of the focal keratoderma family showed a positive lod score of 3.2 at a theta of 0 from the marker D17S855. The lod score for the diffuse family was -6.0 at a theta of 0.05 from the marker D17S776. The second focal keratoderma family showed a haplotype consistent with linkage to 17q close to the keratin gene cluster. A second keratin gene cluster has been mapped in humans on 12q, and we decided to test the unlinked diffuse and punctate keratoderma families with markers in that region. We used the markers: D12S87-D12S85-D12S368-D12S96-D12S90. Linkage analysis of the diffuse family gave a lod score of 3.1 at a theta of 0 from the marker D12S368. Currently studies are underway to look for mutations in specific keratin genes in the clusters on 17q and 12q that segregate with the observed phenotypes. The punctate keratoderma family gave lod scores of -3.9 at a theta of 0.55 with D17S855 and -6.0 at a theta of 0.05 with D12S90/D12S83. This would lead us to the conclusion that a separate susceptibility locus must exist for the punctate family associated with malignancy. Investigations of candidate regions are in progress.

  9. NEUROPEPTIDE MODULATION OF CHEMICALLY INDUCED SKIN IRRITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was designed to demonstrate that the early symptoms of chemically-induced skin irritation are neurally mediated. everal approaches were used to affect nerve transmission in adult Balb/c female mice. hese included general anesthesia (i.e., sodium pentobarbital), systemi...

  10. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Contact Us Health ...

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Female Patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lucinda A; Umar, Sarah B; Baffy, Noemi; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is probably the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder and is characterized by abdominal pain along with altered bowel function. It is a disorder of female predominance. This article focuses on how being female influences the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and treatment of this common disorder and discusses the evidence and important controversies related to these areas. PMID:27261893

  12. Acute toxicity and primary irritancy of alkylalkanolamines.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, B; Leung, H W

    1996-12-01

    The acute handling hazards of several alkylalkanolamines were determined by investigating their potential acute toxicity and primary irritancy. Materials studied were N-methylethanolamine (MEA), N, N, -dimethylethanolamine (DMEA), N, N, -dimethylisopropanolamine (DMIPA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and tertbutyldiethanolamine (BDEA). All these alkylalkanolamines were of comparable acute peroral toxicity in the rat (LD50 range 1.48-2.83 ml/kg). By 24 h occluded epicutaneous contact in the rabbit, MEA, DMEA and DMIPA were of moderate acute percutaneous toxicity (LD50 range 1.13-2.0 ml/kg), MDEA was of slight acute percutaneous toxicity (LD50 male 9.85 ml/kg, female 10.90 ml/kg), and BDEA of intermediate toxicity (LD50 6.4 ml/kg). Due to differences in vapor pressure the acute vapor exposure toxicity of the alkylalkanolamines to rats varied; MEA, MDEA and BDEA were of a low order of acute toxicity, and DMIPA was moderately toxic with an LT50 of 3.2 h for a saturated vapor atmosphere exposure. A 4 h-LC50 (rat combined sex) of 1461 ppm was determined for DMEA. All alkylalkanolamines studied, except MDEA, were moderately to markedly irritating and caused variable degrees of skin corrosivity; MDEA caused only transient minor skin irritation. In accord with the skin irritancy results, the eye irritancy from 0.005 ml MEA, DMEA, DMIPA and BDEA was severe, and that from MDEA was slight. Exposure to these compounds has implications for occupational health procedures. PMID:8948072

  13. [Irritant contact dermatitis. Part I. Epidemiology, etiopathogenesis and clinical manifestation].

    PubMed

    Chomiczewska, Dorota; Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Krecisz, Beata

    2008-01-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis is a frequent problem in dermatology. It compromises the majority of all occupational skin diseases in most countries. It develops as a result of the environmental or work-related exposure to irritants. Cutaneous reaction depends on the intrinsic properties of the irritant, individual skin susceptibility and environmental conditions. A great morphological variety of irritant contact dermatitis and difficulties in diagnosis may lead to misdiagnosis and inadequate treatment. The prognosis is variable. Preventive measures, including education, individual skin protection and proper skin care may contribute to the reduced incidence of occupational irritant contact dermatitis. PMID:19227886

  14. Malassezia arunalokei sp. nov., a Novel Yeast Species Isolated from Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients and Healthy Individuals from India.

    PubMed

    Honnavar, Prasanna; Prasad, Gandham S; Ghosh, Anup; Dogra, Sunil; Handa, Sanjeev; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M

    2016-07-01

    The majority of species within the genus Malassezia are lipophilic yeasts that colonize the skin of warm-blooded animals. Two species, Malassezia globosa and Malassezia restricta, are implicated in the causation of seborrheic dermatitis/dandruff (SD/D). During our survey of SD/D cases, we isolated several species of Malassezia and noticed vast variations within a few lipid-dependent species. Variations observed in the phenotypic characteristics (colony morphology, absence of catalase activity, growth at 37°C, and precipitation surrounding wells containing Tween 20 or Cremophor EL) suggested the possible presence of a novel species. Sequence divergence observed in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, the D1/D2 domain, and the intergenic spacer 1 (IGS1) region of rDNA and the TEF1 gene, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ITS2 region, and fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis support the existence of a novel species. Based on phenotypic and molecular characterization of these strains, we propose a new species, namely, M. arunalokei sp. nov., and we designate NCCPF 127130 (= MTCC 12054 = CBS 13387) as the type strain. PMID:27147721

  15. Clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reygagne, Pascal; Poncet, Michel; Sidou, Farzaneh; Soto, Pascale

    2007-05-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a common dermatosis associating hyperseborrhea, erythema, itching, and dandruff, has frequent scalp involvement. Malassezia furfur infection seems to play an important role in the condition's etiopathology. Treatment of SD usually consists of corticosteroids or antifungals, such as ketoconazole. The aim of this multicenter, randomized, investigator-blinded, parallel-group pilot study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% after different short-contact application times compared with its vehicle and ketoconazole foaming gel 2% in the treatment of SD of the scalp. For 4 weeks, 55 subjects received one of the following treatments twice weekly: clobetasol propionate shampoo for 2.5, 5, or 10 minutes; clobetasol propionate vehicle for 10 minutes; or ketoconazole foaming gel for 5 minutes before rinsing off. Efficacy criteria included total severity score (TSS) and individual scores of signs such as itching and global improvement. Safety included reporting of burning, overall tolerance, and adverse events. Results showed that an application of clobetasol propionate for 5 and 10 minutes provided a similar mean percentage decrease of TSS, and the mean percentage decrease of TSS for all active groups was significantly superior to that of the vehicle (P < .01). Overall and local safety were good for all treatment groups. The present pilot study demonstrated that a short-contact application of clobetasol propionate shampoo is effective and safe in the treatment of SD of the scalp. PMID:17569404

  16. Irritative symptoms and exposure to mineral wool.

    PubMed

    Petersen, R; Sabroe, S

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study undertaken in 1981 using a postal questionnaire, the prevalence of irritative symptoms was investigated among 2,654 Danish construction workers working with mineral wool. An evaluation was undertaken in a multivariate logit analysis of the relationship between exposure level (measured by hours of exposure to mineral wool per month) and prevalence of symptoms. The analysis controlled for the confounders of age, smoking habits, and exposure to organic solvents. With greater exposure to mineral wool, there was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of irritative symptoms from the eyes, the skin, and the upper respiratory tract. Among construction workers working with mineral wool 160-180 hours per month, two-thirds had these symptoms once a week or oftener. The occurrence was 2-3 times higher compared with the construction workers not working with mineral wool. The relationship between exposure to mineral wool and skin and mucous membrane symptoms may be explained by the irritative action of the fibers that are given off during insulation work. PMID:1831004

  17. Proretinal nanoparticles: stability, release, efficacy, and irritation

    PubMed Central

    Pisetpackdeekul, Pimolphan; Supmuang, Piyapan; Pan-In, Porntip; Banlunara, Wijit; Limcharoen, Benchaphorn; Kokpol, Chayada; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2016-01-01

    Despite many potent biological activities, retinoids such as retinoic acid (RA) and retinal possess dose-related broad side effects. In this study, we show that this problem, which has been unsolvable for a long time, can be tackled through a controlled release strategy in which retinal is continuously delivered to the skin via sustained release from proretinal nanoparticles. The water dispersible proretinal nanoparticles are stable when kept in water at neutral pH and at room temperature for 8 months under light-proof conditions, and show sustained release of retinal into human synthetic sebum at a pH of 5. In the daily topical application tests performed for 4 weeks on rats’ skin, the nanoparticles showed superior ability to increase epidermal thickness compared to RA and retinal, with no skin irritation observed for the proretinal particles, but severe skin irritation observed for RA and free retinal. When tested under occlusion conditions in human volunteers, insignificant skin irritation was observed for the proretinal nanoparticles. The 12-week, double-blind, split-face study on human volunteers indicates better antiaging efficacy of the particles as compared to the free RA. PMID:27499622

  18. Proretinal nanoparticles: stability, release, efficacy, and irritation.

    PubMed

    Pisetpackdeekul, Pimolphan; Supmuang, Piyapan; Pan-In, Porntip; Banlunara, Wijit; Limcharoen, Benchaphorn; Kokpol, Chayada; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2016-01-01

    Despite many potent biological activities, retinoids such as retinoic acid (RA) and retinal possess dose-related broad side effects. In this study, we show that this problem, which has been unsolvable for a long time, can be tackled through a controlled release strategy in which retinal is continuously delivered to the skin via sustained release from proretinal nanoparticles. The water dispersible proretinal nanoparticles are stable when kept in water at neutral pH and at room temperature for 8 months under light-proof conditions, and show sustained release of retinal into human synthetic sebum at a pH of 5. In the daily topical application tests performed for 4 weeks on rats' skin, the nanoparticles showed superior ability to increase epidermal thickness compared to RA and retinal, with no skin irritation observed for the proretinal particles, but severe skin irritation observed for RA and free retinal. When tested under occlusion conditions in human volunteers, insignificant skin irritation was observed for the proretinal nanoparticles. The 12-week, double-blind, split-face study on human volunteers indicates better antiaging efficacy of the particles as compared to the free RA. PMID:27499622

  19. Efficacy and Safety of a Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid Topical Gel in the Treatment of Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis Final Report

    PubMed Central

    Rowland Powell, Callie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Hyaluronic acid sodium salt gel 0.2% is a topical device effective in reducing skin inflammation. Facial seborrheic dermatitis, characterized by erythema and or flaking/scaling in areas of high sebaceous activity, affects up to five percent of the United States population. Despite ongoing study, the cause of the condition is yet unknown, but has been associated with yeast colonization and resultant immune derived inflammation. First-line management typically is with keratolytics, topical steroids, and topical antifungals as well as the targeted immunosuppressant agents pimecrolimus and tacrolimus. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel topical antiinflammatory containing low molecular weight hyaluronic acid. Design and setting: Prospective, observational, non-blinded safety and efficacy study in an outpatient setting. Participants: Individuals 18 to 75 years of age with facial seborrheic dermatitis. Measurements: Outcome measures included scale, erythema, pruritus, and the provider global assessment, all measured on a five-point scale. Subjects were assessed at baseline, Week 2, Week 4, and Week 8. Results: Final data with 13 of 17 subjects are presented. Hyaluronic acid sodium salt gel 0.2% was shown through visual grading assessments to improve the provider global assessment by 65.48 percent from baseline to Week 4. Reductions in scale, erythema, and pruritus were 76.9, 64.3, and 50 percent, respectively, at Week 4. At Week 8, the provider global assessment was improved from baseline in 92.3 percent of subjects. Conclusion: Treatment with topical low molecular weight hyaluronic acid resulted in improvement in the measured endpoints. Final data reveal continued improvement from that seen in the interim data shown previously. Topical low molecular weight hyaluronic acid is another option that may be considered for the treatment of facial seborrheic dermatitis in the adult population. Compliance and tolerance were

  20. Co-occurrence of Erythrosis Pigmentosa Mediofacialis and Erythromelanosis Follicularis Faciei et Colli Associated with Keratosis Pilaris in an Adolescent Female

    PubMed Central

    Kalwaniya, Sarita; Morgaonkar, Manjaree; Gupta, Savera; Jain, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Erythromelanosis follicularis faciei et colli (EFFC) is a rare disease characterized by a triad of reddish-brown pigmentation, erythema and follicular papules localized on face and neck and is usually described in males. Erythrosis pigmentosa mediofacialis (also known as Brocq or erythrosis pigmentosa peribuccalis) is a similar disorder of the mediofacial area but with female predominance. We report a case of simultaneous occurrence of erythrosis pigmentosa peribuccalis and EFFC associated with keratosis pilaris in an adolescent female. PMID:27512206

  1. Dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products containing coal tar and menthol for over-the-counter human use; amendment to the monograph. Final rule

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule amending the final monograph (FM) for over-the-counter (OTC) dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and psoriasis drug products to include the combination of 1.8 percent coal tar solution and 1.5 percent menthol in a shampoo drug product to control dandruff. FDA did not receive any comments or data in response to its previously proposed rule to include this combination. This final rule is part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products.

  2. Comparing the efficacy of Emu oil with clotrimazole and hydrocortisone in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Attarzadeh, Yalda; Asilian, Ali; Shahmoradi, Zabihollah; Adibi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common, chronic inflammatory disease. Inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress are thought to be effective in the pathogenesis of SD. Based on anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of emu oil, this study was designed to evaluate effects of emu oil on patients suffering from SD, and to compare it with routine treatments of SD with topical steroids and antifungal agents. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on126 patients who were randomly allocated to 2 groups: 62 in the clotrimazole vs. emu oil (group-1) and 64 in the hydrocortisone vs. emu oil (group-2). The right side of the face in both groups was treated with topical emu oil. The left side was treated with topical clotrimazole in the first group and with topical hydrocortisone in the second group. One month after the treatment, pre and post treatment symptom severity scores of pruritus, erythema and scales were compared. Results: All 3 medications significantly improved pruritus, erythema and scales (P < 0. 01). However, topical clotrimazole and hydrocortisone were significantly more effective than emu oil in improving scales (P < 0.01), and hydrocortisone was significantly more effective than emu oil in reducing pruritus (P < 0. 01). Comparing with topical clotrimazole, emu oil resulted in significantly more improvement of erythema (p:0.01). Conclusion: Emu oil is a potentially useful agent that significantly improves itching, erythema and scales associated with SD; however, it was less effective than hydrocortisone and clotrimazole which are routinely prescribed to treat SD. PMID:24250695

  3. Pulmonary alterations associated with inhalation of occupational and environmental irritants.

    PubMed

    Castranova, V; Frazer, D G; Manley, L K; Dey, R D

    2002-02-01

    Many gases, vapors, or particles found in occupational and/or environmental settings can act as irritants. In the present study, sensory irritants are characterized by the stimulation of neuropeptide release from sensory nerves in the nasal mucosa, while pulmonary irritants are characterized by recruitment of PMN into bronchoalveolar airspaces, elevation of breathing frequency, and neuropeptide release from sensory fibers innervating the epithelium of the conducting airways. A review of data from our laboratory as well as results from others indicate that asphalt fume is a sensory irritant; toluene diisocyanate (TDI), methyl isocyanate, and machining fluid act as both sensory and pulmonary irritants; while cotton dust, agricultural dusts, microbial products, leather conditioner, and ozone exhibit responses characteristic of pulmonary irritants. PMID:11811921

  4. TRPA1 receptors mediate environmental irritant-induced meningeal vasodilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Phillip Edward; Ballard, Carrie Jo; Oxford, Gerry Stephen; Hurley, Joyce Harts

    2010-01-01

    The TRPA1 receptor is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 receptors are targeted by pungent compounds from mustard and garlic and environmental irritants such as formaldehyde and acrolein. Ingestion or inhalation of these chemical agents causes irritation and burning in the nasal and oral mucosa and respiratory lining. Headaches have been widely reported to be induced by inhalation of environmental irritants, but it is unclear how these agents produce headache. Stimulation of trigeminal neurons releases CGRP and substance P and induces neurogenic inflammation associated with the pain of migraine. Here we test the hypothesis that activation of TRPA1 receptors are the mechanistic link between environmental irritants and peptide mediated neurogenic inflammation. Known TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants stimulate CGRP release from dissociated rat trigeminal ganglia neurons and this release is blocked by a selective TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031. Further, TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants increase meningeal blood flow following intranasal administration. Prior dural application of the CGRP antagonist, CGRP8–37, or intranasal or dural administration of HC-030031, blocks the increases in blood flow elicited by environmental irritants. Together these results demonstrate that TRPA1 receptor activation by environmental irritants stimulates CGRP release and increases cerebral blood flow. We suggest that these events contribute to headache associated with environmental irritants. PMID:21075522

  5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, H; Ansari, R; Mir-Nasseri, MM; Jafari, E

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder noted in the general population worldwide. Its chronic nature, signs and symptoms which vary periodically from mild to severe have many negative effects on the quality of life for the sufferer; therefore the appropriate treatment of these patients is highly important. Patients should be informed by their doctors that the nature of the disease is benign, and educated on how to deal with and control symptoms of the disease. This article sets out a review of recent studies on the prevalence of IBS in Iran and appropriate methods for management of patients affected by IBS. PMID:25197516

  6. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  7. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Załęski, Andrzej; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  8. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Załęski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  9. The effect of damaged skin barrier induced by subclinical irritation on the sequential irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yan-yu, Wu; Xue-min, Wang; Yi-Mei, Tan; Ying, Cheng; Na, Liu

    2011-12-01

    Skin damage caused by a single specific stimulus has been extensively studied. However, many additional mild skin irritants are experienced every day before obvious irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) appears. The effect that these previously experienced mild irritations have on the incidence and severity of sequential ICD remains undefined. The purpose of this work was to explore whether the effects of skin barrier damage induced by either the open patch test with 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), tape stripping test (TAP) (10×), or irradiation with 0.75 median erythemal dose UVB (MED) will affect the severity of sequential irritant dermatitis induced by a 0.5% SLS occlusive patch test (PT). Nine treatments were applied to nine different locations of the ventral forearm of each subject at random. The nine treatment types were as follows: open patch test with 1% SLS; 10× TAP; UVB irradiation with 0.75 MED; open patch test with 1% SLS + PT with 0.5% SLS (SLSPT); 10× TAP + PT with 0.5% SLS (TAPPT); UVB irradiation with 0.75 MED + PT with 0.5% SLS (UVPT); PT with distilled water (DISPT); PT with 0.5% SLS (PT); and the CONTROL (no treatment). After 5 days of subclinical irritation, the PT was applied on day 6. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), capacitance (CAP), and skin color (a*) were measured at baseline and on days 6, 7, and 8. After the PT, indices of irritancy of PT, UVPT, SLSPT, and TAPPT were 60, 80, 87 and 100%, respectively. The index of irritancy of TAPPT and SLSPT were significantly higher than that of PT (p < 0.05). Clinical scores of SLSPT and TAPPT were also significantly higher than PT (p < 0.05). After 5 days of irritation, TEWL of SLS, TAP, SLSPT, and TAPPT were increased significantly compared to that of baseline. After the PT, D-value of TEWL between day 8 and day 6 ((≥6-8)TEWL) of SLSPT and TAPPT were greater than that of PT, and D-value of TEWL between day 8 and day 7 ((≥7-8)TEWL) of SLSPT and TAPPT were less than that of PT values. After the

  10. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  11. In vitro alternatives for ocular irritation.

    PubMed Central

    Curren, R D; Harbell, J W

    1998-01-01

    The necessity of using animals to test whether new chemicals and products are eye irritants has been questioned with increasing frequency and fervor over the last 20 years. During this time many new nonanimal methods have been proposed as reliable alternatives to the traditional rabbit (Draize) test. To date, however, none of these nonanimal (in vitro) tests have become universally accepted as a complete replacement for the Draize test. To understand why a complete replacement has not been found, one has to first understand the reasonably complex structure of the eye, the standard Draize scoring scale--which is based on a qualitative evaluation of three different tissues--the differences between human and rabbit eyes, the intrinsic variability of the animal test, and the details of the different in vitro tests that have been proposed as replacements. The in vitro tests vary from relatively simple assays using single cells to more sophisticated assays that use discarded animal tissue or artificially constructed human tissue. It is clear that appropriately designed in vitro tests will eventually give more useful mechanistic information about ocular injury from which we can more comfortably predict the risk of human eye irritation from new products and ingredients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9599696

  12. [Neonatal parechovirus infection, fever, irritability and myositis].

    PubMed

    Eyssette-Guerreau, S; Boize, P; Thibault, M; Sarda, H

    2013-07-01

    Human parechovirus (HPeV) is associated with central nervous system infection and sepsis-like illness in newborn infants. The most frequent signs are fever, seizures, irritability, rash, and encephalitis. We report 4 cases of full-term infants with HPeV infection. They were admitted from home to the pediatric emergency unit of our hospital in October 2012. The median age at onset of symptoms was 15 days. They all developed sepsis-like illness with predominantly gastrointestinal disease and irritability. Two patients developed respiratory problems and 2 a skin rash (concerning only the extremities for one). Two patients required hospitalization in an intensive care unit. There was normal or mild inflammatory syndrome, normal white blood cell or mild leukopenia, hepatitis. We describe for the first time elevation of muscular enzymes in 3 of these patients. The diagnosis of HPeV infection was made by positive HPeV real-time PCR in cerebrospinal fluid (including the patient without pleocytosis) and/or blood. HPeV may cause severe disease in the neonatal period and patients presenting with such signs should be evaluated for HPeV. It also should be considered in sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:23742920

  13. Adolescent irritability: phenotypic associations and genetic links with depressed mood

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Argyris; Zavos, Helena; Leibenluft, Ellen; Maughan, Barbara; Eley, Thalia

    2013-01-01

    Objective Irritability has been proposed to underlie the developmental link between oppositional problems and depression. However, little is known about the genetic and environmental influences on irritability and its overlap with depression. This paper tests the hypothesis that the association between irritability and depression is accounted for by genetic factors. As such, it draws on the notion of “generalist genes” i.e., genes of general effect that underlie phenotypic overlap between disorders. Method The G1219 study, a UK-based twin sample (N=2651), was used in a cross-sectional and longitudinal design. Irritable and headstrong/hurtful dimensions of oppositional behavior were derived using factor analysis. Regression was used to estimate the association between depression and delinquency. Multivariate genetic analyses were used to estimate the genetic overlap between irritability versus headstrong/hurtful behaviors with depression and delinquency respectively. Results Irritability showed a significantly stronger phenotypic relationship with depression than delinquency, whereas headstrong/hurtful behaviors were more strongly related to delinquency than depression. In multivariate genetic analyses, the genetic correlation between irritability and depression (0.70; CI: 0.59-0.82) was significantly higher than that between irritability and delinquency (0.57; CI: 0.45-0.69); conversely, the genetic correlation between headstrong/hurtful behaviors and delinquency (0.80; CI: 0.72-0.86) was significantly higher than that between headstrong/hurtful behaviors and depression (0.46; CI: 0.36-0.57). In longitudinal models, the phenotypic association between irritability at Time 1 and depression at Time 2 was accounted for by the genetic association between irritability and depression at Time1. Conclusions The findings are consistent with the theory that genes with general effects underlie the relationship between irritability and depression. PMID:22193524

  14. BEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF THE IRRITATING PROPERTIES OF OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensory irritant properties of ozone have been considered to be responsible for symptoms that occur in humans after exposure. This assumption has not been studied explicitly. One way to assess the aversive properties of airborne irritants is to give the exposed individual an ...

  15. 16 CFR 1500.42 - Test for eye irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test for eye irritants. 1500.42 Section 1500.42 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.42 Test for eye irritants. (a)(1) Six albino rabbits...

  16. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  17. Lurasidone for the Treatment of Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loebel, Antony; Brams, Matthew; Goldman, Robert S.; Silva, Robert; Hernandez, David; Deng, Ling; Mankoski, Raymond; Findling, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of lurasidone in treating irritability associated with autistic disorder. In this multicenter trial, outpatients age 6-17 years who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and who demonstrated irritability, agitation, and/or self-injurious behaviors were randomized to…

  18. Rifaximin therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hoonmo L; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  19. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  1. [Importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Peña, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-05-01

    About two-thirds of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients associate their symptoms with certain foods. We reviewed food-related factors putatively associated with manifestations of IBS. Soluble fiber may improve constipation but frequently increases bloating and abdominal pain. Carbohydrate malabsorption seems to be more frequent in IBS. A low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet significantly reduces IBS symptoms and has been suggested as a therapeutic option. Serological screening for celiac disease should be done in patients without constipation. Moreover, non-celiac disease gluten sensitivity, defined as gluten intolerance once celiac disease and wheat allergy have been ruled out, should be considered in these patients. There is no specific diet for IBS patients but small and frequent meals, avoiding greasy foods, dairy products, many carbohydrates, caffeine and alcohol, is recommended. PMID:24582764

  2. Food components and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R; Varney, Jane; Malakar, Sreepurna; Muir, Jane G

    2015-05-01

    Ingestion of food has long been linked with gut symptoms, and there is increasing interest in using diet in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The West has developed an intense interest in specialized, restrictive diets, such as those that target multiple food groups, avoid gluten, or reduce fermentable oligo-, di-, and mono-saccharides and polyols. However, most gastroenterologists are not well educated about diets or their effects on the gut. It is important to understand the various dietary approaches, their putative mechanisms, the evidence that supports their use, and the benefits or harm they might produce. The concepts behind, and delivery of, specialized diets differ from those of pharmacologic agents. High-quality research is needed to determine the efficacy of different dietary approaches and the place of specific strategies. PMID:25680668

  3. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  4. Allergen and irritant control: importance and implementation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H S

    1998-01-01

    The Expert Panel Report 2. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (1) begins its section on controlling factors that precipitate or worsen asthma with the statement: "For successful long-term asthma management, it is essential to identify and reduce exposures to relevant allergens and irritants and to control other factors that have been shown to increase asthma symptoms and/or precipitate asthma exacerbations." The presence of allergy to indoor allergens and certain seasonal fungal spores has been found to be a risk factor for asthma in epidemiologic studies around the world. Generally between 70% and 85% of asthmatic populations studied have been reported to have positive skin-prick tests. Exposure of allergic patients to inhalant allergens increases airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, asthma symptoms, need for medication, severe attacks, and even death due to asthma. Environmental tobacco smoke exposure has been shown to increase the prevalence of childhood asthma and to increase asthma symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness while reducing pulmonary function in children chronically exposed. Exposure to other indoor irritants, largely products of unvented combustion, has also been found to increase asthma symptoms. Outdoor air pollution increases asthma symptoms; levels of specific pollutants correlate with emergency room visits and hospitalization for asthma. Rhinitis/sinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux are commonly associated with asthma, and treatment of these conditions has been shown to improve asthma. In patients sensitive to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or metabisulfites, exposure to these agents can precipitate severe attacks of asthma. Viral infections are common causes for exacerbations of asthma. Infections with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae contribute to acute exacerbations and perhaps to long-term morbidity, as well. This chapter will discuss preventive and therapeutic measures

  5. Defining Field Cancerization of the Skin Using Noninvasive Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging to Detect and Monitor Actinic Keratosis in Ingenol Mebutate 0.015%- Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Michelle; Feldman, Eleanor; Bieber, Amy; Bienenfeld, Amanda; Nandanan, Naveen; Siegel, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of optical coherence tomography to detect clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses confirmed by histopathology. The efficacy of ingenol mebutate treatment of actinic keratosis was also evaluated using optical coherence tomography, and correlation of treatment efficacy with severity of local skin reactions was determined. Design: Single-arm, open-label, split-face study. Setting: Hospital outpatient clinic. Participants: Male subjects (N=30) with seven actinic keratoses. Measurements: A suspected actinic keratosis and the normal-appearing, perilesional skin were imaged, biopsied for histopathologic analysis, and the results compared with the clinical and a blinded optical coherence tomography diagnosis. Treatment with ingenol mebutate gel 0.015% was randomly administered to three clinically suspected actinic keratoses and the perilesional skin; three additional, suspected actinic keratoses lesions and perilesional areas were left untreated. Clinical and optical coherence tomography images were obtained for all lesions. Severity of local skin reactions was recorded to evaluate the relationship between local skin reaction and treatment effect. Results: Optical coherence tomography analysis had a 100-percent (28/28) correlation with the clinical diagnosis of actinic keratosis and detected 16 of 22 (73%) histopathologically confirmed subclinical lesions from perilesional skin sites. By optical coherence tomography assessment, the clearance rate for clinically observed lesions was 76 percent for ingenol mebutate-treated areas versus 11 percent for untreated areas; the clearance rate for treated subclinical lesions was 88 percent versus 43 percent for untreated areas. Clearance rates did not vary with the severity of the local response. Conclusion: Optical coherence tomography is effective at detecting clinical and subclinical actinic keratoses and monitoring their response to treatment. PMID:27386042

  6. Optical Biopsy of Human Skin in Conjunction With Laser Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Malignant Melanoma,; Merkel Cell Carcinoma,; Basal Cell Carcinoma,; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Atypical Nevi,; Congenital Nevi; Seborrheic Keratosis,; Paget's Disease; Dermatofibroma,; Kaposi's Sarcoma; Port Wine Stain; Hemangioma; Tattoos; Scleroderma; Burns

  7. Pediatric Seborrheic Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2006-2013 Logical Images, Inc. All rights reserved. Advertising Notice This Site and third parties who place ... would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral ...

  8. Potential allergy and irritation incidents among health care workers.

    PubMed

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Yu, Shicheng; Chavoshi, Negar; Ngan, Karen

    2008-07-01

    This study describes the types, causes, and outcomes of potential irritation and allergy incidents among workers in British Columbia's health care industry. Data on occupation-induced allergy and irritation incidents were extracted from a standardized database using the number of productive hours obtained from payroll data as a denominator during a 1-year period from three British Columbia health regions. Younger workers, female workers, facility support service workers, laboratory assistants and technicians, and maintenance and acute care workers were found to be at higher risk for allergy and irritation incidents. Major causes of allergy and irritation incidents included chemicals, blood and body fluids, food and objects, communicable diseases, air quality, and latex. A larger proportion of chemically induced incidents resulted in first aid care only, whereas non-chemical incidents required more emergency room visits. PMID:18669179

  9. Is irritable bowel syndrome an organic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder that is generally considered to be functional because there appears to be no associated anatomical defect. Stress and psychological factors are thought to play an important role in IBS. The gut neuroendocrine system (NES), which regulates all functions of the gastrointestinal tract, consists of endocrine cells that are scattered among the epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the enteric nervous system. Although it is capable of operating independently from the central nervous system (CNS), the gut NES is connected to and modulated by the CNS. This review presents evidence for the presence of an anatomical defect in IBS patients, namely in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. These cells have specialized microvilli that project into the lumen and function as sensors for the luminal content and respond to luminal stimuli by releasing hormones into the lamina propria, which starts a chain reaction that progresses throughout the entire NES. The changes in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells observed in IBS patients are highly consistent with the other abnormalities reported in IBS patients, such as visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and abnormal secretion. PMID:24574708

  10. Diet and the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1991-06-01

    Food intake plays a key role in triggering or perpetuating symptoms in patients with IBS. Evaluation of the impact of diet in the individual patient requires a precise dietary history and a 7-day prospective dietary analysis, which should include the quality and quantity of food consumed, chronologic sequence and nature of symptoms, and the frequency and consistency of bowel movements. The caloric density of the meal, total fat intake, the quantity and quality of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, and the nature and quantity of soluble and insoluble fiber intake must be noted. Patients with reflux esophageal symptoms should eliminate foods that decrease LES pressure, such as chocolate, peppermint, alcohol, and coffee. Direct esophageal mucosal irritants such as tomatoes, citrus juices, sharp condiments, and alcohol should be limited. Gastric emptying is slowed with the ingestion of fats and soluble fiber. Small bowel motility is slowed by soluble fiber and fatty foods. Gaseous syndromes may be reduced by avoidance of smoking, chewing gum, excessive liquid intake, and carbonated drinks. The reduced intake of large amounts of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, and fructose may limit postprandial bloating. Flatus production can be lowered by reducing fermentable carbohydrates such as beans, cabbage, lentils, brussel sprouts, and legumes. Soluble and insoluble fiber ingestion will reduce sigmoidal intraluminal pressures and overcome spastic constipation when given in progressive graded doses. Effective dietary manipulations remain a key factor in reducing symptoms in IBS. PMID:2066155

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome: emerging paradigm in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Kyung Sik

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. These symptoms cannot be explained by structural abnormalities and there is no specific laboratory test or biomarker for IBS. Therefore, IBS is classified as a functional disorder with diagnosis dependent on the history taking about manifested symptoms and careful physical examination. Although a great deal of research has been carried out in this area, the pathophysiology of IBS is complex and not completely understood. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the symptoms in IBS patients; altered gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and the brain-gut interaction are important classical concepts in IBS pathophysiology. New areas of research in this arena include inflammation, postinfectious low-grade inflammation, genetic and immunologic factors, an altered microbiota, dietary factors, and enteroendocrine cells. These emerging studies have not shown consistent results, provoking controversy in the IBS field. However, certain lines of evidence suggest that these mechanisms are important at least a subset of IBS patients, confirming that IBS symptoms cannot be explained by a single etiological mechanism. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that IBS requires a more holistic approach to determining effective treatment and understanding the underlying mechanisms. PMID:24627583

  12. Common gastrointestinal symptoms: irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Gitu, Alfred Chege

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) should be considered when patients have had abdominal pain/discomfort, bloating, and change in bowel habits for 6 months. Patients may experience variation between periods of constipation and diarrhea. When evaluating patients with IBS, physicians should be alert for red flag symptoms, such as rectal bleeding, anemia, nighttime pain, and weight loss. Physicians also should consider other medical conditions that manifest similarly to IBS. Clinicians who are confident in diagnosing IBS based on symptoms typically do not obtain many tests unless the patient has red flag symptoms. Various etiologic mechanisms have been proposed for IBS, including abnormal bowel motility, inflammation, altered mucosal permeability, genetic predisposition, and visceral hypersensitivity. Lack of certainty about the etiology makes it difficult to develop effective management approaches; thus, management is directed toward symptom relief. Dietary changes, such as avoiding fermentable carbohydrates, may benefit some patients, especially those with bloating. Constipation-dominant IBS can be managed with antispasmodics, lubiprostone, or linaclotide, whereas diarrhea-dominant IBS can be managed with loperamide or alosetron, though the latter drug can cause ischemic colitis. For long-term therapy, tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have good efficacy. Peppermint oil and probiotics also may provide benefit. PMID:24124703

  13. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  14. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS. PMID:25083057

  16. Molecular basis of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Karamanolis, Georgios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Karatzias, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder characterized by abdominal pain, discomfort and bloating. The pathophysiology of IBS is poorly understood, but the presence of psychosocial basis is now known. There is an increasing number of publications supporting the role of genetics in IBS. Most of the variations are found in genes associated with the brain-gut axis, revealing the strong correlation of brain-gut axis and IBS. miRNAs, which play critical roles in physiological processes, are not well studied in IBS. However, so far there is found an involvement of alterations in miRNA expression or sequence, in IBS symptoms. IBS phenotype is affected by epigenetic alteration and environment. Changes in DNA and histone methylation are observed in patients who suffered childhood trauma or abuse, resulting in altered gene expression, such as the glucocorticoid receptor gene. Finally, diet is another factor associated with IBS, which may contribute to symptom onset. Certain foods may affect on bacterial metabolism and epigenetic modifications, predisposing to IBS. PMID:24574707

  17. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified. PMID:24029448

  18. The Intestinal Microbiota and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Yehuda; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent and the best studied functional gastrointestinal disorder. The etiology and the pathogenesis of IBS are still not clear; however, recent studies have implicated a role for alterations in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Epidemiological observations have demonstrated that the development of IBS symptoms is often preceded by a disruption of the individual's normal intestinal microbiota, and microbiological studies have demonstrated compositional differences in the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS patients and healthy controls. In addition, animal studies and a few recent human clinical studies have demonstrated that compositional changes in the intestinal microbiota in IBS are associated with relevant abnormal gastrointestinal and brain-gut axis functions that are often observed in patients with IBS. This article discusses points of interest from the current research on the microbiota-gut-brain interactions in IBS and highlights the relevance of the emerging data to our understanding of the disorder and the clinical implications for patients' care. PMID:26447966

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Gut Microbiota and Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Beom Jae

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder characterized by abdominal symptoms including chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS is multifactorial, as abnormal gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed neural function of the brain-gut axis and an abnormal autonomic nervous system are all implicated in disease progression. Based on recent experimental and clinical studies, it has been suggested that additional etiological factors including low-grade inflammation, altered gut microbiota and alteration in the gut immune system play important roles in the pathogenesis of IBS. Therefore, therapeutic restoration of altered intestinal microbiota may be an ideal treatment for IBS. Probiotics are live organisms that are believed to cause no harm and result in health benefits for the host. Clinical efficacy of probiotics has been shown in the treatment or prevention of some gastrointestinal inflammation-associated disorders including traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics-associated diarrhea, pouchitis of the restorative ileal pouch and necrotizing enterocolitis. The molecular mechanisms, as cause of IBS pathogenesis, affected by altered gut microbiota and gut inflammation-immunity are reviewed. The effect of probiotics on the gut inflammation-immune systems and the results from clinical trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS are also summarized. PMID:21860817

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS. PMID:25083057

  2. The Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; De Lee, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional bowel disorder routinely encountered by healthcare providers. Although not life-threatening, this chronic disorder reduces patients’ quality of life and imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. IBS is no longer considered a diagnosis of exclusion that can only be made after performing a battery of expensive diagnostic tests. Rather, IBS should be confidently diagnosed in the clinic at the time of the first visit using the Rome III criteria and a careful history and physical examination. Treatment options for IBS have increased in number in the past decade and clinicians should not be limited to using only fiber supplements and smooth muscle relaxants. Although all patients with IBS have symptoms of abdominal pain and disordered defecation, treatment needs to be individualized and should focus on the predominant symptom. This paper will review therapeutic options for the treatment of IBS using a tailored approach based on the predominant symptom. Abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and diarrhea are the four main symptoms that can be addressed using a combination of dietary interventions and medications. Treatment options include probiotics, antibiotics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agents that modulate chloride channels and serotonin. Each class of agent will be reviewed using the latest data from the literature. PMID:21180545

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  4. Odor and irritation effects of a volatile organic compound mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hudnell, H.K.; Otto, O.D.; Mohave, L.; House, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Human exposure to volatile organic compounds elicits a variety of symptoms, many of which are thought to be mediated by the olfactory and trigeminal systems. The report describes evidence indicating that perceived odor intensity diminishes during prolonged exposure, whereas irritation of the eyes and throat reaches an asymptotic level. Both odor and irritation appear to influence the assessment of air quality. Results of the study will be used in designing future indoor air studies related to sick building syndrome.

