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Sample records for islaster paa fundament

  1. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolases and PAA biodegradation: current knowledge and impact on applications.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    Thermally synthesized poly(aspartic acid) (tPAA) is a bio-based, biocompatible, biodegradable, and water-soluble polymer that has a high proportion of β-Asp units and equivalent moles of D- and L-Asp units. Poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) hydrolase-1 and hydrolase-2 are tPAA biodegradation enzymes purified from Gram-negative bacteria. PAA hydrolase-1 selectively cleaves amide bonds between β-Asp units via an endo-type process, whereas PAA hydrolase-2 catalyzes the exo-type hydrolysis of the products of tPAA hydrolysis by PAA hydrolase-1. The novel reactivity of PAA hydrolase-1 makes it a good candidate for a biocatalyst in β-peptide synthesis. This mini-review gives an overview of PAA hydrolases with emphasis on their biochemical and functional properties, in particular, PAA hydrolase-1. Functionally related enzymes, such as poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerases and β-aminopeptidases, are compared to PAA hydrolases. This mini-review also provides findings that offer an insight into the catalytic mechanisms of PAA hydrolase-1 from Pedobacter sp. KP-2. PMID:26695157

  2. Multifunctional ORMOSIL and PAA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anurag; Rao, K. V. R.; Pera, Paula; Wang, Shouyan J.; Missert, Joseph R.; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish; Roy, Indrajit; Morgan, Janet; Prasad, Paras N.; Kopelman, Raoul; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2009-06-01

    Various problems arising during molecular imaging of different fluoroprobes and metabolites used in PDT can be circumvented by focusing on multifunctional therapy agents. Thus an effective photo sensitizer coupled with other useful roles to play in PDT treatment make nanoparticles as a good vehicle for different delivery assuming multifunctional roles not only in PDT but also as therapeutic agents for targeted delivery. A new approach is the involving use of 100 nm NPs as photo sensitizers and/or imaging agents. In our Lab., we employ two such NPs and are ORMOSIL (organically Modified Silica) and PAA (Polyacrylamide) which are found to be biologically very safe without disturbing the therapeutic value. The size of the nanoparticles determined by TEM and Dynamic Light Scattering are ~30 nm. These NPs are taken up in conjunction with cyanine dye at near infra red as it has been reported in literature that encapsulated NPs shows very low singlet oxygen production compared with the post-loaded NPs though the reasons are not yet clear. Therefore, we investigated the idea of post-loading or adsorbing vis-a-vis encapsulation.

  3. NGAP: A (Brief) Update PaaS, IaaS, Onbording, and the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Brett; Pawloski, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    NASA ESDIS has charged the EED2 program with delivering a NASA-compliant, secure, cloud-based platform for application hosting. More than just a move to the cloud, this has forced us to examine all aspects of application hosting, from resource management to system administration, patching to monitoring, deployment to multiple environments. The result of this mandate is NGAP, the NASA General Application Platform. In this presentation, we will also discuss the various applications we are supporting and targeting, and their architectures including NGAPs move to support both PaaS and IaaS architectures.

  4. Dynamic peracetic acid (PAA) exposure, a treatment strategy against ectoparasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The search for alternative therapeutic agents is a difficult and laborious task. The use of peracetic acid (PAA) has recently been evaluated as an alternative compound for disinfection (Gustavino et al., 2005). In addition to having a broad antimicrobial spectrum, PAA does not contribute to the form...

  5. Protein-protein interactions in the β-oxidation part of the phenylacetate utilization pathway: crystal structure of the PaaF-PaaG hydratase-isomerase complex.

    PubMed

    Grishin, Andrey M; Ajamian, Eunice; Zhang, Linhua; Rouiller, Isabelle; Bostina, Mihnea; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2012-11-01

    Microbial anaerobic and so-called hybrid pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds contain β-oxidation-like steps. These reactions convert the product of the opening of the aromatic ring to common metabolites. The hybrid phenylacetate degradation pathway is encoded in Escherichia coli by the paa operon containing genes for 10 enzymes. Previously, we have analyzed protein-protein interactions among the enzymes catalyzing the initial oxidation steps in the paa pathway (Grishin, A. M., Ajamian, E., Tao, L., Zhang, L., Menard, R., and Cygler, M. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 10735-10743). Here we report characterization of interactions between the remaining enzymes of this pathway and show another stable complex, PaaFG, an enoyl-CoA hydratase and enoyl-Coa isomerase, both belonging to the crotonase superfamily. These steps are biochemically similar to the well studied fatty acid β-oxidation, which can be catalyzed by individual monofunctional enzymes, multifunctional enzymes comprising several domains, or enzymatic complexes such as the bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complex. We have determined the structure of the PaaFG complex and determined that although individually PaaF and PaaG are similar to enzymes from the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway, the structure of the complex is dissimilar from bacterial fatty acid β-oxidation complexes. The PaaFG complex has a four-layered structure composed of homotrimeric discs of PaaF and PaaG. The active sites of PaaF and PaaG are adapted to accept the intermediary components of the Paa pathway, different from those of the fatty acid β-oxidation. The association of PaaF and PaaG into a stable complex might serve to speed up the steps of the pathway following the conversion of phenylacetyl-CoA to a toxic and unstable epoxide-CoA by PaaABCE monooxygenase. PMID:22961985

  6. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) to Ichthyophthirius multifiliis theronts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an antimicrobial disinfectant used in agriculture, food processing and medical facilities. It has recently been suggested as a means to control infestations of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of two products contai...

  7. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) to fish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA; also called peroxyacetic acid) is a promising new aquatic disinfectant that has also been used to treat parasites and fungus. It is registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an antimicrobial compound approved for indoor use on hard, non-porous surfaces. T...

  8. PERI-ANESTHESIA ANAPHYLAXIS (PAA): WE STILL HAVE NOT STARTED POST-PAA TESTING FOR INCITING ANESTHESIA-RELATED ALLERGENS.

    PubMed

    Alshaeri, Taghreed; Gupta, Deepak; Nagabhushana, Ananthamurthy

    2016-02-01

    Anaphylaxis during anesthesia is uncommon. Diagnosis of peri-anesthesia anaphylaxis (PAA) requires anesthesia providers' vigilance for prompt diagnosis and treatment. In this case report, we present a challenging case with suspected PAA including its perioperative management, intensive care unit (ICU) course, and post-discharge follow-up. A 44-year-old female (body mass index = 26) presented for elective abdominal panniculectomy. Post-intubation, severe bronchospasm occurred that was non-responsive to nebulized albuterol and intravenous epinephrine. Continuous infusion of epinephrine was initiated. After aborting surgical procedure, the patient was transferred to ICU on continuous intravenous infusion of epinephrine. Venous blood sampling showed elevated troponin level. Echocardiography revealed ejection fraction of 25% suspicious of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (mid cavitary variant). Tracheal extubation was only possible after three days. Subsequently, patient was discharged home with a cardiology follow-up appointment and a referral to an allergy specialist. Unfortunately at our institution (an academic university hospital in United States) along with neighboring institutions in near-by areas, the only allergy skin tests available are for local anesthetics and antibiotics, while neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) cannot be tested (the suspected anaphylactic agent in our case was presumably rocuronium). In summary, PAA requires and responds to emergent diagnosis and immediate treatment; however there is still a long way to go to ensure post-PAA testing for inciting anesthesia-related allergens. PMID:27382817

  9. Electrospinning of Bioactive Dex-PAA Hydrogel Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Katherine Boyook

    In this work, a novel method is developed for making nano- and micro-fibrous hydrogels capable of preventing the rejection of implanted materials. This is achieved by either (1) mimicking the native cellular environment, to exert fine control over the cellular response or (2) acting as a protective barrier, to camouflage the foreign nature of a material and evade recognition by the immune system. Comprehensive characterization and in vitro studies described here provide a foundation for developing substrates for use in clinical applications. Hydrogel dextran and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) fibers are formed via electrospinning, in sizes ranging from nanometers to microns in diameter. While "as-electrospun" fibers are continuous in length, sonication is used to fragment fibers into short fiber "bristles" and generate nano- and micro- fibrous surface coatings over a wide range of topographies. Dex-PAA fibrous surfaces are chemically modified, and then optimized and characterized for non-fouling and ECM-mimetic properties. The non-fouling nature of fibers is verified, and cell culture studies show differential responses dependent upon chemical, topographical and mechanical properties. Dex-PAA fibers are advantageously unique in that (1) a fine degree of control is possible over three significant parameters critical for modifying cellular response: topography, chemistry and mechanical properties, over a range emulating that of native cellular environments, (2) the innate nature of the material is non-fouling, providing an inert background for adding back specific bioactive functionality, and (3) the fibers can be applied as a surface coating or comprise the scaffold itself. This is the first reported work of dex-PAA hydrogel fibers formed via electrospinning and thermal cross-linking, and unique to this method, no toxic solvents or cross-linking agents are needed to create hydrogels or for surface attachment. This is also the first reported work of using sonication to

  10. PAA/PEO comb polymer effects on the rheological property evolution in concentrated cement suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Glen Harold

    We have studied the behavior of polyelectrolyte-based comb polymers in dilute solution and on the rheological property evolution of concentrated Portland cement suspensions. These species consisted of charge-neutral, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) "teeth" grafted onto a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) "backbone" that contains one ionizable carboxylic acid group (COOH) per monomer unit. As a benchmark, our observations were compared to those obtained for pure cement pastes and systems containing pure polyelectrolyte species, i.e., sulfonated naphthalene formaldehyde (SNF) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The behavior of PAA/PEO comb polymers, SNF, and PAA in dilute solution was studied as a function of pH in the absence and presence of mono-, di-, and trivalent counterions. Light scattering and turbidity measurements were carried out to assess their hydrodynamic radius and stability in aqueous solution, respectively. PAA experienced large conformational changes as a function of solution pH and ionic strength. Moreover, dilute solutions of ionized SNF and PAA species became unstable in the presence of multivalent counterions due to ion-bridging interactions. PAA/PEO solutions exhibited enhanced stability relative to pure polyelectrolytes under analogous conditions. The charge neutral PEO teeth shielded the underlying PAA backbone from ion-bridging interactions. In addition, such species hindered conformational changes in solution due to steric interactions between adjacent teeth. A new oscillatory shear technique was developed to probe the rheological property evolution of concentrated cement systems. The rheological property evolution of ordinary and white Portland cement systems were studied in the absence and presence of pure polyelectrolytes and PAA/PEO comb polymers with a wide range of PAA backbone molecular weight, PEO teeth molecular weight, and acid:imide ratio. Cement-PAA suspensions experienced rapid irreversible stiffening and set at 6 min due to ion

  11. High strain-rate response of injectable PAA hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Ru; Wang, Shih-Han; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Juang, Yun-Ching; Yu, Fu-Ann; Tsai, Liren

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogel materials have been widely considered as potential soft tissue replacements because of their high permeability, hydrophilicity, and biocompatibility, as well as their low coefficient of friction. Injectable (thermo-responsive) hydrogels can provide support and cushioning at irregularly shaped disease sites, and are thus suitable for use in treating osteoarthritis or degenerative disc disease. However, while some injectable hydrogels have been proven to sustain human body weight during daily activities, their mechanical properties under harsh dynamic conditions have not been well documented. A specified injectable polyacrylic acid (PAA) hydrogel was prepared for this study. To simulate sudden impacts or unexpected shocks to the PAA hydrogel, the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique was utilized. The dynamic responses of various hydrogels at confined high strain rates (100-2590 s(-1)) were presented. Hydrogel specimens with 3.37, 6.75, and 13.5% acrylic acid (AAc) concentrations were tested in the following three different material conditions: raw, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) swollen, and PBS swollen with elevated temperature (37 °C). The dynamic bulk moduli of the hydrogels varied from 1.55 to 47.8 MPa depending on the given hydrogel's AAc concentration and swollen condition. PMID:25816201

  12. Investigations of PAA degradation in aqueous solutions: Impacts of water hardness, salinity and DOC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is used in aquaculture under various conditions for disinfection purposes. However, there is lack of information about its environmental fate. Therefore, the impact of water hardness, salinity, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on PAA-degradation within 5 hours was investigat...

  13. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid (PAA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The disinfection behaviour of peracetic acid (PAA) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) was investigated. Peracetic acid is a strong oxidizing agent found in various concentrations in different products. Three Wofasteril PAA products (E400 (c), Lspecical; AC 150) were tested in vitro for the...

  14. Sanitizing with peracetic acid (PAA)- An alternative treatment to use in aquaculture ...?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the lack of approved treatments for fish disease, disinfectants were tested to treat fish pathogens. One of these substances is peracetic acid (PAA). PAA is an agent used for disinfection in aquaculture, but it must be investigated thoroughly in order to mitigate diseases without harmful ...

  15. Human mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast differentiation, ECM deposition, and biomineralization on PAH/PAA polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Pattabhi, Sudhakara Rao; Lehaf, Ali M; Schlenoff, Joseph B; Keller, Thomas C S

    2015-05-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMU) coatings built layer by layer with alternating pairs of polyelectrolytes can be tuned to improve cell interactions with surfaces and may be useful as biocompatible coatings to improve fixation between implants and tissues. Here, we show that human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) induced with bone differentiation medium (BDM) to become osteoblasts biomineralize crosslinked PEMUs built with the polycation poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and the polyanion poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). Degrees of hMSC osteoblast differentiation and surface biomineralization on the smooth PAH-terminated PEMUs (PAH-PEMUs) and microstructured PAA-terminated PEMUs (PAA-PEMUs) reflect differences in cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM). BDM-induced hMSCs expressed higher levels of the early osteoblast differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase and collagen 1 (COL1) sooner on PAA-PEMUs than on PAH-PEMUs. Cells on both types of PEMUs proceeded to express the later stage osteoblast differentiation marker bone sialoprotein (BSP), but the BDM-induced cells organized a more amorphous Collagen I and denser BSP localization on PAA-PEMUs than on PAH-PEMUs. These ECM properties correlated with greater biomineralization on the PAA-PEMUs than on PAH-PEMUs. Together, these results confirm the suitability of PAH/PAA PEMUs as a substrate for hMSC osteogenesis and highlight the importance of substrate effects on ECM organization and BSP presentation on biomineralization. PMID:25203301

  16. PAA: an R/bioconductor package for biomarker discovery with protein microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Turewicz, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Eisenacher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The R/Bioconductor package Protein Array Analyzer (PAA) facilitates a flexible analysis of protein microarrays for biomarker discovery (esp., ProtoArrays). It provides a complete data analysis workflow including preprocessing and quality control, uni- and multivariate feature selection as well as several different plots and results tables to outline and evaluate the analysis results. As a main feature, PAA’s multivariate feature selection methods are based on recursive feature elimination (e.g. SVM-recursive feature elimination, SVM-RFE) with stability ensuring strategies such as ensemble feature selection. This enables PAA to detect stable and reliable biomarker candidate panels. Availability and implementation: PAA is freely available (BSD 3-clause license) from http://www.bioconductor.org/packages/PAA/. Contact: michael.turewicz@rub.de or martin.eisenacher@rub.de PMID:26803161

  17. Cloning and expression of the porcine attaching and effacing-associated (paa) gene of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pereira, D A; Teixeira Florian, E C; Ono, M A; Rossi, C Nachi; Vidotto, O; Vidotto, M C

    2015-01-01

    Porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (PEPEC) produce an outer membrane protein (intimin) called Paa (porcine attaching and effacing-associated), which is involved in the pathogenesis of E. coli in piglets with diarrhea. The paa gene of a PEPEC strain isolated in Paraná, Brazil, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and cloned into the pTrcHisTOPO2 vector. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by the paa gene of PEPEC from Paraná, Brazil, showed 99% homology to the sequences from other PEPEC strains. In this study, the overexpression of recombinant Paa (rPaa) using alternative induction strategies was attempted. The auto-induction protocol showed excellent results for rPaa protein production with 0.4% (w/v) lactose. The rPaa protein is insoluble and was purified with Triton X-100 wash as a total antigen. This method produced a relatively high yield of rPaa. rPaa was recognized by serum from pigs immunized with the PEPEC strain. These results suggest that rPaa could be included in the development of a vaccine against swine colibacillosis. PMID:26345788

  18. Pre/post-strike atmospheric assessment system (PAAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peglow, S. G., LLNL; Molitoris, J. D., LLNL

    1997-02-03

    The Pre/Post-Strike Atmospheric Assessment System was proposed to show the importance of local meteorological conditions in the vicinity of a site suspected of storing or producing toxic agents and demonstrate a technology to measure these conditions, specifically wind fields. The ability to predict the collateral effects resulting from an attack on a facility containing hazardous materials is crucial to conducting effective military operations. Our study approach utilized a combination of field measurements with dispersion modeling to better understand which variables in terrain and weather were most important to collateral damage predictions. To develop the PAAS wind-sensing technology, we utilized a combination of emergent and available technology from micro-Doppler and highly coherent laser systems. The method used for wind sensing is to probe the atmosphere with a highly coherent laser beam. As the beam probes, light is back-scattered from particles entrained in the air to the lidar transceiver and detected by the instrument. Any motion of the aerosols with a component along the beam axis leads to a Doppler shift of the received light. Scanning in a conical fashion about the zenith results in a more accurate and two-dimensional measurement of the wind velocity. The major milestones in the benchtop system development were to verify the design by demonstrating the technique in the laboratory, then scale the design down to a size consistent with a demonstrator unit which could be built to take data in the field. The micro-Doppler heterodyne system we developed determines absolute motion by optically mixing a reference beam with the return signal and has shown motion sensitivity to better than 1 cm/s. This report describes the rationale, technical approach and laboratory testing undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of a system to provide local meteorological data and predict atmospheric particulate motion. The work described herein was funded by

  19. Marketing fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined. PMID:11401791

  20. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, ?. For example, the standard model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers or scales? they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as ?, c, G, e and k ?, are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense, only dimensionless constants are 'fundamental'. Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental 'constants' of nature is operationally well defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as ? or ? on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might disagree depending on their apparatus. All these confusions disappear if one asks only unit-independent questions. We provide a selection of opposing opinions in the literature and respond accordingly.

  1. Involvement of the TetR-Type Regulator PaaR in the Regulation of Pristinamycin I Biosynthesis through an Effect on Precursor Supply in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yawei; Feng, Rongrong; Zheng, Guosong; Tian, Jinzhong; Ruan, Lijun; Ge, Mei; Jiang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pristinamycin I (PI), produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, is a streptogramin type B antibiotic, which contains two proteinogenic and five aproteinogenic amino acid precursors. PI is coproduced with pristinamycin II (PII), a member of streptogramin type A antibiotics. The PI biosynthetic gene cluster has been cloned and characterized. However, thus far little is understood about the regulation of PI biosynthesis. In this study, a TetR family regulator (encoded by SSDG_03033) was identified as playing a positive role in PI biosynthesis. Its homologue, PaaR, from Corynebacterium glutamicum serves as a transcriptional repressor of the paa genes involved in phenylacetic acid (PAA) catabolism. Herein, we also designated the identified regulator as PaaR. Deletion of paaR led to an approximately 70% decrease in PI production but had little effect on PII biosynthesis. Identical to the function of its homologue from C. glutamicum, PaaR is also involved in the suppression of paa expression. Given that phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) is the common intermediate of the PAA catabolic pathway and the biosynthetic pathway of l-phenylglycine (l-Phg), the last amino acid precursor for PI biosynthesis, we proposed that derepression of the transcription of paa genes in a ΔpaaR mutant possibly diverts more PA-CoA to the PAA catabolic pathway, thereby with less PA-CoA metabolic flux toward l-Phg formation, thus resulting in lower PI titers. This hypothesis was verified by the observations that PI production of a ΔpaaR mutant was restored by l-Phg supplementation as well as by deletion of the paaABCDE operon in the ΔpaaR mutant. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the regulation of PI biosynthesis by S. pristinaespiralis. IMPORTANCE A better understanding of the regulation mechanisms for antibiotic biosynthesis will provide valuable clues for Streptomyces strain improvement. Herein, a TetR family regulator PaaR, which serves as the repressor of the

  2. Acute toxicity of peracetic acid (PAA) formulations to Ichthyophthirius multifiliis theronts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is an antimicrobial disinfectant used in agriculture, food processing and medical facilities. It has recently been suggested as a means to control infestations of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. The purpose of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of two products contai...

