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Sample records for ischemic myocardiopathy trasplante

  1. Clinical effects of carvedilol and trimetazidine for the treatmentof alcoholic myocardiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Liu, Fu-Yuan; Li, Xiao-Lan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical effects of carvedilol and trimetazidine for the treatment of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. A total of 60 patients diagnosed with alcoholic cardiomyopathy were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly divided into the carvedilol (n=20), trimetazidine (n=20) and control (n=20) groups. The patients in the control, carvedilol and trimetazidine groups were treated with conventional drugs, conventional drugs + carvedil and conventional drugs + trimetazidine respectively, for 12 weeks. The patients were compared for their heart functions [left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), C-reactive protein (CRP) and 6 min walking], heart rate, blood pressure and heart enlargement (cardiothoracic proportion and left ventricular diameter) before and after treatment. The parameters studied for heart functions, heart rate, blood pressure, heart enlargement, clinical effects before and after treatment were statistically insignificant (p>0.05). After treatment, the carvedilol and trimetazidine groups showed higher LVEF and CRP, longer walking distance in 6 min, as well as lower heart rate and blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) compared to the control group. Similarly, the cardiothoracic proportion and left ventricular internal diameter for the carvedilol and trimetazidine groups was lower than those of the control group, with better clinical effects (p<0.05). In conclusion, the curative effects of the carvedilol and trimetazidine groups of alcoholic myocardiopathy similar. Both are safe agents that may improve the cardiac function and heart expansion of patients. PMID:27446307

  2. Ischemic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic stroke is the most common type. It is usually ... are at risk for having a more serious stroke. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness ...

  3. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  4. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-meng; Liu, Mei; Liu, Ying-ying; Ma, Li-li; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Xiao-hong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αvβ3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αvβ3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αvβ3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia. PMID:27335560

  5. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Meng; Liu, Mei; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Li-Li; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Xiao-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αvβ3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αvβ3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αvβ3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia. PMID:27335560

  6. Ischemic Strokes (Clots)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz 5 Things to Know About Stroke Ischemic Strokes (Clots) Updated:Jul 12,2016 Ischemic stroke accounts ... strokes. Read more about silent strokes . TIA and Stroke: Medical Emergencies When someone has shown symptoms of ...

  7. Lubiprostone induced ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Sherid, Muhammed; Sifuentes, Humberto; Samo, Salih; Deepak, Parakkal; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2013-01-14

    Ischemic colitis accounts for 6%-18% of the causes of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. It is often multifactorial and more commonly encountered in the elderly. Several medications have been implicated in the development of colonic ischemia. We report a case of a 54-year old woman who presented with a two-hour history of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and bloody stool. The patient had recently used lubiprostone with close temporal relationship between the increase in the dose and her symptoms of rectal bleeding. The radiologic, colonoscopic and histopathologic findings were all consistent with ischemic colitis. Her condition improved without any serious complications after the cessation of lubiprostone. This is the first reported case of ischemic colitis with a clear relationship with lubiprostone (Naranjo score of 10). Clinical vigilance for ischemic colitis is recommended for patients receiving lubiprostone who are presenting with abdominal pain and rectal bleeding. PMID:23345954

  8. Ischemic Colitis Revealing Polyarteritis Nodosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Amira; Litaiem, Noureddine; Smiti Khanfir, M.; Ayadi, Sofiene; Nfoussi, Haifa; Houman, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is one of the most common intestinal ischemic injuries. It results from impaired perfusion of blood to the bowel and is rarely caused by vasculitis. We report a case of ischemic colitis revealing polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) in a 55-year-old man. Histological examination of the resected colon led to the diagnosis of PAN. PMID:24382967

  9. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  10. [Effect of liver trasplantation on familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) and its limt].

    PubMed

    Ando, Yukio

    2011-11-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is a hereditary intractable disease induced by mutated transthyretin (TTR). Since TTR is predominantly synthesized by liver, liver transplantation has been performed to halt the clinical symptoms of FAP in the worldwide. It has been well documented that liver transplantation could halt the progression of FAP manifestations. However, the surgery could not prevent ocular symptoms and in some cases, cardiopathy and neuroparthy progressed even after liver trasplantation. Quantitative analyses for changes in the amount of amyloid deposition and ratio of wild type and variant type of TTR for autopsy transplanted FAP cases revealed that the amount of amyloid deposition decreased in most of the organs, but in heart and lung, the amount increased even after liver transplantation. In those organs, the ratio of wild type to variant TTR increased. Since liver transplantation has several problems, we are now performing several new therapeutic researches for FAP, such as development of drug stabilizing tetrameric form of TTR, siRNA therapy to stop TTR production, and low molecular compounds for preventing misfolding of TTR. PMID:22277510

  11. Adenosine and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bruce T.; Swierkosz, Tomasz A.; Herrmann, Howard C.; Kimmel, Stephen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is released in large amounts during myocardial ischemia and is capable of exerting potent cardioprotective effects in the heart. Although these observations on adenosine have been known for a long time, how adenosine acts to achieve its anti-ischemic effect remains incompletely understood. However, recent advances on the chemistry and pharmacology of adenosine receptor ligands have provided important and novel information on the function of adenosine receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. The development of model systems for the cardiac actions of adenosine has yielded important insights into its mechanism of action and have begun to elucidate the sequence of signalling events from receptor activation to the actual exertion of its cardioprotective effect. The present review will focus on the adenosine receptors that mediate the potent anti-ischemic effect of adenosine, new ligands at the receptors, potential molecular signalling mechanisms downstream of the receptor, mediators for cardioprotection, and possible clinical applications in cardiovascular disorders. PMID:10607860

  12. Ischemic tissue injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, R. B.; Ganote, C. E.; Reimer, K. A.

    1975-01-01

    The subendocardial to subepicardial gradient in the severity of ischemia following acute coronary occlusion is described. The effects of mild, moderate, and severe ischemia on cell structure and function are compared in summary form, and special attention is given to the effects of severe ischemia on myocardial cells. The characteristics of reversible and irreversible ischemic injury are defined in biologic terms. The failure of cell volume regulation in cells which have entered an irreversible state of ischemic injury is demonstrated by the use of free-hand slices in vitro. Irreversibility is associated with structural defects in the plasma membrane and is reflected in an increased slice inulin-diffusible space, increased slice H2O and Na+ content, and failure of the tissue to maintain the high K+ and Mg2+ levels characteristic of normal left ventricular myocardium. Defective cell membrane function is an early feature of irreversible ischemic injury and may be a primary event in the genesis of the irreversible state. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1180331

  13. Imaging acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    González, R Gilberto; Schwamm, Lee H

    2016-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is common and often treatable, but treatment requires reliable information on the state of the brain that may be provided by modern neuroimaging. Critical information includes: the presence of hemorrhage; the site of arterial occlusion; the size of the early infarct "core"; and the size of underperfused, potentially threatened brain parenchyma, commonly referred to as the "penumbra." In this chapter we review the major determinants of outcomes in ischemic stroke patients, and the clinical value of various advanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging methods that may provide key physiologic information in these patients. The focus is on major strokes due to occlusions of large arteries of the anterior circulation, the most common cause of a severe stroke syndrome. The current evidence-based approach to imaging the acute stroke patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital is presented, which is applicable for all stroke types. We conclude with new information on time and stroke evolution that imaging has revealed, and how it may open the possibilities of treating many more patients. PMID:27432672

  14. Acute Ischemic Stroke Intervention.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Yavagal, Dileep R; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) is the leading cause of disability worldwide and among the leading causes of mortality. Although intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) was approved nearly 2 decades ago for treatment of AIS, only a minority of patients receive it due to a narrow time window for administration and several contraindications to its use. Endovascular approaches to recanalization in AIS developed in the 1980s, and recently, 5 major randomized trials showed an overwhelming superior benefit of combining endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with IV-rtPA over IV-rtPA alone. In this paper, we discuss the evolution of catheter-based treatment from first-generation thrombectomy devices to the game-changing stent retrievers, results from recent trials, and the evolving stroke systems of care to provide timely access to acute stroke intervention to patients in the United States. PMID:27256835

  15. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  16. [Cerebrolysin for acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    iganshina, L E; Abakumova, T R

    2013-01-01

    The review discusses existing evidence of benefits and risks of cerebrolysin--a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and amino acids derived from pigs' brain tissue with proposed neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties, for acute ischemic stroke. The review presents results of systematic search and analysis of randomised clinical trials comparing cerebrolysin with placebo in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Only one trial was selected as meeting quality criteria. No difference in death and adverse events between cerebrolysin and placebo was established. The authors conclude about insufficiency of evidence to evaluate the effect of cerebrolysin on survival and dependency in people with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:23805635

  17. Ischemic ulcers - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... restrict blood flow. Certain lifestyle changes can help prevent ischemic ulcers. If you have a wound, taking these steps can improve blood flow and aid healing. Quit smoking. Smoking can lead to clogged arteries. ...

  18. Ischemic Stroke after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Acampa, Maurizio; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Guideri, Francesca; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are more common in comparison with neurological sequelae subsequent to routine cardiac surgery. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are more common (with an incidence of up to 13%) than intracranial hemorrhage (2.5%). Clinically, ischemic stroke is manifested by the appearance of focal neurologic deficits, although sometimes a stroke may be silent or manifests itself by the appearance of encephalopathy, reflecting a diffuse brain disorder. Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution in perioperative and postoperative period after OHT is very different from classical distribution, with different pathogenic mechanisms. Infact, ischemic stroke may be caused by less common and unusual mechanisms, linked to surgical procedures and to postoperative inflammation, peculiar to this group of patients. However, many strokes (40%) occur without a well-defined etiology (cryptogenic strokes). A silent atrial fibrillation (AF) may play a role in pathogenesis of these strokes and P wave dispersion may represent a predictor of AF. In OHT patients, P wave dispersion correlates with homocysteine plasma levels and hyperhomocysteinemia could play a role in the pathogenesis of these strokes with multiple mechanisms increasing the risk of AF. In conclusion, stroke after heart transplantation represents a complication with considerable impact not only on mortality but also on subsequent poor functional outcome. PMID:26915504

  19. Ischemic Stroke after Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Acampa, Maurizio; Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Guideri, Francesca; Tassi, Rossana; Martini, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrovascular complications after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT) are more common in comparison with neurological sequelae subsequent to routine cardiac surgery. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are more common (with an incidence of up to 13%) than intracranial hemorrhage (2.5%). Clinically, ischemic stroke is manifested by the appearance of focal neurologic deficits, although sometimes a stroke may be silent or manifests itself by the appearance of encephalopathy, reflecting a diffuse brain disorder. Ischemic stroke subtypes distribution in perioperative and postoperative period after OHT is very different from classical distribution, with different pathogenic mechanisms. Infact, ischemic stroke may be caused by less common and unusual mechanisms, linked to surgical procedures and to postoperative inflammation, peculiar to this group of patients. However, many strokes (40%) occur without a well-defined etiology (cryptogenic strokes). A silent atrial fibrillation (AF) may play a role in pathogenesis of these strokes and P wave dispersion may represent a predictor of AF. In OHT patients, P wave dispersion correlates with homocysteine plasma levels and hyperhomocysteinemia could play a role in the pathogenesis of these strokes with multiple mechanisms increasing the risk of AF. In conclusion, stroke after heart transplantation represents a complication with considerable impact not only on mortality but also on subsequent poor functional outcome. PMID:26915504

  20. HYPERTENSIVE-ISCHEMIC LEG ULCERS

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Eugene M.; Schmidt, Otto E. L.

    1950-01-01

    Ischemic ulcers of the leg having characteristics different from those of ordinary leg ulcers have been observed in a small number of hypertensive patients, mostly women, during the past few years. Such ulcers are usually located above the ankle. They begin with a small area of purplish discoloration at the site of slight trauma, and progress to acutely tender ulceration. In studies of tissue removed from the margin and the base of an ulcer of this kind, obliterative arteriolar sclerotic changes, ischemic-appearing connective tissue and inflammatory changes were noted. Two additional cases are reported. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:15398887

  1. [Phenomenon of heart ischemic postconditioning].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Mrochek, A G; Hanus, L; Pei, J -M; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Naryzhnaia, N V

    2012-08-01

    Authors of review analyzed papers on problem of heart ischemic postconditioning. In the review, it was demonstrated that postconditioning decreased an infarct size, prevented cardiomyocytes apoptosis, improved cardiac contractility in reperfusion period, augmented cardiac tolerance to arrhythmogenic impact ofreperfusion, prevented neutrophil invasion into the reperfused heart, abolished reperfusion endothelial dysfunction and suppressed reperfusion oxidative stress in myocardium. PMID:23155619

  2. Microglia in ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Jonathan R; Koerner, Ines P; Möller, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Microglia are resident CNS immune cells that are active sensors in healthy brain and versatile effectors under pathological conditions. Cerebral ischemia induces a robust neuroinflammatory response that includes marked changes in the gene-expression profile and phenotype of a variety of endogenous CNS cell types (astrocytes, neurons and microglia), as well as an influx of leukocytic cells (neutrophils, macrophages and T-cells) from the periphery. Many molecules and conditions can trigger a transformation of surveying microglia to microglia of an alerted or reactive state. Here we review recent developments in the literature that relate to microglial activation in the experimental setting of in vitro and in vivo ischemia. We also present new data from our own laboratory demonstrating the direct effects of in vitro ischemic conditions on the microglial phenotype and genomic profile. In particular, we focus on the role of specific molecular signaling systems, such as hypoxia inducible factor-1 and Toll-like receptor-4, in regulating the microglial response in this setting. We then review histological and novel radiological data that confirm a key role for microglial activation in the setting of ischemic stroke in humans. We also discuss recent progress in the pharmacologic and molecular targeting of microglia in acute ischemic stroke. Finally, we explore how recent studies on ischemic preconditioning have increased interest in pre-emptively targeting microglial activation in order to reduce stroke severity. PMID:20401171

  3. Remote ischemic conditioning for acute ischemic stroke: dawn in the darkness.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingrui; Li, Xiangpen; Peng, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Of all strokes, 87% are ischemic. The only approved treatments for acute ischemic stroke are intravenous thrombolysis with alteplase within 4.5 h and thrombectomy within 8 h after symptom onset, which can be applied to just a few patients. During the past decades, ischemic preconditioning has been widely studied to confirm its neuroprotection against subsequent ischemia/reperfusion injury in the brain, including preconditioning in situ or in a remote organ (such as a limb) before onset of brain ischemia, the latter of which is termed as remote ischemic preconditioning. Because acute stroke is unpredicted, ischemic preconditioning is actually not suitable for clinical application. So remote ischemic conditioning performed during or after the ischemic duration of the brain was then designed to study its neuroprotection alone or in combination with alteplase in animals and patients, which is named as remote ischemic perconditioning or remote ischemic postconditioning. As expected, animal experiments and clinical trials both showed exciting results, indicating that an evolution in the treatment for acute ischemic stroke may not be far away. However, some problems or disputes still exist. This review summarizes the research progress and unresolved issues of remote ischemic conditioning (pre-, per-, and post-conditioning) in treating acute ischemic stroke, with the hope of advancing our understanding of this promising neuroprotective strategy for ischemic stroke in the near future. PMID:26812782

  4. Arterial ischemic stroke in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bryer, Alan; Lucas, Sebastian; Stanley, Alan; Allain, Theresa J.; Joekes, Elizabeth; Emsley, Hedley; Turnbull, Ian; Downey, Colin; Toh, Cheng-Hock; Brown, Kevin; Brown, David; Ison, Catherine; Smith, Colin; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Nath, Avindra; Heyderman, Robert S.; Connor, Myles D.; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection, and potentially its treatment, increases the risk of an arterial ischemic stroke. Multiple etiologies and lack of clear case definitions inhibit progress in this field. Several etiologies, many treatable, are relevant to HIV-related stroke. To fully understand the mechanisms and the terminology used, a robust classification algorithm to help ascribe the various etiologies is needed. This consensus paper considers the strengths and limitations of current case definitions in the context of HIV infection. The case definitions for the major etiologies in HIV-related strokes were refined (e.g., varicella zoster vasculopathy and antiphospholipid syndrome) and in some instances new case definitions were described (e.g., HIV-associated vasculopathy). These case definitions provided a framework for an algorithm to help assign a final diagnosis, and help classify the subtypes of HIV etiology in ischemic stroke. PMID:27386505

  5. [Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents in childhood].

    PubMed

    Pascual Pascual, S I; Pascual Castroviejo, I; Vélez, A

    1988-04-01

    Authors review 53 children, aged 0 to 14 years, affected with cerebrovascular ischemic strokes. Largest aetiological groups were: a) congenital heart disease, 16 patients; b) arteritis of unknown cause, 11; c) idiopathic arterial occlusion without arteritis images on angiography, 7; d) moyamoya disease, 6; and d) local or systemic infections, 5. The mode of onset was as completed stroke in 72% and stroke in evolution in 24%. After acute stage 17.6% of patients presented other definitive strokes, 11.7% suffered only transient ischemic strokes (TIA), and 4% reversible ischemic neurologic deficits (RIND). Mean follow-up was 4.36 years, 9.8% of patients died, 11.8% recovered completely and 52.9% improved after initial stroke. Poor global evolution was associated with heart disease (p less than 0.05) and with onset of strokes before age 2 (p less than 0.05). Most important sequelae, besides motor impairment, were epilepsy (49%) and mental retardation (50% got less than IQ 80). Late epilepsy was associated with seizures at onset (p less than 0.05). Clinical factors of adverse mental development were: a) seizures at onset, b) late epilepsy and c) stroke before age 2. 66% of cases had two or more arterial lesions in the same or in different arterial trees. Therefore, embolic and arteritic factors probably play an important role in infancy and childhood stroke. PMID:3400936

  6. Intravenous thrombolytics for ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Andrew D

    2011-07-01

    For many decades, intravenous (IV) thrombolytics have been delivered to treat acute thrombosis. Although these medications were originally effective for coronary thrombosis, their mechanisms have proven beneficial for many other disease processes, including ischemic stroke. Treatment paradigms for acute ischemic stroke have largely followed those of cardiology. Specifically, the aim has been to recanalize the occluded artery and to restore perfusion to the brain that remains salvageable. To that end, rapid clot lysis was sought using thrombolytic medicines already proven effective in the coronary arteries. IV-thrombolysis for ischemic stroke began its widespread adoption in the late 1990s after the publication of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke study. Since that time, other promising IV-thrombolytics have been developed and tested in human trials, but as of yet, none have been proven better than a placebo. Adjunctive treatments are also being evaluated. The challenge remains balancing reperfusion and salvaging brain tissue with the potential risks of brain hemorrhage. PMID:21638138

  7. Management of ischemic optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) consist primarily of two types: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). AION comprises arteritic AION (A-AION: due to giant cell arteritis) and non-arteritic AION (NA-AION: due to other causes). PION consists of arteritic PION (A-PION: due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic PION (NA-PION: due to other causes), and surgical PION (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). These five types of ION are distinct clinical entities etiologically, pathogenetically, clinically and from the management point of view. In the management of AION, the first crucial step with patients aged 50 and over is to identify immediately whether it is arteritic or not because A-AION is an ophthalmic emergency and requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. Patients with NA-AION, when treated with systemic corticosteroid therapy within first 2 weeks of onset, had significantly better visual outcome than untreated ones. Systemic risk factors, particularly nocturnal arterial hypotension, play major roles in the development of NA-AION; management of them is essential in its prevention and management. NA-PION patients, when treated with high-dose systemic steroid therapy during the very early stages of the disease, showed significant improvement in visual acuity and visual fields, compared to untreated eyes. A-PION, like A-AION, requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. There is no satisfactory treatment for surgical PION, except to take prophylactic measures to prevent its development. PMID:21350282

  8. Peroxisomal Biogenesis in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jennifer M.; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Cheng, Jian; Zhang, Wenri; Mader, Sarah; Davis, Catherine M.; Morrison, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Peroxisomes are highly adaptable and dynamic organelles, adjusting their size, number, and enzyme composition to changing environmental and metabolic demands. We determined whether peroxisomes respond to ischemia, and whether peroxisomal biogenesis is an adaptive response to cerebral ischemia. Results: Focal cerebral ischemia induced peroxisomal biogenesis in peri-infarct neurons, which was associated with a corresponding increase in peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme catalase. Peroxisomal biogenesis was also observed in primary cultured cortical neurons subjected to ischemic insult induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). A catalase inhibitor increased OGD-induced neuronal death. Moreover, preventing peroxisomal proliferation by knocking down dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) exacerbated neuronal death induced by OGD, whereas enhancing peroxisomal biogenesis pharmacologically using a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha agonist protected against neuronal death induced by OGD. Innovation: This is the first documentation of ischemia-induced peroxisomal biogenesis in mammalian brain using a combined in vivo and in vitro approach, electron microscopy, high-resolution laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that neurons respond to ischemic injury by increasing peroxisome biogenesis, which serves a protective function, likely mediated by enhanced antioxidant capacity of neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 109–120. PMID:25226217

  9. Symptoms of transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong S

    2014-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a cerebrovascular disease with temporary (<24 h) neurological symptoms. The symptoms of TIA patients are largely similar to those of ischemic stroke patients and include unilateral limb weakness, speech disturbances, sensory symptoms, visual disturbances, and gait difficulties. As these symptoms are transient, they are frequently evaluated based on patients' subjective reports, which are less precise than those of patients with stroke whose longer-lasting symptoms and signs can be reliably assessed by physicians. Some symptoms, such as monocular blindness, are much more common in TIA than in stroke, and limb shaking occurs almost exclusively in TIA patients. On the other hand, symptoms like hemivisual field defects or limb ataxia are underappreciated in TIA patients. These transient neurological symptoms are not necessarily caused by cerebrovascular diseases, but can be produced by a variety of non-vascular diseases. Careful history taking, examination, and appropriate imaging tests are needed to differentiate these TIA mimics from TIA. Each TIA symptom has a different specificity and sensitivity, and there has been an effort to assess the outcome of the patients through the use of specific clinical features. On top of this, recent developments in imaging techniques have greatly enhanced our ability to predict the outcomes of TIA patients. Perception or recognition of TIA symptoms may differ according to the race, sex, education, and specialty of physicians. Appropriate education of both the general population and physicians with regard to TIA symptoms is important as TIAs need emergent evaluation and treatment. PMID:24157558

  10. Stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vivek; Ritchie, Michael M.; Stone, Laura L.; Low, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Cell-based therapies are being investigated as an adjunct to IV thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. This review summarizes the potential applications as well as challenges of intravascular cell delivery in ischemic stroke. Method: We conducted a search of Medline as well as the clinicaltrials.gov Web site for all ongoing human clinical studies using stem cells in ischemic stroke patients. Result: The pros and cons of the various donor cell types and routes of cell delivery, including intravascular delivery, in ischemic stroke are discussed. In addition, the potential challenges in translation from bench to bedside, the optimal techniques for intravascular cell delivery, and an updated comprehensive list of ongoing clinical trials in ischemic stroke are highlighted. Conclusions: Stem cells have shown a promising role in ischemic stroke, in preclinical studies as well as initial pilot studies. Further studies are needed to assess intravascular cell therapy as a potential adjunct to thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy in ischemic stroke. PMID:23008400

  11. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, Ralph R. E. G.; Borst, Jordi; Lucas, Marit; Boers, A. M. Merel; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; van Walderveen, Marianne A. A.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Marquering, Henk A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up. Materials and Methods This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0). Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT) and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT) regions. False discovery ratio (FDR), defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT) were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests. Results Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml); median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml). Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%). Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289%) and 342% (IQR:249%-432%) for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43–1.79) ml/100g (P<0.01) and 1.38 (IQR:1.15–1.49) ml/100g (P<0.01) for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly. Conclusion For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core

  12. Growth factors in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranconi, S; Locatelli, F; Corti, S; Candelise, L; Comi, G P; Baron, P L; Strazzer, S; Bresolin, N; Bersano, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Data from pre-clinical and clinical studies provide evidence that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and other growth factors (GFs) can improve stroke outcome by reducing stroke damage through their anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and by promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. This review provides a critical and up-to-date literature review on CSF use in stroke. We searched for experimental and clinical studies on haemopoietic GFs such as granulocyte CSF, erythropoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial GF, stromal cell-derived factor-1α and SCF in ischemic stroke. We also considered studies on insulin-like growth factor-1 and neurotrophins. Despite promising results from animal models, the lack of data in human beings hampers efficacy assessments of GFs on stroke outcome. We provide a comprehensive and critical view of the present knowledge about GFs and stroke, and an overview of ongoing and future prospects. PMID:20015202

  13. In-Hospital Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Between 2.2% and 17% of all strokes have symptom onset during hospitalization in a patient originally admitted for another diagnosis or procedure. These in-hospital strokes represent a unique population with different risk factors, more mimics, and substantially worsened outcomes compared to community-onset strokes. The fact that these strokes manifest during the acute care hospitalization, in patients with higher rates of thrombolytic contraindications, creates distinct challenges for treatment. However, the best evidence suggests benefit to treating appropriately selected in-hospital ischemic strokes with thrombolysis. Evidence points toward a “quality gap” for in-hospital stroke with longer in-hospital delays to evaluation and treatment, lower rates of evaluation for etiology, and decreased adherence to consensus quality process measures of care. This quality gap for in-hospital stroke represents a focused opportunity for quality improvement. PMID:26288675

  14. Ischemic perinatal stroke: challenge and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Raju, Tonse N K

    2008-08-01

    The second highest risk group for developing a cerebral stroke is the perinatal period, generally defined as 20 weeks of gestation through 28th postnatal day of age. In this commentary, a brief overview of ischemic perinatal strokes is presented. Ischemic perinatal stroke (IPS) occurs at a rate of 1 : 2300 to 1 : 5000 births, accounting for 30% of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Thus, IPS is the most common known cause for CP [1-3]. Although they occur frequently, much remains to be studied about perinatal strokes in general and the ischemic variety in particular. PMID:18705894

  15. Post-ischemic diastolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Marsch, S C; Dalmas, S; Philbin, D M; Wanigasekera, V A; Ryder, W A; Wong, L S; Foëx, P