  5. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention. PMID:25194867

  6. Significance of hair-dye base-induced sensory irritation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, F; Azuma, T; Tajiri, M; Okamoto, H; Sano, M; Tominaga, M

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation hair-dyes, which are the principal hair-dyes, sometimes induce painful sensory irritation of the scalp caused by the combination of highly reactive substances, such as hydrogen peroxide and alkali agents. Although many cases of severe facial and scalp dermatitis have been reported following the use of hair-dyes, sensory irritation caused by contact of the hair-dye with the skin has not been reported clearly. In this study, we used a self-assessment questionnaire to measure the sensory irritation in various regions of the body caused by two model hair-dye bases that contained different amounts of alkali agents without dyes. Moreover, the occipital region was found as an alternative region of the scalp to test for sensory irritation of the hair-dye bases. We used this region to evaluate the relationship of sensitivity with skin properties, such as trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum water content, sebum amount, surface temperature, current perception threshold (CPT), catalase activities in tape-stripped skin and sensory irritation score with the model hair-dye bases. The hair-dye sensitive group showed higher TEWL, a lower sebum amount, a lower surface temperature and higher catalase activity than the insensitive group, and was similar to that of damaged skin. These results suggest that sensory irritation caused by hair-dye could occur easily on the damaged dry scalp, as that caused by skin cosmetics reported previously. PMID:20557579

  7. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  8. Patterns of alternation in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CHIRA, ALEXANDRA; FILIP, MIHAELA; DUMITRAŞCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorders, having its subtypes related to the predominant bowel pattern: IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), IBS with constipation (IBS-C), mixed IBS (IBS-M) or alternating IBS (IBS-A). Some patients alternate between subtypes (IBS-A). We looked for the prevalence of alternation between subtypes in patients with IBS. We also analyzed changes in pharmacological therapy specifically addressed to IBS. Methods We performed a retrospective observational study that included 60 patients diagnosed with IBS according to Rome III criteria. Patients were asked using a detailed structured interview about their stool form changes regarding previous six months. Alternators were defined as patients that changed IBS subtype over time (previous six months). Results Out of the 60 patients diagnosed with IBS, 18 patients (30%) were alternators. Of these, 8 patients (44%) changed twice the subtype. Two patients (66.66%) of the IBS-M subgroup shifted between subtypes. Eight patients (44.44%) changed medication over the six months. Four patients (22.2%) of the alternators were on double association of therapy (antispasmodics) addressed to IBS. Four patients (22.22%) discontinued medication. Conclusions Patients with IBS often change between subtypes even within six months. Alternators in our pilot study represented 30% of IBS patients. IBS-M seems to be the least stable phenotype. The rarest change is the shift between IBS-C and IBS-D. Alternators also often change their pharmacological treatment (antispasmodics). PMID:27152072

  9. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome treatment: a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Shani-Zur, Dana; Wolkomir, Keren

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects 9-23% of the general population. This diagnosis contributes to more frequent doctor visits and multiple consultations by patients. The current approach to treating IBS is symptomatic and consists of a regimen of first line pharmacological treatment options; the use of anti-depressant drugs is also common. The efficiency of complementary medicine in the treatment of IBS has been studied in the last few years. Qualitative multidisciplinary approach studies, using personalized medicines with complementary therapies are needed. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of IBS since 2009, who complained about gastrointestinal symptoms since the age of 13 and severe episodes of spasmodic stomach aches in the last year self-ranked as 10, on a 0-10 scale; 3-4 episodes a month, which last for 5 days, accompanied by severe flatulence and bloating. In addition, she has constipation (one bowel movement every 10 days), alternating with multiple diarrheic bowel movements (6 times a day). Using a multidisciplinary approach, including medicinal care, Chinese medicine, reflexology and naturopathy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life, as well as gradual reduction of drugs, approved by her physician. Stomach ache self-ranked now as 1, on a 0-10 scale; and flatulence and bloating self-ranked as mild. Bowel movement frequency increased and is now every other day. She no longer has diarrheic and/or multiple bowel movements. This case report emphasizes the importance of integrative treatment in IBS and its benefit in improving patients' quality of life. PMID:25796677

  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Michael D; Martin, Daniel K; Dhillon, Sonu; Puli, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common in population studies including chronic abdominal pain associated with altered bowel habits. Patients often have associated gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms suggesting a possible common contributing mechanism, but the heterogeneous symptom patterns of individual patients make generalizations difficult. The pathophysiology of IBS is incompletely understood but includes disturbances of the brain-gut axis. Central mechanisms are: the psychosocial history and environment, dysfunctional brain processing of peripheral signals attributed to the intestine including the enteric nervous system, the microbiome and the innate and adaptive immune system. As a result there is visceral hypersensitivity and disturbed intestinal secretory and motor activity. Some mechanisms of visceral pain hypersensitivity may overlap with other pain syndromes including fibromyalgia (FMS). Central Sensitization (CS) would offer a way to conceptualize an integration of life experience and psychologic response into a biopsychosocial framework of pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of IBS. Corticotropin-releasing factor, a principle regulator in the stress and pain response may contribute to a neuroendocrine mechanism for the brain-gut interaction. The positive diagnostic approach to IBS symptoms to avoid excess testing and enhance the patient-provider therapeutic relationship requires the recognition of the "cluster" of IBS symptoms while identifying "alarm" symptoms requiring specific attention. The severity of the symptoms and other individual psychosocial factors characterize patients who seek medical care. The presence of significant psychosocial comorbidities adds to the complexity of management which often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Several treatment options exist but no single method is effective for all the symptoms of IBS. The therapeutic benefit of the well-executed physician-patient relationship is considered

  11. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosa LS

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a clinical challenge in the 21st century. It’s the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition and also the most common reason for referral to gastroenterology clinics. Its can affect up to one in five people at some point in their lives, and has a significantly impact of life quality and health care utilization. The prevalence varies according to country and criteria used to define IBS. Various mechanisms and theories have been proposed about its etiology, but the biopsychosocial model is the most currently accepted for IBS. The complex of symptoms would be the result of the interaction between psychological, behavioral, psychosocial and environmental factors. The diagnosis of IBS is not confirmed by a specific test or structural abnormality. It is made using criteria based on clinical symptoms such as Rome criteria, unless the symptoms are thought to be atypical. Today the Rome Criteria III is the current gold-standard for the diagnoses of IBS. Secure positive evidence of IBS by means of specific disease marker is currently not possible and cannot be currently recommended for routine diagnosis. There is still no clinical evidence to recommend the use of biomarkers in blood to diagnose IBS. However, a number of different changes in IBS patients were demonstrated in recent years, some of which can be used in the future as a diagnostic support. IBS has no definitive treatment but could be controlled by non-pharmacologic management eliminating of some exacerbating factors such certain drugs, stressor conditions and changes in dietary habits.The traditional pharmacologic management of IBS has been symptom based and several drugs have been used. However, the cornerstone of its therapy is a solid patient physician relationship. This review will provide a summary of pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria and current and emerging therapies for IBS. PMID:25232249

  13. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H2 breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  14. Eye irritation of low-irritant cosmetic formulations: correlation of in vitro results with clinical data and product composition.

    PubMed

    Debbasch, Caroline; Ebenhahn, Catherine; Dami, Nadia; Pericoi, Marc; Van den Berghe, Christine; Cottin, Martine; Nohynek, Gerhard J

    2005-01-01

    Alternative methods to the Draize eye irritation test, such as the hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) or the bovine corneal opacity and permeability (BCOP) tests, are currently used to evaluate the irritant potential of cosmetic or consumer products. Although, for strong irritants, the results of these tests correlate well with those of the Draize test, they appear to be less suited to identify mild irritants. In order to improve the sensitivity of alternative eye irritation tests, we developed a novel method that uses a human corneal epithelial cell line (CEPI), and the endpoints of cytotoxicity and IL-8 release. Twelve make-up removers were assessed by the HET-CAM, BCOP and CEPI tests, as well as in a clinical in-use test under ophthalmological control after their application to the external eye lid. In addition, we investigated the impact of osmolality and raw material composition on in vitro and clinical results and compared the in vitro results with those of clinical studies. Overall, although HET-CAM results were unrelated to eye discomfort and adverse clinical signs, they correlated mainly with the presence and concentration of surfactants in the test articles. BCOP scores were unrelated to clinical signs, but related mainly to glycol and sodium lactate content and concentration in the test articles. Cytotoxicity in CEPI mainly correlated with presence and concentrations of surfactants, and IL-8 release to clinical signs and/or glycol and sodium lactate concentrations. Overall, IL-8 release appeared to be the most sensitive and reliable endpoint to predict human eye tolerance to mildly irritant products. Although our results suggest that the IL-8 assay appears to be a promising screen for borderline-irritant formulations, further experiments are required to confirm and validate these preliminary results. PMID:15582208

  15. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  16. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  17. Meditation over medication for irritable bowel syndrome? On exercise and alternative treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asare, Fredrick; Störsrud, Stine; Simrén, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Complimentary alternative treatment regimens are widely used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the evidence supporting their use varies. For psychological treatment options, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, gut-directed hypnotherapy, and psychodynamic therapy, the evidence supporting their use in IBS patients is strong, but the availability limits their use in clinical practice. Dietary interventions are commonly included in the management of IBS patients, but these are primarily based on studies assessing physiological function in relation to dietary components, and to a lesser degree upon research examining the role of dietary components in the therapeutic management of IBS. Several probiotic products improve a range of symptoms in IBS patients. Physical activity is of benefit for health in general and recent data implicates its usefulness also for IBS patients. Acupuncture does not seem to have an effect beyond placebo in IBS. A beneficial effect of some herbal treatments has been reported. PMID:22661301

  18. Estimation of proinflammatory biomarkers of skin irritation by dermal microdialysis following exposure with irritant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Fulzele, Suniket V; Babu, R J; Ahaghotu, E; Singh, Mandip

    2007-07-31

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the release of proinflammatory biomarkers by dermal microdialysis after topical exposure with irritant chemicals, Jet fuel (JP-8) and xylene in rat skin. Occlusive dermal exposure (2h) was carried out with 230microl of JP-8 or xylene using Hill top chambers((R)). Linear microdialysis probes (10mm) were inserted in the dermis under urethane anesthesia. The dialysis fluid was pumped at a flow rate of 2microl/min and the dialysate was collected for 7h following probe insertion. The expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the dialysate following microdialysis was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The effect of pretreatment with an SP antagonist (SR-140333) and a PGE(2) inhibitor (celecoxib), 6 and 18h before the application of JP-8 was also assessed to further establish the sensitivity of the microdialysis set up. On similar lines, untreated and capsaicin treated control experiments were performed to compare with the SP release following JP-8 treatment. Further, we also investigated the SP release following topical application of xylene. The mean concentrations of SP after the application of JP-8 (90.01+/-3.31) and 3h after its removal (58.66+/-9.36) indicated that JP-8 induced significantly higher release of SP as compared to the baseline value (P<0.05). The release of SP following JP-8 treatment (58.66+/-9.36pg/ml) was comparable to capsaicin (58.18+/-11.29pg/ml). JP-8 exposure resulted in a significant increase (P<0.001) in PGE(2) levels over the baseline control at the end of 1 and 2h of exposure. JP-8 treatment also produced significant increase (P<0.001) in PGE(2) levels as compared to the untreated control during occlusion and 1h following its removal. There was a significant drop (P<0.05) in the PGE(2) levels by the end of 3h following exposure. Pretreatment with SR-140333 and celecoxib significantly reduced (P<0.05) SP and PGE(2) release induced

  19. Alternative methods for the replacement of eye irritation testing.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Christian; Schmid, Freia F; Rossi, Angela; Kurdyn, Szymon; Kampik, Daniel; De Wever, Bart; Walles, Heike; Groeber, Florian K

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades significant regulatory attempts were made to replace, refine and reduce animal testing to assess the risk of consumer products for the human eye. As the original in vivo Draize eye test has been criticized for limited predictivity, costs and ethical issues, several animal-free test methods have been developed to categorize substances according to the global harmonized system (GHS) for eye irritation.This review summarizes the progress of alternative test methods for the assessment of eye irritation. Based on the corneal anatomy and the current knowledge of the mechanisms causing eye irritation, different ex vivo and in vitro methods will be presented and discussed in regard of possible limitations and their status of regulatory acceptance. In addition to established in vitro models, this review will also highlight emerging, full thickness cornea models that might be applicable to predict all GHS categories. PMID:26626125

  20. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... growths on the skin caused by too much sun exposure). Diclofenac is in a class of medications called ... side effects.talk to your doctor before applying sunscreen or cosmetics to skin that is being treated ...

  1. Diclofenac Topical (actinic keratosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skin to treat arthritis pain. This monograph only gives information about diclofenac gel (Solaraze; generic) for ... or peeling skin.Diclofenac gel (Solaraze; generic) is only for use on the skin. Be careful not ...

  2. In vitro and human testing strategies for skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M K; Osborne, R; Perkins, M A

    2000-01-01

    Prior to the manufacture, transport, and marketing of chemicals or products, it is critical to assess their potential for skin toxicity (corrosion or irritation), thereby protecting the worker and consumer from adverse skin effects due to intended or accidental skin exposure. Traditionally, animal testing procedures have provided the data needed to assess the more severe forms of skin toxicity, and current regulations may require animal test data before permission can be obtained to manufacture, transport, or market chemicals or the products that contain them. In recent years, the use of animals to assess skin safety has been opposed by some as inhumane and unnecessary. The conflicting needs of the industrial toxicologist to (1) protect human safety, (2) comply with regulations, and (3) reduce animal testing have led to major efforts to develop alternative, yet predictive, test methods. A variety of in vitro skin corrosion test methods have been developed and several have successfully passed initial international validation. These have included skin or epidermal equivalent assays that have been shown to distinguish corrosive from noncorrosive chemicals. These skin/epidermal equivalent assays have also been modified and used to assess skin irritation potential relative to existing human exposure test data. The data show a good correlation between in vitro assay data and different types of human skin irritation data for both chemicals and consumer products. The effort to eliminate animal tests has also led to the development of a novel human patch test for assessment of acute skin irritation potential. A case study shows the benefits of in vitro and human skin irritation tests compared to the animal tests they seek to replace, and strategies now exist to adequately assess human skin irritation potential without the need to rely on animal test methods. PMID:11083109

  3. Epidemiologic Study of Malassezia Yeasts in Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients by the Analysis of 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Byung Ho; Choe, Yong Beom; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2010-01-01

    Background This case-control study concerns a molecular biological method based on the data gathered from a group of Korean subjects to examine the distribution of Malassezia yeasts in seborrheic dermatitis (SD) patients. Cultures for Malassezia yeasts were taken from the foreheads, cheeks and chests of 60 patients with SD and in 60 healthy controls of equivalent age. Objective The purpose of this study is to identify the relationship between certain species of Malassezia and SD. This was done by analyzing the differences in the distribution of Malassezia species in terms of age and body parts of the host with healthy controls. Methods 26S rDNA PCR-RFLP, a fast and accurate molecular biological method, was used to overcome the limits of morphological and biochemical methods. Results The positive Malassezia culture rate was 51.7% in patients with SD, which was lower than that of healthy adults (63.9%). M. restricta was dominant in patients with SD (19.5%). Likewise, M. restricta was identified as a common species (20.5%) in healthy controls. In the ages 31~40, M. restricta was found to be the most common species (31.6%) among SD patients. Conclusion According to the results of the study, the most frequently isolated species was M. restricta (19.5%) in patients with SD. There was no statistically significant difference in the distribution of Malassezia species between the SD patients and healthy control groups. PMID:20548904

  4. Malassezia Intra-Specific Diversity and Potentially New Species in the Skin Microbiota from Brazilian Healthy Subjects and Seborrheic Dermatitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Renan Cardoso; Zani, Marcelo Bergamin; Arruda, Ana Carolina Belini Bazán; de Arruda, Lucia Helena Fávaro; Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are part of the resident cutaneous microbiota, and are also associated with skin diseases such as seborrheic dermatitis (SD). The role these fungi play in skin diseases and why they are pathogenic for only some individuals remain unclear. This study aimed to characterize Malassezia microbiota from different body sites in healthy and SD subjects from Brazil. Scalp and forehead samples from healthy, mild SD and severe SD subjects were collected. Non-scalp lesions from severe SD patients were also sampled. 5.8S rDNA/ITS2 amplicons from Malassezia sp. were analyzed by RFLP and sequencing. Results indicate that Malassezia microbiota did not group according to health condition or body area. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that three groups of sequences did not cluster together with any formally described species, suggesting that they might belong to potential new species. One of them was found in high proportions in scalp samples. A large variety of Malassezia subtypes were detected, indicating intra-specific diversity. Higher M. globosa proportions were found in non-scalp lesions from severe SD subjects compared with other areas, suggesting closer association of this species with SD lesions from areas other than scalp. Our results show the first panorama of Malassezia microbiota in Brazilian subjects using molecular techniques and provide new perspectives for further studies to elucidate the association between Malassezia microbiota and skin diseases. PMID:25695430

  5. [Current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, N V; Chernenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Modern definition, classifications, diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are presented together with results of treatment of 30 patients with irritable bowel syndrome with the new selective calcium-channel blocker dicetel. PMID:11881362

  6. Perceived Informativeness of and Irritation with Local Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasadeos, Yorgo

    1990-01-01

    Surveys mall shoppers to determine the relative informativeness of retail advertising. Finds that newspaper advertisements are considered the most informative with radio commercials next and television commercials least. Finds that newspaper ads are more irritating than radio or television advertising. Finds older and wealthier shoppers more…

  7. Acute inhalation toxicity and sensory irritation of dimethylamine. [Rats, mice

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhagen, W.H.; Swenberg, J.A.; Barrow, C.S.

    1982-06-01

    The sensory irritation potential of dimethylamine (DMA) inhalation on male Fischer-344 rats and male Swiss-Webster mice was evaluated by measuring the reflex decrease in respiratory rate. In addition, the six hour LC/sub 50/ for rats exposed to dimetylamine was established. Groups of 3 or 4 rats and mice were exposed for 10 minutes to concentrations of DMA ranging from 49 to 1576 ppm during which time the respiratory rate was monitored and recorded. Sensory irritation concentration-response curves were obtained and RD/sub 50/ values (concentration which elicits a 50% decrease in respiratory rate) were determined to be 573 and 511 ppm for rats and mice, respectively. In another set of experiments seven groups of male rats were exposed to concentrations of DMA ranging from 600 to 6119 ppm for six hours. Mortality counts were made during and for 48 hours post exposure. The six hour LC/sub 50/ was determined to be 4540 ppm. Histopathologic examination of the respiratory tract revealed concentration related changes ranging from ulceration and necrosis to rhinitis, tracheitis, and emphysema. Overall, DMA was found to be less potent as a sensory irritant than other airborne irritants.

  8. Sensitivity to environmental irritants and quality of life in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa; Larsson, Sven; Millqvist, Eva

    2011-01-01

    It is a common clinical experience that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complain of airway symptoms provoked by environmental irritants like chemicals and scents, although few studies can confirm such connections. The aim was to study the prevalence of airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents in a group of patients with newly diagnosed CPOD and to analyze any relation to illness severity and quality of life. Eighty-one patients with COPD were recruited to the study. By mail they were asked to answer three questionnaires regarding symptoms, quality of life, and social and emotional influence of airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants. A majority (62%) of the COPD patients claimed to be hyperreactive to chemicals and scents. As a group they scored higher on a questionnaire measuring social and emotional influences of such environmental irritants compared to healthy control subjects. Further, high scores were more common among patients with a very severe form of COPD and among patients with regular use of β2-stimulants. High scores were also associated with significantly more airway symptoms and, in some aspects, with impaired quality of life. In conclusion, the results of this study show that airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants are common in patients with COPD and that this increased airway sensitivity follows the impairment of lung capacity. The mechanisms behind this remain unclear. PMID:22259245

  9. Sensitivity to environmental irritants and quality of life in COPD.

    PubMed

    Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa; Larsson, Sven; Millqvist, Eva

    2011-01-01

    It is a common clinical experience that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complain of airway symptoms provoked by environmental irritants like chemicals and scents, although few studies can confirm such connections. The aim was to study the prevalence of airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents in a group of patients with newly diagnosed CPOD and to analyze any relation to illness severity and quality of life. Eighty-one patients with COPD were recruited to the study. By mail they were asked to answer three questionnaires regarding symptoms, quality of life, and social and emotional influence of airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants. A majority (62%) of the COPD patients claimed to be hyperreactive to chemicals and scents. As a group they scored higher on a questionnaire measuring social and emotional influences of such environmental irritants compared to healthy control subjects. Further, high scores were more common among patients with a very severe form of COPD and among patients with regular use of β(2)-stimulants. High scores were also associated with significantly more airway symptoms and, in some aspects, with impaired quality of life. In conclusion, the results of this study show that airway symptoms induced by environmental irritants are common in patients with COPD and that this increased airway sensitivity follows the impairment of lung capacity. The mechanisms behind this remain unclear. PMID:22259245

  10. 16 CFR 1500.42 - Test for eye irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500.232. A weight-of-evidence analysis or a validated... interpreting ocular irritation test results, the CPSC animal testing policy Web page at http://www.cpsc.gov.... Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (Available:...

  11. [Introduce a new vitro replacement method of skin irritation test].

    PubMed

    Sun, Likui; Hou, Li; Shi, Yanping

    2011-09-01

    A series of new replacement methods of skin irritation test such as EpiSkin, EpiDermSIT (updated) and SkinEthicRHE have been validated by ECVAM. Due to it, animals are protected to the full extent. These provide more methods for biological evaluation of medical devices. PMID:22242390

  12. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability...

  13. 16 CFR 1500.42 - Test for eye irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... materials that might produce eye irritation. Both eyes of each animal in the test group shall be examined... injection of the blood vessels), or if such substance produces in the conjunctivae (excluding the cornea and... in the test group exhibit a positive reaction. If only one animal exhibits a positive reaction,...

  14. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic l...

  15. Gastrointestinal microbiome signatures of pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal microbiomes of healthy children and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are not well defined. Studies in adults have indicated that the gastrointestinal microbiota could be involved in IBS. We analyzed 71 samples from 22 children with IBS (pediatric Rome III criteri...

  16. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  17. Urinary proteome analysis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom subgroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with alterations in bowel function. Given the heterogeneity of the symptoms, multiple pathophysiologic factors are suspected to play a role. We classified women with IBS i...

  18. The simulation of behaviors of photodetectors under pulsed laser irritation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xin; Cheng, Xiang-ai; Yu, Xiangyang; Qian, Le; Jiang, Tian

    2013-05-01

    Precise simulation of transient electrical behaviors of photodetectors under laser irradiation is becoming an increasingly concern. It not only can allow a detailed study and analysis of complex phenomena that cannot be carried out by experiments, but gives valuable information about the physical mechanisms which ultimately determine the response of the photodetectors. Finite difference numerical technique is adopted in the simulation to calculate the current response of photodetectors under pulsed laser irritation in this paper. To simulation the behaviors of photodetectors under pulsed laser irritation, the transport and trapping of carries and external circuit effects, including load resistance, junction capacitance, and parasitic capacitance, are considered. The basic equations governing the carrier behaviors are solved, including Poisson's equation, the carrier motion equations, and the carrier continuity equations. The simulated transient carrier density and velocities are present, as well as corresponding transient electric field distributions. The behaviors of electrons and holes and its contributions to the external current response are analyzed. Then a general and brief image of the transient progress of photodetectors under pulsed laser irritation is established. How the carrier is induced, transported, and trapped and whether they make any significant contribution to the external current response are discussed. Besides, bias dependent response is also studied. Higher bias will improver the behaviors of photodetectors under pulsed laser irritation. The simulated results and theory analysis will show valuable clue for future research on the behaviors of photodetectors irradiated by pulsed laser.

  19. Acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Wieland, L. Susan; Min, Li Shih; Shen, Xueyong; Berman, Brian M; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, costly, and difficult to treat disorder that impairs health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide guidance on the effects of acupuncture for IBS because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous and methodologically unsound trials. Objectives The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating IBS. Search methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and RCTs that evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment, in adults with IBS were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We extracted data for the outcomes overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. For dichotomous data (e.g. the IBS Adequate Relief Question), we calculated a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for substantial improvement in symptom severity after treatment. For continuous data (e.g. the IBS Severity Scoring System), we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% CI in post-treatment scores between groups. Main results Seventeen RCTs (1806 participants) were included. Five RCTs compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. The risk of bias in these studies was low.We found no evidence of an improvement with acupuncture relative to sham (placebo) acupuncture for symptom severity (SMD-0.11, 95%CI −0.35 to 0.13; 4 RCTs; 281 patients) or quality of life (SMD = −0.03, 95%CI −0.27 to 0.22; 3 RCTs; 253 patients). Sensitivity analyses based on study

  20. Treatment of Irritability in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Opinion statement Irritability is a common neuropsychiatric feature of Huntington’s disease (HD), with prevalences varying from 38% to 73%. Similar prevalences of irritability are reported in other neurodegenerative disorders and traumatic brain injury, especially when the frontal lobe is involved. Before therapeutic interventions are initiated, the clinician should analyze the severity and frequency of the irritable behavior. By examining irritability in a broader spectrum, a tailor-made treatment can be provided. In general, I recommend as a first step a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), such as sertraline, or the mood stabilizer valproate; they both have a mild side effect profile. Next, if the result is insufficient, I advise a switch between these two medications. As an alternative, I recommend a switch to a low dose of an atypical antipsychotic, preferably twice daily. Buspirone may be another alternative. Both antipsychotics and buspirone are also used as an add-on. Other mood stabilizers and beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists should only be used when earlier treatments are ineffective. The use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of irritability is discouraged, as results are unclear. Synthetic cannabinoids are an interesting new therapeutic option, though their “illicit” compound and side effect profile make them not a first-line option. It is important to identify possible comorbid psychiatric disorders, because irritability may be secondary to a psychiatric condition, and the choice of medication partly depends on the co-occurrence of a specific psychiatric disorder. For example, antipsychotic medication would be the treatment of choice in delusional HD patients with excessive irritability, instead of an SSRI or valproate. Besides psychiatric comorbidity, the choice of medication also depends on the general medical condition, the side effect profile, and drug-drug interactions with other medications in concomitant use

  1. [Current issues on irritable bowel syndrome: diet and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung

    2014-09-25

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a multifactorial disorder with its pathogenesis attributed to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Traditionally, IBS has been treated with diet and lifestyle modification, fiber supplementation, psychological therapy, and pharmacological treatment. Carbohydrates are intermingled with a wide range of regularly consumed food including grains such as rye and wheat, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. Short-chain carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed exert osmotic effects in the intestinal lumen increasing its water volume, and are rapidly fermented by bacteria with consequent gas production. These effects may be the basis for the induction of most of the gastrointestinal symptoms. This has led to the use of lactose-free diets in those with lactose intolerance and of fructose-reduced diets for fructose malabsorption. As all poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates have similar and additive effects in the intestine, a concept has been developed to regard them collectively as FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) and to evaluate a dietary approach that restricts them all. Based on the observational and comparative studies, and randomized-controlled trials, FODMAPs have been shown to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with IBS. Food choice via the low FODMAPs and potentially other dietary strategies is now a realistic and efficacious therapeutic approach for managing symptoms of IBS. PMID:25252862

  2. Management of soft tissue irritation around exposed zygomatic implant in a hemimaxillectomy patient: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Balshi, Thomas J; Wolfinger, Glenn J; Balshi, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Patients missing portions or all of the maxillary alveolar bone who are restored with zygomatic implants frequently have threads exposed that can be a mucosal irritant. If such irritation is reported, covering the threads with a highly polished titanium sleeve is recommended. The technique of placing said custom sleeve is described. This adjunctive treatment method has eliminated mucosal irritation. PMID:25506639

  3. Newborn Irritability Moderates the Association between Infant Attachment Security and Toddler Exploration and Sociability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupica, Brandi; Sherman, Laura J.; Cassidy, Jude

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal investigation of 84 infants examined whether the effect of 12-month attachment on 18- and 24-month exploration and sociability with unfamiliar adults varied as a function of newborn irritability. As expected, results revealed an interaction between attachment (secure vs. insecure) and irritability (highly irritable vs. moderately…

  4. Emulsifiers' composition modulates venous irritation of the nanoemulsions as a lipophilic and venous irritant drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chengwen; Wan, Jiangling; Chen, Huabing; Xu, Huibi; Yang, Xiangliang

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a nanoemulsion (NE) system was investigated for intravenous delivery of lipophilic and venous irritant drugs. NEs were prepared to deliver diallyl trisulfide (DT) for systemic therapy of bacterial and fungal infection, egg phospholipid was chosen as the main emulsifier, and two co-emulsifiers were also incorporated, including Poloxamer 188 (P188) and Solutol HS 15 (S15). Soybean oil was used as the dispersed phases, forming stable DT NEs with small particle sizes. The venous irritation of DT NEs was evaluated by in vitro human umbilical cord endothelial cells (CRL 1730) compatibility model with the intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP) concentrations as the indices. The intracellular ATP and GTP reduction changed with the incorporation of a variety of co-emulsifiers, which varied in a free DT concentration-dependent manner. It was deduced that the free DT concentrations of NEs containing co-emulsifiers were determined by the partition coefficient of DT between oil and surfactant buffer solution. In conclusion, NE was an appropriate delivery system for lipophilic and venous irritant drug, and optimization of the composition of emulsifiers was an effective method to alleviate the venous irritation of DT NEs. PMID:19669895

  5. From topical antidote against skin irritants to a novel counter-irritating and anti-inflammatory peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Berta; Erlanger-Rosengarten, Avigail; Proscura, Elena; Shapira, Elena; Wormser, Uri

    2008-06-15

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of the counter-irritating activity of topical iodine against skin lesions induced by chemical and thermal stimuli. The hypothesis that iodine exerts its activity by inducing an endogenous anti-inflammatory factor was confirmed by exposing guinea pig skin to heat stimulus followed by topical iodine treatment and skin extraction. Injection of the extract into naive guinea pigs reduced heat-induced irritation by 69%. The protective factor, identified as a new nonapeptide (histone H2A 36-44, H-Lys-Gly-Asn-Tyr-Ala-Glu-Arg-Ileu-Ala-OH), caused reduction of 40% in irritation score in heat-exposed guinea pigs. The murine analog (H-Lys-Gly-His-Tyr-Ala-Glu-Arg-Val-Gly-OH, termed IIIM1) reduced sulfur mustard (SM)-induced ear swelling at a dose-dependent bell-shape manner reaching peak activity of 1 mg/kg. Cultured keratinocytes transfected with the peptide were more resistant towards SM than the control cells. The peptide suppressed oxidative burst in activated neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the peptide reduced glucose oxidase-induced skin edema in mice at a dose-dependent bell-shape manner. Apart from thermal and chemical-induced skin irritation this novel peptide might be of potential use in chronic dermal disorders such as psoriasis and pemphigus as well as non-dermal inflammatory diseases like multiple sclerosis, arthritis and colitis.

  6. Efficacy of skin barrier creams (II). Ineffectiveness of a popular "skin protector" against various irritants in the repetitive irritation test in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Frosch, P J; Schulze-Dirks, A; Hoffmann, M; Axthelm, I

    1993-08-01

    A popular "skin protector" consisting of an emulsion-like foam of lipophilic and hydrophilic substances (Marly skin) was evaluated in a previously described repetitive irritation guinea pig model. The product failed to inhibit the irritation due to sodium lauryl sulphate and toluene. In striking contrast to the recommended use, the irritant response of sodium hydroxide was aggravated, as demonstrated by significant differences for all test parameters (clinical score for erythema and scaling, transepidermal water loss, blood flow volume). The results show that protection against chemical irritants may be quite specific and that some formulations may actually be harmful. PMID:8365180

  7. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  8. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  9. Double blind study of ispaghula in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prior, A; Whorwell, P J

    1987-11-01

    A double blind placebo controlled trial of ispaghula husk in 80 patients with irritable bowel syndrome is reported. Global assessment judged treatment to be satisfactory in 82% of patients receiving ispaghula and 53% of the placebo group (p less than 0.02). Bowel habit was unchanged in the placebo group, while constipation significantly improved in patients taking ispaghula (p = 0.026). Transit time decreased significantly in those taking ispaghula compared with placebo (p = 0.001), especially in patients with initially high transit times. Abdominal pain and bloating improved in both groups, with no significant differences between ispaghula and placebo. Four of the eight withdrawals on ispaghula and 10 of the 15 withdrawals on placebo were because of treatment failure. Ispaghula significantly improves overall well being in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and in those with constipation favourably affects bowel habit and transit time. PMID:3322956

  10. Role of TNF-α polymorphism -308 in neurosensory irritation.

    PubMed

    Davis, J A; Visscher, M O; Wickett, R R; Hoath, S B

    2011-04-01

    Neurosensory cutaneous discomfort in response to topical products is common, yet the relationship between symptoms such as stinging and visible irritation is currently unclear. The presence of a polymorphism at position -308 on the TNF-α gene has been associated with skin irritation, i.e., erythema, dryness. Individuals with a G to A transition (AA/GA genotypes) have a lower threshold to experimentally induced irritation than those with the wild type (G allele, GG genotype). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on neurosensory irritation (NSI). DNA genotyping was used to determine the allele type amongst a population of health care workers. The neurosensory response to lactic acid and water on the nasolabial folds and hands was assessed using a quantitative lactic acid sting test. Both genotypes had a more intense response to lactic acid compared with water on the face. The AA/GA genotypes had directionally higher scores from lactic acid (P = 0.1) and significantly higher stinging intensities from water (P = 0.001) on the face. For the hands, stinging intensities were higher for lactic acid and water amongst the AA/GA genotypes (P = 0.03 and 0.006 respectively). NSI to lactic acid was significantly higher on the face than on the hands (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that subjects with the A transition at position -308 on the TNF-α gene experience more intense NSI with common ingredients, i.e., lactic acid and water, than those with the wild type. TNF-α polymorphism -308 may account for some of the inter-individual variability in response to skin care practices. PMID:20646084

  11. [NEWS IN ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS OF IRRITATED BOWEL SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of irritated bowel syndrome as a complex of functional disorders that can not be explained by organic changes and are totally due to intestinal motility and visceral sensitivity needs revision. The development of this syndrome also depends on a number of pathogenetic and etiological factors, such as inflammation of intestinal mucosa, changes of its permeability, previous infection, altered microflora, gene polymorphism, and food hypersensitivity. PMID:27459756

  12. Impact of psychological stress on irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Tang, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Psychological stress is an important factor for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). More and more clinical and experimental evidence showed that IBS is a combination of irritable bowel and irritable brain. In the present review we discuss the potential role of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of IBS and provide comprehensive approaches in clinical treatment. Evidence from clinical and experimental studies showed that psychological stresses have marked impact on intestinal sensitivity, motility, secretion and permeability, and the underlying mechanism has a close correlation with mucosal immune activation, alterations in central nervous system, peripheral neurons and gastrointestinal microbiota. Stress-induced alterations in neuro-endocrine-immune pathways acts on the gut-brain axis and microbiota-gut-brain axis, and cause symptom flare-ups or exaggeration in IBS. IBS is a stress-sensitive disorder, therefore, the treatment of IBS should focus on managing stress and stress-induced responses. Now, non-pharmacological approaches and pharmacological strategies that target on stress-related alterations, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, miscellaneous agents, 5-HT synthesis inhibitors, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and specific 5-HT receptor antagonists or agonists have shown a critical role in IBS management. A integrative approach for IBS management is a necessary. PMID:25339801

  13. Impact of psychological stress on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Tang, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2014-10-21

    Psychological stress is an important factor for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). More and more clinical and experimental evidence showed that IBS is a combination of irritable bowel and irritable brain. In the present review we discuss the potential role of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of IBS and provide comprehensive approaches in clinical treatment. Evidence from clinical and experimental studies showed that psychological stresses have marked impact on intestinal sensitivity, motility, secretion and permeability, and the underlying mechanism has a close correlation with mucosal immune activation, alterations in central nervous system, peripheral neurons and gastrointestinal microbiota. Stress-induced alterations in neuro-endocrine-immune pathways acts on the gut-brain axis and microbiota-gut-brain axis, and cause symptom flare-ups or exaggeration in IBS. IBS is a stress-sensitive disorder, therefore, the treatment of IBS should focus on managing stress and stress-induced responses. Now, non-pharmacological approaches and pharmacological strategies that target on stress-related alterations, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, miscellaneous agents, 5-HT synthesis inhibitors, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and specific 5-HT receptor antagonists or agonists have shown a critical role in IBS management. A integrative approach for IBS management is a necessary. PMID:25339801

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi-Hao A.; Nahas, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE (from January 1966), EMBASE (from January 1980), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched until March 2008, combining the terms irritable bowel syndrome or irritable colon with complementary therapies, alternative medicine, acupuncture, fiber, peppermint oil, herbal, traditional, yoga, massage, meditation, mind, relaxation, probiotic, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, or behavior therapy. Results were screened to include only clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Level I evidence was available for most interventions. MAIN MESSAGE Soluble fibre improves constipation and global IBS symptoms. Peppermint oil alleviates IBS symptoms, including abdominal pain. Probiotic trials show overall benefit for IBS but there is little evidence supporting the use of any specific strain. Hypnotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are also effective therapeutic options for appropriate patients. Certain herbal formulas are supported by limited evidence, but safety is a potential concern. All interventions are supported by systematic reviews or meta-analyses. CONCLUSION Several complementary and alternative therapies can be recommended as part of an evidence-based approach to the treatment of IBS; these might provide patients with satisfactory relief and improve the therapeutic alliance. PMID:19221071

  15. Dual-channel red/blue fluorescence dosimetry with broadband reflectance spectroscopic correction measures protoporphyrin IX production during photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanick, Stephen Chad; Davis, Scott C.; Zhao, Yan; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.; Pogue, Brian W.; Chapman, M. Shane

    2014-07-01

    Dosimetry for aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photodynamic therapy of actinic keratosis was examined with an optimized fluorescence dosimeter to measure PpIX during treatment. While insufficient PpIX generation may be an indicator of incomplete response, there exists no standardized method to quantitate PpIX production at depths in the skin during clinical treatments. In this study, a spectrometer-based point probe dosimeter system was used to sample PpIX fluorescence from superficial (blue wavelength excitation) and deeper (red wavelength excitation) tissue layers. Broadband white light spectroscopy (WLS) was used to monitor aspects of vascular physiology and inform a correction of fluorescence for the background optical properties. Measurements in tissue phantoms showed accurate recovery of blood volume fraction and reduced scattering coefficient from WLS, and a linear response of PpIX fluorescence versus concentration down to 1.95 and 250 nM for blue and red excitations, respectively. A pilot clinical study of 19 patients receiving 1-h ALA incubation before treatment showed high intrinsic variance in PpIX fluorescence with a standard deviation/mean ratio of >0.9. PpIX fluorescence was significantly higher in patients reporting higher pain levels on a visual analog scale. These pilot data suggest that patient-specific PpIX quantitation may predict outcome response.

  16. [(18) F]-Fluorodeoxy-d-glucose uptake-positive seborrhoeic keratosis on positron emission tomography may result from high expression of glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Kariya, T; Kato, Y; Kanzaki, A; Kanda, Y; Ohara, T; Tsuboi, R

    2016-07-01

    [(18) F]-Fluorodeoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is known to be highly accurate in differentiating benign lesions from malignant lesions. In rare cases, benign tumours, viral infections and sarcoidosis of the skin have been reported to show FDG uptake, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report the first documented case of seborrhoeic keratosis (SK) showing increased FDG uptake. FDG PET-CT can be used to detect enhanced glycolysis of tumour cells by measuring increased levels of glucose transporters (GLUTs) indicative of higher glucose uptake. GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in this case was compared with that in PET-negative SK and two normal skin samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction with paraffin-embedded tissue. The expression of GLUT1 and GLUT3 was higher in PET-positive SK than in PET-negative SK or normal skin. More specifically, the expression of GLUT3 was observed only in the PET-positive case. This study revealed that high GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in SK might be associated with the uptake of FDG. PMID:26801868

  17. Combination of 595-nm pulsed dye laser, long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion treatment for keratosis pilaris: retrospective analysis of 26 Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Choi, Min Ju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2013-06-01

    Keratosis pilaris (KP) has beenpresented as small keratotic follicular papules with or without surrounding erythema. Various treatments with laser or light therapy have been used for the management of KP with various clinical outcomes. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy and safety of a combination therapy for KP. A total of 29 anatomical sites with KP in 26 patients were treated using a 595-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) with nonpurpuragenic fluences, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion. Clinical improvement was assessed by comparing preand posttreatment clinical photographs and patient satisfaction rates. Evaluation of the clinical results three months after the treatments showed that 12 of the 29 anatomical sites (41.4%) demonstrated Grade 3 clinical improvement, ten (34.5%) had Grade 2 clinical improvement, four (13.8%) showed Grade 1 improvement, and three (10.3%) showed Grade 4 improvement. We observed that KP lesions improved not only in erythema and skin texture, but also in brownish dyschromias. Potential adverse events were not observed, except prolonged posttherapy scaling. Our observations demonstrate that combination therapy using a 595-nm PDL, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser, and microdermabrasion can have a positive therapeutic effect on KP. PMID:23464682

  18. Dissecting the role of TRPV1 in detecting multiple trigeminal irritants in three behavioral assays for sensory irritation

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, CJ

    2013-01-01

    Polymodal neurons of the trigeminal nerve innervate the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral cavity and cornea. Trigeminal nociceptive fibers express a diverse collection of receptors and are stimulated by a wide variety of chemicals. However, the mechanism of stimulation is known only for relatively few of these compounds. Capsaicin, for example, activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. In the present study, wildtype (C57Bl/6J) and TRPV1 knockout mice were tested in three behavioral assays for irritation to determine if TRPV1 is necessary to detect trigeminal irritants in addition to capsaicin. In one assay mice were presented with a chemical via a cotton swab and their response scored on a 5 level scale. In another assay, a modified two bottle preference test, which avoids the confound of mixing irritants with the animal’s drinking water, was used to assess aversion. In the final assay, an air dilution olfactometer was used to administer volatile compounds to mice restrained in a double-chambered plethysmograph where respiratory reflexes were monitored. TRPV1 knockouts showed deficiencies in the detection of benzaldehyde, cyclohexanone and eugenol in at least one assay. However, cyclohexanone was the only substance tested that appears to act solely through TRPV1. PMID:24358880

  19. Chronic, irritant contact dermatitis: Mechanisms, variables, and differentiation from other forms of contact dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, M.V. )

    1988-01-01

    Irritant dermatitis is an eczematous reaction to toxic chemicals contacting the skin. The mechanisms by which various chemicals elicit dermatitis are multiple. Strong irritants quickly elicit signs and symptoms of dermatitis, but weak irritants may not. Chronic cumulative exposure to weak irritants can elicit dermatitis which may mimic allergic contact dermatitis and mislead the physician and patient with respect to cause and preventative strategy. The skins of different people vary in susceptibilities to irritation. Susceptibility is also influenced by chemical properties, vehicles, concentrations, amounts applied to the skin surface, surface area, regional variations, length of exposure, method of exposure, age, sex, race, genetic background, environmental factors, hardening, concomitant disease, and the excited skin syndrome as well as treatment. Patch testing can help distinguish between allergens and irritants, but pitfalls may mislead.35 references.