  3. Microbial reduction in wastewater treatment using Fe(3+) and Al(3+) coagulants and PAA disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Surendra K; Kauppinen, Ari; Martikainen, Kati; Pitkänen, Tarja; Kusnetsov, Jaana; Miettinen, Ilkka T; Pessi, Matti; Poutiainen, Hannu; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi

    2013-12-01

    Wastewater is an important source of pathogenic enteric microorganisms in surface water and a major contaminating agent of drinking water. Although primary and secondary wastewater treatments reduce the numbers of microorganisms in wastewater, significant numbers of microbes can still be present in the effluent. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of tertiary treatment for municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) using PIX (FeCl3) or PAX (AlCl3) coagulants and peracetic acid (PAA) the disinfectant to reduce microbial load in effluent. Our study showed that both PIX and PAX efficiently reduced microbial numbers. PAA disinfection greatly reduced the numbers of culturable indicator microorganisms (Escherichia coli, intestinal enterococci, F-specific RNA coliphages and somatic DNA coliphages). In addition, pathogenic microorganisms, thermotolerant Campylobacter, Salmonella and norovirus GI, were successfully reduced using the tertiary treatments. In contrast, clostridia, Legionella, rotavirus, norovirus GII and adenovirus showed better resistance against PAA compared to the other microorganisms. However, interpretation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis results will need further studies to clarify the infectivity of the pathogenic microbes. In conclusion, PIX and PAX flocculants followed by PAA disinfectant can be used as a tertiary treatment for municipal WWTP effluents to reduce the numbers of indicator and pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:24334832

  4. In vivo kinetic analysis of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway using PAA stimulus response experiments.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Amit T; Verheijen, Peter J T; Maleki Seifar, Reza; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2015-11-01

    In this study we combined experimentation with mathematical modeling to unravel the in vivo kinetic properties of the enzymes and transporters of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway in a high yielding Penicillium chrysogenum strain. The experiment consisted of a step response experiment with the side chain precursor phenyl acetic acid (PAA) in a glucose-limited chemostat. The metabolite data showed that in the absence of PAA all penicillin pathway enzymes were expressed, leading to the production of a significant amount of 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6APA) as end product. After the stepwise perturbation with PAA, the pathway produced PenG within seconds. From the extra- and intracellular metabolite measurements, hypotheses for the secretion mechanisms of penicillin pathway metabolites were derived. A dynamic model of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway was then constructed that included the formation and transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of pathway intermediates, PAA and the product penicillin-G (PenG). The model parameters and changes in the enzyme levels of the penicillin biosynthesis pathway under in vivo conditions were simultaneously estimated using experimental data obtained at three different timescales (seconds, minutes, hours). The model was applied to determine changes in the penicillin pathway enzymes in time, calculate fluxes and analyze the flux control of the pathway. This led to a reassessment of the in vivo behavior of the pathway enzymes and in particular Acyl-CoA:Isopenicillin N Acyltransferase (AT). PMID:26476338

  5. Crystal structure of phenylacetic acid degradation protein PaaG from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Kichise, Tomoyasu; Hisano, Tamao; Takeda, Kazuki; Miki, Kunio

    2009-09-01

    Microbial degradation of phenylacetic acid proceeds via the hybrid pathway that includes formation of a coenzyme A thioester, ring hydroxylation, non-oxygenolytic ring opening, and beta-oxidation-like reactions. A phenylacetic acid degradation protein PaaG is a member of the crotonase superfamily, and is a candidate non-oxygenolytic ring-opening enzyme. The crystal structure of PaaG from Thermus thermophilus HB8 was determined at a resolution of 1.85 A. PaaG consists of three identical subunits related by local three-fold symmetry. The monomer is comprised of a spiral and a helical domain with a fold characteristic of the crotonase superfamily. A putative active site residue, Asp136, is situated in an active site cavity and surrounded by several hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues. The active site cavity is sufficiently large to accommodate a ring substrate. Two conformations are observed for helix H2 located adjacent to the active site. Helix H2 is kinked at Asn81 in two subunits, whereas it is kinked at Leu77 in the other subunit, and the side chain of Tyr80 is closer to Asp136. This indicates that catalytic reaction of PaaG may proceed with large conformational changes at the active site. Asp136 is the only conserved polar residue in the active site. It is located at the same position as those of 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA dehalogenase and peroxisomal Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase, indicating that PaaG may undergo isomerization or a ring-opening reaction via a Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase-like mechanism. PMID:19452559

  6. Bio-inspired self-cleaning PAAS hydrogel released coating for marine antifouling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lili; Lu, Xili; Wei, Huan; Long, Ping; Xu, Jina; Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an antifouling hydrogel coating of slippery hydrogel-released hydrous surface (SHRHS) with the self-cleaning ability of oil-resistance and self-regeneration characters was designed. A physical blending method of loading Sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) powder into the organic silicon resin was employed to prepare the SHRHS coating. The oil-resistance of the intact and scratch SHRHS coatings was performed by time-sequence images of washing dyed beef tallow stain away. The results showed that the SHRHS coating has the greater ability of stain removal. The concentration of Na+ ions released from PAAS hydrogel on the surface of the SHRHS coating was investigated by ion chromatograph (IC). The results revealed that the coating had the ability of self-regeneration by PAAS hydrogel continuously peeling. The biomass of two marine microalgae species, Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula climacospheniae Booth attached on the SHRHS was investigated using UV-Visible Spectrophotometer (UV) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the microalgaes attached a significantly lower numbers on the SHRHS in comparison with the organic silicon coating. In order to confirm the antifouling ability of the SHRHS coating, the field trials were carried out for 12weeks. It showed that the SHRHS may provide an effective attachment resistance to reduce biofouling. PMID:24594048

  7. Chemical Analysis and Aqueous Solution Properties of Charged Amphiphilic Block Copolymers PBA-b-PAA Synthesized by MADIX

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquin,M.; Muller, P.; Talingting-Pabalan, R.; Cottet, H.; Berret, J.; Futterer, T.; Theodoly, O.

    2007-01-01

    We have linked the structural and dynamic properties in aqueous solution of amphiphilic charged diblock copolymers poly(butyl acrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid), PBA-b-PAA, synthesized by controlled radical polymerization, with the physico-chemical characteristics of the samples. Despite product imperfections, the samples self-assemble in melt and aqueous solutions as predicted by monodisperse microphase separation theory. However, the PBA core are abnormally large; the swelling of PBA cores is not due to AA (the Flory parameter ?PBA/PAA, determined at 0.25, means strong segregation), but to h-PBA homopolymers (content determined by liquid chromatography at the point of exclusion and adsorption transition, LC-PEAT). Beside the dominant population of micelles detected by scattering experiments, capillary electrophoresis CE analysis permitted detection of two other populations, one of h-PAA, and the other of free PBA-b-PAA chains, that have very short PBA blocks and never self-assemble. Despite the presence of these free unimers, the self-assembly in solution was found out of equilibrium: the aggregation state is history dependant and no unimer exchange between micelles occurs over months (time-evolution SANS). The high PBA/water interfacial tension, measured at 20 mN/m, prohibits unimer exchange between micelles. PBA-b-PAA solution systems are neither at thermal equilibrium nor completely frozen systems: internal fractionation of individual aggregates can occur.

  8. Synthesis and high-efficiency methylene blue adsorption of magnetic PAA/MnFe2O4 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Zui; Cai, Minhan; Jian, Haitao; Zeng, Zhiqiao; Li, Feng; Liu, J. Ping

    2015-08-01

    MnFe2O4 nanoparticles and polyacrylic acid PAA/MnFe2O4 nanocomposites were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and ultrasonic mixing process. The obtained materials were characterized by XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, and VSM. XRD patterns indicate that the synthesized MnFe2O4 nanoparticles have a single cubic spinel phase. SEM images confirm the existence of three types of basic morphology of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles: octahedral, flower-like, and plate-like particles. High saturation magnetization Ms (up to 74.6 emu/g) of the as-synthesized MnFe2O4 nanoparticles was obtained. Experiments demonstrate that the variation of the hydrothermal reaction time does not remarkably affect the magnetic properties of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. In PAA/MnFe2O4 nanocomposites, the coating of PAA leads to a slight decrease in magnetization of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles. Additionally, PAA coating greatly enhances the adsorption properties of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles for Methylene Blue (MB) dye. Especially, the removal efficiency reaches 96.3%. This research indicates that the as-synthesized PAA/MnFe2O4 nanocomposites exhibit excellent magnetic properties and can be taken as a promising adsorbent for removal of MB dye in industrial scale.

  9. Coupling High-Energy Radiography And Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) To Optimize The Characterization Of Nuclear Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Carrel, F.; Agelou, M.; Gmar, M.; Laine, F.; Lamotte, T.; Lazaro, D.; Poumarede, B.; Rattoni, B.

    2009-12-02

    Radiological characterization of nuclear waste packages is an industrial issue in order to select the best mode of storage. The alpha-activity, mainly due to the presence of actinides ({sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu,...) inside the package, is one of the most important parameter to assess during the characterization. Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) is a non-destructive active method (NDA method) based on the photofission process and on the detection of delayed particles (neutrons and gammas). This technique is well-adapted to the characterization of large concrete waste packages. However, PAA methods often require a simulation step which is necessary to analyze experimental results and to quantify the global mass of actinides. The weak point of this approach is that characteristics of the package are often not well-known, these latter having a huge impact on the final simulation result. High-energy radiography, based on the use of a linear electron accelerator (LINAC), allows to visualize the content of the package and is also a performing way to tune simulation models and to optimize the characterization process by PAA. In this article, we present high-energy radiography results obtained for two different large concrete waste packages in the SAPHIR facility (Active Photon and Irradiation System). This facility is dedicated to PAA study and development and setup for a decade in CEA Saclay. We also discuss possibilities offered by the coupling between high-energy radiography and PAA techniques.

  10. Liquid crystal-based glucose biosensor functionalized with mixed PAA and QP4VP brushes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Park, Soo-Young

    2015-06-15

    4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB) in a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid was developed for glucose detection by coating with a monolayer of mixed polymer brushes using poly(acrylicacid-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4'-oxyundecylacrylate) (PAA-b-LCP) and quaternized poly(4-vinylpyridine-b-4-cynobiphenyl-4'-oxyundecylacrylate) (QP4VP-b-LCP) (LCP stands for liquid crystal polymer) at the 5CB/aqueous interface. The resultant 5CB in TEM grid was functionalized with the PAA and QP4VP brushes, which were strongly anchored by the LCP block. The PAA brush rendered the 5CB/aqueous interface pH-responsive and the QP4VP brush immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) through electrostatic interactions without the aid of coupling agents. The glucose was detected through a homeotropic-to-planar orientational transition of the 5CB observed through a polarized optical microscope (POM) under crossed polarizers. The optimum immobilization with a 0.78 µM GOx solution on the dual-brush-coated TEM grid enabled glucose detection at concentrations higher than 0.5 mM with response times shorter than 180 s. This TEM grid glucose sensor provided a linear response of birefringence of the 5CB to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 11 mM with a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 1.67 mM. This new and sensitive glucose biosensor has the advantages of low production cost, simple enzyme immobilization, high enzyme sensitivity and stability, and easy detection with POM, and may be useful for prescreening the glucose level in the human body. PMID:25617751

  11. Grafting mechanism of electrochromic PAA-WO{sub 3} composite film

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, J.H.; Kim, Y.I.; Kim, B.W.; Campet, G.; Portier, J.; Huong, P.V.

    1999-02-01

    A micro-Raman spectroscopic study has been carried out to investigate the electrochromic process in a porous and nanocrystalline tungsten oxide film. The film was prepared by dipping the tin-doped indium oxide glass into an aqueous mixture solution of PAA (polyacrylic acid) and WO{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}OH. After heating at low temperature, around 100 C, the film was treated in 1 N HCl in order to achieve polycondensation, where the ammonium ion was replaced with a proton. In the micro-Raman spectra for the bleached and colored PAA-WO{sub 3} films, it was evident that the coloration accompanies a peak reduction at {approximately}960 cm{sup {minus}1} and a peak enhancement at {approximately}810 cm{sup {minus}1}. Based upon the present Raman observation, the authors can confirm that the electrochromism of the nanocrystalline tungsten oxide is dominated by the grafting process, i.e., the surface modification of {single_bond}W{sup VI}{double_bond}O bonds into {single_bond}W{sup V}{double_bond}O{sup (1{minus}{delta})+}{emdash}M{sup {delta}+} (M = H, Li) ones.

  12. Hygienisierung in der Fischzucht mittels Per-essigsäure (Disinfection of water with PAA: State of the investigations)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are very few therapeutic agents against aquaculture ectoparasites in Germany. Peracetic Acid (PAA) has been referred to as the best disinfective agent in the world, but it has not been used much here in aquaculture. We currently use this compound in ‘treatment crisis’ situations because ther...

  13. Nanoparticle Loading Induced Morphological Transitions and Size Fractionation of Coassemblies from PS-b-PAA with Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Mao, Jun; Xue, Yanhu; Zhao, Ziliang; Zhang, Haishan; Ji, Xiangling

    2016-08-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles play a very important role in the fabrication and regulation of desirable hybrid structures with block copolymers. In this study, polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS48-b-PAA67) and oleic acid-capped CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) are coassembled in tetrahydrofuran (THF) through gradual water addition. QDs are incorporated into the hydrophilic PAA blocks because of the strong coordination between PAA blocks and the surface of QDs. Increasing the weight fraction of QDs (ω = 0-0.44) leads to morphological transitions from hybrid spherical micelles to large compound micelles (LCMs) and then to bowl-shaped structures. The coassembly process is monitored using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Formation mechanism of different morphologies is further proposed in which the PAA blocks bridging QDs manipulates the polymer chain mobility and the resulting morphology. Furthermore, the size and size distribution of assemblies serving as drug carriers will influence the circulation time, organ distribution and cell entry pathway of assemblies. Therefore, it is important to prepare or isolate assemblies with monodisperse or narrow size distribution for biomedical applications. Here, the centrifugation and membrane filtration techniques are applied to fractionate polydisperse coassemblies, and the results indicate that both techniques provide effective size fractionation. PMID:27447738

  14. Salinity, water hardness, and dissolved organic carbon modulate degradation of peracetic acid (PAA) compounds in aqueous solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is used in aquaculture under different conditions for disinfection purposes. However, there is a lack of information about its environmental fate, particularly its persistence in aquatic systems with different chemistries. Therefore, the impact of water hardness, salinity, and d...

  15. Microfluidic formation of pH responsive 5CB droplets decorated with PAA-b-LCP.

    PubMed

    Khan, Waliullah; Choi, Jin Ho; Kim, Gyu Man; Park, Soo-Young

    2011-10-21

    We are reporting for the first time the pH responsiveness of liquid crystal (LC) microdroplets decorated with an amphiphilic block copolymer of PAA-b-LCP. We successfully demonstrated the adsorption of block copolymer on LC droplets by fluorescence microscopy and pH response to the radial-to-bipolar orientational change of the LC droplets by changing pH from 12 to 2 through the polarized optical microscope (POM). We believe that our results may pave the way for the generation of monodisperse droplets decorated by various amphiphilic block copolymers which respond to several kinds of the external stimuli. These developments may be important for potential applications of the LC droplets in sensing and encapsulation fields. PMID:21874196

  16. Synthesis and self-assembly of PAMAM/PAA Janus dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chunmei; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Zhang, Xinjie; Chen, Yuanmou

    2014-03-01

    Janus dendrimers have two differently functionalized segments which are located on opposite sides. They have many excellent properties and broad application prospects. In this study, poly(amido amine)/poly(acrylic acid) (PAMAM/PAA) Janus dendrimers were prepared by click chemistry. One of the first steps taken was the synthesis of N-Boc-G3.0 PAMAM dendrimers with primary amine groups at the periphery. Second, by amide coupling between propargylic acid and N-Boc-G3.0 PAMAM, PAMAM dendrimers with alkyne were successfully synthesized. After being dissolved in aqueous solutions with different pH, Janus dendrimers spontaneously form flowerlike micellar, Janus particles, and spherical micelles due to primary amino, tertiary amino, and carboxyl groups in the dendrimers. This self-assembly behavior depending on pH changes has a number of potential applications in the field of materials.

  17. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  18. Covalently-layers of PVA and PAA and in situ formed Ag nanoparticles as versatile antimicrobial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fragal, Vanessa H; Cellet, Thelma S P; Pereira, Guilherme M; Fragal, Elizângela H; Costa, Marco Antonio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Asefa, Tewodros; Rubira, Adley F; Silva, Rafael

    2016-10-01

    The in situ synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) within covalently-modified poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films possessing ultra-thin layer of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is successfully demonstrated. The resulting polymeric films are shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities toward Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and fungus (Candida albicans). To make the films, first PET surfaces were subject to photo-oxidation and subsequent solid-state grafting to attach a PVA layer, followed by a PAA layer. To synthesize the AgNPs inside the films, the PVA and PAA-modified PET was soaked in AgNO3 solution and the polymeric film was modified with the Ag(+) ions via Ag(+)-carboxylate interaction, and then the Ag(+) ions-containing polymer film was subject to either photo-reduction or thermal reduction processes. The PVA and PAA thin layers attached by covalent bonds to the PET surface uniquely promoted not only the in situ synthesis but also the stabilization of AgNPs. The formation of the AgNPs was confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy or by monitoring the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak associated with AgNPs. The resulting PVA and PAA ultrathin layers modified and AgNPs containing PET served as bactericide and fungicide, inhibiting the growth of bacteria and fungi on the surfaces. Given PET's versatility and common use in many commercial processes, the method can be used for producing plastic surfaces with versatile antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. PMID:27196366

  19. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two variants of the Escherichia coli O157 ParE2-PaaA2 toxin-antitoxin complex.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Yann G J; Haesaerts, Sarah; Van Melderen, Laurence; Loris, Remy

    2014-09-01

    The paaR2-paaA2-parE2 operon is a three-component toxin-antitoxin module encoded in the genome of the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157. The toxin (ParE2) and antitoxin (PaaA2) interact to form a nontoxic toxin-antitoxin complex. In this paper, the crystallization and preliminary characterization of two variants of the ParE2-PaaA2 toxin-antitoxin complex are described. Selenomethionine-derivative crystals of the full-length ParE2-PaaA2 toxin-antitoxin complex diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P41212 (or P43212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 90.5, c = 412.3 Å. It was previously reported that the full-length ParE2-PaaA2 toxin-antitoxin complex forms a higher-order oligomer. In contrast, ParE2 and PaaA213-63, a truncated form of PaaA2 in which the first 12 N-terminal residues of the antitoxin have been deleted, form a heterodimer as shown by analytical gel filtration, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. Crystals of the PaaA213-63-ParE2 complex diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6122 (or P6522), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.6, c = 185.6 Å. PMID:25195911

  1. Pervaporation separation of binary organic-aqueous liquid mixtures using crosslinked PVA membranes. I. Characterization of the reaction between PVA and PAA

    SciTech Connect

    Jiwon Rhim; Kewho Lee . Membranes and Separation Lab.); Minyoung Sohn; Hyeokjong Joo . Dept. of Polymer Science and Engineering)

    1993-10-20

    For the purpose of the water-selective membrane material development for pervaporation separation, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was crosslinked with a low molecular weight of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). The crosslinking reactions between PVA and PAA were characterized through IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests when varying the reaction conditions, that is, time, temperature, amounts of cross-linking agents, PAA. It was found that the crosslinking reaction was fast: in other words, that the reaction mainly occurred at the initial step of each reaction condition. The best reaction conditions for preparing the crosslinked PVA membranes were found to be: reaction time not over 1 h, reaction temperature in the range of 150-180 C. PAA contents of 15-20 wt% were found satisfactory with respect to the application areas.