    1994-12-01

    Though a sustained post-ischemic decrease in contractile function has been clearly established, post-ischemic diastolic function has not been thoroughly investigated. Accordingly, 11 anesthetized (isoflurane 1%) open-chest beagles were instrumented to measure left ventricular pressure and dimensions (circumferential length and wall thickness) in an apicoanterior area supplied by the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Pressure-dimension relations were modified by stepwise infusion and withdrawal of 200 mL of the animals' own blood during baseline, 45 minutes partial occlusion of the LAD (systolic bulging), and 60 minutes after the onset of reperfusion. Stiffness constants were derived from the end-diastolic pressure-length and stress-strain relations, respectively. Myocardial ischemia was associated with significant (P < 0.05) alterations of the following parameters of diastolic function: (1) 47% increase in end-diastolic pressure; (2) 22% decrease in peak negative dP/dt; (3) 9% increase in the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau); (4) postcystolic contraction; (5) 6% increase in end-diastolic length and 10% decrease in end-diastolic thickness; (6) 12% increase in unstressed length (creep) and 13% decrease in unstressed thickness; (7) 51% increase in chamber stiffness and a 63% increase in myocardial stiffness; and (8) 40% decrease in the peak lengthening rate. After 60 minutes of reperfusion, only end-diastolic pressure and tau had returned to baseline values whereas systolic shortening fraction, postsystolic contraction, and end-diastolic and unstressed dimensions had only partially recovered. No recovery occurred in peak negative dP/dt, chamber stiffness, myocardial stiffness, and peak lengthening rate. Thus, both myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are associated with complex changes in global and regional left ventricular diastolic function. PMID:7880987

  16. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Taurine against Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Menzie, Janet; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke exhibits a multiplicity of pathophysiological mechanisms. To address the diverse pathophysiological mechanisms observed in ischemic stroke investigators seek to find therapeutic strategies that are multifaceted in their action by either investigating multipotential compounds or by using a combination of compounds. Taurine, an endogenous amino acid, exhibits a plethora of physiological functions. It exhibits antioxidative properties, stabilizes membrane, functions as an osmoregulator, modulates ionic movements, reduces the level of pro-inflammators, regulates intracellular calcium concentration; all of which contributes to its neuroprotective effect. Data are accumulating that show the neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine against stroke pathophysiology. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms employed by taurine against ischemic stroke and its use in clinical trial for ischemic stroke. PMID:24961429

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V; Oltean, Mihai; Jespersen, Bente; Dor, Frank J M F

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent part of the renal defense mechanism against ischemia and can be triggered by short periods of intermittent ischemia and reperfusion. Understanding the signaling transduction pathways of renal ischemic conditioning can promote further clinical translation and pharmacological advancements in this era. This review summarizes research on the molecular mechanisms underlying both local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning of the kidney. The different types of conditioning strategies in the kidney recruit similar powerful pro-survival mechanisms. Likewise, renal ischemic conditioning mobilizes many of the same protective signaling pathways as in other organs, but differences are recognized. PMID:26330099

  18. Neuroimaging in Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Pradeep; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is emerging as one of the most important tools in identifying the etiology of neonatal encephalopathy as well as in predicting long-term outcomes. This makes it imperative to have a broader understanding of normal myelination of the neonatal brain on MR imaging and to be familiar with the spectrum of imaging features in ischemic and non-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. Hypoxic ischemic injury (HIE) is one of the most common causes of neonatal encephalopathy and imaging appearances are influenced by factors such as the stage of maturation of the neonatal brain and severity as well as duration of ischemic insult. Other common causes of neonatal encephalopathy include infectious diseases, congenital disorders and inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:26909496

  19. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Muthukrishnan; Kumar, Sandeep; Ahmad, F M H

    2013-10-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery. PMID:24251140

  20. Chinese Herbal Products for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Hung, I-Ling; Hung, Yu-Chiang; Wang, Lin-Yi; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Kuo, Chun-En; Hu, Wen-Long; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese herbal products (CHPs) have been described in ancient medicine systems as treatments for various stroke-associated ailments. This study is aimed to investigate the prescription patterns and combinations of CHPs for ischemic stroke in Taiwan. Prescriptions of CHPs for ischemic stroke were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) of Taiwan. Every prescription with a leading diagnosis of ischemic stroke made during 2000-2010 was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were applied to the pattern of co-prescriptions. Multiple logistic regression models were used to assess demographic and risk factors that are correlated with CHP use. The dataset of inpatient claims data contained information on 15,896 subjects who experienced ischemic stroke from 2000 to 2010. There was an average of 5.82 CHPs in a single prescription for subjects with ischemic stroke. Bu-yang-huan-wu-tang (BYHWT) (40.32%) was by far the most frequently prescribed formula CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two-formula-CHP was BYHWT with Shu-jin-huo-xue-tang (SJHXT) (4.40%). Dan Shen (16.50%) was the most commonly used single CHP for ischemic stroke, and the most commonly used combination of two single CHPs was Shi Chang Pua with Yuan Zhi (4.79%). We found that BYHWT and Dan Shen were the most frequently prescribed formula and single CHP for ischemic stroke, respectively. These results provide information about individualized therapy and may contribute to further pharmacologic experiments and clinical trials. PMID:26477801

  1. Ischemic Conditioning: Implications for Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Kenneth; Bloom, Adam S

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic conditioning refers to the ability of brief episodes of controlled hypoperfusion around the time of an acute ischemic event to protect the target organ from reperfusion injury. A considerable body of literature suggests that interventions as simple and safe as repetitively inflating a blood pressure cuff could reduce the size and long-term morbidity of myocardial and cerebral infarction. This review introduces and summarizes the body of evidence contributing to these impressions. PMID:26973174

  2. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  3. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Froehler, Michael T; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-04-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator remains the only US FDA-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, the very limited time window for its administration restricts its usefulness. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that, given the numerous pathways via which cerebral ischemia causes cell death, the capacity to inhibit multiple mechanisms simultaneously may provide additive or synergistic beneficial clinical effects for stroke patients. Although no clinical trials have yet investigated the efficacy of therapeutic hypothermia in focal cerebral ischemia, its pleiotropic neuroprotective actions, positive results in preclinical studies, as well as proven enhancement of neurologic outcomes in survivors of cardiac arrest and newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, make this neuroprotective strategy highly promising. This review presents an overview of the potential role of hypothermia in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke and discusses ischemic cell death pathophysiology, neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, methodologies employed for the induction of hypothermia, results from animal models of cerebral ischemia, and finally, currently available clinical trial data. Two valuable lessons learned thus far are that first, rapid induction of hypothermia is key and is best accomplished with a combination of ice-cold saline infusion and the use of endovascular cooling devices, and second, that shivering can be overcome with aggressive anti-shivering protocols including meperidine, buspirone and surface warming. We await the results of clinical trials to determine the utility of therapeutic hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke. If proven efficacious, hypothermia would be a welcome complement to established reperfusion therapies for ischemic stroke patients. PMID:20397832

  4. The Ischemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS) Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F; Brott, Thomas G; Brown, Robert D; Crook, Richard JP; Frankel, Michael; Hardy, John; Merino, José G; Rich, Stephen S; Silliman, Scott; Worrall, Bradford Burke

    2003-01-01

    Background The molecular basis for the genetic risk of ischemic stroke is likely to be multigenic and influenced by environmental factors. Several small case-control studies have suggested associations between ischemic stroke and polymorphisms of genes that code for coagulation cascade proteins and platelet receptors. Our aim is to investigate potential associations between hemostatic gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke, with particular emphasis on detailed characterization of the phenotype. Methods/Design The Ischemic Stroke Genetic Study is a prospective, multicenter genetic association study in adults with recent first-ever ischemic stroke confirmed with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Patients are evaluated at academic medical centers in the United States and compared with sex- and age-matched controls. Stroke subtypes are determined by central blinded adjudication using standardized, validated mechanistic and syndromic classification systems. The panel of genes to be tested for polymorphisms includes β-fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein Ia, Iba, and IIb/IIIa. Immortalized cell lines are created to allow for time- and cost-efficient testing of additional candidate genes in the future. Discussion The study is designed to minimize survival bias and to allow for exploring associations between specific polymorphisms and individual subtypes of ischemic stroke. The data set will also permit the study of genetic determinants of stroke outcome. Having cell lines will permit testing of future candidate risk factor genes. PMID:12848902

  5. Angiotensinogen polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Hao, Jun-Jie; Yang, Yu-Mei; Xu, Xia-Hong; Wang, Yue; Zuo, Lian; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Si-Yi; Wang, Xuan; Li, Ying; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke risk. However, the results were controversial. Thus, a meta-analysis was conducted. NCBI, Medline, Web of Science and Embase databases were systematically searched. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using random-effects models. There was a significant association between angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.69; 95% CI, 1.35-2.11; P < 0.001). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, we found that this polymorphism was significantly associated with ischemic stroke in Asian (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.45-2.35; P < 0.001). In the age subgroup, we found that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism could increase both early-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.88; 95% CI, 1.33-2.43; P < 0.001) and late-onset ischemic stroke risk (OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.01-1.39; P = 0.04). This meta-analysis suggested that angiotensinogen M235T polymorphism was associated with ischemic stroke. PMID:26550208

  6. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  7. Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning of Different Intraoperative Ischemic Times of Vascularized Bone Graft Rabbit Models

    PubMed Central

    Wan Ahmad Kamal, Wan Syazli Rodzaia; Noor, Norizal Mohd; Abdullah, Shafie

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic preconditioning has been shown to improve the outcomes of hypoxic tolerance of the heart, brain, lung, liver, jejunum, skin, and muscle tissues. However, to date, no report of ischemic preconditioning on vascularized bone grafts has been published. Methods Sixteen rabbits were divided into four groups with ischemic times of 2, 6, 14, and 18 hours. Half of the rabbits in each group underwent ischemic preconditioning. The osteomyocutaneous flaps consisted of the tibia bone, from which the overlying muscle and skin were raised. The technique of ischemic preconditioning involved applying a vascular clamp to the pedicle for 3 cycles of 10 minutes each. The rabbits then underwent serial plain radiography and computed tomography imaging on the first, second, fourth, and sixth postoperative weeks. Following this, all of the rabbits were sacrificed and histological examinations were performed. Results The results showed that for clinical analysis of the skin flaps and bone grafts, the preconditioned groups showed better survivability. In the plain radiographs, except for two non-preconditioned rabbits with intraoperative ischemic times of 6 hours, all began to show early callus formation at the fourth week. The computed tomography findings showed more callus formation in the preconditioned groups for all of the ischemic times except for the 18-hour group. The histological findings correlated with the radiological findings. There was no statistical significance in the difference between the two groups. Conclusions In conclusion, ischemic preconditioning improved the survivability of skin flaps and increased callus formation during the healing process of vascularized bone grafts. PMID:24286040

  8. Local and remote ischemic preconditioning protect against intestinal ischemic/reperfusion injury after supraceliac aortic clamping

    PubMed Central

    Erling, Nilon; de Souza Montero, Edna Frasson; Sannomiya, Paulina; Poli-de-Figueiredo (in memoriam), Luiz Francisco

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study tests the hypothesis that local or remote ischemic preconditioning may protect the intestinal mucosa against ischemia and reperfusion injuries resulting from temporary supraceliac aortic clamping. METHODS: Twenty-eight Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the sham surgery group, the supraceliac aortic occlusion group, the local ischemic preconditioning prior to supraceliac aortic occlusion group, and the remote ischemic preconditioning prior to supraceliac aortic occlusion group. Tissue samples from the small bowel were used for quantitative morphometric analysis of mucosal injury, and blood samples were collected for laboratory analyses. RESULTS: Supraceliac aortic occlusion decreased intestinal mucosal length by reducing villous height and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase and lactate levels. Both local and remote ischemic preconditioning mitigated these histopathological and laboratory changes. CONCLUSIONS: Both local and remote ischemic preconditioning protect intestinal mucosa against ischemia and reperfusion injury following supraceliac aortic clamping. PMID:24473514

  9. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  10. Resveratrol and ischemic preconditioning in the brain.

    PubMed

    Raval, Ami P; Lin, Hung Wen; Dave, Kunjan R; Defazio, R Anthony; Della Morte, David; Kim, Eun Joo; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies in the French are not prevalent despite high dietary saturated fat consumption. This is commonly referred to as the "French Paradox" attributing its anti-lipidemic effects to moderate consumption of red wine. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in red wine, is currently the focus of intense research both in the cardiovascular system and the brain. Current research suggests resveratrol may enhance prognosis of neurological disorders such as, Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's diseases and stroke. The beneficial effects of resveratrol include: antioxidation, free radical scavenger, and modulation of neuronal energy homeostasis and glutamatergic receptors/ion channels. Resveratrol directly increases sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity, a NAD(+) (oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide)-dependent histone deacetylase related to increased lifespan in various species similar to calorie restriction. We recently demonstrated that brief resveratrol pretreatment conferred neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia via SIRT1 activation. This neuroprotective effect produced by resveratrol was similar to ischemic preconditioning-induced neuroprotection, which protects against lethal ischemic insults in the brain and other organ systems. Inhibition of SIRT1 abolished ischemic preconditioning-induced neuroprotection in CA1 region of the hippocampus. Since resveratrol and ischemic preconditioning-induced neuroprotection require activation of SIRT1, this common signaling pathway may provide targeted therapeutic treatment modalities as it relates to stroke and other brain pathologies. In this review, we will examine common signaling pathways, cellular targets of resveratrol, and ischemic preconditioning-induced neuroprotection as it relates to the brain. PMID:18537630

  11. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  12. Small vessel hematocrit in ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Gumm, D.C.; Cooper, S.M.; Marcus, M.L.; Chilian, W.M.; Harrison, D.G.

    1986-03-01

    As blood enters the microvasculature of normally perfused myocardium, there is a progressive decrease in small vessel hematocrit (SV Hct) due to RBC streaming in smaller branching vessels and the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect. We hypothesized that if the coronary collateral circulation was composed of very small vessels branching from large parent vessels, plasma streaming would result in a further decrease of SV Hct in ischemic myocardium. Six open chest anesthetized dogs were studied. Plasma was labelled with /sup 59/FeCl siderophilin and RBC's with /sup 99/mTc to estimate SV Hct from myocardial biopsies. The LAD was occluded and cannulated for measurement of retrograde flow (arising presumably from proximal collaterals). The ischemic region was identified using the microsphere shadow technique. Collateral flow after LAD occlusion was 30 +- 12 ml/min 100g (x +- SE). Systemic Hct was 40 +- 1%. The Hct of blood from retrograde flow was 39 +- 1% (p = NS). Activity of /sup 59/FeCl and /sup 99/mTc in known quantities of blood were compared to myocardial biopsies to estimate SV Hct. Ischemic SV Hct was 23 +- 2% and non-ischemic SV Hct was 21 +- 1% (p = NS). We conclude that the size and branching pattern of coronary collaterals is such that plasma streaming in collaterals does not result in an additional decrease in SV Hct in ischemic myocardium.

  13. Pre-ischemic exercise alleviates oxidative damage following ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xiao; Li, Wen-Bin; Ren, Shi-Qing; Zhang, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Physical exercise has been proved to be neuroprotective in clinical trials and animal experiments. However, the exact mechanism underlying this neuroprotective effect remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore whether pre-ischemic treadmill training could act as a form of ischemic preconditioning in a rat following ischemic stroke by reducing oxidative damage. Fifty-four rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=18 per group): Sham surgery, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) without exercise and MCAO with exercise. Subsequent to treadmill training, ischemic stroke was induced by occluding the MCA for 1.5 h, followed by reperfusion. Six rats in each group were evaluated for neurological deficits and then sacrificed by decapitation to calculate the infarct volume. The remaining rats in each group were sacrificed to detect the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (n=6) and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration (n=6). The results indicated that pre-ischemic exercise training reduced brain infarct volume and neurological deficits, increased SOD activity and decreased the concentration of MDA following ischemic stroke. In conclusion, treadmill exercise training prior to MCAO/reperfusion increased the antioxidant ability and decreased the oxidative damage in the brain subsequent to ischemic stroke. PMID:25187848

  14. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Ischemic Tissue Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jerry S; Wang, Xiaoying; Zhe Sun, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) are versatile diagnostic techniques capable of characterizing the complex stroke pathophysiology, and hold great promise for guiding stroke treatment. Particularly, tissue viability and salvageability are closely associated with its metabolic status. Upon ischemia, ischemic tissue metabolism is disrupted including altered metabolism of glucose and oxygen, elevated lactate production/accumulation, tissue acidification and eventually, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and energy failure. Whereas metabolism impairment during ischemic stroke is complex, it may be monitored non-invasively with magnetic resonance (MR)-based techniques. Our current article provides a concise overview of stroke pathology, conventional and emerging imaging and spectroscopy techniques, and data analysis tools for characterizing ischemic tissue damage. PMID:22216079

  15. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Kidney Tissue Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Fitzgerald, J T; Michalopoulou, A P; Troppmann, C

    2004-03-11

    Noninvasive evaluation of tissue viability of donor kidneys used for transplantation is an issue that current technology is not able to address. In this work, we explore optical spectroscopy for its potential to assess the degree of ischemic damage in kidney tissue. We hypothesized that ischemic damage to kidney tissue will give rise to changes in its optical properties which in turn may be used to asses the degree of tissue injury. The experimental results demonstrate that the autofluorescence intensity of the injured kidney is decreasing as a function of time exposed to ischemic injury. Changes were also observed in the NIR light scattering intensities most probably arising from changes due to injury and death of the tissue.

  16. Resilience in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Conceição Maria Martins; Moraes, David William; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is a psychosocial factor associated with clinical outcomes in chronic diseases. The relationship between this protective factor and certain diseases, such heart diseases, is still under-explored. Objective The present study sought to investigate the frequency of resilience in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Method This was a cross-sectional study with 133 patients of both genders, aged between 35 and 65 years, treated at Rio Grande do Sul Cardiology Institute - Cardiology University Foundation, with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease during the study period. Sixty-seven patients had a history of acute myocardial infarction. The individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Wagnild & Young resilience scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire. Results Eighty-one percent of patients were classified as resilient according to the scale. Conclusion In the sample studied, resilience was identified in high proportion among patients with ischemic heart disease. PMID:26815312

  17. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  18. Ischemic Gastropathic Ulcer Mimics Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Saleh; Lahav, Ziv; Rmeileh, Ayman Abu; Mizrahi, Meir

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer due to mesenteric ischemia is a rare clinical finding. As a result, few reports of ischemic gastric ulcers have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of ischemic gastropathy is seldom considered in patients presenting with abdominal pain and gastric ulcers. In this case report, we describe a patient with increasing abdominal pain, weight loss, and gastric ulcers, who underwent extensive medical evaluation and whose symptoms were resistant to medical interventions. Finally he was diagnosed with chronic mesenteric ischemia, and his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities resolved after surgical revascularization of both the superior mesenteric artery and the celiac trunk. PMID:27579191

  19. Flow Augmentation in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Yadollahikhales, Golnaz; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Edgell, Randall; Cruz-Flores, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for additional therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke considering the major pitfalls of the options available. Herein, we briefly review the role of cerebral blood flow, collaterals, vasoreactivity, and reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke. Then, we reviewed pharmacological and interventional measures such as volume expansion and induced hypertension, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, partial aortic occlusion, extracranial-intracranial carotid bypass surgery, sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, and transcranial laser therapy with regard to their effects on flow augmentation and neuroprotection. PMID:25475112

  20. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole K.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report sonographic and endoscopic images along with abdominal computed tomography in a case of cocaine-induced ischemic colitis. PMID:26798523

  1. Obesity Exacerbates Rat Cerebral Ischemic Injury through Enhancing Ischemic Adiponectin-Containing Neuronal Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Hsiu; Chio, Chung-Ching; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Chang, Ching-Ping; Lin, Nan-Kai; Huang, Chao-Ching; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2016-08-01

    A diet consisting of high levels of saturated fat has been linked to a dramatic rise in obesity. Long-term exposure to high fat, "Western diet" (WD), is detrimental to ischemic brain injury. Adiponectin receptor 1 (ADR-1) activation is also shown to exacerbate ischemic neuronal death. However, it is not known whether increasing percentages of adiponectin (APN)-containing neurons attenuates ischemic neuronal apoptosis by modulating ADRS. To explore the role of APN and its ADRs in the development of acute cerebral injury, we subjected WD and control diet (CD) rats to 1 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 23 h of reperfusion. Compared with CD rats, WD rats exhibited higher levels of brain infarct, neurologic deficits, brain edema, and apoptosis of APN-containing neurons; upregulation of both ADR-1 and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38MAPK); and downregulation of ADR-2 in ischemic brain tissues including frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. Increasing percentages of APN-containing neurons by baculovirus-mediated administration of APN, in addition to reducing apoptosis of APN-containing neurons in ischemic brain tissues, significantly attenuated brain infarct and edema, neurologic deficits, and altered expression of ADR-1, P38MAPK, and ADR-2 in both WD and CD group rats. These data suggest a negative correlation between percentages of APN-containing neurons and cerebral ischemic injury. Obesity could exacerbate rat cerebral ischemic injury by enhancing apoptosis of APN-containing neurons in ischemic brain tissues probably via modulating ADRs and P38MAPK. PMID:26126515

  2. Cerebral Ischemic Preconditioning: the Road So Far….

    PubMed

    Thushara Vijayakumar, N; Sangwan, Amit; Sharma, Bhargy; Majid, Arshad; Rajanikant, G K

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral preconditioning constitutes the brain's adaptation to lethal ischemia when first exposed to mild doses of a subtoxic stressor. The phenomenon of preconditioning has been largely studied in the heart, and data from in vivo and in vitro models from past 2-3 decades have provided sufficient evidence that similar machinery exists in the brain as well. Since preconditioning results in a transient protective phenotype labeled as ischemic tolerance, it can open many doors in the medical warfare against stroke, a debilitating cerebrovascular disorder that kills or cripples thousands of people worldwide every year. Preconditioning can be induced by a variety of stimuli from hypoxia to pharmacological anesthetics, and each, in turn, induces tolerance by activating a multitude of proteins, enzymes, receptors, transcription factors, and other biomolecules eventually leading to genomic reprogramming. The intracellular signaling pathways and molecular cascades behind preconditioning are extensively being investigated, and several first-rate papers have come out in the last few years centered on the topic of cerebral ischemic tolerance. However, translating the experimental knowledge into the clinical scaffold still evades practicality and faces several challenges. Of the various preconditioning strategies, remote ischemic preconditioning and pharmacological preconditioning appears to be more clinically relevant for the management of ischemic stroke. In this review, we discuss current developments in the field of cerebral preconditioning and then examine the potential of various preconditioning agents to confer neuroprotection in the brain. PMID:26081149

  3. An overview of antithrombotics in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Patricia A; Gaughen, John R; Kreitel, Elizabeth M; Shephard, Timothy J; Solenski, Nina J; Jensen, Mary E

    2016-06-19

    The use of antithrombotic medications is an important component of ischemic stroke treatment and prevention. This article reviews the evidence for best practices for antithrombotic use in stroke with focused discussion on the specific agents used to treat and prevent stroke. PMID:27153001

  4. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    PubMed Central

    Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy. PMID:21331336

  5. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lévigne, D.; Tobalem, M.; Modarressi, A.; Pittet-Cuénod, B.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.). In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia. PMID:23509730

  6. Ischemic tolerance: the mechanisms of neuroprotective strategy.

    PubMed

    Lehotský, Jan; Burda, Jozef; Danielisová, Viera; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Kaplán, Peter; Saniová, Beata

    2009-12-01

    The phenomenon of ischemic tolerance perfectly describes this quote "What does not kill you makes you stronger." Ischemic pre- or postconditioning is actually the strongest known procedure to prevent or reverse neurodegeneration. It works specifically in sensitive vulnerable neuronal populations, which are represented by pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. However, tolerance is effective in other brain cell populations as well. Although, its nomenclature is "ischemic" tolerance, the tolerant phenotype can also be induced by other stimuli that lead to delayed neuronal death (intoxication). Moreover, the recent data have proven that this phenomenon is not limited to application of sublethal stimuli before the lethal stress but reversed arrangement of events, sublethal stress after lethal insult, is rather equally effective. A very important term is called "cross conditioning." Cross conditioning is the capability of one stressor to induce tolerance against another. So, since pre- or post-conditioners can be used plenty of harmful stimuli, hypo- or hyperthermia and some physiological compounds, such as norepinephrine, bradykinin. Delayed neuronal death is the slow development of postischemic neurodegeneration. This allows an opportunity for a great therapeutic window of 2-3 days to reverse the cellular death process. Moreover, it seems that the mechanisms of ischemic tolerance-delayed postconditioning could be used not only after ischemia but also in some other processes leading to apoptosis. PMID:19943353

  7. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  8. Cerebrovascular ischemic events in wind instrument players.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Altenmüller, E; Ringelstein, E B

    2000-09-26

    Two cases of ischemic stroke due to carotid artery dissection occurring during wind instrument playing, probably caused by increased intrathoracic and subsequent intrapharyngeal pressure, are presented. A review of the literature revealed three similar patients with other types of cerebrovascular events, such as paradoxical cerebral embolism due to a patent foramen ovale and spinal epidural hematoma during trumpet playing. PMID:10994010

  9. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  10. Role of thioredoxin-1 in ischemic preconditioning, postconditioning and aged ischemic hearts.