  20. A laboratory-based study on patients with Parkinson’s disease and seborrheic dermatitis: the presence and density of Malassezia yeasts, their different species and enzymes production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are frequently associated conditions. Aims of this study were: to determine severity of SD, presence of different species and density of Malassezia yeasts; to assess yeast lipases and phosphatases production in vitro and to compare these results between SD patients with and without PD. Methods This case–control prospective study was conducted at the Dermatology and Neurology Units, Clinical Centre of Serbia and at the National Medical Mycology Reference Laboratory, University of Belgrade Medical School, Serbia. A total of 90 patients and 70 healthy controls (HC) were investigated: 60 patients with SD (SDN) and 30 patients with SD and PD (SDP). Culture-based mycological examination was carried out on lesional skin (LS) and non-lesional skin (NLS). A yeasts density was determined by counting the Malassezia colony forming units per tape (CFU/tape). Enzymes production by isolated Malassezia was investigated. Results The most patients with SD were male (76.7%; SDP and 63.3%; SDN) and the intensity of SD was dominantly severe or moderate (76.7%; SDP and 75%; SDN). The presence of Malasseziа was high on LS in both groups (87.3%; SDP and 86.7%; SDN) (p=0.667). The highest yeasts density (mean CFU/tape=67.8) was detected on LS in 53% of SDP group and in 21.7% of SDN group (mean CFU/tape=31.9) (p < 0.01). The presence of negative cultures was lower in SDP group (13.3%) in comparison to HC and SDN groups (37% and 31.7%, respectively). Malassezia density on NLS in SDP group (mean CFU/tape=44.3) was significantly higher in comparison to SDN and HC (p=0.018). M. globosa was the most abundant species identified amongst isolates from the SDP group (42.3%) and exhibited high production of phosphatase and lipase in vitro. Conclusion From this laboratory-based study a positive correlation between SD, PD, M. globosa incidence, high yeast density and high phosphatase and lipase activity was established. Our data

  1. Response to Nonallergenic Irritants in Children With Allergic and Nonallergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Eunhae; Kim, Mi Ae; Lee, Seung Won; Kang, Yu Sun; Sheen, Youn Ho; Jee, Hye Mi; Jung, Young-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Nonallergenic irritants can aggravate the symptoms of rhinitis. We investigated the clinical responses of children with allergic rhinitis (AR) and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) to nonallergenic irritants, and identified factors associated with these responses. Methods Children with chronic rhinitis (n=208) were classified as having AR or NAR based on the presence of aeroallergen-specific IgE. Healthy controls (n=24) were recruited for comparison. The Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines were used to classify patients, and their irritant score (0-21 points) and current symptom score (5-35 points) were measured. Subjects with irritant scores ≥3 and <3 were classified as having irritant and nonirritant rhinitis, respectively. Results The mean age of enrolled subjects was 6.8 years (range: 1.8-16.0 years). The AR and NAR groups had similar irritant scores (P=0.394) and proportions of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 (P=0.105). Irritant score correlated positively with symptom score (P=0.005), and the proportion of subjects with irritant scores ≥3 was greater in children with moderate-severe rhinitis than in those with mild rhinitis (P=0.046). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the presence of atopic eczema increased the risk for sensitivity to a nonallergenic irritant (aOR=2.928, 95% CI 1.567-5.473, P=0.001). Conclusions Response to a nonallergenic irritant was useful for gauging the severity of rhinitis, but not for differentiating AR from NAR. AR and NAR patients with atopic eczema may increase nasal sensitivity to nonallergenic irritants. PMID:27126728

  2. IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS

    PubMed Central

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, María E.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, José A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood. PMID:23364997

  3. Safety evaluation of petroleum products using an in vitro eye irritation test battery.

    PubMed

    Martin, S A; Roy, T A; Saladdin, K A; Fleming, B A; Mackerer, C R

    1994-08-01

    An in vitro eye irritation test battery (IVEye) composed of the EYTEX and Modified Agarose Diffusion Method (MADM) assays was evaluated for use as a predictive, economical screen and/or adjunct for the Draize eye test. EYTEX mimics corneal opacification using a synthetic matrix of proteins that is intended to produce measurable opacity on exposure to chemical irritants in proportion to their ocular irritation potential. MADM is a cytotoxicity-based assay consisting of NCTC clone 929 mouse fibroblasts overlayed with 1% agarose in culture medium. Potential eye irritation is measured macroscopically as the area of decolorization (neutral red release) around the area of chemical application and microscopically as the percentage of cell lysis resulting from chemical application. Of the 70 materials tested in the IVEye for which Draize eye test data also exist, the battery correctly identified 38 materials as non-irritants and 30 as irritants, with two false positives and no false negatives. Non-parametric analysis of the data show the battery to have a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 95% and a predictive value of 94%. The irritation class correlation (equivalence; irritation ranking) between EYTEX alone and the Draize data was 85%. These data support the use of IVEye as an accurate, reproducible and cost-effective in vitro method for identifying the eye irritation potential of petroleum products. PMID:20692994

  4. Lurasidone for the Treatment of Irritability Associated with Autistic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Antony; Brams, Matthew; Goldman, Robert S; Silva, Robert; Hernandez, David; Deng, Ling; Mankoski, Raymond; Findling, Robert L

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of lurasidone in treating irritability associated with autistic disorder. In this multicenter trial, outpatients age 6-17 years who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for autistic disorder, and who demonstrated irritability, agitation, and/or self-injurious behaviors were randomized to 6 weeks of double-blind treatment with lurasidone 20 mg/day (N = 50), 60 mg/day (N = 49), or placebo (N = 51). Efficacy measures included the Aberrant Behavior Checklist Irritability subscale (ABC-I, the primary endpoint) and the Clinical Global Impressions, Improvement (CGI-I) scale, and were analyzed using a likelihood-based mixed model for repeated measures. Least squares (LS) mean (standard error [SE]) improvement from baseline to Week 6 in the ABC-I was not significantly different for lurasidone 20 mg/day (-8.8 [1.5]) and lurasidone 60 mg/day (-9.4 [1.4]) versus placebo (-7.5 [1.5]; p = 0.55 and 0.36, respectively). CGI-I scores showed significantly greater LS mean [SE] improvement at Week 6 for lurasidone 20 mg/day versus placebo (2.8 [0.2] vs. 3.4 [0.2]; p = 0.035) but not for lurasidone 60 mg/day (3.1 [0.2]; p = 0.27). Discontinuation rates due to adverse events were: lurasidone 20 mg/day, 4.1 %; 60 mg/day, 3.9 %; and placebo, 8.2 %. Adverse events with an incidence ≥10 % (lurasidone combined, placebo) included vomiting (18.0, 4.1 %) and somnolence (12.0, 4.1 %). Modest changes were observed in weight and selected metabolic parameters. In this study, once-daily, fixed doses of 20 and 60 mg/day of lurasidone were not demonstrated to be efficacious compared to placebo for the short-term treatment of children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe irritability associated with autistic disorder. PMID:26659550

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: a concise review of current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, "classic" treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and "alternative" therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: A concise review of current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, “classic” treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and “alternative” therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  7. Gut Microbiota as Potential Orchestrators of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Sean M.P.; Öhman, Lena; Simrén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial functional disorder with no clearly defined etiology or pathophysiology. Modern culture-independent techniques have improved the understanding of the gut microbiota’s composition and demonstrated that an altered gut microbiota profile might be found in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. Research on IBS from a microbial perspective is gaining momentum and advancing. This review will therefore highlight potential links between the gut microbiota and IBS by discussing the current knowledge of the gut microbiota; it will also illustrate bacterial-host interactions and how alterations to these interactions could exacerbate, induce or even help alleviate IBS. PMID:25918261

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome: a mild disorder; purely symptomatic treatment.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) Patients frequently complain of occasional bowel movement disorders, associated with abdominal pain or discomfort, but they are rarely due to an underlying organ involvement. Even when patients have recurrent symptoms, serious disorders are no more frequent in these patients than in the general population, unless other manifestations, anaemia, or an inflammatory syndrome is also present; (2) There is currently no way of radically modifying the natural course of recurrent irritable bowel syndrome; (3) The effects of antispasmodics on abdominal pain have been tested in about 20 randomised controlled trials. Pinaverium and peppermint essential oil have the best-documented efficacy and only moderate adverse effects. Antispasmodics with marked atropinic effects do not have a favourable risk-benefit balance; (4) Tricylic antidepressants seem to have only modest analgesic effects in this setting. In contrast, their adverse effects are frequent and they have somewhat negative risk-benefit balances. Nor has the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) been demonstrated; (5) Alosetron and tegaserod carry a risk of potentially life-threatening adverse effects and therefore have negative risk-benefit balances; (6) Seeds of plants such as psyllium and ispaghul, as well as raw apples and pears, have a limited impact on constipation and pain. Osmotic laxatives are effective on constipation. Symptomatic treatments for constipation can sometimes aggravate abdominal discomfort; (7) Loperamide has been poorly assessed in patients with recurrent irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea. It modestly slows bowel movement but does not relieve pain or abdominal discomfort; (8) Dietary measures have not been tested in comparative trials. Some patients are convinced that certain foods provoke a recurrence of irritable bowel syndrome, but restrictive diets carry a risk of nutritional deficiencies; (9) Various techniques intended to control emotional and

  9. Traditional thoughts on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasler, William L

    2011-03-01

    The pathogenesis of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is multifactorial and varies from patient to patient. Disturbances of motor function in the small intestine and colon and smooth-muscle dysfunction in other gut and extraintestinal regions are prominent. Abnormalities of sensory function in visceral and somatic structures are detected in most patients with IBS, which may relate to peripheral sensitization or altered central nervous system processing of afferent information. Contributions from psychosocial disturbances are observed in patients from tertiary centers and primary practice. Proof of causation of symptom genesis for most of these factors is limited. PMID:21333899

  10. Food: the forgotten factor in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Shanti; Tack, Jan; Chey, William D

    2011-03-01

    After years of inattention, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that dietary constituents at least exacerbate symptoms and perhaps contribute to the pathogenesis of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although patients with IBS self-report food allergies more often than the general population, the evidence suggests that true food allergies are relatively uncommon. Less clearly defined food intolerances may be an important contributor to symptoms in IBS patients. This article reviews the literature supporting a causal link between food and the symptoms of IBS as well as the evidence supporting dietary interventions as a means of managing IBS symptoms. PMID:21333905

  11. Gut microbiota as potential orchestrators of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Sean M P; Ohman, Lena; Simren, Magnus

    2015-05-23

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial functional disorder with no clearly defined etiology or pathophysiology. Modern culture-independent techniques have improved the understanding of the gut microbiota's composition and demonstrated that an altered gut microbiota profile might be found in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. Research on IBS from a microbial perspective is gaining momentum and advancing. This review will therefore highlight potential links between the gut microbiota and IBS by discussing the current knowledge of the gut microbiota; it will also illustrate bacterial-host interactions and how alterations to these interactions could exacerbate, induce or even help alleviate IBS. PMID:25918261

  12. When to reconsider the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammerle, Christopher W; Crowe, Sheila E

    2011-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent disorder characterized by nonspecific symptoms that can mimic other common medical conditions. A careful history and physical examination may reveal clues that suggest a coexisting or alternative diagnosis, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or celiac disease (CD). Testing for bacterial overgrowth has limitations, but emerging data suggest that antibiotics may be of some benefit in patients with IBS with diarrhea and bloating. CD seems to have a higher prevalence in patients with IBS. Some patients with IBS may have symptomatic improvement on gluten-restricted diets, without histologic or serologic evidence of CD. PMID:21601781

  13. [Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with dicetelium and spasmomen].

    PubMed

    Nedogoda, S V; Parshev, V V

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical efficacy of new spasmolytics--pinaverium bromide (dicetel, Solvay Pharma) and otilonium bromide (spasmomen, Menarini-Berlin-Chemie)--in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Effects appearing during the treatment with anxiolytic drug tofisopam (grandaxin, Egis) after using dicetel and spasmomen were also studied. The results indicate marked clinical efficiency of dicetel and spasmomen which improve vegetative functions and psychoemotional status. Grandaxin provides further improvement of clinical symptoms and additionally corrects psychoemotional status. PMID:11220900

  14. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome. Strategy for the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common reasons for disability and health care seeking. A sensible strategy for management incorporates a confident diagnosis based upon history, physical examination, and pertinent tests. The physician can then reassure the patient, offer dietary and stress management advice, and recommend bran to relieve constipation and to evoke the placebo response. Patients who do not respond could require supportive psychotherapy or a drug for the dominant symptom. A few require careful referral, but overall responsibility should remain with the primary physician. Images Figures 1-2 PMID:8130678

  16. Amantadine Effect on Perceptions of Irritability after Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of the Amantadine Irritability Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Sherer, Mark; Malec, James F.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Whitney, Marybeth; Bell, Kathleen; Dikmen, Sureyya; Bogner, Jennifer; Mysiw, Jerry; Pershad, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study examines the effect of amantadine on irritability in persons in the post-acute period after traumatic brain injury (TBI). There were 168 persons ≥6 months post-TBI with irritability who were enrolled in a parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial receiving either amantadine 100 mg twice daily or equivalent placebo for 60 days. Subjects were assessed at baseline and days 28 (primary end-point) and 60 of treatment using observer-rated and participant-rated Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-I) Most Problematic item (primary outcome), NPI Most Aberrant item, and NPI-I Distress Scores, as well as physician-rated Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale. Observer ratings between the two groups were not statistically significantly different at day 28 or 60; however, observers rated the majority in both groups as having improved at both intervals. Participant ratings for day 60 demonstrated improvements in both groups with greater improvement in the amantadine group on NPI-I Most Problematic (p<0.04) and NPI-I Distress (p<0.04). These results were not significant with correction for multiple comparisons. CGI demonstrated greater improvement for amantadine than the placebo group (p<0.04). Adverse event occurrence did not differ between the two groups. While observers in both groups reported large improvements, significant group differences were not found for the primary outcome (observer ratings) at either day 28 or 60. This large placebo or nonspecific effect may have masked detection of a treatment effect. The result of this study of amantadine 100 mg every morning and noon to reduce irritability was not positive from the observer perspective, although there are indications of improvement at day 60 from the perspective of persons with TBI and clinicians that may warrant further investigation. PMID:25774566

  17. Efficacy of a photolyase-based device in the treatment of cancerization field in patients with actinic keratosis and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Puviani, M; Barcella, A; Milani, M

    2013-12-01

    Eryfotona AK-NMSC (ISDIN Spain) is a film-forming medical device in cream or fluid formulation containing the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase and high-protection UV filters in liposomes (repairsomes) indicated in the treatment of cancerization field in patients with actinic keratosis (AK) or non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Photolyase is an enzyme that recognizes and directly repairs UV-induced DNA damage. The most common UV-induced DNA damage is the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). Clinical studies evaluating the histological and cellular effects of Eryfotona AK-NMSC have shown a potential benefit in the treatment of the cancerization field in AK patients. In particular the use of Eryfotona AK-NMSC improves the confocal microscopic appearance of skin at the cancerization field level. In addition, Eryfotona AK-NMSC improves the p53 gene expression at keratinocyte level. In this study we reported a series of 6 cases of patients with AK or NMSC lesions treated with Eryfotona AK-NMSC fluid, both as coadjuvant and as single treatment, applied twice daily in the affected area with photograph documentation. Clinical photographs of the skin lesions at baseline and after Eryfotona AK-NMSC treatment were taken in all cases using a high-definition digital camera. Six patients with multiple AK lesions of the scalp or face with or without NMSC were treated for a mean of 1-3 months with Eryfotona AK-NMSC fluid formulation. Image documentations before and after treatment of this clinical series show a great improvement in AK lesions count and of cancerization field. This clinical series supports the clinical efficacy of the use of photolyase and high-protection UV filters in the treatment of cancerization field and AK lesions in patients with actinic damage. PMID:24442053

  18. Methylglyoxal Induces Systemic Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS. PMID:25157984

  19. Sensitization of the Trigeminovascular System following Environmental Irritant Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Phillip Edward; Zhang, LuJuan; Pellman, Jessica Joan; Oxford, Gerry Stephen; Hurley, Joyce Harts

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution is linked to increased emergency room visits for headache and migraine patients frequently cite chemicals or odors as headache triggers, but the association between air pollutants and headache is not well-understood. We previously reported that nasal administration of environmental irritants acutely increases meningeal blood flow via a TRPA1-dependent mechanism, involving the trigeminovascular system. Here, we examine whether chronic environmental irritant exposure sensitizes the trigeminovascular system. Methods Male rats were exposed to acrolein, a TRPA1 agonist, or room air by inhalation for 4 days prior to meningeal blood flow measurements. Some animals were injected daily with a TRPA1 antagonist, AP-18 or vehicle prior to inhalation exposure. Trigeminal ganglia were isolated following blood flow measurements for immunocytochemistry and/or qPCR determination of TRPV1, TRPA1 and CGRP levels. Results Acrolein inhalation exposure potentiated blood flow responses to both TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonists compared to room air. Acrolein exposure did not alter TRPV1 or TRPA1 mRNA levels or TRPV1 or CGRP immunoreactive cell counts in the trigeminal ganglion. Acrolein sensitization of trigeminovascular responses to a TRPA1 agonist was attenuated by pre-treatment with AP-18. Interpretation These results suggest trigeminovascular sensitization as a mechanism for enhanced headache susceptibility after chemical exposure. PMID:25724913

  20. Role of FODMAPs in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Pasquale; Seidita, Aurelio; D'Alcamo, Alberto; Carroccio, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, flatus, and altered bowel habits. The role of dietary components in inducing IBS symptoms is difficult to explore. To date, foods are not considered a cause but rather symptom-triggering factors. Particular interest has been given to the so-called FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols). We aimed to summarize the evidence from the most common approaches to manage suspected food intolerance in IBS, with a particular interest in the role of FODMAPs and the effects of a low FODMAP diet. We reviewed literature, consulting PubMed and Medline by using the search terms FODMAP(s), fructose, lactose, fructans, galactans, polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, xylitol, erythritol, polydextrose, and isomalt), irritable bowel syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal symptoms. FODMAP-restricted diets have been used for a long time to manage patients with IBS. The innovation in the so-called FODMAP concept is that a global restriction should have a more consistent effect than a limited one in preventing abdominal distension. Even though all the potential low FODMAP diets provide good relief of symptoms in many patients, there is just a little relief in others. Several studies highlight the role of low FODMAP diets to improve symptoms in patients with IBS. The evidence on this dietary approach supports the hypothesis that a low FODMAP diet should be the first dietary approach. However, many points remain to be clarified, including the evaluation of possibly significant nutrition concerns. PMID:25694210

  1. Methylglyoxal induces systemic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS. PMID:25157984

  2. [Rectoscopy and Hemoccult II in irritable colon. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Hovendal, C P; Kronborg, O; Hem, J; Grinsted, P; Fenger, C

    1990-09-17

    It was investigated whether Hemoccult-II test (H-II) could reduce the number of colonic examinations in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome, with normal rigid proctoscopic findings. A negative H-II was obtained in 299 patients from general practice and a positive test in nine. Colonoscopy was done in 157 and double contrast barium enema in 142 after random allocation. The nine patients with positive H-II all had colonoscopy. Among the 299 with negative H-II, colonic adenomas were detected in ten and an early cancer in an adenoma in the sigmoid colon; overlooked rectal adenomas were found in three, rectal cancer in one, rectal carcinoid in another and a coecal cancer, which could be palpated, in a third patient. Two patients with colonic cancer and one with adenoma were detected among those with positive H-II. All patients were followed by clinical examination after one year. In conclusion, colonic examination should carry a low priority in patients with symptoms of irritable bowel, negative Hemoccult-II and normal rigid proctoscopic findings performed by an experienced examiner. The investigation confirmed the recommendation of total colonoscopy in patients with a positive H-II and added support for increasing number of endoscopy services in contrast to those of diagnostic radiology, which should be reduced. PMID:2219505

  3. Pathologic response of the lung to irritant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, F.R.; Runnels, L.J.; Conrad, D.A.; Teclaw, R.F.; Thacker, H.L. )

    1990-12-01

    The pathologic response of the lung to irritant gases ranges from the acute exudative phase through the subacute proliferative phase to the chronic fibrosing phase. These responses are based on damage to the Type I cells, and possibly endothelial cells, and the subsequent proliferative and repair processes in the surviving animals. Responses to high dose exposures appear at the microscopic level as exudation of protein rich fluids into alveoli (alveolar edema) and subsequent death due to anoxia. Physiologically, this could be described as a mismatch of ventilation with perfusion, resulting in impaired gas exchange. Animals surviving this acute exudative phase resolve the alveolar edema to fibrin, and Type II cells become hypertrophic and hyperplastic in the process of replacing the damaged Type I cells. The acute and subacute responses also elicit inflammatory changes in the interstitium of the lung that may progress to fibrosis in the chronic stage of a survivable exposure. Diagnostic cases in livestock involving irritant gases reflect similar toxic injuries to the lung.

  4. [Manometric effects of pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Soifer, L; Varela, E; Olmos, J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of pinaverium bromide on colonic motility were investigated in a controlled, controlled, cross-over study in 32 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Constipation was clearly predominant in one group of 16 patients, and diarrhea in the other group of 16. Manometric measurements were taken of the colonic motor response generated by distention of a balloon inserted to the rectosigmoid junction. Measurements were taken before and one hour after ingestion of two tablets containing placebo or two tablets each containing 50 mg of pinaverium bromide. Following intake of placebo the motility index increased from the basal value in patients with constipation, and resistance to distention decreased in the diarrhea group. These changes were attributable to repetition of the mechanical stimulus within a relatively brief time lapse, or more probably to the ingestion of liquid which accompanied intake of tablets. Compared with placebo, pinaverium bromide induced inhibition of both effects. From the therapeutic point of view, the decrease in motility index seen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation is particularly interesting. PMID:1295286

  5. A superfusion apparatus for ex vivo human eye irritation investigations.

    PubMed

    Elbadawy, Hossein Mostafa; Salvalaio, Gianni; Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Baruzzo, Mattia; Cagini, Carlo; Ponzin, Diego; Ferrari, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    A superfusion apparatus (SA) was developed to maintain isolated human corneas ex vivo under conditions which mimic the natural eye environment in vivo, including controlled temperature, tear flow and intraocular pressure. The SA was designed, developed and tested for use in ophthalmic pre-clinical research and to test new pharmaceutical formulations. Corneas undergo an equilibration process in the new physiological environment for one day. The test was then initiated by the application of the test substance, incubation, and temporal assessment of corneal damage using various parameters. The effects of mild and severe irritant concentrations of NaOH (2% and 8%, respectively) on corneal opacity, swelling and epithelial integrity were studied, and the inflammatory status assessed using F4/80 and MPO as macrophages and neutrophils markers, respectively. The SA was then used to test new artificial tear formulations supplemented with silver ions as an active constituent, showing different degrees of inflammatory responses as indicated by the migration of MPO and F4/80 positive cells towards the epithelium. The human cornea superfusion apparatus was proposed as a model for acute eye irritation research. PMID:26100225

  6. Skin reactions and irritation potential of four commercial toothpastes.

    PubMed

    Skaare, A; Kjaerheim, V; Barkvoll, P; Rølla, G

    1997-04-01

    Skin reactions to 4 toothpastes were tested in 19 healthy dental students in a double-blind study. The hypothesis was that common toothpaste brands with and without sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and triclosan and with different additives/emulgators differ in irritation potential. An occlusion test system on human skin was used. The toothpastes tested were A) Zendium (non-ionic detergent), B) Solidox F (SLS/polyethylene glycol), C) Colgate Total (triclosan/copolymer/SLS/propylene glycol), and D) Solidox G (triclosan/zinc citrate/SLS/polyethylene glycol). Toothpaste C was the greatest irritant, causing skin erythema in 16 of the 19 subjects, whereas toothpaste D gave no reactions. Toothpaste B provoked three reactions (two severe), whereas toothpaste A caused only one mild reaction. Although this study was carried out on skin and hence not directly applicable to the oral cavity, these and previous results may indicate that a toothpaste without propylene glycol and SLS may be preferred by susceptible persons. PMID:9176662

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: a test of the colonic hyperalgesia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Latimer, P; Campbell, D; Latimer, M; Sarna, S; Daniel, E; Waterfall, W

    1979-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a primary hyperalgesia of the colon. Previous work, which examined these patients and normals, has not included subjects who provide a control for relevant psychological characteristics. We compared ratings of pain, following varying degrees of distension of the sigmoid colon, in normals, patients with IBS, and patients who were psychologically disturbed but without bowel symptoms. Psychological characteristics were assessed by a psychiatric interview and psychometric inventories; response to distension was tested by placing a tube in the rectosigmoid colon and successively inflating a nd deflating a balloon at its tip at 10 cm3 increments up to 50 cm3. Ratings of pain were recorded at each volume. The results indicated that the two patient groups were psychologically similar and both were more disturbed than normals. A linear relation was found between reports of pain and volume of distension in all three groups. There were no significant differences between the proportions of subjects experiencing pain in each group or the average of the ratings. There were no significant associations between the pain ratings and measures of anxiety, depression, neuroticism, and extraversion. The data do not support the hypothesis that colonic hyperalgesia is an important contributory factor in the etiology of the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:537039

  8. Managing Irritability and Aggression in Autism Spectrum Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Adelaide S.

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism and autism spectrum disorders have a high rate of irritability and aggressive symptoms. In one study up to 20% of children with autism have symptoms of irritability and aggression including aggression, severe tantrums, and deliberate self injurious behavior (Lecavalier [2006] "J. Autism Dev. Disord." 36:1101-1114.). These…

  9. Efficacy of 4 commercially available protective creams in the repetitive irritation test (RIT).

    PubMed

    Schlüter-Wigger, W; Elsner, P

    1996-04-01

    Protective creams (PCs) play their part in the prevention of occupational contact dermatitis, even though efficacy data are frequently lacking. 4 different commercially-available PCs were evaluated against a set of 4 standard irritants (10% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), 1% sodium hydroxide (NaOH), 30% lactic acid (LA) and undiluted toluene (TOL)) in the repetitive irritation test (RIT) in humans described by Frosch and Kurte. 20 subjects were tested on the paravertebral skin on the mid-back. Irritation was assessed by visual scoring, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as an indicator of epidermal barrier function, and colorimetry as a parameter of inflammation. Very different protective effects of the PCs on irritation by chemical substances were detectable. All products were very effective against SLS irritation. No PC provided significant protection against toluene. 3 products showed a partially protective effect against all ionic irritants, while the 4th showed less protection against SLS and NaOH, and even amplification of inflammation by TOL. Considering the range of PC effects from good protection to increased irritation, depending on the irritant, the need for careful selection of PCs for specific workplaces is stressed. PMID:8730167

  10. AGONISTIC SENSORY EFFECTS OF AIRBORNE CHEMICALS IN MIXTURES: ODOR, NASAL PUNGENCY, AND EYE IRRITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Threshold responses of odor, nasal pungency (irritation), and eye irritation were measured for single chemicals (1-propanol, 1-hexanol, ethyl acetate, heptyl acetate, 2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, toluene, ethyl benzene, and propyl benzene) and mixtures of them (two three-component m...

  11. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH AND ITS CONSTITUENTS ON SENSORY IRRITATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sensory irritation caused by fly ash from oil-fired (OF), fluidized bed coal (FB) combustion and conventional coal (CC) combustion power plants, and from Mt. St. Helens volcano (VA) was studied in mice. The irritating sensation due to contact with fly ash or its constituents was ...

  12. POST-INFECTIOUS IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: A LONG TERM CONSEQUENCE OF BACTERIAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly diagnosed disease characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms often associated with psychological illness and emotional problems. The prevalence rate world-wide for IBS ranges from 10 to 20% and is higher for women than for men. Irritable bowel disease ...

  13. Tandem repeated application of organic solvents and sodium lauryl sulphate enhances cumulative skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Sibylle; Schmidt, Christina; Elsner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the tandem irritation potential of two organic solvents with concurrent exposure to the hydrophilic detergent irritant sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). A tandem repeated irritation test was performed with two undiluted organic solvents, cumene (C) and octane (O), with either alternating application with SLS 0.5% or twice daily application of each irritant alone in 27 volunteers on the skin of the back. The cumulative irritation induced over 4 days was quantified using visual scoring and non-invasive bioengineering measurements (skin colour reflectance, skin hydration and transepidermal water loss). Repeated application of C/SLS and O/SLS induced more decline of stratum corneum hydration and higher degrees of clinical irritation and erythema compared to each irritant alone. Our results demonstrate a further example of additive harmful skin effects induced by particular skin irritants and indicate that exposure to organic solvents together with detergents may increase the risk of acquiring occupational contact dermatitis. PMID:24457469

  14. Irritability without Elation in a Large Bipolar Youth Sample: Frequency and Clinical Description

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Birmaher, Boris; Leonard, Henrietta; Strober, Michael; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal; Yang, Mei; Gill, Marykay; Dyl, Jennifer; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Swenson, Lance; Goldstein, Benjamin; Goldstein, Tina; Stout, Robert; Keller, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of 361 youths with bipolar disorder reveal that irritable-only subgroups constitute 10 percent of this sample while elated-only subgroups constitute 15 percent of the sample. These findings support continued consideration for episodic irritability in the diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorder.

  15. Are Histrionic Personality Traits Associated with Irritability during Conscious Sedation Endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Shin; Park, Hyo Jung

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We aimed to evaluate whether histrionic personality traits are associated with irritability during conscious sedation endoscopy (CSE). Materials and Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study was planned. Irritability during CSE was classified into five grades: 0, no response; I, minimal movement; II, moderate movement; III, severe movement; IV, fighting against procedure. Patients in grades III and IV were defined as the irritable group. Participants were required to complete questionnaire sheet assessing the extent of histrionic personality traits, extraversion-introversion, and current psychological status. The present authors also collected basic sociodemographic data including alcohol use history. Results. A total of 32 irritable patients and 32 stable patients were analyzed. The histrionic personality trait score of the irritable group was higher than that of the stable group (9.5 ± 3.1 versus 6.9 ± 2.9; P = 0.001), as was the anxiety score (52.8 ± 8.6 versus 46.1 ± 9.6; P = 0.004). Heavy alcohol use was more frequently observed in the irritable group (65.6% versus 28.1%; P = 0.003). In multivariate analysis, all these three factors were independently correlated with irritability during CSE. Conclusion. This study revealed that histrionic personality traits, anxiety, and heavy alcohol use can affect irritability during CSE. PMID:25954307

  16. [Controlled clinical study of the action of mebeverine hydrochloride in the treatment of irritable colon].

    PubMed

    Secco, G B; Di Somma, C; Arnulfo, G; Ricci, C

    1983-03-31

    The results of a study about the mebeverina administered in 45 cases of irritable colon are reported. The clinical and laboratory findings together with the results of colometrography under psychic stimulation, have shown the therapeutic efficacy of the new formulation, specially in irritable colon with abdominal pain. Its tolerance was excellent. PMID:6339996

  17. A single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data presented here shows that a single exposure to photochemical smog causes airway irritation and cardiac dysrhythmia in mice. Smog, which is a complex mixture of particulate matter and gaseous irritants (ozone, sulfur dioxide, reactive aldehydes), as well as components whi...

  18. Evaluation of the EYTEX system as a screen for eye irritancy of petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Roy, T A; Saladdin, K A; Mackerer, C R

    1994-08-01

    89 petroleum products were tested in the EYTEX in vitro assay and the results were compared with data from Draize tests on the same materials. All 26 chemicals assessed as irritant in the Draize test were classified as irritant by the EYTEX assay; 61 of the 63 non-irritants were correctly classified by the in vitro assay. The correlation between the results from the EYTEX system and the Draize data was 89%, and the predictive value of the EYTEX system (percentage of EYTEX irritants that are true irritants) was 93%. When the same chemicals were tested in another laboratory, the coefficient of determination for the comparison of the EYTEX scores from the two laboratories was R(2) = 0.86. The results demonstrate the reliability and interpretability of the EYTEX assay carried out in our laboratory and therefore the viability, if not the validity, of this in vitro method as a screening test for the Draize assay. PMID:20693014

  19. New model of cytoprotection/adaptive cytoprotection in rats: endogenous small irritants, antiulcer agents and indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Desković, S; Grabarević, Z; Marović, A; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Konjevoda, P; Jadrijević, S; Sosa, T; Perović, D; Aralica, G; Turković, B

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive cytoprotection in the stomach was originally defined by applying the exogenous irritants only. The contribution of endogenous irritants as inductors of initial lesions was not specially evaluated. No attempt was made to either focus antiulcer agent activity on adaptive cytoprotection, or split their 'cytoprotection' into complex adaptive cytoprotective activity and simple cytoprotective effects. Agents had so far not been applied simultaneously with the second challenge with ethanol (or irritant), when differences between cytoprotection and adaptive cytoprotection appear. Gastrojejunal anastomosis for 24 h in rats was introduced as new model for analyzing cytoprotection/adaptive cytoprotection. The contribution of the up-normal level of endogenous irritants and the endogenous small irritant-induced minor lesions during the adaptive cytoprotection were studied. The effect of late challenge with 96% ethanol in the presence of an up-normal level of endogenous irritants and endogenous small irritant-induced minor lesions was compared with results of classic studies of ethanol-induced gastric lesions in normal rats (1 ml/rat i.g.). Antiulcer agents or a prostaglandins-synthesis inhibitor, indomethacin, given once only in classic studies, were given at several points during injury induction: (i) surgery, (ii) mild ethanol, (iii) strong ethanol, (iv) strong ethanol applied after a suitable period following either mild ethanol or surgery). Their effects were compared in rats treated as follows: exogenous irritant studies (96% or 20% ethanol), exogenous/exogenous irritant studies (20% ethanol 1 h before 96% ethanol), endogenous irritant studies (gastrojejunal anastomosis for 24 h), and endogenous/exogenous irritant studies (gastrojejunal anastomosis for 24 h before 96% ethanol). Characteristic of the various irritants differed: the (preceding) small irritants (exogenous (i.e., mild ethanol in healthy intact rats) (exogenous irritant studies) vs. endogenous (e

  20. Quaternary ammonium derivatives as spasmolytics for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, S

    2004-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium derivatives such as cimetropium, n-butyl scopolammonium, otilonium and pinaverium bromide have been discovered and developed as potent spasmolytics of the gastrointestinal tract. Their pharmacological activity has been proven in both "in vivo" and "in vitro" studies of hypermotility. "In vitro" experiments showed that they possess antimuscarinic activity at nM level but only pinaverium and otilonium are endowed with calcium channel blocker properties. These latter compounds relaxed the gastrointestinal smooth muscle mainly through a specific inhibition of calcium ion influx through L-type voltage operated calcium channels. Molecular pharmacology trials have indicated that pinaverium and otilonium can bind specific subunits of the calcium channel in the external surface of the plasma membrane and in this way they block the machinery of the contraction. Recent evidence showed that otilonium is able to bind tachykinin NK(2) receptors and not only inhibits one of the major contractile agents but can reduce the activation of afferent nerves devoted to the passage of sensory signals from the periphery to the central nervous system. Thanks to their typical physico-chemical characteristics, they are poorly absorbed by the systemic circulation and generally remain in the gastrointestinal tract where they exert the muscle relaxant activity by a local activity. Some differences exists in the absorption among these compounds: both n-butyl scopolammonium and cimetropium are partially taken up in the bloodstream, pinaverium has a low absorption (8-10 %) but is endowed with an excellent hepato-biliary excretion and otilonium, which has the lowest absorption (3 %), is almost totally excreted by faeces. Quaternary ammonium derivatives are widely used for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and recent meta-analyses have supported their efficacy in this disease. Due to its therapeutic index, the use of n-butyl scopolammonium is more indicated to treat acute

  1. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Actor Gene Kelly in the 1945 film, Combat Fatigue Irritability, now available to the public ...

  2. An evaluation of irritant smoke to detect exhalation valve leakage in respirators.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Erin M; McKay, Roy T

    2003-09-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a qualitative fit-test method (irritant smoke) to detect known exhalation valve leakage. The OSHA protocol for the irritant smoke test mandates the use of a low flow air pump at 200 mL/minute or an aspirator squeeze bulb. Many commercial test kits include an aspirator bulb, which is subject to variation in frequency, depth of squeeze, fatigue rate, and individual hand strength. Previous studies on irritant smoke used a handheld squeeze bulb. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a low flow pump for irritant smoke fit-testing. Twenty subjects wearing North 7600 series full-face respirators equipped with P100 filters were fit-tested with a Portacount Plus to ensure adequate fit. After successful fit was demonstrated, the exhalation valve was replaced with a damaged valve and/or rotated approximately 90 degrees to produce a fit factor below 100. Having induced an exhalation valve leak, the irritant smoke fit-test was performed using the OSHA irritant smoke protocol. To avoid introducing additional unknown leakage, all head movement exercises were replaced with the head straight, normal breathing maneuver. Irritant smoke did not detect 40 percent of respirators with leaking exhalation valves. Sixty percent of the subjects were able to detect the irritant smoke. Test sensitivity was 60 percent, well below the recommended 95 percent criterion. Of the 12 subjects that detected irritant smoke, none detected the smoke in less than a minute; the average detection time was 3 min 5 s. Some subjects were able to suppress the cough reflex. These findings suggest that qualitative fit-testing using irritant smoke with a 200 ml/min continuous flow pump does not have adequate sensitivity to detect fit factors less than 100. PMID:12909538

  3. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Mohammed; McCallum, Richard W

    2013-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based therapies for IBS. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic that demonstrates no clinically relevant bacterial resistance. Some studies have demonstrated the efficacy and durable improvement of IBS symptoms after treatment with rifaximin. In this review we explore the current data showing the association of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and IBS as well as review the available data on the clinical use of rifaximin in the treatment of SIBO in patients with IBS. PMID:23556126

  4. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based therapies for IBS. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic that demonstrates no clinically relevant bacterial resistance. Some studies have demonstrated the efficacy and durable improvement of IBS symptoms after treatment with rifaximin. In this review we explore the current data showing the association of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and IBS as well as review the available data on the clinical use of rifaximin in the treatment of SIBO in patients with IBS. PMID:23556126

  5. Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bye, William; Ishaq, Naveed; Bolin, Terry D; Duncombe, Vic M; Riordan, Stephen M

    2014-03-14

    Culture-independent molecular techniques have demonstrated that the majority of the gut microbiota is uncultivable. Application of these molecular techniques to more accurately identify the indigenous gut microbiome has moved with great pace over recent years, leading to a substantial increase in understanding of gut microbial communities in both health and a number of disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Use of culture-independent molecular techniques already employed to characterise faecal and, to a lesser extent, colonic mucosal microbial populations in IBS, without reliance on insensitive, traditional microbiological culture techniques, has the potential to more accurately determine microbial composition in the small intestine of patients with this disorder, at least that occurring proximally and within reach of sampling. Current data concerning culture-based and culture-independent analyses of the small intestinal microbiome in IBS are considered here. PMID:24627582

  6. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome; gut microbiota and probiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Tojo González, Rafael; Suarez Gonzalez, Adolfo; Rúas Madiedo, Patricia; Mancebo Mata, Alejo; Pipa Muñiz, María; Barreiro Alonso, Eva; Roman Llorente, Francisco Javier; Moro Villar, María Carmen; Arce González, Marta María; Villegas Diaz, María Francisca; Mosquera Sierra, Eugenia; Ruiz Ruiz, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. This common disorder is managed by varying clinical styles as no dominant therapeutic strategy has emerged. The pathophysiology of IBS remains unknown, but several lines of evidence link this disorder with the gut microbiota. Although controversy exists, gut microbiota is likely contributing to symptoms of IBS, at least in some patients, through an altered fermentation process, an impaired intestinal barrier function, a harmful modulation of enteric sensorimotor function, a promotion of low-grade inflammation without tissue damage, and a harmful modulation of the brain-gut axis. Probiotic therapy has a modest effect on IBS symptomatic relief, but the actual evidence is not strong enough to support a general recommendation of use. The best results are achieved, in children, with Lactobacillus rhamnusus GG, which moderately improves abdominal pain, while in adults the benefit appears to be greatest employing Bifidobacterium species. PMID:25659060

  7. Clinical trials in irritable bowel syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Claire M; Mangel, Allen W

    2013-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders and it is characterized by episodes of abdominal pain and altered bowel functions. The specific bowel disturbances of diarrhea, constipation or an alternation between the two defines the IBS subtypes of diarrhea-predominant, constipation-predominant, and mixed or alternating IBS. Because of the abnormalities in bowel states associated with each IBS subtype, it is not likely that one agent would successfully treat all three subtypes. As a result, clinical trials have focused, for the most part, on one IBS subtype. Over the past 2 decades very few agents have achieved regulatory approval for the treatment of IBS. In the present article we review publications reporting on phase 2 and phase 3 studies evaluating agents to potentially be used in the treatment of patients with IBS. PMID:23130604

  8. Placebo Effect in Clinical Trial Design for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Eric; Pimentel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing efforts to improve clinical trial design in irritable bowel syndrome have been hindered by high placebo response rates and ineffective outcome measures. We assessed established strategies to minimize placebo effect as well as the various approaches to placebo effect which can affect trial design. These include genetic markers such as catechol-O-methyltransferase, opioidergic and dopaminergic neurobiologic theory, pre-cebo effect centered on expectancy theory, and side effect unblinding grounded on conditioning theory. We reviewed endpoints used in the study of IBS over the past decade including adequate relief and subjective global relief, emphasizing their weaknesses in fully evaluating the IBS condition, specifically their motility effects based on functional net value and relative benefit-harm based on dropouts due to adverse events. The focus of this review is to highlight ongoing efforts to improve clinical trial design which can lead to better outcomes in a real-world setting. PMID:24840369

  9. Symbolic dynamics of jejunal motility in the irritable bowel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wackerbauer, Renate; Schmidt, Thomas

    1999-09-01

    Different studies of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by conventional analysis of jejunal motility report conflicting results. Therefore, our aim is to quantify the jejunal contraction activity by symbolic dynamics in order to discriminate between IBS and control subjects. Contraction amplitudes during fasting motility (phase II) are analyzed for 30 IBS and 30 healthy subjects. On the basis of a particular scale-independent discretization of the contraction amplitudes with respect to the median, IBS patients are characterized by increased block entropy as well as increased mean contraction amplitude. In a further more elementary level of analysis these differences can be reduced to specific contraction patterns within the time series, namely the fact that successive large contraction amplitudes are less ordered in IBS than in controls. These significant differences in jejunal motility may point to an altered control of the gut in IBS, although further studies on a representative number of patients have to be done for a validation of these findings.