  2. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  3. The ParE2–PaaA2 toxin–antitoxin complex from Escherichia coli O157 forms a heterodocecamer in solution and in the crystal

    PubMed Central

    Sterckx, Yann G. J.; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Haesaerts, Sarah; Jové, Thomas; Geerts, Lieselotte; Sakellaris, Viktor; Van Melderen, Laurence; Loris, Remy

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 paaR2-paaA2-parE2 constitutes a unique three-component toxin–antitoxin (TA) module encoding a toxin (ParE2) related to the classic parDE family but with an unrelated antitoxin called PaaA2. The complex between PaaA2 and ParE2 was purified and characterized by analytical gel filtration, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. It consists of a particle with a radius of gyration of 3.95 nm and is likely to form a heterododecamer. Crystals of the ParE2–PaaA2 complex diffract to 3.8 Å resolution and belong to space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.9, c = 87.5 Å. The asymmetric unit is consistent with a particle of around 125 kDa, which is compatible with the solution data. Therefore, the ParE2–PaaA2 complex is the largest toxin–antitoxin complex identified to date and its quaternary arrangement is likely to be of biological significance. PMID:22684081

  4. Kinetics of temperature response of PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA triblock terpolymer aggregates and of their complexes with lysozyme

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Papagiannopoulos, Aristeidis; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Hong, Kunlun; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-12-18

    We present the kinetics of temperature response of a PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA triblock terpolymer and of its complexes with lysozyme in aqueous solution. It is found that during the coil-to-globule transition of PNIPAM new bonds within the polymer aggregates are created, making the transition of the aggregates partially irreversible. This effect is also found for the protein loaded PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA aggregates whereas in this case protein globules appear to enhance the formation of bonds, making the transition totally irreversible. The internal dynamics of both aggregates and complexes are “frozen” once the temperature is increased upon PINIPAM's LCST in water and remain so evenmore » when the temperature drops below LCST. As a result, we investigate the complexation kinetics of lysozyme and PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA and observe that it occurs in two stages, one where protein globules adsorb on single pre-formed aggregates and one where protein globules cause inter-aggregate clustering.« less

  5. Kinetics of temperature response of PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA triblock terpolymer aggregates and of their complexes with lysozyme

    SciTech Connect

    Papagiannopoulos, Aristeidis; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Hong, Kunlun; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-12-18

    We present the kinetics of temperature response of a PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA triblock terpolymer and of its complexes with lysozyme in aqueous solution. It is found that during the coil-to-globule transition of PNIPAM new bonds within the polymer aggregates are created, making the transition of the aggregates partially irreversible. This effect is also found for the protein loaded PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA aggregates whereas in this case protein globules appear to enhance the formation of bonds, making the transition totally irreversible. The internal dynamics of both aggregates and complexes are “frozen” once the temperature is increased upon PINIPAM's LCST in water and remain so even when the temperature drops below LCST. As a result, we investigate the complexation kinetics of lysozyme and PEO-b-PNIPAM-b-PAA and observe that it occurs in two stages, one where protein globules adsorb on single pre-formed aggregates and one where protein globules cause inter-aggregate clustering.

  6. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T.; Philipse, Albert P.; Erné, Ben H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  7. Short Stimulation of Electro-Responsive PAA/Fibrin Hydrogel Induces Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nastaran; Swennen, Geertje; Verbruggen, Sanne; Scibiorek, Martyna; Molin, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Acrylic acid/fibrin hydrogel can mechanically stimulate cells when an external electrical field is applied, enabling them to migrate and align throughout the depth of the gel. The ability of electro-responsive polyacrylic acid (PAA)/fibrin hydrogel to promote collagen production and remodeling has been investigated by three-dimensional (3D) culturing and conditioning of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs-seeded hydrogels were subjected to an alternating electrical field (0.06 V/mm) for 2 h for one, two, or three times per week during 4 weeks of culturing. Fluorescent images of collagen structure and accumulation, assessed by CNA-35 probe, showed increased collagen content (>100-fold at 1× stimulation/week) in the center of the hydrogels after 4 weeks of culture. The increase in collagen production correlated with increasing extracellular matrix gene expression and resulted in significantly improved mechanical properties of the stimulated hydrogels. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity was also significantly enhanced by stimulation, which probably has a role in the reorganization of the collagen. Short stimulation (2 h) induced a favorable response in the cells and enhanced tissue formation and integrity of the scaffold by inducing collagen production. The presented set up could be used for conditioning and improving the functionality of current tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:24341313

  8. Aqueous – Phase Synthesis of PAA in PVDF Membrane Pores for Nanoparticle Synthesis and Dichlorobiphenyl Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Smuleac, V.; Bachas, L.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with bimetallic (Fe/Pd) nanoparticle synthesis inside the membrane pores and application for catalytic dechlorination of toxic organic compounds form aqueous streams. Membranes have been used as platforms for nanoparticle synthesis in order to reduce the agglomeration, encountered in solution phase synthesis which leads to a dramatic loss of reactivity. The membrane support, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was modified by in situ polymerization of acrylic acid in aqueous phase. Subsequent steps included ion exchange with Fe2+, reduction to Fe0 with sodium borohydride and Pd deposition. Various techniques, such as STEM, EDX, FTIR and permeability measurements, were used for membrane characterization and showed that bimetallic (Fe/Pd) nanoparticles with an average size of 20-30 nm have been incorporated inside of the PAA-coated membrane pores. The Fe/Pd–modified membranes showed a high reactivity toward a model compound, 2, 2′-dichlorobyphenyl and a strong dependence of degradation on Pd (hydrogenation catalyst) content. The use of convective flow substantially reduces the degradation time: 43% conversion of dichlorobiphenyl to biphenyl can be achieved in less than 40 s residence time. Another important aspect is the ability to regenerate and reuse the Fe/Pd bimetallic systems by washing with a solution of sodium borohydride, because the iron becomes inactivated (corroded) as the dechlorination reaction proceeds. PMID:20161475

  9. Frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles embedded in PAA hydrogel.

    PubMed

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network. PMID:23673482

  10. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  11. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  12. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  13. Reading Is Fundamental, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Reading is Fun-damental Program.

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national, nonprofit organization designed to motivate children to read by making a wide variety of inexpensive books available to them and allowing the children to choose and keep books that interest them. This annual report for 1977 contains the following information on the RIF project: an account of the…

  14. Fundamentals of soil science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  15. Homeschooling and Religious Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to…

  16. Fundamentals of tribology

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, N.P.; Saka, N.

    1980-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the June 1978 International Conference on the Fundamentals of Tribology. The papers discuss the effects of surface topography and of the properties of materials on wear; friction, wear, and thermomechanical effects; wear mechanisms in metal processing; polymer wear; wear monitoring and prevention; and lubrication. (LCL)

  17. Food Service Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on food service fundamentals is designed to provide a general background in the basic aspects of the food service program in the Marine Corps; it is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI…

  18. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  19. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  20. Fundamentals of Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Monty L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he: (1) Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent…

  1. Fundamental electrode kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elder, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents the fundamentals of electrode kinetics and the methods used in evaluating the characteristic parameters of rapid-charge transfer processes at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The concept of electrode kinetics is outlined, followed by the principles underlying the experimental techniques for the investigation of electrode kinetics.

  2. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites is described. Image data was provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site and all four images were registered to one another.

  3. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  4. The Fundamental Property Relation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a basic equation in thermodynamics (the fundamental property relation), focusing on a logical approach to the development of the relation where effects other than thermal, compression, and exchange of matter with the surroundings are considered. Also demonstrates erroneous treatments of the relation in three well-known textbooks. (JN)

  5. Basic Publication Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savedge, Charles E., Ed.

    Designed for students who produce newspapers and newsmagazines in junior high, middle, and elementary schools, this booklet is both a scorebook and a fundamentals text. The scorebook provides realistic criteria for judging publication excellence at these educational levels. All the basics for good publications are included in the text of the…

  6. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  7. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    Choosing an intermediate-level geophysics text is always problematic: What should we teach students after they have had introductory courses in geology, math, and physics, but little else? Fundamentals of Geophysics is aimed specifically at these intermediate-level students, and the author's stated approach is to construct a text “using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and equations in which the student can follow each derivation step-by-step.” Moreover, for Lowrie, the Earth is round, not flat—the “fundamentals of geophysics” here are the essential properties of our Earth the planet, rather than useful techniques for finding oil and minerals. Thus this book is comparable in both level and approach to C. M. R. Fowler's The Solid Earth (Cambridge University Press, 1990).

  8. Fundamental limits on EMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, R. M.; Lin, S.-Y.; Schulz, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Both fundamental and state-of-the-art limits are treated with emphasis on the former. Fundamental limits result from both natural and man-made electromagnetic noise which then affect two basic ratios, signal-to-noise (S/N) and extraneous-input-to-noise (I/N). Tolerable S/N values are discussed for both digital and analog communications systems. These lead to tolerable signal-to-extraneous-input (S/I) ratios, again for digital and analog communications systems, as well as radar and sonar. State-of-the-art limits for transmitters include RF noise emission, spurious emissions, and intermodulation. Receiver limits include adjacent-channel interactions, image, IF, and other spurious responses, including cross modulation, intermodulation, and desensitization. Unintentional emitters and receivers are also discussed. Coupling limitations between undesired sources and receptors are considered from mechanisms including radiation, induction, and conduction.

  9. CS/PAA@TPGS/PLGA nanoparticles with intracellular pH-sensitive sequential release for delivering drug to the nucleus of MDR cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Kong, Yan-Yan; Shao, Luan-Luan; Zhang, Fen-Yi; Gao, Yu; Mu, Xu; Wang, Jie; Li, Hao-Fan; Yu, Shu-Qin; Xu, Qian

    2016-09-01

    Development of novel nano-drug delivery systems (NDDS) that can transport anticancer drugs into cell nuclei is still a highly desirable strategy for reversing multi-drug resistance (MDR) in cancer therapy. Herein, we designed and prepared a novel NDDS, designated S@L NPs, in which several smaller nanoparticles are contained within a larger nanoparticle. Our S@L NPs (CS/PAA/VP-16@TPGS/PLGA NPs) possess a structure in which smaller nanoparticles (Chitosan-Poly(acrylic acid) nanoparticles, CS/PAA NPs) containing the drug etoposide (VP-16) are loaded within a larger nanoparticle (Vitamin E d-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles, TPGS/PLGA NPs). The system utilizes intracellular pH gradients to achieve pH-sensitive sequential release within different intracellular domains of MDR cells. S@L NPs could be triggered to degrade and release CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs in the acid environment of the cytosol, endosomes or lysosomes, and CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs were capable of entering the nucleus through nucleopores. It is significant that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs exhibit disaggregation in the alkaline environment of the nucleus and thereby release the contained anticancer drug. Further mechanistic studies showed that CS/PAA/VP-16 NPs escaped retention and degradation within lysosomes and protected the drug from P-glycoprotein-induced efflux. Simultaneously, S@L NPs enhanced the anticancer effect of the loaded drug by inducing autophagy and apoptosis of MDR cells. This novel NDDS may provide a promising platform for nuclear drug delivery for reversing MDR. PMID:27289313

  10. Dual stimuli-responsive coating designed through layer-by-layer assembly of PAA-b-PNIPAM block copolymers for the control of protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Osypova, A; Magnin, D; Sibret, P; Aqil, A; Jérôme, C; Dupont-Gillain, C; Pradier, C-M; Demoustier-Champagne, S; Landoulsi, J

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe the successful construction, characteristics and interaction with proteins of stimuli-responsive thin nanostructured films prepared by layer-by-layer (LbL) sequential assembly of PNIPAM-containing polyelectrolytes and PAH. PAA-b-PNIPAM block copolymers were synthesized in order to benefit from (i) the ionizable properties of PAA, to be involved in the LbL assembly, and (ii) the sensitivity of PNIPAM to temperature stimulus. The impact of parameters related to the structure and size of the macromolecules (their molecular weight and the relative degree of polymerization of PAA and PNIPAM), and the interaction with proteins under physico-chemical stimuli, such as pH and temperature, are carefully investigated. The incorporation of PAA-b-PNIPAM into multilayered films is shown to be successful whatever the block copolymer used, resulting in slightly thicker films than the corresponding (PAA/PAH)n film. Importantly, the protein adsorption studies demonstrate that it is possible to alter the adsorption behavior of proteins on (PAA-b-PNIPAM/PAH)n surfaces by varying the temperature and/or the pH of the medium, which seems to be intimately related to two key factors: (i) the ability of PNIPAM units to undergo conformational changes and (ii) the structural changes of the film made of weak polyelectrolytes. The simplicity of construction of these PNIPAM block copolymer-based LbL coatings on a large range of substrates, combined with their highly tunable features, make them ideal candidates to be employed for various biomedical applications requiring the control of protein adsorption. PMID:26338028

  11. Fundamental studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hager, B. H.; Kanamori, H.

    1981-01-01

    Research in fundamental studies in geodynamics continued in a number of fields including seismic observations and analysis, synthesis of geochemical data, theoretical investigation of geoid anomalies, extensive numerical experiments in a number of geodynamical contexts, and a new field seismic volcanology. Summaries of work in progress or completed during this report period are given. Abstracts of publications submitted from work in progress during this report period are attached as an appendix.

  12. Value of Fundamental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexey

    Fundamental science is a hard, long-term human adventure that has required high devotion and social support, especially significant in our epoch of Mega-science. The measure of this devotion and this support expresses the real value of the fundamental science in public opinion. Why does fundamental science have value? What determines its strength and what endangers it? The dominant answer is that the value of science arises out of curiosity and is supported by the technological progress. Is this really a good, astute answer? When trying to attract public support, we talk about the ``mystery of the universe''. Why do these words sound so attractive? What is implied by and what is incompatible with them? More than two centuries ago, Immanuel Kant asserted an inseparable entanglement between ethics and metaphysics. Thus, we may ask: which metaphysics supports the value of scientific cognition, and which does not? Should we continue to neglect the dependence of value of pure science on metaphysics? If not, how can this issue be addressed in the public outreach? Is the public alienated by one or another message coming from the face of science? What does it mean to be politically correct in this sort of discussion?

  13. Fundamentals of Structural Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, David D.; Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2005-09-01

    Fundamentals of Structural Geology provides a new framework for the investigation of geological structures by integrating field mapping and mechanical analysis. Assuming a basic knowledge of physical geology, introductory calculus and physics, it emphasizes the observational data, modern mapping technology, principles of continuum mechanics, and the mathematical and computational skills, necessary to quantitatively map, describe, model, and explain deformation in Earth's lithosphere. By starting from the fundamental conservation laws of mass and momentum, the constitutive laws of material behavior, and the kinematic relationships for strain and rate of deformation, the authors demonstrate the relevance of solid and fluid mechanics to structural geology. This book offers a modern quantitative approach to structural geology for advanced students and researchers in structural geology and tectonics. It is supported by a website hosting images from the book, additional colour images, student exercises and MATLAB scripts. Solutions to the exercises are available to instructors. The book integrates field mapping using modern technology with the analysis of structures based on a complete mechanics MATLAB is used to visualize physical fields and analytical results and MATLAB scripts can be downloaded from the website to recreate textbook graphics and enable students to explore their choice of parameters and boundary conditions The supplementary website hosts color images of outcrop photographs used in the text, supplementary color images, and images of textbook figures for classroom presentations The textbook website also includes student exercises designed to instill the fundamental relationships, and to encourage the visualization of the evolution of geological structures; solutions are available to instructors

  14. Design of a novel crosslinked HEC-PAA porous hydrogel composite for dissolution rate and solubility enhancement of efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, M; Chejara, D R; Mulla, J A S; Badhe, R V; Choonara, Y E; Kumar, P; du Toit, L C; Pillay, V

    2015-07-25

    The purpose of this research was to synthesize, characterize and evaluate a Crosslinked Hydrogel Composite (CHC) as a new carrier for improving the solubility of the anti-HIV drug, efavirenz. The CHC was prepared by physical blending of hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) (1:1) in the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (as a crosslinker) (1:5) under lyophilization. Efavirenz was loaded in situ into the CHC in varying proportions (200-600 mg). The CHC demonstrated impressive rheological properties (dynamic viscosity=6053 mPa; 500 s(-1)) and tensile strength (2.5 mPa) compared with the native polymers (HEC and PAA). The physicochemical and thermal behavior also confirmed that the CHC was compatible with efavirenz. The incorporation of efavirenz in the CHC increased the surface area (4.4489-8.4948 m(2)/g) and pore volume (469.547-776.916Å) of the hydrogel system which was confirmed by SEM imagery and BET surface area measurements. The solubility of efavirenz was significantly enhanced (150 times) in a sustained release manner over 24h as affirmed by the in vitro drug release studies. The hydration medium provided by the CHC network played a pivotal role in improving the efavirenz solubility via increasing hydrogen bonding as proved by the zeta potential measurements (-18.0 to +0.10). The CHC may be a promising alternative as an oral formulation for the delivery of efavirenz with enhanced solubility. PMID:26047962

  15. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hull, Larry; Shinas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  16. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base was created on a single 9-track 1600 BPI tape containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites. Each site is 5x6 nm in area. Image data has been provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site. All four images have been registered to one another. A list of the order of the files on tape and the dates of acquisition is provided.

  17. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Science is all about testing the things we take for granted including some of the most fundamental aspects of how we understand our universe. Is the speed of light in a vacuum the same for all photons regardless of their energy? Is the rest mass of a photon actually zero? A series of recent studies explore the possibility of using transient astrophysical sources for tests!Explaining Different Arrival TimesArtists illustration of a gamma-ray burst, another extragalactic transient, in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]Suppose you observe a distant transient astrophysical source like a gamma-ray burst, or a flare from an active nucleus and two photons of different energies arrive at your telescope at different times. This difference in arrival times could be due to several different factors, depending on how deeply you want to question some of our fundamental assumptions about physics:Intrinsic delayThe photons may simply have been emitted at two different times by the astrophysical source.Delay due to Lorentz invariance violationPerhaps the assumption that all massless particles (even two photons with different energies) move at the exact same velocity in a vacuum is incorrect.Special-relativistic delayMaybe there is a universal speed for massless particles, but the assumption that photons have zero rest mass is wrong. This, too, would cause photon velocities to be energy-dependent.Delay due to gravitational potentialPerhaps our understanding of the gravitational potential that the photons experience as they travel is incorrect, also causing different flight times for photons of different energies. This would mean that Einsteins equivalence principle, a fundamental tenet of general relativity (GR), is incorrect.If we now turn this problem around, then by measuring the arrival time delay between photons of different energies from various astrophysical sources the further away, the better we can provide constraints on these

  18. Fundamental Atomtronic Circuit Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; McIlvain, Brian; Lobb, Christopher; Hill, Wendell T., III

    2012-06-01

    Recent experiments with neutral superfluid gases have shown that it is possible to create atomtronic circuits analogous to existing superconducting circuits. The goals of these experiments are to create complex systems such as Josephson junctions. In addition, there are theoretical models for active atomtronic components analogous to diodes, transistors and oscillators. In order for any of these devices to function, an understanding of the more fundamental atomtronic elements is needed. Here we describe the first experimental realization of these more fundamental elements. We have created an atomtronic capacitor that is discharged through a resistance and inductance. We will discuss a theoretical description of the system that allows us to determine values for the capacitance, resistance and inductance. The resistance is shown to be analogous to the Sharvin resistance, and the inductance analogous to kinetic inductance in electronics. This atomtronic circuit is implemented with a thermal sample of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The atoms are confined using what we call free-space atom chips, a novel optical dipole trap produced using a generalized phase-contrast imaging technique. We will also discuss progress toward implementing this atomtronic system in a degenerate Bose gas.