    PubMed

    D'Annunzio, Veronica; Perez, Virginia; Boveris, Alberto; Gelpi, Ricardo J; Poderoso, Juan J

    2016-07-01

    Thioredoxin is one of the most important cellular antioxidant systems known to date, and is responsible of maintaining the reduced state of the intracellular space. Trx-1 is a small cytosolic protein whose transcription is induced by stress. Therefore it is possible that this antioxidant plays a protective role against the oxidative stress caused by an increase of reactive oxygen species concentration, as occurs during the reperfusion after an ischemic episode. However, in addition to its antioxidant properties, it is able to activate other cytoplasmic and nuclear mediators that confer cardioprotection. It is remarkable that Trx-1 also participates in myocardial protection mechanisms such as ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning, activating proteins related to cellular survival. In this sense, it has been shown that Trx-1 inhibition abolished the preconditioning cardioprotective effect, evidenced through apoptosis and infarct size. Furthermore, ischemic postconditioning preserves Trx-1 content at reperfusion, after ischemia. However, comorbidities such as aging can modify this powerful cellular defense leading to decrease cardioprotection. Even ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning protocols performed in aged animal models failed to decrease infarct size. Therefore, the lack of success of antioxidants therapies to treat ischemic heart disease could be solved, at least in part, avoiding the damage of Trx system. PMID:26987940

  11. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  12. Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy: Pathophysiology and Experimental Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kimberly A.; Brandon, Debra H.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a serious birth complication affecting full term infants: 40–60% of affected infants die by 2 years of age or have severe disabilities. The majority of the underlying pathologic events of HIE are a result of impaired cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain with resulting primary and secondary energy failure. In the past, treatment options were limited to supportive medical therapy. Currently, several experimental treatments are being explored in neonates and animal models to ameliorate the effects of secondary energy failure. This review discusses the underlying pathophysiologic effects of a hypoxic-ischemic event and experimental treatment modalities being explored to manage infants with HIE. Further research is needed to better understand if the long-term impact of the experimental treatments and whether the combinations of experimental treatments can improve outcomes in infants with HIE. PMID:21927583

  13. Evolving Treatments for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zerna, Charlotte; Hegedus, Janka; Hill, Michael D

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this article is to review advances in stroke treatment in the hyperacute period. With recent evolutions of technology in the fields of imaging, thrombectomy devices, and emergency room workflow management, as well as improvement in statistical methods and study design, there have been ground breaking changes in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. We describe how stroke presents as a clinical syndrome and how imaging as the most important biomarker will help differentiate between stroke subtypes and treatment eligibility. The evolution of hyperacute treatment has led to the current standard of care: intravenous thrombolysis with tissue-type plasminogen activator and endovascular treatment for proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation. All patients with acute ischemic stroke are in need of hyperacute secondary prevention because the risk of recurrence is highest closest to the index event. The dominant themes of modern stroke care are the use of neurovascular imaging and speed of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27126651

  14. [Nuclear magnetic resonance in ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Meave, Aloha

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is the "gold standard" technique to quantify the ventricular volume, the ejection fraction, and the myocardial mass. In patients suffering from ischemic cardiopathy, the ejection fraction is the most important prognostic parameter, even above from lessoned arteries index. An adequate diagnose between a non-viable and a viable myocardium is of great importance in the therapeutic approach for ischemic cardiopathy. By administrating a paramagnetic contrast media named gadolinium, fist pass and late-reinforcement techniques, are applied. With these, it is possible to evaluate the perfusion as well as necrotic areas. In order to identify sub-endocardium ischemia, drugs such as adenosine and dipiridamol, are employed as vasodilators. This technique allows the definition of reinforcement extension, being sub-endocardiac, which is an ailment which affects 50% of the myocardium depth, or even, transmural compromise. PMID:18938717

  15. [Serious jaundice and thyrotoxic myocardiopathy with atrial thrombus].

    PubMed

    Souza, Marcus V Leitão de; Novaes, Fernanda Satake

    2012-10-01

    Jaundice related to thyrotoxicosis and not as an effect of antithyroid drugs is a rare complication that usually occurs in the presence of heart failure (HF) or hepatitis. We report a case of a 54-year-old white woman with hyperthyroidism caused by Graves's disease and jaundice despite methimazole suspension. Bilirubin fluctuated at high values, between 30.0 and 52.3 mg/dL, transaminases were slightly increased, on admission ALT = 46 U/L and AST = 87 U/L; coagulation indices and serum proteins were on the lower limit of the normal range with PT 68% and albumin = 2.5 g/dL. Serology for hepatitis was negative. After the first radioiodine therapy (RT), bilirubin reached its maximum, which coincided with the worst period of HF exacerbation. Bilirubin normalized 4 weeks after the second RT, with the stabilization of HF and normalization of thyroid hormones. We discuss the possible etiologies of severe jaundice in hyperthyroid patients, as well as the difficult anticoagulant therapy with warfarin. PMID:23108751

  16. [Pathogenetic interpretation of left ventricle obstruction in hypertrophic obstructive myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    D'Annunzio, E; Mobilji, A; Falcone, A; D'Orazio, G; Rasetti, G; Olivieri, N; Griffi, E; Pontono, O

    1982-09-15

    Nine patients affected from IHSS have been studied by 2D-echocardiography examination. Following detected pictures the Authors try to explain the pathogenesis of the dynamic obstruction of the L.V. The Authors conclude ascribing it to the postero-medial papillary muscle that move abnormally towards the IVS. Instead the SAM could be ascribed to the chordee of the mitral value, but these are considered unable to obstruct L.V. The differences between SAM and L.V. obstruction are underlined and discussed. PMID:6213883

  17. [Peripartum myocardiopathy. A case report, diagnostic and therapeutic considerations].

    PubMed

    Camarero García, A; Chang Córdova, E; Márquez García, A; Martínez Vivas, A; Carranza Lira, S

    1998-01-01

    A case of periobstetric cardiomyopathy is presented, it was identified at 32 weeks, because of congestive cardiac failure, the obstetric event was resolved by cesarean section due to low fetal reserve, clinical and hemodynamical criteria for diagnosis are reviewed and also therapeutic alternatives are discussed. PMID:9528212

  18. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    PubMed Central

    Grames, Chase; Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S.

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female running the Marine Corps Marathon developed diarrhea at mile 12. After finishing the race she noted that she was covered in bloody stool. A local emergency department suspected ischemic colitis. After discharge, her primary care physician instructed her to discontinue the use of all nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Her symptoms resolved and she returned to running without any complications. This paper describes the pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and management options. PMID:23091744

  19. Remote ischemic conditioning: a clinical trial's update.

    PubMed

    Candilio, Luciano; Hausenloy, Derek J; Yellon, Derek M

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and early and successful restoration of myocardial reperfusion following an ischemic event is the most effective strategy to reduce final infarct size and improve clinical outcome. This process can, however, induce further myocardial damage, namely acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) and worsen clinical outcome. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are required to protect the myocardium against IRI in patients with CAD. In this regard, the endogenous cardioprotective phenomenon of "ischemic conditioning," in which the heart is put into a protected state by subjecting it to one or more brief nonlethal episodes of ischemia and reperfusion, has the potential to attenuate myocardial injury during acute IRI. Intriguingly, the heart can be protected in this manner by applying the "ischemic conditioning" stimulus to an organ or tissue remote from the heart (termed remote ischemic conditioning or RIC). Furthermore, the discovery that RIC can be noninvasively applied using a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm to induce brief episodes of nonlethal ischemia and reperfusion in the forearm has greatly facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical arena. Several recently published proof-of-concept clinical studies have reported encouraging results with RIC, and large multicenter randomized clinical trials are now underway to investigate whether this simple noninvasive and virtually cost-free intervention has the potential to improve clinical outcomes in patients with CAD. In this review article, we provide an update of recently published and ongoing clinical trials in the field of RIC. PMID:21821533

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Crespo, Javier; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Ramírez, Sergi; Peña, Esther; Marín, Rebeca; Dinia, Lavinia; Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Pérez-Pérez, Jesús; Querol, Luis; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Badimon, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in ischemic stroke have not been studied extensively and reported results are inconsistent. We aimed to investigate the time course, the prognostic relevance, and the variables associated with EPC counts in patients with ischemic stroke at different time points. Material and methods We studied prospectively 146 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke within the first 48 h from the onset of symptoms (baseline). We evaluated demographic data, classical vascular risk factors, treatment with thrombolysis and statins, stroke etiology, National Institute of Health and Stroke Scale score and outcome (favorable when Rankin scale score 0–2). Blood samples were collected at baseline, at day 7 after stroke (n = 121) and at 3 months (n = 92). The EPC were measured by flow cytometry. Results We included 146 patients with a mean age of 70.8 ± 12.2 years. The circulating EPC levels were higher on day 7 than at baseline or at 3 months (P = 0.045). Pretreatment with statins (odds ratio [OR] 3.11, P = 0.008) and stroke etiology (P = 0.032) were predictive of EPC counts in the baseline sample. EPC counts were not associated with stroke severity or functional outcome in all the patients. However, using multivariate analyses, a better functional outcome was found in patients with higher EPC counts in large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease etiologic subtypes. Conclusions After acute ischemic stroke, circulating EPC counts peaked at day 7. Pretreatment with statins increased the levels of EPC. In patients with large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease subtypes, higher counts were related to better outcome at 3 months. PMID:24363968

  1. Endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele; Rabinov, James; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular thrombectomy is an effective treatment for major acute ischemic stroke syndromes caused by major anterior circulation artery occlusions (commonly referred to as large vessel occlusion) and is superior to intravenous thrombolysis and medical management. Treatment should occur as quickly as is reasonably possible. All patients with moderate to severe symptoms (National Institutes of Health stroke scale >8) and a treatable occlusion should be considered. The use of neuroimaging is critical to exclude hemorrhage and large ischemic cores. Very shortly after stroke onset (<3 hours) computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography provide sufficient information to proceed; diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is less reliable during this early stage. After 3 hours from onset diffusion MRI is the most reliable method to define ischemic core size and should be used in centers that can offer it rapidly. Recanalization is highly effective with a stentriever or using a direct aspiration technique, with the patient awake or under conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, if it may be performed safely. After thrombectomy the patient should be admitted to an intensive care setting and inpatient rehabilitation undertaken as soon as feasible. Patient outcomes should be assessed at 3 months, preferably using the modified Rankin score. PMID:27430469

  2. White matter injury in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Liu, Gang; Hong, Dandan; Chen, Fenghua; Ji, Xunming; Cao, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of disability and mortality worldwide. It is well known that ischemic stroke can cause gray matter injury. However, stroke also elicits profound white matter injury, a risk factor for higher stroke incidence and poor neurological outcomes. The majority of damage caused by stroke is located in subcortical regions and, remarkably, white matter occupies nearly half of the average infarct volume. Indeed, white matter is exquisitely vulnerable to ischemia and is often injured more severely than gray matter. Clinical symptoms related to white matter injury include cognitive dysfunction, emotional disorders, sensorimotor impairments, as well as urinary incontinence and pain, all of which are closely associated with destruction and remodeling of white matter connectivity. White matter injury can be noninvasively detected by MRI, which provides a three-dimensional assessment of its morphology, metabolism, and function. There is an urgent need for novel white matter therapies, as currently available strategies are limited to preclinical animal studies. Optimal protection against ischemic stroke will need to encompass the fortification of both gray and white matter. In this review, we discuss white matter injury after ischemic stroke, focusing on clinical features and tools, such as imaging, manifestation, and potential treatments. We also briefly discuss the pathophysiology of WMI and future research directions. PMID:27090751

  3. Biomarkers for ischemic preconditioning: finding the responders

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sebastian; Della-Morte, David; Dave, Kunjan R; Sacco, Ralph L; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is emerging as an innovative and novel cytoprotective strategy to counter ischemic vascular disease. At the root of the preconditioning response is the upregulation of endogenous defense systems to achieve ischemic tolerance. Identifying suitable biomarkers to show that a preconditioning response has been induced remains a translational research priority. Preconditioning leads to a widespread genomic and proteonomic response with important effects on hemostatic, endothelial, and inflammatory systems. The present article summarizes the relevant preclinical studies defining the mechanisms of preconditioning, reviews how the human preconditioning response has been investigated, and which of these bioresponses could serve as a suitable biomarker. Human preconditioning studies have investigated the effects of preconditioning on coagulation, endothelial factors, and inflammatory mediators as well as on genetic expression and tissue blood flow imaging. A biomarker for preconditioning would significantly contribute to define the optimal preconditioning stimulus and the extent to which such a response can be elicited in humans and greatly aid in dose selection in the design of phase II trials. Given the manifold biologic effects of preconditioning a panel of multiple serum biomarkers or genomic assessments of upstream regulators may most accurately reflect the full spectrum of a preconditioning response. PMID:24643082

  4. Immune mechanisms in cerebral ischemic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bonilla, Lidia; Benakis, Corinne; Moore, Jamie; Iadecola, Costantino; Anrather, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Stressor-induced tolerance is a central mechanism in the response of bacteria, plants, and animals to potentially harmful environmental challenges. This response is characterized by immediate changes in cellular metabolism and by the delayed transcriptional activation or inhibition of genetic programs that are not generally stressor specific (cross-tolerance). These programs are aimed at countering the deleterious effects of the stressor. While induction of this response (preconditioning) can be established at the cellular level, activation of systemic networks is essential for the protection to occur throughout the organs of the body. This is best signified by the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning, whereby application of ischemic stress to one tissue or organ induces ischemic tolerance (IT) in remote organs through humoral, cellular and neural signaling. The immune system is an essential component in cerebral IT acting simultaneously both as mediator and target. This dichotomy is based on the fact that activation of inflammatory pathways is necessary to establish IT and that IT can be, in part, attributed to a subdued immune activation after index ischemia. Here we describe the components of the immune system required for induction of IT and review the mechanisms by which a reprogrammed immune response contributes to the neuroprotection observed after preconditioning. Learning how local and systemic immune factors participate in endogenous neuroprotection could lead to the development of new stroke therapies. PMID:24624056

  5. Cardioprotection by remote ischemic conditioning: Mechanisms and clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Aimo, Alberto; Borrelli, Chiara; Giannoni, Alberto; Pastormerlo, Luigi Emilio; Barison, Andrea; Mirizzi, Gianluca; Emdin, Michele; Passino, Claudio

    2015-10-26

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC), several cycles of ischemia and reperfusion render distant organ and tissues more resistant to the ischemia-reperfusion injury. The intermittent ischemia can be applied before the ischemic insult in the target site (remote ischemic preconditioning), during the ischemic insult (remote ischemic perconditioning) or at the onset of reperfusion (remote ischemic postconditioning). The mechanisms of RIC have not been completely defined yet; however, these mechanisms must be represented by the release of humoral mediators and/or the activation of a neural reflex. RIC has been discovered in the heart, and has been arising great enthusiasm in the cardiovascular field. Its efficacy has been evaluated in many clinical trials, which provided controversial results. Our incomplete comprehension of the mechanisms underlying the RIC could be impairing the design of clinical trials and the interpretation of their results. In the present review we summarize current knowledge about RIC pathophysiology and the data about its cardioprotective efficacy. PMID:26516416

  6. Cellular Basis of Anoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bronshvag, Michael M.

    1978-01-01

    Anoxic-ischemic cerebral disease is an important primary cause of morbidity and mortality, and also complicates a number of systemic diseases. Its clinical manifestations, such as hemiparesis and coma, represent cellular injury sustained by the complex, inhomogeneous brain. An understanding of the nature and pattern of anoxic-ischemic cerebral injury, and of the logical basis for avenues of therapy, is necessary to the management of patients with the various anoxic-ischemic disorders. PMID:685270

  7. Ischemic postconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury by up-regulation of acid-sensing ion channel 2a

    PubMed Central

    Duanmu, Wang-sheng; Cao, Liu; Chen, Jing-yu; Ge, Hong-fei; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning renders brain tissue tolerant to brain ischemia, thereby alleviating ischemic brain injury. However, the exact mechanism of action is still unclear. In this study, a rat model of global brain ischemia was subjected to ischemic postconditioning treatment using the vessel occlusion method. After 2 hours of ischemia, the bilateral common carotid arteries were blocked immediately for 10 seconds and then perfused for 10 seconds. This procedure was repeated six times. Ischemic postconditioning was found to mitigate hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage in rats with brain ischemia, and up-regulate acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression at the mRNA and protein level. These findings suggest that ischemic postconditioning up-regulates acid-sensing ion channel 2a expression in the rat hippocampus after global brain ischemia, which promotes neuronal tolerance to ischemic brain injury. PMID:27212927

  8. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  9. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  10. Transient ischemic attack as a medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Since transient ischemic attack (TIA) is regarded as a medical emergency with high risk for early stroke recurrence, the underlying mechanisms should be immediately clarified to conclude a definitive diagnosis and provide early treatment. Early risk stratification using ABCD(2) scores can predict the risk of ischemic stroke occurring after TIA. Carotid ultrasonography (US) can evaluate the degree of stenosis, plaque properties and flow velocity of ICA lesions. High-risk mobile plaques can be classified by carotid US, and aortogenic sources of emboli can be detected by transesophageal echocardiography. Cardiac monitoring and blood findings are thought to play a key role in a diagnosis of cardioembolic TIA. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-MRI and MR angiography are also indispensable to understand the mechanism of TIA and cerebral circulation. To prevent subsequent stroke arising from TIA, antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies should be started immediately along with comprehensive management of life-style, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and other atherosclerotic diseases. Carotid endarterectomy and endovascular intervention are critical for treating symptomatic patients with significant stenosis of ICA. A novel concept of acute cerebrovascular syndrome (ACVS) has recently been advocated to increase awareness of TIA among citizens, patients and medical professionals. TIA should be recognized as the last opportunity to avoid irreversible ischemic stroke and its sequelae. The clinical relevance of the new concept of ACVS is advocated by early recurrence after TIA, analysis of high-risk TIA, treatment strategies and the optimal management of TIA. Raising TIA awareness should also proceed across many population sectors. PMID:24157554

  11. Ischemic exercise and the muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Cornett, J A; Herr, M D; Gray, K S; Smith, M B; Yang, Q X; Sinoway, L I

    2000-10-01

    In exercising muscle, interstitial metabolites accumulate and stimulate muscle afferents. This evokes the muscle metaboreflex and raises arterial blood pressure (BP). In this report, we examined the effects of tension generation on muscle metabolites and BP during ischemic forearm exercise in humans. Heart rate (HR), BP, P(i), H(2)PO(4)(-), and pH ((31)P-NMR spectroscopy) data were collected in 10 normal healthy men (age 23 +/- 1 yr) during rhythmic handgrip exercise. After baseline measurements, the subjects performed rhythmic handgrip for 2 min. At 2 min, a 250-mmHg occlusion cuff was inflated, and ischemic handgrip exercise was continued until near fatigue (Borg 19). Measurements were continued for an additional 30 s of ischemia. This protocol was performed at 15, 30, 45, and 60% of the subjects' maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in random order. As tension increased, the time to fatigue decreased. In addition, mean arterial pressure and HR were higher at 60% MVC than at any of the other lower tensions. The NMR data showed significantly greater increases in H(2)PO(4)(-), P(i), and H(+) at 60% than at 15 and 30% MVC. Therefore, despite the subjects working to the same perceived effort level, a greater reflex response (represented by BP and HR data) was elicited at 60% MVC than at any of the other ischemic tensions. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that, as tension increases, factors aside from insufficient blood flow contribute to the work effect on muscle metabolites and the magnitude of the reflex response. PMID:11007579

  12. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:25771074

  13. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  14. Ischemic preconditioning attenuates functional, metabolic, and morphologic injury from ischemic acute renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, J; Williams, B T; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H; Burke, T J; Cairns, C B; Shapiro, J I

    1999-03-01

    Ischemic preconditioning has been shown to ameliorate injury due to subsequent ischemia in several organs. However, relatively little is known about preconditioning and the kidney. To address this, rats were randomized to control (C, N = 14), 2 min of ischemic preconditioning (P2 N = 10), 3 periods of 2 min of ischemia separated by 5 min periods of reflow (P2,3 N = 7), or three 5 min periods of ischemia separated by 5 min of reflow (P5,3 N = 6) prior to 45 min of bilateral renal ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. We observed a lower serum creatinine after 24 hours of reflow in P2, P2, 3 but not P5, 3 rats compared with C. Histology was examined in the C and P2, 3 groups and demonstrated less severe injury in the P2, 3 group. To gain insight into the mechanism by which preconditioning ameliorated ischemic injury, we performed near IR spectroscopy and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Based on near IR spectroscopy, the P2, 3 group had closer coupling of cytochrome aa3 redox state with that of hemoglobin during reflow. In the 31P NMR studies, the changes in ATP and pHi were similar during ischemia, but the P2, 3 group recovered ATP and pHi faster than C. These data suggest that ischemic preconditioning may ameliorate ischemic renal injury as assessed by functional, metabolic and morphological methods. The mechanism(s) by which this occurs requires additional study. PMID:10088174

  15. Inflammatory mechanisms in ischemic stroke: role of inflammatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Yang, Guojun; Li, Guohong

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and other forms of ischemic brain injury. Experimentally and clinically, the brain responds to ischemic injury with an acute and prolonged inflammatory process, characterized by rapid activation of resident cells (mainly microglia), production of proinflammatory mediators, and infiltration of various types of inflammatory cells (including neutrophils, different subtypes of T cells, monocyte/macrophages, and other cells) into the ischemic brain tissue. These cellular events collaboratively contribute to ischemic brain injury. Despite intense investigation, there are still numerous controversies concerning the time course of the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the brain and their pathogenic roles in ischemic brain injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the time-dependent recruitment of different inflammatory cells following focal cerebral I/R. We discuss how these cells contribute to ischemic brain injury and highlight certain recent findings and currently unanswered questions about inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:20130219

  16. Oxidative stress--assassin behind the ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Hanumanthappa; Diya, Joseph B; Shashikumar, Shivaiah; Rajanikant, Golgodu K

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is the second leading cause of death and disability worldwide and is associated with significant clinical and socioeconomic implications, emphasizing the need for effective therapies. Several neuroprotective strategies have failed in clinical trials because of poor knowledge of the molecular processes flanked with ischemic stroke. Therefore, uncovering the molecular processes involved in ischemic brain injury is of critical importance. Therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke remain ineffective, though rapid advances occur in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. The oxidative stress is one such high-potential phenomenon, the precise role of which needs to be understood during ischemic events. Nevertheless, the studies carried out in preclinical models of ischemic stroke have pointed to the major role of oxidative stress in exacerbating the ischemic injury. Oxidative stress leading to cell death requires generation of free radicals through multiple mechanisms, such as respiratory inhibition, Ca(2+) imbalance, excitotoxicity, reperfusion injury and inflammation. Free radicals are highly reactive to all the molecular targets: lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, modifying their chemical structure and generating oxidation-derived products. This review discusses molecular aspects of oxidative stress in ischemic stroke and catastrophes that set up as an aftermath of the trauma. PMID:23023336

  17. Atypical and ischemic features of embolized meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ken; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Arai, Yoshikazu; Kitai, Ryuhei; Hosoda, Tetsuya; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Arishima, Hidetaka; Sato, Kazufumi; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Preoperative embolization (POE) of meningiomas is widely used to facilitate surgical removal and to reduce intraoperative blood loss. The resulting necrosis and enhanced proliferation have been reported to affect subsequent histologic grading. However, there was little concern about ischemic features, for example small cells resembling atypical meningiomas, cytoplasmic vacuoles resembling clear cell meningioma, intercellular discohesion resembling rhabdoid meningioma, and perivascular cuffs resembling papillary meningioma. Therefore, the extent of these ischemic features was scored and Ki-67 staining indices were investigated in a POE group composed of 29 specimens of meningiomas treated with POE and compared with equivalent results for a non-POE group composed of 29 meningiomas that were not treated with POE. Small cells with high N/C ratios, cytoplasmic vacuoles, intercellular discohesion, and perivascular cuffs were significantly increased in the POE group (versus the non-POE group, p < 0.05). There were no significant differences of the Ki-67 index between the POE group (2.2%) and the non-POE group (1.9%) (p = 0.49). Our results suggest that small cell change resulting in necrosis may be followed by POE, and that clear cell-like, rhabdoid cell-like, or pseudopapillary pattern identified in meningiomas may also be induced by POE. Therefore, histological findings and determination of grading should be evaluated cautiously in cases of embolized meningiomas. PMID:21789536

  18. REMOTE ISCHEMIC CONDITIONING INFLUENCES MITOCHONDRIAL DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Laura; Tamareille, Sophie; Kalakech, Hussein; Guillou, Sophie; Lenaers, Guy; Prunier, Fabrice; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has emerged as an attractive strategy to protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanisms by which remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is protective are to date unknown, yet a well-accepted theory holds that the mitochondria play a central role. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo fusion and fission. Interventions that decrease mitochondrial fission or increase mitochondrial fusion have been associated with reduced I/R injury. However, whether RIPC influences mitochondrial dynamics or not has yet to be ascertained. We sought to determine the role played by mitochondrial dynamics in RIPC-induced cardioprotection. Male adult rats exposed in vivo to myocardial I/R were assigned to one of two groups, either undergoing 40 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (MI group) or four 5-min cycles of limb ischemia interspersed by 5 min of limb reperfusion, immediately prior to myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion (MI+RIPC group). After reperfusion, infarct size was assessed and myocardial tissue was analyzed by Western blot and electron microscopy. RIPC induced smaller infarct size (−28%), increased mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1, and preserved mitochondrial morphology. These findings suggest that mitochondrial dynamics play a role in the mechanisms of RIPC-induced cardioprotection. PMID:26555744

  19. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  20. Ischemic nephropathy: detection and therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    García-Donaire, José A; Alcázar, José M

    2005-12-01

    Although the real prevalence of ischemic nephropathy as a cause of end-stage renal disease is unknown, its incidence has increased in past years. The diagnosis of this pathology requires that a number of functional and anatomic tests be carried out. The initial approach should be to perform duplex Doppler ultrasonography which, besides providing data on the size and extent of the stenosis, enables the intrarenal resistive index to be estimated to determine the pattern of renal parenchyma injury and the expected progression if revascularized. The most frequently used morphologic techniques are magnetic resonance angiography and computer tomography angiography. In the event of ischemic neuropathy, it is necessary to perform a renal arteriography regardless of the inherent risks of contrast toxicity or atheroembolism. Various therapeutic options are reviewed, with emphasis on percutaneous transluminal renal angiography plus stent as the first indication. Even though initial reports were contradictory, several meta-analyses have concluded that better blood pressure control and renal function improvement are achieved with percutaneous transluminal renal angiography plus stent than with conventional medical therapy. Surgical revascularization is preferable in patients with severe aorto-iliac pathology and renal artery ostium complete thrombosis. The risks and benefits of these procedures must be evaluated on an individual basis. PMID:16336566

  1. Creatine kinase in ischemic and inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Kitzenberg, David; Colgan, Sean P; Glover, Louise E

    2016-12-01

    The creatine/phosphocreatine pathway plays a conserved and central role in energy metabolism. Compartmentalization of specific creatine kinase enzymes permits buffering of local high energy phosphates in a thermodynamically favorable manner, enabling both rapid energy storage and energy transfer within the cell. Augmentation of this metabolic pathway by nutritional creatine supplementation has been shown to elicit beneficial effects in a number of diverse pathologies, particularly those that incur tissue ischemia, hypoxia or oxidative stress. In these settings, creatine and phosphocreatine prevent depletion of intracellular ATP and internal acidification, enhance post-ischemic recovery of protein synthesis and promote free radical scavenging and stabilization of cellular membranes. The creatine kinase energy system is itself further regulated by hypoxic signaling, highlighting the existence of endogenous mechanisms in mammals that can enhance creatine metabolism during oxygen deprivation to promote tissue resolution and homeostasis. Here, we review recent insights into the creatine kinase pathway, and provide rationale for dietary creatine supplementation in human ischemic and inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27527620

  2. Mitral valve function following ischemic cardiomyopathy: a biomechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Yonghoon; McPherson, David D.; Kim, Hyunggun

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic mitral valve (MV) is a common complication of pathologic remodeling of the left ventricle due to acute and chronic coronary artery diseases. It frequently represents the pathologic consequences of increased tethering forces and reduced coaptation of the MV leaflets. Ischemic MV function has been investigated from a biomechanical perspective using finite element-based computational MV evaluation techniques. A virtual 3D MV model was created utilizing 3D echocardiographic data in a patient with normal MV. Two types of ischemic MVs containing asymmetric medial-dominant or symmetric leaflet tenting were modeled by altering the configuration of the normal papillary muscle (PM) locations. Computational simulations of MV function were performed using dynamic finite element methods, and biomechanical information across the MV apparatus was evaluated. The ischemic MV with medial-dominant leaflet tenting demonstrated distinct large stress distributions in the posteromedial commissural region due to the medial PM displacement toward the apical-medial direction resulting in a lack of leaflet coaptation. In the ischemic MV with balanced leaflet tenting, mitral incompetency with incomplete leaflet coaptation was clearly identified all around the paracommissural regions. This computational MV evaluation strategy has the potential for improving diagnosis of ischemic mitral regurgitation and treatment of ischemic MVs. PMID:24211876

  3. Bone Fracture Pre-Ischemic Stroke Exacerbates Ischemic Cerebral Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dingquan; Zhan, Lei; Li, Zhengxi; Zhu, Wan; Su, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a devastating complication of bone fracture. Bone fracture shortly after stroke enhances stroke injury by augmenting inflammation. We hypothesize that bone fracture shortly before ischemic stroke also exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Tibia fracture was performed 6 or 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) on C57BL/6J mice or Ccr2RFP/+Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice that have the RFP gene knocked into one allele of Ccr2 gene and GFP gene knocked into one allele of Cx3cr1 gene. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Infarct volume, the number of CD68+ cells, apoptotic neurons, bone marrow-derived macrophages (RFP+), and microgila (GFP+) in the peri-infarct region were quantified. Compared to mice subjected to pMCAO only, bone fracture 6 or 24 hours before pMCAO increased behavioral deficits, the infarct volume, and the number of CD68+ cells and apoptotic neurons in the peri-infarct area. Both bone marrow-derived macrophages (CCR2+) and microglia (CX3CR1+) increased in the peri-infarct regions of mice subjected to bone fracture before pMCAO compared to stroke-only mice. The mice subjected to bone fracture 6 hours before pMCAO had more severe injury than mice that had bone fracture 24 hours before pMCAO. Our data showed that bone fracture shortly before stroke also increases neuroinflammation and exacerbates ischemic cerebral injury. Our findings suggest that inhibition of neuroinflammation or management of stroke risk factors before major bone surgery would be beneficial for patients who are likely to suffer from stroke. PMID:27089041

  4. Irradiation-related ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, B.W.; Trock, B.J.; Goodman, R.L. )

    1990-04-01

    An expectation for long-term survival has emerged among several groups of cancer patients treated with therapeutic irradiation (eg, Hodgkin's disease, early stage breast cancer). Therefore, the cardiovascular sequelae of thoracic irradiation have recently come under scrutiny. Animal models have demonstrated that cardiac irradiation can directly damage the myocardial microvasculature and can indirectly damage the coronary macrovasculature when coupled with cholesterol feeding. A clear association between thoracic radiotherapy and ischemic heart disease was observed among older clinical studies using radiotherapeutic techniques that are no longer optimal by today's standards. Such a relationship could not be confirmed in modern studies in which treatment factors (such as dose and volume of heart irradiated) were more carefully controlled. 56 references.