  10. Is fructose malabsorption a cause of irritable bowel syndrome?

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-09-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition that may be marked by abdominal pain, bloating, fullness, indigestion, belching, constipation and/or diarrhea. IBS symptoms can result from malabsorption of fructose. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in small quantities in fruits and some vegetables, and in much larger quantities in industrially manufactured sweets with added sugars (e.g. sucrose and high fructose corn syrup). Fructose malabsorption leads to osmotic diarrhea as well as gas and bloating due to fermentation in the colon. A low-fructose diet has been found to improve IBS symptoms in some patients. This paper discusses the prevalence of fructose malabsorption and considers fructose ingestion as a possible cause of--and fructose restriction as a possible dietary treatment for--IBS. PMID:26059250

  11. Role of environmental pollution in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marynowski, Mateusz; Likońska, Aleksandra; Zatorski, Hubert; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), with the prevalence of 10%-20 % of the population has become an emerging problem worldwide. IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS contains genetic, psychological, and immunological factors, and has not been fully elucidated; of note, recent studies also point at environmental pollution and its role in the development of functional GI diseases. In this review we focus on several environmental factors, such as bacterial contamination, air pollution, radiation and even stress as potential triggers of IBS. We discuss associated disturbances in homeostasis, such as changes in intestinal microbiome and related pathophysiological mechanisms. Based on the effect of environmental factors on the GI tract, we also propose novel targets in IBS treatment. PMID:26523104

  12. New and Investigational Agents for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Akhilesh; Camilleri, Michael; Grover, Madhusudan

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects about 15 % of the US population and results in significant morbidity and health care costs. There remains a significant unmet need for effective treatments particularly for the pain component of IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Progress made in our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms such as the role of altered bile acid metabolism, neurohormonal regulation, immune dysfunction, the epithelial barrier and secretory properties of the gut has led to advancements in therapeutic armamentarium for IBS. This review discusses the new drugs for constipation and diarrhea-predominant IBS subtypes that have been tested or have been under investigation over the last 3-4 years. Overall, there is a promising pipeline of investigational drugs for the future treatment of IBS and related FGIDs. PMID:26446557

  13. Intestinal secretory mechanisms in irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although diarrhea is the predominant bowel dysfunction in as many as one-third of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it is unclear whether there is a specific disorder of intestinal fluid or electrolyte secretion in IBS. Diarrhea is generally considered a result of accelerated colonic transit in patients with IBS. Although a primary secretory diathesis has not been well-documented in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), several mechanisms that could potentially contribute to intestinal secretion have been reported. Some of these mechanisms also influence motor and secretory dysfunctions that contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS-D. We review the evidence supporting secretion in IBS-D caused by peptides and amines produced by enteroendocrine cells or submucosal neurons, enterocyte secretory processes, and intraluminal factors (bile acids and short-chain fatty acids). Understanding these mechanisms and developing clinical methods for their identification could improve management of patients with IBS-D. PMID:25041862

  14. Low-FODMAP Diet for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Magge, Suma

    2012-01-01

    Functional bowel disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are common disorders that have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life. These disorders present major challenges to healthcare providers, as few effective medical therapies are currently available. Recently, there has been increasing interest in dietary therapies for IBS, particularly a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). Since ingestion of FODMAPs increases the delivery of readily fermentable substrates and water to the distal small intestine and colon—which results in luminal distention and gas—the reduction of FODMAPs in a patient’s diet may improve functional gastrointestinal symptoms. This paper will review the pathophysiology of IBS and the role of FODMAPs for the treatment of this condition. PMID:24672410

  15. Thermal irritation of teeth during dental treatment procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Su-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jung; Jun, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Lee, In-Bog; Cho, Byeong-Hoon; Son, Ho-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    While it is reasonably well known that certain dental procedures increase the temperature of the tooth's surface, of greater interest is their potential damaging effect on the pulp and tooth-supporting tissues. Previous studies have investigated the responses of the pulp, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone to thermal irritation and the temperature at which thermal damage is initiated. There are also many in vitro studies that have measured the temperature increase of the pulp and tooth-supporting tissues during restorative and endodontic procedures. This review article provides an overview of studies measuring temperature increases in tooth structures during several restorative and endodontic procedures, and proposes clinical guidelines for reducing potential thermal hazards to the pulp and supporting tissues. PMID:24010075

  16. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Global Challenge Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sarah Rauf; Abdelaal, Ahmed M; Janjua, Zaynab A; Alasmari, Hajar A; Obad, Adam S; Alamodi, Abdulhadi

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been identified as one of the more highly prevalent and costly gastrointestinal disorders. Despite its uncertain etiology, risk factors, such as stress and academic load, are well correlated with the prevalence of the disease. Being in one of the most stressful and challenging environments, medical students are predisposed to have high rates of IBS. The socioeconomic burden of the disease on its sufferers is devastating as their quality of life is reduced, mandating additional health care precautions. The aim of this article, therefore, is to review the current literature about IBS among medical students, its prevalence, associated risk factors, and diagnostic criteria. Additionally, different solutions and management options are recommended to control the disease.  PMID:27625907

  17. Inflammation in irritable bowel syndrome: Myth or new treatment target?

    PubMed Central

    Sinagra, Emanuele; Pompei, Giancarlo; Tomasello, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Amvrosiadis, Georgios; Rossi, Francesca; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Rizzo, Aroldo Gabriele; Raimondo, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade intestinal inflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and this role is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this review was to summarize the evidence on the spectrum of mucosal inflammation in IBS, highlighting the relationship of this inflammation to the pathophysiology of IBS and its connection to clinical practice. We carried out a bibliographic search in Medline and the Cochrane Library for the period of January 1966 to December 2014, focusing on publications describing an interaction between inflammation and IBS. Several evidences demonstrate microscopic and molecular abnormalities in IBS patients. Understanding the mechanisms underlying low-grade inflammation in IBS may help to design clinical trials to test the efficacy and safety of drugs that target this pathophysiologic mechanism. PMID:26900287

  18. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Mikhail; Castillo, Carlos Cuellar; Barber, Melissa S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be comorbidities that are difficult to treat. In this patient, an evidence-informed treatment pathway guided by laboratory biomarkers was used to address both conditions. Case Presentation A 69-y-old female patient presented with a 50-y history of sinusitis that was worse in the winter, postnasal drip, frequent sore throats, gastrointestinal complaints, headaches, and yeast infections. Two sinus surgeries (in years 2000 and 2002) and multiple courses of antibiotics had not resolved her sinus symptoms. In addition to CRS and IBS, this patient was noted to have intestinal overgrowth of Candida albicans, multiple food sensitivities, and leaky gut syndrome. Conclusion Antifungal medication and dietary changes in the course of 8 mo resulted in the resolution of her CRS and IBS. PMID:27547167

  19. Recent advances in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The symptom-based diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not been established in everyday clinical practice, and the diagnosis of this disorder remains one of exclusion. It has been demonstrated that the densities of duodenal chromogranin A, rectal peptide YY and somatostatin cells are good biomarkers for the diagnosis of sporadic IBS, and low-grade mucosal inflammation is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of postinfectious IBS. Genetic markers are not useful as biomarkers for IBS since the potential risk genes have yet to be validated, and the intestinal microbiota cannot be used because of the lack of an association between a specific bacterial species and IBS. Furthermore, gastrointestinal dysmotility and visceral hypersensitivity tests produce results that are too nonconsistent and noncharacteristic to be used in the diagnosis of IBS. A combination of symptom-based assessment, exclusion of overlapping gastrointestinal diseases and positive biomarkers appears to be the best way to diagnose IBS. PMID:26162959

  20. Current and Novel Therapeutic Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Management

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Andresen, Viola

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting up to 3-15% of the general population in western countries. It is characterized by unexplained abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating in association with altered bowel habits. The pathophysiology of IBS is multifactorial involving disturbances of the brain-gut-axis. The pathophysiology provides the rationale for pharmacotherapy: abnormal gastrointestinal motor functions, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial factors, autonomic dysfunction, and mucosal immune activation. Understanding the mechanisms, and their mediators or modulators including neurotransmitters and receptors have led to several therapeutic approaches including agents acting on the serotonin receptor or serotonin transporter system, antidepressants, novel selective anticholinergics, α-adrenergic agonists, opioid agents, cholecystokinin-antagonists, neurokinin-antagonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, corticotropin releasing factor antagonists, chloride-channel activators, guanylate-cyclase-c agonists, melatonin, atypical benzodiazepines, antibiotics, immune modulators and probiotics. The mechanisms and current evidence regarding efficacy of these agents are reviewed. PMID:19665953

  1. Cluster belly: a variant of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are pain disorders that possess relationships with circadian rhythms. However, they have not been compared to assess similarities that could yield pathophysiologic insights. A young male adult with periodic episodes of abdominal pain highly reminiscent of CH is described. Since childhood, he experienced severe attacks featuring excruciating, abdominal pain accompanied by prominent restlessness, lasting 30-120 minutes, occurring in the evening and in discrete 2- to 8-week periods, interspersed with remissions where typical triggers did not lead to attacks. Although all of the patient's symptoms fell within the spectrum of IBS, the semiology was highly evocative of CH, based on the attack duration, restlessness, periodicity, and selective vulnerability to particular triggers only during attack periods. A subset of patients thought to have IBS may feature similar attack profiles and could suggest the importance of the hypothalamus in its pathophysiology, akin to CH. PMID:25039367

  2. Mind/Body Psychological Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fresé, Michael P.; Rapgay, Lobsang

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the goal of treatment for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is to improve the quality of life through a reduction in symptoms. While the majority of treatment approaches involve the use of traditional medicine, more and more patients seek out a non-drug approach to managing their symptoms. Current forms of non-drug psychologic or mind/body treatment for IBS include hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, all of which have been proven efficacious in clinical trials. We propose that incorporating the constructs of mindfulness and acceptance into a mind/body psychologic treatment of IBS may be of added benefit due to the focus on changing awareness and acceptance of one's own state which is a strong component of traditional and Eastern healing philosophies. PMID:18317547

  3. [Irritable bowel syndrome: New pathophysiological hypotheses and practical issues].

    PubMed

    Duboc, H; Dior, M; Coffin, B

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, besides the fact that it still fills the gastroenterologists' offices and impairs patient's quality of life, the irritable bowel syndrome has considerably evolved on several points. The pathophysiology is now organized around a consensual hypothesis called the "brain-gut axis", which gather all the influences of peripheral factors as gut microbiota or local serotonin secretion, on the central pain perception, contributing to visceral hypersensitivity and transit modifications. About the diagnosis, the key message is "avoid over-prescription" of additional tests, and reminds that a positive clinical diagnosis based on Rome III criteria is possible after the elimination of simple clinical warning signs. Finally, the food component, a neglected and historical claim of patients, finally finds a strong scientific rational, with a diet low in fermentable sugar and polyols, that gives positive and reproducible results. PMID:26872433

  4. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Global Challenge Among Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sarah Rauf; Abdelaal, Ahmed M; Janjua, Zaynab A; Alasmari, Hajar A; Obad, Adam S; Alamodi, Abdulhadi; Shareef, Mohammad Abrar

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been identified as one of the more highly prevalent and costly gastrointestinal disorders. Despite its uncertain etiology, risk factors, such as stress and academic load, are well correlated with the prevalence of the disease. Being in one of the most stressful and challenging environments, medical students are predisposed to have high rates of IBS. The socioeconomic burden of the disease on its sufferers is devastating as their quality of life is reduced, mandating additional health care precautions. The aim of this article, therefore, is to review the current literature about IBS among medical students, its prevalence, associated risk factors, and diagnostic criteria. Additionally, different solutions and management options are recommended to control the disease. PMID:27625907

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: Relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of “interface disorders” to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders.

    PubMed

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-05-28

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of "interface disorders" to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  7. Irritation fibroma removal: a comparison of two laser wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Walinski, Christopher J

    2004-01-01

    Laser wavelengths are available that offer dentists treatment options for both hard and soft oral tissues. This article discusses the benefits of removing hypertrophic soft tissue by using an all-tissue laser. A clinical case is presented involving the use of both an 810 nm diode laser and a 2,780 nm Er,Cr:YSGG laser to remove two irritation fibromas, both located on the left cheek of the same patient. This unique perspective was ideal for comparing the healing of each wound. The Er,Cr:YSGG appeared to have a less traumatic effect on target tissue and offered improved postoperative healing, faster recovery time, and less trauma than traditional surgical modalities. PMID:15206255

  8. Quality of life measures in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Reuben K M; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with significant morbidity, resulting from the interaction of physiologic, psychological, social, cultural and behavioral factors. In view of this complex interaction, and in the absence of a measurable biological index of disease, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as an ideal measure for use in clinical trials and outcome studies. This article discusses the relevance of HRQoL measurement in IBS and its definition. It then explores the research methodology in HRQoL and describes how global measures and generic HRQoL instruments have been used in IBS. Finally, the IBS-specific HRQoL measures are described in detail, with an emphasis on their development, content and validation. PMID:20528115

  9. Dicationic Alkylammonium Bromide Gemini Surfactants. Membrane Perturbation and Skin Irritation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, João A. S.; Faneca, Henrique; Carvalho, Rui A.; Marques, Eduardo F.; Pais, Alberto A. C. C.

    2011-01-01

    Dicationic alkylammonium bromide gemini surfactants represent a class of amphiphiles potentially effective as skin permeation enhancers. However, only a limited number of studies has been dedicated to the evaluation of the respective cytotoxicity, and none directed to skin irritation endpoints. Supported on a cell viability study, the cytotoxicity of gemini surfactants of variable tail and spacer length was assessed. For this purpose, keratinocyte cells from human skin (NCTC 2544 cell line), frequently used as a model for skin irritation, were employed. The impact of the different gemini surfactants on the permeability and morphology of model vesicles was additionally investigated by measuring the leakage of calcein fluorescent dye and analyzing the NMR spectra of 31P, respectively. Detail on the interaction of gemini molecules with model membranes was also provided by a systematic differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. An irreversible impact on the viability of the NCTC 2544 cell line was observed for gemini concentrations higher than 25 mM, while no cytotoxicity was found for any of the surfactants in a concentration range up to 10 mM. A higher cytotoxicity was also found for gemini surfactants presenting longer spacer and shorter tails. The same trend was obtained in the calorimetric and permeability studies, with the gemini of longest spacer promoting the highest degree of membrane destabilization. Additional structural and dynamical characterization of the various systems, obtained by 31P NMR and MD, provide some insight on the relationship between the architecture of gemini surfactants and the respective perturbation mechanism. PMID:22102870

  10. A Network Meta-Analysis of the Relative Efficacy of Treatments for Actinic Keratosis of the Face or Scalp in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Vegter, Stefan; Tolley, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background Several treatments are available for actinic keratosis (AK) on the face and scalp. Most treatment modalities were compared to placebo and therefore little is known on their relative efficacy. Objectives To compare the different treatments for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp available in clinical practice in Europe. Methods A network meta-analysis (NMA) was performed on the outcome “complete patient clearance”. Ten treatment modalities were included: two 5-aminolaevulinic acid photodynamic therapies (ALA-PDT), applied as gel (BF-200 ALA) or patch; methyl-aminolevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT); three modalities with imiquimod (IMI), applied as a 4-week or 16-week course with 5% imiquimod, or a 2–3 week course with 3.75% imiquimod; cryotherapy; diclofenac 3% in 2.5% hyaluronic acid; 0.5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); and ingenol mebutate (IMB). The only data available for 5% 5-FU was from one small study and was determined to be too limited to be reliably included in the analysis. For BF-200 ALA and MAL-PDT, data from illumination with narrow-band lights were selected as these are typically used in clinical practice. The NMA was performed with a random-effects Bayesian model. Results 25 trials on 5,562 patients were included in the NMA. All active treatments were significantly better than placebo. BF-200 ALA showed the highest efficacy compared to placebo to achieve total patient clearance. BF-200 ALA had the highest probability to be the best treatment and the highest SUCRA score (64.8% and 92.1%), followed by IMI 5% 4 weeks (10.1% and 74.2%) and 5-FU 0.5% (7.2% and 66.8%). Conclusions This NMA showed that BF-200 ALA, using narrow-band lights, was the most efficacious treatment for mild to moderate AK on the face and scalp. This analysis is relevant for clinical decision making and health technology assessment, assisting the improved management of AK. PMID:24892649

  11. Evaluation of TOPKAT, Toxtree, and Derek Nexus in Silico Models for Ocular Irritation and Development of a Knowledge-Based Framework To Improve the Prediction of Severe Irritation.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Wilson, Daniel M; Parks, Amanda K; Carney, Edward W; Spencer, Pamela J

    2016-05-16

    Assessment of ocular irritation is an essential component of any risk assessment. A number of (Q)SARs and expert systems have been developed and are described in the literature. Here, we focus on three in silico models (TOPKAT, BfR rulebase implemented in Toxtree, and Derek Nexus) and evaluate their performance using 1644 in-house and 123 European Centre for Toxicology and Ecotoxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) compounds with existing in vivo ocular irritation classification data. Overall, the in silico models performed poorly. The best consensus predictions of severe ocular irritants were 52 and 65% for the in-house and ECETOC compounds, respectively. The prediction performance was improved by designing a knowledge-based chemical profiling framework that incorporated physicochemical properties and electrophilic reactivity mechanisms. The utility of the framework was assessed by applying it to the same test sets and three additional publicly available in vitro irritation data sets. The prediction of severe ocular irritants was improved to 73-77% if compounds were filtered on the basis of AlogP_MR (hydrophobicity with molar refractivity). The predictivity increased to 74-80% for compounds capable of preferentially undergoing hard electrophilic reactions, such as Schiff base formation and acylation. This research highlights the need for reliable ocular irritation models to be developed that take into account mechanisms of action and individual structural classes. It also demonstrates the value of profiling compounds with respect to their chemical reactivity and physicochemical properties that, in combination with existing models, results in better predictions for severe irritants. PMID:27018716

  12. Inhibition of irritation and contact hypersensitivity by phenoxyacetic acid methyl ester in mice.

    PubMed

    Wille, J J; Kydonieus, A; Kalish, R S

    2000-01-01

    New anti-irritant treatments are required to prevent irritation and sensitization reactions to consumer medicines and dermatological drugs. We report here that phenoxyacetic acid methyl ester (PAME) is an effective agent to prevent and treat irritant and allergic contact dermatitis. Balb/c mice skin-treated with 1% PAME do not lose weight relative to vehicle-treated mice, nor is it irritating to mouse skin. Topical PAME prevents skin irritation to a wide variety of irritants including: arachidonic acid, capsaicin, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), disodium laureth sulfosuccinate and tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Histological studies showed that 1% PAME greatly diminished dermal neutrophilic infiltration and dermal capillary vessel dilation, and prevented epidermal hyperproliferation and hyperkeratosis that accompanies detergent (SLS)-induced skin irritation. Topical PAME inhibited ear swelling following ear challenge during the elicitation phase of contact hypersensitivity in mice sensitized with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), oxazolone and the hair coloring dye rho-phenylenediamine (PPD). Finally, topical administration of 1% PAME prior to PPD or DNCB sensitization prevented the induction phase of contact hypersensitivity. These results indicate that PAME represents a potential new category of potent topical anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:10754454

  13. The role of dermal irritation in the skin tumor promoting activity of petroleum middle distillates.

    PubMed

    Nessel, C S; Freeman, J J; Forgash, R C; McKee, R H

    1999-05-01

    Petroleum middle distillates (PMDs), a class of hydrocarbons which boil between 350-700 degrees F, are tumor promoters in mouse skin. The promotional activity is produced under conditions that also result in local changes, including chronic irritation and epidermal hyperplasia. The present study was conducted by comparing equal weekly doses of irritating and minimally or nonirritating test materials, to assess whether tumor promotion was a secondary response to these effects. Four PMDs, C10-C14 normal paraffins (NP), lightly refined paraffinic oil (LRPO), Jet Fuel A (JF), and steam-cracked gas oil (SCGO), were evaluated. Test materials were applied undiluted (2x/week) or as 28.6% (7x/week) or 50% (4x/week) concentrations in mineral oil for 52 weeks following initiation with dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA). When applied undiluted, all materials produced moderate irritation and significant increase in tumor incidence. When NP, LRPO, or JF were applied in mineral oil diluent, skin irritation was generally ameliorated and few, if any, tumors were produced. SCGO was irritating and produced a significant increase in tumor frequency when administered in mineral-oil diluent. These data indicate that the promotional activity of straight-run PMDs is likely related to chronic irritation at the application site and not to dose. Thus, when used appropriately in the absence of prolonged irritation, these materials should not present a tumorigenic hazard to humans. PMID:10367341

  14. The use of nanoencapsulation to decrease human skin irritation caused by capsaicinoids

    PubMed Central

    Contri, Renata V; Frank, Luiza A; Kaiser, Moacir; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, a topical analgesic used in the treatment of chronic pain, has irritant properties that frequently interrupt its use. In this work, the effect of nanoencapsulation of the main capsaicinoids (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin) on skin irritation was tested in humans. Skin tolerance of a novel vehicle composed of chitosan hydrogel containing nonloaded nanocapsules (CH-NC) was also evaluated. The chitosan hydrogel containing nanoencapsulated capsaicinoids (CH-NC-CP) did not cause skin irritation, as measured by an erythema probe and on a visual scale, while a formulation containing free capsaicinoids (chitosan gel with hydroalcoholic solution [CH-ET-CP]) and a commercially available capsaicinoids formulation caused skin irritation. Thirty-one percent of volunteers reported slight irritation one hour after application of CH-NC-CP, while moderate (46% [CH-ET-CP] and 23% [commercial product]) and severe (8% [CH-ET-CP] and 69% [commercial product]) irritation were described for the formulations containing free capsaicinoids. When CH-NC was applied to the skin, erythema was not observed and only 8% of volunteers felt slight irritation, which demonstrates the utility of the novel vehicle. A complementary in vitro skin permeation study showed that permeation of capsaicinoids through an epidermal human membrane was reduced but not prevented by nanoencapsulation. PMID:24611011

  15. Constructing Human Skin Equivalents on Porcine Acellular Peritoneum Extracellular Matrix for In Vitro Irritation Testing.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Chin; Zhang, Zheng; Florek, Charles; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2016-01-01

    The irritancy of topical products has to be investigated to ensure the safety and compliance. Although several reconstructed human epidermal models have been adopted by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to replace in vivo animal irritation testing, these models are based on a single cell type and lack dermal components, which may be insufficient to reflect all of the components of irritation. In our study, we investigated the use of acellular porcine peritoneum extracellular matrix as a substrate to construct full-thickness human skin equivalents (HSEs) for use as irritation screening tool. The acellular peritoneum matrix (APM) exhibited excellent skin cell attachment (>80%) and proliferation for human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). APM-HSEs based on coculture of HDF and HaCaT were prepared. Increased HDF seeding density up to 5 × 10(4)/cm(2) resulted in APM-HSEs with a thicker and more organized epidermis. The epidermis of APM-HSEs expressed keratin 15, a keratinocyte proliferation marker, and involucrin, a differentiation marker, respectively. To assess the use of APM-HSEs for irritation testing, six proficiency chemicals, including three nonirritants (phosphate-buffered saline, polyethylene glycol 400, and isopropanol) and three irritants (1-bromohexane, heptanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate) were applied. The APM-HSEs were able to discriminate nonirritants from irritants based on the viability. Levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in these treatment groups further assisted the irritancy ranking. In conclusion, we have developed partially differentiated full-thickness APM-HSEs based on acellular porcine peritoneum matrix, and these APM-HSEs demonstrated utility as an in vitro irritation screening tool. PMID:26415037

  16. Menthol attenuates respiratory irritation and elevates blood cotinine in cigarette smoke exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Michael A; Smith, Gregory J; Cichocki, Joseph A; Fan, Lu; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Caceres, Ana I; Jordt, Sven Eric; Morris, John B

    2015-01-01

    Addition of menthol to cigarettes may be associated with increased initiation of smoking. The potential mechanisms underlying this association are not known. Menthol, likely due to its effects on cold-sensing peripheral sensory neurons, is known to inhibit the sensation of irritation elicited by respiratory irritants. However, it remains unclear whether menthol modulates cigarette smoke irritancy and nicotine absorption during initial exposures to cigarettes, thereby facilitating smoking initiation. Using plethysmography in a C57Bl/6J mouse model, we examined the effects of L-menthol, the menthol isomer added to cigarettes, on the respiratory sensory irritation response to primary smoke irritants (acrolein and cyclohexanone) and smoke of Kentucky reference 2R4 cigarettes. We also studied L-menthol's effect on blood levels of the nicotine metabolite, cotinine, immediately after exposure to cigarette smoke. L-menthol suppressed the irritation response to acrolein with an apparent IC₅₀ of 4 ppm. Suppression was observed even at acrolein levels well above those necessary to produce a maximal response. Cigarette smoke, at exposure levels of 10 mg/m³ or higher, caused an immediate and marked sensory irritation response in mice. This response was significantly suppressed by L-menthol even at smoke concentrations as high as 300 mg/m³. Counterirritation by L-menthol was abolished by treatment with a selective inhibitor of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), the neuronal cold/menthol receptor. Inclusion of menthol in the cigarette smoke resulted in roughly a 1.5-fold increase in plasma cotinine levels over those observed in mice exposed to smoke without added menthol. These findings document that, L-menthol, through TRPM8, is a strong suppressor of respiratory irritation responses, even during highly noxious exposures to cigarette smoke or smoke irritants, and increases blood cotinine. Therefore, L-menthol, as a cigarette additive, may promote smoking

  17. Menthol Attenuates Respiratory Irritation and Elevates Blood Cotinine in Cigarette Smoke Exposed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Michael A.; Smith, Gregory J.; Cichocki, Joseph A.; Fan, Lu; Liu, Yi-Shiuan; Caceres, Ana I.; Jordt, Sven Eric; Morris, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of menthol to cigarettes may be associated with increased initiation of smoking. The potential mechanisms underlying this association are not known. Menthol, likely due to its effects on cold-sensing peripheral sensory neurons, is known to inhibit the sensation of irritation elicited by respiratory irritants. However, it remains unclear whether menthol modulates cigarette smoke irritancy and nicotine absorption during initial exposures to cigarettes, thereby facilitating smoking initiation. Using plethysmography in a C57Bl/6J mouse model, we examined the effects of L-menthol, the menthol isomer added to cigarettes, on the respiratory sensory irritation response to primary smoke irritants (acrolein and cyclohexanone) and smoke of Kentucky reference 2R4 cigarettes. We also studied L-menthol’s effect on blood levels of the nicotine metabolite, cotinine, immediately after exposure to cigarette smoke. L-menthol suppressed the irritation response to acrolein with an apparent IC₅₀ of 4 ppm. Suppression was observed even at acrolein levels well above those necessary to produce a maximal response. Cigarette smoke, at exposure levels of 10 mg/m³ or higher, caused an immediate and marked sensory irritation response in mice. This response was significantly suppressed by L-menthol even at smoke concentrations as high as 300 mg/m³. Counterirritation by L-menthol was abolished by treatment with a selective inhibitor of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8), the neuronal cold/menthol receptor. Inclusion of menthol in the cigarette smoke resulted in roughly a 1.5-fold increase in plasma cotinine levels over those observed in mice exposed to smoke without added menthol. These findings document that, L-menthol, through TRPM8, is a strong suppressor of respiratory irritation responses, even during highly noxious exposures to cigarette smoke or smoke irritants, and increases blood cotinine. Therefore, L-menthol, as a cigarette additive, may promote smoking

  18. Rat epidermal keratinocyte organotypic culture (ROC) as a model for chemically induced skin irritation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pappinen, Sari . E-mail: sari.pappinen@uku.fi; Pasonen-Seppaenen, Sanna; Suhonen, Marjukka; Tammi, Raija; Urtti, Arto

    2005-11-01

    The potential of rat epidermal keratinocyte (REK) organotypic culture (ROC) with proper stratum corneum barrier as a model for screening skin irritants was evaluated. The test chemicals were selected from ECETOC database (1995) and the observed in vitro irritation potential was compared to ECETOC in vivo primary irritation index (PII), to EU risk phrases, and to the harmonized OECD criteria. Chemicals were applied onto the stratum corneum surface of ROC for 30 min and samples were taken from the underlying medium at 4 and 8 h after exposure. Cell membrane integrity (determined by LDH assay) and pro-inflammatory effect (determined by IL-1{alpha} release) were verified at both time points and correlated to PII values. The best correlation (R {sup 2} = 0.831) was seen with LDH leakage test. Based on obtained data, chemicals were classified according to criteria defined by EU and OECD. From 12 chemicals, only two were incorrectly classified according to OECD criteria when using LDH leakage and IL-1{alpha} release as irritation markers. At the end of experiment, chemical-treated ROC cultures were fixed and histological changes were assessed. Typical signs for irritation were lightly stained cytoplasm, condensed nuclei, cellular vacuolization, eosinophilic cytoplasms, and blebbing. These irritation effects of chemicals were graded visually into four classes (A-D). The extent of morphological perturbations of the cultures mostly correlated with PII. The present results indicate the validity of the ROC model in predicting skin irritation potential of chemicals and show that the use of set of irritation markers with different mechanistic responses gives more information on irritation than if only one marker was used.

  19. Occupational airways diseases from chronic low-level exposures to irritants.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R

    2002-12-01

    Short-term, high-level exposures to dusts, gases, mists, fumes, and smoke that are irritating to the respiratory tract are capable of inducing asthma, the so-called reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Such exposures, however, do not occur frequently; chronic or recurrent exposures to lower levels of irritants are much more common. This article reviews the evidence that supports the concept that low-level exposures to respiratory tract irritants can contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. PMID:12512162

  20. Formation of strong airway irritants in mixtures of isoprene/ozone and isoprene/ozone/nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, C K; Clausen, P A; Wolkoff, P; Larsen, S T; Hammer, M; Larsen, K; Hansen, V; Nielsen, G D

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the airway irritation of isoprene, isoprene/ozone, and isoprene/ozone/nitrogen dioxide mixtures using a mouse bioassay, from which we calculated sensory irritation, bronchial constriction, and pulmonary irritation. We observed significant sensory irritation (approximately 50% reduction of mean respiratory rate) by dynamically exposing the mice, over 30 min, to mixtures of isoprene and O3 or isoprene, O3, and NO2. The starting concentrations were approximately 4 ppm O3 and 500 ppm isoprene (+ approximately 4 ppm NO2. The reaction mixtures after approximately 30 sec contained < 0.2 ppm O3. Addition of the effects of the residual reactants and the identified stable irritant products (formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methacrolein, and methylvinyl ketone) could explain only partially the observed sensory irritation. This suggests that one or more strong airway irritants were formed. It is thus possible that oxidation reactions of common unsaturated compounds may be relevant for indoor air quality. PMID:11673123

  1. Respiratory and eye irritation from boron oxide and boric acid dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Garabrant, D.H.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Smith, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    Boron oxide has been shown in animals to irritate the respiratory mucosa and conjuctiva. The present study was undertaken to determine whether exposures to boron oxide and its hydration product, boric acid, cau

  2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Approaches for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: What the Science Says Share: July 2015 © Tom Le Goff/Digital ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  3. Irritant contact dermatitis complicated by deep-seated staphylococcal infection caused by a hair relaxer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Birinder J; Singh, Harmeet; Lin-Greenberg, Alan

    2002-02-01

    Chemical hair relaxers are used by many women to straighten their hair. We describe a case of a deep soft tissue staphylococcal abscess that complicated an irritant contact dermatitis from a hair relaxer treatment. PMID:11853045

  4. Irritant contact dermatitis complicated by deep-seated staphylococcal infection caused by a hair relaxer.

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Birinder J.; Singh, Harmeet; Lin-Greenberg, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Chemical hair relaxers are used by many women to straighten their hair. We describe a case of a deep soft tissue staphylococcal abscess that complicated an irritant contact dermatitis from a hair relaxer treatment. PMID:11853045

  5. Building a Definition of Irritability From Academic Definitions and Lay Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Barata, Paula C.; Holtzman, Susan; Cunningham, Shannon; O’Connor, Brian P.; Stewart, Donna E.