  19. Fundamentals of electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, M. W.

    The study of electrokinetics is a very mature field. Experimental studies date from the early 1800s, and acceptable theoretical analyses have existed since the early 1900s. The use of electrokinetics in practical field problems is more recent, but it is still quite mature. Most developments in the fundamental understanding of electrokinetics are in the colloid science literature. A significant and increasing divergence between the theoretical understanding of electrokinetics found in the colloid science literature and the theoretical analyses used in interpreting applied experimental studies in soil science and waste remediation has developed. The soil science literature has to date restricted itself to the use of very early theories, with their associated limitations. The purpose of this contribution is to review fundamental aspects of electrokinetic phenomena from a colloid science viewpoint. It is hoped that a bridge can be built between the two branches of the literature, from which both will benefit. Attention is paid to special topics such as the effects of overlapping double layers, applications in unsaturated soils, the influence of dispersivity, and the differences between electrokinetic theory and conductivity theory.

  20. Fundamentals of gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, K. B.; Nasr, A. T.

    2013-06-01

    Fundamental chemical and physical phenomena that occur in Fricke gel dosimeters, polymer gel dosimeters, micelle gel dosimeters and genipin gel dosimeters are discussed. Fricke gel dosimeters are effective even though their radiation sensitivity depends on oxygen concentration. Oxygen contamination can cause severe problems in polymer gel dosimeters, even when THPC is used. Oxygen leakage must be prevented between manufacturing and irradiation of polymer gels, and internal calibration methods should be used so that contamination problems can be detected. Micelle gel dosimeters are promising due to their favourable diffusion properties. The introduction of micelles to gel dosimetry may open up new areas of dosimetry research wherein a range of water-insoluble radiochromic materials can be explored as reporter molecules.

  1. Fundamentals in Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis, Rich, James, Spiro, Michael

    This course on nuclear physics leads the reader to the exploration of the field from nuclei to astrophysical issues. Much nuclear phenomenology can be understood from simple arguments such as those based on the Pauli principle and the Coulomb barrier. This book is concerned with extrapolating from such arguments and illustrating nuclear systematics with experimental data. Starting with the basic concepts in nuclear physics, nuclear models, and reactions, the book covers nuclear decays and the fundamental electro-weak interactions, radioactivity, and nuclear energy. After the discussions of fission and fusion leading into nuclear astrophysics, there is a presentation of the latest ideas about cosmology. As a primer this course will lay the foundations for more specialized subjects. This book emerged from a series of topical courses the authors delivered at the Ecole Polytechnique and will be useful for graduate students and for scientists in a variety of fields.

  2. Fundamentals of battery dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jossen, Andreas

    Modern applications, such as wireless communication systems or hybrid electric vehicles operate at high power fluctuations. For some applications, where the power frequencies are high (above some 10 or 100 Hz) it is possible to filter the high frequencies using passive components; yet this results in additional costs. In other applications, where the dynamic time constants are in the range up to some seconds, filtering cannot be done. Batteries are hence operated with the dynamic loads. But what happens under these dynamic operation conditions? This paper describes the fundamentals of the dynamic characteristics of batteries in a frequency range from some MHz down to the mHz range. As the dynamic behaviour depends on the actual state of charge (SOC) and the state of health (SOH), it is possible to gain information on the battery state by analysing the dynamic behaviour. High dynamic loads can influence the battery temperature, the battery performance and the battery lifetime.

  3. Fundamentals of zoological scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Herbert

    1982-01-01

    Most introductory physics courses emphasize highly idealized problems with unique well-defined answers. Though many textbooks complement these problems with estimation problems, few books present anything more than an elementary discussion of scaling. This paper presents some fundamentals of scaling in the zoological domain—a domain complex by any standard, but one also well suited to illustrate the power of very simple physical ideas. We consider the following animal characteristics: skeletal weight, speed of running, height and range of jumping, food consumption, heart rate, lifetime, locomotive efficiency, frequency of wing flapping, and maximum sizes of animals that fly and hover. These relationships are compared to zoological data and everyday experience, and match reasonably well.

  4. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    1990-05-01

    This is an expanded version of the third Dirac Memorial Lecture, given in 1988 by the Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. Salam's lecture presents an overview of the developments in modern particle physics from its inception at the turn of the century to the present theories seeking to unify all the fundamental forces. In addition, two previously unpublished lectures by Paul Dirac, and Werner Heisenberg are included. These lectures provide a fascinating insight into their approach to research and the developments in particle physics at that time. Nonspecialists, undergraduates and researchers will find this a fascinating book. It contains a clear introduction to the major themes of particle physics and cosmology by one of the most distinguished contemporary physicists.

  5. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  6. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Science is all about testing the things we take for granted including some of the most fundamental aspects of how we understand our universe. Is the speed of light in a vacuum the same for all photons regardless of their energy? Is the rest mass of a photon actually zero? A series of recent studies explore the possibility of using transient astrophysical sources for tests!Explaining Different Arrival TimesArtists illustration of a gamma-ray burst, another extragalactic transient, in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]Suppose you observe a distant transient astrophysical source like a gamma-ray burst, or a flare from an active nucleus and two photons of different energies arrive at your telescope at different times. This difference in arrival times could be due to several different factors, depending on how deeply you want to question some of our fundamental assumptions about physics:Intrinsic delayThe photons may simply have been emitted at two different times by the astrophysical source.Delay due to Lorentz invariance violationPerhaps the assumption that all massless particles (even two photons with different energies) move at the exact same velocity in a vacuum is incorrect.Special-relativistic delayMaybe there is a universal speed for massless particles, but the assumption that photons have zero rest mass is wrong. This, too, would cause photon velocities to be energy-dependent.Delay due to gravitational potentialPerhaps our understanding of the gravitational potential that the photons experience as they travel is incorrect, also causing different flight times for photons of different energies. This would mean that Einsteins equivalence principle, a fundamental tenet of general relativity (GR), is incorrect.If we now turn this problem around, then by measuring the arrival time delay between photons of different energies from various astrophysical sources the further away, the better we can provide constraints on these

  7. Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.

    2005-06-01

    Quantum mechanics has evolved from a subject of study in pure physics to one with a wide range of applications in many diverse fields. The basic concepts of quantum mechanics are explained in this book in a concise and easy-to-read manner emphasising applications in solid state electronics and modern optics. Following a logical sequence, the book is focused on the key ideas and is conceptually and mathematically self-contained. The fundamental principles of quantum mechanics are illustrated by showing their application to systems such as the hydrogen atom, multi-electron ions and atoms, the formation of simple organic molecules and crystalline solids of practical importance. It leads on from these basic concepts to discuss some of the most important applications in modern semiconductor electronics and optics. Containing many homework problems and worked examples, the book is suitable for senior-level undergraduate and graduate level students in electrical engineering, materials science and applied physics. Clear exposition of quantum mechanics written in a concise and accessible style Precise physical interpretation of the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics Illustrates the important concepts and results by reference to real-world examples in electronics and optoelectronics Contains homeworks and worked examples, with solutions available for instructors

  8. Fundamentals of Atmospheric Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

    2006-02-01

    This textbook fills a gap in the literature for teaching material suitable for students of atmospheric science and courses on atmospheric radiation. It covers the fundamentals of emission, absorption, and scattering of electromagnetic radiation from ultraviolet to infrared and beyond. Much of the book applies to planetary atmosphere. The authors are physicists and teach at the largest meteorology department of the US at Penn State. Craig T. Bohren has taught the atmospheric radiation course there for the past 20 years with no book. Eugene Clothiaux has taken over and added to the course notes. Problems given in the text come from students, colleagues, and correspondents. The design of the figures especially for this book is meant to ease comprehension. Discussions have a graded approach with a thorough treatment of subjects, such as single scattering by particles, at different levels of complexity. The discussion of the multiple scattering theory begins with piles of plates. This simple theory introduces concepts in more advanced theories, i.e. optical thickness, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter. The more complicated theory, the two-stream theory, then takes the reader beyond the pile-of-plates theory. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of atmospheric science.

  9. GRBs and Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Patrick; Wang, F. Y.; Wu, X. F.; Wei, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense flashes at the cosmological distances, which are the most luminous explosions in the Universe. The high luminosities of GRBs make them detectable out to the edge of the visible universe. So, they are unique tools to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal evolution of the Universe. First, they can be used to constrain the history of cosmic acceleration and the evolution of dark energy in a redshift range hardly achievable by other cosmological probes. Second, long GRBs are believed to be formed by collapse of massive stars. So they can be used to derive the high-redshift star formation rate, which can not be probed by current observations. Moreover, the use of GRBs as cosmological tools could unveil the reionization history and metal evolution of the Universe, the intergalactic medium (IGM) properties and the nature of first stars in the early universe. But beyond that, the GRB high-energy photons can be applied to constrain Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) and to test Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EEP). In this paper, we review the progress on the GRB cosmology and fundamental physics probed by GRBs.

  10. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of two variants of the Escherichia coli O157 ParE2–PaaA2 toxin–antitoxin complex

    PubMed Central

    Sterckx, Yann G. J.; Haesaerts, Sarah; Van Melderen, Laurence; Loris, Remy

    2014-01-01

    The paaR2–paaA2–parE2 operon is a three-component toxin–antitoxin module encoded in the genome of the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157. The toxin (ParE2) and antitoxin (PaaA2) interact to form a nontoxic toxin–antitoxin complex. In this paper, the crystallization and preliminary characterization of two variants of the ParE2–PaaA2 toxin–antitoxin complex are described. Selenomethionine-derivative crystals of the full-length ParE2–PaaA2 toxin–antitoxin complex diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P41212 (or P43212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 90.5, c = 412.3 Å. It was previously reported that the full-length ParE2–PaaA2 toxin–antitoxin complex forms a higher-order oligomer. In contrast, ParE2 and PaaA213–63, a truncated form of PaaA2 in which the first 12 N-terminal residues of the antitoxin have been deleted, form a heterodimer as shown by analytical gel filtration, dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. Crystals of the PaaA213–63–ParE2 complex diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6122 (or P6522), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 91.6, c = 185.6 Å. PMID:25195911

  12. Solar astrophysical fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2014-08-01

    The accurate determination of the solar photospheric radius has been an important problem in astronomy for many centuries. From the measurements made by the PICARD spacecraft during the transit of Venus in 2012, we obtained a solar radius of 696,156±145 kilometres. This value is consistent with recent measurements carried out atmosphere. This observation leads us to propose a change of the canonical value obtained by Arthur Auwers in 1891. An accurate value for total solar irradiance (TSI) is crucial for the Sun-Earth connection, and represents another solar astrophysical fundamental parameter. Based on measurements collected from different space instruments over the past 35 years, the absolute value of the TSI, representative of a quiet Sun, has gradually decreased from 1,371W.m-2 in 1978 to around 1,362W.m-2 in 2013, mainly due to the radiometers calibration differences. Based on the PICARD data and in agreement with Total Irradiance Monitor measurements, we predicted the TSI input at the top of the Earth's atmosphere at a distance of one astronomical unit (149,597,870 kilometres) from the Sun to be 1,362±2.4W.m-2, which may be proposed as a reference value. To conclude, from the measurements made by the PICARD spacecraft, we obtained a solar photospheric equator-to-pole radius difference value of 5.9±0.5 kilometres. This value is consistent with measurements made by different space instruments, and can be given as a reference value.

  13. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  14. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    A total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed to date, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This readable text presents the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardio-vascular, bone, and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated, and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination of both the

  15. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, G.

    2003-10-01

    As of today, a total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This book presents in a readable text the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardiovascular, bone and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination

  16. Small-angle X-ray scattering- and nuclear magnetic resonance-derived conformational ensemble of the highly flexible antitoxin PaaA2.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Yann G J; Volkov, Alexander N; Vranken, Wim F; Kragelj, Jaka; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Buts, Lieven; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Jové, Thomas; Van Melderen, Laurence; Blackledge, Martin; van Nuland, Nico A J; Loris, Remy

    2014-06-10

    Antitoxins from prokaryotic type II toxin-antitoxin modules are characterized by a high degree of intrinsic disorder. The description of such highly flexible proteins is challenging because they cannot be represented by a single structure. Here, we present a combination of SAXS and NMR data to describe the conformational ensemble of the PaaA2 antitoxin from the human pathogen E. coli O157. The method encompasses the use of SAXS data to filter ensembles out of a pool of conformers generated by a custom NMR structure calculation protocol and the subsequent refinement by a block jackknife procedure. The final ensemble obtained through the method is validated by an established residual dipolar coupling analysis. We show that the conformational ensemble of PaaA2 is highly compact and that the protein exists in solution as two preformed helices, connected by a flexible linker, that probably act as molecular recognition elements for toxin inhibition. PMID:24768114

  17. Study of the interaction between a diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA-b-PAA and a gemini surfactant 12-6-12 in basic media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongmei; Peng, Baoliang; Liang, Yanyan; Han, Xia; Liu, Honglai

    2009-05-01

    The interactions between negatively charged diblock polyelectrolyte PDMA(71)-b-PAA(59) and oppositely charged gemini surfactant hexylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) in basic media were studied using dynamic light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, surface tension, and (1)H NMR. With increased addition of surfactant, the conformation of polyelectrolyte experienced changes from the initial unimer with open-extended PAA block, to the nano-scaled aggregates/complexes with a maximum hydrodynamic diameter (D(h)), and finally to the stable complexes with a smaller D(h). Accordingly, the value of D(h) during the whole process of increasing the surfactant concentration changed from 14-17 nm, to 184 nm, and to the final 70 nm, respectively. This transformation was driven by the electrostatic attractive/repulsive interactions, the hydrophobic interaction between hydrophobic surfactant tails, and the hydrophilicity of PDMA block. PMID:19217121

  18. A unique hetero-hexadecameric architecture displayed by the Escherichia coli O157 PaaA2-ParE2 antitoxin-toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Yann G-J; Jové, Thomas; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Geerts, Lieselotte; De Kerpel, Maia; Lah, Jurij; De Greve, Henri; Van Melderen, Laurence; Loris, Remy

    2016-04-24

    Many bacterial pathogens modulate their metabolic activity, virulence and pathogenicity through so-called "toxin-antitoxin" (TA) modules. The genome of the human pathogen Escherichia coli O157 contains two three-component TA modules related to the known parDE module. Here, we show that the toxin EcParE2 maps in a branch of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily that is distinct from the branches that contain verified gyrase and ribosome inhibitors. The structure of EcParE2 closely resembles that of Caulobacter crescentus ParE but shows a distinct pattern of conserved surface residues, in agreement with its apparent inability to interact with GyrA. The antitoxin EcPaaA2 is characterized by two α-helices (H1 and H2) that serve as molecular recognition elements to wrap itself around EcParE2. Both EcPaaA2 H1 and H2 are required to sustain a high-affinity interaction with EcParE2 and for the inhibition of EcParE2-mediated killing in vivo. Furthermore, evidence demonstrates that EcPaaA2 H2, but not H1, determines specificity for EcParE2. The initially formed EcPaaA2-EcParE2 heterodimer then assembles into a hetero-hexadecamer, which is stable in solution and is formed in a highly cooperative manner. Together these findings provide novel data on quaternary structure, TA interactions and activity of a hitherto poorly characterized family of TA modules. PMID:26996937

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the PaaI-like thioesterase SAV0944 from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Khandokar, Yogesh B; Roman, Noelia; Smith, Kate M; Srivastava, Parul; Forwood, Jade K

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of many diseases, including meningitis, bacteraemia, pneumonia, food poisoning and toxic shock syndrome. Structural characterization of the PaaI-like thioesterase SAV0944 (SaPaaI) from S. aureus subsp. aureus Mu50 will aid in understanding its potential as a new therapeutic target by knowledge of its molecular details and cellular functions. Here, the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of SaPaaI thioesterase from S. aureus are reported. This protein initially crystallized with the ligand coenzyme A using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique with condition No. 40 of Crystal Screen from Hampton Research at 296 K. Optimal final conditions consisting of 24% PEG 4000, 100 mM sodium citrate pH 6.5, 12% 2-propanol gave single diffraction-quality crystals. These crystals diffracted to beyond 2 Å resolution at the Australian Synchrotron and belonged to space group P12(1)1, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.05, b = 89.05, c = 60.74 Å, β = 100.5°. Initial structure determination and refinement gave an R factor and R(free) of 17.3 and 22.0%, respectively, confirming a positive solution in obtaining phases using molecular replacement. PMID:24637766

  20. RF beam transmission of x-band PAA system utilizing large-area, polymer-based true-time-delay module developed using imprinting and inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zeyu; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiaochu; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Xiangning; Zhang, Xingyu; Zou, Yi; Panday, Ashwin; Guo, L. Jay; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-02-01

    Phased-array antenna (PAA) technology plays a significant role in modern day radar and communication networks. Truetime- delay (TTD) enabled beam steering networks provide several advantages over their electronic counterparts, including squint-free beam steering, low RF loss, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and large bandwidth control of PAAs. Chip-scale and integrated TTD modules promise a miniaturized, light-weight system; however, the modules are still rigid and they require complex packaging solutions. Moreover, the total achievable time delay is still restricted by the wafer size. In this work, we propose a light-weight and large-area, true-time-delay beamforming network that can be fabricated on light-weight and flexible/rigid surfaces utilizing low-cost "printing" techniques. In order to prove the feasibility of the approach, a 2-bit thermo-optic polymer TTD network is developed using a combination of imprinting and ink-jet printing. RF beam steering of a 1×4 X-band PAA up to 60° is demonstrated. The development of such active components on large area, light-weight, and low-cost substrates promises significant improvement in size, weight, and power (SWaP) requirements over the state-of-the-art.

  1. The characterization of EIAV reverse transcriptase and its inhibition by 5'-triphosphates of 2'-deoxyuridine analogs, PFA and PAA.

    PubMed

    Tao, P; Zhang, X; Quan, K

    1990-01-01

    A characterization of equine infectious anemia virus reverse transcriptase (EIAV RT) and its inhibition by 5'-triphosphate analogs was undertaken to explore the possibility of using EIAV RT as an in vitro model for studying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). EIAV RT activity was found to be dependent on the bivalent cations Mg++ and Mn++. The optimal pH for enzyme reaction was pH 8.2. EIAV RT preferred a 70 mmol/L concentration of monovalent salts. Phosphonoformic acid (PFA) was an active inhibitor of EIAV RT, but phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) were not. The inhibition of EIAV RT activity by 5'-triphosphates of nucleoside derivatives was in the following decreasing order: FLTTP greater than AZTTP greater than nPrearaUTP greater than nPredUTP = CEdUTP greater than EtdUTP greater than nPrdUTP greater than HMdUTP. nPrearaUTP was a linear competitive and PFA a linear noncompetitive inhibitor of EIAV RT with respect to dTTP. Apparent Kis and Kii were 1.5 and 2.2 mumol/L respectively. The susceptibility pattern of EIAV RT to inhibitors was similar to that of HIV RT. PMID:1711694

  2. Ablative Thermal Protection System Fundamentals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Robin A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This is the presentation for a short course on the fundamentals of ablative thermal protection systems. It covers the definition of ablation, description of ablative materials, how they work, how to analyze them and how to model them.