  5. [Ischemic stroke following a scorpion sting].

    PubMed

    Elkhayari, M; Hachimi, A; Ziadi, A; Abdenasser Samkaoui, M

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion envenomation is caused by an accidental scorpion sting. In its severe form, it involves life-threatening respiratory or cardiac damage; it may also cause the neurological severity of systemic manifestations. We report the case of a young 35-year-old woman stung by an Androctonus mauretanicus scorpion, who developed impaired consciousness, hemiplegia and respiratory distress. At admission, the brain computed tomography showed a hypodense area in the right parietal region; the chest radiograph revealed a bilateral alveolar syndrome. Troponin was elevated and hemostasis disorders were present. The clinical course was remarkable: cardiogenic shock with multiple organ failure followed by death on day 3. This case illustrates a rare complication of scorpion envenomation: ischemic stroke due to an undetermined mechanism, which in addition to the cardiac and respiratory injuries, led to the serious complications and fatal outcome. PMID:23648127

  6. PAD in women: the ischemic continuum.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Amy West

    2015-06-01

    Lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is part of the ischemic continuum of atherosclerotic vascular disease and is associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. Compared to men, women with PAD are more likely to have asymptomatic disease or atypical symptoms. PAD in women is associated with decreased exercise capacity, reduced quality of life, increased risk of depression, as well as a greater risk of acute cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality than male counterparts. Ensuring an appropriate diagnosis of women with PAD offers an opportunity to begin risk factor modification therapy, improve walking capacity and make a timely referral for revascularization if needed. It is critical to highlight the sex-based disparities in lower extremity PAD so that we may work to improve outcomes for women with PAD. PMID:25939674

  7. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brandon J.; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  8. Neuroprotective Strategies after Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brandon J; Reis, Cesar; Ho, Wing Mann; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a devastating disease that primarily causes neuronal and white matter injury and is among the leading cause of death among infants. Currently there are no well-established treatments; thus, it is important to understand the pathophysiology of the disease and elucidate complications that are creating a gap between basic science and clinical translation. In the development of neuroprotective strategies and translation of experimental results in HIE, there are many limitations and challenges to master based on an appropriate study design, drug delivery properties, dosage, and use in neonates. We will identify understudied targets after HIE, as well as neuroprotective molecules that bring hope to future treatments such as melatonin, topiramate, xenon, interferon-beta, stem cell transplantation. This review will also discuss some of the most recent trials being conducted in the clinical setting and evaluate what directions are needed in the future. PMID:26389893

  9. [Ischemic myocardial metabolism and antianginal drugs].

    PubMed

    Ichihara, K

    1986-12-01

    The effect of several kinds of antianginal drugs: nitrates, coronary vasodilators, beta-adrenergic blocking agents and calcium entry blocking agents on the myocardial metabolism and myocardial acidosis during ischemia was studied in the dog heart in vivo. Ischemia was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Ischemia accelerated anaerobic metabolism in the myocardium, in which glycogen breakdown, accumulation of glycolytic intermediates, loss of high energy phosphate and tissue acidosis occurred. Nitroglycerin, beta-adrenergic blocking agents such as propranolol, and some calcium entry blocking agents such as diltiazem and flunarizine prevented the myocardial metabolism from shifting to an anaerobic metabolism in spite of ischemia. However, coronary vasodilators and the dihydropyridine type of calcium entry blocking agents were not capable of reducing changes in the myocardial metabolism and myocardial acidosis during ischemia. The author makes a point in the present review that all the drugs which dilate coronary artery are not always effective on the ischemic myocardium. PMID:3549484

  10. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    PubMed Central

    Shaafi, Sheyda; Mahmoudi, Javad; Pashapour, Ali; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Sadigh-eteghad, Saeed; Akbari, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:25671178

  11. Leukocyte Recruitment and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes are recruited into the cerebral microcirculation following an ischemic insult. The leukocyte–endothelial cell adhesion manifested within a few hours after ischemia (followed by reperfusion, I/R) largely reflects an infiltration of neutrophils, while other leukocyte populations appear to dominate the adhesive interactions with the vessel wall at 24 h of reperfusion. The influx of rolling and adherent leukocytes is accompanied by the recruitment of adherent platelets, which likely enhances the cytotoxic potential of the leukocytes to which they are attached. The recruitment of leukocytes and platelets in the postischemic brain is mediated by specific adhesion glycoproteins expressed by the activated blood cells and on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. This process is also modulated by different signaling pathways (e.g., CD40/CD40L, Notch) and cytokines (e.g., RANTES) that are activated/released following I/R. Some of the known risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity appear to exacerbate the leukocyte and platelet recruitment elicited by brain I/R. Although lymphocyte–endothelial cell and –platelet interactions in the postischemic cerebral microcirculation have not been evaluated to date, recent evidence in experimental animals implicate both CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the cerebral microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and tissue injury associated with brain I/R. Evidence implicating regulatory T-cells as cerebroprotective modulators of the inflammatory and tissue injury responses to brain I/R support a continued focus on leukocytes as a target for therapeutic intervention in ischemic stroke. PMID:19579016

  12. Green Space and Mortality Following Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wilker, Elissa H.; Wu, Chih-Da; McNeely, Eileen; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Spengler, John; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Residential proximity to green space has been associated with physical and mental health benefits, but whether green space is associated with post-stroke survival has not been studied. Methods Patients ≥21 years of age admitted to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) between 1999 and 2008 with acute ischemic stroke were identified. Demographics, presenting symptoms, medical history and imaging results were abstracted from medical records at the time of hospitalization for stroke onset. Addresses were linked to average Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, distance to roadways with more than 10,000 cars/day, and US census block group. Deaths were identified through June 2012 using the Social Security Death Index. Results There were 929 deaths among 1,645 patients with complete data (median follow up: 5 years). In multivariable Cox models adjusted for indicators of medical history, demographic and socioeconomic factors, the hazard ratio for patients living in locations in the highest quartile of green space compared to the lowest quartile was 0.78 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.63 to 0.97) (p-trend=0.009). This association remained statistically significant after adjustment for residential proximity to a high traffic road. Conclusions Residential proximity to green space is associated with higher survival rates after ischemic stroke in multivariable adjusted models. Further work is necessary to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for this association, and to better understand the exposure-response relationships and susceptibility factors that may contribute to higher mortality in low green space areas. PMID:24906067

  13. Pre-ischemic treadmill training for prevention of ischemic brain injury via regulation of glutamate and its transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojiao; He, Zhijie; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Yi; Hu, Yongshan; Wang, Xiaolou; Li, Mingfen; Wu, Zhiyuan; Guo, Zhenzhen; Guo, Jingchun; Jia, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate. PMID:22949807

  14. Sexual dimorphism in ischemic stroke: lessons from the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Manwani, Bharti; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is emerging as a major health problem for elderly women. Women have lower stroke incidence than men until an advanced age, when the epidemiology of ischemic stroke shifts and incidence rises dramatically in women. Experimental models of rodent stroke have replicated this clinical epidemiology, with exacerbated injury in older compared with young female rodents Many of the detrimental effects of aging on ischemic stroke outcome in females can be replicated by ovariectomy, suggesting that hormones such as estrogen play a neuroprotective role. However, emerging data suggest that the molecular mechanisms leading to ischemic cell death differ in the two sexes, and these effects may be independent of circulating hormone levels. This article highlights recent clinical and experimental literature on sex differences in stroke outcomes and mechanisms. PMID:21612353

  15. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2) migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3) the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4) migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions. PMID:21197470

  16. Fatty acids, membrane viscosity, serotonin and ischemic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Novel markers for ischemic heart disease are under investigation by the scientific community at international level. This work focuses on a specific platelet membrane fatty acid condition of viscosity which is linked to molecular aspects such as serotonin and G proteins, factors involved in vascular biology. A suggestive hypothesis is considered about the possibility to use platelet membrane viscosity, in relation to serotonin or, indirectly, the fatty acid profile, as indicator of ischemic risk. PMID:20825633

  17. Inhibition of HDAC2 Protects the Retina From Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Alsarraf, Oday; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Platt, Kenneth A.; Chou, C. James; Rice, Dennis S.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Protein acetylation is an essential mechanism in regulating transcriptional and inflammatory events. Studies have shown that nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can protect the retina from ischemic injury in rats. However, the role of specific HDAC isoforms in retinal degenerative processes remains obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HDAC2 isoform in a mouse model of ischemic retinal injury. Methods. Localization of HDAC2 in mice retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemical analyses. To investigate whether selective reduction in HDAC2 activity can protect the retina from ischemic injury, Hdac2+/− mice were utilized. Electroretinographic (ERG) and morphometric analyses were used to assess retinal function and morphology. Results. Our results demonstrated that HDAC2 is primarily localized in nuclei in inner nuclear and retinal ganglion cell layers, and HDAC2 activity accounted for approximately 35% of the total activities of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6 in the retina. In wild-type mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly reduced when compared to pre-ischemia baseline values. Morphometric examination of these eyes revealed significant degeneration of inner retinal layers. In Hdac2+/− mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly greater than those measured in ischemic eyes from wild-type mice. Morphologic measurements demonstrated that Hdac2+/− mice exhibit significantly less retinal degeneration than wild-type mice. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that suppressing HDAC2 expression can effectively reduce ischemic retinal injury. Our results support the idea that the development of selective HDAC2 inhibitors may provide an efficacious treatment for ischemic retinal injury. PMID:23696608

  18. Trans Fat, Aspirin, and Ischemic Stroke in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Yaemsiri, Sirin; Sen, Souvik; Tinker, Lesley; Rosamond, Wayne; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; He, Ka

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between dietary fat intake and ischemic stroke among postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 87,025 generally healthy postmenopausal women (age 50–79 years) enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Repeated and validated dietary assessments were done using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of ischemic stroke based on quintiles of the cumulative average of fat intake. Results We documented 1,049 incident cases of ischemic stroke over 663,041 person-years of follow-up. Women in the highest quintile of trans fat intake had a significantly higher incidence of ischemic stroke (HR 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08–1.79, P-trend = 0.048) compared with women in the lowest quintile, while controlling for multiple covariates. The observed association was modified by aspirin use (P-interaction=0.02). The HR was 1.66 (95% CI 1.21–2.36, P-trend<0.01) among baseline non-aspirin users (n=67,288) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.60–1.48, P-trend=0.43) among aspirin users (n=19,736). No significant associations were found between intakes of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat and ischemic stroke or any ischemic stroke subtypes. Interpretation In this large cohort of postmenopausal women, higher intake of trans fat was associated with incident ischemic stroke independent of major lifestyle/dietary factors. Aspirin use may attenuate the potential adverse effect of trans fat intake on ischemic stroke. PMID:22383309

  19. Progressive "vascular" corticobasal syndrome due to bilateral ischemic hemispheric lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Do; Kim, Joong-Seok; Lee, Eek-Sung; Yang, Dong-Won; Lee, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Yeong-In

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient that presented with the corticobasal syndrome (CBS), including progressive dementia, asymmetric parkinsonism associated with constructional and ideomotor apraxia, action myoclonus and focal hand dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive ischemic lesions in both fronto-temporo-parieto-occipital lobes and steno-occlusion of the middle cerebral arteries, bilaterally. This case illustrates that extensive cortical vascular-ischemic lesions may present with symptoms mimicking the corticobasal syndrome. PMID:19755778

  20. Systemic chemokine levels, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke events

    PubMed Central

    Canouï-Poitrine, F.; Luc, G.; Mallat, Z.; Machez, E.; Bingham, A.; Ferrieres, J.; Ruidavets, J.-B.; Montaye, M.; Yarnell, J.; Haas, B.; Arveiler, D.; Morange, P.; Kee, F.; Evans, A.; Amouyel, P.; Ducimetiere, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify the association between systemic levels of the chemokine regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES/CCL5), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), and eotaxin-1 (CCL11) with future coronary heart disease (CHD) and ischemic stroke events and to assess their usefulness for CHD and ischemic stroke risk prediction in the PRIME Study. Methods: After 10 years of follow-up of 9,771 men, 2 nested case-control studies were built including 621 first CHD events and 1,242 matched controls and 95 first ischemic stroke events and 190 matched controls. Standardized hazard ratios (HRs) for each log-transformed chemokine were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Results: None of the 4 chemokines were independent predictors of CHD, either with respect to stable angina or to acute coronary syndrome. Conversely, RANTES (HR = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–2.74), IP-10 (HR = 1.53; 95% CI 1.06–2.20), and eotaxin-1 (HR = 1.59; 95% CI 1.02–2.46), but not MCP-1 (HR = 0.99; 95% CI 0.68–1.46), were associated with ischemic stroke independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, hs-CRP, and fibrinogen. When the first 3 chemokines were included in the same multivariate model, RANTES and IP-10 remained predictive of ischemic stroke. Their addition to a traditional risk factor model predicting ischemic stroke substantially improved the C-statistic from 0.6756 to 0.7425 (p = 0.004). Conclusions: In asymptomatic men, higher systemic levels of RANTES and IP-10 are independent predictors of ischemic stroke but not of CHD events. RANTES and IP-10 may improve the accuracy of ischemic stroke risk prediction over traditional risk factors. PMID:21849651

  1. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia. PMID:26805916

  2. Therapeutic hypothermia and ischemic stroke: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Rizwan A.; Pabaney, Aqueel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the US. Clinical techniques aimed at helping to reduce the morbidity associated with stroke have been studied extensively, including therapeutic hypothermia. In this study, the authors review the literature regarding the role of therapeutic hypothermia in ischemic stroke to appreciate the evolution of hypothermia technology over several decades and to critically analyze several early clinical studies to validate its use in ischemic stroke. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Search terms included “hypothermia and ischemic stroke” and “therapeutic hypothermia.” A comprehensive search of the current clinical trials using clinicaltrials.gov was conducted using the keywords “stroke and hypothermia” to evaluate early and ongoing clinical trials utilizing hypothermia in ischemic stroke. Results: A comprehensive review of the evolution of hypothermia in stroke and the current status of this treatment was performed. Clinical studies were critically analyzed to appreciate their strengths and pitfalls. Ongoing and future registered clinical studies were highlighted and analyzed compared to the reported results of previous trials. Conclusion: Although hypothermia has been used for various purposes over several decades, its efficacy in the treatment of ischemic stroke is debatable. Several trials have proven its safety and feasibility; however, more robust, randomized clinical trials with large volumes of patients are needed to fully establish its utility in the clinical setting. PMID:27313963

  3. The Many Roles of Statins in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Wen, Ya; Cui, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of human death. Endothelial dysfunction, thrombogenesis, inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and angiogenesis play an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and represent a target for prevention and treatment. Statins have been found to improve endothelial function, modulate thrombogenesis, attenuate inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and facilitate angiogenesis far beyond lowering cholesterol levels. Statins have also been proved to significantly decrease cardiovascular risk and to improve clinical outcome. Could statins be the new candidate agent for the prevention and therapy in ischemic stroke? In recent years, a vast expansion in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the pleiotropic effects of statins has occurred and clinical trials involving statins for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke have begun. These facts force us to revisit ischemic stroke and consider new strategies for prevention and treatment. Here, we survey the important developments in the non-lipid dependent pleiotropic effects and clinical effects of statins in ischemic stroke. PMID:25977681

  4. Clinical and morphological correlations in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slujitoru, Anca Stefania; Enache, Andreea Lorena; Pintea, Irina Lavinia; Rolea, Elisabeta; Stocheci, Cristina Mariana; Pop, O T; Predescu, Anca

    2012-01-01

    We studied the clinical and histopathological changes in twenty-seven cases of acute ischemic stroke, aged between 65 and 75 years. All deaths occurred within 30 days after stroke. The aim of our study was to establish the clinical and histological correlations in acute ischemic stroke to detect prognostic factors. Brain lesions after acute stroke were observed in all regions. Our study describes the heterogeneity of brain injury after acute ischemic stroke with the participation of all brain components and the chronology in which these lesions develop and evolve. By histological and immunohistochemical studies, we identified neuronal, glial and vascular damage. The neurons had undergone in the area of lesion a process of necrosis, ballooning or condensation process. In the ischemic penumbra, we observed the presence of red neurons. Vascular lesions were represented by the discontinuity of capillaries, always associated with a marked perivascular edema. The following clinical and morphological correlations were established: liquefactive necrosis, astrocyte gliosis, phagocytosis phenomena are the more intense the later the death of the patient; apoptosis phenomena are the more intense the faster the death of the patient; the entire cerebral microcirculation presented microscopic modifications following the ischemic strokes, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made; the major neurological complications of the ischemic stroke - the hemorrhagic transformation phenomena, cerebral edema, were microscopically objectified, regardless of the time since the lesion occurred and the histological examination was made. PMID:23303014

  5. Polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with cognitive ability

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rainer; Marioni, Riccardo; Campbell, Archie; Seshadri, Sudha; Worrall, Bradford B.; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Hayward, Caroline; Bastin, Mark E.; Starr, John M.; Porteous, David J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke (and its subtypes) and cognitive ability in 3 relatively healthy Scottish cohorts: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936), the Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 (LBC1921), and Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS). Methods: Polygenic risk scores for ischemic stroke were created in LBC1936 (n = 1005), LBC1921 (n = 517), and GS (n = 6,815) using genome-wide association study summary data from the METASTROKE collaboration. We investigated whether the polygenic risk scores correlate with cognitive ability in the 3 cohorts. Results: In the largest cohort, GS, polygenic risk of all ischemic stroke, small vessel disease stroke, and large vessel disease stroke, but not cardioembolic stroke, were correlated with both fluid and crystallized cognitive abilities. The highest correlation was between a polygenic risk score for all ischemic stroke and general cognitive ability (r = −0.070, p = 1.95 × 10−8). Few correlations were identified in LBC1936 and LBC1921, but a meta-analysis of all 3 cohorts supported the correlation between polygenic risk of ischemic stroke and cognitive ability. Conclusions: The findings from this study indicate that even in the absence of stroke, being at high polygenic risk of ischemic stroke is associated with lower cognitive ability. PMID:26695942

  6. Relationship Between Ischemic Heart Disease and Sexual Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Afra, Leila Ghanbari; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Gilasi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ischemic heart disease is a life-threatening condition. Considerable doubts exist over the effects of this disease on patients’ sexual activity and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ischemic heart disease and sexual satisfaction. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, the convenience sample of 150 patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and 150 people without exposure it was drawn from Shahid Beheshti hospital, Kashan, Iran. Sampling was performed from March to September 2014. We employed the Larson’s Sexual Satisfaction Questionnaire for gathering the data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square, t-test and linear regression analysis. Results: The means of sexual satisfaction in patients exposure with ischemic heart disease and among the subjects without exposure it were 101.47±13.42 and 100.91±16.52, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding sexual satisfaction. However, sexual satisfaction was significantly correlated with gender and the use of cardiac medications (P value < 0.05). Conclusion: The level of sexual satisfaction in patients with exposure ischemic heart disease is similar to the people without exposure it. Moreover, the men and the patients who do not receive cardiac medications have higher levels of sexual satisfaction. Nurses who are providing care to patients with ischemic heart disease need to pay closer attention to patient education about sexual issues. PMID:26234982

  7. The Paradox Role of Regulatory T Cells in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Jiang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of ischemic stroke is not completely known. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of T cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological process of ischemic stroke. However, there is also controversy over the role of Tregs in stroke. Hence, the function of Tregs in ischemic stroke has triggered a heated discussion recently. In this paper, we reviewed the current lines of evidence to describe the full view of Tregs in stroke. We would like to introduce the basic concepts of Tregs and then discuss their paradox function in ischemic stroke. On one side, Tregs could protect brain against ischemic injury via modulating the inflammation process. On the other side, they exaggerated the insult by causing microvascular dysfunction. They also interfered with the neurological function recovery. In addition, the reasons for this paradox role would be discussed in the review and the prospective of the clinical application of Tregs was also included. In conclusion, Tregs contributed to the outcome of ischemic stroke, while more lines of evidence are needed to understand how Tregs regulate the immune system and influence the outcome of stroke. PMID:24288462

  8. Surgical Treatment of Moderate Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P.K.; Puskas, J.D.; Ascheim, D.D.; Voisine, P.; Gelijns, A.C.; Moskowitz, A.J.; Hung, J.W.; Parides, M.K.; Ailawadi, G.; Perrault, L.P.; Acker, M.A.; Argenziano, M.; Thourani, V.; Gammie, J.S.; Miller, M.A.; Pagé, P.; Overbey, J.R.; Bagiella, E.; Dagenais, F.; Blackstone, E.H.; Kron, I.L.; J., D.; Rose, E.A.; Moquete, E.G.; Jeffries, N.; Gardner, T.J.; O’Gara, P.T.; Alexander, J.H.; Michler, R.E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ischemic mitral regurgitation is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. For surgical patients with moderate regurgitation, the benefits of adding mitral-valve repair to coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) are uncertain. METHODS We randomly assigned 301 patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation to CABG alone or CABG plus mitral-valve repair (combined procedure). The primary end point was the left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI), a measure of left ventricular remodeling, at 1 year. This end point was assessed with the use of a Wilcoxon rank-sum test in which deaths were categorized as the lowest LVESVI rank. RESULTS At 1 year, the mean LVESVI among surviving patients was 46.1±22.4 ml per square meter of body-surface area in the CABG-alone group and 49.6±31.5 ml per square meter in the combined-procedure group (mean change from baseline, −9.4 and −9.3 ml per square meter, respectively). The rate of death was 6.7% in the combined-procedure group and 7.3% in the CABG-alone group (hazard ratio with mitral-valve repair, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.38 to 2.12; P = 0.81). The rank-based assessment of LVESVI at 1 year (incorporating deaths) showed no significant between-group difference (z score, 0.50; P = 0.61). The addition of mitral-valve repair was associated with a longer bypass time (P<0.001), a longer hospital stay after surgery (P = 0.002), and more neurologic events (P = 0.03). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation was less common in the combined-procedure group than in the CABG-alone group (11.2% vs. 31.0%, P<0.001). There were no significant between-group differences in major adverse cardiac or cerebrovascular events, deaths, readmissions, functional status, or quality of life at 1 year. CONCLUSIONS In patients with moderate ischemic mitral regurgitation, the addition of mitral-valve repair to CABG did not result in a higher degree of left ventricular reverse remodeling. Mitral-valve repair was

  9. Dendrimers Target the Ischemic Lesion in Rodent and Primate Models of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Johnson, Mary A.; Mehrabian, Zara; Mishra, Manoj K.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Miller, Neil R.; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyamidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles (~ 4 nanometers) are inert polymers that can be linked to biologically active compounds. These dendrimers selectively target and accumulate in inflammatory cells upon systemic administration. Dendrimer-linked compounds enable sustained release of therapeutic compounds directly at the site of damage. The purpose of this study was to determine if dendrimers can be used to target the optic nerve (ON) ischemic lesion in our rodent and nonhuman primate models of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), a disease affecting >10,000 individuals in the US annually, and for which there currently is no effective treatment. Methods NAION was induced in male Long-Evans rats (rNAION) and in one adult male rhesus monkey (pNAION) using previously described procedures. Dendrimers were covalently linked to near-infrared cyanine-5 fluorescent dye (D-Cy5) and injected both intravitreally and systemically (in the rats) or just systemically (in the monkey) to evaluate D-Cy5 tissue accumulation in the eye and optic nerve following induction of NAION. Results Following NAION induction, Cy-5 dendrimers selectively accumulated in astrocytes and circulating macrophages. Systemic dendrimer administration provided the best penetration of the ON lesion site when injected shortly after induction. Systemic administration 1 day post-induction in the pNAION model gave localization similar to that seen in the rats. Conclusions Dendrimers selectively target the ischemic ON lesion after induction of both rNAION and pNAION. Systemic nanoparticle-linked therapeutics thus may provide a powerful, targeted and safe approach to NAION treatment by providing sustained and focused treatment of the cells directly affected by ischemia. PMID:27128315

  10. Human Data Supporting Glyburide in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Kevin N; Simard, J Marc; Elm, Jordan; Kronenberg, Golo; Kunte, Hagen; Kimberly, W Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The SUR1-TRPM4 channel is a critical determinant of edema and hemorrhagic transformation after focal ischemia. Blockade of this channel by the small molecule glyburide results in improved survival and neurological outcome in multiple preclinical models of ischemic stroke. A robust, compelling body of evidence suggests that an intravenous formulation of glyburide, RP-1127, can prevent swelling and improve outcome in patients with stroke. Retrospective studies of diabetic stroke patients show improved outcomes in patients who are continued on sulfonylureas after stroke onset. An early phase II study using magnetic resonance imaging and plasma biomarkers supports the conclusion that RP-1127 may decrease swelling and hemorrhagic transformation. Finally, the ongoing phase II RP-1127 development program has demonstrated continued safety as well as feasibility of enrollment and tolerability of the intervention. Continued efforts to complete the ongoing phase II study and definitive efficacy studies are needed to bring a candidate pharmacotherapy to a population of severe stroke patients that currently have no alternative. PMID:26463916

  11. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Scalzo, Fabien; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and T max, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  12. The Apexcardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Howard H.