    2016-01-01

    The current work builds a definition of irritability from both academic definitions and lay perspectives. In Study 1, a quantitative content analysis of academic definitions resulted in eight main content categories (i.e., behaviour, emotion or affect, cognition, physiological, qualifiers, irritant, stability or endurance, and other). In Study 2, a community sample of 39 adults participated in qualitative interviews. A deductive thematic analysis resulted in two main themes. The first main theme dealt with how participants positioned irritability in relation to other negative states. The second dealt with how participants constructed irritability as both a loss of control and as an experience that should be controlled. The discussion integrates the findings of both studies and provides a concise, but comprehensive definition. PMID:27134650

  6. Airborne irritant contact dermatitis and conjunctivitis after occupational exposure to chlorothalonil in textiles.

    PubMed

    Lensen, Gerda; Jungbauer, Frank; Gonçalo, Margarida; Coenraads, Pieter Jan

    2007-09-01

    Chlorothalonil (tetrachloro-1,3-benzenedicarbonitrile, CAS 1897-45-6) is a pesticide that has been on the market for many years. It is used as a fungicide in agriculture, horticulture, and floriculture; as a wood preservative; and in paint. We report an epidemic of airborne irritant contact dermatitis, conjunctivitis, and upper airway complaints among seamstresses in a Portuguese trailer tent factory, which we attribute to chlorothalonil. All exposed workers had work-related skin symptoms. After patch testing, we showed that none of these were of allergic origin. Instead of allergic reactions, we noticed a delayed type of irritation after 72 hr to chlorothalonil and to the textile extracts containing high concentrations of chlorothalonil. Although allergic and irritant contact dermatitis from chlorothalonil has been described before, this is, as far as we know, the first time that a delayed type of dermatitis, conjunctivitis, and upper airway irritation after exposure to chlorothalonil in tent-cloth is described. PMID:17680869

  7. Workplace irritant exposures: do they produce true occupational asthma?

    PubMed

    Banks, D E

    2001-04-01

    The recognition that irritant exposures can cause asthma is not new. Many investigators turn towards the gassings of soldiers in World War I as the first examples of this, while Brooks, in 1985, reported this in detail in workers and called it 'Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS)'. There is considerable overlap with RADS and occupational asthma as both share respiratory symptoms which can be described as 'asthmatic', yet RADS is the result of an acute excessive exposure, while occupational asthma occurs due to a series of sensitizing exposures. Yet, a clear understanding of RADS has been limited by the lack of epidemiologic studies; rather the disease has been described by case series. This report contrasts RADS and occupational asthma and finds that although there may be some difference in lung pathology, reports for the past years since Brooks' initial reports have shown that the line separating occupational asthma and RADS has become increasingly blurred, rather than increasingly distinct, with considerable overlap in the clinical symptoms with the perspective that these described entities are a part of a continuum. Perhaps the development of animal models for RADS may hasten further understanding. PMID:11964685

  8. Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Mento, Carmela; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2016-01-01

    The review focuses on those personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), constructs (alexithymia and distressed - Type D personality) and emotional patterns (negative and positive) that are of particular concern in health psychology, with the aim to highlight their potential role on the pathogenesis, onset, symptom clusters, clinical course, and outcome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Personality traits and emotional patterns play key roles in affecting autonomic, immune, inflammatory, and endocrine functions, thus contributing not only to IBS clinical expression and symptomatic burden, but also to disease physiopathology. In this sense, psychological treatments should address those personality traits and emotional features that are constitutive of, and integral to IBS. The biopsychosocial model of illness applied to IBS acknowledges the interaction between biological, psychological, environmental, and social factors in relation to pain and functional disability. A holistic approach to IBS should take into account the heterogeneous nature of the disorder, and differentiate treatments for different types of IBS, also considering the marked individual differences in prevalent personality traits and emotional patterns. Beyond medications, and lifestyle/dietary interventions, psychological and educational treatments may provide the optimal chance of addressing clinical symptoms, comorbid conditions, and quality of life in IBS patients. PMID:27605876

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation: Fact and fiction

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; De Bortoli, Nicola; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Stasi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC) are the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. According to the Rome III Criteria these two disorders should be theoretically separated mainly by the presence of abdominal pain or discomfort relieved by defecation (typical of IBS) and they should be mutually exclusive. However, many gastroenterologists have serious doubts as regards a clear separation. Both IBS-C and FC, often associated with many other functional digestive and non digestive disorders, are responsible for a low quality of life. The impact of the media on patients’ perception of these topics is sometimes disruptive, often suggesting a distorted view of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy. These messages frequently overlap with previous subjective opinions and are further processed on the basis of the different culture and the previous experience of the constipated patients, often producing odd, useless or even dangerous behaviors. The aim of this review was to analyze the most common patients’ beliefs about IBS-C and CC, helping physicians to understand where they should focus their attention when communicating with patients, detecting false opinions and misconceptions and correcting them on the basis of scientific evidence. PMID:26523103

  10. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Stensvold, C. Rune; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The role of Dientamoeba fragilis in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is incompletely known. We aimed to investigate whether eradication of D. fragilis alleviates symptoms in IBS. Twenty-five D. fragilis-positive IBS patients were treated with Metronidazole (MZ) or Tetracycline. The patients were mostly female (89%), and mean age (SD) was 35.1 (8.2) years. Microbiological response, evaluated 2 weeks post-treatment, was observed in 15 of 25 patients (60%), all by MZ. Clinical response, defined as adequate relief of symptoms, was observed in 7 of 22 patients (32%), all by MZ. In a logistic regression analysis, we found no significant association between clinical and microbiological response. This case study did not support our hypothesis of a simple association between D. fragilis and IBS. Some D. fragilis-infections were insufficiently treated by MZ. Further studies into the prevalence and effect of eradication of D. fragilis in IBS and into efficient treatments of D. fragilis are warranted. PMID:23091195

  11. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients' diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome: a microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-10-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  13. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. PMID:25083061

  14. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: beyond fiber and antispasmodic agents

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Anita; Ford, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. The diagnosis of IBS is made clinically, using symptom-based criteria such as the Manning or Rome criteria. Medical therapy for this condition has traditionally been directed towards symptom relief, using fiber or antispasmodic agents. In recent years, emerging data have confirmed the efficacy of antidepressants, psychological therapies, 5-HT3 antagonists, 5-HT4 agonists, and probiotics in the short-term treatment of IBS, although whether these therapies influence the long-term course of the disease is unknown. Increasing knowledge regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying IBS has resulted in a number of novel molecular treatments, which show promise. These include therapies targeting gastrointestinal mucosal chloride channels and guanylate cyclase-C receptors, as well as highly selective agents influencing serotonergic transmission that, at the time of writing, do not appear to have any severe deleterious effects. In this article we provide a summary of current and emerging therapies in this field. PMID:21694813

  15. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder that reduces patients’ quality of life. It is a chronic disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered defecation in the absence of identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities. IBS imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. Alteration in neurohumoral mechanisms and psychological factors, bacterial overgrowth, genetic factors, gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and immune system factors are currently believed to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. It is possible that there is an interaction of one or more of these etiologic factors leading to heterogeneous symptoms of IBS. IBS treatment is predicated upon the patient’s most bothersome symptoms. Despite the wide range of medications and the high prevalence of the disease, to date no completely effective remedy is available. This article reviews the literature from January 2008 to July 2013 on the subject of IBS peripherally acting pharmacological treatment. Drugs are categorized according to their administration for IBS-C, IBS-D or abdominal pain predominant IBS. PMID:25083060

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation: Fact and fiction.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; De Bortoli, Nicola; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Stasi, Cristina

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC) are the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. According to the Rome III Criteria these two disorders should be theoretically separated mainly by the presence of abdominal pain or discomfort relieved by defecation (typical of IBS) and they should be mutually exclusive. However, many gastroenterologists have serious doubts as regards a clear separation. Both IBS-C and FC, often associated with many other functional digestive and non digestive disorders, are responsible for a low quality of life. The impact of the media on patients' perception of these topics is sometimes disruptive, often suggesting a distorted view of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy. These messages frequently overlap with previous subjective opinions and are further processed on the basis of the different culture and the previous experience of the constipated patients, often producing odd, useless or even dangerous behaviors. The aim of this review was to analyze the most common patients' beliefs about IBS-C and CC, helping physicians to understand where they should focus their attention when communicating with patients, detecting false opinions and misconceptions and correcting them on the basis of scientific evidence. PMID:26523103

  17. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  18. Optimal management of constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Revelli, Matteo; Marabotto, Elisa; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Del Nero, Lorenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Giannini, Edoardo G; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, meanly characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit. It is a complex disorder involving biological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. The diagnosis is achieved according to the Rome III criteria provided that organic causes have been excluded. Although IBS does not constitute a life-threatening condition, it has a remarkable prevalence and profoundly reduces the quality of life with burdening socioeconomic costs. One of the principal concerns about IBS is the lack of effective therapeutic options. Up to 40% of patients are not satisfied with any available medications, especially those suffering from chronic constipation. A correct management of IBS with constipation should evolve through a global approach focused on the patient, starting with careful history taking in order to assess the presence of organic diseases that might trigger the disorder. Therefore, the second step is to examine lifestyle, dietary habits, and psychological status. On these bases, a step-up management of disease is recommended: from fiber and bulking agents, to osmotic laxative drugs, to new molecules like lubiprostone and linaclotide. Although new promising tools for relief of bowel-movement-related symptoms are being discovered, a dedicated doctor-patient relationship still seems to be the key for success. PMID:26028974

  19. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 1014 cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. PMID:25083061

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: A microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  1. Gut microbiota role in irritable bowel syndrome: New therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Distrutti, Eleonora; Monaldi, Lorenzo; Ricci, Patrizia; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade the impressive expansion of our knowledge of the vast microbial community that resides in the human intestine, the gut microbiota, has provided support to the concept that a disturbed intestinal ecology might promote development and maintenance of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a correlate, manipulation of gut microbiota represents a new strategy for the treatment of this multifactorial disease. A number of attempts have been made to modulate the gut bacterial composition, following the idea that expansion of bacterial species considered as beneficial (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) associated with the reduction of those considered harmful (Clostridium, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas) should attenuate IBS symptoms. In this conceptual framework, probiotics appear an attractive option in terms of both efficacy and safety, while prebiotics, synbiotics and antibiotics still need confirmation. Fecal transplant is an old treatment translated from the cure of intestinal infective pathologies that has recently gained a new life as therapeutic option for those patients with a disturbed gut ecosystem, but data on IBS are scanty and randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:26900286

  2. Guidelines on the irritable bowel syndrome: mechanisms and practical management

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R; Aziz, Q; Creed, F; Emmanuel, A; Houghton, L; Hungin, P; Jones, R; Kumar, D; Rubin, G; Trudgill, N; Whorwell, P

    2007-01-01

    Background IBS affects 5–11% of the population of most countries. Prevalence peaks in the third and fourth decades, with a female predominance. Aim To provide a guide for the assessment and management of adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Methods Members of the Clinical Services Committee of The British Society of Gastroenterology were allocated particular areas to produce review documents. Literature searching included systematic searches using electronic databases such as Pubmed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases and extensive personal reference databases. Results Patients can usefully be classified by predominant bowel habit. Few investigations are needed except when diarrhoea is a prominent feature. Alarm features may warrant further investigation. Adverse psychological features and somatisation are often present. Ascertaining the patients' concerns and explaining symptoms in simple terms improves outcome. IBS is a heterogeneous condition with a range of treatments, each of which benefits a small proportion of patients. Treatment of associated anxiety and depression often improves bowel and other symptoms. Randomised placebo controlled trials show benefit as follows: cognitive behavioural therapy and psychodynamic interpersonal therapy improve coping; hypnotherapy benefits global symptoms in otherwise refractory patients; antispasmodics and tricyclic antidepressants improve pain; ispaghula improves pain and bowel habit; 5‐HT3 antagonists improve global symptoms, diarrhoea, and pain but may rarely cause unexplained colitis; 5‐HT4 agonists improve global symptoms, constipation, and bloating; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors improve global symptoms. Conclusions Better ways of identifying which patients will respond to specific treatments are urgently needed. PMID:17488783

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: Physicians' awareness and patients' experience

    PubMed Central

    Olafsdottir, Linda Bjork; Gudjonsson, Hallgrímur; Jonsdottir, Heidur Hrund; Jonsson, Jon Steinar; Bjornsson, Einar; Thjodleifsson, Bjarni

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study if and how physicians use the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) diagnostic criteria and to assess treatment strategies in IBS patients. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 191 physicians regarding IBS criteria, diagnostic methods and treatment. Furthermore, 94 patients who were diagnosed with IBS underwent telephone interview. RESULTS: A total of 80/191 (41.9%) physicians responded to the survey. Overall, 13 patients were diagnosed monthly with IBS by specialists in gastroenterology (SGs) and 2.5 patients by general practitioners (GPs). All the SGs knew of the criteria to diagnose IBS, as did 46/70 (65.7%) GPs. Seventy-nine percent used the patient’s history, 38% used a physical examination, and 38% exclusion of other diseases to diagnose IBS. Only 18/80 (22.5%) physicians used specific IBS criteria. Of the patients interviewed, 59/94 (62.8%) knew they had experienced IBS. Two out of five patients knew IBS and had seen a physician because of IBS symptoms. Half of those received a diagnosis of IBS. A total of 13% were satisfied with treatment. IBS affected daily activities in 43% of cases. CONCLUSION: Half of the patients with IBS who consulted a physician received a diagnosis. Awareness and knowledge of diagnostic criteria for IBS differ between SGs and GPs. PMID:22851864

  4. Therapeutic Advances in Functional Gastrointestinal Disease: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gaman, Alexandru; Bucur, Maria Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Reported prevalence rates of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are between 8% to 20% in the US general population with an average medical expenditure of US$1.35 billion direct and US$205 million indirect costs. Current pathophysiologic theories are based on abnormalities of both the brain and gut, thus setting a new stage for current and future therapeutic approaches. There are numerous treatment options in IBS acting centrally and peripherally by influencing motility and visceral sensitivity. Clinical evidence is variable; however, newer emerging treatments are being evaluated using better-designed clinical trials. Accurate assessment of IBS drug efficacy is still hampered by heterogeneity of the IBS population. Novel methods such as pharmacogenomics or brain imaging may be helpful in the future to better understand and characterize IBS patient subtypes, and this in turn will lead to more specific and efficient therapeutic options. Patient subpopulation measurement of side effects is also a clinical challenge and further understanding could improve treatment efficacy by enhancing the patient compliance. PMID:19936327

  5. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients’ diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  6. Novel Therapies for Myocardial Irritability following Extreme Hydroxychloroquine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Paul B.; Missirlis, Perseus I.; Brar, Harry; Dhingra, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) overdose is rare and potentially deadly when consumed in large doses. Management of severe HCQ toxicity is limited and infrequently reported. This report presents the case of a massive ingestion of HCQ. Case Report. A 23-year-old female presents following an intentional ingestion of approximately 40 g of HCQ. Within six hours after ingestion, she developed severe hemodynamic instability resulting from myocardial irritability with frequent ventricular ectopic activity leading to runs of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PMVT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) requiring multiple defibrillations. Additional treatments included intravenous diazepam, epinephrine, norepinephrine, sodium bicarbonate, and magnesium sulfate. Despite the ongoing hemodynamic instability, the patient was also treated with Intralipid (ILE) and received hemodialysis. Improvements in her hemodynamics were observed after 18 hours. She survived her massive overdose of HCQ. Conclusion. HCQ poisoning is rare but serious because of its rapid progression to life-threatening symptoms. Hemodynamic support, gastric decontamination, electrolyte monitoring and replacement, and management of arrhythmias are the mainstays of treatment. The combined role of dialysis and ILE in the setting of massive HCQ overdose may improve outcomes. PMID:26351590

  7. Gut microbiota role in irritable bowel syndrome: New therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Distrutti, Eleonora; Monaldi, Lorenzo; Ricci, Patrizia; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-02-21

    In the last decade the impressive expansion of our knowledge of the vast microbial community that resides in the human intestine, the gut microbiota, has provided support to the concept that a disturbed intestinal ecology might promote development and maintenance of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a correlate, manipulation of gut microbiota represents a new strategy for the treatment of this multifactorial disease. A number of attempts have been made to modulate the gut bacterial composition, following the idea that expansion of bacterial species considered as beneficial (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) associated with the reduction of those considered harmful (Clostridium, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas) should attenuate IBS symptoms. In this conceptual framework, probiotics appear an attractive option in terms of both efficacy and safety, while prebiotics, synbiotics and antibiotics still need confirmation. Fecal transplant is an old treatment translated from the cure of intestinal infective pathologies that has recently gained a new life as therapeutic option for those patients with a disturbed gut ecosystem, but data on IBS are scanty and randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:26900286

  8. [Irritable bowel syndrome: diet and complementary medicine therapies?].

    PubMed

    Gerkens, A

    2012-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent and invalidating functional bowel disorder with entangled mechanisms. Its therapeutic approach is therefore complex. Classical therapies, prescribed alone or in combination in light of the predominant symptom, consist of antispasmodics, fibers, laxatives, antidiarrheals, and psychotropic agents. Other emerging pharmacological therapies, such as prokinetics, prosecretory or serotoninergic agents, bile acid modulators and antibiotics have been recently studied in clinical trials. Dietary measures can include reduction of short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (FODMAPs) and gluten restriction. Assessment of food allergy can be proposed in a subgroup of IBS patients. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies, that are generally low cost and safe, appear to be appreciated by patients. Probiotics have demonstrated action on the gut microbiote modulation, and may be helpful in a subset of patients. Peppermint oil has an established visceral analgesic effect. Hypnotherapy represents an original, global and effective approach. Finally, education, reassurance and listening to the patient, leading to a solid therapeutic relationship, represents an essential backdrop of remedy or diet effectiveness. PMID:23091952

  9. Genetic epidemiology and pharmacogenetics in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Katzka, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this review are twofold. Our first objective is to evaluate the evidence supporting a role for genetics in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Specific examples of the associations of genetic variation and symptoms, syndromes, and intermediate phenotypes, including neurotransmitter (serotonergic, α2-adrenergic, and cannabinoid) mechanisms, inflammatory pathways (IL-10, TNFα, GNβ3, and susceptibility loci involved in Crohn's disease), and bile acid metabolism, are explored. The second objective is to review pharmacogenetics in IBS, with the focus on cytochrome P-450 metabolism of drugs used in IBS, modulation of motor and sensory responses to serotonergic agents based on the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and 5-HT3 genetic variants, responses to a nonselective cannabinoid agonist (dronabinol) based on cannabinoid receptor (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) variation, and responses to a bile acid (sodium chenodeoxycholate) and bile acid binding (colesevelam) based on klothoβ (KLB) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) variation. Overall, there is limited evidence of a genetic association with IBS; the most frequently studied association is with 5-HTTLPR, and the most replicated association is with TNF superfamily member 15. Most of the pharmacogenetic associations are reported with intermediate phenotypes in relatively small trials, and confirmation in large clinical trials using validated clinical end points is still required. No published genome-wide association studies in functional gastrointestinal or motility disorders have been published. PMID:22403795

  10. Recent developments in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not completely known, although it has been shown that genetic/social learning factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal low-grade inflammation, and abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells play a major role. Studies of familial aggregation and on twins have confirmed the heritability of IBS. However, the proposed IBS risk genes are thus far nonvalidated hits rather than true predisposing factors. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, with the effect exerted by diet seemingly caused by intake of poorly absorbed carbohydrates and fiber. Obesity is a possible comorbidity of IBS. Differences in the microbiota between IBS patients and healthy controls have been reported, but the association between IBS symptoms and specific bacterial species is uncertain. Low-grade inflammation appears to play a role in the pathophysiology of a major subset of IBS, namely postinfectious IBS. The density of intestinal endocrine cells is reduced in patients with IBS, possibly as a result of genetic factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, and low-grade inflammation interfering with the regulatory signals controlling the intestinal stem-cell clonogenic and differentiation activities. Furthermore, there is speculation that this decreased number of endocrine cells is responsible for the visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, and abnormal gut secretion seen in IBS patients. PMID:26167065

  11. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Emotion Regulation, and Gut Microbiota].

    PubMed

    Fukudo, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is defined as a representative functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain and/or abdominal discomfort associated with abnormal bowel movement. Gut microbiota are related to the pathophysiology of IBS. In the field of IBS, post-infectious etiology, stress-induced alteration of microbiota, increased mucosal permeability, bacterial overgrowth, disease-specific microbiota, microbial products, and brain-gut interactions are being investigated. In some individuals, IBS develops after recovery from acute gastroenteritis known as post-infectious IBS. Gut microbiota in IBS patients differ from those in healthy individuals, and the profiles of gut microbiota in IBS patients also vary among IBS patients with constipation, diarrhea, and mixed subtypes. In Japan, gut microbiota in IBS patients also differ from those observed in healthy individuals, and organic acid by-products observed in the patients correlated with symptoms, quality of life, and alexithymia. Further research on gut microbiota in IBS patients is warranted. PMID:27279158

  12. Optimal management of constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Revelli, Matteo; Marabotto, Elisa; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Del Nero, Lorenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Giannini, Edoardo G; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, meanly characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit. It is a complex disorder involving biological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. The diagnosis is achieved according to the Rome III criteria provided that organic causes have been excluded. Although IBS does not constitute a life-threatening condition, it has a remarkable prevalence and profoundly reduces the quality of life with burdening socioeconomic costs. One of the principal concerns about IBS is the lack of effective therapeutic options. Up to 40% of patients are not satisfied with any available medications, especially those suffering from chronic constipation. A correct management of IBS with constipation should evolve through a global approach focused on the patient, starting with careful history taking in order to assess the presence of organic diseases that might trigger the disorder. Therefore, the second step is to examine lifestyle, dietary habits, and psychological status. On these bases, a step-up management of disease is recommended: from fiber and bulking agents, to osmotic laxative drugs, to new molecules like lubiprostone and linaclotide. Although new promising tools for relief of bowel-movement-related symptoms are being discovered, a dedicated doctor–patient relationship still seems to be the key for success. PMID:26028974

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. The economic impact of IBS on the health care system is substantial, as is the personal impact on patients. Patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) comprise a substantial proportion of the overall IBS population. Primary care providers are often the first point of contact for patients with IBS-D and can accurately diagnose IBS after a careful history and examination without extensive diagnostic tests. Several pharmacologic treatments (eg, loperamide, alosetron, and antidepressants) and non-pharmacologic treatments (eg, dietary modification and probiotics) are available for IBS-D, but restrictions on use (eg, alosetron) or the lack of controlled trial data showing reductions in both global and individual IBS-D symptoms (eg, bloating, pain and stool frequency) emphasize the need for alternative treatment options. Two newer medications (eluxadoline and rifaximin) were approved in May 2015 for the treatment of IBS-D, and represent new treatment options for this common gastrointestinal condition. PMID:26929659

  14. Sex hormones in the modulation of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette; Larauche, Muriel

    2014-03-14

    Compelling evidence indicates sex and gender differences in epidemiology, symptomatology, pathophysiology, and treatment outcome in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Based on the female predominance as well as the correlation between IBS symptoms and hormonal status, several models have been proposed to examine the role of sex hormones in gastrointestinal (GI) function including differences in GI symptoms expression in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle, in pre- and post-menopausal women, during pregnancy, hormonal treatment or after oophorectomy. Sex hormones may influence peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms of the brain-gut axis involved in the pathophysiology of IBS contributing to the alterations in visceral sensitivity, motility, intestinal barrier function, and immune activation of intestinal mucosa. Sex differences in stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system, neuroimmune interactions triggered by stress, as well as estrogen interactions with serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling systems are being increasingly recognized. A concept of "microgenderome" related to the potential role of sex hormone modulation of the gut microbiota is also emerging. Significant differences between IBS female and male patients regarding symptomatology and comorbidity with other chronic pain syndromes and psychiatric disorders, together with differences in efficacy of serotonergic medications in IBS patients confirm the necessity for more sex-tailored therapeutic approach in this disorder. PMID:24627581

  15. Immunomodulation of enteric neural function in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Dervla

    2015-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterised by symptoms such as bloating, altered bowel habit and visceral pain. It's generally accepted that miscommunication between the brain and gut underlies the changes in motility, absorpto-secretory function and pain sensitivity associated with IBS. However, partly due to the lack of disease-defining biomarkers, understanding the aetiology of this complex and multifactorial disease remains elusive. Anecdotally, IBS patients have noted that periods of stress can result in symptom flares and many patients exhibit co-morbid stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. However, in addition to psychosocial stressors, infection-related stress has also been linked with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptom flares. Indeed, prior gastrointestinal infection is one of the strongest predictors of developing IBS. Despite a lack of overt morphological inflammation, the importance of immune factors in the pathophysiology of IBS is gaining acceptance. Subtle changes in the numbers of mucosal immune cell infiltrates and elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been reproducibly demonstrated in IBS populations. Moreover, these immune mediators directly affect neural signalling. An exciting new area of research is the role of luminal microbiota in the modulation of neuro-immune signalling, resulting in local changes in gastrointestinal function and alterations in central neural functioning. Progress in this area has begun to unravel some of the complexities of neuroimmune and neuroendocrine interactions and how these molecular exchanges contribute to GI dysfunction. PMID:26139983

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome: the role of gut neuroendocrine peptides.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Seim, Inge; Chopin, Lisa; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic disorder with a prevalence ranging from 5 to 10 percent of the world's population. This condition is characterised by abdominal discomfort or pain, altered bowel habits, and often bloating and abdominal distension. IBS reduces quality of life in the same degree of impairment as major chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes and the economic burden on the health care system and society is high. Abnormalities have been reported in the neuroendocrine peptides/amines of the stomach, small- and large intestine in patients with IBS. These abnormalities would cause disturbances in digestion, gastrointestinal motility and visceral hypersensitivity, which have been reported in patients with IBS. These abnormalities seem to contribute to the symptom development and appear to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS. Neuroendocrine peptides/amines are potential tools in the treatment and diagnosis of IBS. In particular, the cell density of duodenal chromogranin A expressing cells appears to be a good histopathological marker for the diagnosis of IBS with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22652678

  17. Recent developments in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not completely known, although it has been shown that genetic/social learning factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal low-grade inflammation, and abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells play a major role. Studies of familial aggregation and on twins have confirmed the heritability of IBS. However, the proposed IBS risk genes are thus far nonvalidated hits rather than true predisposing factors. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, with the effect exerted by diet seemingly caused by intake of poorly absorbed carbohydrates and fiber. Obesity is a possible comorbidity of IBS. Differences in the microbiota between IBS patients and healthy controls have been reported, but the association between IBS symptoms and specific bacterial species is uncertain. Low-grade inflammation appears to play a role in the pathophysiology of a major subset of IBS, namely postinfectious IBS. The density of intestinal endocrine cells is reduced in patients with IBS, possibly as a result of genetic factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, and low-grade inflammation interfering with the regulatory signals controlling the intestinal stem-cell clonogenic and differentiation activities. Furthermore, there is speculation that this decreased number of endocrine cells is responsible for the visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, and abnormal gut secretion seen in IBS patients. PMID:26167065

  18. Rifaximin: The Revolutionary Antibiotic Approach for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2015-01-01

    A large number of clinical studies using breath testing and a smaller number of studies using quantitative cultures of the upper small intestine established a link between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). A series of 12 studies both prospective and retrospective in design in a population of patients with SIBO without IBS showed that the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin can eradicate SIBO as proved through decrease of the exhaled hydrogen and methane in breath tests. The efficacy of rifaximin was superior over the comparator treatment in most of these studies. Based on these findings, short course rifaximin was tested in various concentrations in eight open-label trials in patients with IBS and proven SIBO by breath test. Similar efficacy of rifaximin was shown in SIBO eradication; this was accompanied by improvement of the global score for IBS symptoms. Finally, five double-blind randomized clinical trials were conducted in patients with IBS; four were placebo-controlled. The larger trials were TARGET 1 and TARGET 2 studies testing rifaximin at a regimen of 550 mg tid for 14 days. All trials showed a significant superiority of rifaximin over comparator for the improvement of global symptoms of IBS and bloating. Although the aforementioned results render rifaximin a revolutionary therapeutic approach for IBS, several concerns on induction of antimicrobial resistant flora remain. PMID:26202193

  19. [Bran in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dubinin, A V; Kabanov, A V; Kirkin, B V; Kolkunova, G K; Igorianova, N A

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of using wheat bran in the treatment of patients with irritable colon syndrome expressed as spastic constipation. The effectiveness of the treatment with the wheat bran only (in a dose of 30-35 g/day), and in combination with drugs was comparatively studied in 105 patients. The bran fractions differing in the particle size, in the content of cellulose, starch and vitamins were used in the treatment. The combined therapy proved to be advantageous only in the rate of the clinical effect, while the acceleration of the movement along the large intestine did not depend on the treatment type. A long-term (during one year) follow-up of the patients showed that the bran intake led to the cessation of the disease relapse; when the bran was abolished the symptoms of the disease appeared in 11 out of 12 cases. The highest effect was recorded with the bran fraction containing 55.3% cellulose, 18.3% lignin, 157 micrograms tocopherol and the lowest amount of starch--18.0%. A conclusion has been made that the wheat bran are effective in the treatment and prevention of intestinal diseases, the effectiveness of the treatment depends on the summary content of food fibers in the nutrition. PMID:3031879

  20. Celiac disease: Serologic prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Zobeiri; Sakineh, Ebrahimi; Mohammad, Farahvash; Mansour, Rezaei; Alireza, Abdollahi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in the community is 10%–20% and have symptom based diagnostic criteria. Many symptoms of celiac disease (CD) with 1% prevalence in some communities can mimic IBS. Sensitive and specific serologic tests of CD can detect asymptomatic cases. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of anti-tissue-transglutaminase (tTG) IgA in IBS patients and controls group. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed at a University hospital in which 107 patients with IBS who met the Rome II criteria for their diagnosis were compared with 126 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Both groups were investigated for CD by analysis of their serum tTG IgA antibody with human recombinant antigen. Titers were positive containing over 10u/ml and borderline if they were between 4 and 10 u/ml. Result: 86 percent of IBS patients were female. The mean antibody level was 0.837 u/ml in IBS group and 0.933 u/ml in control group without any significant difference. Discussion and Conclusion: Results of this study may intensify disagreement on the situation of CD in IBS patients. PMID:23826010

  1. Practical management of irritable bowel syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Ellinor; Törnblom, Hans; Simrén, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, frequently managed by general practitioners and gastroenterologists. It is a complex condition, characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits, and it affects 11% of the population worldwide. It has a profound effect on quality of life for many patients and poses a substantial cost to society. Due to the complexity and diversity of IBS, diagnosis and treatment can be challenging. Common drawbacks in diagnosing and treating this disorder include unnecessary tests, failure to establish trust in the physician-patient relationship and difficulties in explaining the diagnosis. Research in recent years has however refined the diagnostic criteria and improved our ability to safely identify IBS with a limited number of investigations. A concise diagnostic evaluation, guided adequate information, prompt initiation of symptom-guided treatment and consistency in the patient-doctor relationship can help relieve the suffering experienced by patients with IBS. For patients with mild symptoms, reassurance, education, lifestyle changes and dietary advice are often sufficient. Patients with moderate to severe symptoms might need symptom modifying drugs, and psychological treatments such as CBT or hypnotherapy may be offered at this stage. For patients with severe and incapacitating symptoms, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended and psychotropic drugs are often used. This clinical review offers suggestions for a diagnostic approach as well as a treatment strategy, based on the current evidence on pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment in IBS. PMID:26448307

  2. New Receptor Targets for Medical Therapy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite setbacks to the approval of new medications for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, interim guidelines on endpoints for IBS trials have enhanced interest as new targets for medical therapy are proposed based on novel mechanisms or chemical entities. Aim To review the approved lubiprostone, two targets that are not meeting expectations (tachykinins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone), the efficacy and safety of new 5-HT4 agonists, intestinal secretagogues (chloride channel activators, and guanylate cyclase-C agonists), bile acid modulation, anti-inflammatory agents and visceral analgesics. Methods Review of selected articles based on PubMed search and clinically relevant information on mechanism of action, safety, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy Conclusions The spectrum of peripheral targets of medical therapy address chiefly the bowel dysfunction of IBS, and these effects are associated with pain relief. There are less clear targets related to the abdominal pain or visceral sensation in IBS. The new 5-HT4 agonists are more specific than older agents, and show cardiovascular safety to date. Secretory agents have high specificity, low bioavailability, and efficacy. The potential risks of agents “borrowed” from other indications (like hyperlipidemia, inflammatory bowel disease or somatic pain) deserve further study. There is reason for optimism in medical treatment of IBS. PMID:19785622

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  4. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in China: A review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Yan; Li, Shu-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, chronic, functional gastrointestinal disorder with a high incidence rate in the general population, and it is common among the Chinese population. The pathophysiology, etiology and pathogenesis of IBS are poorly understood, with no evidence of inflammatory, anatomic, metabolic, or neoplastic factors to explain the symptoms. Treatment approaches are mainly focused on symptom management to maintain everyday functioning and to improve quality of life for patients with IBS. However, prescribed medications often result in significant side effects, and many IBS sufferers (particularly Chinese) do not improve. Instead of taking a variety of conventional medications, many have turned to taking traditional Chinese medicine or integrated Chinese and Western medicine for remedy. A number of clinical trials have shown that Chinese herbal, acupuncture or integrative therapies presented improved treatment outcomes and reduced side effects in IBS patients. The purpose of this review article is to examine the treatment approaches of IBS that have been published in recent years, especially in China, to assess the possible differences in treating IBS between China and other countries. This would provide some useful information of unique treatment approach in clinical practice for physicians in the management of IBS in China, thus offering more treatment options for IBS patients with potentially better treatment outcomes while reducing the medical cost burden. PMID:25741137

  5. Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Mento, Carmela; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2016-07-28

    The review focuses on those personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), constructs (alexithymia and distressed - Type D personality) and emotional patterns (negative and positive) that are of particular concern in health psychology, with the aim to highlight their potential role on the pathogenesis, onset, symptom clusters, clinical course, and outcome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Personality traits and emotional patterns play key roles in affecting autonomic, immune, inflammatory, and endocrine functions, thus contributing not only to IBS clinical expression and symptomatic burden, but also to disease physiopathology. In this sense, psychological treatments should address those personality traits and emotional features that are constitutive of, and integral to IBS. The biopsychosocial model of illness applied to IBS acknowledges the interaction between biological, psychological, environmental, and social factors in relation to pain and functional disability. A holistic approach to IBS should take into account the heterogeneous nature of the disorder, and differentiate treatments for different types of IBS, also considering the marked individual differences in prevalent personality traits and emotional patterns. Beyond medications, and lifestyle/dietary interventions, psychological and educational treatments may provide the optimal chance of addressing clinical symptoms, comorbid conditions, and quality of life in IBS patients. PMID:27605876

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. The economic impact of IBS on the health care system is substantial, as is the personal impact on patients. Patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) comprise a substantial proportion of the overall IBS population. Primary care providers are often the first point of contact for patients with IBS-D and can accurately diagnose IBS after a careful history and examination without extensive diagnostic tests. Several pharmacologic treatments (eg, loperamide, alosetron, and antidepressants) and non-pharmacologic treatments (eg, dietary modification and probiotics) are available for IBS-D, but restrictions on use (eg, alosetron) or the lack of controlled trial data showing reductions in both global and individual IBS-D symptoms (eg, bloating, pain and stool frequency) emphasize the need for alternative treatment options. Two newer medications (eluxadoline and rifaximin) were approved in May 2015 for the treatment of IBS-D, and represent new treatment options for this common gastrointestinal condition. PMID:26929659

  7. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  8. An assessment of air quality reflecting the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Gola, Joelle M R; Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to assess the air quality of an environment based on the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in such environment. We begin by approximating the sigmoid function that characterizes psychometric plots of probability of irritation detection (Q) versus VOC vapor concentration to a linear function. First, we apply an established equation that correlates and predicts human sensory irritation thresholds (SIT) (i.e., nasal and eye irritation) based on the transfer of the VOC from the gas phase to biophases, e.g., nasal mucus and tear film. Second, we expand the equation to include other biological data (e.g., odor detection thresholds) and to include further VOCs that act mainly by "specific" effects rather than by transfer (i.e., "physical") effects as defined in the article. Then we show that, for 72 VOCs in common, Q values based on our calculated SITs are consistent with the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) listed for those same VOCs on the basis of sensory irritation by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Third, we set two equations to calculate the probability (Qmix) that a given air sample containing a number of VOCs could elicit chemosensory irritation: one equation based on response addition (Qmix scale: 0.00 to 1.00) and the other based on dose addition (1000*Qmix scale: 0 to 2000). We further validate the applicability of our air quality assessment method by showing that both Qmix scales provide values consistent with the expected sensory irritation burden from VOC mixtures present in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor environments as reported on field studies in the literature. These scales take into account both the concentration of VOCs at a particular site and the propensity of the VOCs to evoke sensory irritation. PMID:26550706

  9. Development of a cumulative irritation model for incontinence-associated dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Larner, J; Matar, H; Goldman, V S; Chilcott, R P

    2015-01-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a painful yet preventable form of cumulative skin irritation prevalent amongst those with limited movement. Consequently, it has a significant impact on the quality of life for those affected as well as substantial cost implications. Prevention and intervention is typically through good skin hygiene regimes and regular use of barrier products. In this paper, we describe the development of an in vivo model of IAD in healthy volunteers by occluded application of alkaline synthetic urine to the volar aspect of volunteer's forearms for 6 h per day over a five-day period to reproduce the moist and irritant conditions causative of IAD. Irritation was assessed and quantified on a daily basis by a series of non-invasive biophysical measurements and compared to a contralateral saline-treated (control) site. Dermal irritation was assessed by subjective (visual) and objective measurements (laser Doppler and polarisation spectroscopic imaging, infrared thermography, skin reflectance spectroscopy, transepidermal water loss and skin surface pH). The provocation of reproducible, cumulative skin irritation was successfully demonstrated and quantified. This five-day model of irritation is considered appropriate for the initial clinical assessment of topical products to prevent or treat IAD. PMID:25416151

  10. An in silico expert system for the identification of eye irritants.

    PubMed

    Verma, R P; Matthews, E J

    2015-01-01

    This report describes development of an in silico, expert rule-based method for the classification of chemicals into irritants or non-irritants to eye, as defined by the Draize test. This method was developed to screen data-poor cosmetic ingredient chemicals for eye irritancy potential, which is based upon exclusion rules of five physicochemical properties - molecular weight (MW), hydrophobicity (log P), number of hydrogen bond donors (HBD), number of hydrogen bond acceptors (HBA) and polarizability (Pol). These rules were developed using the ADMET Predictor software and a dataset of 917 eye irritant chemicals. The dataset was divided into 826 (90%) chemicals used for training set and 91 (10%) chemicals used for external validation set (every 10th chemical sorted by molecular weight). The sensitivity of these rules for the training and validation sets was 72.3% and 71.4%, respectively. These rules were also validated for their specificity using an external validation set of 2011 non-irritant chemicals to the eye. The specificity for this validation set was revealed as 77.3%. This method facilitates rapid screening and prioritization of data poor chemicals that are unlikely to be tested for eye irritancy in the Draize test. PMID:25967253

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy options for the treatment of irritability in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Kirino, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism have a high rate of irritability and aggressive symptoms. Irritability or self-injurious behavior can result in significant harm to those affected, as well as to marked distress for their families. This paper provides a literature review regarding the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacotherapy for the treatment of irritability in autistic children. Although antipsychotics have not yet been approved for the treatment of autistic children by many countries, they are often used to reduce symptoms of behavioral problems, including irritability, aggression, hyperactivity, and panic. However, among antipsychotics, the Food and Drug Administration has approved only risperidone and aripiprazole to treat irritability in autism. Among atypical antipsychotics, olanzapine and quetiapine are limited in their use for autism spectrum disorders in children because of high incidences of weight gain and sedation. In comparison, aripiprazole and ziprasidone cause less weight gain and sedation. However, potential QTc interval prolongation with ziprasidone has been reported. Contrary to ziprasidone, no changes were evident in the QT interval in any of the trials for aripiprazole. However, head-to-head comparison studies are needed to support that aripiprazole may be a promising drug that can be used to treat irritability in autistic children. On the other hand, risperidone has the greatest amount of evidence supporting it, including randomized controlled trials; thus, its efficacy and tolerability has been established in comparison with other agents. Further studies with risperidone as a control drug are needed. PMID:24932108

  12. Potential irritation of lysine derivative surfactants by hemolysis and HaCaT cell viability.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, L; Mitjans, M; Infante, M R; Vinardell, M P

    2006-02-01

    Surfactants represent one of the most common constituents in topical pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications or cleansers. Since adverse skin and ocular reactions can be caused by them, it is important to evaluate damaging effects. Amino acid-based surfactants deserve particular attention because of their low toxicity and environmental friendly properties. New lysine derivative surfactants associated with heavy and light counterions were tested. The ocular irritancy was assessed by hemolysis, and photohemolysis was employed to evaluate their phototoxicity. Cytotoxicity on HaCaT cells was determined by neutral red uptake and MTT assay to predict skin irritation. All lysine derivative surfactants were less hemolytic and thus less eye-irritating than the commercial surfactants used as model irritants. No phototoxic effects were found. All surfactants presented cytotoxic effects as demonstrated by decrease of neutral red uptake and reduction of MTT salt, with clear concentration-effect profiles. However, the rates of cytotoxicity on HaCaT for the new surfactants suggested that they were less cytotoxic and then, less skin-irritating than the reference ones; surfactants with heavy counterions were the less cytotoxic. The anionic surfactants investigated in the present work may constitute a promising class of surfactants given their low irritancy potential for pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. PMID:16135402

  13. Ocular irritation from product of pesticide degradation among workers in a seed warehouse

    PubMed Central

    MATSUKAWA, Takehisa; YOKOYAMA, Kazuhito; ITOH, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Four workers at a seed supply warehouse in Chiba Prefecture, Japan, complained of ocular irritation on the job. Pesticide-coated seeds were stored in the warehouse but no significant amount of pesticide was detected in the air inside the warehouse. To identify the cause of the ocular irritation and to determine an appropriate solution to the problem, the authors used thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze the profiles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air of the two warehouses at the site—warehouse A, where the four workers experienced ocular irritation, and warehouse B, where no workers experienced ocular irritation. Comparing the profiles of VOCs in these warehouses indicated that n-butyl isocyanate, a hydrolyzed product of the fungicide benomyl, was the cause of the workers’ ocular irritation. n-Butyl isocyanate is known to be a contact irritant and if the benomyl-coated seeds were not properly dried before storage in the warehouse n-butyl isocyanate would have been produced. The results of the study suggest that more attention should be paid both to the pesticide itself and to the products of pesticide degradation. In this study, n-butyl isocyanate was identified as a product of pesticide degradation and a causative chemical affecting occupational health. PMID:25327297

  14. Sensitizing and irritant properties of 3 environmental classes of diesel oil and their indicator dyes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T; Bjarnason, B

    1996-05-01

    3 dyes, Solvent Yellow 124 and Solvent Blue 79 or Solvent Blue 98, were added to diesel oils in Sweden for identification of their particular use and taxation bracket in late 1993. Health concern regarding the toxicity of the dyes resulted in several reports to the Worker Inspection Bureau. 36 men reporting skin disease supposedly caused by dyes were diagnosed to have irritant reactions, irritant contact dermatitis or exacerbation of other skin disease. Tests on 15 individuals from this group, and 20 healthy volunteers, failed to demonstrate contact allergy or contact urticaria to the dyes or dyed diesel oil. Patch tests with dyes (10% v/v) in pet. did not cause irritation. Tests of irritant properties of the diesel oils showed that the old type of oil, with high viscosity, high content or aromatic compounds and moderately high sulfur content, caused little irritation, whereas newer, lighter qualities of diesel oil, with low concentrations of aromatic compounds and low sulfur content, which cause less pollution to the environment when burnt, were significantly more irritant to the skin and probably a cause of the skin problems. PMID:8807221

  15. Assessment of skin and eye irritation of 14 products under the stepwise approach of the OECD.

    PubMed

    Mancebo, Axel; Hernández, Osvaldo; González, Yana; Aldana, Lizet; Carballo, Onelio

    2008-01-01

    The determination of acute eye and skin irritation is included in international regulatory requirements for the testing of chemicals, because of the possibility of exposure during the production, transport, marketing, and disposal of products. Although there have been some advances in the areas of refinement and reduction, no single battery of tests has emerged as being acceptable as a complete replacement for the conventional Draize rabbit eye and skin irritation tests. Currently, dermal irritation and ocular irritation are generally evaluated in a sequential manner in the context of tiered assessment strategies. In this work, we show how 14 products, mostly designed to be used in agriculture, were evaluated in the Center of Experimental Toxicology of the Center for the Production of Laboratory Animals (Centro Nacional para la Producción de Animales de Laboratorio; CENPALAB) in order to assess their acute dermal and ocular effects. The performed studies include the acute dermal toxicity test, the acute dermal irritation/corrosion test, the hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane (HET-CAM) method, and the acute eye irritation/corrosion test. In general, it could be concluded that of the 14 products assessed, none of them showed systemic effects, but local reactions mainly to the eyes. The most significant effects were apparently related to the effects of azadirachtin, an active principle of 2 tested neem derivatives. PMID:18988087

  16. Treatment Options for Actinic Keratosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  17. Microbial community and metabolomic comparison of irritable bowel syndrome faeces.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Kannan; Choi, Jung Nam; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Human health relies on the composition of microbiota in an individual's gut and the synthesized metabolites that may alter the gut environment. Gut microbiota and faecal metabolites are involved in several gastrointestinal diseases. In this study, 16S rRNA-specific denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the mean similarity of total bacteria was significantly different (P<0.001) in faecal samples from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS; n = 11) and from non-IBS (nIBS) patients (n = 8). IBS subjects had a significantly higher diversity of total bacteria, as measured by the Shannon index (H') (3.360.05). GC/MS-based multivariate analysis delineated the faecal metabolites of IBS from nIBS samples. Elevated levels of amino acids (alanine and pyroglutamic acid) and phenolic compounds (hydroxyphenyl acetate and hydroxyphenyl propionate) were found in IBS. These results were highly correlated with the abundance of lactobacilli and Clostridium, which indicates an altered metabolism rate associated with these gut micro-organisms. A higher diversity of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus groups in IBS faecal samples also correlated with the respective total quantity. In addition, these changes altered protein and carbohydrate energy metabolism in the gut. PMID:21330412