  3. Controllable Cooperative Self-Assembly of PS-b-PAA/PS-b-P4VP Mixture by Tuning the Intercorona Interaction.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhen; Cheng, Zhongkai; Zhu, Yutian; Jiang, Wei

    2016-06-23

    The cooperative self-assembly of amphiphilic polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PS144-b-PAA22) and polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS144-b-P4VP33) diblock copolymers in DMF/H2O mixtures has been investigated. Both copolymers self-assemble into small spherical micelles (SSMs) if used individually. However, the equimolar mixture of these two copolymers cooperatively self-assembles into vesicles. It is found that the formation of vesicles is attributed to the complex interactions between PAA and P4VP chains, including the hydrogen bonds between un-ionized acrylic acid units and pyridine units as well as the electronic attractions between ionized acrylic acid units and protonated pyridine units. Since these interactions between PAA and P4VP chains depend on pH value, the cooperatively self-assembled morphology can be easily tuned by the addition of HCl or NaOH. At high addition of H(+) or OH(-), the intercorona interaction is repulsive and the copolymer mixture tends to form SSMs (basic condition) or cylindrical micelles (acidic condition), whereas it prefers to aggregate into vesicles at low addition of H(+) or OH(-) because the intercorona interaction is attractive. Interestingly, the same morphology of the self-assembled aggregates can be obtained either at high H(+) addition or at low OH(-) addition, which results from the nonmonotonic variation of the intercorona interaction along with the addition of HCl or NaOH. The current study implies that it is the intercorona interaction rather than the chemical condition that dominates the cooperatively self-assembled morphology. PMID:27195581

  4. Fundamentals of Environmental Education. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    An outline of fundamental definitions, relationships, and human responsibilities related to environment provides a basis from which a variety of materials, programs, and activities can be developed. The outline can be used in elementary, secondary, higher education, or adult education programs. The framework is based on principles of the science…

  5. Lighting Fundamentals. Monograph Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig N.; Gerlach, Vernon S.

    Using an accompanying, specified film that consists of 10-second pictures separated by blanks, the learner can, with the 203-step, self-correcting questions and answers provided in this program, come to understand the fundamentals of lighting in photography. The learner should, by the end of the program, be able to describe and identify the…

  6. Fundamentals of Microelectronics Processing (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a 15-week course in the fundamentals of microelectronics processing in chemical engineering, which emphasizes the use of very large scale integration (VLSI). Provides a listing of the topics covered in the course outline, along with a sample of some of the final projects done by students. (TW)

  7. Environmental Law: Fundamentals for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, David R.

    This booklet outlines the environmental problems most likely to arise in schools. An overview provides a fundamental analysis of environmental issues rather than comprehensive analysis and advice. The text examines the concerns that surround superfund cleanups, focusing on the legal framework, and furnishes some practical pointers, such as what to…

  8. Fundamental Cycles of Cognitive Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegg, John

    Over recent years, various theories have arisen to explain and predict cognitive development in mathematics education. We focus on an underlying theme that recurs throughout such theories: a fundamental cycle of growth in the learning of specific concepts, which we frame within broader global theories of individual cognitive growth. Our purpose is…

  9. Fundamentals of the Slide Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Susan Zee

    This paper is an introduction to the fundamentals of the art (including architecture) slide library, with some emphasis on basic procedures of the science slide library. Information in this paper is particularly relevant to the college, university, and museum slide library. Topics addressed include: (1) history of the slide library; (2) duties of…

  10. Status of Fundamental Physics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C.

    2003-01-01

    Update of the Fundamental Physics Program. JEM/EF Slip. 2 years delay. Reduced budget. Community support and advocacy led by Professor Nick Bigelow. Reprogramming led by Fred O Callaghan/JPL team. LTMPF M1 mission (DYNAMX and SUMO). PARCS. Carrier re baselined on JEM/EF.

  11. Brake Fundamentals. Automotive Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Larry; And Others

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary auto mechanics programs, this curriculum guide contains learning exercises in seven areas: (1) brake fundamentals; (2) brake lines, fluid, and hoses; (3) drum brakes; (4) disc brake system and service; (5) master cylinder, power boost, and control valves; (6) parking brakes; and (7) trouble shooting. Each…

  12. Museum Techniques in Fundamental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Some museum techniques and methods can be used in fundamental educational programs without elaborate buildings or equipment; exhibitions should be based on valid presumptions and should take into account the "common sense" beliefs of people for whom the exhibit is designed. They can be used profitably in the economic development of local cultural…

  13. Fundamentals of Welding. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    These instructional materials assist teachers in improving instruction on the fundamentals of welding. The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and 27 references. Seven units of…

  14. Light as a Fundamental Particle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Steven

    1975-01-01

    Presents two arguments concerning the role of the photon. One states that the photon is just another particle distinguished by a particular value of charge, spin, mass, lifetime, and interaction properties. The second states that the photon plays a fundamental role with a deep relation to ultimate formulas of physics. (GS)

  15. Report from PAA.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    The Population Association of America Annual Meeting, held in San Francisco April 6-8, 1995, generated papers on the key demographic themes of marriage, birth, mortality, and migration. In the US 47% of people between the ages of 25 and 44 have lived with an unmarried partner for some period, up from 37% during 1987-1988. For teenagers, absence of contact with fathers is associated with symptoms of depression, becoming a teen parent, and delinquency. Single fathers in 1990 were younger and had lower incomes than in the past. About 40% of nonpaying fathers had children out of wedlock; 30% to 48% had low or no income. The tendency of Whites to leave or avoid minority neighborhoods is due to perceptions about crime, quality of the schools, neighborhood deterioration, and the socioeconomic level of neighbors. Although African-American death rates generally are higher than those of Whites, the pattern seems to reverse itself after age 85. Surprisingly, survival probability at ages 80-95 for US Whites is higher than that in Europe and Japan. When immigrants enter an area, there is not much evidence of low-skilled native-born people moving out. Families with undocumented heads received an average of $6,080 in welfare benefits, while refugees received $10,444. The Social Security system is shifting large amounts of money from regions of the country with younger age structures, such as California, to states with older age structures, such as Florida. Among other topics, the remarkably low total fertility rate of 3.4 in the Bangladesh 1993-1994 Demographic and Health Survey was questioned as biased; the infant mortality data for Tajikistan appeared to be suspect; the diffusion of information about family planning in Africa was mentioned; the significance of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development regarding reproductive health services was hailed; and USAID's designing of indicators in safe pregnancy, breastfeeding, and women's nutrition was related. PMID:12289924

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; Sanz, Jesús M.; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li2SO4 and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution. PMID:22102047

  17. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  18. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  19. Fundamentals of gas measurement I

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    To truly understand gas measurement, a person must understand gas measurement fundamentals. This includes the units of measurement, the behavior of the gas molecule, the property of gases, the gas laws, and the methods and means of measuring gas. Since the quality of gas is often the responsibility of the gas measurement technician, it is important that he or she have a knowledge of natural gas chemistry.

  20. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  1. Reconstruction of fundamental SUSY parameters

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Zerwas et al.

    2003-09-25

    We summarize methods and expected accuracies in determining the basic low-energy SUSY parameters from experiments at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in the TeV energy range, combined with results from LHC. In a second step we demonstrate how, based on this set of parameters, the fundamental supersymmetric theory can be reconstructed at high scales near the grand unification or Planck scale. These analyses have been carried out for minimal supergravity [confronted with GMSB for comparison], and for a string effective theory.

  2. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  3. Cognition is … Fundamentally Cultural

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Beller, Sieghard

    2013-01-01

    A prevailing concept of cognition in psychology is inspired by the computer metaphor. Its focus on mental states that are generated and altered by information input, processing, storage and transmission invites a disregard for the cultural dimension of cognition, based on three (implicit) assumptions: cognition is internal, processing can be distinguished from content, and processing is independent of cultural background. Arguing against each of these assumptions, we point out how culture may affect cognitive processes in various ways, drawing on instances from numerical cognition, ethnobiological reasoning, and theory of mind. Given the pervasive cultural modulation of cognition—on all of Marr’s levels of description—we conclude that cognition is indeed fundamentally cultural, and that consideration of its cultural dimension is essential for a comprehensive understanding. PMID:25379225

  4. [INFORMATION, A FUNDAMENTAL PATIENT RIGHT?].

    PubMed

    Mémeteau, Gérard

    2015-03-01

    Although expressed before the "Lambert" case, which has led us to think about refusal and assent in the context of internal rights, conventional rights--and in the context of the patient's bed!--these simple remarks present the patient's right to medical information as a so-called fundamental right. But it can only be understood with a view to a treatment or other medical act; otherwise it has no reason to be and is only an academic exercise, however exciting, but not much use by itself. What if we reversed the terms of the problem: the right of the doctor to information? (The beautiful thesis of Ph. Gaston, Paris 8, 2 December 2014). PMID:26606765

  5. Fundamentals of air quality systems

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, K.E.

    1999-08-01

    The book uses numerous examples to demonstrate how basic design concepts can be applied to the control of air emissions from industrial sources. It focuses on the design of air pollution control devices for the removal of gases and particles from industrial sources, and provides detailed, specific design methods for each major air pollution control system. Individual chapters provide design methods that include both theory and practice with emphasis on the practical aspect by providing numerous examples that demonstrate how air pollution control devices are designed. Contents include air pollution laws, air pollution control devices; physical properties of air, gas laws, energy concepts, pressure; motion of airborne particles, filter and water drop collection efficiency; fundamentals of particulate emission control; cyclones; fabric filters; wet scrubbers; electrostatic precipitators; control of volatile organic compounds; adsorption; incineration; absorption; control of gaseous emissions from motor vehicles; practice problems (with solutions) for the P.E. examination in environmental engineering. Design applications are featured throughout.

  6. Understand vacuum-system fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, G.R. ); Lines, J.R. ); Golden, S.W. )

    1994-10-01

    Crude vacuum unit heavy vacuum gas-oil (HVGO) yield is significantly impacted by ejector-system performance, especially at conditions below 20 mmHg absolute pressure. A deepcut vacuum unit, to reliably meet the yields, calls for proper design of all the major pieces of equipment. Ejector-system performance at deepcut vacuum column pressures may be independently or concurrently affected by: atmospheric column overflash, stripper performance or cutpoint; vacuum column top temperature and heat balance; light vacuum gas-oil (LVGO) pumparound entrainment to the ejector system; cooling-water temperature; motive steam pressure; non-condensible loading, either air leakage or cracked light-end hydrocarbons; condensible hydrocarbons; intercondenser or aftercondenser fouling ejector internal erosion or product build-up; and system vent back pressure. The paper discusses gas-oil yields; ejector-system fundamentals; condensers; vacuum-system troubleshooting; process operations; and a case study of deepcut operations.

  7. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Adam S; Ostriker, Jeremiah P

    2014-02-18

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  8. Fundamental base closure environmental principles

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Military base closures present a paradox. The rate, scale and timing of military base closures is historically unique. However, each base itself typically does not present unique problems. Thus, the challenge is to design innovative solutions to base redevelopment and remediation issues, while simultaneously adopting common, streamlined or pre-approved strategies to shared problems. The author presents six environmental principles that are fundamental to base closure. They are: remediation not clean up; remediation will impact reuse; reuse will impact remediation; remediation and reuse must be coordinated; environmental contamination must be evaluated as any other initial physical constraint on development, not as an overlay after plans are created; and remediation will impact development, financing and marketability.

  9. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  10. Holographic viscosity of fundamental matter.

    PubMed

    Mateos, David; Myers, Robert C; Thomson, Rowan M

    2007-03-01

    A holographic dual of a finite-temperature SU(Nc) gauge theory with a small number of flavors Nf or =1/4pi. Given the known results for the entropy density, the contribution of the fundamental matter eta fund is therefore enhanced at strong 't Hooft coupling lambda; for example, eta fund approximately lambda NcNfT3 in four dimensions. Other transport coefficients are analogously enhanced. These results hold with or without a baryon number chemical potential. PMID:17358523

  11. Astronomical reach of fundamental physics

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Adam S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2014-01-01

    Using basic physical arguments, we derive by dimensional and physical analysis the characteristic masses and sizes of important objects in the universe in terms of just a few fundamental constants. This exercise illustrates the unifying power of physics and the profound connections between the small and the large in the cosmos we inhabit. We focus on the minimum and maximum masses of normal stars, the corresponding quantities for neutron stars, the maximum mass of a rocky planet, the maximum mass of a white dwarf, and the mass of a typical galaxy. To zeroth order, we show that all these masses can be expressed in terms of either the Planck mass or the Chandrasekar mass, in combination with various dimensionless quantities. With these examples, we expose the deep interrelationships imposed by nature between disparate realms of the universe and the amazing consequences of the unifying character of physical law. PMID:24477692

  12. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  13. Rare Isotopes and Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, B. Alex; Engel, Jonathan; Haxton, Wick; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Romalis, Michael; Savard, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments searching for new interactions in nuclear beta decay / Klaus P. Jungmann -- The beta-neutrino correlation in sodium-21 and other nuclei / P. A. Vetter ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure and fundamental symmetries/ B. Alex Brown -- Schiff moments and nuclear structure / J. Engel -- Superallowed nuclear beta decay: recent results and their impact on V[symbol] / J. C. Hardy and I. S. Towner -- New calculation of the isospin-symmetry breaking correlation to superallowed Fermi beta decay / I. S. Towner and J. C. Hardy -- Precise measurement of the [symbol]H to [symbol]He mass difference / D. E. Pinegar ... [et al.] -- Limits on scalar currents from the 0+ to 0+ decay of [symbol]Ar and isospin breaking in [symbol]Cl and [symbol]Cl / A. Garcia -- Nuclear constraints on the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction / W. C. Haxton -- Atomic PNC theory: current status and future prospects / M. S. Safronova -- Parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions: what can we learn from nuclear anapole moments? / B. Desplanques -- Proposed experiment for the measurement of the anapole moment in francium / A. Perez Galvan ... [et al.] -- The Radon-EDM experiment / Tim Chupp for the Radon-EDM collaboration -- The lead radius Eexperiment (PREX) and parity violating measurements of neutron densities / C. J. Horowitz -- Nuclear structure aspects of Schiff moment and search for collective enhancements / Naftali Auerbach and Vladimir Zelevinsky -- The interpretation of atomic electric dipole moments: Schiff theorem and its corrections / C. -P. Liu -- T-violation and the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the mercury atom / M. D. Swallows ... [et al.] -- The new concept for FRIB and its potential for fundamental interactions studies / Guy Savard -- Collinear laser spectroscopy and polarized exotic nuclei at NSCL / K. Minamisono -- Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants / M. Pospelov.

  14. Fundamental enabling issues in nanotechnology :

    SciTech Connect

    Floro, Jerrold Anthony; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hearne, Sean Joseph; Hoyt, Jeffrey John; Seel, Steven Craig; Webb, Edmund Blackburn,; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2007-10-01

    To effectively integrate nanotechnology into functional devices, fundamental aspects of material behavior at the nanometer scale must be understood. Stresses generated during thin film growth strongly influence component lifetime and performance; stress has also been proposed as a mechanism for stabilizing supported nanoscale structures. Yet the intrinsic connections between the evolving morphology of supported nanostructures and stress generation are still a matter of debate. This report presents results from a combined experiment and modeling approach to study stress evolution during thin film growth. Fully atomistic simulations are presented predicting stress generation mechanisms and magnitudes during all growth stages, from island nucleation to coalescence and film thickening. Simulations are validated by electrodeposition growth experiments, which establish the dependence of microstructure and growth stresses on process conditions and deposition geometry. Sandia is one of the few facilities with the resources to combine experiments and modeling/theory in this close a fashion. Experiments predicted an ongoing coalescence process that generates signficant tensile stress. Data from deposition experiments also supports the existence of a kinetically limited compressive stress generation mechanism. Atomistic simulations explored island coalescence and deposition onto surfaces intersected by grain boundary structures to permit investigation of stress evolution during later growth stages, e.g. continual island coalescence and adatom incorporation into grain boundaries. The predictive capabilities of simulation permit direct determination of fundamental processes active in stress generation at the nanometer scale while connecting those processes, via new theory, to continuum models for much larger island and film structures. Our combined experiment and simulation results reveal the necessary materials science to tailor stress, and therefore performance, in

  15. Fundamentals and Techniques of Nonimaging

    SciTech Connect

    O'Gallagher, J. J.; Winston, R.

    2003-07-10

    This is the final report describing a long term basic research program in nonimaging optics that has led to major advances in important areas, including solar energy, fiber optics, illumination techniques, light detectors, and a great many other applications. The term ''nonimaging optics'' refers to the optics of extended sources in systems for which image forming is not important, but effective and efficient collection, concentration, transport, and distribution of light energy is. Although some of the most widely known developments of the early concepts have been in the field of solar energy, a broad variety of other uses have emerged. Most important, under the auspices of this program in fundamental research in nonimaging optics established at the University of Chicago with support from the Office of Basic Energy Sciences at the Department of Energy, the field has become very dynamic, with new ideas and concepts continuing to develop, while applications of the early concepts continue to be pursued. While the subject began as part of classical geometrical optics, it has been extended subsequently to the wave optics domain. Particularly relevant to potential new research directions are recent developments in the formalism of statistical and wave optics, which may be important in understanding energy transport on the nanoscale. Nonimaging optics permits the design of optical systems that achieve the maximum possible concentration allowed by physical conservation laws. The earliest designs were constructed by optimizing the collection of the extreme rays from a source to the desired target: the so-called ''edge-ray'' principle. Later, new concentrator types were generated by placing reflectors along the flow lines of the ''vector flux'' emanating from lambertian emitters in various geometries. A few years ago, a new development occurred with the discovery that making the design edge-ray a functional of some other system parameter permits the construction of whole

  16. Review of receptor model fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Ronald C.; Lewis, Charles W.; Hopke, Philip K.; Williamson, Hugh J.

    There are several broad classes of mathematical models used to apportion the aerosol measured at a receptor site to its likely sources. This paper surveys the two types applied in exercises for the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II): chemical mass balance models and multivariate models. The fundamental principles of each are reviewed. Also considered are the specific models available within each class. These include: tracer element, linear programming, ordinary linear least-squares, effective variance least-squares and ridge regression (all solutions to the chemical mass balance equation), and factor analysis, target transformation factor analysis, multiple linear regression and extended Q-mode factor analysis (all multivariate models). In practical application of chemical mass balance models, a frequent problem is the presence of two or more emission sources whose signatures are very similar. Several techniques to reduce the effects of such multicollinearity are discussed. The propagation of errors for source contribution estimates, another practical concern, also is given special attention.

  17. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  18. Fundamental principles of robot vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Ernest L.

    1993-08-01

    Robot vision is a specialty of intelligent machines which describes the interaction between robotic manipulators and machine vision. Early robot vision systems were built to demonstrate that a robot with vision could adapt to changes in its environment. More recently attention is being directed toward machines with expanded adaptation and learning capabilities. The use of robot vision for automatic inspection and recognition of objects for manipulation by an industrial robot or for guidance of a mobile robot are two primary applications. Adaptation and learning characteristics are often lacking in industrial automation and if they can be added successfully, result in a more robust system. Due to a real time requirement, the robot vision methods that have proven most successful have been ones which could be reduced to a simple, fast computation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the fundamental concepts in sufficient detail to provide a starting point for the interested engineer or scientist. A detailed example of a camera system viewing an object and for a simple, two dimensional robot vision system is presented. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for further study are presented.