    1972-01-01

    The apexcardiogram (acg), when recorded serially in patients with acute myocardial infarction (ami), preinfarction angina (pia) and stable ischemic heart disease (ihd), appeared to reflect the abnormal patterns of contraction of the left ventricle in these conditions. Thus, paradoxical bulging (dyskinesis) of the systolic wave or increased “a” wave amplitude with gradual recovery over several weeks was found in all 60 patients with documented ami and in 18 of 20 patients with pia. Electrocardiogram changes were noted, however, in only eight of the pia patients. Changes in the acg frequently antedated ischemia in the ecg. Paradoxical bulging of the systolic wave of the acg was additionally noted in patients during the pain of angina pectoris but this promptly disappeared after the administration of nitroglycerine. Patients with classic angina often had normal resting ecg's but abnormal resting acg's. In contrast to the relatively transient abnormalities noted above, the acg remained unchanged in most patients with stable ihd during follow-up of three months to two years. Patients undergoing coronary bypass operations, however, showed immediate improvement in the acg in the postoperative period. These results suggest the acg reflects the contractile pattern of the left ventricle, and may be an indirectly recorded ventriculogram. Its enhanced sensitivity and the earlier development of changes in comparison to the ecg make this a valuable tool in the study of patients with heart disease. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:5008498

  13. Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Mohammad Nurulqadr

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell transplantation has emerged as a novel treatment option for ischemic heart disease. Different cell types have been utilized and the recent development of induced pluripotent stem cells has generated tremendous excitement in the regenerative field. Bone marrow-derived multipotent progenitor cell transplantation in preclinical large animal models of postinfarction left ventricular remodeling has demonstrated long-term functional and bioenergetic improvement. These beneficial effects are observed despite no significant engraftment of bone marrow cells in the myocardium and even lower differentiation of these cells into cardiomyocytes. It is thought to be related to the paracrine effect of these stem cells, which secrete factors that lead to long-term gene expression changes in the host myocardium, thereby promoting neovascularization, inhibiting apoptosis, and stimulating resident cardiac progenitor cells. Future studies are warranted to examine the changes in the recipient myocardium after stem cell transplantation and to investigate the signaling pathways involved in these effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1879–1897. PMID:20687781

  14. Perfusion Angiography in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Visualization and quantification of blood flow are essential for the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of cerebrovascular diseases. For rapid imaging of the cerebrovasculature, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) remains the gold standard as it offers high spatial resolution. This paper lays out a methodological framework, named perfusion angiography, for the quantitative analysis and visualization of blood flow parameters from DSA images. The parameters, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP), and Tmax, are computed using a bolus tracking method based on the deconvolution of the time-density curve on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The method is tested on 66 acute ischemic stroke patients treated with thrombectomy and/or tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and also evaluated on an estimation task with known ground truth. This novel imaging tool provides unique insights into flow mechanisms that cannot be observed directly in DSA sequences and might be used to evaluate the impact of endovascular interventions more precisely. PMID:27446232

  15. [Acute postop ischemic hepatitis and hypotension].

    PubMed

    Uzhva, V P

    2000-01-01

    The significance of the pronounced durable systemic arterial hypotension (SAH) in the origin of an acute postoperative ischemic hepatitis (APIH) was established, basing on the analysis of 40 clinical observations. Its occurrence is promoted by hemorrhage with 30% and more the circulating blood volume (CBV) deficiency, chronic cardiovascular system and pulmonary diseases, liver cirrhosis, shock, massive infusions of the blood and its components, the abdominal aorta atherosclerosis with stenosis of tr. coeliacus, a. hepatica. Forgoing SAH, the presence of promoting factors, jaundice, the transpherase activity raising in 3-5 times, the level of blood coagulating factors reduction, stable intestinal paresis were diagnostically significant symptoms. Experimental model of an APIH was elaborated in dogs, which occurs due to hypotension, caused by CBV reduction by 40% during two hours. The refractoriness of a. hepatica propria to the blood reinfusion was established. In the APIH occurrence threat the perftoran application in the 20 ml/kg dosage is the prophylaxis method as well as the method of the curative tactics choice. PMID:10857279

  16. Defining the Ischemic Penumbra using Magnetic Resonance Oxygen Metabolic Index

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyu; Ford, Andria L.; Chen, Yasheng; Zhu, Hongtu; Ponisio, Rosana; Kumar, Gyanendra; Shanechi, Amirali Modir; Khoury, Naim; Vo, Katie D.; Williams, Jennifer; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Diringer, Michael N.; Panagos, Peter; Powers, William J.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Lin, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Penumbral biomarkers promise to individualize treatment windows in acute ischemic stroke. We used a novel MRI approach which measures oxygen metabolic index (OMI), a parameter closely related to PET-derived cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen utilization, to derive a pair of ischemic thresholds: (1) an irreversible-injury threshold which differentiates ischemic core from penumbra and (2) a reversible-injury threshold which differentiates penumbra from tissue not-at-risk for infarction. Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients underwent MRI at three time-points after stroke onset: < 4.5 hours (for OMI threshold derivation), 6 hours (to determine reperfusion status), and 1 month (for infarct probability determination). A dynamic susceptibility contrast method measured CBF, and an asymmetric spin echo sequence measured OEF, to derive OMI (OMI=CBF*OEF). Putative ischemic threshold pairs were iteratively tested using a computation-intensive method to derive infarct probabilities in three tissue groups defined by the thresholds (core, penumbra, and not-at-risk tissue). An optimal threshold pair was chosen based on its ability to predict: infarction in the core, reperfusion-dependent survival in the penumbra, and survival in not-at-risk tissue. The predictive abilities of the thresholds were then tested within the same cohort using a 10-fold cross-validation method. Results The optimal OMI ischemic thresholds were found to be 0.28 and 0.42 of normal values in the contralateral hemisphere. Using the 10-fold cross-validation method, median infarct probabilities were 90.6% for core, 89.7% for non-reperfused penumbra, 9.95% for reperfused penumbra, and 6.28% for not-at-risk tissue. Conclusions OMI thresholds, derived using voxel-based, reperfusion-dependent infarct probabilities, delineated the ischemic penumbra with high predictive ability. These thresholds will require confirmation in an independent patient sample. PMID:25721017

  17. Ischemic and hemorrhagic moyamoya disease in adults: CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Anming; Luo, Li; Ding, Yaojun; Li, Gongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the findings of adult moyamoya disease (MD) of different types on plain CT, brain perfusion CT (CTP) and brain CT angiography (CTA). Materials and methods: A total of 48 patients with ischemic MD and hemorrhagic MD were recruited into present study, and findings were collected from plain CT, CTP and CTA. Results: The incidence of watershed or cortex stroke in ischemic MD (55.6% and 38.9%) was higher than in hemorrhagic MD (0%). The incidence of ventricle or basal ganglia stroke in hemorrhagic MD (40.0%, 43.3%) was higher than in ischemic MD (0%, 5.6%). CTP showed hypoperfusion in 11 patients, hyperperfusion in 12 and normal perfusion in 25. Ischemic MD patients were more likely to present hypoperfusion (61.1%; normal perfusion: 22.2%; hyperperfusion: 16.7%). Hemorrhagic MD patients were more likely to present normal perfusion (70%; hyperperfusion: 30%; hypoperfusion: 0%). The incidence of grade II MD in ischemic MD (27.8%) was higher than in hemorrhagic MD (6.7%). The incidences of grade IV and V MD in hemorrhagic MD (33.3% and 16.7%) were higher than in ischemic MD (16.7% and 11.0%). Conclusion: Hemorrhagic MD is dominant in adults with MD and stroke of these patients mainly occurs at the intraventricular space and basal ganglia. Ischemic MD in adults is characterized by hypoperfusion and hemorrhagic MD by normal perfusion on CTP. MD in adults is usually classified as grade II, III or IV on CTA. PMID:26885076

  18. Sensitivity of the neuroimaging techniques in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Sinanović, Osman

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the sensitivity and effectiveness of neuroimaging techniques in 190 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The first computed tomography (CT) scan for all patients was performed within the first 12 hours of the stroke symptoms onset. For each patient, between the third and fifth day of the hospitalization, at least one more neuroimaging procedure (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging--MRI, and/or diffusion weighted imaging--DWI) was done. The CT scan in the first 12 hours of the stroke onset was positive in 32% of the patients; the highest number of the positive findings was in the patients with total anterior circulation infarct (52%). After 48 hours of the stroke onset second CT was positive in 85% (75/89), MRI in 93.5% (115/123), and DWI in 98.8% (79/80) patients. MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detection of ischemic lesion (88% vs. 72%, P=0.01), particularly in the patients with lacunar infarcts (75% vs. 50%, P=0.005). In detection of ischemic stroke 48 hours of the stroke onset the slightly higher number of strokes were detected on DWI in comparison with MRI (98.6% vs. 88.7%). According to our results, within the first 12 hours after the stroke onset, CT is reliable only for detection of considerable number of cortical ischemic strokes of the anterior cerebral circulation. After 48 hours from the stroke onset CT, MRI and DWI show high sensitivity in the detection of ischemic lesion of all clinical stroke subtypes. MRI is more sensitive in comparison with CT in detection of ischemic lesion, while DWI does not show dominance in comparison with MRI in identification of ischemic stroke after 48 hours of the symptoms onset. PMID:15628251

  19. Premature Cardiac Contractions and Risk of Incident Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ofoma, Uchenna; He, Fan; Shaffer, Michele L.; Naccarelli, Gerard V.; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Background The etiologies of ischemic stroke remain undetermined in 15% to 40% of patients. Apart from atrial fibrillation, other arrhythmias are less well-characterized as risk factors. Premature cardiac contractions are known to confer long-term cardiovascular risks, like myocardial infarction. Ischemic stroke as cardiovascular risk outcome remains a topic of interest. We examined the prospective relationships in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, to determine whether premature atrial (PAC) or ventricular (PVC) contractions are associated with increased risk for incident ischemic stroke. Methods and Results We analyzed 14 493 baseline stroke-free middle-aged individuals in the ARIC public-use data. The presence of PAC or PVC at baseline was assessed from 2-minute electrocardiogram. A physician-panel confirmed and classified all stroke cases. Average follow-up time was 13 years. Proportional hazards models assessed associations between premature contractions and incident stroke. PACs and PVCs were identified in 717 (4.9%) and 793 (5.5%) participants, respectively. In all, 509(3.5%) participants developed ischemic stroke. The hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) associated with PVC was 1.77 (1.30, 2.41), attenuated to 1.25 (0.91, 1.71) after adjusting for baseline stroke risk factors. The interaction between PVC and baseline hypertension was marginally significant (P=0.08). Among normotensives, having PVCs was associated with nearly 2-fold increase in the rate of incident ischemic stroke (HR 1.69; 95% CI 1.02, 2.78), adjusting for stroke risk factors. The adjusted risk of ischemic stroke associated with PACs was 1.30 (95% CI 0.92, 1.83). Conclusions Presence of PVCs may indicate an increased risk of ischemic stroke, especially in normotensives. This risk approximates risk of stroke from being black, male, or obese in normotensives from this cohort. PMID:23316293

  20. Remote ischemic preconditioning as treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal disorders: beyond ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo

    2014-04-01

    Common gastrointestinal diseases such as radiation enteritis (RE), acute pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and drug-induced hepatotoxicity share pathophysiological mechanisms at the molecular level, mostly involving the activation of many pathways of the immune response, ultimately leading to tissue injury. Increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokine release, inflammatory cell infiltration and activation and the up-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors participate in the pathophysiology of these complex entities. Treatment varies in each specific disease, but at least in the cases of RE and IBD immunosuppressors are effective. However, full therapeutic responses are not always achieved. The pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury shares many of these mechanisms. Brief and repetitive periods of ischemia in an organ or limb have been shown to protect against subsequent major IR injury in distant organs, a phenomenon called remote ischemic preconditioning (RIP). This procedure has been shown to protect the gut, pancreas and liver by modulating many of the same inflammatory mechanisms. Since RIP is safe and tolerable, and has shown to be effective in some recent clinical trials, I suggest that RIP could be used as a physiologically relevant adjunct treatment for non-ischemic gastrointestinal inflammatory conditions. PMID:24707140

  1. Dynamic changes in neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following permanent ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yi-hao; He, Hong-yun; Yang, Li-qiang; Zhang, Peng-yue

    2016-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the ischemic penumbra following stroke remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the dynamic changes in autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra to provide insight into potential therapeutic targets for stroke. An adult Sprague-Dawley rat model of permanent ischemic stroke was prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the penumbra post-ischemia were evaluated by western blot assay and immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3, respectively. Levels of both LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 in the penumbra gradually increased within 5 hours post-ischemia. Thereafter, levels of both proteins declined, especially LC3-II. The cerebral infarct volume increased slowly 1–4 hours after ischemia, but subsequently increased rapidly until 5 hours after ischemia. The severity of the neurological deficit was positively correlated with infarct volume. LC3-II and cleaved caspase-3 levels were high in the penumbra within 5 hours after ischemia, and after that, levels of these proteins decreased at different rates. LC3-II levels were reduced to a very low level, but cleaved caspase-3 levels remained high 72 hours after ischemia. These results indicate that there are temporal differences in the activation status of the autophagic and apoptotic pathways. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of these pathways should take into consideration their unique temporal dynamics.

  2. Transient ischemic attack: Part II. Risk factor modification and treatment.

    PubMed

    Simmons, B Brent; Gadegbeku, Annette B; Cirignano, Barbara

    2012-09-15

    Interventions following a transient ischemic attack are aimed at preventing a future episode or stroke. Hypertension, current smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia are all well-known risk factors, and controlling these factors can have dramatic effects on transient ischemic attack and stroke risk. For patients presenting within 48 hours of resolution of transient ischemic attack symptoms, advantages of hospital admission include rapid diagnostic evaluation and early intervention to reduce the risk of stroke. For long-term prevention of future stroke, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends antiplatelet agents, statins, and carotid artery intervention for advanced stenosis. Aspirin, extended-release dipyridamole/aspirin, and clopidogrel are acceptable first-line antiplatelet agents. Statins have also been shown to reduce the risk of stroke following transient ischemic attack, with maximal benefit occurring with at least a 50 percent reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level or a target of less than 70 mg per dL (1.81 mmol per L). For those with transient ischemic attack and carotid artery stenosis, carotid endarterectomy is recommended if stenosis is 70 to 99 percent, and perioperative morbidity and mortality are estimated to be less than 6 percent. PMID:23062044

  3. Potential microRNA biomarkers for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Jing-Xia; Yan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Xing-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Heng

    2015-12-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a significant cause of high morbidity and mortality in the aging population globally. However, current therapeutic strategies for acute ischemic stroke are limited. Atherosclerotic plaque is considered an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke. To identify biomarkers for carotid atheromatous plaque, bioinformatics analysis of the gene microarray data of plaque and intact tissue from individuals was performed. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using the Multtest and Limma packages of R language, including 56 downregulated and 69 upregulated DEGs. Enriched microRNA (miRNA or miR) DEGs networks were generated using WebGestalt software and the STRING databases, and the miRNAs were validated using serum from acute ischemic stroke patients with reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT‑qPCR). Four confirmed differentially expressed miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑22, ‑23 and ‑125) were associated with 28 upregulated DEGs, and 7 miRNAs (miR‑9, ‑30, ‑33, ‑124, ‑181, ‑218 and ‑330) were associated with 25 downregulated DEGs. Gene ontology (GO) function suggested that the confirmed miRNA‑targeted DEGs predominantly associated with signal transduction, the circulatory system, biological adhesion, striated muscle contraction, wound healing and the immune system. The confirmed miRNA‑targeted genes identified serve as potential therapeutic targets for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26459744

  4. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  5. Diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. An early and accurate diagnosis of IHD is necessary to improve outcomes. According to recent guidelines, the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is based on increased or decreased value of cardiospecific troponins with one measure exceeding the 99th percentile upper reference limit, associated with symptoms suggestive for myocardial ischemia, indicative electrocardiogram abnormalities, and evidence of recent myocardial functional impairment or intracoronary thrombosis. The recent advent of highly sensitive troponin immunoassays has represented a paradigm shift, wherein the improved analytical sensitivity has increased the negative predictive value, while contextually decreasing the diagnostic specificity of these tests. Although several additional biomarkers have been proposed as surrogate or in combination with troponins, there is little evidence that any of these will substantially improve AMI diagnosis. With regard to therapy, early mechanical (i.e., percutaneous coronary intervention, PCI) or pharmacological reperfusion should be performed early in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) within 12 h of symptom onset, whereas fibrinolysis may be considered in all other circumstances. Patients undergoing primary PCI should also receive a combination of double antiplatelet therapy (i.e., aspirin and adenosine diphosphate receptor blocker), associated with parenteral anticoagulation, preferably with low-molecular-weight heparin. In analogy with STEMI, a wealth of data shows that primary early invasive strategy (i.e., PCI) and antiplatelet therapy remains the cornerstone of management of patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Stem cell-based therapy has also emerged as a potentially therapeutic option, and there are ongoing efforts among several investigators to translate basic research into clinical practice. PMID:23378254

  6. Heart Failure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Ois, Angel; Roquer, Jaume

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the ventricle to fill with or eject blood. Due to the aging of the population it has become a growing public health problem in recent decades. Diagnosis of HF is clinical and there is no diagnostic test, although some basic complementary testing should be performed in all patients. Depending on the ejection fraction (EF), the syndrome is classified as HF with low EF or HF with normal EF (HFNEF). Although prognosis in HF is poor, HFNEF seems to be more benign. HF and ischemic stroke (IS) share vascular risk factors such as age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation. Persons with HF have higher incidence of IS, varying from 1.7% to 10.4% per year across various cohort studies. The stroke rate increases with length of follow-up. Reduced EF, independent of severity, is associated with higher risk of stroke. Left ventricular mass and geometry are also related with stroke incidence, with concentric hypertrophy carrying the greatest risk. In HF with low EF, the stroke mechanism may be embolism, cerebral hypoperfusion or both, whereas in HFNEF the mechanism is more typically associated with chronic endothelial damage of the small vessels. Stroke in patients with HF is more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence, dependency, and short term and long term mortality. Cardiac morbidity and mortality is also high in these patients. Acute stroke treatment in HF includes all the current therapeutic options to more carefully control blood pressure. For secondary prevention, optimal control of all vascular risk factors is essential. Antithrombotic therapy is mandatory, although the choice of a platelet inhibitor or anticoagulant drug depends on the cardiac disease. Trials are ongoing to evaluate anticoagulant therapy for prevention of embolism in patients with low EF who are at

  7. Targeting ischemic penumbra: part I - from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Levine, Steven R.; Winn, H. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Penumbra is the viable tissue around the irreversibly damaged ischemic core. The purpose of acute stroke treatment is to salvage penumbral tissue and to improve brain function. However, the majority of acute stroke patients who have treatable penumbra are left untreated. Therefore, developing an effective non-recanalizational therapeutics, such as neuroprotective agents, has significant clinical applications. Part I of this serial review on “targeting penumbra” puts special emphases on penumbral pathophysiology and the development of therapeutic strategies. Bioenergetic intervention by massive metabolic suppression and direct energy delivery would be a promising future direction. An effective drug delivery system for this purpose should be able to penetrate BBB and achieve high local tissue drug levels while non-ischemic region being largely unaffected. Selective drug delivery to ischemic stroke penumbra is feasible and deserves intensive research. PMID:20607107

  8. Autonomic dysfunction in acute ischemic stroke: an underexplored therapeutic area?

    PubMed

    De Raedt, Sylvie; De Vos, Aurelie; De Keyser, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    Impaired autonomic function, characterized by a predominance of sympathetic activity, is common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This review describes methods to measure autonomic dysfunction in stroke patients. It summarizes a potential relationship between ischemic stroke-associated autonomic dysfunction and factors that have been associated with worse outcome, including cardiac complications, blood pressure variability changes, hyperglycemia, immune depression, sleep disordered breathing, thrombotic effects, and malignant edema. Involvement of the insular cortex has been suspected to play an important role in causing sympathovagal imbalance, but its exact role and that of other brain regions remain unclear. Although sympathetic overactivity in patients with ischemic stroke appears to be a negative prognostic factor, it remains to be seen whether therapeutic strategies that reduce sympathetic activity or increase parasympathetic activity might improve outcome. PMID:25541326

  9. [Ischemic colitis: an uncommon manifestation in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Medina, Viviana; Bulgach, Valeria; Lagandara, Pamela; Berner, Enrique

    2013-04-01

    We present the case of an adolescent with ischemic colitis, an infrequent pathology in this age group, worsened in the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The patient, aged 20, was diagnosed SLE at 6. She consulted for fever, abdominal pain in the side and right iliac fossa and diarrhea lasting 48 hours. It was assumed as acute gastroenteritis but given the persistent pain, incoercible vomiting and abdominal distension she was hospitalized. The abdominal X-ray showed distended loops, abundant feces, without air-fluid levels. The ultrasound showed erosions and ulcerations, edema and bleeding in the descending colon submucosal layer. The CT scan evidenced an ischemic lesion in the right colon. Ischemic colitis is a severe condition, infrequent in young individuals. Signs, symptoms, abdominal CT scan and colonoscopy are the elements of choice for the diagnosis. PMID:23568076

  10. Sudden cardiac death markers in non-ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mauricio; Rohde, Luis Eduardo; Zimerman, André; Zimerman, Leandro Ioschpe

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 30-40% of patients, the etiology is non-ischemic. In this group of patients, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) prevents sudden death and decreases total mortality. However, due to burden of cost, the fact that many ICD patients will never need any therapy, and possible complications involved in implant and follow-up, the device should not be implanted in every patient with non-ischemic heart failure. There is an urgent need to adequately identify patients with highest sudden death risk, in whom the implant is most cost-effective. In the present paper, the authors discuss current available tests for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. PMID:27016256

  11. Perioperative ischemic injury after coronary bypass graft surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hanelin, L.G.; Riggins, R.C.; Agnew, R.C.; Annest, L.S.; Anderson, R.P.

    1985-07-01

    Two hundred twelve patients who underwent isolated coronary bypass graft surgery were prospectively evaluated for perioperative ischemic injury. All patients underwent preoperative and postoperative testing with technetium 99m pyrophosphate first-pass ventriculography combined with myocardial uptake scans, 12-lead electrocardiography, and serial creatinine phosphokinase MB determination. Fifteen percent of the patients had ischemic injury with at least two test results positive, but only 4 percent had positive results of all three tests. No single test proved adequate. Enzyme levels were highly sensitive and had value as a screening test. The electrocardiogram was specific but only moderately sensitive. The single best test was the radionuclide scan with good sensitivity and no false-positive results. All three tests are required to rigorously diagnose ischemic injury.