  18. Role of antispasmodics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Annaházi, Anita; Róka, Richárd; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a long-lasting, relapsing disorder characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel habits. Intestinal motility impairment and visceral hypersensitivity are the key factors among its multifactorial pathogenesis, both of which require effective treatment. Voltage-gated calcium channels mediate smooth muscle contraction and endocrine secretion and play important roles in neuronal transmission. Antispasmodics are a group of drugs that have been used in the treatment of IBS for decades. Alverine citrate, a spasmolytic, decreases the sensitivity of smooth muscle contractile proteins to calcium, and it is a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Alverine, in combination with simethicone, has been demonstrated to effectively reduce abdominal pain and discomfort in a large placebo-controlled trial. Mebeverine is a musculotropic agent that potently blocks intestinal peristalsis. Non-placebo-controlled trials have shown positive effects of mebeverine in IBS regarding symptom control; nevertheless, in recent placebo-controlled studies, mebeverine did not exhibit superiority over placebo. Otilonium bromide is poorly absorbed from the GI tract, where it acts locally as an L-type calcium channel blocker, an antimuscarinic and a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist. Otilonium has effectively reduced pain and improved defecation alterations in placebo-controlled trials in IBS patients. Pinaverium bromide is also an L-type calcium channel blocker that acts locally in the GI tract. Pinaverium improves motility disorders and consequently reduces stool problems in IBS patients. Phloroglucinol and trimethylphloroglucinol are non-specific antispasmodics that reduced pain in IBS patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Antispasmodics have excellent safety profiles. T-type calcium channel blockers can abolish visceral hypersensitivity in animal models, which makes them potential candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents in the

  19. Anti-Enteric Neuronal Antibodies and the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sumei; Drossman, Douglas A; Ringel, Yehuda; Whitehead, William E

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Functional gastrointestinal disorders are those in which no abnormal metabolic or physical processes, which can account for the symptoms, can be identified. The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a significant functional disorder, which affects 10-20 percent of the population worldwide. Predominant symptoms of IBS are abnormal defecation associated with abdominal pain, both of which may be exacerbated by psychogenic stress. Our study was designed to test a hypothesis that symptoms in a subset of patients with a diagnosis of IBS are associated with an autoimmune degenerative neuropathy in the enteric nervous system. Methods Serum was collected from Rome II-IBS patients and controls at the University of North Carolina Functional Gastrointestinal Diseases Center. Assay procedures were immunohistochemical localization of antibody binding to enteric neurons and human protein microarray assay for antigens recognized by antibodies in the sera. Results Eighty-seven percent of IBS sera and 59% of control sera contained anti-enteric neuronal antibodies. Antibody immunostaining was seen in the nucleus and cytoplasm of neurons in the enteric nervous system. Protein microarray analysis detected antibody reactivity for autoantigens in serum with anti-enteric neuronal antibodies and no reactivity for the same autoantigens in samples not containing anti-enteric neuronal antibodies in our immunostaining assay. Antibodies in sera from IBS patients recognized only 3 antigens out of an 8,000 immunoprotein array. The 3 antigens were: (1) a nondescript ribonucleoprotein (RNP-complex); (2) small nuclear ribonuclear polypeptide A; and (3) Ro-5,200 kDa. Conclusions Results of the present study suggest that symptoms in a subset of IBS patients might be a reflection of enteric neuronal damage or loss, caused by circulating anti-enteric autoimmune antibodies. PMID:22323991

  20. Role of opioid ligands in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corazziari, E

    1999-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides - enkephalins, beta-endorphin and dynorphins - are located in specific sites of the brain, the spinal cord, the autonomic ganglia and the enteric nervous system. Endogenous opioids participate in the regulation of nervous visceral afference and sensitivity as well as of several visceral motor function induced by the central nervous system and through the enteroenteric and the myoenteric reflexes. Their final effect on gut physiology is the net and harmonically balanced result of their binding to mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor subtypes. Exogenous opioid receptor ligands with different affinities for the opioid receptor subtypes have been effectively used to modify and normalize altered gut functions. The mu receptor agonists - morphine and, to a greater extent, the meperidine congeners diphenoxylate and loperamide - have been shown to slow gastrointestinal transit by their effects on the circular and longitudinal muscle of the intestine. Diphenoxylate and, more efficiently, loperamide, for the lack of any effect on the central nervous system, have been usefully employed in the treatment of diarrhea in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Unlike the mu receptor agonists morphine and loperamide, which invariably stimulate colonic motility, trimebutine, which has almost equal affinity for mu, delta and kappa receptors, has no effect on normal colonic activity but reduces the abnormal increase in postprandial motor activity in IBS patients and accelerates slow large bowel transit in constipated patients. Opioid ligands can be usefully employed to normalize altered visceral sensitivity in IBS patients. The kappa receptor agonist fedotozine exerts its antinociceptive effect by acting on peripheral nerve endings of sensory vagal and nonvagal afferent pathways. Fedotozine has been shown to increase the threshold of perception to colonic distension in experimental conditions and to affect favourably symptoms of IBS in clinical trials. PMID

  1. Modern Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: More Than Motility.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan; Vanuytsel, Tim; Corsetti, Maura

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), loperamide seems efficacious for diarrhea and ispaghula for constipation, while musculotropic spasmolytics may relieve abdominal pain. Antidepressants were found to be efficacious for abdominal pain, but their tolerance may be problematic and the therapeutic effect varied largely between trials. While meta-analyses suggest efficacy of probiotics as a group, the quality of the trials is often suboptimal and there is large variability. Lubiprostone, a chloride channel activator, and linaclotide, a guanylyl cyclase-C agonist, showed favorable effects on multiple symptoms in IBS with constipation. For IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ramosetron showed efficacy in men and women, but is currently only approved in Japan. A multicenter study with the anti-emetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron showed efficacy on stool pattern in IBS-D. The poorly absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and eluxadoline, a mu opioid receptor agonist and delta antagonist, both showed efficacy in phase III trials in IBS-D and were approved by the FDA. Eluxadoline was associated with increased occurrence of sphincter of Oddi spasm and biliary pancreatitis. The non-pharmacological treatment of IBS, with dietary interventions (mainly gluten elimination and low FODMAP (fructose, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols)) has received a lot of attention lately. While responder rates vary across studies, perhaps based on regional variations in dietary intake of FODMAPs, the dietary approach seems to have acquired recognition as a valid therapeutic alternative. Long-term studies and comparative studies with pharmacotherapy, as well as elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of action, are needed. PMID:27331917

  2. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern. PMID:24845149

  3. Latent structure of irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Fabian; Egloff, Boris; Roalfe, Andrea; Witthöft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the latent structure of an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom severity scale in a population of healthy adults. METHODS: The Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire which consists of three symptom specific scales (diarrhea, constipation, pain) was evaluated by means of structural equation modeling. We compared the original 3-factor solution to a general factor model and a bifactor solution in a large internet sample of college students (n = 875). Statistical comparisons of competing models were conducted by means of χ2 difference tests. Regarding the evaluation of model fit, we examined the comparative fit index (CFI) and the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA). RESULTS: Results clearly favored a bifactor model of IBS symptom severity (CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.05) which consisted of a strong general IBS somatization factor and three symptom specific factors (diarrhea, constipation, pain) based on the subscales of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire. The fit indices of the competing one factor model (CFI = 0.85, RMSEA = 0.17) and three factor model (CFI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.08) were clearly inferior. χ2 difference tests showed that the differences between the models were indeed significant in favor of the bifactor model (P < 0.001). Correlations of the four latent factors with measures of pain sensitivity, somatoform dissociation, fatigue severity, and demographic variables support the validity of our bifactor model of IBS specific symptom severity. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that IBS symptom severity might best be understood as a continuous and multidimensional construct which can be reliably and validly assessed with the B-IBS. PMID:25574104

  4. Role of antispasmodics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Annaházi, Anita; Róka, Richárd; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor

    2014-05-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a long-lasting, relapsing disorder characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel habits. Intestinal motility impairment and visceral hypersensitivity are the key factors among its multifactorial pathogenesis, both of which require effective treatment. Voltage-gated calcium channels mediate smooth muscle contraction and endocrine secretion and play important roles in neuronal transmission. Antispasmodics are a group of drugs that have been used in the treatment of IBS for decades. Alverine citrate, a spasmolytic, decreases the sensitivity of smooth muscle contractile proteins to calcium, and it is a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Alverine, in combination with simethicone, has been demonstrated to effectively reduce abdominal pain and discomfort in a large placebo-controlled trial. Mebeverine is a musculotropic agent that potently blocks intestinal peristalsis. Non-placebo-controlled trials have shown positive effects of mebeverine in IBS regarding symptom control; nevertheless, in recent placebo-controlled studies, mebeverine did not exhibit superiority over placebo. Otilonium bromide is poorly absorbed from the GI tract, where it acts locally as an L-type calcium channel blocker, an antimuscarinic and a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist. Otilonium has effectively reduced pain and improved defecation alterations in placebo-controlled trials in IBS patients. Pinaverium bromide is also an L-type calcium channel blocker that acts locally in the GI tract. Pinaverium improves motility disorders and consequently reduces stool problems in IBS patients. Phloroglucinol and trimethylphloroglucinol are non-specific antispasmodics that reduced pain in IBS patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Antispasmodics have excellent safety profiles. T-type calcium channel blockers can abolish visceral hypersensitivity in animal models, which makes them potential candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents in the

  5. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K.; Sherwin, LeeAnne B.; Joseph, Paule V.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Ferguson, Eric G.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r2 > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS. PMID:26963804

  6. Possible pathogenetic roles of abdominal surgery in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Yu, Yifeng; Prakash, Ravi

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a plethora of studies have reported that irritably bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have increased incidences of abdominal surgeries, mainly gut surgeries. This high incidence of surgeries highlights the fact that the surgery was done because diagnosis of IBS was not suspected in them. It is then a matter of inquisitiveness as to why the diagnosis of IBS was missed in so many patients. Lack of clinical diagnostic sophistication could be one of the reasons. However, inspite of these facts, it has never been documented that the typical IBS like picture was present in these patients before surgery. Mostly, the preoperative complaints in negative appendectomy patients have been atypical pain syndromes. Thus we should also take into account the possibility that the typical IBS symptom profile was not present in these patients before surgery and that the surgical intervention could have resulted in subsequent development of complete picture of IBS. Infact, in one study, various surgical procedures were known to precede IBS symptoms, where they have also been conceptualized as one of the stressors which could lead to IB. Seeing from the other perspective, the etiological understanding of IBS in medical literature is still so preliminary that we have only been able to enumerate some possible factors. In such a scenario, we need to explore in detail the events which occur frequently in IBS patients, like abdominal surgery. Here, we hypothesize that any abdominal surgical intervention could itself be a reason for development of IBS. We provide evidences from literature in favor of two such possible mechanisms through which any abdominal surgical procedure could act resulting in development of IBS. In addition, we present the report of follow-up of 4 of our own patients where we specifically inquired about IBS before the appendectomy, which turned out to be negative. After 6 months of the followup, the patients developed symptoms which were diagnosable as IBS. PMID

  7. Evaluation of drug treatment in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Nicholas J

    2003-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a therapeutic challenge in part because of the limited understanding of the pathophysiology. The placebo response rate varies in randomized controlled trials from 20 to 70%, and can persist for up to at least 1 year. It is contentious whether dietary fibre and bulking agents relieve the symptoms of IBS; constipation probably improves. Anticholinergic and antispasmodic agents are of questionable benefit in IBS despite positive meta-analyses of poor quality trials. A meta-analysis concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants were superior to placebo in IBS, although the individual trial results were variable. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are of uncertain benefit. Laxatives are used for constipation but probably poorly control the IBS symptom complex. Loperamide is superior to placebo in improvement of diarrhoea but not abdominal pain in IBS. Tegaserod is a well- tolerated aminoguanidine indole derivative of serotonin that is a partial 5HT4–receptor agonist with prokinetic properties; a therapeutic gain over placebo of 5% to 15% has been observed in constipation-predominant IBS in females. Alosetron is a 5HT3-receptor antagonist that is efficacious in females with diarrhoea-predominant IBS, with a 12% to 17% therapeutic gain; the risk of ischaemic colitis is 1 in 350, with very severe constipation occurring in about 1 in 1000. Optimizing study design remains a challenge in IBS. New visceral analgesic and motility modifying agents, as well as anti-inflammatory agents are in trials, and hopefully additional efficacious therapeutic options for patients with IBS will soon emerge. PMID:12968980

  8. Noncorticosteroid Combination Shampoo versus 1% Ketoconazole Shampoo for the Management of Mild-to-Moderate Seborrheic Dermatitis of the Scalp: Results from a Randomized, Investigator-Single-Blind Trial Using Clinical and Trichoscopic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Dall'Oglio, Federica; Lacarrubba, Francesco; Verzì, Anna Elisa; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of a combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo versus 1% ketoconazole shampoo in the treatment of mild-to-moderate scalp seborrheic dermatitis (SD). Procedures Twenty patients were randomized to using the combination shampoo (group A, 10 patients) or the 1% ketoconazole shampoo (group B, 10 patients) 3 times a week every other day for 8 weeks. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring the degree of scaling and pruritus by clinical and trichoscopic examination using a 4-point scale. Additionally, a physician global assessment (PGA) was assessed at the end of the study. Results At 4 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling from baseline for both groups, while pruritus showed a significant reduction only for group A. After 8 weeks, there was a significant reduction of scaling and pruritus for both groups. PGA showed a complete response in 90% of the cases in both groups. Conclusions The results of our study demonstrate that the combination noncorticosteroid, antiinflammatory/antifungal shampoo represents an alternative approach to standard topical treatment for scalp SD. A noncorticosteroid shampoo may be equally safe and effective as ketoconazole shampoo for scalp SD, and trichoscopy provides accurate and reliable quantifiable data to assist in therapeutic monitoring. PMID:27171495

  9. The involvement of TRP channels in sensory irritation: a mechanistic approach toward a better understanding of the biological effects of local irritants.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Ramona; Schöbel, Nicole; Hatt, Hanns; van Thriel, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves innervating the mucosae of the nose, mouth, and throat protect the organism against chemical hazards. Upon their stimulation, characteristic perceptions (e.g., stinging and burning) and various reflexes are triggered (e.g., sneezing and cough). The potency of a chemical to cause sensory irritation can be estimated by a mouse bioassay assessing the concentration-dependent decrease in the respiratory rate (50 % decrease: RD50). The involvement of the N. trigeminus and its sensory neurons in the irritant-induced decrease in respiratory rates are not well understood to date. In calcium imaging experiments, we tested which of eight different irritants (RD50 5-730 ppm) could induce responses in primary mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons. The tested irritants acetophenone, 2-ethylhexanol, hexyl isocyanate, isophorone, and trimethylcyclohexanol stimulated responses in trigeminal neurons. Most of these responses depended on functional TRPA1 or TRPV1 channels. For crotyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and sodium metabisulfite, no activation could be observed. 2-ethylhexanol can activate both TRPA1 and TRPV1, and at low contractions (100 µM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) seem to be involved. GPCRs might also be involved in the mediation of the responses to trimethylcyclohexanol. By using neurobiological tools, we showed that sensory irritation in vivo could be based on the direct activation of TRP channels but also on yet unknown interactions with GPCRs present in trigeminal neurons. Our results showed that the potency suggested by the RD50 values was not reflected by direct nerve-compound interaction. PMID:27037703

  10. Predictive performance of the Vitrigel-eye irritancy test method using 118 chemicals.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Hajime; Takezawa, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We recently developed a novel Vitrigel-eye irritancy test (EIT) method. The Vitrigel-EIT method is composed of two parts, i.e., the construction of a human corneal epithelium (HCE) model in a collagen vitrigel membrane chamber and the prediction of eye irritancy by analyzing the time-dependent profile of transepithelial electrical resistance values for 3 min after exposing a chemical to the HCE model. In this study, we estimated the predictive performance of Vitrigel-EIT method by testing a total of 118 chemicals. The category determined by the Vitrigel-EIT method in comparison to the globally harmonized system classification revealed that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90.1%, 65.9% and 80.5%, respectively. Here, five of seven false-negative chemicals were acidic chemicals inducing the irregular rising of transepithelial electrical resistance values. In case of eliminating the test chemical solutions showing pH 5 or lower, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were improved to 96.8%, 67.4% and 84.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, nine of 16 false-positive chemicals were classified irritant by the US Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the disappearance of ZO-1, a tight junction-associated protein and MUC1, a cell membrane-spanning mucin was immunohistologically confirmed in the HCE models after exposing not only eye irritant chemicals but also false-positive chemicals, suggesting that such false-positive chemicals have an eye irritant potential. These data demonstrated that the Vitrigel-EIT method could provide excellent predictive performance to judge the widespread eye irritancy, including very mild irritant chemicals. We hope that the Vitrigel-EIT method contributes to the development of safe commodity chemicals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26472347

  11. Development of an in vitro alternative assay method for vaginal irritation.

    PubMed

    Ayehunie, Seyoum; Cannon, Chris; Larosa, Karen; Pudney, Jeffrey; Anderson, Deborah J; Klausner, Mitchell

    2011-01-11

    The vaginal mucosa is commonly exposed to chemicals and therapeutic agents that may result in irritation and/or inflammation. In addition to acute effects, vaginal irritation and inflammation can make women more susceptible to infections such as HIV-1 and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2). Hence, the vaginal irritation potential of feminine care formulations and vaginally administered therapeutic agents is a significant public health concern. Traditionally, testing of such materials has been performed using the rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) assay. In the current study, we investigated whether the organotypic, highly differentiated EpiVaginal™ tissue could be used as a non-animal alternative to the RVI test. The EpiVaginal tissue was exposed to a single application of ingredients commonly found in feminine hygiene products and the effects on tissue viability (MTT assay), barrier disruption (measured by transepithelial electrical resistance, TEER and sodium fluorescein (NaFl) leakage), and inflammatory cytokine release (interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) patterns were examined. When compared to untreated controls, two irritating ingredients, nonoxynol 9 and benzalkonium chloride, reduced tissue viability to <40% and TEER to <60% while increasing NaFl leakage by 11-24% and IL-1α and IL-1β release by >100%. Four other non-irritating materials had minimal effects on these parameters. Assay reproducibility was confirmed by testing the chemicals using three different tissue production lots and by using tissues reconstructed from cells obtained from three different donors. Coefficients of variation between tissue lots reconstructed with cells obtained from the same donor or lots reconstructed with cells obtained from different donors were less than 10% and 12%, respectively. In conclusion, decreases in tissue viability and barrier function and increases in IL-1α and IL-1β release appear to be useful endpoints for preclinical screening of topically applied

  12. Evaluation of dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Matsuda, Akitaka; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Naya, Masato; Nakanishi, Junko

    2011-12-01

    The present paper summarizes the results of our studies on dermal and eye irritation and skin sensitization due to carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whose potential applications and uses are wide and varied, including CNT-enhanced plastics, electromagnetic interference/radio-frequency (EMI/RFI) shielding, antistatic material, flexible fibers and advanced polymers, medical and health applications, and scanning probe microscopy. Skin and eyes have the highest risk of exposure to nanomaterials, because deposition of nanomaterials to the surficial organs has the potential to be a major route of exposure during the manufacturing, use, and disposal of nanomaterials. Two products composed of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and two products composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were tested regarding acute dermal and acute eye irritation using rabbits, and skin sensitization using guinea pigs. The concentrations of the CNTs in the substances were the maximum allowable for administration. The two products of SWCNTs and one of the products of MWCNTs were not irritants to the skin or eyes. The other product of MWCNTs caused very slight erythema at 24h, but not at 72h, after patch removal in the dermal irritation experiments and conjunctival redness and blood vessel hyperemia at 1h, but not at 24h, in eye irritation experiments. These findings showed that one product of MWCNTs was a very weak acute irritant to the skin and eyes. No products of SWCNTs and MWCNTs exhibited skin-sensitization effects. Our knowledge of the toxicological effects of CNTs is still limited. Further information is needed to clarify the potential for irritation and sensitization given the complex nature of CNTs. PMID:21893152

  13. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  14. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  15. Alcohol Use Disorder Increases the Risk of Irritable Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tai-Yi; He, Guan-Yi; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Chih-Yu; Wang, Shih-Hao; Chen, Wei-Kung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is considered a possible risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, previous studies investigating the association between AUD and IBS have yielded inconsistent results. The study investigated whether AUD increases the risk of IBS by using a population-based database in Taiwan. This retrospective matched-cohort study included the health insurance claims data of 56,355 AUD inpatients and 225,420 randomly selected controls by frequency-matched for sex, age, and index year. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to measure the risk of IBS among AUD patients compared with non-AUD patients. During the follow-up period, the incidence rate ratio (IRR) of IBS had 12.3-fold (95% CI: 11.9–12.7) in the AUD patients than non-AUD patients and the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for IBS in the AUD patients was 5.51 (95% CI: 4.36–6.96). For several comorbidities, the risk of IBS was significantly higher in the AUD patients than in non-AUD patients, with aHRs of 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.84), 2.05 (95% CI: 1.06–3.96), and 2.91 (95% CI: 1.26–6.72) for sleep disorders, acute pancreatitis, and hepatitis B, respectively. When we stratified the severity of AUD according to the length of hospital stay, the aHRs exhibited a significant correlation (P < 0.001) with severity, yielding aHRs of 3.24 (95% CI: 2.49–4.22), 11.9 (95% CI: 8.96–15.9), and 26.1 (95% CI: 19.4–35.2) for mild, moderate, and severe AUD, respectively. The risk of IBS was higher among AUD patients, and increased with the length of hospital stay. PMID:26705226

  16. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Increases the Risk of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An abnormal interaction in the brain–gut axis is regarded as the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We attempted to determine the association between IBS and subsequent development of epilepsy. A total of 32,122 patients diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2011 were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and 63,295 controls were randomly selected from the insurants without IBS and frequency-matched according to age, sex, and index year as the comparison cohort. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of epilepsy. We analyzed the risks of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazards regression models. The IBS patients had greater cumulative incidence of epilepsy than the cohort without IBS (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 2.54 versus 1.86 per 1000 person-years). The IBS cohort had a higher risk of epilepsy after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, head injury, depression, systemic lupus erythematosus, brain tumor, and antidepressants usage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–1.45). Stratified by the presence of other risk factors, the relative risk was also greater for patients with (aHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10–1.41) or without other risk factors (aHR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35–2.10) in the IBS cohort than for those in the non-IBS cohort. The age-specific relative risk of epilepsy in the IBS cohort was greater than that in the non-IBS cohort for both 35 to 49 age group and 50 to 64 age group (age ≤ 34, aHR:1.31, 95% CI: 0.93–1.85; age 35–49, aHR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.12–1.83; age 50–64, aHR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.27–1.91). However, there was no difference between patients > 65 years with IBS and those without IBS (aHR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94–1.31). This population-based cohort study revealed that IBS increases the risk of developing epilepsy. However, IBS may be less influential than other risk factors

  17. Personality factors and profiles in variants of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farnam, Alireza; Somi, Mohammad H; Sarami, Firouz; Farhang, Sara; Yasrebinia, Sanaz

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) variants (constipation, diarrhea, or both) and personality traits in non-psychiatric patients. METHODS: IBS was diagnosed using the Rome II diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview. Personality traits and the score of each factor were evaluated using the NEO Five Factor Inventory. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were studied. The mean age (± SD) was 33.4 (± 11.0) year (62% female). Subjects scored higher in neuroticism (26.25 ± 7.80 vs 22.92 ± 9.54, P < 0.0005), openness (26.25 ± 5.22 vs 27.94 ± 4.87, P < 0.0005) and conscientiousness (32.90 ± 7.80 vs 31.62 ± 5.64, P < 0.01) compared to our general population derived from universities of Iran. Our studied population consisted of 71 patients with Diarrhea dominant-IBS, 33 with Constipation dominant-IBS and 46 with Altering type-IBS. Scores of conscientiousness and neuroticism were significantly higher in C-IBS compared to D-IBS and A-IBS (35.79 ± 5.65 vs 31.95 ± 6.80, P = 0.035 and 31.97 ± 9.87, P = 0.043, respectively). Conscientiousness was the highest dimension of personality in each of the variants. Patients with C-IBS had almost similar personality profiles, composed of higher scores for neuroticism and conscientiousness, with low levels of agreeableness, openness and extraversion that were close to those of the general population. CONCLUSION: Differences were observed between IBS patients and the general population, as well as between IBS subtypes, in terms of personality factors. Patients with constipation-predominant IBS showed similar personality profiles. Patients with each subtype of IBS may benefit from psychological interventions, which can be focused considering the characteristics of each subtype. PMID:18081232

  18. Effect of São Pedro do Sul thermal water on skin irritation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M O; Costa, P C; Bahia, M F

    2010-06-01

    Many mineral waters are known for centuries for treating dermatological diseases but there is little scientific evaluation of the effects of these waters in skin. A total of 17 healthy Caucasian volunteers, including men and women, were enrolled in this study. Two skin sites were marked on each volunteer forearm and irritated with sodium lauryl sulphate at 2% (w/v) kept under occlusion for 24 h with Finn chambers. Afterwards, purified water or São Pedro do Sul (SPS) thermal water were applied to the irritated skin sites, and kept under occlusion for 48 h also with Finn chambers. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used as a measure of the skin barrier function to evaluate the potential anti-irritant effect of the thermal water on skin. Statistically significant differences in the mean TEWL variations were observed for the skin treated with SPS thermal water and with purified water (P = 0.036). The thermal water reduced the degree to which the skin barrier was disrupted compared with purified water alone in 82.4% of the volunteers. The SPS thermal water is anti-irritant and, therefore, can be helpful to relieve skin irritation and in cosmetic formulations to improve the tolerability of the products. PMID:20557578

  19. Influence of temperature on irritation in the hand/forearm immersion test.

    PubMed

    Clarys, P; Manou, I; Barel, A O

    1997-05-01

    As indicated by in vitro experiments the penetration of irritants through the skin is significantly influenced by the temperature of the solution. In vivo experiments, demonstrated equally a significant influence of temperature in surfactant-induced skin irritation. In order to evaluate the irritant potential of detergent solutions under normal user conditions, we used the hand/forearm immersion test. We compared 2 detergents with different anionic character in a repetitive immersion protocol (30 min immersion on 4 consecutive days). The solutions were tested at 2 temperatures (37 degrees C and 40 degrees C). The irritation was quantified by assessment of the stratum corneum barrier function (transepidermal water loss), skin redness (a* colour parameter) and skin dryness (capacitance method). Both detergents affected the integrity of the skin in a significant way. The anionic content as well as the temperature of the solutions were found to be determinative for the irritant potential, with a stronger response for higher anionic content and temperature, respectively. PMID:9197957

  20. Association of MHC region SNPs with irritant susceptibility in healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Berran; Talzhanov, Yerkebulan; Michael Barmada, M; Johnson, Victor J; Kashon, Michael L; Baron, Elma; Wilson, Nevin W; Frye, Bonnie; Wang, Wei; Fluharty, Kara; Gharib, Rola; Meade, Jean; Germolec, Dori; Luster, Michael I; Nedorost, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis is the most common work-related skin disease, especially affecting workers in "wet-work" occupations. This study was conducted to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and skin irritant response in a group of healthcare workers. 585 volunteer healthcare workers were genotyped for MHC SNPs and patch tested with three different irritants: sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and benzalkonium chloride (BKC). Genotyping was performed using Illumina Goldengate MHC panels. A number of SNPs within the MHC Class I (OR2B3, TRIM31, TRIM10, TRIM40 and IER3), Class II (HLA-DPA1, HLA-DPB1) and Class III (C2) genes were associated (p < 0.001) with skin response to tested irritants in different genetic models. Linkage disequilibrium patterns and functional annotations identified two SNPs in the TRIM40 (rs1573298) and HLA-DPB1 (rs9277554) genes, with a potential impact on gene regulation. In addition, SNPs in PSMB9 (rs10046277 and ITPR3 (rs499384) were associated with hand dermatitis. The results are of interest as they demonstrate that genetic variations in inflammation-related genes within the MHC can influence chemical-induced skin irritation and may explain the connection between inflamed skin and propensity to subsequent allergic contact sensitization. PMID:27258892

  1. Evaluation of acute skin irritation and phototoxicity by aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei

    PubMed Central

    LEE, SANG-HAN

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to assess whether aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei induce acute skin irritation and phototoxicity, acute skin irritancy and phototoxicity tests were performed. The skin of rabbits or guinea pigs was treated with these fractions (100 mg/dose) and whether the animals sustained significant skin damage was determined. The data demonstrated that the aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei did not induce acute toxicity in the skin of the animals, as assessed by anatomical and pathological observations. The results from the present study suggest that these aqueous and ethanol fractions of Angelica keiskei have promising potential uses as cosmetic ingredients that do not induce significant levels of skin irritation or phototoxicity. PMID:23251240

  2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes. PMID:26076568

  3. Towards an Irritable Bowel Syndrome Control System Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolski, Ina; Rettberg, Achim

    To solve health problems with medical applications that use complex algorithms is a trend nowadays. It could also be a chance to help patients with critical problems caused from nerve irritations to overcome them and provide a better living situation. In this paper a system for monitoring and controlling the nerves from the intestine is described on a theoretical basis. The presented system could be applied to the irritable bowel syndrome. For control a neural network is used. The advantages for using a neural network for the control of irritable bowel syndrome are the adaptation and learning. These two aspects are important because the syndrome behavior varies from patient to patient and have also concerning the time a lot of variations with respect to each patient. The developed neural network is implemented and can be simulated. Therefore, it can be shown how the network monitor and control the nerves for individual input parameters.

  4. Removal of an Extra-large Irritation Fibroma With a Combination of Diode Laser and Scalpel

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Sedigheh; Taheri, Jamileh Bigom; Sehhatpour, Marziye; Asnaashari, Mohammad; Attarbashi Moghadam, Saaedeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Irritation fibroma is the most common tumor like and sub mucosal reactive lesion in the oral cavity. Usually it is measured less than 1.5 cm in diameter; however in rare case it has more than 3 cm in diameter. Different kind of treatment for soft tissue lesions include scalpel excision, electrical surgery, and laser surgery. The diode laser can be more effective than conventional surgery, electrosurgery and cryosurgery in reduction of bleeding and pain. Case Report: We reported a very large irritation fibroma in right lingual side of retromolar pad which was less prone to be traumatized under local irritation, in a woman wearing maxillary complete denture and use of both diode laser and scalpel for its excision. PMID:26705465

  5. Role of protective gloves in the causation and treatment of occupational irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonyou; Campbell, Lauren S; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2006-11-01

    Irritant contact dermatitis of the hands is a significant occupational problem. Management primarily involves cessation of exposure to hazardous substances. Protective gloves can reduce or eliminate exposure of the hands to hazardous substances if used correctly, but if not selected and used correctly, protective gloves can actually cause or worsen irritant contact dermatitis of the hands by increasing exposure of the hands to hazardous chemicals. We present two cases of occupational irritant contact dermatitis of the hands caused by incorrect use of protective gloves. Glove failure can occur by penetration, permeation, or contamination, and all 3 mechanisms were operative in these cases. These cases demonstrate that correct use of gloves is at least as important as selection of gloves made of the appropriate material. By understanding mechanisms of glove failure, clinicians can make more appropriate recommendations for the selection and use of protective gloves in the workplace. PMID:17052501

  6. Identifying an indoor air exposure limit for formaldehyde considering both irritation and cancer hazards

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-studied chemical and effects from inhalation exposures have been extensively characterized in numerous controlled studies with human volunteers, including asthmatics and other sensitive individuals, which provide a rich database on exposure concentrations that can reliably produce the symptoms of sensory irritation. Although individuals can differ in their sensitivity to odor and eye irritation, the majority of authoritative reviews of the formaldehyde literature have concluded that an air concentration of 0.3 ppm will provide protection from eye irritation for virtually everyone. A weight of evidence-based formaldehyde exposure limit of 0.1 ppm (100 ppb) is recommended as an indoor air level for all individuals for odor detection and sensory irritation. It has recently been suggested by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) that formaldehyde is causally associated with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and leukemia. This has led US EPA to conclude that irritation is not the most sensitive toxic endpoint and that carcinogenicity should dictate how to establish exposure limits for formaldehyde. In this review, a number of lines of reasoning and substantial scientific evidence are described and discussed, which leads to a conclusion that neither point of contact nor systemic effects of any type, including NPC or leukemia, are causally associated with exposure to formaldehyde. This conclusion supports the view that the equivocal epidemiology studies that suggest otherwise are almost certainly flawed by identified or yet to be unidentified confounding variables. Thus, this assessment concludes that a formaldehyde indoor air limit of 0.1 ppm should protect even particularly susceptible individuals from both irritation effects and any potential cancer hazard. PMID:21635194

  7. Irritancy and allergic responses induced by topical application of ortho-phthalaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Stacey E; Umbright, Christina; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Fluharty, Kara; Kashon, Michael; Franko, Jennifer; Jackson, Laurel G; Johnson, Victor J; Joseph, Pius

    2010-06-01

    Although ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) has been suggested as an alternative to glutaraldehyde for the sterilization and disinfection of hospital equipment, the toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the irritancy and sensitization potential of OPA. The EpiDerm Skin Irritation Test was used to evaluate in vitro irritancy potential of OPA and glutaraldehyde. Treatment with 0.4125 and 0.55% OPA induced irritation, while glutaraldehyde exposure at these concentrations did not. Consistent with the in vitro results, OPA induced irritancy, evaluated by ear swelling, when mice were treated with 0.75%. Initial evaluation of the sensitization potential was conducted using the local lymph node assay at concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 0.75%. A concentration-dependent increase in lymphocyte proliferation was observed with a calculated EC3 value of 0.051% compared to that of 0.089%, previously determined for glutaraldehyde. Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-inducing potential was evaluated by phenotypic analysis of draining lymph node (DLN) cells and measurement of total and specific serum IgE levels. The 0.1 and 0.75% exposed groups yielded significant increases in the IgE+B220+ cell population in the lymph nodes while the 0.75% treated group demonstrated significant increases in total IgE, OPA-specific IgE, and OPA-specific IgG(1). In addition, significant increases in interleukin-4 messenger RNA and protein expression in the DLNs were observed in OPA-treated groups. The results demonstrate the dermal irritancy and allergic potential of OPA and raise concern about the proposed/intended use of OPA as a safe alternative to glutaraldehyde. PMID:20176622

  8. Review of skin irritation/corrosion Hazards on the basis of human data: A regulatory perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jírova, Dagmar; Kandárová, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory classification of skin irritation has historically been based on rabbit data, however current toxicology processes are transitioning to in vitro alternatives. The in vitro assays have to provide sufficient level of sensitivity as well as specificity to be accepted as replacement methods for the existing in vivo assays. This is usually achieved by comparing the in vitro results to classifications obtained in animals. Significant drawback of this approach is that neither in vivo nor in vitro methods are calibrated against human hazard data and results obtained in these assays may not correspond to situation in human. The main objective of this review was to establish an extended database of substances classified according to their human hazard to serve for further development of alternative methods relevant to human health as well as resource for improved regulatory classification. The literature has been reviewed to assemble all the available information on the testing of substances in the human 4 h human patch test, which is the only standardized protocol in humans matching the exposure conditions of the regulatory accepted in vivo rabbit skin irritation test. A total of 81 substances tested according to the defined 4 h human patch test protocol were found and collated into a dataset together with their existing in vivo classifications published in the literature. While about 50% of the substances in the database are classified as irritating based on the rabbit skin test, on using the 4 h HPT test, less than 20% were identified as acutely irritant to human skin. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the rabbit skin irritation test largely over-predicts human responses for the evaluated chemicals. Correct classification of the acute skin irritation hazard will only be possible if newly developed in vitro toxicology methods will be calibrated to produce results relevant to man. PMID:23118595

  9. IL-6 deficiency exacerbates skin inflammation in a murine model of irritant dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric G; Mickle-Kawar, Bethany M; Gallucci, Randle M

    2013-01-01

    Contact dermatitis is the second most reported occupational injury associated with workers compensation. Inflammatory cytokines are closely involved with the development of dermatitis, and their modulation could exacerbate skin damage, thus contributing to increased irritancy. IL-6 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine paradoxically associated with both skin healing and inflammation. To determine what role this pleiotropic cytokine plays in chemically-induced irritant dermatitis, IL-6 deficient (KO), IL-6 over-expressing transgenic (TgIL6), and corresponding wild-type (WT) mice were exposed to acetone or the irritants JP-8 jet fuel or benzalkonium chloride (BKC) daily for 7 days. Histological analysis of exposed skin was performed, as was tissue mRNA and protein expression patterns of inflammatory cytokines via QPCR and multiplex ELISA. The results indicated that, following JP-8 exposure, IL-6KO mice had greatly increased skin IL-1β, TNFα, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL1 mRNA and corresponding product protein expression when compared to that of samples from WT counterparts and acetone-exposed control mice. BKC treatment induced the expression of all cytokines examined as compared to acetone, with CCL2 significantly higher in skin from IL-6KO mice. Histological analysis showed that IL-6KO mice displayed significantly more inflammatory cell infiltration as compared to WT and TgIL6 mice in response to jet fuel. Analysis of mRNA for the M2 macrophage marker CD206 indicated a 4-fold decrease in skin of IL-6KO mice treated with either irritant as compared to WT. Taken together, these observations suggest that IL-6 acts in an anti-inflammatory manner during irritant dermatitis, and these effects are dependent on the chemical nature of the irritant. PMID:22966985

  10. Encapsulation of Mentha Oil in Chitosan Polymer Matrix Alleviates Skin Irritation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nidhi; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Yadav, Kuldeep Singh; Sinha, Priyam; Kanaujia, Archana; Chanda, Debabrata; Jakhmola, Apurva; Saikia, Dharmendra; Yadav, Narayan Prasad

    2016-04-01

    Mentha spicata L. var. viridis oil (MVO) is a potent antifungal agent, but its application in the topical treatment is limited due to its irritancy and volatility. It was aimed to develop more efficient, chitosan-incrusted MVO microspheres with reduced volatility and lesser irritancy and to dispense it in the form of ointment. Simple coacervation technique was employed to microencapsulate MVO in chitosan matrix. Morphological properties and polymer cross-linking were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. Optimization was carried out on the basis of entrapment efficiency (EE) using response surface methodology. Well-designed microspheres having smooth surface and spherical shape were observed. EE (81.20%) of optimum batch (R21) was found at 1.62% w/v of cross-linker, 5.4:5 of MVO to chitosan ratio and at 1000 rpm. R21 showed 69.38 ± 1.29% in vitro MVO release in 12 h and 96.92% retention of MVO in microspheres even after 8 week. Ointments of PEG 4000 and PEG 400 comprising MVO (F1) and R21 (F2) were developed separately. F2 showed comparatively broader zone of growth inhibition (13.33 ± 1.76-18.67 ± 0.88 mm) and less irritancy (PII 0.5833, irritation barely perceptible) than that of F1. F2 was able to avoid the direct contact of mild irritant MVO with the skin and to reduce its rapid volatility. Controlled release of MVO helped in lengthening the duration of availability of MVO in agar media and hence improved its therapeutic efficacy. In conclusion, a stable and non-irritant formulation with improved therapeutic potential was developed. PMID:26248538

  11. Comparison of in vitro cell toxicity with in vivo eye irritation.

    PubMed

    Bracher, M; Faller, C; Spengler, J; Reinhardt, C A

    The effects of 26 different cosmetic ingredients (e.g., permanent wave and hair dye compounds, emulsifiers, resins, and detergents such as quats) were assessed by four end points indicative for qualitatively and quantitatively different cytotoxicity: (1) neutral red uptake reduction after 24 h of treatment (NR-90 and NR-50); (2) cell detachment from culture dish after 4 h of treatment (CD-25); (3) growth inhibition after 48 h of treatment (GI-50); and (4) membrane permeability measured by fluorescent dye retention (fluorescence shift FS-25) and dye exclusion (viability ratio VR-25). The cytotoxicity potentials of the test agents were ranked for each in vitro test and compared with the in vivo eye irritation in guinea pigs (Draize test) after application of 5 or 2.5% (w/v) solutions of the same test batches. Strong irritants could be easily detected by most of the in vitro tests, but the neutral red uptake assay (especially NR-50) was the only one that was able to distinguish the minimally irritating test agents from strong irritants as well as from nonirritants. (I) All three extremely irritating quaternary ammonia compounds were identified as the strongest cytotoxic agents. (II) Nine out of 12 minimally irritating substances (mainly emulsifiers and resins) were ranked in the intermediate group. (III) Eight out of 11 non-or practically nonirritating chemicals (mainly permanent wave compounds) showed cytotoxic effects at very high concentrations only. The distinction of these three groups was better by means of NR-50 than by NR-90 data. At least two of the other cell tests (CD-25, GI-50, FS-25, and VR-25) had to be considered to allow an adequate interpretation of in vitro cytotoxicity. PMID:3509702