  19. Technological fundamentals of endoscopic haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1992-01-01

    In order to perform endoscopic haemostasis there exist several different mechanical, biochemical and thermal methods, which may be applied together with rigid or fully flexible endoscopes in different situations. The technological fundamentals of convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer, the irradiation with coherent electromagnetic waves like microwaves and laser radiation and the resistive heating by RF-current are described. A review of the state of the art of haemostatic coagulation by laser radiation (photocoagulation) and radio-frequency currents (surgical diathermy, high-frequency coagulation) is given. The wavelength-dependent interactions of coherent light waves are compared especially for the three mainly different laser types, i.e., carbon-dioxide-, neodymium-YAG- and argon-ion-laser. The well-known disadvantages of the conventional RF-coagulation are overcome by the so-called electrohydrothermosation (EHT), i.e. the liquid-assisted application of resistive heating of biological tissues to perform haemostasis. Different technological solutions for bipolar RF-coagulation probes including ball-tips and forceps are shown and the first experimental results are discussed in comparison. PMID:1595405

  20. Do goldfish miss the fundamental?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, Richard R.

    2003-10-01

    The perception of harmonic complexes was studied in goldfish using classical respiratory conditioning and a stimulus generalization paradigm. Groups of animals were initially conditioned to several harmonic complexes with a fundamental frequency (f0) of 100 Hz. ln some cases the f0 component was present, and in other cases, the f0 component was absent. After conditioning, animals were tested for generalization to novel harmonic complexes having different f0's, some with f0 present and some with f0 absent. Generalization gradients always peaked at 100 Hz, indicating that the pitch value of the conditioning complexes was consistent with the f0, whether or not f0 was present in the conditioning or test complexes. Thus, goldfish do not miss the fundmental with respect to a pitch-like perceptual dimension. However, generalization gradients tended to have different skirt slopes for the f0-present and f0-absent conditioning and test stimuli. This suggests that goldfish distinguish between f0 present/absent stimuli, probably on the basis of a timbre-like perceptual dimension. These and other results demonstrate that goldfish respond to complex sounds as if they possessed perceptual dimensions similar to pitch and timbre as defined for human and other vertebrate listeners. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  1. Fundamentals of the DIGES code

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1994-08-01

    Recently the authors have completed the development of the DIGES code (Direct GEneration of Spectra) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper presents the fundamental theoretical aspects of the code. The basic modeling involves a representation of typical building-foundation configurations as multi degree-of-freedom dynamic which are subjected to dynamic inputs in the form of applied forces or pressure at the superstructure or in the form of ground motions. Both the deterministic as well as the probabilistic aspects of DIGES are described. Alternate ways of defining the seismic input for the estimation of in-structure spectra and their consequences in terms of realistically appraising the variability of the structural response is discussed in detaiL These include definitions of the seismic input by ground acceleration time histories, ground response spectra, Fourier amplitude spectra or power spectral densities. Conversions of one of these forms to another due to requirements imposed by certain analysis techniques have been shown to lead, in certain cases, in controversial results. Further considerations include the definition of the seismic input as the excitation which is directly applied at the foundation of a structure or as the ground motion of the site of interest at a given point. In the latter case issues related to the transferring of this motion to the foundation through convolution/deconvolution and generally through kinematic interaction approaches are considered.

  2. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1992-05-26

    The major portion of this program is devoted to critical ICH phenomena. The topics include edge physics, fast wave propagation, ICH induced high frequency instabilities, and a preliminary antenna design for Ignitor. This research was strongly coordinated with the world's experimental and design teams at JET, Culham, ORNL, and Ignitor. The results have been widely publicized at both general scientific meetings and topical workshops including the speciality workshop on ICRF design and physics sponsored by Lodestar in April 1992. The combination of theory, empirical modeling, and engineering design in this program makes this research particularly important for the design of future devices and for the understanding and performance projections of present tokamak devices. Additionally, the development of a diagnostic of runaway electrons on TEXT has proven particularly useful for the fundamental understanding of energetic electron confinement. This work has led to a better quantitative basis for quasilinear theory and the role of magnetic vs. electrostatic field fluctuations on electron transport. An APS invited talk was given on this subject and collaboration with PPPL personnel was also initiated. Ongoing research on these topics will continue for the remainder fo the contract period and the strong collaborations are expected to continue, enhancing both the relevance of the work and its immediate impact on areas needing critical understanding.

  3. Fundamental mechanisms of micromachine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; REDMOND,JAMES M.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; MAYER,THOMAS K.

    2000-01-01

    Due to extreme surface to volume ratios, adhesion and friction are critical properties for reliability of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS), but are not well understood. In this LDRD the authors established test structures, metrology and numerical modeling to conduct studies on adhesion and friction in MEMS. They then concentrated on measuring the effect of environment on MEMS adhesion. Polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) is the primary material of interest in MEMS because of its integrated circuit process compatibility, low stress, high strength and conformal deposition nature. A plethora of useful micromachined device concepts have been demonstrated using Sandia National Laboratories' sophisticated in-house capabilities. One drawback to polysilicon is that in air the surface oxidizes, is high energy and is hydrophilic (i.e., it wets easily). This can lead to catastrophic failure because surface forces can cause MEMS parts that are brought into contact to adhere rather than perform their intended function. A fundamental concern is how environmental constituents such as water will affect adhesion energies in MEMS. The authors first demonstrated an accurate method to measure adhesion as reported in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 through 5, they then studied the effect of water on adhesion depending on the surface condition (hydrophilic or hydrophobic). As described in Chapter 2, they find that adhesion energy of hydrophilic MEMS surfaces is high and increases exponentially with relative humidity (RH). Surface roughness is the controlling mechanism for this relationship. Adhesion can be reduced by several orders of magnitude by silane coupling agents applied via solution processing. They decrease the surface energy and render the surface hydrophobic (i.e. does not wet easily). However, only a molecular monolayer coats the surface. In Chapters 3-5 the authors map out the extent to which the monolayer reduces adhesion versus RH. They find that adhesion is independent of

  4. Fundamental Mechanisms of Interface Roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Randall L. Headrick

    2009-01-06

    Publication quality results were obtained for several experiments and materials systems including: (i) Patterning and smoothening of sapphire surfaces by energetic Ar+ ions. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) experiments were performed in the system at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X21 beamline. Ar+ ions in the energy range from 300 eV to 1000 eV were used to produce ripples on the surfaces of single-crystal sapphire. It was found that the ripple wavelength varies strongly with the angle of incidence of the ions, which increase significantly as the angle from normal is varied from 55° to 35°. A smooth region was found for ion incidence less than 35° away from normal incidence. In this region a strong smoothening mechanism with strength proportional to the second derivative of the height of the surface was found to be responsible for the effect. The discovery of this phase transition between stable and unstable regimes as the angle of incidence is varied has also stimulated new work by other groups in the field. (ii) Growth of Ge quantum dots on Si(100) and (111). We discovered the formation of quantum wires on 4° misoriented Si(111) using real-time GISAXS during the deposition of Ge. The results represent the first time-resolved GISAXS study of Ge quantum dot formation. (iii) Sputter deposition of amorphous thin films and multilayers composed of WSi2 and Si. Our in-situ GISAXS experiments reveal fundamental roughening and smoothing phenomena on surfaces during film deposition. The main results of this work is that the WSi2 layers actually become smoother during deposition due to the smoothening effect of energetic particles in the sputter deposition process.

  5. Astronomia Motivadora no Ensino Fundamental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, J.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2008-09-01

    O objetivo principal deste trabalho é procurar desenvolver o interesse dos alunos pelas ciências através da Astronomia. Uma pesquisa com perguntas sobre Astronomia foi realizada junto a 161 alunos do Ensino Fundamental, com o intuito de descobrir conhecimentos prévios dos alunos sobre o assunto. Constatou-se, por exemplo, que 29,3% da 6ª série responderam corretamente o que é eclipse, 30,0% da 8ª série acertaram o que a Astronomia estuda, enquanto 42,3% dos alunos da 5ª série souberam definir o Sol. Pretende-se ampliar as turmas participantes e trabalhar, principalmente de forma prática com: dimensões e escalas no Sistema Solar, construção de luneta, questões como dia e noite, estações do ano e eclipses. Busca-se abordar, também, outros conteúdos de Física tais como a óptica na construção da luneta, e a mecânica no trabalho com escalas e medidas, e ao utilizar uma luminária para representar o Sol na questão do eclipse, e de outras disciplinas como a Matemática na transformação de unidades, regras de três; Artes na modelagem ou desenho dos planetas; a própria História com relação à busca pela origem do universo, e a Informática que possibilita a busca mais rápida por informações, além de permitir simulações e visualizações de imagens importantes. Acredita-se que a Astronomia é importante no processo ensino aprendizagem, pois permite a discussão de temas curiosos como, por exemplo, a origem do universo, viagens espaciais a existência ou não de vida em outros planetas, além de temas atuais como as novas tecnologias.

  6. Development of potentiometric urea biosensor based on urease immobilized in PVA-PAA composite matrix for estimation of blood urea nitrogen (BUN).

    PubMed

    Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Topkar, Anita; D'Souza, Stanislaus F

    2008-04-24

    A urea biosensor was developed using the urease entrapped in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyacrylamide (PAA) composite polymer membrane. The membrane was prepared on the cheesecloth support by gamma-irradiation induced free radical polymerization. The performance of the biosensor was monitored using a flow-through cell, where the membrane was kept in conjugation with the ammonia selective electrode and urea was added as substrate in phosphate buffer medium. The ammonia produced as a result of enzymatic reaction was monitored potentiometrically. The potential of the system was amplified using an electronic circuit incorporating operational amplifiers. Automated data acquisition was carried by connecting the output to a 12-bit analog to digital converter card. The sensor working range was 1-1000 mM urea with a response time of 120 s. The enzyme membranes could be reused 8 times with more than 90% accuracy. The biosensor was tested for blood urea nitrogen (BUN) estimation in clinical serum samples. The biosensor showed good correlation with commercial Infinitytrade mark BUN reagent method using a clinical chemistry autoanalyzer. The membranes could be preserved in phosphate buffer containing dithiothreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol and glycerol for a period of two months without significant loss of enzyme activity. PMID:18329719

  7. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles by self-assembling reverse micelle cores of PS-b-PAA for functional textile applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akpolat, Leyla Budama; Çakır, Burçin Acar; Topel, Önder Hoda, Numan

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized within poly(styrene)-b-poly(acrylic acid) micelles. • The copolymer solution including nano TiO{sub 2} was coated onto textile fabrics. • UV-protective factor of nano TiO{sub 2} coated fabrics was estimated as 50+. • Nano TiO{sub 2} coated fabrics was found to exhibit a high photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (i.e., titanium(IV) oxide, TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been fabricated using a copolymer templating technique in micellar solution of poly(styrene)-block-poly(acrylic acid), PS(10912)-b-PAA(4842) synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The size and morphology of the synthesized TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been characterized via TEM and XRD measurements. The average size of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was determined as 13 ± 3 and 13 ± 4 nm for titanium:copolymer ratios of 20:1 and 33:1, respectively. The copolymer solution including nano TiO{sub 2} particles has been coated onto textile fabrics to enhance their UV-blocking and self-cleaning properties. It has been determined that nano TiO{sub 2} coated textile fabrics have very good UV-blocking properties with 50+ of the ultraviolet protecting factor (UPF) and high photocatalytic efficiency with 69.2% of the photodegradation of methylene blue.

  8. Investigating the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental theorem of calculus, in its simplified complexity, connects differential and integral calculus. The power of the theorem comes not merely from recognizing it as a mathematical fact but from using it as a systematic tool. As a high school calculus teacher, the author developed and taught lessons on this fundamental theorem that were…

  9. Fundamentals of fossil simulator instructor training

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This single-volume, looseleaf text introduces the beginning instructor to fundamental instructor training principles, and then shows how to apply those principles to fossil simulator training. Topics include the fundamentals of classroom instruction, the learning process, course development, and the specifics of simulator training program development.

  10. Individual differences in fundamental social motives.

    PubMed

    Neel, Rebecca; Kenrick, Douglas T; White, Andrew Edward; Neuberg, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Motivation has long been recognized as an important component of how people both differ from, and are similar to, each other. The current research applies the biologically grounded fundamental social motives framework, which assumes that human motivational systems are functionally shaped to manage the major costs and benefits of social life, to understand individual differences in social motives. Using the Fundamental Social Motives Inventory, we explore the relations among the different fundamental social motives of Self-Protection, Disease Avoidance, Affiliation, Status, Mate Seeking, Mate Retention, and Kin Care; the relationships of the fundamental social motives to other individual difference and personality measures including the Big Five personality traits; the extent to which fundamental social motives are linked to recent life experiences; and the extent to which life history variables (e.g., age, sex, childhood environment) predict individual differences in the fundamental social motives. Results suggest that the fundamental social motives are a powerful lens through which to examine individual differences: They are grounded in theory, have explanatory value beyond that of the Big Five personality traits, and vary meaningfully with a number of life history variables. A fundamental social motives approach provides a generative framework for considering the meaning and implications of individual differences in social motivation. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26371400

  11. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    mechanics, which is assumed, but to examine whether it gives a consistent account of measurement. The conclusion is that after a measurement, interference terms are ‘effectively’ absent; the set of ‘one-to-one correlations between states of the apparatus and the object’ has the same form as that of everyday statistics and is thus a probability distribution. This probability distribution refers to potentialities, only one of which is actually realized in any one trial. Opinions may differ on whether their treatment is any less vulnerable to criticisms such as those of Bell. To sum up, Gottfried and Yan’s book contains a vast amount of knowledge and understanding. As well as explaining the way in which quantum theory works, it attempts to illuminate fundamental aspects of the theory. A typical example is the ‘fable’ elaborated in Gottfried’s article in Nature cited above, that if Newton were shown Maxwell’s equations and the Lorentz force law, he could deduce the meaning of E and B, but if Maxwell were shown Schrödinger’s equation, he could not deduce the meaning of Psi. For use with a well-constructed course (and, of course, this is the avowed purpose of the book; a useful range of problems is provided for each chapter), or for the relative expert getting to grips with particular aspects of the subject or aiming for a deeper understanding, the book is certainly ideal. It might be suggested, though, that, even compared to the first edition, the isolated learner might find the wide range of topics, and the very large number of mathematical and conceptual techniques, introduced in necessarily limited space, somewhat overwhelming. The second book under consideration, that of Schwabl, contains ‘Advanced’ elements of quantum theory; it is designed for a course following on from one for which Gottfried and Yan, or Schwabl’s own `Quantum Mechanics' might be recommended. It is the second edition in English, and is a translation of the third German edition

  12. Rotor-Liquid-Fundament System's Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kydyrbekuly, A.

    The work is devoted to research of oscillation and sustainability of stationary twirl of vertical flexible static dynamically out-of-balance rotor with cavity partly filled with liquid and set on relative frame fundament. The accounting of such factors like oscillation of fundament, liquid oscillation, influence of asymmetry of installation of a rotor on a shaft, anisotropism of shaft support and fundament, static and dynamic out-of-balance of a rotor, an external friction, an internal friction of a shaft, allows to settle an invoice more precisely kinematic and dynamic characteristics of system.

  13. Modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Vitek, J.M.; Goldak, J.A.; DebRoy, T.A.; Rappaz, M.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the mathematical modeling of fundamental phenomena in welds are summarized. State-of-the-art mathematical models, advances in computational techniques, emerging high-performance computers, and experimental validation techniques have provided significant insight into the fundamental factors that control the development of the weldment. The current status and scientific issues in the areas of heat and fluid flow in welds, heat source metal interaction, solidification microstructure, and phase transformations are assessed. Future research areas of major importance for understanding the fundamental phenomena in weld behavior are identified.

  14. Fundamentals of preparative and nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Felinger, Attila; Katti, Anita; Shirazi, Dean G

    2006-02-01

    The second edition of Fundamentals of Preparative and Nonlinear Chromatography is devoted to the fundamentals of a new process of purification or extraction of chemicals or proteins widely used in the pharmaceutical industry and in preparative chromatography. This process permits the preparation of extremely pure compounds satisfying the requests of the US Food and Drug Administration. The book describes the fundamentals of thermodynamics, mass transfer kinetics, and flow through porous media that are relevant to chromatography. It presents the models used in chromatography and their solutions, discusses the applications made, describes the different processes used, their numerous applications, and the methods of optimization of the experimental conditions of this process.

  15. Instructor Special Report: RIF (Reading Is FUNdamental)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1976

    1976-01-01

    At a time when innovative programs of the sixties are quickly falling out of the picture, Reading Is FUNdamental, after ten years and five million free paperbacks, continues to expand and show results. (Editor)

  16. Precision laser spectroscopy in fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolachevsky, N. N.; Khabarova, K. Yu

    2014-12-01

    The role of precision spectroscopic measurements in the development of fundamental theories is discussed, with particular emphasis on the hydrogen atom, the simplest stable atomic system amenable to the accurate calculation of energy levels from quantum electrodynamics. Research areas that greatly benefited from the participation of the Lebedev Physical Institute are reviewed, including the violation of fundamental symmetries, the stability of the fine-structure constant α, and sensitive tests of quantum electrodynamics.

  17. Fundamental understanding of matter: an engineering viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Cort, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of matter is a continuous process that should produce physical data for use by engineers and scientists in their work. Lack of fundamental property data in any engineering endeavor cannot be mitigated by theoretical work that is not confirmed by physical experiments. An engineering viewpoint will be presented to justify the need for understanding of matter. Examples will be given in the energy engineering field to outline the importance of further understanding of material and fluid properties and behavior. Cases will be cited to show the effects of various data bases in energy, mass, and momentum transfer. The status of fundamental data sources will be discussed in terms of data centers, new areas of engineering, and the progress in measurement techniques. Conclusions and recommendations will be outlined to improve the current situation faced by engineers in carrying out their work. 4 figures.

  18. Sensors, Volume 1, Fundamentals and General Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandke, Thomas; Ko, Wen H.

    1996-12-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This volume deals with the fundamentals and common principles of sensors and covers the wide areas of principles, technologies, signal processing, and applications. Contents include: Sensor Fundamentals, e.g. Sensor Parameters, Modeling, Design and Packaging; Basic Sensor Technologies, e.g. Thin and Thick Films, Integrated Magnetic Sensors, Optical Fibres and Intergrated Optics, Ceramics and Oxides; Sensor Interfaces, e.g. Signal Processing, Multisensor Signal Processing, Smart Sensors, Interface Systems; Sensor Applications, e.g. Automotive: On-board Sensors, Traffic Surveillance and Control, Home Appliances, Environmental Monitoring, etc. This volume is an indispensable reference work and text book for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  19. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Facilities at NIST

    PubMed Central

    Nico, J. S.; Arif, M.; Dewey, M. S.; Gentile, T. R.; Gilliam, D. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Jacobson, D. L.; Thompson, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    The program in fundamental neutron physics at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) began nearly two decades ago. The Neutron Interactions and Dosimetry Group currently maintains four neutron beam lines dedicated to studies of fundamental neutron interactions. The neutrons are provided by the NIST Center for Neutron Research, a national user facility for studies that include condensed matter physics, materials science, nuclear chemistry, and biological science. The beam lines for fundamental physics experiments include a high-intensity polychromatic beam, a 0.496 nm monochromatic beam, a 0.89 nm monochromatic beam, and a neutron interferometer and optics facility. This paper discusses some of the parameters of the beam lines along with brief presentations of some of the experiments performed at the facilities. PMID:27308110

  20. Fundamental Vocabulary Selection Based on Word Familiarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Kaname; Kanasugi, Tomoko; Amano, Shigeaki

    This paper proposes a new method for selecting fundamental vocabulary. We are presently constructing the Fundamental Vocabulary Knowledge-base of Japanese that contains integrated information on syntax, semantics and pragmatics, for the purposes of advanced natural language processing. This database mainly consists of a lexicon and a treebank: Lexeed (a Japanese Semantic Lexicon) and the Hinoki Treebank. Fundamental vocabulary selection is the first step in the construction of Lexeed. The vocabulary should include sufficient words to describe general concepts for self-expandability, and should not be prohibitively large to construct and maintain. There are two conventional methods for selecting fundamental vocabulary. The first is intuition-based selection by experts. This is the traditional method for making dictionaries. A weak point of this method is that the selection strongly depends on personal intuition. The second is corpus-based selection. This method is superior in objectivity to intuition-based selection, however, it is difficult to compile a sufficiently balanced corpora. We propose a psychologically-motivated selection method that adopts word familiarity as the selection criterion. Word familiarity is a rating that represents the familiarity of a word as a real number ranging from 1 (least familiar) to 7 (most familiar). We determined the word familiarity ratings statistically based on psychological experiments over 32 subjects. We selected about 30,000 words as the fundamental vocabulary, based on a minimum word familiarity threshold of 5. We also evaluated the vocabulary by comparing its word coverage with conventional intuition-based and corpus-based selection over dictionary definition sentences and novels, and demonstrated the superior coverage of our lexicon. Based on this, we conclude that the proposed method is superior to conventional methods for fundamental vocabulary selection.