  12. Ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Rubens Camargo; Kaiser Junior, Roberto Luiz; Ruiz, Lilian Piron; Ruiz, Milton Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease. Case report This report presents a case of a 28-year-old female patient with Crohn’s disease and sudden decrease of visual acuity in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal electroretinography confirmed the clinical features of ischemic retinopathy. After systemic corticosteroid treatment, the patient developed epiretinal membrane without significant improvement in visual acuity. Discussion The patient presented with ischemic retinopathy associated with Crohn’s disease with deficiency of central visual acuity. Periodic examination by a retina specialist is recommended for patients being treated for Crohn’s disease. PMID:27524921

  13. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. PMID:24805069

  14. Toll-Like Receptors and Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gesuete, Raffaella; Kohama, Steven G.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are master regulators of innate immunity and play an integral role in the activation of the inflammatory response during infections. In addition, TLRs influence the body’s response to numerous forms of injury. Recent data have shown that TLRs play a modulating role in ischemic brain damage after stroke. Interestingly, their stimulation prior to ischemia induces a tolerant state that is neuroprotective. This phenomenon, referred to as TLR preconditioning, is the result of reprogramming of the TLR response to ischemic injury. This review addresses the role of TLRs in brain ischemia and the activation of endogenous neuroprotective pathways in the setting of preconditioning. We highlight the protective role of the interferon-related response and the potential site of action for TLR preconditioning involving the blood-brain-barrier. Pharmacological modulation of TLR activation to promote protection against stroke is a promising approach for the development of prophylactic and acute therapies targeting ischemic brain injury. PMID:24709682

  15. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  16. IL1RN VNTR Polymorphism in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Brown, W. Mark; Rich, Stephen S.; Arepalli, Sampath; Wavrant-De Vrièze, Fabienne; Duckworth, Jaime; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hardy, John; Meschia, James F.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Genetic factors influence risk for ischemic stroke and likely do so at multiple steps in the pathogenic process. Variants in genes related to inflammation contribute to risk of stroke. The purpose of this study was to confirm our earlier finding of an association between allele 2 of a variable number tandem repeat of the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene (IL1RN) and cerebrovascular disease. Methods An association study of the variable number tandem repeat genotype with ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes was performed on samples from a North American study of affected sibling pairs concordant for ischemic stroke and 2 North American cohorts of prospectively ascertained ischemic stroke cases and unrelated controls. DNA analysis was performed on cases and controls, stratified by race. Results After adjustment for age, sex, and stroke risk factors, the odds ratio for association of allele 2 and ischemic stroke was 2.80 (95% confidence interval, 1.29 to 6.11; P=0.03) for the white participants. The effect of allele 2 of IL1RN on stroke risk most closely fits a recessive genetic model (P=0.009). For the smaller sample of nonwhite participants, the results were not significant. Conclusions Allele 2 of IL1RN, present in nearly one-quarter of stroke patients, may contribute to genetic risk for ischemic stroke and confirm the previously identified association with cerebrovascular disease. These results are driven by the association in the white participants. Further exploration in a larger nonwhite sample is warranted. PMID:17332449

  17. Suppression of Acid Sphingomyelinase Protects the Retina from Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Wu, Bill X.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and mediates multiple responses involved in inflammatory and apoptotic signaling. However, the role ASMase plays in ischemic retinal injury has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate how reduced ASMase expression impacts retinal ischemic injury. Methods Changes in ceramide levels and ASMase activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis and ASMase activity. Retinal function and morphology were assessed by electroretinography (ERG) and morphometric analyses. Levels of TNF-α were determined by ELISA. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was assessed by Western blot analysis. Results In wild-type mice, ischemia produced a significant increase in retinal ASMase activity and ceramide levels. These increases were associated with functional deficits as measured by ERG analysis and significant structural degeneration in most retinal layers. In ASMase+/− mice, retinal ischemia did not significantly alter ASMase activity, and the rise in ceramide levels were significantly reduced compared to levels in retinas from wild-type mice. In ASMase+/− mice, functional and morphometric analyses of ischemic eyes revealed significantly less retinal degeneration than in injured retinas from wild-type mice. The ischemia-induced increase in retinal TNF-α levels was suppressed by the administration of the ASMase inhibitor desipramine, or by reducing ASMase expression. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that reducing ASMase expression provides partial protection from ischemic injury. Hence, the production of ceramide and subsequent mediators plays a role in the development of ischemic retinal injury. Modulating ASMase may present new opportunities for adjunctive therapies when treating retinal ischemic disorders. PMID:27571014

  18. LIPID LEVELS AND THE RISK OF ISCHEMIC STROKE IN WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Tobias; Everett, Brendan M.; Buring, Julie E.; Kase, Carlos S.; Ridker, Paul M; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio, and non-HDL-C with the risk of ischemic stroke in a large cohort of apparently healthy women. Methods Prospective cohort study among 27,937 US women aged ≥45 years participating in the Women's Health Study who provided baseline blood samples. Stroke occurrence was self-reported and confirmed by medical record review. We categorized plasma lipid measurements into quintiles. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between lipids and risk of ischemic stroke. Results During 11 years of follow-up, 282 ischemic strokes occurred. All lipid levels were strongly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in age-adjusted models. The association attenuated particularly for HDL-C after adjustment for potential confounders. For the comparison of the highest to the lowest quintile, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals; P for trend across mean quintile values) of ischemic stroke were 2.27 (1.43-3.60; Ptrend<0.001) for total cholesterol; 1.74 (1.14-2.66; Ptrend=0.003) for LDL-C; 0.78 (0.52-1.17; Ptrend=0.27) for HDL-C; 1.65 (1.06-2.58; Ptrend=0.02) for total cholesterol to HDL-C ratio; and 2.45 (1.54-3.91; Ptrend<0.001) for non-HDL-C. Conclusions In this large cohort of apparently healthy women, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke. PMID:17310025

  19. Biomarkers Associated with Ischemic Stroke in Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuisheng; Zhao, Jingfeng; Chen, Yuxiang; Lei, Minxiang

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is an established risk factor for ischemic stroke, but the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. This study investigated the role of plasma and platelet microRNAs and their targeting proteins in the activation of platelets and their association with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results showed that the expressions of platelet and plasma miR-144 and miR-223 were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke compared to that in healthy controls, but these changes were more significant in T2DM patients with ischemic stroke. The expressions of P2Y12 and IRS-1 as well as phosphorylation levels of IRS-1, PI3K, and Akt in platelets were significantly altered in T2DM patients with or without ischemic stroke. The expression of platelet miR-144 and miR-223 significantly correlated with their plasma levels, P2Y12 and IRS-1 expression, blood glucose concentration, and platelet activation rate. High glucose concentration significantly elevated P-selectin, miR-144 and P2Y12 expression and significantly reduced miR-223 and IRS-1 expression in UT-7 cells. Overexpression of miR-223 and blocking of miR-144 expression significantly normalized the effects of high glucose concentration in UT-7 cells. In conclusion, hyperglycemia may activate platelets through miR-144 and miR-223 to downregulate IRS-1 and upregulate P2Y12 expression in the platelets of T2DM patients through an IRS-1-PI3K-Akt signaling. Low platelet and plasma miR-223 expression in addition to high platelet and plasma miR-144 expression are risk factors for ischemic stroke in T2DM patients. PMID:26175178

  20. Personalized approach to primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke represents a significant part of stroke management and health care. Although there are official guidelines concerning stroke management, new knowledge are introduced to them with a slight delay. This article provides an overview of current information on primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. It summarizes information especially in the field of cardioembolic stroke, the use of new anticoagulants and the management of carotid stenosis based on the results of recent clinical studies. The optimal approach in stroke management is to follow these recommendations, to know new strategies and to apply an individual personalized approach in our clinical decisions. PMID:24949113

  1. Ischemic colitis after mesotherapy combined with anti-obesity medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Bin; Moon, Won; Park, Seun Ja; Park, Moo In; Kim, Kyu-Jong; Lee, Jae Nam; Kang, Seong Joo; Jang, Lee La; Chang, Hee Kyung

    2010-03-28

    Mesotherapy and anti-obesity medications are gradually gaining worldwide popularity for purposes of body contouring and weight loss. Their adverse effects are various, but there is a tendency to disregard them. Ischemic colitis is one of the most common diseases associated with non-obstructive blood vessel disorders. However, there have been no case reports about the adverse effects resulting from mesotherapy only or in combination with anti-obesity medications. We report on an interesting case of ischemic colitis after mesotherapy combined with anti-obesity medications in a 39-year-old female who had no risk factors. PMID:20333798

  2. Factoring in Factor VIII With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Samai, Alyana; Albright, Karen C.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    There is growing research interest into the etiologies of cryptogenic stroke, in particular as it relates to hypercoagulable states. An elevation in serum levels of the procoagulant factor VIII is recognized as one such culprit of occult cerebral infarctions. It is the objective of the present review to summarize the molecular role of factor VIII in thrombogenesis and its clinical use in the diagnosis and prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. We also discuss the utility of screening for serum factor VIII levels among patients at risk for, or those who have experienced, ischemic stroke. PMID:25669199

  3. Anesthesia for Endovascular Approaches to Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Avitsian, Rafi; Machado, Sandra B

    2016-09-01

    Involvement of the Anesthesiologist in the early stages of care for acute ischemic stroke patient undergoing endovascular treatment is essential. Anesthetic management includes the anesthetic technique (general anesthesia vs sedation), a matter of much debate and an area in need of well-designed prospective studies. The large numbers of confounding factors make the design of such studies a difficult process. A universally agreed point in the endovascular management of acute ischemic stroke is the importance of decreasing the time to revascularization. Hemodynamic and ventilatory management and implementation of neuroprotective modalities and treatment of acute procedural complications are important components of the anesthetic plan. PMID:27521194

  4. Ischemic preconditioning protects against gap junctional uncoupling in cardiac myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sundset, Rune; Cooper, Marie; Mikalsen, Svein-Ole; Ytrehus, Kirsti

    2004-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning increases the heart's tolerance to a subsequent longer ischemic period. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of gap junction communication in simulated preconditioning in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myofibroblasts. Gap junctional intercellular communication was assessed by Lucifer yellow dye transfer. Preconditioning preserved intercellular coupling after prolonged ischemia. An initial reduction in coupling in response to the preconditioning stimulus was also observed. This may protect neighboring cells from damaging substances produced during subsequent regional ischemia in vivo, and may preserve gap junctional communication required for enhanced functional recovery during subsequent reperfusion. PMID:16247851

  5. New method of posterior scallop augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ito, Toshiaki

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method of posterior middle scallop (P2) augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation to achieve deep coaptation. First, P2 was divided straight at the center and partially detached from the annulus in a reverse T shape. A narrow pentagon-shaped section of pericardium was sutured to the divided P2 and annular defect. The tip of the pentagon was attached directly to the papillary muscle, thus creating a very large P2 scallop. A standard-sized ring was placed. We adopted this technique in 2 patients with advanced ischemic cardiomyopathy, and no mitral regurgitation was observed during a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25742844

  6. Interaction of heritable and estrogen-induced thrombophilia: possible etiologies for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Glueck, C J; Fontaine, R N; Wang, P

    2001-02-01

    Our specific aim was to assess how thrombophilic exogenous estrogens interacted with heritable thrombophilias leading to non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and ischemic stroke. Coagulation measures were performed in a 74 year old patient and her immediate family. The proband had a 47 year history of 9 previous thrombotic episodes, and developed unilateral NAION 4 years after starting estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The proband was heterozygous for two thrombophilic gene mutations (G20210A prothrombin gene, platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism), and homozygous for the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. Of 238 normal controls, none had these 3 gene mutations together. The proband's mother and brother had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The proband's brother, sister, nephew, daughter, and two granddaughters were homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation. The proband's brother was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The proband's niece was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation, homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation, homozygous for the hypofibrinolytic 4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, and heterozygous for the platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism. Of 238 normal controls, none had the niece's combination of 4 gene mutations. When ERT-mediated thrombophilia was superimposed on the proband's heritable thrombophilias, unilateral ischemic optic neuropathy developed, her tenth thrombotic event over a 5 decade period. When estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives were given to the proband's niece, she had an ischemic stroke at age 22. Exogenous estrogen-mediated thrombophilia superimposed on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis is associated with arterial and venous thrombi, and appears to be a preventable, and potentially reversible etiology for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke. PMID:11246543

  7. Therapy Effects of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xinchun; Hu, Jinxia; Cui, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death and major cause of disability worldwide. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to improve functional outcome after stroke. In this review, we will focus on the protective effects of BMSCs on ischemic brain and the relative molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of BMSCs on stroke. PMID:27069533

  8. Update on the Role of Cannabinoid Receptors after Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Capettini, Luciano S. A.; Savergnini, Silvia Q.; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Santos, Robson A. S.; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids are considered as key mediators in the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. In particular, they have been shown to reduce the ischemic injury after acute cardiovascular events, such as acute myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. These protective and anti-inflammatory properties on peripheral tissues and circulating inflammatory have been demonstrated to involve their binding with both selective cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) transmembrane receptors. On the other hands, the recent discoveries of novel different classes of cannabinoids and receptors have increased the complexity of this system in atherosclerosis. Although only preliminary data have been reported on the activities of novel cannabinoid receptors, several studies have already investigated the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in ischemic stroke. While CB1 receptor activation has been shown to directly reduce atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, controversial data have been shown on neurotransmission and neuroprotection after stroke. Given its potent anti-inflammatory activities on circulating leukocytes, the CB2 activation has been proven to produce protective effects against acute poststroke inflammation. In this paper, we will update evidence on different cannabinoid-triggered avenues to reduce inflammation and neuronal injury in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:22577257

  9. Medications Used in the Treatment of Ischemic Heart Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on medications used in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first.…

  10. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  11. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  12. Association of integrin α2 gene variants with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Matarin, Mar; Brown, W Mark; Hardy, John A; Rich, Stephen S; Singleton, Andrew B; Brown, Robert D; Brott, Thomas G; Worrall, Bradford B; Meschia, James F

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variants in the gene encoding integrin α2 (ITGA2) have been reported to be associated with an increased risk for ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in ITGA2 and risk of ischemic stroke in a collection of North American stroke cases and controls. The study included 484 cases and 263 controls. Thirteen tSNPs were genotyped. Association tests at and across each tSNP were performed, including haplotype association analysis. Secondary analyses considered stroke subtypes on the basis of Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria. We observed significant association between tSNP rs3756541 (additive model, odds ratio (OR), 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11 to 2.04; P = 0.009) and disease and a trend toward association at rs2303124 (recessive model, OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.33; P= 0.03). These associations remained significant in the haplotype analyses. The associated tSNPs did not distinguish stroke etiology after application of TOAST criteria. Our results suggest that genetic variability within ITGA2 may confer risk for ischemic stroke independent of conventional risk factors. These results provide additional support for a role for platelet receptor genes in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke of diverse subtypes. PMID:17534386

  13. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason J.; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  14. Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer: an underdiagnosed Entity©.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Mayer, Dieter; Hafner, Jürg; Sibbald, R Gary

    2012-12-01

    Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer represents rapidly progressive and extremely painful ulcers that are frequently underdiagnosed. These occur most commonly on the lateral-dorsal calf and are associated with hypertension and diabetes. This article will synthesize a review of the literature for the accurate diagnosis and treatment of this painful debilitating condition. PMID:23151767

  15. Remote limb ischemic conditioning enhances motor learning in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Cherry-Allen, Kendra M; Gidday, Jeff M; Lee, Jin-Moo; Hershey, Tamara; Lang, Catherine E

    2015-06-01

    Brief bouts of sublethal ischemia have been shown to protect exposed tissue (ischemic conditioning) and tissues at remote sites (remote ischemic conditioning) against subsequent ischemic challenges. Given that the mechanisms of this protective phenomenon are multifactorial and epigenetic, we postulated that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC) might enhance mechanisms responsible for neural plasticity, and thereby facilitate learning. Specifically, we hypothesized that conditioning of the nervous system with RLIC, achieved through brief repetitive limb ischemia prior to training, would facilitate the neurophysiological processes of learning, thus making training more effective and more long-lasting. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study; nine were randomly allocated to RLIC and nine to sham conditioning. All subjects underwent seven consecutive weekday sessions and 2-wk and 4-wk follow-up sessions. We found that RLIC resulted in significantly greater motor learning and longer retention of motor performance gains in healthy adults. Changes in motor performance do not appear to be due to a generalized increase in muscle activation or muscle strength and were not associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Of note, RLIC did not enhance cognitive learning on a hippocampus-dependent task. While future research is needed to establish optimal conditioning and training parameters, this inexpensive, clinically feasible paradigm might ultimately be implemented to enhance motor learning in individuals undergoing neuromuscular rehabilitation for brain injury and other pathological conditions. PMID:25867743

  16. [Ischemic stroke: A rare complication of liver hydatid cyst].

    PubMed

    Ghadhoune, H; Chaari, A; Baccouche, N; Chelly, H; Bouaziz, M

    2013-10-01

    Hydatid cyst of the liver (HCL) is a widespread disease in North African countries. We report the case of a 39-year-old patient who was admitted in our intensive care unit because of anaphylactic shock due to a cracked HCL fortuitously discovered. This accident was also complicated by an ischemic stroke witch underline mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24075197

  17. Brainstem ischemic stroke after to Bothrops atrox snakebite.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos A

    2016-09-15

    We report case of a 48 years old woman bitten on her right foot by a Bothrops atrox viper. As a result, she developed a severe coagulopathy which improved with application of polyvalent antivenom. Four days after bite she suffered a devastating brainstem ischemic stroke. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:27527269

  18. Heat shock proteins, end effectors of myocardium ischemic preconditioning?

    PubMed Central

    Guisasola, María Concepcion; Desco, Maria del Mar; Gonzalez, Fernanda Silvana; Asensio, Fernando; Dulin, Elena; Suarez, Antonio; Garcia Barreno, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) whether ischemia-reperfusion increased the content of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) transcripts and (2) whether myocardial content of Hsp72 is increased by ischemic preconditioning so that they can be considered as end effectors of preconditioning. Twelve male minipigs (8 protocol, 4 sham) were used, with the following ischemic preconditioning protocol: 3 ischemia and reperfusion 5-minute alternative cycles and last reperfusion cycle of 3 hours. Initial and final transmural biopsies (both in healthy and ischemic areas) were taken in all animals. Heat shock protein 72 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression was measured by a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method using complementary DNA normalized against the housekeeping gene cyclophilin. The identification of heat shock protein 72 was performed by immunoblot. In our “classic” preconditioning model, we found no changes in mRNA hsp72 levels or heat shock protein 72 content in the myocardium after 3 hours of reperfusion. Our experimental model is valid and the experimental techniques are appropriate, but the induction of heat shock proteins 72 as end effectors of cardioprotection in ischemic preconditioning does not occur in the first hours after ischemia, but probably at least 24 hours after it, in the so-called “second protection window.” PMID:17009598

  19. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  20. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25749474

  1. [Development of Researches on Scalp Acupuncture for Ischemic Stroke].

    PubMed

    Tian, Liang; Wang, Jin-hai; Sun, Run-jie; Zhang, Xing-hua; Yuan, Bo; Du, Xiao-zheng

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the commonly met diseases in clinical practice nowadays. Acupuncture therapy is widly used in the treatment of sequela of ischemic stroke in China and its mechanisms have been extensively studied in recen years. In the present paper, the authors focus on the development of studies on the mechanism of scalp acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Results indicate that scalp acupuncture intervention can 1) improve cerebral blood circulation to promote regional energy metabolism, 2) up-regulate expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), etc., possibly promoting proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the focal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, 3) reduce contents of excitatory amino acid and increase level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to lower neurogenic toxicity, and relieve cerebral injury, 4) ease cerebral vascular immunoinflammatory reactions, 5) regulate blood lipid metabolism to resist cerebral free radical damage, and 6) inhibit cerebral cortical apoptosis. However, these results only revealed very limited intrinsic mechanisms of scalp acupuncture in improving ischemic stroke. Further studies using comprehensive techniques of multi-disciplines as molecular biology, electrophysiology, etc. are definitely needed. PMID:27141629

  2. [Ischemic stroke as reaction to an acute stressful event].

    PubMed

    Ibrahimagić, Omer C; Sinanović, Osman; Cickusić, Amra; Smajlović, Dzevdet

    2005-01-01

    The period following ischemic stroke can be considered as a reaction to a stressful event. Changes in cortisol secretion are one of the indicators of stress reaction. The aim of the study was to determine morning serum levels of cortisol in stroke patients within 48 hours and 15 days of ischemic stroke onset. Study group included 40 patients, 20 of them were females, mean age 65.3 +/- 10.3 years. The patients did not receive any corticosteroid agents or spironolactone, and did not suffer from Cushing's or Addison's syndrome. Ischemic stroke was verified by computed tomography of the brain. The fluorometric method with DELFIA Cortisol immunoassay was used to determine morning serum cortisol levels. Reference values of the measured hormone were 201-681 nmol/l. The mean level of serum cortisol within 48 hours of stroke was 560.9 +/- 318.9 nmol/l, and on day 15 it was 426.2 +/- 159.3 nmol/l, i.e. significantly lower (p < 0.02). On the first measurement, the level of serum cortisol was elevated in 32%, and on the second measurement in only 7.5% patients, which was also significantly lower (p < 0.001). It was concluded that the stress reaction in ischemic stroke patients was more pronounced within the first 48 hours of stroke onset. Judging from the morning cortisol levels, the reaction to stress was considerably less pronounced 15 days after stroke onset. PMID:15875466

  3. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase Polymorphisms in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason J; Stanfill, Ansley; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2016-01-01

    Stroke remains the fifth leading cause of mortality in the United States with an annual rate of over 128,000 deaths per year. Differences in incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcome have long been noted when comparing ischemic stroke among different ethnicities. The observation that racial disparities exist in clinical outcomes after stroke has resulted in genetic studies focusing on specific polymorphisms. Some studies have focused on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are a ubiquitous group of proteins with extensive roles that include extracellular matrix remodeling and blood-brain barrier disruption. MMPs play an important role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology and clinical outcome. This review will evaluate the evidence for associations between polymorphisms in MMP-1, 2, 3, 9, and 12 with ischemic stroke incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical outcome. The role of polymorphisms in MMP genes may influence the presentation of ischemic stroke and be influenced by racial and ethnic background. However, contradictory evidence for the role of MMP polymorphisms does exist in the literature, and further studies will be necessary to consolidate our understanding of these multi-faceted proteins. PMID:27529234

  4. The neuroprotective roles of BDNF in hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ai; Xiong, Li-Jing; Tong, Yu; Mao, Meng

    2013-03-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (H/I) brain injury results in various degrees of damage to the body, and the immature brain is particularly fragile to oxygen deprivation. Hypothermia and erythropoietin (EPO) have long been known to be neuroprotective in ischemic brain injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has recently been recognized as a potent modulator capable of regulating a wide repertoire of neuronal functions. This review was based on studies concerning the involvement of BDNF in the protection of H/I brain injury following a search in PubMed between 1995 and December, 2011. We initially examined the background of BDNF, and then focused on its neuroprotective mechanisms against ischemic brain injury, including its involvement in promoting neural regeneration/cognition/memory rehabilitation, angiogenesis within ischemic penumbra and the inhibition of the inflammatory process, neurotoxicity, epilepsy and apoptosis. We also provided a literature overview of experimental studies, discussing the safety and the potential clinical application of BDNF as a neuroprotective agent in the ischemic brain injury. PMID:24648914

  5. Risk factors and outcomes of childhood ischemic stroke in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Ying; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Chou, Min-Liang; Hung, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Meng-Ying; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Wong, Alex Mun-Ching

    2008-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the charts and collected clinical and radiographic data on children (age range, 1 month to 18 years) with symptoms and radiographic confirmation of ischemic stroke for the period of January 1996 to July 2006. Ninety-four children were enrolled. Eighty-eight had arterial ischemic stroke and six had sinovenous thrombosis. Twenty-nine percent of the children had seizures. Twenty-six percent had diffuse neurological signs and 76% had focal neurological signs. Risk factors included vascular disease (33%), infection (27%), metabolic disorders (18%), trauma (11%), prothrombotic states (13%), cardiac disease (10%), and mitochondrial disease (6%). Ten percent (n=9) had no identifiable cause. Twenty-two percent of the children had more than one risk factor. Anterior territory (70%) was more involved than posterior territory (18%) in arterial ischemic stroke. Unilateral infarctions were more common on the left side (51%) than on the right (24.5%). Neurological deficits were present in 45% (n=34/75) of the children; the most frequent deficit was motor impairment (24%). Seven children (9%) died in the acute stage. There were 12 children (16%) who had recurrent stroke and 8 children (8/12) who had underlying vascular disease. The vascular disease included moyamoya disease (5), CNS lupus (1) and ill-defined vasculopathy (2). The etiology pattern in Taiwan was different from that in Western countries. Vascular disease was a significant risk factor for recurrence in childhood ischemic stroke. PMID:17573220

  6. Nitrite anion stimulates ischemic arteriogenesis involving NO metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Shyamal C.; Pattillo, Christopher B.; Pardue, Sibile; Kolluru, Gopi K.; Docherty, John; Goyette, Dave; Dvorsky, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential regulator of ischemic vascular remodeling, and as such therapies augmenting its bioavailability may be useful for the treatment of ischemic tissue diseases. Here we examine the effect of administering the NO prodrug sodium nitrite on arteriogenesis activity during established tissue ischemia. Chronic hindlimb ischemia was induced by permanent unilateral femoral artery and vein ligation. Five days postligation; animals were randomized to control PBS or sodium nitrite (165 μg/kg) therapy twice daily. In situ vascular remodeling was measured longitudinally using SPY angiography and Microfil vascular casting. Delayed sodium nitrite therapy rapidly increased ischemic limb arterial vessel diameter and branching in a NO-dependent manner. SPY imaging angiography over time showed that nitrite therapy enhanced ischemic gracillis collateral vessel formation from the profunda femoris to the saphenous artery. Immunofluorescent staining of smooth muscle cell actin also confirmed that sodium nitrite therapy increased arteriogenesis in a NO-dependent manner. The NO prodrug sodium nitrite significantly increases arteriogenesis and reperfusion of established severe chronic tissue ischemia. PMID:22610173

  7. Remote limb ischemic conditioning enhances motor learning in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Cherry-Allen, Kendra M.; Gidday, Jeff M.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Hershey, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Brief bouts of sublethal ischemia have been shown to protect exposed tissue (ischemic conditioning) and tissues at remote sites (remote ischemic conditioning) against subsequent ischemic challenges. Given that the mechanisms of this protective phenomenon are multifactorial and epigenetic, we postulated that remote limb ischemic conditioning (RLIC) might enhance mechanisms responsible for neural plasticity, and thereby facilitate learning. Specifically, we hypothesized that conditioning of the nervous system with RLIC, achieved through brief repetitive limb ischemia prior to training, would facilitate the neurophysiological processes of learning, thus making training more effective and more long-lasting. Eighteen healthy adults participated in this study; nine were randomly allocated to RLIC and nine to sham conditioning. All subjects underwent seven consecutive weekday sessions and 2-wk and 4-wk follow-up sessions. We found that RLIC resulted in significantly greater motor learning and longer retention of motor performance gains in healthy adults. Changes in motor performance do not appear to be due to a generalized increase in muscle activation or muscle strength and were not associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. Of note, RLIC did not enhance cognitive learning on a hippocampus-dependent task. While future research is needed to establish optimal conditioning and training parameters, this inexpensive, clinically feasible paradigm might ultimately be implemented to enhance motor learning in individuals undergoing neuromuscular rehabilitation for brain injury and other pathological conditions. PMID:25867743

  8. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-08-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11,000 patients with various neurologic disorders, including acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The conclusion is that citicoline is safe to use and may have a beneficial effect in AIS patients and most beneficial in less severe stroke in older patients not treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. No other neuroprotective agent had any beneficial effect in confirmative clinical trials or had any positive effect in the subgroup analysis. Citicoline is the only drug that in a number of different clinical stroke trials continuously had some neuroprotective benefit. PMID:24739589

  9. [Ischemic insult in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation].