  12. Evaluation of Eye Irritation Potential of Solid Substance with New 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea Model, MCTT HCETM

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won-hee; Jung, Kyoung-mi; Yang, Hye-ri; Lee, Miri; Jung, Haeng-Sun; Lee, Su-Hyon; Park, Miyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    The eye irritation potential of drug candidates or pharmaceutical ingredients should be evaluated if there is a possibility of ocular exposure. Traditionally, the ocular irritation has been evaluated by the rabbit Draize test. However, rabbit eyes are more sensitive to irritants than human eyes, therefore substantial level of false positives are unavoidable. To resolve this species difference, several three-dimensional human corneal epithelial (HCE) models have been developed as alternative eye irritation test methods. Recently, we introduced a new HCE model, MCTT HCETM which is reconstructed with non-transformed human corneal cells from limbal tissues. Here, we examined if MCTT HCETM can be employed to evaluate eye irritation potential of solid substances. Through optimization of washing method and exposure time, treatment time was established as 10 min and washing procedure was set up as 4 times of washing with 10 mL of PBS and shaking in 30 mL of PBS in a beaker. With the established eye irritation test protocol, 11 solid substances (5 non-irritants, 6 irritants) were evaluated which demonstrated an excellent predictive capacity (100% accuracy, 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity). We also compared the performance of our test method with rabbit Draize test results and in vitro cytotoxicity test with 2D human corneal epithelial cell lines. PMID:26157556

  13. Irritability Levels of Field and Laboratory Population of Culex pipiens Complex in Tehran to Different Groups of Insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Sara; Vatandoost, Hassan; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Raeisi, Ahmad; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Rafi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The irritant effect of some insecticides can cause a proportion of mosquitoes to leave the sprayed rooms before acquiring a lethal dose, so the repeated contact al sub-lethal dose may lead to extent the resistance. Methods: Larvae and pupae of Culex pipiens complex were collected in mass from open canals of waste water in capital city Tehran and reared to obtain the first generation at laboratory. Sugar-fed 2–3 days female mosquitoes were used for the experiments and compared with laboratory strain. The irritability tests of insecticides impregnated papers were measured in plastic conical exposure chambers placed which implemented at controlled conditions according to the method described by WHO. Number of take-offs were counted during 15 minutes of exposure time. Results: DDT had the most irritancy effect against field population of Cx. pipiens. DDT, permethrin and deltamethrin was moderately irritable against laboratory strain, whereas, addition to three previous insecticides, malathion, cyfluthrin and propoxur should be also considered as moderately irritable insecticides for field population of. Irritability level of etofenprox, fenithrothion, bendiocarb, and lambdacyhalothrin did not differ from control group. Conclusion: The irritability response of mosquitoes may have a negative impact on control measures. Periodical execution of irritability tests with insecticides that routinely used in vector control program is highly recommended. PMID:27308276

  14. Slight respiratory irritation but not inflammation in mice exposed to (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, A; Kasanen, J-P; Kosma, V-M; Rylander, R; Pasanen, A-L

    2003-01-01

    Airway irritation effects after single and repeated inhalation exposures to aerosols of beta-glucan (grifolan) were investigated in mice. In addition, the effects on serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) production and histopathological inflammation in the respiratory tract were studied. The beta-glucan aerosols provoked slight sensory irritation in the airways, but the response was not concentration dependent at the levels studied. Slight pulmonary irritation was observed after repeated exposures. No effect was found on the serum total IgE levels, and no signs of inflammation were seen in the airways 6 h after the final exposure. The results suggest that, irrespective of previous fungal sensitization of the animals, inhaled beta-glucan may cause symptoms of respiratory tract irritation but without apparent inflammation. Respiratory tract irritation reported after inhalation of fungi may not be entirely attributed to beta-glucan. PMID:12857597

  15. Deconstructing Oppositional Defiant Disorder: Clinic-Based Evidence for an Anger/Irritability Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine risk factors and co-occurring symptoms associated with mother-reported versus teacher-reported anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in a clinic-based sample of 1,160 youth aged 6 through 18 years. Method: Participants completed a background history questionnaire (mothers), school…

  16. Anger and Irritability Symptoms among Youth with ODD: Cross-Informant versus Source-Exclusive Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2012-01-01

    We examined differences in co-occurring psychological symptoms and background characteristics among clinically referred youth with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) with and without anger/irritability symptoms (AIS) according to either parent or teacher (source-exclusive) and both informants (cross-informant), youth with noncompliant symptoms…

  17. Anxiety, Depression, and Irritability in Children with Autism Relative to Other Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Murray, Michael J.; Ahuja, Meesha; Smith, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Maternal ratings of anxiety, depression, and irritability were analyzed in 1390 children (6-16 years of age), including 233 children with high functioning autism (HFA, IQ greater than or equal to 80), 117 children with low functioning autism (LFA, IQ less than 80), 187 typical children, and 853 children with other disorders. As a group, children…

  18. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  19. Psychological Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Mesmer, Christina; Morley, Stephen; Dowzer, Clare; Hamilton, Simon

    2004-01-01

    This study conducted a systematic review to assess the quality of existing literature on psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and to quantify the evidence for their efficacy. Three independent reviewers (2 from England, 1 from the United States) coded the quality of 32 studies, 17 of which provided data suitable for meta-analysis.…

  20. Type A Behavior and Marital Satisfaction: Differential Effects of Achievement Striving and Impatience/Irritability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacEwen, Karyl; Barling, Julian

    1993-01-01

    Examined how dimensions of Type A behavior exert different effects on marital relationship. Findings from 200 couples are consistent with view that Type A behavior should be divided into at least 2 components, and that it is Impatience/Irritability dimension rather than achievement-oriented or job-involved dimension that exerts detrimental effects…

  1. [Irritable bowel syndrome in the light of Rome consensus III (2006): 10 years later].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Albulova, E A; Ruchkina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common diagnosis in gastroenterology. Over 10 years after Rome consensus III (2006), there has been much new information on the pathogenesis of IBS and its therapy options. The paper analyzes basic investigations that have contributed to the theory of this disease and to a better quality of life in patients. PMID:27135104

  2. Daily Shame and Hostile Irritability in Adolescent Girls with Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lori N.; Stepp, Stephanie D.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Whalen, Diana J.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests that adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have difficulty regulating both shame and anger, and that these emotions may be functionally related in clinically relevant ways (e.g., Schoenleber & Berenbaum, 2012b). The covariation of shame with anger-related emotions has important clinical implications for interventions targeting shame and uncontrolled anger in BPD. However, no studies have examined shame, anger, and their covariation in adolescents who may be at risk for developing BPD. Therefore, this study focuses on associations between BPD symptoms and patterns of covariation between daily experiences of shame and anger-related affects (i.e., hostile irritability) in a community sample of adolescent girls using ecological momentary assessment. Multilevel models revealed that girls with greater BPD symptoms who reported greater mean levels of shame across the week also tended to report more hostile irritability, even after controlling for guilt. Additionally, examination of within-person variability showed that girls with greater BPD symptoms reported more hostile irritability on occasions when they also reported greater concurrent shame, but this was only the case in girls of average socioeconomic status (i.e., those not receiving public assistance). Unlike shame, guilt was not associated with hostile irritability in girls with greater BPD symptoms. Results suggest that shame may be a key clinical target in the treatment of anger-related difficulties among adolescent girls with BPD symptoms. PMID:25580673

  3. Nasal chemosensory cells use bitter taste signaling to detect irritants and bacterial signals

    PubMed Central

    Tizzano, Marco; Gulbransen, Brian D.; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Clapp, Tod R.; Herman, Jake P.; Sibhatu, Hiruy M.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Silver, Wayne L.; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is continually assaulted with harmful dusts and xenobiotics carried on the incoming airstream. Detection of such irritants by the trigeminal nerve evokes protective reflexes, including sneezing, apnea, and local neurogenic inflammation of the mucosa. Although free intra-epithelial nerve endings can detect certain lipophilic irritants (e.g., mints, ammonia), the epithelium also houses a population of trigeminally innervated solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) that express T2R bitter taste receptors along with their downstream signaling components. These SCCs have been postulated to enhance the chemoresponsive capabilities of the trigeminal irritant-detection system. Here we show that transduction by the intranasal solitary chemosensory cells is necessary to evoke trigeminally mediated reflex reactions to some irritants including acyl–homoserine lactone bacterial quorum-sensing molecules, which activate the downstream signaling effectors associated with bitter taste transduction. Isolated nasal chemosensory cells respond to the classic bitter ligand denatonium as well as to the bacterial signals by increasing intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, these same substances evoke changes in respiration indicative of trigeminal activation. Genetic ablation of either Gα-gustducin or TrpM5, essential elements of the T2R transduction cascade, eliminates the trigeminal response. Because acyl–homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing molecules for Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, detection of these substances by airway chemoreceptors offers a means by which the airway epithelium may trigger an epithelial inflammatory response before the bacteria reach population densities capable of forming destructive biofilms. PMID:20133764

  4. Identification of potential biomarkers for predicting acute dermal irritation by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihao; Dai, Taoli; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Minjing; Xiao, Xue; Hu, Hao; Zou, Ping; Liu, Xia; Xiang, Qi; Su, Zhijian; Huang, Yadong; He, Qing-Yu

    2011-11-01

    In vitro alternative tests aiming at replacing the traditional animal test for predicting the irritant potential of chemicals have been developed, but the assessment parameters or endpoints are still not sufficient for analysis. To discover novel endpoints for skin irritation responses, a proteomics approach was used to analyze the protein expression in human keratinocytes exposed to sodium lauryl sulfate in the present study. Among the 20 identified proteins with altered expression, small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) and superoxide dismutase [Cu-Zn] were down-regulated while cofilin-1 was up-regulated significantly in response to the chemical challenge. Keratinocytes were exposed to acid and basic chemicals for further validation of the proteins. HSP27 displayed the most significant alteration both in mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by nuclear translocation. The irritation also induced an increased production of interleukin-1α in keratinocytes. These findings suggest that these proteins may be combinational biomarkers or additional endpoints for skin hazard assessment. Further investigation into the protein alterations would be helpful for the mechanistic understanding of skin irritation. PMID:21469165

  5. 16 CFR 1500.41 - Method of testing primary irritant substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of testing primary irritant substances. 1500.41 Section 1500.41 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.41 Method of testing primary...

  6. Gut microbiota influences low fermentable substrate diet efficacy in children with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to determine whether a low fermentable substrate diet (LFSD) decreases abdominal pain frequency in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to identify potential microbial factors related to diet efficacy. Pain symptoms, stooling characteristics, breath hydrogen and methane, whole ...

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtypes: Nothing resembles less an IBS than another IBS.

    PubMed

    Mearin Manrique, Fermín

    2016-02-01

    Two new members of "IBS Patient Association" met at a meeting. Feeling somewhat lost, not knowing anybody present, they introduced themselves to each other. After exchanging names, one asks the other - "What's your problem?" The other one answers - "I got constipation that laxatives fail to relieve, and my belly, which is always bloated, sometimes hurts so much that I can´t even leave home". Deeply surprised, the first individual inquires - "What are you doing here then?" "Why, I came to this meeting looking for some help for my irritable colon", she answered. "Irritable colon? That's no irritable colon. Irritable bowel syndrome is what I suffer from, and it's diarrhea that won't let me be; can't stop running to the toilet, and cramps just pop up any time". Now both looked surprised. Both thought they had come to the wrong meeting, and both were on the verge of leaving. Luckily, the Association's secretary showed up and explained that both had IBS. PMID:26838485

  8. Comparison of in vitro predictive tests for irritation induced by anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Paye, M; Piérard, G E

    1995-07-01

    Skin compatibility of anionic surfactants may often but not always be predicted by in vitro tests. For instance, the correlation between in vivo and in vitro data is classically hampered in the presence of magnesium. This ion is known to interfere with in vitro skin irritation predictive tests based on protein denaturation. This study was conducted to compare a recently introduced assay, corneosurfametry, with other in vitro tests including the pH-rise of bovine serum albumin, collagen swelling, and zein solubilization tests. Corneosurfametry entails collection of cyanoacrylate skin surface strippings and short contact time with surfactants, followed by staining samples with toluidine blue and basic fuchsin dyes. Measurements are made by reflectance colorimetry. Data show that irritation potentials predicted by corneosurfametry agree with those obtained by established in vivo and in vitro irritation tests. Moreover, corneosurfametry data are not artificially lowered by addition of magnesium in surfactant solutions. In conclusion, corneosurfametry should be viewed as one of the realistic predictive tests for surfactant irritancy. PMID:7493460

  9. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. 57.15006 Section 57.15006 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND...

  10. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. 56.15006 Section 56.15006 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL...

  11. Effects of Orchard Pesticides on Galendromus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae): Repellency and Irritancy.

    PubMed

    Beers, Elizabeth H; Schmidt-Jeffris, Rebecca A

    2015-02-01

    The effects of repellency or irritancy in Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbitt) were studied for three rates of 16 pesticides commonly used in apple production. Adult female mites were exposed to residues in a series of choice bioassays (treated and untreated half of bean leaf disks). Novaluron, carbaryl, mancozeb+copper hydroxide, and sulfur were the most repellent materials to G. occidentalis, with females consistently avoiding the treated side of the leaf disk. Spirotetramat, flubendiamide, and cyantriniliprole caused an intermediate or inconsistent degree of repellency; azinphosmethyl, lambda-cyhalothrin, acetamiprid, thiacloprid, imidacloprid, spinetoram, spinosad, and chlorantriniliprole caused little to no repellency. Irritancy (running off of the disk, as opposed to resting on the untreated half) was the most pronounced in the acetamiprid and lambda-cyhalothrin treatments. Acute toxicity (within the 6 h test period) was highest in the lambda-cyhalothrin and spinetoram treatments; in the former case, the mortality at all rates tested was substantial enough to interfere with the measurement of behavioral effects. Although irritancy may be considered the more extreme form of repellency, there were several pesticides (carbaryl, cyantraniliprole, mancozeb+copper hydroxide, novaluron) where a moderate to high degree of repellency did not correspond to a high degree of irritancy. Similarly, repellency was not consistently related to acute toxicity; one of the most repellent materials (novaluron) was not acutely toxic. Behavioral effects may help explain instances where lethal or sublethal bioassays do not fully predict the effects of pesticides seen in orchard use. PMID:26470128

  12. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall...

  13. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall...

  14. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall be provided, maintained in a...

  15. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall be provided, maintained in a...

  16. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall be provided, maintained in a...

  17. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall...

  18. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall be provided, maintained in a...

  19. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall...

  20. Methodological issues in the study of intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an intestinal functional disorder with the highest prevalence in the industrialized world. The intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the pathogenesis of IBS and is not merely a consequence of this disorder. Previous research efforts have not revealed unequivocal microbiological signatures of IBS, and the experimental results are contradictory. The experimental methodologies adopted to investigate the complex intestinal ecosystem drastically impact the quality and significance of the results. Therefore, to consider the methodological aspects of the research on IM in IBS, we reviewed 29 relevant original research articles identified through a PubMed search using three combinations of keywords: "irritable bowel syndrome + microflora", "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiota" and "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiome". For each study, we reviewed the quality and significance of the scientific evidence obtained with respect to the experimental method adopted. The data obtained from each study were compared with all considered publications to identify potential inconsistencies and explain contradictory results. The analytical revision of the studies referenced in the present review has contributed to the identification of microbial groups whose relative abundance significantly alters IBS, suggesting that these microbial groups could be IM signatures for this syndrome. The identification of microbial biomarkers in the IM can be advantageous for the development of new diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of different subtypes of IBS. PMID:25083056

  1. [Primary results of the reflexotherapy in the syndrome of irritable colon. Preliminary note5].

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, M; Magnani, G; Roccia, L

    1976-06-01

    After stressing the uncertainties of classifying the syndrome exactly and the part played by psychosomatism in its aetiopathogenesis, some forms of acupuncture have been attempted as alternatives to psychodrugs and antispastic substances. 50 cases are examined in which diagnosis of irritable colon was confirmed by thorough clinical and laboratory examinations, use is also being made of appropriate computerizable tables. PMID:934538

  2. Separation of retinoid-induced epidermal and dermal thickening from skin irritation

    PubMed Central

    Fligiel, Helene; Zhang, Jian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Lu, Yi; Dehne, Lindsay A.; Keller, Evan T.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the synthetic retinoid MDI-301, in which the carboxylic acid of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) is replaced with an ester linkage, to induce epidermal and dermal thickening and skin irritation (erythema and flaking) in hairless (rhino) mice following its topical application was investigated in comparison with that of 14-all-trans-retinoic acid (14-all-trans-RA) and 9-cis-RA. MDI-301 induced epidermal proliferation leading to a thickened epidermis. Treated animals also demonstrated a prominent band of organized connective tissue immediately below the epidermis. In its ability to induce epidermal thickening, MDI-301 was quantitatively similar to 14-all-trans-RA and 9-cis-RA. However, unlike 14-all-trans-RA and 9-cis-RA, which produced skin irritation associated with a perivascular influx of mononuclear leukocytes into the dermis, there was no evidence of irritation with MDI-301 and little leukocyte infiltration. Intraperitoneal injection of either 14-all-trans-RA or MDI-301 also resulted in epidermal and dermal thickening. Irritation of skin was not observed in these animals but splenomegaly was prominent in animals treated with either agent. PMID:14564458

  3. The influence of hard water (calcium) and surfactants on irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Warren, R; Ertel, K D; Bartolo, R G; Levine, M J; Bryant, P B; Wong, L F

    1996-12-01

    Although the induction of irritant contact dermatitis has been extensively studied for surfactants, the role of the environmental factor water hardness (i.e., calcium content) on the induction process has not received attention. Our objective was to investigate differences in surfactant-induced irritant skin reactions from cumulative exposure to 3 different personal cleansing agents and determine whether the irritation potential can be affected by the hardness of the water. 2 commonly used exaggerated washing procedures were variously employed to evaluate representative sodium soap, triethanolamine-soap, or synthetic detergent cleansers under conditions where the water hardness varied from 0-grain to 11-grain (gr). Subjects were clinically evaluated for skin dryness, skin redness, and instrumentally for hydration. Soap binding to skin was quantified using Fourier transform infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Using the more mild wash procedure, skin sites treated under conditions of hard, 11 gr water were significantly drier, had more erythema, and were less hydrated than corresponding sites treated with deionized 0 gr water. All 3 surfactant cleanser behaved similarly. We also found the hardness of the rinse water to be the more significant factor versus that of the wash water. Effect of water hardness on soap binding to skin revealed a similar outcome. Under a more exaggerated wash condition the relationship between water hardness and irritation broke down. PMID:9118628

  4. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  5. The Affective Reactivity Index: A Concise Irritability Scale for Clinical and Research Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert; Ferdinando, Sumudu; Razdan, Varun; Muhrer, Eli; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Irritable mood has recently become a matter of intense scientific interest. Here, we present data from two samples, one from the United States and the other from the United Kingdom, demonstrating the clinical and research utility of the parent- and self-report forms of the Affective Reactivity Index (ARI), a concise dimensional measure…

  6. Associations among gut permeability, inflammatory markers, and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and immune measures are present in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but the relationship to symptoms is poorly defined. In adults with IBS, we compared permeability, unstimulated peripheral blood monocyte (PBMC) interleukin-10 (IL-10...

  7. Characterization of Spatial Repellent, Contact Irritant and Toxicant Chemical Actions of Standard Vector Control Compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously described modular high-throughput screening system (HITTS) was used to characterize the spatial repellent, contact irritant and toxicant chemical actions of 14 compounds with a history of use in vector control. The response of F1-F4 Aedes aegypti to various concentrations of four organo...

  8. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  9. Brief Report: Retrospective Case Series of Oxcarbazepine for Irritability/Agitation Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jessica F.; Sanders, Kevin B.; Benneyworth, M. Hannah; Smith, Jessica L.; DeJean, Virginia M.; McGrew, Susan G.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    We examined response to oxcarbazepine prescribed for irritability/agitation symptoms in a retrospective case series of 30 patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The average patient was 12.0 years old (range 5-21) and taking two other psychotropic medications (range 0-4). Fourteen patients (47 %) had a clinical global impression of…

  10. Can a positive photopatch test be elicited by subclinical irritancy or allergy plus suberythemal UV exposure?

    PubMed

    Beattie, P E; Traynor, N J; Woods, J A; Dawe, R S; Ferguson, J; Ibbotson, S H

    2004-01-01

    Photopatch test (PhPT) interpretation is difficult and clinical relevance is not always apparent. A positive PhPT may reflect photocontact allergy or phototoxicity. We hypothesized that it may also reflect the additive or synergistic effects of a suberythemal reaction to a contact irritant [e.g. sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)] or allergen (e.g. nickel) and suberythemal UV exposure. 10 nickel allergic volunteers had duplicate SLS and nickel series applied on either side of the back for 24 h and 48 h, respectively. After removal, one side was irradiated with 5 J/cm(2) UVA or the dose below the minimal erythema dose for solar-simulated radiation (SSR). The minimal irritancy dose (MID) for SLS and the minimal allergenic dose (MAD) for nickel were determined visually and objectively by erythema meter. While photoaugmentation of subclinical contact allergy or irritancy occurred in some subjects, photosuppression occurred in roughly an equal number. UVA changed the nickel MAD at 48 h in 2 of 5 volunteers but not the SLS MID. SSR changed the nickel MAD in 4 of 5 and the SLS MID in 3 of 5. 2 subjects (none after UVA) showed erythema only in the irradiated set of patches, which could have been interpreted as a positive PhPT. We have demonstrated photoaugmentation and photosuppression of contact allergy and irritancy, which could result in false-positive or false-negative interpretation of PhPTs. PMID:15606647

  11. Longitudinal Outcome of Youth Oppositionality: Irritable, Headstrong, and Hurtful Behaviors Have Distinctive Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal design that compares data from two British national surveys and their follow-ups reveal that an irritable dimension of oppositional behavior is the sole predictor of emotional disorder at follow-up. The headstrong dimension is the predictor of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder while the hurtful dimension is a strong predictor…

  12. Methodological issues in the study of intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an intestinal functional disorder with the highest prevalence in the industrialized world. The intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the pathogenesis of IBS and is not merely a consequence of this disorder. Previous research efforts have not revealed unequivocal microbiological signatures of IBS, and the experimental results are contradictory. The experimental methodologies adopted to investigate the complex intestinal ecosystem drastically impact the quality and significance of the results. Therefore, to consider the methodological aspects of the research on IM in IBS, we reviewed 29 relevant original research articles identified through a PubMed search using three combinations of keywords: “irritable bowel syndrome + microflora”, “irritable bowel syndrome + microbiota” and “irritable bowel syndrome + microbiome”. For each study, we reviewed the quality and significance of the scientific evidence obtained with respect to the experimental method adopted. The data obtained from each study were compared with all considered publications to identify potential inconsistencies and explain contradictory results. The analytical revision of the studies referenced in the present review has contributed to the identification of microbial groups whose relative abundance significantly alters IBS, suggesting that these microbial groups could be IM signatures for this syndrome. The identification of microbial biomarkers in the IM can be advantageous for the development of new diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of different subtypes of IBS. PMID:25083056

  13. Improved procedures for in vitro skin irritation testing of sticky and greasy natural botanicals.

    PubMed

    Molinari, J; Eskes, C; Andres, E; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Hurtado, S P; Barrichello, C

    2013-02-01

    Skin irritation evaluation is an important endpoint for the safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients required by various regulatory authorities for notification and/or import of test substances. The present study was undertaken to investigate possible protocol adaptations of the currently validated in vitro skin irritation test methods based on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) for the testing of plant extracts and natural botanicals. Due to their specific physico-chemical properties, such as lipophilicity, sticky/buttery-like texture, waxy/creamy foam characteristics, normal washing procedures can lead to an incomplete removal of these materials and/or to mechanical damage to the tissues, resulting in an impaired prediction of the true skin irritation potential of the materials. For this reason different refined washing procedures were evaluated for their ability to ensure appropriate removal of greasy and sticky substances while not altering the normal responses of the validated RhE test method. Amongst the different procedures evaluated, the use of a SDS 0.1% PBS solution to remove the sticky and greasy test material prior to the normal washing procedures was found to be the most suitable adaptation to ensure efficient removal of greasy and sticky in-house controls without affecting the results of the negative control. The predictive capacity of the refined SDS 0.1% washing procedure, was investigated by using twelve oily and viscous compounds having known skin irritation effects supported by raw and/or peer reviewed in vivo data. The normal washing procedure resulted in 8 out of 10 correctly predicted compounds as compared to 9 out of 10 with the refined washing procedures, showing an increase in the predictive ability of the assay. The refined washing procedure allowed to correctly identify all in vivo skin irritant materials showing the same sensitivity as the normal washing procedures, and further increased the specificity of the assay from 5 to 6 correct

  14. Chemosensory irritations and pulmonary effects of acute exposure to emissions from oriented strand board.

    PubMed

    Gminski, Richard; Marutzky, Rainer; Kevekordes, Sebastian; Fuhrmann, Frank; Bürger, Werner; Hauschke, Dieter; Ebner, Winfried; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2011-09-01

    Due to the reduction of air change rates in low-energy houses, the contribution to indoor air quality of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitting from oriented strand boards (OSB) has become increasingly important. The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory irritations, pulmonary effects and odor annoyance of emissions from OSB in healthy human volunteers compared to clean air. Twenty-four healthy non-smokers were exposed to clean air and OSB emissions for 2 h under controlled conditions in a 48 m(3) test chamber at three different time points: to fresh OSB panels and to the same panels after open storage for 2 and 8 weeks. Chemosensory irritation, exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration, eye blink frequency, lung function and subjective perception of irritation of eyes, nose and throat were examined before, during and after exposure. Additionally, olfactory perception was investigated. Total VOC exposure concentrations reached 8.9 ± 0.8 mg/m(3) for the fresh OSB panels. Emissions consisted predominantly of α-pinene, Δ(3)-carene and hexanal. Two-hour exposure to high VOC concentrations revealed no irritating or pulmonary effects. All the subjective ratings of discomfort were at a low level and the medians did not exceed the expression 'hardly at all.' Only the ratings for smell of emissions increased significantly during exposure in comparison to clean air. In conclusion, exposure of healthy volunteers to OSB emissions did not elicit sensory irritations or pulmonary effects up to a VOC concentration of about 9 mg/m(3). Sensory intensity of OSB emissions in the chamber air was rated as 'neutral to pleasant.' PMID:21071553

  15. Epithelium-fibroblast co-culture for assessing mucosal irritancy of metals used in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Arenholt-Bindslev, D; Hiller, K A; Schweikl, H

    1997-02-01

    No valid animal or in vitro model exists to assess the potential mucosal irritancy of dental materials. However, recently, a commercially available model system based on a recombined co-culture of human fibroblasts and human epithelial cells has been introduced for evaluating the time-dependent irritancy of cosmetic products. Cell viability and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from the cells were used as markers for the irritative potential of test materials. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of this model for monitoring the irritative potential of metals and cast alloys used in dentistry. The human fibroblast-keratinocyte co-cultures were exposed to test specimens fabricated from copper, zinc, palladium, nickel, tin, cobalt, indium, a high noble cast alloy, and from a dental ceramic. Cell survival rates decreased after exposure to copper (14-25%), cobalt (60%), zinc (63%), indium (85%), nickel (87%), and the non-oxidized and oxidized high noble cast alloy (87%/90%) compared to untreated control cultures. Dental ceramic, palladium and tin did not influence cell viability. In parallel, the PGE2 release was continuously monitored up to 24 h using a competitive displacement enzyme immunoassay. PGE2 release increased most highly in the cultures exposed to copper (6-25 fold), cobalt (7 fold), indium (4 fold), and zinc (2 fold) compared to untreated control cultures. The PGE2 determination proved to be a non-destructive method for continuous monitoring of cell reactions in the same culture. The model used seems promising for evaluating the time-dependent mucosal irritancy of dental cast alloys. PMID:9085034

  16. Contribution of Blastocystishominis subtypes and associated inflammatory factors in development of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Marzieh; Basati, Gholam; Abangah, Ghobad; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Mirzaei, Asad

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis hominis with worldwide distribution is a human intestinal protozoa found in all countries. There have been differences in the severity of the pathogenesis of various Blastocystis spp. and a concomitant variation in the plasma concentration of the cytokines in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the contribution of B. hominis subtypes in the development of irritable bowel syndrome. Stool samples were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders. All samples were evaluated through native-lugol method. Total DNA was extracted. A PCR protocol was developed to amplify a specific region of the SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. Serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by immunoassay methods. The ClustalW algorithm was applied to align and blast the nucleotide sequences of the amplified region of the SSU rDNA gene. To evaluate the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary of the nucleotide sequences, we used the MEGA software. In this study, we found 26 haplotypes of B. hominis in the studied samples which were collectively belong to five subtypes (ST1, ST2 in patients without irritable bowel syndrome vs. ST3 and two unknown subtypes in patients with irritable bowel syndrome). Result of ELISA showed a high level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the serum of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The genetic heterogeneity of B. hominis and the existence of different subtypes of the protozoan in patients with IBS may shed light to the fact that some subtypes of parasites may involve in the pathogenesis of IBS. PMID:26841770

  17. Relevance and reliability of the PREDISAFE assay in the COLIPA eye irritation validation program (phase 1).

    PubMed

    Courtellemont, P; Hébert, P; Biesse, J P; Castelli, D; Friteau, L; Serrano, J; Robles, C

    1999-04-01

    The 6th Amendment of the European Directive on Cosmetics induces a potential ban on animal testing for cosmetic ingredients and finished products. In this new context, COLIPA (The European Cosmetic Toiletry and Perfumery Association) has initiated an international multicentric study with the main goal of validating available alternatives to in vitro methods for assessing the eye irritation potential of cosmetic raw materials and formulations. In order to test undiluted and hydrophobic ingredients and formulations, a cytotoxicity test named PREDISAFE was incorporated into our internal battery of in vitro tests for 3 years. This cell culture test based on the neutral red release procedure was prevalidated with several cosmetic formulations and used systematically by comparison with internal benchmarks. In this article, the defined prediction model and the protocol used in the COLIPA eye irritation program are described, and furthermore the PREDISAFE assay results obtained during Phase I of the above mentioned study are presented and discussed in detail. The statistical analysis proves clearly a great interest in the PREDISAFE test for the prediction of eye irritation potential of cosmetic formulations. Its strong compatibility for a wide category of finished products associated with its ease of use offer relevant advantages for a routine use in the ocular irritancy screening in the cosmetics industry. This paper also explains the reasons for false negative and false positive in vitro tests results and describes possible technical modifications to avoid these wrong predictions. At the end, some recommendations for the Phase II of the COLIPA study are considered with the main objective to prove that a multivariable analysis could be useful to find the best battery of in vitro assays for acceptance by the regulators for the replacement of the Draize eye irritation test. PMID:20654488

  18. TRPV4 is necessary for trigeminal irritant pain and functions as a cellular formalin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Kanju, Patrick; Fang, Quan; Lee, Suk Hee; Parekh, Puja K.; Lee, Whasil; Moore, Carlene; Brenner, Daniel; Gereau, Robert W.; Wang, Fan; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Detection of external irritants by head nociceptor neurons has deep evolutionary roots. Irritant-induced aversive behavior is a popular pain model in laboratory animals. It is used widely in the formalin-model, where formaldehyde is injected into the rodent paw, eliciting quantifiable nocifensive behavior that has a direct, tissue-injury-evoked phase, and a subsequent tonic phase caused by neural maladaptation. The formalin model has elucidated many anti-pain compounds and pain-modulating signaling pathways. We have adopted this model to trigeminally-innervated territories in mice. Also, we have examined the involvement of TRPV4 channels in formalin-evoked trigeminal pain behavior, because TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons, also because we have recently defined TRPV4’s role in response to air-borne irritants, and in a model for temporomandibular joint pain. We found TRPV4 to be important for trigeminal nocifensive behavior evoked by formalin whiskerpad injections. This conclusion is supported by studies with Trpv4−/− mice and TRPV4-specific antagonists. Our results imply TRPV4 in MEK-ERK activation in TG sensory neurons. Furthermore, cellular studies in primary TG neurons and in heterologous TRPV4-expressing cells suggest that TRPV4 can be activated directly by formalin to gate Ca++. Using TRPA1-blocker and Trpa1−/− mice, we found that both TRP channels co-contribute to the formalin trigeminal pain response. These results imply TRPV4 as an important signaling molecule in irritation-evoked trigeminal pain. TRPV4-antagonistic therapies can therefore be envisioned as novel analgesics, possibly for specific targeting of trigeminal pain disorders, such as migraine, headaches, TMJ, facial and dental pain, and irritation of trigeminally-innervated surface epithelia. PMID:25281928

  19. Bronchial asthma and COPD due to irritants in the workplace - an evidence-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory irritants represent a major cause of occupational obstructive airway diseases. We provide an overview of the evidence related to irritative agents causing occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Methods We searched MEDLINE via PubMed. Reference lists of relevant reviews were also screened. The SIGN grading system was used to rate the quality of each study. The modified RCGP three-star system was used to grade the body of evidence for each irritant agent regarding its causative role in either occupational asthma or occupational COPD. Results A total of 474 relevant papers were identified, covering 188 individual agents, professions or work-sites. The focus of most of the studies and the predominant diagnosis was occupational asthma, whereas occupational COPD arose only incidentally. The highest level assigned using the SIGN grading was 2+ (well-conducted systematic review, cohort or case–control study with a low risk of confounding or bias). According to the modified RCGP three-star grading, the strongest evidence of association with an individual agent, profession or work-site (“**”) was found for 17 agents or work-sites, including benzene-1,2,4-tricarboxylicacid-1,2-anhydride, chlorine, platinum salt, isocyanates, cement dust, grain dust, animal farming, environmental tobacco smoke, welding fumes or construction work. Phthalic anhydride, glutaraldehyde, sulphur dioxide, cotton dust, cleaning agents, potrooms, farming (various), foundries were found to be moderately associated with occupational asthma or occupational COPD (“*[+]”). Conclusion This study let us assume that irritant-induced occupational asthma and especially occupational COPD are considerably underreported. Defining the evidence of the many additional occupational irritants for causing airway disorders will be the subject of continued studies with implications for diagnostics and preventive measures. PMID:23013890

  20. Novel vehicle based on cubosomes for ophthalmic delivery of flurbiprofen with low irritancy and high bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shun; Shen, Jin-qiu; Gan, Yong; Geng, Hai-ming; Zhang, Xin-xin; Zhu, Chun-liu; Gan, Li

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To develop a novel vehicle based on cubosomes as an ophthalmic drug delivery system for flurbiprofen (FB) to reduce ocular irritancy and improve bioavailability. Methods: FB-loaded cubosomes were prepared using hot and high-pressure homogenization. Cubosomes were then characterized by particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, particle morphology, inner cubic structure and in vitro release. Corneal permeation was evaluated using modified Franz-type cells. Ocular irritation was then evaluated using both the Draize method and histological examination. The ocular pharmacokinetics of FB was determined using microdialysis. Results: The particle size of each cubosome formulation was about 150 nm. A bicontinuous cubic phase of cubic P-type was determined using cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) observation and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. In vitro corneal permeation study revealed that FB formulated in cubosomes exhibited 2.5-fold (F1) and 2.0-fold (F2) increase in Papp compared with FB PBS. In the ocular irritation test, irritation scores for each group were less than 2, indicating that all formulations exhibited excellent ocular tolerance. Histological examination revealed that neither the structure nor the integrity of the cornea was visibly affected after incubation with FB cubosomes. The AUC of FB administered as FB cubosome F2 was 486.36±38.93 ng·mL−1·min·μg−1, which was significantly higher than that of FB Na eye drops (P<0.01). Compared with FB Na eye drops, the Tmax of FB cubosome F2 was about 1.6-fold higher and the MRT was also significantly longer (P<0.001). Conclusion: This novel low-irritant vehicle based on cubosomes might be a promising system for effective ocular drug delivery. PMID:20686524

  1. Anhedonia, but not Irritability, Is Associated with Illness Severity Outcomes in Adolescent Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Alonso, Carmen M.; Evans, Lori K.; Babb, James S.; Klein, Rachel G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Unlike adult major depressive disorder (MDD) which requires anhedonia or depressed mood for diagnosis, adolescent MDD can be sufficiently diagnosed with irritability in the absence of the former symptoms. In addition, the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) schema does not account for the interindividual variability of symptom severity among depressed adolescents. This practice has contributed to the high heterogeneity and diagnostic complexity of adolescent MDD. Here, we sought to examine relationships between two core symptoms of adolescent MDD – irritability and anhedonia, assessed both quantitatively and categorically – and other clinical correlates among depressed adolescents. Methods: Ninety adolescents with MDD (51 females), ages 12–20, were enrolled. Anhedonia and irritability scores were quantified by summing related items on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised and the Beck Depression Inventory. Extremes of score distribution were defined as high or low irritability/anhedonia subgroups. A significance level of p=0.01 was set to adjust for the five comparisons. Results: Despite all subjects exhibiting moderate to severe MDD, both irritability and anhedonia scores manifested a full and normally distributed severity range including the lowest values possible. However, only anhedonia severity was associated with more severe clinical outcomes, including greater overall illness severity (p<0.001), suicidality scores (p<0.001), episode duration (p=0.006), and number of MDD episodes (p=0.01). Similarly, only the high-anhedonia subgroup manifested more severe outcomes; specifically, greater illness severity (p<0.0001), number of MDD episodes (p=0.01), episode duration (p=0.01), and suicidality scores (p=0.0001). Conclusions: Our findings suggest the significance of anhedonia as a hallmark of adolescent MDD and the need to incorporate dimensional analyses. These data are preliminary, and future

  2. Non-occlusive topical exposure of human skin in vitro as model for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds.

    PubMed

    Lönnqvist, Susanna; Briheim, Kristina; Kratz, Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    Testing of irritant compounds has traditionally been performed on animals and human volunteers. Animal testing should always be restricted and for skin irritancy mice and rabbits hold poor predictive value for irritant potential in humans. Irritant testing on human volunteers is restricted by the duration subjects can be exposed, and by the subjectivity of interpreting the visual signs of skin irritation. We propose an irritant testing system using viable human full thickness skin with the loss of cell viability in the exposed skin area as end point measurement. Skin was exposed to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 20% concentration by non-occluded topical exposure to establish a positive control response and subsequent test compounds were statistically compared with the 20% SDS response. Cell viability and metabolism were measured with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The model presents correlation between increased concentration of SDS and decreased viability of cells in the exposed skin area (R(2) = 0.76). We propose the model to be used for cytotoxicity testing of irritant compounds. With fully intact barrier function, the model comprises all cells present in the skin with quantifiable end point measurement. PMID:26446981

  3. The EpiOcular Eye Irritation Test (EIT) for hazard identification and labelling of eye irritating chemicals: protocol optimisation for solid materials and the results after extended shipment.

    PubMed

    Kaluzhny, Yulia; Kandárová, Helena; Handa, Yuki; DeLuca, Jane; Truong, Thoa; Hunter, Amy; Kearney, Paul; d'Argembeau-Thornton, Laurence; Klausner, Mitchell

    2015-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and the EU REACH Regulation have reinforced the need for in vitro ocular test methods. Validated in vitro ocular toxicity tests that can predict the human response to chemicals, cosmetics and other consumer products are required for the safety assessment of materials that intentionally, or inadvertently, come into contact with the eye. The EpiOcular Eye Irritation Test (EIT), which uses the normal human cell-based EpiOcular™ tissue model, was developed to address this need. The EpiOcular-EIT is able to discriminate, with high sensitivity and accuracy, between ocular irritant/corrosive materials and those that require no labelling. Although the original EpiOcular-EIT protocol was successfully pre-validated in an international, multicentre study sponsored by COLIPA (the predecessor to Cosmetics Europe), data from two larger studies (the EURL ECVAM-COLIPA validation study and an independent in-house validation at BASF SE) resulted in a sensitivity for the protocol for solids that was below the acceptance criteria set by the Validation Management Group (VMG) for eye irritation, and indicated the need for improvement of the assay's sensitivity for solids. By increasing the exposure time for solid materials from 90 minutes to 6 hours, the optimised EpiOcular-EIT protocol achieved 100% sensitivity, 68.4% specificity and 84.6% accuracy, thereby meeting all the acceptance criteria set by the VMG. In addition, to satisfy the needs of Japan and the Pacific region, the EpiOcular-EIT method was evaluated for its performance after extended shipment and storage of the tissues (4-5 days), and it was confirmed that the assay performs with similar levels of sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility in these circumstances. PMID:25995013

  4. Eye Irritation Test (EIT) for Hazard Identification of Eye Irritating Chemicals using Reconstructed Human Cornea-like Epithelial (RhCE) Tissue Model.