  1. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

  2. Fundamental principals of battery design: Porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Deyang

    2014-06-01

    The fundamental aspects of a porous electrode from electrochemistry and material chemistry standpoints are discussed in the light of battery engineering designs. For example, the ionic diffusion, the electrode-electrolyte interface, interfacial charge transfer and electrode catalytic processes are discussed. The discussion of such fundamental electrochemical aspects is in conjunction with the design of batteries, e.g. the electrochemical assessable surface area for porous electrode, electrode catalytic reactions. The porous electrodes used as a gas diffusion electrode and the electrode in a supercapacitor are discussed to demonstrate the application of electrochemical principals in battery design.

  3. Dark Energy: A Crisis for Fundamental Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Stubbs, Christopher [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    2010-09-01

    Astrophysical observations provide robust evidence that our current picture of fundamental physics is incomplete. The discovery in 1998 that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating (apparently due to gravitational repulsion between regions of empty space!) presents us with a profound challenge, at the interface between gravity and quantum mechanics. This "Dark Energy" problem is arguably the most pressing open question in modern fundamental physics. The first talk will describe why the Dark Energy problem constitutes a crisis, with wide-reaching ramifications. One consequence is that we should probe our understanding of gravity at all accessible scales, and the second talk will present experiments and observations that are exploring this issue.

  4. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

  5. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors and generators; AC power and reactive components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; transformers; and electrical test instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

  6. Nucleosynthesis and the variation of fundamental couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Christian M.; Schaefer, Gregor; Wetterich, Christof

    2004-10-15

    We determine the influence of a variation of the fundamental 'constants' on the predicted helium abundance in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. The analytic estimate is performed in two parts: the first step determines the dependence of the helium abundance on the nuclear physics parameters, while the second step relates those parameters to the fundamental couplings of particle physics. This procedure can incorporate in a flexible way the time variation of several couplings within a grand unified theory while keeping the nuclear physics computation separate from any GUT model dependence.

  7. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Electrical Science, Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Electrical Science Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of electrical theory, terminology, and application. The handbook includes information on alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) theory, circuits, motors, and generators; AC power and reactive transformers; and electrical test components; batteries; AC and DC voltage regulators; instruments and measuring devices. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility electrical equipment.

  8. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Mathematics, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Mathematics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mathematics and its application to facility operation. The handbook includes a review of introductory mathematics and the concepts and functional use of algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus. Word problems, equations, calculations, and practical exercises that require the use of each of the mathematical concepts are also presented. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding and performing basic mathematical calculations that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations.

  9. Fundamental monogamy relation between contextuality and nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Kurzyński, Paweł; Cabello, Adán; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2014-03-14

    We show that the no-disturbance principle imposes a tradeoff between locally contextual correlations violating the Klyachko-Can-Biniciogˇlu-Shumovski inequality and spatially separated correlations violating the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality. The violation of one inequality forbids the violation of the other. We also obtain the corresponding monogamy relation imposed by quantum theory for a qutrit-qubit system. Our results show the existence of fundamental monogamy relations between contextuality and nonlocality that suggest that entanglement might be a particular form of a more fundamental resource. PMID:24679270

  10. Laser Wakefield Acceleration and Fundamental Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2011-06-20

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) along with the now available laser technology allows us to look at TeV physics both in leptons and hadrons. Near future proof-of-principle experiments for a collider as well as high energy frontier experiments without a collider paradigm are suggested. The intense laser can also contribute to other fundamental physics explorations such as those of dark matter and dark energy candidates. Finally the combination of intense laser and laser-accelerated particles (electrons, hadrons, gammas) provides a further avenue of fundamental research.

  11. Fundamentals of Pharmacogenetics in Personalized, Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Roland; Yin, DeLu Tyler

    2016-09-01

    This article introduces fundamental principles of pharmacogenetics as applied to personalized and precision medicine. Pharmacogenetics establishes relationships between pharmacology and genetics by connecting phenotypes and genotypes in predicting the response of therapeutics in individual patients. We describe differences between precision and personalized medicine and relate principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics to applications in laboratory medicine. We also review basic principles of pharmacogenetics, including its evolution, how it enables the practice of personalized therapeutics, and the role of the clinical laboratory. These fundamentals are a segue for understanding specific clinical applications of pharmacogenetics described in subsequent articles in this issue. PMID:27514461

  12. Fundamental Monogamy Relation between Contextuality and Nonlocality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyński, Paweł; Cabello, Adán; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2014-03-01

    We show that the no-disturbance principle imposes a tradeoff between locally contextual correlations violating the Klyachko-Can-Binicioǧlu-Shumovski inequality and spatially separated correlations violating the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality. The violation of one inequality forbids the violation of the other. We also obtain the corresponding monogamy relation imposed by quantum theory for a qutrit-qubit system. Our results show the existence of fundamental monogamy relations between contextuality and nonlocality that suggest that entanglement might be a particular form of a more fundamental resource.

  13. Fundamental symmetries and interactions—selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2015-11-01

    In the field of fundamental interactions and symmetries numerous experiments are underway or planned in order to verify the standard model in particle physics, to search for possible extensions to it or to exploit the standard model for extracting most precise values for fundamental constants. We cover selected recent developments, in particular such which exploit stored and confined particles. Emphasis is on experiments with transformative character, i.e. such which may be able to guide and steer theoretical model building into new but defined directions. Among those are projects with antiprotons, muons and certain selected atoms and atomic nuclei.

  14. Radio and Television Repairer Fundamentals. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maul, Chuck

    This self-contained student manual on fundamentals of radio and television repair is designed to help trade and industrial students relate work experience on the job to information studied at school. Designed for individualized instruction under the supervision of a coordinator or instructor, the manual has 9 sections, each containing 2 to 10…

  15. Reversing: A Fundamental Idea in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Ginat, David

    2008-01-01

    Reversing is the notion of thinking or working in reverse. Computer science textbooks and tutors recognize it primarily in the form of recursion. However, recursion is only one form of reversing. Reversing appears in the computer science curriculum in many other forms, at various intellectual levels, in a variety of fundamental courses. As such,…

  16. Areas and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vajiac, A.; Vajiac, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present a concise, yet self-contained module for teaching the notion of area and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus for different groups of students. This module contains two different levels of rigour, depending on the class it used for. It also incorporates a technological component. (Contains 6 figures.)

  17. Measurement and Fundamental Processes in Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Gregg

    2015-07-01

    In the standard mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics, measurement is an additional, exceptional fundamental process rather than an often complex, but ordinary process which happens also to serve a particular epistemic function: during a measurement of one of its properties which is not already determined by a preceding measurement, a measured system, even if closed, is taken to change its state discontinuously rather than continuously as is usual. Many, including Bell, have been concerned about the fundamental role thus given to measurement in the foundation of the theory. Others, including the early Bohr and Schwinger, have suggested that quantum mechanics naturally incorporates the unavoidable uncontrollable disturbance of physical state that accompanies any local measurement without the need for an exceptional fundamental process or a special measurement theory. Disturbance is unanalyzable for Bohr, but for Schwinger it is due to physical interactions' being borne by fundamental particles having discrete properties and behavior which is beyond physical control. Here, Schwinger's approach is distinguished from more well known treatments of measurement, with the conclusion that, unlike most, it does not suffer under Bell's critique of quantum measurement. Finally, Schwinger's critique of measurement theory is explicated as a call for a deeper investigation of measurement processes that requires the use of a theory of quantum fields.

  18. Fundamental Concepts Bridging Education and the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Steve; Foisy, Lorie-Marlène Brault

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of papers have already discussed the relevance of brain research for education, the fundamental concepts and discoveries connecting education and the brain have not been systematically reviewed yet. In this paper, four of these concepts are presented and evidence concerning each one is reviewed. First, the concept of…

  19. Fundamentals of Library Science. Library Science 424.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Donald L.

    An introductory letter, a list of general instructions on how to proceed with a correspondence course, a syllabus, and an examination request form are presented for a correspondence course in the fundamentals of library science offered by the University of New Mexico's Division of Continuing Education and Community Services. The course is a survey…

  20. Prequantum Classical Statistical Field Theory: Fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2011-03-28

    We present fundamentals of a prequantum model with hidden variables of the classical field type. In some sense this is the comeback of classical wave mechanics. Our approach also can be considered as incorporation of quantum mechanics into classical signal theory. All quantum averages (including correlations of entangled systems) can be represented as classical signal averages and correlations.

  1. Mathematical Literacy--It's Become Fundamental

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrone, Sharon Soucy; Dossey, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The rising tide of numbers and statistics in daily life signals a need for a fundamental broadening of the concept of literacy: mathematical literacy assuming a coequal role in the curriculum alongside language-based literacy. Mathematical literacy is not about studying higher levels of formal mathematics, but about making math relevant and…

  2. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  3. [Reading Is Fundamental: Pamphlets and Newsletters].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.

    These pamphlets and newsletters are products of the Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) program, which provides free and inexpensive books to children through a variety of community organizations throughout the country. The newsletter appears monthly and contains reports on specific programs, trends in the national program, RIF involvement with other…

  4. A Fundamental Breakdown. Part II: Manipulative Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, J. Scott; Mohr, Derek J.

    2005-01-01

    In the May, 2005, issue of "TEPE," the "Research to Practice" section initiated a two-part series focused on assessing fundamental locomotor and manipulative skills. The series was generated in response to research by Pappa, Evanggelinou, & Karabourniotis (2005), recommending that curricular programming in physical education at the elementary…

  5. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  6. Drafting Fundamentals. Drafting Module 1. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Missouri Vocational Instruction Management System instructor's drafting guide has been keyed to the drafting competency profile developed by state industry and education professionals. The guide contains a cross-reference table of instructional materials. Ten units cover drafting fundamentals: (1) introduction to drafting; (2) general safety;…

  7. A Fundamental Theorem on Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2003-05-01

    A fundamental theorem on particle acceleration is derived from the reciprocity principle of electromagnetism and a rigorous proof of the theorem is presented. The theorem establishes a relation between acceleration and radiation, which is particularly useful for insightful understanding of and practical calculation about the first order acceleration in which energy gain of the accelerated particle is linearly proportional to the accelerating field.

  8. Fundamental Limitations in Advanced LC Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailichenko, A. A.

    2010-11-04

    Fundamental limitations in acceleration gradient, emittance, alignment and polarization in acceleration schemes are considered in application for novel schemes of acceleration, including laser-plasma and structure-based schemes. Problems for each method are underlined whenever it is possible. Main attention is paid to the scheme with a tilted laser bunch.

  9. Fundamental issues on electromagnetic fields (EMF).

    PubMed

    Novini, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper will examine the fundamental principals of Electromagnetic Field Radiation. The discussion will include: The basic physical characteristics of magnetic and electric fields, the numerous sources of EMF in our everyday lives, ways to detect and measure EMF accurately, what to look for in EMF instruments, and the issues and misconceptions on shielding and exposure reduction. PMID:8098895

  10. Getting a Better Grasp on Flu Fundamentals

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Better Grasp on Flu Fundamentals Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Getting a Better Grasp on Flu ... Seasonal Flu Patterns? Forecasting Flu This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  11. Applied and fundamental aspects of fusion science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, Alexander V.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion research is driven by the applied goal of energy production from fusion reactions. There is, however, a wealth of fundamental physics to be discovered and studied along the way. This Commentary discusses selected developments in diagnostics and present-day research topics in high-temperature plasma physics.

  12. Course Objectives: Electronic Fundamentals, EL16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David H.

    The general objective, recommended text, and specific objectives of a course titled "Electronic Fundamentals," as offered at St. Lawrence College of Applied Arts and Technology, are provided. The general objective of the course is "to acquire an understanding of diodes, transistors, and tubes, and so be able to analyze the operation of single…

  13. Solar Energy: Solar System Design Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system design fundamentals is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy…

  14. Uncovering Racial Bias in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The portrayal of African Americans in nursing fundamentals textbooks was analyzed, resulting in 11 themes in the areas of history, culture, and physical assessment. Few African American leaders were included, and racial bias and stereotyping were apparent. Differences were often discussed using Eurocentric norms, and language tended to minimize…

  15. RLIN Product Batch: Fundamental Design Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1984-01-01

    Considers fundamental decisions that shaped the output products of Research Libraries Information Network. Product Batch was designed using single data definition (RMARC) combined with standard PL/I, modular programing techniques, program documentation. Choice of software and programing languages, other design aspects (accountability, count…

  16. Fundamental and Gradient Differences in Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herschensohn, Julia

    2009-01-01

    This article reexamines Bley-Vroman's original (1990) and evolved fundamental difference hypothesis that argues that differences in path and endstate of first language acquisition and adult foreign language learning result from differences in the acquisition procedure (i.e., language faculty and cognitive strategies, respectively). The evolved…

  17. Retention of Electronic Fundamentals: Differences Among Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kirk A.

    Criterion-referenced tests were used to measure the learning and retention of a sample of material taught by means of programed instruction in the Avionics Fundamentals Course, Class A. It was found that the students knew about 30 percent of the material before reading the programs, that mastery rose to a very high level on the immediate posttest,…

  18. Fundamental Theorems of Algebra for the Perplexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poodiak, Robert; LeClair, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental theorem of algebra for the complex numbers states that a polynomial of degree n has n roots, counting multiplicity. This paper explores the "perplex number system" (also called the "hyperbolic number system" and the "spacetime number system") In this system (which has extra roots of +1 besides the usual [plus or minus]1 of the…

  19. Fundamental Physics for Probing and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Wade

    2006-12-01

    This book addresses the question 'What is physics for?' Physics has provided many answers for mankind by extending his ability to see. Modern technology has enabled the power of physics to see into objects to be used in archaeology, medicine including therapy, geophysics, forensics and other spheres important to the good of society. The book looks at the fundamental physics of the various methods and how they are used by technology. These methods are magnetic resonance, ionising radiation and sound. By taking a broad view over the whole field it encourages comparisons, but also addresses questions of risk and benefit to society from a fundamental viewpoint. This textbook has developed from a course given to third year students at Oxford and is written so that it can be used coherently as a basis for shortened courses by omitting a number of chapters.

  20. Three fundamental problems of molecular statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenchikov, M. A.; Potekaev, A. I.; Bubenchikov, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    Three fundamental problems of molecular statistics can be identified using the shape of a nanoparticle and the curvature of a λ-layer surrounding it, which correspond to the polar, axial, and plane symmetry. Within the framework of a single-velocity approximation, solutions to these problems are constructed and formulas for coefficients of average resistance to motion of variously-shaped particles are found.

  1. DOE fundamentals handbook: Mechanical science. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Mechanical Science Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mechanical components and mechanical science. The handbook includes information diesel engines, heat exchangers, pumps, valves, and miscellaneous mechanical components. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the construction and operation of mechanical components that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  2. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the two modules: structure of metals (bonding, common lattic types, grain structure/boundary, polymorphis, alloys, imperfections in metals) and properties of metals (stress, strain, Young modulus, stress-strain relation, physical properties, working of metals, corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, tritium/material compatibility).

  3. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Mechanical Science Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mechanical components and mechanical science. The handbook includes information on diesel engines, heat exchangers, pumps, valves, and miscellaneous mechanical components. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the construction and operation of mechanical components that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  4. Fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    For several years the authors have performed fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization (MPI). We will present a potpourri of techniques and results chosen to illustrate the interesting complexities of molecular MPI. Techniques used include time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, supersonic expansion cooling of molecular beams, harmonic generation, two-color laser MPI, and polarization spectroscopy. Whenever possible the relevance of these results to resonance ionization spectroscopy schemes will be delineated. 23 references, 10 figures.

  5. Fundamental plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for fundamental plasma emission by the three-wave processes L + or - S to T (where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and transverse waves, respectively) is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes are identified. In addition the rates, path-integrated wave temperatures, and limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation are derived.

  6. Fundamental Limits to Extinction by Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, O. D.; Hsu, C. W.; Reid, M. T. H.; Qiu, W.; DeLacy, B. G.; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Soljačić, M.; Johnson, S. G.

    2014-03-01

    We show that there are shape-independent upper bounds to the extinction cross section per unit volume of dilute, randomly arranged nanoparticles, given only material permittivity. Underlying the limits are restrictive sum rules that constrain the distribution of quasistatic eigenvalues. Surprisingly, optimally designed spheroids, with only a single quasistatic degree of freedom, reach the upper bounds for four permittivity values. Away from these permittivities, we demonstrate computationally optimized structures that surpass spheroids and approach the fundamental limits.

  7. Baryogenesis and its implications to fundamental physics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, M.

    2008-08-08

    In this talk I shall explain some basic concepts of baryogenesis and leptogenesis theory, and a new idea of experimental method of verification of fundamental ingredients of leptogenesis theory; the Majorana nature and the absolute magnitude of neutrino masses. Both of these are important to the quest of physics beyond the standard theory, and have far reaching implications irrespective of any particular medel of leptogenesis. If this new method works ideally, there is even a further possibility of detecting relic neutrinos.

  8. Fundamental Processes in Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Thomas M.; Driscoll, C. Fred

    2009-11-30

    This research focuses on fundamental processes in plasmas, and emphasizes problems for which precise experimental tests of theory can be obtained. Experiments are performed on non-neutral plasmas, utilizing three electron traps and one ion trap with a broad range of operating regimes and diagnostics. Theory is focused on fundamental plasma and fluid processes underlying collisional transport and fluid turbulence, using both analytic techniques and medium-scale numerical simulations. The simplicity of these systems allows a depth of understanding and a precision of comparison between theory and experiment which is rarely possible for neutral plasmas in complex geometry. The recent work has focused on three areas in basic plasma physics. First, experiments and theory have probed fundamental characteristics of plasma waves: from the low-amplitude thermal regime, to inviscid damping and fluid echoes, to cold fluid waves in cryogenic ion plasmas. Second, the wide-ranging effects of dissipative separatrices have been studied experimentally and theoretically, finding novel wave damping and coupling effects and important plasma transport effects. Finally, correlated systems have been investigated experimentally and theoretically: UCSD experients have now measured the Salpeter correlation enhancement, and theory work has characterized the 'guiding center atoms of antihydrogen created at CERN.

  9. Fundamental Physics Explored with High Intensity Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.; Homma, K.

    2012-10-01

    Over the last century the method of particle acceleration to high energies has become the prime approach to explore the fundamental nature of matter in laboratory. It appears that the latest search of the contemporary accelerator based on the colliders shows a sign of saturation (or at least a slow-down) in increasing its energy and other necessary parameters to extend this frontier. We suggest two pronged approach enabled by the recent progress in high intensity lasers. First we envision the laser-driven plasma accelerator may be able to extend the reach of the collider. For this approach to bear fruit, we need to develop the technology of high averaged power laser in addition to the high intensity. For this we mention that the latest research effort of ICAN is an encouraging sign. In addition to this, we now introduce the concept of the noncollider paradigm in exploring fundamental physics with high intensity (and large energy) lasers. One of the examples we mention is the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) far beyond TeV without large luminosity. If we relax or do not require the large luminosity necessary for colliders, but solely in ultrahigh energy frontier, we are still capable of exploring such a fundamental issue. Given such a high energetic particle source and high-intensity laser fields simultaneously, we expect to be able to access new aspects on the matter and the vacuum structure from fundamental physical point of views. LWFA naturally exploits the nonlinear optical effects in the plasma when it becomes of relativistic intensity. Normally nonlinear optical effects are discussed based upon polarization susceptibility of matter to external fields. We suggest application of this concept even to the vacuum structure as a new kind of order parameter to discuss vacuum-originating phenomena at semimacroscopic scales. This viewpoint unifies the following observables with the unprecedented experimental environment we envision; the dispersion relation of

  10. 146 Kepler-Lamost targets fundamental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yaqian

    2015-08-01

    Accurate stellar fundamental parameters with high precision are important for distinguishing stellar populationand star study.Turn-off stars are in the relatively vital stellar evolution state. Studying turn-off stars can help us to have a more comprehensive understand of the stellar physics.With the help of observation provided by Lamost project, we obtain atmospheric parameters of 146 turn-off stars from LSP3 pipeline. Combined with stellar pulsation data from Kepler, we can get asteroseismic characteristic of stars,such as Δν and νmax.In this paper,we constructed a grid of evolutionary models, with the mass range from 0.8 to 2.5 M⊙ and metallicities Zini = 0.0085, 0.0105, 0.0130, 0.0165, 0.0200, 0.0250, 0.0300, 0.0400 (i.e.[Fe/H] from -0.3 to 0.4dex).All evolutionary tracks were started in the pre-main sequence birth line and ended at the base of Red Giant Branch.Based on the stellar model grid we constructed,as well as Kepler-Lamost observations, we obtained fundamental parameters of 146 around turn-off stars, and found that 112 targets lied in turn-off state or in the Main Sequence,15 targets are subgiant stars and 7 targets have evolved to the red giants stage.Then we use pulsation code(JIG) of Guenther to extract theorical individual frequencies and calculate theorical Δν.Meanwhile we obtained more precise fundamental parameters of these stars.