    PubMed

    Smajlović, Dzevdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer; Dostović, Zikrija

    2003-01-01

    In the everyday practice among clinical and etiological classifications for ischemic stroke, the terms strokes in the anterior and posterior cerebral circulation are also in use. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of ischemic strokes in the anterior and posterior circulation, their age and sex distribution, risk factors and hospital mortality. In the study it was analyzed 1772 patients with acute ischemic stroke hospitalized at the Department of Neurology Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, between January 1st 1996 and December 31st 2000. The mean age was 65.5 years (+9.9), 942 (55%) were females. Ischemic strokes for all patients were confirmed with computed tomography, while other data were collected from the standard patients' history charts. Anterior circulation stroke (ACS) had 1408 patients (81.8%), the rest of 314 (18.2%) had posterior circulation stroke (PCS). In the both types females were slightly overrepresented: 784 (56%) in ACS, and 158 (50.5%) in PCS. Moreover, females were significantly older than males: 67 (+9.8) versus 64 (+10) years in ACS (p < 0.001), 67.5 (+10.3) versus 63.5 (+9.2) in PCS (p < 0.001). Hypertension was the major risk factor occurring in 67% patients with ACS and 71 with PCS; heart diseases 54% in the both types, and diabetes in 23% patients with ACS and 20% with PCS. The cortical ischemic lesion was verified in 46% patients with ACS, 41% with PCS; subcortical in 12.5% and 14.5%; and lacunar in 41.5% and 44.5%, respectively. Hospital mortality was 30% (430 patients) for ACS, and 32% (101 patients) for PCS. Hospital mortality was considerably higher among females: 33% versus 28% for ACS (p = 0.03), 38% versus 27% for PCS (p = 0.03). On the basis of our study we can conclude that ischemic strokes in the anterior cerebral circulation are 4/5 of all ischemic strokes at the Department of Neurology Tuzla. Both, anterior and posterior circulation strokes are more frequent in females, witches were in average older than males

  10. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases. PMID:27293445

  11. Protective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning in rat hindlimb on ischemia- reperfusion injury★

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiangrong; Yan, Feng; Min, Lianqiu; Ji, Xunming; Luo, Yumin

    2012-01-01

    Three cycles of remote ischemic pre-conditioning induced by temporarily occluding the bilateral femoral arteries (10 minutes) prior to 10 minutes of reperfusion were given once a day for 3 days before the animal received middle artery occlusion and reperfusion surgery. The results showed that brain infarct volume was significantly reduced after remote ischemic pre-conditioning. Scores in the forelimb placing test and the postural reflex test were significantly lower in rats having undergone remote ischemic pre-conditioning compared with those who did not receive remote ischemic pre-conditioning. Thus, neurological function was better in rats having undergone remote ischemic pre-conditioning compared with those who did not receive remote ischemic pre-conditioning. These results indicate that remote ischemic pre-conditioning in rat hindlimb exerts protective effects in ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25745448

  12. Advances in the Treatment of Ischemic Diseases by Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Wang, Xianyun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Qi, Yixin; Yan, Baoyong; Li, Quanhai

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic diseases are a group of diseases, including ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), and diabetic foot as well as other diseases which are becoming a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the whole world. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to treat a variety of ischemic diseases in animal models and clinical trials. Lots of recent publications demonstrated that MSCs therapy was safe and relieved symptoms in patients of ischemic disease. However, many factors could influence therapeutic efficacy including route of delivery, MSCs' survival and residential rate in vivo, timing of transplantation, particular microenvironment, and patient's clinical condition. In this review, the current status, therapeutic potential, and the detailed factors of MSCs-based therapeutics for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, ICM, and diabetic foot are presented and discussed. We think that MSCs transplantation would constitute an ideal option for patients with ischemic diseases. PMID:27293445

  13. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  14. TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis during ischemic acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    White, Laura E.; Santora, Rachel J.; Cui, Yan; Moore, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advancements in renal replacement therapy, the mortality rate for acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unacceptably high, likely due to remote organ injury. Kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates cellular and soluble mediators that incite a distinct pulmonary proinflammatory and proapoptotic response. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) has been identified as a prominent death receptor activated in the lungs during ischemic AKI. We hypothesized that circulating TNF-α released from the postischemic kidney induces TNFR1-mediated pulmonary apoptosis, and we aimed to elucidate molecular pathways to programmed cell death. Using an established murine model of kidney IRI, we characterized the time course for increased circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α levels and measured concurrent upregulation of pulmonary TNFR1 expression. We then identified TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis after ischemic AKI using TNFR1−/− mice. Subsequent TNF-α signaling disruption with Etanercept implicated circulatory TNF-α as a key soluble mediator of pulmonary apoptosis and lung microvascular barrier dysfunction during ischemic AKI. We further elucidated pathways of TNFR1-mediated apoptosis with NF-κB (Complex I) and caspase-8 (Complex II) expression and discovered that TNFR1 proapoptotic signaling induces NF-κB activation. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB (Complex I) resulted in a proapoptotic phenotype, lung barrier leak, and altered cellular flice inhibitory protein signaling independent of caspase-8 (Complex II) activation. Ischemic AKI activates soluble TNF-α and induces TNFR1-dependent pulmonary apoptosis through augmentation of the prosurvival and proapoptotic TNFR1 signaling pathway. Kidney-lung crosstalk after ischemic AKI represents a complex pathological process, yet focusing on specific biological pathways may yield potential future therapeutic targets. PMID:22728466

  15. Hemodilution increases cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Vorstrup, S.; Andersen, A.; Juhler, M.; Brun, B.; Boysen, G.

    1989-07-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow in 10 consecutive, but selected, patients with acute ischemic stroke (less than 48 hours after onset) before and after hemodilution. Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography, and only patients with focal hypoperfusion in clinically relevant areas were included. Hemodilution was done according to the hematocrit level: for a hematocrit greater than or equal to 42%, 500 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by the same volume of dextran 40; for a hematocrit between 37% and 42%, only 250 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by 500 cc of dextran 40. Mean hematocrit was reduced by 16%, from 46 +/- 5% (SD) to 39 +/- 5% (SD) (p less than 0.001). Cerebral blood flow increased in both hemispheres by an average of 20.9% (p less than 0.001). Regional cerebral blood flow increased in the ischemic areas in all cases, on an average of 21.4 +/- 12.0% (SD) (p less than 0.001). In three patients, a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the hypoperfused areas was observed, and in six patients, the fractional cerebral blood flow increase in the hypoperfused areas was of the same magnitude as in the remainder of the brain. In the last patient, cerebral blood flow increased relatively less in the ischemic areas. Our findings show that cerebral blood flow increases in the ischemic areas after hemodilution therapy in stroke patients. The marked regional cerebral blood flow increase seen in some patients could imply an improved oxygen delivery to the ischemic tissue.

  16. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35-54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16-2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55-64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56-1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  17. Pre-ischemic treadmill training alleviates brain damage via GLT-1-mediated signal pathway after ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Yang, S-D; Li, W-B; Ren, S-Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-08-22

    Physical exercise could play a neuroprotective role in both human and animals. However, the involved signal pathways underlying the neuroprotective effect are still not well established. This study was to investigate the possible signal pathways involved in the neuroprotection of pre-ischemic treadmill training after ischemic stroke. Seventy-two SD rats were randomly assigned into three groups (n=24/group): sham surgery group, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group and MCAO with exercise group. Following three weeks of treadmill training exercise, ischemic stroke was induced by occluding the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rat for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after MCAO/reperfusion, 12 rats in each group were evaluated for neurological deficit scores and then sacrificed to measure the infarct volume (n=6) and cerebral edema (n=6). Six rats in each group were sacrificed to measure the expression level of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), protein kinase C-α (PKC-α), Akt, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) (n=6). Two hundred and eighty minutes (4.67 h) after occlusion, six rats in each group were decapitated to detect the mRNA expression level of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit type 2B (NR2B) (n=6).The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training exercise reduced brain infarct volume, cerebral edema and neurological deficits, also decreased the over expression of PKC-α and increased the expression level of GLT-1, Akt and PI3K after ischemic stroke (p<0.05). The over-expression of mGluR5 and NR2B mRNA was also inhibited by pre-ischemic exercise (p<0.05). In summary, exercise preconditioning ameliorated brain damage after ischemic stroke, which might be involved in two signal pathways: PKC-α-GLT-1-Glutamate and PI3K/Akt-GLT-1-Glutamate. PMID:24907601

  18. Ischemic Preconditioning in White Matter: Magnitude and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hamner, Margaret A.; Ye, Zucheng; Lee, Richard V.; Colman, Jamie R.; Le, Thu; Gong, Davin C.; Weinstein, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a robust neuroprotective phenomenon whereby brief ischemic exposure confers tolerance to a subsequent ischemic challenge. IPC has not been studied selectively in CNS white matter (WM), although stroke frequently involves WM. We determined whether IPC is present in WM and, if so, its mechanism. We delivered a brief in vivo preconditioning ischemic insult (unilateral common carotid artery ligation) to 12- to 14-week-old mice and determined WM ischemic vulnerability [oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD)] 72 h later, using acutely isolated optic nerves (CNS WM tracts) from the preconditioned (ipsilateral) and control (contralateral) hemispheres. Functional and structural recovery was assessed by quantitative measurement of compound action potentials (CAPs) and immunofluorescent microscopy. Preconditioned mouse optic nerves (MONs) showed better functional recovery after OGD than the non-preconditioned MONs (31 ± 3 vs 17 ± 3% normalized CAP area, p < 0.01). Preconditioned MONs also showed improved axon integrity and reduced oligodendrocyte injury compared with non-preconditioned MONs. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and type 1 interferon receptor (IFNAR1), key receptors in innate immune response, are implicated in gray matter preconditioning. Strikingly, IPC-mediated WM protection was abolished in both TLR4−/− and IFNAR1−/− mice. In addition, IPC-mediated protection in WM was also abolished in IFNAR1fl/fl LysMcre, but not in IFNAR1fl/fl control, mice. These findings demonstrated for the first time that IPC was robust in WM, the phenomenon being intrinsic to WM itself. Furthermore, WM IPC was dependent on innate immune cell signaling pathways. Finally, these data demonstrated that microglial-specific expression of IFNAR1 plays an indispensable role in WM IPC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has been studied predominantly in gray matter, but stroke in humans frequently involves white matter (WM) as well. Here we

  19. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  20. Review of current and emerging therapies in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Novakovic, R; Toth, G; Purdy, P D

    2009-07-01

    The statistics for stroke in the USA reads like a familiar ad slogan cited in most papers pertaining to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the USA. While stroke ranks third among all causes of death, behind diseases of the heart and cancer, it is the leading cause of serious long-term disability in the USA.(1) Approximately 795 000 people, 87% of whom are ischemic, suffer from stroke each year in the USA.(2) That means that on average, every 40 seconds someone within the USA develops a stroke. For 2009 the combined direct and indirect cost of stroke, from hospitalization and rehabilitation to institutionalization, is estimated at $68.9 billion within the USA.(2). PMID:21994100

  1. Drug repurposing for immune modulation in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Amantea, Diana; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune cells play a dualistic role in the evolution of ischemic brain damage, with classic phenotypes promoting injury, and alternatively activated M2 microglia/macrophages or N2 neutrophils providing tissue remodelling and repair. Recently, a number of drugs commonly used for other indications (i.e., azithromycin, minocycline, bexarotene, rosiglitazone, metformin) was reported to provide neuroprotection in preclinical stroke models by promoting immune polarization towards non-inflammatory, protective phenotypes. Repurposing drugs with a well-established safety profile should allow a reduction in the risk of clinical trial failure that has dominated the unsuccessful development of neuroprotective drugs in stroke during the last decades. The clinical validation of the proof of concept, followed by the assessment of safety and efficacy of immune-polarizing repurposed drugs will definitively offer new opportunities for the acute treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26657075

  2. Investigation of Reperfusion Injury and Ischemic Preconditioning in Microsurgry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is inevitable in many vascular and musculoskeletal traumas, diseases, free tissue transfers, and during time-consuming reconstructive surgeries in the extremities. Salvage of a prolonged ischemic extremity or flap still remains a challenge for the microvascular surgeon. One of the common complications after microsurgery is I/R-induced tissue death or I/R injury. Twenty years after the discovery, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) has emerged as a powerful method for attenuating I/R injury in a variety of organs or tissues. However, its therapeutic expectations still need to be fulfilled. In this article, the author reviews some important experimental evidences of I/R injury as well as preconditioning-induced protection in the fields relevant to microsurgery. PMID:18946882

  3. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  4. Acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke due to electric injury.

    PubMed

    Singh Jain, Rajendra; Kumar, Sunil; Suresh, Desai Tushar; Agarwal, Rakesh

    2015-07-01

    Electrical injuries are most commonly due to household accidents.Various factors determine the severity of electric injury, including type of current, amperage, voltage, tissue resistance, pathway of current,and duration of contact with the body. Various types of neurologic damage due to electrical injury have been described in literature. It may manifest as peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord damage, seizures, cerebellarataxia, hypoxic encephalopathy, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Acute ischemic stroke is an infrequent complication of electrical injury. Herein,we report a case of middle-aged man, who accidentally sustained high voltage electrical injury followed by acute vertebrobasilar ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed acute infarctin bilateral cerebellar and medial occipital regions. Computed tomographic angiogram of the brain and neck vessels was normal. Possibly,in our patient, the mechanism could be related to direct vascular injury due to electric current. PMID:25684743

  5. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of ischemic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Gonzales, Ernie; Soetikno, Brian; Gong, Enhao; Yan, Ping; Maslov, Konstantin; Lee, Jin-Moo; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A major obstacle in understanding the mechanism of ischemic stroke is the lack of a tool to noninvasively or minimally invasively monitor cerebral hemodynamics longitudinally. Here, we applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to longitudinally study ischemic stroke induced brain injury in a mouse model with transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). OR-PAM showed that, during MCAO, the average hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) values of feeder arteries and draining veins within the stroke core region dropped ~10% and ~34%, respectively. After reperfusion, arterial sO2 recovered back to the baseline; however, the venous sO2 increased above the baseline value by ~7%. Thereafter, venous sO2 values were close to the arterial sO2 values, suggesting eventual brain tissue infarction.

  6. Ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation secondary to severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Coban-Karatas, Muge; Altan-Yaycioglu, Rana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case with severe head trauma and perforating globe injury in one eye and ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation in the other eye. A 37-year-old male was brought to the emergency department after a motor vehicle accident with severe maxillofacial trauma. Ophthalmic examination revealed hematoma of the left eyelids as well as traumatic rupture and disorganization of the left globe. On the right eye, anterior segment and fundoscopic examination were normal. Primary globe repair was performed. At postoperative one-month visit, the right eye revealed no pathology of the optic disc and macula but severe neovascularization in the temporal peripheral retina. The patient was diagnosed as ischemic retinopathy and neovascular proliferation due to head trauma. PMID:25143848

  7. Melatonin and Ischemic Stroke: Mechanistic Roles and Action

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Syed Suhail; Parvez, Suhel; Tabassum, Heena

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most devastating neurological disabilities and brain's vulnerability towards it proves to be fatal and socio-economic loss of millions of people worldwide. Ischemic stroke remains at the center stage of it, because of its prevalence amongst the several other types attacking the brain. The various cascades of events that have been associated with stroke involve oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction, upregulation of Ca2+ level, and so forth. Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by pineal and extra pineal tissues responsible for various physiological processes like sleep and mood behaviour. Melatonin has been implicated in various neurological diseases because of its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We have previously reviewed the neuroprotective effect of melatonin in various models of brain injury like traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. In this review, we have put together the various causes and consequence of stroke and protective role of melatonin in ischemic stroke. PMID:26435711

  8. Nanoparticles-Assisted Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Lai, Hao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has attracted increasing attention as a promising treatment strategy for cardiac repair in ischemic heart disease. Nanoparticles (NPs), with their superior physical and chemical properties, have been widely utilized to assist stem cell therapy. With the help of NPs, stem cells can be genetically engineered for enhanced paracrine profile. To further understand the fate and behaviors of stem cells in ischemic myocardium, imaging NPs can label stem cells and be tracked in vivo under multiple modalities. Besides that, NPs can also be used to enhance stem cell retention in myocardium. These facts have raised efforts on the development of more intelligent and multifunctional NPs for cellular application. Herein, an overview of the applications of NPs-assisted stem cell therapy is given. Key issues and future prospects are also critically addressed. PMID:26839552

  9. Brain imaging in transient ischemic attack--redefining TIA.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Aleksandra M; Barras, Christen D; Hand, Peter J; Tress, Brian M; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M

    2010-09-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) has recently been redefined to incorporate the latest clinical and neuroimaging information that has shed new light on TIA pathophysiology. Patients suffering from TIA are at a substantial risk of subsequent stroke, but quantifying this risk is difficult as TIA patients are a heterogeneous population and there are multiple TIA mimics. Clinical scores for prediction of stroke risk are principally based on patient history and potentially understate actual risk. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in particular diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed in the first days following TIA, reveals relevant focal ischemic abnormalities in 21-68% of patients. These lesions predict stroke recurrence, functional dependence and subsequent vascular events. Adding imaging information to clinical scores improves prediction of stroke risk following TIA. Alongside clinical judgement, use of MRI has the potential to change the management of TIA patients and is the imaging modality of choice for this condition. PMID:20605469

  10. Hepatitis C and recurrent treatment-resistant acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tarsia, Joseph; Dunn, Casey; Aysenne, Aimee; Shah, Basil; Moore, David F.

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and thrombolysis, acute ischemic stroke has become a treatable disorder if the patient presents within the 4.5-hour time window. Typically, sporadic stroke is caused by atherosclerotic disease involving large or small cerebral arteries or secondary to a cardioembolic source often associated with atrial fibrillation. In the over-65-year age group, more rare causes of stroke, such as antiphospholipid syndromes, are unusual; such stroke etiologies are mostly seen in a younger age group (<55 years). Here we describe acute ischemic stroke in three patients >65 years with hepatitis C–associated antiphospholipid antibodies. We suggest that screening for antiphospholipid disorders in the older patient might be warranted, with potential implications for therapeutic management and secondary stroke prevention. PMID:23543984

  11. [Multimodal imaging of ischemic heart diseases: A 2015 update].

    PubMed

    Di Marco, L; Rosset, M; Zhang-Yin, J; Ohana, M

    2016-05-01

    Current realities and future possibilities of imaging in the ischemic heart diseases are very broad and constantly evolving, with the improvement of existing technologies and the introduction of new features such as dual-energy CT, strain ultrasound, multimodality fusion or perfusion MRI. Regular collaboration between prescribing clinicians, cardiologists, radiologists and nuclear radiologists is therefore essential to tailor the examination to the specific clinical question. The indications for each modality will therefore depend on its diagnostic performance, cost, acquisition and post-processing times and eventual radiation exposure. This review will detail principles and applications of current cardiac imaging examinations: echocardiography, nuclear medicine, MRI, CT and coronary angiography, emphasizing their current strengths and weaknesses in the ischemic heart diseases management. PMID:26775644

  12. Antisense oligonucleotide for tissue factor inhibits hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kadotani, Yayoi; Ushigome, Hidetaka; Akioka, Kiyokazu; Okamoto, Masahiko; Ohmori, Yoshihiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Yoshimura, Rikio; Yoshimura, Norio

    2002-09-27

    Tissue factor (TF) is an initiation factor for blood coagulation and its expression is induced on endothelial cells during inflammatory or immune responses. We designed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-1/TF) for rat TF and studied its effect on hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. AS-1/TF was delivered intravenously to Lewis rats. After 10 h, hepatic artery and portal vein were partially clamped. Livers were reperfused after 180 min and harvested. TF expression was studied using immunohistochemical staining. One of 10 rats survived in a 5-day survival rate and TF was strongly stained on endothelial cells in non-treatment group. However, by treatment with AS-1/TF, six of seven survived and TF staining was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we observed that fluorescein-labeled AS-1/TF was absorbed into endothelial cells. These results suggest that AS-1/TF can strongly suppress the expression of TF and thereby inhibit ischemic reperfusion injury to the rat liver. PMID:12270110

  13. [The Oradea study regarding the epidemiology factors in ischemic cardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Pop, E; Popa, I; Bolcaş, D; Sirca, D; Simon, F; Costin, V; Balaj, V; Micle, T; Săvulescu, I H; Elenes, S; Negru, M; Cazacu, G; Popper, A; Gerhardt, L; Zavornic, E; Anton, N; Erdös, I; Frăţilă, H; Nica, V; Mesaroş, P; Jozsa, P; Lupu, D; David, D; Derecskey, E; Man, C; Palfi, E; Vass, H L

    1981-01-01

    Cholesterolemia in a population of 100482 inhabitants of the Bihor district, subjected to screening for the risk factors in ischemic cardiopathy were studied. Together with hyperlipidemias other risk factors were detected: arterial hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ischemic alterations of the electrocardiogram, the influence of the noxious agents present at the working place, of the blood groups and disturbances of the menstrual cycle. The mean cholesteremia is of 205 ± 43.7 mgr% (M = 207 ± 43.7 mgr%; F = 204 ± 43.5 mgr%). The prevalence of cholesterolemia, in comparison with the higher normal limits in each age group over 15 years of age, is in the entire studied series, of 13.5%. The population in whom cholesterolemia exceeds 250 mgr% represents 13.92%. PMID:25528799

  14. Angiogenesis-regulating microRNAs and ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ke-Jie; Hamblin, Milton; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Ischemic stroke is the dominant subtype of stroke and results from focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of major cerebral arteries. Thus, the restoration or improvement of reduced regional cerebral blood supply in a timely manner is very critical for improving stroke outcomes and post-stroke functional recovery. The recovery from ischemic stroke largely relies on appropriate restoration of blood flow via angiogenesis. Newly formed vessels would allow increased cerebral blood flow, thus increasing the amount of oxygen and nutrients delivered to affected brain tissue. Angiogenesis is strictly controlled by many key angiogenic factors in the central nervous system, and these molecules have been well-documented to play an important role in the development of angiogenesis in response to various pathological conditions. Promoting angiogenesis via various approaches that target angiogenic factors appears to be a useful treatment for experimental ischemic stroke. Most recently, microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as negative regulators of gene expression in a post-transcriptional manner. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that miRs are essential determinants of vascular endothelial cell biology/angiogenesis as well as contributors to stroke pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the knowledge of stroke-associated angiogenic modulators, as well as the role and molecular mechanisms of stroke-associated miRs with a focus on angiogenesis-regulating miRs. Moreover, we further discuss their potential impact on miR-based therapeutics in stroke through targeting and enhancing post-ischemic angiogenesis. PMID:26156265

  15. Amphetamine-related ischemic colitis causing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Panikkath, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented with acute lower intestinal bleeding requiring blood transfusion. Multiple initial investigations did not reveal the cause of the bleeding. Colonoscopy performed 2 days later showed features suggestive of ischemic colitis. On detailed history, the patient admitted to using amphetamines, and her urine drug screen was positive for them. She was managed conservatively and advised not to use amphetamines again. She did not have any recurrence on 2-year follow-up. PMID:27365888

  16. Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lambrinos, Anna; Schaink, Alexis K; Dhalla, Irfan; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K; Sikich, Nancy; Lum, Cheemun; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; Kelloway, Linda; Xie, Xuanqian; Hill, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    Although intravenous thrombolysis increases the probability of a good functional outcome in carefully selected patients with acute ischemic stroke, a substantial proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis do not have a good outcome. Several recent trials of mechanical thrombectomy appear to indicate that this treatment may be superior to thrombolysis. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) compared with intravenous thrombolysis (if eligible) in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion. We systematically searched seven databases for randomized controlled trials published between January 2005 and March 2015 comparing stent retrievers or thromboaspiration devices with best medical therapy (with or without intravenous thrombolysis) in adults with acute ischemic stroke. We assessed risk of bias and overall quality of the included trials. We combined the data using a fixed or random effects meta-analysis, where appropriate. We identified 1579 studies; of these, we evaluated 122 full-text papers and included five randomized control trials (n=1287). Compared with patients treated medically, patients who received mechanical thrombectomy were more likely to be functionally independent as measured by a modified Rankin score of 0-2 (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-3.04; I2=0%). This finding was robust to subgroup analysis. Mortality and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage were not significantly different between the two groups. Mechanical thrombectomy significantly improves functional independence in appropriately selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27071728

  17. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  18. Classifiers for Ischemic Stroke Lesion Segmentation: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Oskar; Schröder, Christoph; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Martinetz, Thomas; Handels, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Ischemic stroke, triggered by an obstruction in the cerebral blood supply, leads to infarction of the affected brain tissue. An accurate and reproducible automatic segmentation is of high interest, since the lesion volume is an important end-point for clinical trials. However, various factors, such as the high variance in lesion shape, location and appearance, render it a difficult task. Methods In this article, nine classification methods (e.g. Generalized Linear Models, Random Decision Forests and Convolutional Neural Networks) are evaluated and compared with each other using 37 multiparametric MRI datasets of ischemic stroke patients in the sub-acute phase in terms of their accuracy and reliability for ischemic stroke lesion segmentation. Within this context, a multi-spectral classification approach is compared against mono-spectral classification performance using only FLAIR MRI datasets and two sets of expert segmentations are used for inter-observer agreement evaluation. Results and Conclusion The results of this study reveal that high-level machine learning methods lead to significantly better segmentation results compared to the rather simple classification methods, pointing towards a difficult non-linear problem. The overall best segmentation results were achieved by a Random Decision Forest and a Convolutional Neural Networks classification approach, even outperforming all previously published results. However, none of the methods tested in this work are capable of achieving results in the range of the human observer agreement and the automatic ischemic stroke lesion segmentation remains a complicated problem that needs to be explored in more detail to improve the segmentation results. PMID:26672989

  19. Delayed Postconditioning Protects against Focal Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chuancheng; Gao, Xuwen; Niu, Gang; Yan, Zhimin; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Heng

    2008-01-01

    Background We and others have reported that rapid ischemic postconditioning, interrupting early reperfusion after stroke, reduces infarction in rats. However, its extremely short therapeutic time windows, from a few seconds to minutes after reperfusion, may hinder its clinical translation. Thus, in this study we explored if delayed postconditioning, which is conducted a few hours after reperfusion, offers protection against stroke. Methods and Results Focal ischemia was generated by 30 min occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) combined with permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCA); delayed postconditioning was performed by repetitive, brief occlusion and release of the bilateral CCAs, or of the ipsilateral CCA alone. As a result, delayed postconditioning performed at 3h and 6h after stroke robustly reduced infarct size, with the strongest protection achieved by delayed postconditioning with 6 cycles of 15 min occlusion/15 min release of the ipsilateral CCA executed from 6h. We found that this delayed postconditioning provided long-term protection for up to two months by reducing infarction and improving outcomes of the behavioral tests; it also attenuated reduction in 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-uptake therefore improving metabolism, and reduced edema and blood brain barrier leakage. Reperfusion in ischemic stroke patients is usually achieved by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) application, however, t-PA's side effect may worsen ischemic injury. Thus, we tested whether delayed postconditioning counteracts the exacerbating effect of t-PA. The results showed that delayed postconditioning mitigated the worsening effect of t-PA on infarction. Conclusion Delayed postconditioning reduced ischemic injury after focal ischemia, which opens a new research avenue for stroke therapy and its underlying protective mechanisms. PMID:19066627

  20. Heat shock response for ischemic kidney preservation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, H; Perdrizet, G A; Schweizer, R T

    1993-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a form of stress conditioning during which reversible changes in cellular metabolism are rapidly induced by brief exposure to supra-physiologic levels of heat. The nature of these adaptive adjustments has been widely investigated and has received much attention in molecular biology and cancer research. Recent evidence indicates that a basic form of this stress response exists at the cellular level of virtually every organism. Although the physiological phenomenon of HSR is complex, it is well known that it can induce specific proteins, known as heat shock proteins (HSP's), which are not normally synthesized. HSP's become the major proteins synthesized during the heat shock response while normal protein synthesis is suppressed. In addition, the HSR has been demonstrated to confer a transient resistance to the organism to subsequent episodes of stress. Recently it has been reported that the HSR confers protection against cold ischemic injury and extends the cold preservation time of the rat kidney to 48 hours. In this study, we have applied the concept of HSR to the preservation, and transplantation of warm ischemically injured pig kidneys. Since there is a serious shortage of cadaver kidneys available for transplantation worldwide, this number would increase if warm ischemic kidneys could be utilized. However with present methods of organ recovery and preservation, such kidneys are not likely to function after transplantation even if they were removed. We hypothesized that the application of a thermal stress to pig kidneys prior to organ procurement and preservation will enhance the organs' ability to function after warm ischemic injury. PMID:8352637

  1. [Uncaria tomentosa and acute ischemic kidney injury in rats].