    PubMed

    Kaluzhny, Yulia; Kandárová, Helena; d'Argembeau-Thornton, Laurence; Kearney, Paul; Klausner, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    To comply with the Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and EU REACH legislation, validated non-animal alternative methods for reliable and accurate assessment of ocular toxicity in man are needed. To address this need, we have developed an eye irritation test (EIT) which utilizes a three dimensional reconstructed human cornea-like epithelial (RhCE) tissue model that is based on normal human cells. The EIT is able to separate ocular irritants and corrosives (GHS Categories 1 and 2 combined) and those that do not require labeling (GHS No Category). The test utilizes two separate protocols, one designed for liquid chemicals and a second, similar protocol for solid test articles. The EIT prediction model uses a single exposure period (30 min for liquids, 6 hr for solids) and a single tissue viability cut-off (60.0% as determined by the MTT assay). Based on the results for 83 chemicals (44 liquids and 39 solids) EIT achieved 95.5/68.2/ and 81.8% sensitivity/specificity and accuracy (SS&A) for liquids, 100.0/68.4/ and 84.6% SS&A for solids, and 97.6/68.3/ and 83.1% for overall SS&A. The EIT will contribute significantly to classifying the ocular irritation potential of a wide range of liquid and solid chemicals without the use of animals to meet regulatory testing requirements. The EpiOcular EIT method was implemented in 2015 into the OECD Test Guidelines as TG 492. PMID:26325674

  5. Eye Irritation Test (EIT) for Hazard Identification of Eye Irritating Chemicals using Reconstructed Human Cornea-like Epithelial (RhCE) Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzhny, Yulia; Kandárová, Helena; d’Argembeau-Thornton, Laurence; Kearney, Paul; Klausner, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    To comply with the Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and EU REACH legislation, validated non-animal alternative methods for reliable and accurate assessment of ocular toxicity in man are needed. To address this need, we have developed an eye irritation test (EIT) which utilizes a three dimensional reconstructed human cornea-like epithelial (RhCE) tissue model that is based on normal human cells. The EIT is able to separate ocular irritants and corrosives (GHS Categories 1 and 2 combined) and those that do not require labeling (GHS No Category). The test utilizes two separate protocols, one designed for liquid chemicals and a second, similar protocol for solid test articles. The EIT prediction model uses a single exposure period (30 min for liquids, 6 hr for solids) and a single tissue viability cut-off (60.0% as determined by the MTT assay). Based on the results for 83 chemicals (44 liquids and 39 solids) EIT achieved 95.5/68.2/ and 81.8% sensitivity/specificity and accuracy (SS&A) for liquids, 100.0/68.4/ and 84.6% SS&A for solids, and 97.6/68.3/ and 83.1% for overall SS&A. The EIT will contribute significantly to classifying the ocular irritation potential of a wide range of liquid and solid chemicals without the use of animals to meet regulatory testing requirements. The EpiOcular EIT method was implemented in 2015 into the OECD Test Guidelines as TG 492. PMID:26325674

  6. The Importance of Irritability as a Symptom of Major Depressive Disorder: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Maurizio; Hwang, Irving; Rush, A. John; Sampson, Nancy; Walters, Ellen E.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Irritability is a diagnostic symptom of child-adolescent but not adult major depressive disorder (MDD) in both the DSM-IV and ICD-10 systems. We explore the importance of irritability for sub-typing adult DSM-IV MDD in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), a national US adult household survey. The WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to assess prevalence of many DSM-IV disorders in the lifetime and in the year before interview (12-month prevalence). MDD was assessed conventionally (i.e., requiring either persistent sadness or loss of interest), but with irritability included as one of the Criterion A symptoms. We also considered the possibility that irritability might be a diagnostic symptom of adult MDD (i.e., detect cases who had neither sad mood nor loss of interest). Twelve-month MDD symptom severity was assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and role impairment with the Sheehan Disability Scale. After excluding bipolar spectrum disorders, irritability during depressive episodes was reported by roughly half of respondents with lifetime DSM-IV MDD. Irritability in the absence of either sad mood or loss of interest, in comparison, was rare. Irritability in MDD was associated with early age-of-onset, lifetime persistence, comorbidity with anxiety and impulse-control disorders, fatigue and self-reproach during episodes, and disability. Irritability was especially common in MDD among respondents in the age range 18–44 and students. Further investigation is warranted of distinct family aggregation, risk factors, and treatment response. Consideration should also be given to including irritability as a non-diagnostic symptom of adult MDD in DSM-V and ICD-11. PMID:19274052

  7. Evaluation of skin irritation and sensitization of two diol solutions used as experimental dentin primers in humans and guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, A; Manabe, A; Katsuno, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S; Yoshida, T

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety of ethylene glyco (EG) and 1,6-hexanediol (HD) solutions as experimental dentin primers when subjected to the guinea pig maximization test (GPMT), primary irritation test, cumulative skin irritation test and human patch test. No primary and cumulative skin irritation resulting from the use of 62.5% EG or 45% HD solutions was observed. In the case of GPMT, the animals sensitized with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) responded to 100% HD. 62.5% EG and 45% HD as dentin primers were safer than 2-HEMA such as a methacrylic primer. PMID:9550022

  8. Respiratory irritation associated with inhalation of boron trifluoride and fluorosulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Rusch, George M; Bowden, Anthony M; Muijser, Hans; Arts, Josje

    2008-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the respiratory irritancy of boron trifluoride (BF(3)) and fluorosulfonic acid (FSA) following acute inhalation exposure. Testing was conducted using groups of 10 male and 10 female rats (BF(3)) or groups of 6 male rats (FSA). Rats were exposed for a single 4-h period (BF(3)) or a single 1-h period (FSA) and necropsied 1 or 14 days after exposure (BF(3)) or 14 days after exposure (FSA). Measurements consisted of clinical signs, body weight, kidney and lung weight, histopathology (BF(3)), and breathing parameters (FSA) and were used to evaluate the possible irritating effects of these compounds. The results indicated treatment-related findings in the larynx and trachea in the rats exposed to 74.4 mg/m(3) BF(3), consisting of ventral cartilage necrosis, hemorrhage, and an increase in ventral epithelial hyperplasia and ventral inflammatory cell inflammation 24 h postexposure. In the animals sacrificed 14 days postexposure, the only notable observation was ventral cartilage necrosis, present in 2 animals. The next lower level tested, 24.6 mg/m(3) BF, was considered a no-observed-adverse-effects level (NOAEL). A concentration of 4125 mg/m(3) FSA resulted in a clearly decreased breathing rate during and shortly after exposure with 67% (4/6) mortality on days 5-9 after exposure. A concentration of 845 mg/m(3) FSA resulted in only minor signs of irritation, consisting of slight changes in breathing pattern shorlty after exposure. The results of the present 4-h inhalation study with BF(3) indicated that respiratory irritation was present at a level of 74.4 mg/m(3) whereas 24.6 mg/m(3) was a NOAEL. A single 1-h exposure to 845 mg/m(3) FSA resulted in only minor signs of respiratory irritation, indicating that on a mass basis FSA is no more toxic or irritating than hydrogen fluoride (HF) or sulfuric acid. PMID:18464054

  9. Protocol for a randomized controlled study of Iyengar yoga for youth with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Irritable bowel syndrome affects as many as 14% of high school-aged students. Symptoms include discomfort in the abdomen, along with diarrhea and/or constipation and other gastroenterological symptoms that can significantly impact quality of life and daily functioning. Emotional stress appears to exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome symptoms suggesting that mind-body interventions reducing arousal may prove beneficial. For many sufferers, symptoms can be traced to childhood and adolescence, making the early manifestation of irritable bowel syndrome important to understand. The current study will focus on young people aged 14-26 years with irritable bowel syndrome. The study will test the potential benefits of Iyengar yoga on clinical symptoms, psychospiritual functioning and visceral sensitivity. Yoga is thought to bring physical, psychological and spiritual benefits to practitioners and has been associated with reduced stress and pain. Through its focus on restoration and use of props, Iyengar yoga is especially designed to decrease arousal and promote psychospiritual resources in physically compromised individuals. An extensive and standardized teacher-training program support Iyengar yoga's reliability and safety. It is hypothesized that yoga will be feasible with less than 20% attrition; and the yoga group will demonstrate significantly improved outcomes compared to controls, with physiological and psychospiritual mechanisms contributing to improvements. Methods/Design Sixty irritable bowel syndrome patients aged 14-26 will be randomly assigned to a standardized 6-week twice weekly Iyengar yoga group-based program or a wait-list usual care control group. The groups will be compared on the primary clinical outcomes of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, quality of life and global improvement at post-treatment and 2-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will include visceral pain sensitivity assessed with a standardized laboratory task (water load task

  10. Sensory and pulmonary irritation of methyl isocyanate in mice and pulmonary irritation and possible cyanidelike effects of methyl isocyanate in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Alarie, Y.; Ferguson, J.S.; Stock, M.F.; Weyel, D.A.; Schaper, M.

    1987-06-01

    Methyl isocyanate (MIC) was evaluated for sensory and pulmonary irritation in mice. MIC was found to be both a potent sensory and pulmonary irritant in this species. From these results, a safe level of exposure for a period of 8 hr was estimated to be about 0.02 ppm for humans. Guinea pigs were also exposed to MIC for a single 3-hr exposure at a concentration of 37 ppm. During exposure to MIC, coughing was observed in all animals. Pulmonary function was evaluated immediately following exposure and intermittently on the next 35 days using CO/sub 2/ challenges and flow-volume loops. Highly abnormal responses to CO/sub 2/ were observed immediately after exposure in all animals. Six of the eight animals exposed to MIC died. In the two survivors, an apparent recovery was seen during the 5 days following exposure, but a worsening effect was observed at days 21 and 28, with a partial recovery at day 35. The data clearly demonstrated that the primary pulmonary effect of MIC was one of airways obstruction. Oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were also measured in the guinea pigs following exposure to MIC. No evidence of a cyanidelike effect was observed, in contrast to a severe depression of oxygen uptake following exposure to hydrogen cyanide.

  11. What the MAYSI-2 Can Tell Us About Anger-Irritability and Trauma.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Henrika; Leverso, John; Bowen, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    The rate of experiencing trauma can be quite high for juvenile offenders and those experiences can lead to feelings of anger and irritability. This study uses Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-Version 2 (MAYSI-2) data to examine the relationship between the Traumatic Experiences (TE) and Angry-Irritable (AI) scales for juvenile offenders (N = 1,348) from a Midwest detention center. Chi-square analyses revealed statistically significant relationships between the AI scale and gender, race, and the TE scale. In addition, ordinal logistic regression results showed that as the number of traumatic experiences increased, so did the odds of scoring Caution or Warning on the AI scale. Recommendations are that juvenile justice systems utilize a trauma-informed process throughout the adjudicatory process and there be improved efforts to coordinate services across multiple systems, such as child welfare and special education, where juvenile offenders are often engaged. PMID:25395475

  12. Thromboxane synthetase inhibition reduces ventricular irritability after coronary occlusion and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Austin, J C; Berrizbeitia, L D; Schoen, F J; Kauffman, R P; Hechtman, H B; Cohn, L H

    1988-03-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic tissue is responsible for production of metabolites with deleterious local vascular effects. Thromboxane A2, a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator, has been implicated as a mediator of the "reperfusion injury." We studied the effect of an experimental thromboxane synthetase inhibitor, OKY-046, on coronary sinus thromboxane levels, ventricular irritability, myocardial contractility, infarct salvage, and histologic features of reperfusion. Sixteen sheep were randomized to OKY-046, 3 mg/kg, or saline vehicle before 3-hour occlusion and subsequent reperfusion of the left anterior descending artery. The OKY group demonstrated less ventricular irritability as measured by incidence of ventricular fibrillation and necessity for countershock to reverse tachyarrhythmias. Coronary sinus thromboxane levels were significantly lower in the OKY group compared with the control group. There is additional evidence to suggest that OKY increases infarct salvage and attenuates histologic features of microcirculatory damage. PMID:3344655

  13. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B; Walters, Edgar T; Carlton, Susan M; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-09-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity. PMID:23925292

  14. Neurobehavioral and sensory irritant effects of controlled exposure to a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, D.; Molhave, L.; Rose, G.; Hudnell, H.K.; House, D. )

    1990-11-01

    Subjective reactions of discomfort, impaired air quality, irritation of mucosal membranes, and impaired memory have been reported in chemically sensitive subjects during exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in new buildings. Sixty-six normal healthy male subjects aged 18-39 were exposed for 2.75 hr to a complex VOC mixture at 0 and 25 mg/m3. Each subject completed control and exposure sessions at one-week intervals in counterbalanced order. Measurements included comfort ratings of eye, nose and throat irritation, symptom questionnaire and computerized behavioral tests. Subjects found the odor of VOCs unpleasantly strong and reported that VOC exposure degraded air quality, increased headache and produced general discomfort. VOC exposure did not affect performance on any behavioral tests.

  15. Elemental changes at irritant reactions due to chromate and nickel in guinea-pig epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Forslind, B.; Roomans, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation was performed to examine the possibility of using energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to obtain information on epidermal reactions at irritant dermatitis. The elemental redistribution in the stratum germinativum and stratum spinosum of the guinea-pig epidermis after intradermal injection of a chromate and a nickel solution was studied in thick cryo-sections. The two solutions caused different changes in elemental content in both cell layers. Nickel sulfate caused a conspicuous decrease in K levels whereas Na and Cl were elevated in both cell layers. Potassium chromate caused an increase in Cl but lowered the P values. The result of this study show that it is possible to use EDX-analysis of thick skin sections to obtain information on physiologically relevant alterations in epidermis at irritant dermatitis.

  16. Comparative pathology of the nasal mucosa in laboratory animals exposed to inhaled irritants

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal cavity is susceptible to chemically induced injury as a result of exposure to inhaled irritants. Some responses of the nasal mucosa to inhaled toxicants are species specific. These species-related differences in response may be due to variations in structural, physiologic, and biochemical factors, such as gross nasal cavity structure, distribution of luminal epithelial cell populations along the nasal airway, intranasal airflow patterns, nasal mucociliary apparatus, and nasal xenobiotic metabolism among animal species. This paper reviews the comparative anatomy and irritant-induced pathology of the nasal cavity in laboratory animals. The toxicologist, pathologist, and environmental risk assessor must have a good working knowledge of the similarities and differences in normal nasal structure and response to injury among species before they can select animal models for nasal toxicity studies, recognize toxicant-induced lesions in the nasal airway, and extrapolate experimental results to estimate the possible effects of an inhaled toxicant on the human nasal airway.

  17. Bowel function and irritable bowel symptoms after hysterectomy and cholecystectomy--a population based study.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, K W; Parker, D; Cripps, H

    1993-01-01

    Because unsubstantiated beliefs link hysterectomy and cholecystectomy with bowel function, this study examined all the women who had had these operations in a defined population (79 and 37 respectively, out of 1058) with respect to bowel habits, irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and whole gut transit time calculated from records of three defecations. Compared with unoperated controls, women after hysterectomy were more likely to consider themselves constipated; they also strained more and admitted more often to bloating and feelings of incomplete evacuation. Their stools tended to be lumpier and, in women over 50 years, transit time was longer. When women treated by cholecystectomy were compared with women having newly discovered, asymptomatic gall stones, they more often described defecation as urgent but had no other detectable differences. In conclusion symptomatic constipation is frequent in women after hysterectomy; after cholecystectomy, bowel habit is not consistently changed but the rectum seems to be more irritable. PMID:8174964

  18. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 Film | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Medical Movies on the Web Debuts with Gene Kelly's "Combat Fatigue Irritability" 1945 ... of Medicine To view Medical Movies on the Web, go to: www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/collections/ ...

  19. Food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome: new facts and old fallacies

    PubMed Central

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Kalliomäki, M

    2004-01-01

    The notion of food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not new. However, recent evidence suggests significant reduction in IBS symptom severity in patients on elimination diets, provided that dietary elimination is based on foods against which the individual had raised IgG antibodies. These findings should encourage studies dissecting the mechanisms responsible for IgG production against dietary antigens and their putative role in IBS PMID:15361481

  20. Contact Irritant Responses of Aedes aegypti Using Sublethal Concentration and Focal Application of Pyrethroid Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Manda, Hortance; Shah, Pankhil; Polsomboon, Suppaluck; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap; Castro-Llanos, Fanny; Morrison, Amy; Burrus, Roxanne G.; Grieco, John P.; Achee, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated contact irritant and spatial repellent behaviors in Aedes aegypti following exposure to sublethal concentrations of chemicals. These sublethal actions are currently being evaluated in the development of a push-pull strategy for Ae. aegypti control. This study reports on mosquito escape responses after exposure to candidate chemicals for a contact irritant focused push-pull strategy using varying concentrations and focal application. Methods Contact irritancy (escape) behavior, knockdown and 24 hour mortality rates were quantified in populations of female Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions and validated in the field (Thailand and Peru) using experimental huts. Evaluations were conducted using varying concentrations and treatment surface area coverage (SAC) of three pyrethroid insecticides: alphacypermethrin, lambacyhalothrin and deltamethrin. Results Under laboratory conditions, exposure of Ae. aegypti to alphacypermethrin using the standard field application rate (FAR) resulted in escape responses at 25% and 50% SAC that were comparable with escape responses at 100% SAC. Significant escape responses were also observed at <100% SAC using ½FAR of all test compounds. In most trials, KD and 24 hour mortality rates were higher in mosquitoes that did not escape than in those that escaped. In Thailand, field validation studies indicated an early time of exit (by four hours) and 40% increase in escape using ½FAR of alphacypermethrin at 75% SAC compared to a matched chemical-free control. In Peru, however, the maximum increase in Ae. aegypti escape from alphacypermethrin-treated huts was 11%. Conclusions/Significance Results presented here suggest a potential role for sublethal and focal application of contact irritant chemicals in an Ae. aegypti push-pull strategy to reduce human–vector contact inside treated homes. However, the impact of an increase in escape response on dengue virus transmission is currently unknown

  1. Resident Rounds: Part III - Case Report: Betel Quid Induced Irritant Contact Dermatitis of the Hand.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Regine J; Cheraghi, Nikoo; Russo, Marian A

    2016-06-01

    Betel quid is a drug used in Far East Asia, India, and the South Pacific. The habit of betel quid chewing is widely reported to cause oral cancer and tooth and gum disease. However, skin disease due to betel quid use is underreported. We report a case of irritant contact dermatitis to betel quid components in a 35-year-old male betel quid user who presented for evaluation of a persistent rash on his fingertips. PMID:27272092

  2. Betaine reduces the irritating effect of sodium lauryl sulfate on human oral mucosa in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, Irma; Nicander, Ingrid; Jutila, Kirsti; Ollmar, Stig; Tenovuo, Jorma; Söderling, Eva

    2002-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether betaine has a protective effect during exposure of the human oral mucosa in vivo to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or cocoamidopropylbetaine (CAPB) as measured with a multifrequency electrical impedance spectrometer (EI). Both detergents were used at the concentration of 2.0% w/v with and without 4.0% w/v betaine in distilled water in 20 volunteers, and 0.5% and 1.0% w/v SLS combined with 4.0% w/v betaine in 5 volunteers. EI measurements were taken before application of the test solutions, after their removal, and every 15 min up to 45 min. Both 0.5% and 1% SLS solutions showed a significant reduction in 3 of the 4 indices, indicating mucosal irritation after the 15-min exposure (P < 0.05), whereas 2% SLS did so in all 4 indices (P < 0.001). Betaine had no effect on the detergent-induced decline with either the 2% or the 0.5% SLS solutions. However, when combined with the 1% SLS solution, betaine significantly (P < 0.05) reduced mucosal irritation by abolishing decreases in indices MIX (magnitude index) and IMIX (imaginary part index) and lowering it for PIX (phase index). The 2% CAPB solution showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in all 4 indices after the 15-min exposure, but the effect was significantly weaker than that of 2% SLS (P < 0.05). Betaine did not reduce the irritating effect of 2% CAPB. These findings can be used in the development of less irritating products for oral health care. PMID:12418722

  3. Classification of sensitizing and irritative potential in a combined in-vitro assay

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, Reinhard; Sonnenburg, Anna; Quatchadze, Maria; Schreiner, Maximilian; Peiser, Matthias; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a coculture system which in parallel indicates the sensitizing and irritative potential of xenobiotics. The assay is named loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) and may be performed within 5 days. The system is composed of human monocytes that differentiate to a kind of dendritic cells by 2-day culturing in the presence of allogenic keratinocytes. The culture medium is enriched by a cocktail of recombinant cytokines. On day 3, concentration series of probes are added. On day 5, cells are harvested and analyzed for expression range of CD86 as a marker of sensitizing potential and for uptake of the viability stain 7-AAD as a marker of irritative potential. Estimation of the concentration required to cause a half-maximal increase in CD86 expression allowed quantification of sensitizing potential, and estimation of the concentration required to reduce viability to 50% allowed quantification of irritative potential. Examination of substances with known potential resulted in categorization of test scores. To evaluate our data, we have compared results with those of the validated animal-based sensitization test, the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA, OECD TG 429). To a large extent, results from LCSA and from LLNA achieved analogous grouping of allergens into categories like weak-moderate-strong. However, the new assay showed an improved capacity to distinguish sensitizers from non-sensitizers and irritants. In conclusion, the LCSA contains potential to fulfil the requirements of the EU's programme for the safety of chemicals 'Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of chemical substances' (REACH, 2006) to replace animal models.

  4. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  5. [Effectiveness of pharmacotherapy of irritated bowel syndrome from the standpoint of evidence based medicine].

    PubMed

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the action of various medicines used to treat irritated bowel syndrome from the standpoint of evidence based medicine indicates that most of them (spasmolytics, probiotics, loperamide, aperients) show but low effectiveness. The use of more efficacious preparations (alosterone, cisapride, tegacerode) is associated with serious adverse reactions whereas prucalopride is applied for unregistered indications. It necessitates the development of new drugs with enhanced effectiveness and tolerability. PMID:25775909

  6. Standardized hypnosis treatment for irritable bowel syndrome: the North Carolina protocol.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Olafur S

    2006-01-01

    The North Carolina protocol is a seven-session hypnosis-treatment approach for irritable bowel syndrome that is unique in that the entire course of treatment is designed for verbatim delivery. The protocol has been tested in two published research studies and found to benefit more than 80% of patients. This article describes the development, content, and testing of the protocol, and how it is used in clinical practice. PMID:16316883

  7. Transrectal ultrasonography: relationship with anorectal manometry, electromyography and sensitivity tests in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Awad, R A; Martin, J; Cal y Major, M; Noguera, J L; Ramos, R; Amezcua, C; Camacho, S; Santiago, R; Ramirez, J L; Castro, J

    1998-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is the most frequently diagnosed disorder in gastroenterology. It has been demonstrated with specialized motility studies that these patients compared to healthy subjects show changes in rectoanal electrical and mechanical activity and in rectoanal sensitivity. However, until now no report has been published on morphological alterations in the rectum or the internal anal sphincter. Twenty-five consecutive patients with irritable bowel syndrome (mean age 32, range 17-47 years; 24 females) were evaluated prospectively by transrectal ultrasonography, rectal sensitivity studies, and recordings of both electrical and mechanical activity of the distal rectum and internal anal sphincter during a 2-h inter-digestive period. Ten healthy volunteers (mean age 34.5, range 19-50 years) served as a control group. Paired and non-paired Student's two-tailed t test and linear regression analysis were used. It was shown that muscle thickness of the rectum during rest (4.7 +/- 0.1 mm) was correlated neither with its rectal spike amplitude (0.73 +/- 0.1 mV) nor with rectal spike frequency (17.06 +/- 3.6 spike/2 h). In addition, the diameter of the internal anal sphincter (1.2 +/- 0.1 mm) was correlated neither with its resting pressure, nor with frequency (17.1 +/- 3.2/2 h), duration (14.9 +/- 1.5 s), or amplitude (14.1 +/- 1.9 mmHg), of inhibition of the spontaneous rectoanal inhibitory reflex. No correlation was found between ultrasonographic parameters and rectal distension variables (r = 0.03). This study demonstrates for the first time morphological anorectal changes in patients with irritable bowel syndrome compared to healthy subjects, in addition to showing that morphological changes are independent of physiological ones. Therefore both transrectal ultrasonography to determine anorectal morphology and electromanometry to assess anorectal function are important measures in the evaluation of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:9638493

  8. Role of pinaverium bromide in south Indian patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, V; Malathi, S; Ramathilakam, B; Dinakaran, N; Balasubramanian, V; Mathew, S

    1998-04-01

    The effect of pinaverium bromide in controlling gastrointestinal symptoms in 61 patients with irritable bowel syndrome was studied, as an open trial. Individually, there was significant relief in abdominal discomfort/pain as well as in bowel symptoms in most of the patients. Abdominal pain was reduced in 49%, stool consistency improved in 74%, straining and urgency decreased in 71% and mucus decreased in 64%. Tolerance to the drug administered was good and side-effects reported were few. PMID:11273320

  9. Development of Organogel-Derived Capsaicin Nanoemulsion with Improved Bioaccessibility and Reduced Gastric Mucosa Irritation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Muwen; Cao, Yong; Ho, Chi-Tang; Huang, Qingrong

    2016-06-15

    Capsaicin (CAP) is the major active component in chili peppers with health-promoting benefits. However, the low bioavailability and irritating quality of CAP greatly limit its applications in functional foods. The objective of this study was to develop a food-grade nanoemulsion to increase the dissolution and bioaccessibility of CAP and to alleviate its irritating effects. To achieve this goal, CAP was first dissolved in medium-chain triacylglycerol (MCT), followed by the addition of sucrose stearate S-370 as organogelator to develop CAP-loaded organogel. The oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion was formed using organogel as the oil phase and Tween 80 as the emulsifier. After ultrasonication treatment, droplet sizes of emulsion were decreased to 168 nm with enhanced dissolution rate and bioaccessibility. In vivo study further confirmed the reduced rat gastric mucosa irritation caused by CAP. The organogel-derived nanoemulsion was proved to be an effective delivery system for CAP-based functional food products. PMID:27170269

  10. Remote Subcutaneous Needling to Suppress the Irritability of Myofascial Trigger Spots: An Experimental Study in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhonghua; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Hong, Chang-Zern; Kao, Mu-Jung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chou, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To obtain electrophysiological effects of Fu's subcutaneous needling (FSN) on needling distance by assessment of endplate noise (EPN) recorded from the myofascial trigger spots (MTrSs) in rabbit skeletal muscle. Method. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits weighing 2.5–3.0 kg were randomly divided into two groups as follows: proximal needling (PN) group and distal needling (DN) group. The needling procedure followed the instructions described by the inventor of FSN, including needling insertion and swaying movement. The amplitudes of EPN on the MTrS region of BF muscle were recorded as an index of MTrS irritability. Random sampling of EPN tracings were taken for further analyses before, during, and after FSN treatment. Results. In PN and DN groups, the trends of EPN amplitude alterations were similar at conditions before, during, and after FSN treatment. The degree of reduction in the EPN amplitude in PN group was significantly higher than that in DN group. There were no significant changes in EPN amplitudes in the MTrS of contralateral BF without FSN intervention either in DN or PN group. Conclusion. The irritability of proximal MTrSs could be modulated after ipsilateral FSNs. The placement of FSN may affect the effectiveness of suppression of irritability of MTrSs. PMID:23346200

  11. Irritant activation of epithelial cells is mediated via protease-dependent EGFR activation.

    PubMed

    White, Kellie J; Maffei, Vincent J; Newton-West, Marvin; Swerlick, Robert A

    2011-02-01

    Although numerous studies have examined in vivo and in vitro effects of irritants, most focused on events developing hours to days after exposure. Molecular events occurring immediately after skin contact remain incompletely defined. Characterization of early events could lead to the identification of key molecular signals necessary for the production of inflammatory mediators responsible for the signs and symptoms of irritant contact dermatitis (ICD). HaCaT cells treated with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), a model irritant, were used to examine early molecular events of ICD. Western analysis showed SLS-mediated induction of early growth response-1 (egr-1), a transcription factor capable of regulating hallmarks of ICD such as angiogenesis, hyperproliferation, and inflammation. Additionally, de novo egr-1 expression was commensurate with transcriptional activation of egr-1 mRNA and heteronuclear RNA. Use of pharmacological inhibitors demonstrated that SLS-induced egr-1 was dependent on MEK1/p44/42 ERK, but not on p38 or JNK signaling. The EGFR inhibitor PD168393 and the metalloprotease inhibitor TAPI-2 both inhibited SLS-induced egr-1. Finally, small interfering RNA silencing of the EGFR diminished SLS-induced egr-1 mRNA. These studies suggest a role of the EGFR in SLS signaling as well as a, to our knowledge, previously unreported association between ICD and EGFR induction of egr-1. PMID:20981109

  12. TRPA1 mediates the inflammatory actions of environmental irritants and proalgesic agents.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Diana M; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Nikai, Tetsuro; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Read, Andrew J; Poblete, Jeannie; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Basbaum, Allan I; Julius, David

    2006-03-24

    TRPA1 is an excitatory ion channel targeted by pungent irritants from mustard and garlic. TRPA1 has been proposed to function in diverse sensory processes, including thermal (cold) nociception, hearing, and inflammatory pain. Using TRPA1-deficient mice, we now show that this channel is the sole target through which mustard oil and garlic activate primary afferent nociceptors to produce inflammatory pain. TRPA1 is also targeted by environmental irritants, such as acrolein, that account for toxic and inflammatory actions of tear gas, vehicle exhaust, and metabolic byproducts of chemotherapeutic agents. TRPA1-deficient mice display normal cold sensitivity and unimpaired auditory function, suggesting that this channel is not required for the initial detection of noxious cold or sound. However, TRPA1-deficient mice exhibit pronounced deficits in bradykinin-evoked nociceptor excitation and pain hypersensitivity. Thus, TRPA1 is an important component of the transduction machinery through which environmental irritants and endogenous proalgesic agents depolarize nociceptors to elicit inflammatory pain. PMID:16564016

  13. THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND THE ROLE OF PROBIOTICS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: a review.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, chronic relapsing gastrointestinal disorder that affects 7%-22% of the population worldwide. According to Rome III Criteria, the disorder is defined by the coexistence of abdominal discomfort or pain associated with an alteration in bowel habits. Its pathophysiology is not completely understood but, in addition to some important abnormalities, the disturbed intestinal microbiota has also been described supported by several strands of evidence. The treatment of irritable bowel syndrome is based upon several therapeutic approaches but few have been successful or without adverse events and more recently the gut microbiota and the use of probiotics have emerged as a factor to be considered. Probiotics are live micro-organisms which when consumed in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host, such as Lactic bacteria among others. An important scientific rationale has emerged for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome, although the data regarding different species are still limited. Not all probiotics are beneficial: it is important to select the specific strain which should be supported by good evidence base. The mechanisms of action of probiotics are described and the main strains are quoted. PMID:26840477

  14. Effect of mixing conditions on irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide. [Guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O.; McCarthy, J.F.; Gill, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of mechanics of respiration in guinea pigs was used to assess the irritant potency of zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed under different conditions of temperature and humidity. Concentrations were 1-2 mg/m/sup 3/ zinc oxide and 1 ppm sulfur dioxide. Dry conditions of mixing (Chamber RH 30%) either at 24/sup 0/C in the exposure chamber or at 480/sup 0/C in a dry furnace gave a biological response which could be completely accounted for by responses to zinc oxide and/or sulfur dioxide alone. Chemical examination of the aerosols did not indicate the formation of particulate sulfur species. Zinc oxide and sulfur dioxide mixed dry at 480/sup 0/C and fed into the exposure chamber at 80% RH reacted to produce an irritant aerosol as evidenced by a rapid increase in resistance to levels 29% above control; reversal was rapid when exposure ended. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfite on these aerosols. Addition of water vapor to the furnace during mixing at 480/sup 0/C produced a different irritant aerosol. The resistance rose slowly to 19% above control values and remained elevated during the post-exposure hour. Chemical studies indicated the presence of sulfate, sulfite, and adsorbed sulfur trioxide on these aerosols.

  15. Investigation of the Dermal Absorption and Irritation Potential of Sertaconazole Nitrate Anhydrous Gel.

    PubMed

    Manian, Mahima; Madrasi, Kumpal; Chaturvedula, Ayyappa; Banga, Ajay K

    2016-01-01

    Effective topical therapy of cutaneous fungal diseases requires the delivery of the active agent to the target site in adequate concentrations to produce a pharmacological effect and inhibit the growth of the pathogen. In addition, it is important to determine the concentration of the drug in the skin in order to evaluate the subsequent efficacy and potential toxicity for topical formulations. For this purpose, an anhydrous gel containing sertaconazole nitrate as a model drug was formulated and the amount of the drug in the skin was determined by in vitro tape stripping. The apparent diffusivity and partition coefficients were then calculated by a mathematical model describing the dermal absorption as passive diffusion through a pseudo-homogenous membrane. The skin irritation potential of the formulation was also assessed by using the in vitro Epiderm™ model. An estimation of the dermal absorption parameters allowed us to evaluate drug transport across the stratum corneum following topical application. The estimated concentration for the formulation was found to be higher than the MIC100 at the target site which suggested its potential efficacy for treating fungal infections. The skin irritation test showed the formulation to be non-irritating in nature. Thus, in vitro techniques can be used for laying the groundwork in developing efficient and non-toxic topical products. PMID:27399763

  16. A Preliminary Study of White Matter in Adolescent Depression: Relationships with Illness Severity, Anhedonia, and Irritability

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Johnson, Amy R.; Vallejo, Ana I.; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability – two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  17. A preliminary study of white matter in adolescent depression: relationships with illness severity, anhedonia, and irritability.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Johnson, Amy R; Vallejo, Ana I; Katz, Lev; Wong, Edmund; Gabbay, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) during adolescence is a common and disabling psychiatric condition; yet, little is known about its neurobiological underpinning. Evidence indicates that MDD in adults involves alterations in white and gray matter; however, sparse research has focused on adolescent MDD. Similarly, little research has accounted for the wide variability of symptom severity among depressed teens. Here, we aimed to investigate white matter (WM) microstructure between 17 adolescents with MDD and 16 matched healthy controls (HC) using diffusion tensor imaging. We further assessed within the MDD group relationships between WM integrity and depression severity, as well as anhedonia and irritability - two core symptoms of adolescent MDD. As expected, adolescents with MDD manifested decreased WM integrity compared to HC in the anterior cingulum and anterior corona radiata. Within the MDD group, greater depression severity was correlated with reduced WM integrity in the genu of corpus callosum, anterior thalamic radiation, anterior cingulum, and sagittal stratum. However, anhedonia and irritability were associated with alterations in distinct WM tracts. Specifically, anhedonia was associated with disturbances in tracts related to reward processing, including the anterior limb of the internal capsule and projection fibers to the orbitofrontal cortex. Irritability was associated with decreased integrity in the sagittal stratum, anterior corona radiata, and tracts leading to prefrontal and temporal cortices. Overall, these preliminary findings provide further support for the hypotheses that there is a disconnect between prefrontal and limbic emotional regions in depression, and that specific clinical symptoms involve distinct alterations in WM tracts. PMID:24324445

  18. Analysis of Draize eye irritation testing and its prediction by mining publicly available 2008-2014 REACH data.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; Russo, Daniel P; Rovida, Costanza; Zhu, Hao; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Public data from ECHA online dossiers on 9,801 substances encompassing 326,749 experimental key studies and additional information on classification and labeling were made computable. Eye irritation hazard, for which the rabbit Draize eye test still represents the reference method, was analyzed. Dossiers contained 9,782 Draize eye studies on 3,420 unique substances, indicating frequent retesting of substances. This allowed assessment of the test's reproducibility test based on all substances tested more than once. There was a 10% chance of a non-irritant evaluation given after a prior severe-irritant result as given by UN GHS classification criteria. The most reproducible outcomes were the results negative (94% reproducible) and severe eye irritant (73% reproducible). To evaluate whether other GHS categorizations predict eye irritation we built a dataset of 5,629 substances (1,931 'irritant' and 3,698 'non-irritant'). The two best decision trees with up to three other GHS classifications resulted in balanced accuracies of 68% and 73%, i.e., in the rank order of the Draize rabbit eye test itself, but both use inhalation toxicity data ("May cause respiratory irritation"), which is not typically available. Next, a dataset of 929 substances with at least one Draize study was mapped to PubChem to compute chemical similarity using 2D conformational fingerprints and Tanimoto similarity. Using a minimum similarity of 0.7 and simple classification by the closest chemical neighbor resulted in balanced accuracy from 73% over 737 substances to 100% at a threshold of 0.975 over 41 substances. This represents a strong support of read-across and (Q)SAR approaches in this area. PMID:26863293

  19. Second-phase validation study of short time exposure test for assessment of eye irritation potency of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hajime; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Omori, Takashi; Otoizumi, Takuya; Sozu, Takashi; Kuwahara, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Sakaguchi, Mayumi; Toyoda, Akemi; Goto, Haruka; Watanabe, Shinichi; Ahiko, Kyoko; Nakamura, Tsuneaki; Morimoto, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A Short Time Exposure (STE) test is a cytotoxicity test that uses SIRC cells (rabbit corneal cell line) to assess eye irritation potency following a 5-min chemical exposure. This second-phase validation study assessed the predictive capacity of the STE test using 40 coded test substances at three laboratories. A Validation Management Team (VMT) then evaluated the predictivity of the STE test for United Nation (UN) Globally Harmonized System (GHS) categories using 63 test substances including the results of the first-phase validation study. The STE test can assess not only the severe or corrosive ocular irritants (corresponding to the UN GHS Category 1) but also non-irritant (corresponding to UN GHS Non Category) from other toxicity classes, especially for limited types of test substances. The predictivity by STE test, however, was insufficient for identification of UN GHS categories (Category 1, Category 2, or Non Category). These results suggest that the STE test can be recommended as an initial step in a top-down approach to identification of severe irritants and test substances that require classification for eye irritation (UN GHS Category 1) as well as an initial step in a bottom-up approach to identification of test substances that do not require classification for eye irritation (UN GHS Non Category) from other toxicity classes, especially for limited types of test substances. On the other hand, the STE test is not considered adequate for the identification of mild or moderate irritants (i.e., UN GHS Categories 2A and 2B) and severe irritants (UN GHS Category 1). PMID:23747838

  20. Validation study of the in vitro skin irritation test with the LabCyte EPI-MODEL24.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hajime; Ando, Yoko; Idehara, Kenji; Katoh, Masakazu; Kosaka, Tadashi; Miyaoka, Etsuyoshi; Shinoda, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Tamie; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Isao; Yuasa, Atsuko; Watanabe, Yukihiko; Omori, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    A validation study on an in vitro skin irritation assay was performed with the reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) LabCyte EPI-MODEL24, developed by Japan Tissue Engineering Co. Ltd (Gamagori, Japan). The protocol that was followed in the current study was an optimised version of the EpiSkin protocol (LabCyte assay). According to the United Nations Globally Harmonised System (UN GHS) of classification for assessing the skin irritation potential of a chemical, 12 irritants and 13 non-irritants were validated by a minimum of six laboratories from the Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments (JSAAE) skin irritation assay validation study management team (VMT). The 25 chemicals were listed in the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) performance standards. The reconstructed tissues were exposed to the chemicals for 15 minutes and incubated for 42 hours in fresh culture medium. Subsequently, the level of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 α) present in the conditioned medium was measured, and tissue viability was assessed by using the MTT assay. The results of the MTT assay obtained with the LabCyte EPI-MODEL24 (LabCyte MTT assay) demonstrated high within-laboratory and between-laboratory reproducibility, as well as high accuracy for use as a stand-alone assay to distinguish skin irritants from non-irritants. In addition, the IL-1α release measurements in the LabCyte assay were clearly unnecessary for the success of this model in the classification of chemicals for skin irritation potential. PMID:22558976