    PubMed

    de Fátima Fernandes Vattimo, Maria; da Silva, Natalia Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the renoprotective effects of Uncaria Tomentosa (cat's claw) on ischemic acute kidney injury induced by renal clamping in rats. The hypoxia and hypoperfusion increase the production of reactive species already present in the inflammatory process. Results showed that the renal function evaluated by creatinine clearance, the urinary excretion of peroxides and malondealdehyde indexes demonstrated that UT induced renoprotection, probably related to its antioxidant activities. PMID:21445508

  2. Do energy drinks cause epileptic seizure and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Dikici, Suber; Saritas, Ayhan; Besir, Fahri Halit; Tasci, Ahmet Hakan; Kandis, Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Energy drinks are popular among young individuals and marketed to college students, athletes, and active individuals between the ages of 21 and 35 years. We report a case that had ischemic stroke and epileptic seizure after intake of energy drink with alcohol. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first report of ischemic stroke after intake of energy drink. A previously healthy 37-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a witnessed tonic-clonic seizure. According to his wife's testimony, just before loss of consciousness, the patient had been drinking 3 boxes of energy drinks (Redbull, Istanbul, Turkey, 250 mL) with vodka on an empty stomach. He did not have a history of seizures, head trauma, or family history of seizures or another disease. In cranial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging, there were hyperintense signal changes in bilateral occipital area (more pronounced in the left occipital lobe), right temporal lobe, frontal lobe, and posterior parietal lobe. All tests associated with possible etiologic causes of ischemic stroke in young patients were negative. Herein, we want to attract attention to adverse effect of energy drink usage. PMID:22867827

  3. Developing digital tissue phantoms for hyperspectral imaging of ischemic wounds.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronald X; Allen, David W; Huang, Jiwei; Gnyawali, Surya; Melvin, James; Elgharably, Haytham; Gordillo, Gayle; Huang, Kun; Bergdall, Valerie; Litorja, Maritoni; Rice, Joseph P; Hwang, Jeeseong; Sen, Chandan K

    2012-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has the potential to achieve high spatial resolution and high functional sensitivity for non-invasive assessment of tissue oxygenation. However, clinical acceptance of hyperspectral imaging in ischemic wound assessment is hampered by its poor reproducibility, low accuracy, and misinterpreted biology. These limitations are partially caused by the lack of a traceable calibration standard. We proposed a digital tissue phantom (DTP) platform for quantitative calibration and performance evaluation of spectral wound imaging devices. The technical feasibility of such a DTP platform was demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro DTPs were developed based on a liquid blood phantom model. The in vivo DTPs were developed based on a porcine ischemic skin flap model. The DTPs were projected by a Hyperspectral Image Projector (HIP) with high fidelity. A wide-gap 2nd derivative oxygenation algorithm was developed to reconstruct tissue functional parameters from hyperspectral measurements. In this study, we have demonstrated not only the technical feasibility of using DTPs for quantitative calibration, evaluation, and optimization of spectral imaging devices but also its potential for ischemic wound assessment in clinical practice. PMID:22741088

  4. Protein methionine oxidation augments reperfusion injury in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Blokhin, Ilya O.; Wilson, Katina M.; Dhanesha, Nirav; Doddapattar, Prakash; Grumbach, Isabella M.; Chauhan, Anil K.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Reperfusion injury can exacerbate tissue damage in ischemic stroke, but little is known about the mechanisms linking ROS to stroke severity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that protein methionine oxidation potentiates NF-κB activation and contributes to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. We found that overexpression of methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), an antioxidant enzyme that reverses protein methionine oxidation, attenuated ROS-augmented NF-κB activation in endothelial cells, in part, by protecting against the oxidation of methionine residues in the regulatory domain of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In a murine model, MsrA deficiency resulted in increased NF-κB activation and neutrophil infiltration, larger infarct volumes, and more severe neurological impairment after transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. This phenotype was prevented by inhibition of NF-κB or CaMKII. MsrA-deficient mice also exhibited enhanced leukocyte rolling and upregulation of E-selectin, an endothelial NF-κB–dependent adhesion molecule known to contribute to neurovascular inflammation in ischemic stroke. Finally, bone marrow transplantation experiments demonstrated that the neuroprotective effect was mediated by MsrA expressed in nonhematopoietic cells. These findings suggest that protein methionine oxidation in nonmyeloid cells is a key mechanism of postischemic oxidative injury mediated by NF-κB activation, leading to neutrophil recruitment and neurovascular inflammation in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27294204

  5. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+)-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult. PMID:23533962

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Non-Psychotropic Cannabidiol in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis contains the psychoactive component delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), and the non-psychoactive components cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol, and cannabigerol. It is well-known that delta9-THC and other cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are neuroprotective during global and focal ischemic injury. Additionally, delta9-THC also mediates psychological effects through the activation of the CB1 receptor in the central nervous system. In addition to the CB1 receptor agonists, cannabis also contains therapeutically active components which are CB1 receptor independent. Of the CB1 receptor-independent cannabis, the most important is CBD. In the past five years, an increasing number of publications have focused on the discovery of the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and neuroprotective effects of CBD. In particular, CBD exerts positive pharmacological effects in ischemic stroke and other chronic diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. The cerebroprotective action of CBD is CB1 receptor-independent, long-lasting, and has potent anti-oxidant activity. Importantly, CBD use does not lead to tolerance. In this review, we will discuss the therapeutic possibility of CBD as a cerebroprotective agent, highlighting recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms, and therapeutic time window of CBD in ischemic stroke.

  7. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing. PMID:25102201

  8. Correlation Analysis of Sleep Quality and Youth Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunqing; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Juan; Song, Bo; Fang, Hui; Xu, YuMing

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study risk factors related to ischemic stroke (IS) in youth and the influence of sleep quality on youth ischemic stroke incidence. Methods. 223 patients aged 18 to 45 years who were admitted to Puyang People's Hospital from June 2011 to February 2013 with a first-ever ischemic stroke were selected as the research cases. 158 young people with a normal physical examination were selected as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was used to analyse the correlation between sleep quality and youth IS incidence. The US National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and modified Rankin Scale (MRS) scores were used to assess cases' state of illness and prognosis three months after IS. Results. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the association of these risk factors with youth IS incidence, from highest to lowest, was hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, smoking history, high homocysteine, the quality of sleep, family history of stroke, and alcoholism. Poor sleep quality ranked fifth among all risk factors and was positively correlated with poor prognosis for youth IS patients. Conclusion. The results of this study showed that sleep quality is an important factor in the pathogenesis and prognosis of youth IS. PMID:25161340

  9. Curcumin protects against ischemic spinal cord injury: The pathway effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhua; Wei, Hao; Lin, Meimei; Chen, Chunmei; Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Maobai

    2013-12-25

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been shown to participate in nerve cell injury during spinal cord ischemia. This study observed a protective effect of curcumin on ischemic spinal cord injury. Models of spinal cord ischemia were established by ligating the lumbar artery from the left renal artery to the bifurcation of the abdominal aorta. At 24 hours after model establishment, the rats were intraperitoneally injected with curcumin. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after spinal cord ischemia, inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression significantly increased. However, curcumin significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic spinal cord. Tarlov scale results showed that curcumin significantly improved motor function of the rat hind limb after spinal cord ischemia. The results demonstrate that curcumin exerts a neuroprotective fect against ischemic spinal cord injury by decreasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression. PMID:25206661

  10. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  11. Ginsenoside Rd and ischemic stroke; a short review of literatures☆

    PubMed Central

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Habtemariam, Solomon; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Panax ginseng is a well-known economic medical plant that is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine. This species contains a unique class of natural products—ginsenosides. Recent clinical and experimental studies have presented numerous lines of evidence on the promising role of ginsenosides on different diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and certain types of cancer. Nowadays, most of the attention has focused on ginsenoside Rd as a neuroprotective agent to attenuate ischemic stroke damages. Some of the evidence showed that ginsenoside Rd ameliorates ischemic stroke-induced damages through the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation. Ginsenoside Rd can prolong neural cells' survival through the upregulation of the endogenous antioxidant system, phosphoinositide-3-kinase/AKT and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 pathways, preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential, suppression of the nuclear factor-kappa B, transient receptor potential melastatin, acid sensing ion channels 1a, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, protein tyrosine kinase activation, as well as reduction of cytochrome c-releasing and apoptosis-inducing factor. In the current work, we review the available reports on the promising role of ginsenoside Rd on ischemic stroke. We also discuss its chemistry, source, and the molecular mechanism underlying this effect. PMID:26869821

  12. Early embolic events complicating intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ping Song; Lin, Chien Hung; Chao, Hai Lun; Chao, A Ching

    2012-11-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) is the only established thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, secondary embolism after IV rt-PA for acute ischemic stroke is recognized as an uncommon complication, and the pathophysiology is unclear. We describe a 72-year-old man with acute infarction in the territory of left anterior cerebral artery who developed new infarction in the territory of right middle cerebral artery and acute peripheral arterial occlusion after IV rt-PA therapy. It suggested a central embolic source. Because the patient has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (Af), the possible embolic sources may come from fragmentation of pre-existing intra-atrial clot. Although Af and the presence of cardiac thrombus are not contraindication for IV rt-PA in acute ischemic stroke, our case and review suggested that the administration of IV rt-PA to patients with known Af and intracardiac thrombus could represent a particular risk situation and should be carefully evaluated. PMID:22205004

  13. Risk factors for perioperative ischemic stroke in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Mário Augusto Cray; Gauer, Maria Fernanda; Gomes, Ricardo Zaneti; Schafranski, Marcelo Derbli

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for ischemic stroke in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods From January 2010 to December 2012, 519 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery were analyzed prospectively. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with stroke per and postoperative were allocated in Group GS (n=22) and the other patients in the group CCONTROL (n=497). The following variables were compared between the groups: gender, age, carotid stenosis ≥ 70%, diabetes on insulin, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, peripheral arteriopathy, unstable angina, kidney function, left ventricular function, acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary arterial hypertension, use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Ischemic stroke was defined as symptoms lasting over 24 hours associated with changes in brain computed tomography scan. The variables were compared using Fisher’s exact test, Chi square, Student’s t-test and logistic regression. Results Stroke occurred in 4.2% of patients and the risk factors statistically significant were: carotid stenosis of 70% or more (P=0.03; OR 5.07; IC 95%: 1.35 to 19.02), diabetes on insulin (P=0.04; OR 2.61; IC 95%: 1.10 to 6.21) and peripheral arteriopathy (P=0.03; OR 2.61; 95% CI: 1.08 to 6.28). Conclusion Risk factors for ischemic stroke were carotid stenosis of 70% or more, diabetes on insulin and peripheral arteriopathy. PMID:26313728

  14. Dual targeted nanocarrier for brain ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Jiang, Yan; Lv, Wei; Wang, Zhongyuan; Lv, Lingyan; Wang, Baoyan; Liu, Xin; Liu, Yang; Hu, Quanyin; Sun, Wujin; Xu, Qunwei; Xin, Hongliang; Gu, Zhen

    2016-07-10

    Focal cerebral ischemia, known as stroke, causes serious long-term disabilities globally. Effective therapy for cerebral ischemia demands a carrier that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequently target the ischemia area in brain. Here, we designed a novel neuroprotectant (ZL006) loaded dual targeted nanocarrier based on liposome (T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006) conjugated with T7 peptide (T7) and stroke homing peptide (SHp) for penetrating BBB and targeting ischemia area, respectively. Compared with non-targeting liposomes, T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006 could transport across BCEC cells and significantly enhance cellular uptake and reduce cells apoptosis of excitatory amino acid stimulated PC-12 cells. However, there was no significant difference in cellular uptake between SHp-modified and plain liposomes when PC-12 cells were incubated without excitatory amino acid. Besides, ex vivo fluorescent images indicated that DiR labeled T7&SHp-P-LPs could efficiently transport across BBB and mostly accumulated in ischemic region rather than normal cerebral hemisphere of MCAO rats. Furthermore, T7&SHp-P-LPs/ZL006 could enhance the ability of in vivo anti-ischemic stroke of MCAO rats. These results demonstrated that T7&SHp-P-LPs could be used as a safe and effective dual targeted nanocarrier for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:27142584

  15. Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Therapy Mitigated Ischemic Stroke Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moldthan, Huong L.; Hirko, Aaron C.; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; Grant, Maria; Li, Zhimin; Peris, Joanna; Lu, Yuanqing; Elshikha, Ahmed; King, Michael A.; Hughes, Jeffrey A.; Song, Sihong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the only effective therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the thrombolytic agent recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. α1-Antitrypsin, an endogenous inhibitor of serine proteinases and a primary acute phase protein with potent anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, antimicrobial and cytoprotective activities, could be beneficial in stroke.. The goal of this study was to test whether α1-antitrypsin could improve ischemic stroke outcome in an established rat model. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male rats via intracranial microinjection of endothelin-1. Five to ten minutes following stroke induction rats received either intracranial or intravenous delivery of human α1-antitrypsin. Cylinder and vibrissae tests were used to evaluate sensorimotor function before and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Infarct volumes were examined via either 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride assay or magnetic resonance imaging 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Despite equivalent initial strokes, at 72 hours the infarct volumes of the human α1-antitrypsin treatment groups (local and systemic injection) were statistically significantly reduced by 83% and 63% (p<0.0001 and p < 0.05 respectively) compared with control rats. Human α1-antitrypsin significantly limited sensory motor systems deficits. Human α1-antitrypsin could be a potential novel therapeutic drug for the protection against neurodegeneration following ischemic stroke, but more studies are needed to investigate the protective mechanisms and efficacy in other animal models. PMID:24582784

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for ischemic cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2011-10-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of hospital admissions, with the number of affected patients increasing worldwide. The current management of ischemic heart disease has three major therapeutic options: medication, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, the prognosis for patients with severe ischemic heart disease without indications for PCI or CABG still remains poor due to the lack of effective treatments. It is therefore crucial to develop alternative therapeutic strategies for severe ischemic heart disease. Extracorporeal shock wave (SW) therapy was introduced clinically more than 20 years ago to fragment kidney stones, which has markedly improved the treatment of urolithiasis. We found that a low-energy SW (about 10% of the energy density used for urolithiasis) effectively increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured endothelial cells. Based on this in vitro study, we initiated in vivo studies and have demonstrated that extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy with a low-energy SW up-regulates the expression of VEGF, induces neovascularization, and improves myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia, without any adverse effects in vivo. On the basis of promising results in animal studies, we performed a series of clinical studies in patients with severe coronary artery disease without indication for PCI or CABG, including, firstly, an open trial followed by a placebo-controlled, double-blind study. In both studies, our extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy improved symptoms, exercise capacity, and myocardial perfusion in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Importantly, no procedural complications or adverse effects were noted. The SW therapy was also effective in ameliorating left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in pigs and in enhancing angiogenesis in hind-limb ischemia in

  17. NEUROPROTECTION FOR ISCHEMIC STROKE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Myron D.

    2008-01-01

    Neuroprotection for ischemic stroke refers to strategies, applied singly or in combination, that antagonize the injurious biochemical and molecular events that eventuate in irreversible ischemic injury. There has been a recent explosion of interest in this field, with over 1000 experimental papers and over 400 clinical articles appearing within the past 6 years. These studies, in turn, are the outgrowth of three decades of investigative work to define the multiple mechanisms and mediators of ischemic brain injury, which constitute potential targets of neuroprotection. Rigorously conducted experimental studies in animal models of brain ischemia provide incontrovertible proof-of-principle that high-grade protection of the ischemic brain is an achievable goal. Nonetheless, many agents have been brought to clinical trial without a sufficiently compelling evidence-based pre-clinical foundation. At this writing, around 160 clinical trials of neuroprotection for ischemic stroke have been initiated. Of the approximately 120 completed trials, two-thirds were smaller early-phase safety-feasibility studies. The remaining one-third were typically larger (>200 subjects) phase II or III trials, but, disappointingly, only fewer than one-half of these administered neuroprotective therapy within the 4–6 hour therapeutic window within which efficacious neuroprotection is considered to be achievable. This fact alone helps to account for the abundance of “failed” trials. This review presents a close survey of the most extensively evaluated neuroprotective agents and classes and considers both the strengths and weakness of the pre-clinical evidence as well as the results and shortcomings of the clinical trials themselves. Among the agent-classes considered are calcium channel blockers; glutamate antagonists; GABA agonists; antioxidants/radical scavengers; phospholipid precursor; nitric oxide signal-transduction down-regulator; leukocyte inhibitors; hemodilution; and a miscellany

  18. Ischemic Compression After Trigger Point Injection Affect the Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo A; Oh, Ki Young; Choi, Won Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of trigger point injection with or without ischemic compression in treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Methods Sixty patients with active myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius muscle were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (n=20) received only trigger point injections, group 2 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 30 seconds of ischemic compression, and group 3 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 60 seconds of ischemic compression. The visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold, and range of motion of the neck were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 1 week after treatment. Korean Neck Disability Indexes were assessed before treatment and 1 week after treatment. Results We found a significant improvement in all assessment parameters (p<0.05) in all groups. But, receiving trigger point injections with ischemic compression group showed significant improvement as compared with the receiving only trigger point injections group. And no significant differences between receiving 30 seconds of ischemic compression group and 60 seconds of ischemic compression group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the effectiveness of ischemic compression for myofascial trigger point. Trigger point injections combined with ischemic compression shows better effects on treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle than the only trigger point injections therapy. But the duration of ischemic compression did not affect treatment of myofascial trigger point. PMID:24020035

  19. Association of selenoprotein S gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in a Chinese case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Xia; Guan, Hong-Jun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Guo, Yu-Peng; Yang, Yong; Niu, Ying-Ying; Yao, Li-Yan; Yang, Yin-Dong; Yue, Hong-Yu; Meng, Li-Li; Cui, Xin-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Jin-Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that selenoprotein S (SELS) was associated with a range of inflammatory markers, and its gene expression was influenced by a polymorphism in the promoter region. The genetic basis of the ischemic stroke has now been largely determined, so the aim of the study was to examine the role of SELS genetic variants in the ischemic stroke risk in a Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study with 239 ischemic stroke patients and 240 controls. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SELS genes were analyzed for association with the risk of ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. No evidence of ischemic stroke association was observed with the SNP rs34713741. Interestingly, the strongest evidence showed that SELS SNP rs4965814 was associated with ischemic stroke (P < 0.05). We found a significant association with increased ischemic stroke risk in women carrying the CC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 2.43(1.03-5.75)]; a similar trend was also found in men carrying the TC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 1.81(1.06-3.08)]. SNP rs4965814 of SELS may affect the susceptibility to ischemic stroke. Understanding the inflammatory mechanisms of ischemic stroke may give new therapeutic targets to pharmacologists. PMID:25390504

  20. Effect of Extended CT Perfusion Acquisition Time on Ischemic Core and Penumbra Volume Estimation in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke due to a Large Vessel Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Borst, Jordi; Marquering, Henk A.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; Riordan, Alan J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been suggested that CT Perfusion acquisition times <60 seconds are too short to capture the complete in and out-wash of contrast in the tissue, resulting in incomplete time attenuation curves. Yet, these short acquisitions times are not uncommon in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of time attenuation curve truncation in 48 seconds CT Perfusion acquisition and to quantify its effect on ischemic core and penumbra estimation in patients with acute ischemic stroke due to a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion of the anterior circulation. Materials and Methods We analyzed CT Perfusion data with 48 seconds and extended acquisition times, assuring full time attenuation curves, of 36 patients. Time attenuation curves were classified as complete or truncated. Ischemic core and penumbra volumes resulting from both data sets were compared by median paired differences and interquartile ranges. Controlled experiments were performed using a digital CT Perfusion phantom to investigate the effect of time attenuation curve truncation on ischemic core and penumbra estimation. Results In 48 seconds acquisition data, truncation was observed in 24 (67%) cases for the time attenuation curves in the ischemic core, in 2 cases for the arterial input function and in 5 cases for the venous output function. Analysis of extended data resulted in smaller ischemic cores and larger penumbras with a median difference of 13.2 (IQR: 4.3–26.0)ml (P<0.001) and; 12.4 (IQR: 4.1–25.7)ml (P<0.001), respectively. The phantom data showed increasing ischemic core overestimation with increasing tissue time attenuation curve truncation. Conclusions Truncation is common in patients with large vessel occlusion and results in repartitioning of the area of hypoperfusion into larger ischemic core and smaller penumbra estimations. Phantom experiments confirmed that truncation results in overestimation of the ischemic core. PMID

  1. Bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced tissue protection: Evidences and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Roohani; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-12-01

    Ischemic conditioning is an intrinsic protective mechanism in which repeated short episodes of reversible ischemia protects the tissue and increases its tolerance against a subsequent longer period of ischemia (index ischemia). Bradykinin is a physiologically and pharmacologically active peptide of the kallikrein-kinin system. Besides the involvement of bradykinin in a variety of physiological and pathological responses such as pain, inflammation and in cardiovascular system as a potent vasodilator, it also acts as an endogenous cytoprotective mediator in the ischemic tissue. Pretreatment with various pharmacological modulators of bradykinin has confirmed the involvement of bradykinin in ischemic conditioning-induced protection. The protective actions of bradykinin in three major paradigms of ischemic conditioning i.e. ischemic preconditioning, ischemic postconditioning and remote ischemic preconditioning involves activation and regulation of various endogenous signaling cascades to render the heart resistant to infarction. In ischemic preconditioning, bradykinin exerts cardioprotective effect via activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway and regulation of redox state via NO release. The role of bradykinin and its B2 receptors in ischemic-postconditioning induced neuroprotection has been described mainly due to its increased redox signaling cascade and activation of mitochondrial anti-apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, its cardioprotective role during remote ischemic preconditioning has been associated with activation of B2 receptors mediated neurogenic pathway and internalization of B2 receptors along with the formation of signalosomes that activates intracellular cytoprotective transduction pathways. The present review focuses on the potential role of bradykinin in mediating different forms of ischemic conditioning (pre/post/remote)-induced cardioprotection and neuroprotection along with the possible mechanisms. PMID:26499976

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  3. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research. PMID:25657726

  4. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (∼70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (∼2-fold vs. ∼1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY+/+ mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY+/+ mice, but not NPY−/− mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY−/− mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.—Tilan, J. U., Everhart, L. M., Abe, K., Kuo-Bonde, L., Chalothorn, D., Kitlinska, J., Burnett, M. S., Epstein, S. E., Faber, J. E., Zukowska, Z. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice. PMID:23457218

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute ischemic stroke treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum Joon; Kang, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Kim, Na Young; Warach, Steven; Kang, Dong-Wha

    2014-09-01

    Although intravenous administration of tissue plasminogen activator is the only proven treatment after acute ischemic stroke, there is always a concern of hemorrhagic risk after thrombolysis. Therefore, selection of patients with potential benefits in overcoming potential harms of thrombolysis is of great importance. Despite the practical issues in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for acute stroke treatment, multimodal MRI can provide useful information for accurate diagnosis of stroke, evaluation of the risks and benefits of thrombolysis, and prediction of outcomes. For example, the high sensitivity and specificity of diffusion-weighted image (DWI) can help distinguish acute ischemic stroke from stroke-mimics. Additionally, the lesion mismatch between perfusion-weighted image (PWI) and DWI is thought to represent potential salvageable tissue by reperfusion therapy. However, the optimal threshold to discriminate between benign oligemic areas and the penumbra is still debatable. Signal changes of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery image within DWI lesions may be a surrogate marker for ischemic lesion age and might indicate risks of hemorrhage after thrombolysis. Clot sign on gradient echo image may reflect the nature of clot, and their location, length and morphology may provide predictive information on recanalization by reperfusion therapy. However, previous clinical trials which solely or mainly relied on perfusion-diffusion mismatch for patient selection, failed to show benefits of MRI-based thrombolysis. Therefore, understanding the clinical implication of various useful MRI findings and comprehensively incorporating those variables into therapeutic decision-making may be a more reasonable approach for expanding the indication of acute stroke thrombolysis. PMID:25328872

  6. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Douglas B.; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R.; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K.; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Packard, Alan B.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  7. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Douglas B; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; Del Nido, Pedro J; Packard, Alan B; McCully, James D

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  8. Sex stratified neuronal cultures to study ischemic cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Stacy L; Vest, Rebekah; Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  9. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao; Jin, Zhu-Qiu

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  10. Sex differences in predictors of ischemic stroke: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Globally, stroke is a significant public health concern affecting more than 33 million individuals. Of growing importance are the differences between males and females in the predictors and overall risk of stroke. Given that women have a higher lifetime risk for stoke and account for more than half of all stroke deaths, sex-specific stroke risk factors merit investigation and may help target public health interventions. This review aims to discuss the current body of knowledge regarding sex-specific predictors of ischemic stroke including both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors, as well as specific pathologies known to increase stroke risk. PMID:26251609