  11. Model for a fundamental theory with supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, Seiichiro

    Physics in the year 2006 is tightly constrained by experiment, observation, and mathematical consistency. The Standard Model provides a remarkably precise description of particle physics, and general relativity is quite successful in describing gravitational phenomena. At the same time, it is clear that a more fundamental theory is needed for several distinct reasons. Here we consider a new approach, which begins with the unusually ambitious point of view that a truly fundamental theory should aspire to explaining the origins of Lorentz invariance, gravity, gauge fields and their symmetry, supersymmetry, fermionic fields, bosonic fields, quantum mechanics and spacetime. The present dissertation is organized so that it starts with the most conventional ideas for extending the Standard Model and ends with a microscopic statistical picture, which is actually the logical starting point of the theory, but which is also the most remote excursion from conventional physics. One motivation for the present work is the fact that a Euclidean path integral in quantum physics is equivalent to a partition function in statistical physics. This suggests that the most fundamental description of nature may be statistical. This dissertation may be regarded as an attempt to see how far one can go with this premise in explaining the observed phenomena, starting with the simplest statistical picture imaginable. It may be that nature is richer than the model assumed here, but the present results are quite suggestive, because, with a set of assumptions that are not unreasonable, one recovers the phenomena listed above. At the end, the present theory leads back to conventional physics, except that Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry are violated at extremely high energy. To be more specific, one obtains local Lorentz invariance (at low energy compared to the Planck scale), an SO( N) unified gauge theory (with N = 10 as the simplest possibility), supersymmetry of Standard Model fermions and

  12. Fundamental science of nanometer-size clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.; Samara, G.A.; Venturini, E.L.; Williamson, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This research has produced a variety of monodisperse, nanometer-size clusters (nanoclusters for short), characterized their size and crystal structure and developed a scientific understanding of the size dependence of their physical properties. Of specific interest were the influence of quantum electronic confinement on the optical properties, magnetic properties, and dielectric properties. These properties were chosen both for their potential practical impact on various applications identified in the National Critical Technologies list (e.g., catalysis, information storage, sensors, environmental remediation, ...) as well as for their importance to the fundamental science of clusters. An Executive Summary provides a description of the major highlights.

  13. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  14. Development of Fundamental Technologies for Micro Bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiichi; Kitamori, Takehiko

    This chapter reviews the development of fundamental technologies required for microchip-based bioreactors utilizing living mammalian cells and pressure driven flow. The most important factor in the bioreactor is the cell culture. For proper cell culturing, continuous medium supply from a microfluidic channel and appropriate modification of the channel surface to accommodate cell attachment is required. Moreover, the medium flow rate should be chosen carefully, because shear stress affects cell activity. The techniques presented here could be applied to the development of micro bioreactors such as microlivers, pigment production by plant cells, and artificial insemination.

  15. Black hole constraints on varying fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    MacGibbon, Jane H

    2007-08-10

    We apply the generalized second law of thermodynamics and derive upper limits on the variation in the fundamental constants. The maximum variation in the electronic charge permitted for black holes accreting and emitting in the present cosmic microwave background corresponds to a variation in the fine-structure constant of Deltaalpha/alpha approximately 2 x 10(-23) per second. This value matches the variation measured by Webb et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 884 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 091301 (2001)] using absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars and suggests the variation mechanism may be a coupling between the electron and the cosmic photon background. PMID:17930813

  16. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A. ); Durham, M.D. ); Sowa, W.A. . Combustion Lab.); Himes, R.M. ); Mahaffey, W.A. )

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  17. Fundamental bioprocessing research for coal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, E.N.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this program is to gain a fundamental understanding and sound scientific technical basis for evaluating the potential roles of innovative bioprocessing concepts for the utilization and conversion of coal. The aim is to explore the numerous ways in which advanced biological processes and techniques can open new opportunities for coal utilization or can replace more conventional techniques by use of milder conditions with less energy consumption or loss. There are several roles where biotechnology is likely to be important in coal utilization and conversion. These include potential bioprocessing systems such.

  18. Model atmospheres and fundamental stellar parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plez, B.

    2013-11-01

    I start by illustrating the need for precise and accurate fundamental stellar parameters through there examples: lithium abundances in metal-poor stars, the derivation of stellar ages from isochrones, and the chemical composition of planet-hosting stars. I present widely used methods (infrared flux method, spectroscopy) in the determination of T_{eff}, and log g. I comment upon difficulties encountered with the determination of stellar parameters of red supergiant stars, and I discuss the impact of non-LTE and 3D hydrodynamical effects.

  19. Fundamental limits on NOx reduction by plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B. M., LLNL

    1997-04-07

    This paper discusses the gas-phase reaction mechanisms for removal of NO{sub x} in a plasma. The effect of oxygen content on the competition between the reduction and oxidation processes is discussed. The effect of the electron kinetic energy distribution on the radical production and subsequent chemistry is then discussed in order to predict the best performance that can be achieved for NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma alone. The fundamental limit on the minimum electrical energy consumption that will be required to implement NO{sub x} reduction in any type of plasma reactor is established.

  20. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  1. Liposculpture 4. Fundamentals of good liposculpture technique.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G

    1992-03-01

    The fundamentals for good liposculpture are discussed. Horizontal tunneling is to be avoided because the more horizontally the tunnel is angled, the more likely the overlying skin will drape in folds, resulting in poor cosmesis. Superficial tunneling (less than 1 cm) is to be avoided. The author believes that it is important to maintain the adhesive forces and lymphatics of the superficial layer of fat because it leads to more even healing and remodelling postoperatively. Liposuction within 3 cm of the subgluteal fold should be avoided because it can lead to ptosis of the buttocks postoperatively. PMID:1541754

  2. Fundamental Limits to Nonlinear Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2015-12-01

    Linear and nonlinear vibration energy harvesting has been the focus of considerable research in recent years. However, fundamental limits on the harvestable energy of a harvester subjected to an arbitrary excitation force and different constraints is not yet fully understood. Understanding these limits is not only essential for an assessment of the technology potential, but it also provides a broader perspective on the current harvesting mechanisms and guidance in their improvement. Here, we derive the fundamental limits on the output power of an ideal energy harvester for arbitrary excitation waveforms and build on the current analysis framework for the simple computation of this limit for more sophisticated setups. We show that the optimal harvester maximizes the harvested energy through a mechanical analog of a buy-low-sell-high strategy. We also propose a nonresonant passive latch-assisted harvester to realize this strategy for an effective harvesting. It is shown that the proposed harvester harvests energy more effectively than its linear and bistable counterparts over a wider range of excitation frequencies and amplitudes. The buy-low-sell-high strategy also reveals why the conventional bistable harvester works well at low-frequency excitation.

  3. The fundamental plane correlations for globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the parameter space whose axes include a radius (core, or half-light), a surface brightness (central, or average within the half-light radius), and the central projected velocity dispersion, globular clusters lie on a two-dimensional surface (a plane, if the logarithmic quantities are used). This is analogous to the 'fundamental plane' of elliptical galaxies. The implied bivariate correlations are the best now known for globular clusters. The derived scaling laws for the core properties imply that cluster cores are fully virialized, homologous systems, with a constant (M/L) ratio. The corresponding scaling laws on the half-light scale are differrent, but are nearly identical to those derived from the 'fundamental plane' of ellipticals. This may be due to the range of cluster concentrations, which are correlated with other parameters. A similar explanation for elliptical galaxies may be viable. These correlations provide new empirical constraints for models of globular cluster formation and evolution, and may also be usable as rough distance-indicator relations for globular clusters.

  4. Microbial Cellulose Utilization: Fundamentals and Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lynd, Lee R.; Weimer, Paul J.; van Zyl, Willem H.; Pretorius, Isak S.

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental features of microbial cellulose utilization are examined at successively higher levels of aggregation encompassing the structure and composition of cellulosic biomass, taxonomic diversity, cellulase enzyme systems, molecular biology of cellulase enzymes, physiology of cellulolytic microorganisms, ecological aspects of cellulase-degrading communities, and rate-limiting factors in nature. The methodological basis for studying microbial cellulose utilization is considered relative to quantification of cells and enzymes in the presence of solid substrates as well as apparatus and analysis for cellulose-grown continuous cultures. Quantitative description of cellulose hydrolysis is addressed with respect to adsorption of cellulase enzymes, rates of enzymatic hydrolysis, bioenergetics of microbial cellulose utilization, kinetics of microbial cellulose utilization, and contrasting features compared to soluble substrate kinetics. A biological perspective on processing cellulosic biomass is presented, including features of pretreated substrates and alternative process configurations. Organism development is considered for “consolidated bioprocessing” (CBP), in which the production of cellulolytic enzymes, hydrolysis of biomass, and fermentation of resulting sugars to desired products occur in one step. Two organism development strategies for CBP are examined: (i) improve product yield and tolerance in microorganisms able to utilize cellulose, or (ii) express a heterologous system for cellulose hydrolysis and utilization in microorganisms that exhibit high product yield and tolerance. A concluding discussion identifies unresolved issues pertaining to microbial cellulose utilization, suggests approaches by which such issues might be resolved, and contrasts a microbially oriented cellulose hydrolysis paradigm to the more conventional enzymatically oriented paradigm in both fundamental and applied contexts. PMID:12209002

  5. Crude oil prices: Speculation versus fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziej, Marek Krzysztof

    Beginning in 2004, the price of crude oil fluctuates rapidly over a wide range. Large and rapid price increases have recessionary consequences and dampen long-term infrastructural investment. I investigate whether price changes are driven by market fundamentals or speculation. With regard to market fundamentals, I revisit econometric evidence for the importance of demand shocks, as proxied by dry maritime cargo rates, on oil prices. When I eliminate transportation costs from both sides of the equation, disaggregate OPEC and non-OPEC production, and allow for more than one cointegrating relation, I find that previous specifications are inconsistent with arguments that demand shocks play an important role. Instead, results confirm the importance of OPEC supply shocks. I investigate two channels by which speculation may affect oil prices; the direct effect of trader behavior and changes in oil from a commodity to a financial asset. With regard to trader behavior, I find evidence that trader positions are required to explain the spread between spot and futures prices of crude oil on the New York Mercantile Exchange. The inclusion of trader positions clarifies the process of equilibrium error correction, such that there is bidirectional causality between prices and trader positions. This creates the possibility of speculative bubbles. With regard to oil as a commodity and/or financial asset, I use a Kalman Filter model to estimate the time-varying partial correlation between returns to investments in equity and oil markets. This correlation changes from negative to positive at the onset of the 2008 financial crisis. The low interest rates used to rescue the economy depress convenience yields, which reduces the benefits of holding oil as a commodity. Instead, oil becomes a financial asset (on net) as the oil market changed from contango to backwardation. Contradicting simple political narratives, my research suggests that both market fundamentals and speculation drive

  6. Fundamental principles and applications of microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ong, Soon-Eng; Zhang, Sam; Du, Hejun; Fu, Yongqing

    2008-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has provided the platform for the miniaturization of analytical devices for biological applications. Beside the fabrication technology, the study and understanding of flow characteristics of fluid in micrometer or even nanometer scale is vital for the successful implementation of such miniaturized systems. Microfluidics is currently under the spotlight for medical diagnostics and many other bio-analysis as its physical size manifested numerous advantages over lab-based devices. In this review, elementary concepts of fluid and its flow characteristics together with various transport processes and microchannel condition are presented. They are among the fundamental building block for the success in microfluidic systems. Selected application examples include biological cell handling employing different schemes of manipulation and DNA amplification using different microreactor arrangement and fluid flow regime. PMID:17981751

  7. Fundamental Fluidization Research Project. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Morgantown Energy Technology Center proposes to conduct fundamental research on fluidization technology by designing, constructing, and operating a 2-foot diameter, 50-foot high, pressurized fluidized-bed unit. The anticipated result of the proposed project would be a better, understanding of fluidization phenomena under pressurized and high velocity conditions. This improved understanding would, provide a sound basis for design and scale-up of pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion (PCFBC) processes for fossil energy applications. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major, Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

  8. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties. PMID:22432618

  9. Future fundamental combustion research for aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Physical fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and chemical kinetic processes which occur in the combustion chamber of aeropropulsion systems were investigated. With the component requirements becoming more severe for future engines, the current design methodology needs the new tools to obtain the optimum configuration in a reasonable design and development cycle. Research efforts in the last few years were encouraging but to achieve these benefits research is required into the fundamental aerothermodynamic processes of combustion. It is recommended that research continues in the areas of flame stabilization, combustor aerodynamics, heat transfer, multiphase flow and atomization, turbulent reacting flows, and chemical kinetics. Associated with each of these engineering sciences is the need for research into computational methods to accurately describe and predict these complex physical processes. Research needs in each of these areas are highlighted.

  10. Fundamental aspects of quantum Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Haenggi, Peter; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig

    2005-06-01

    With this work we elaborate on the physics of quantum noise in thermal equilibrium and in stationary nonequilibrium. Starting out from the celebrated quantum fluctuation-dissipation theorem we discuss some important consequences that must hold for open, dissipative quantum systems in thermal equilibrium. The issue of quantum dissipation is exemplified with the fundamental problem of a damped harmonic quantum oscillator. The role of quantum fluctuations is discussed in the context of both, the nonlinear generalized quantum Langevin equation and the path integral approach. We discuss the consequences of the time-reversal symmetry for an open dissipative quantum dynamics and, furthermore, point to a series of subtleties and possible pitfalls. The path integral methodology is applied to the decay of metastable states assisted by quantum Brownian noise.

  11. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  12. Fundamentals of tribology at the atomic level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1989-01-01

    Tribology, the science and engineering of solid surfaces in moving contact, is a field that encompasses many disciplines: solid state physics, chemistry, materials science, and mechanical engineering. In spite of the practical importance and maturity of the field, the fundamental understanding of basic phenomena has only recently been attacked. An attempt to define some of these problems and indicate some profitable directions for future research is presented. There are three broad classifications: (1) fluid properties (compression, rheology, additives and particulates); (2) material properties of the solids (deformation, defect formation and energy loss mechanisms); and (3) interfacial properties (adhesion, friction chemical reactions, and boundary films). Research in the categories has traditionally been approached by considering macroscopic material properties. Recent activity has shown that some issues can be approached at the atomic level: the atoms in the materials can be manipulated both experimentally and theoretically, and can produce results related to macroscopic phenomena.

  13. Fundamental Constants and Tests with Simple Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Precise measurements with simple atoms provide stringent tests of physical laws, improving the accuracy of fundamental constants--a set of which will be selected to fully define the proposed New International System of Units. This talk focuses on the atomic constants (namely, the Rydberg constant, the fine-structure constant, and the proton charge radius), discussing the impact of the proton radius obtained from the Lamb-shift measurements in muonic hydrogen. Significant discrepancies persist despite years of careful examination: the slightly smaller proton radius obtained from muonic hydrogen requires the Rydberg constant and the fine-structure constant to have values that disagree significantly with the CODATA recommendations. After giving a general overview, I will discuss our effort to produce one-electron ions in Rydberg states, to enable a different test of theory and measurement of the Rydberg constant.

  14. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in celss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multi-sample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  15. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multisample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  16. Two Fundamental Principles of Nature's Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, we present two fundamental principles of nature's interactions, the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PRI). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint. PID offers a completely different and natural way of introducing Higgs fields. PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. These two principles give rise to a unified field model for four interactions, which can be naturally decoupled to study individual interactions. With these two principles, we are able to derive 1) a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) layered strong and weak interaction potentials, and 3) the energy levels of subatomic particles. Supported in part by NSF, ONR and Chinese NSF.

  17. Fundamental differences between SPH and grid methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Potter, Doug; Miniati, Francesco; Read, Justin; Mayer, Lucio; Gawryszczak, Artur; Kravtsov, Andrey; Nordlund, Åke; Pearce, Frazer; Quilis, Vicent; Rudd, Douglas; Springel, Volker; Stone, James; Tasker, Elizabeth; Teyssier, Romain; Wadsley, James; Walder, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    We have carried out a comparison study of hydrodynamical codes by investigating their performance in modelling interacting multiphase fluids. The two commonly used techniques of grid and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) show striking differences in their ability to model processes that are fundamentally important across many areas of astrophysics. Whilst Eulerian grid based methods are able to resolve and treat important dynamical instabilities, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz or Rayleigh-Taylor, these processes are poorly or not at all resolved by existing SPH techniques. We show that the reason for this is that SPH, at least in its standard implementation, introduces spurious pressure forces on particles in regions where there are steep density gradients. This results in a boundary gap of the size of an SPH smoothing kernel radius over which interactions are severely damped.

  18. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  19. Graphene oxide: from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrozzi, F.; Prezioso, S.; Ottaviano, L.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the fundamental characterization of graphene oxide (GO) and its future application perspectives. Morphology is discussed through optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy studies. Chemical, structural, and vibrational properties are discussed through x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. Two easy characterization strategies, based on the correlation between x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle/optical contrast measurements are reported. Sensing and nano-biotechnology applications are discussed with focus on practical gas sensing and optical sensing, on the one hand, and on the toxicity issue of GO, on the other hand. Synthesis and post-synthesis treatments are also discussed, these latter with emphasis on lithography.

  20. Fundamentals of natural computing: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Leandro Nunes

    2007-03-01

    Natural computing is a terminology introduced to encompass three classes of methods: (1) those that take inspiration from nature for the development of novel problem-solving techniques; (2) those that are based on the use of computers to synthesize natural phenomena; and (3) those that employ natural materials (e.g., molecules) to compute. The main fields of research that compose these three branches are the artificial neural networks, evolutionary algorithms, swarm intelligence, artificial immune systems, fractal geometry, artificial life, DNA computing, and quantum computing, among others. This paper provides an overview of the fundamentals of natural computing, particularly the fields listed above, emphasizing the biological motivation, some design principles, their scope of applications, current research trends and open problems. The presentation is concluded with a discussion about natural computing, and when it should be used.

  1. PREFACE: Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Volkmar; Kramer, Bernhard

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 70th PTB Seminar which, the second on the subject "Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology", was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig from October 21 to 22, 1985. About 100 participants from the universities and various research institutes of the Federal Republic of Germany participated in the meeting. Besides a number of review lectures on various broader subjects there was a poster session which contained a variety of topical contributed papers ranging from the theory of the quantum Hall effect to reports on the status of the metrological experiments at the PTB. In addition, the participants were also offered the possibility to visit the PTB laboratories during the course of the seminar. During the preparation of the meeting we noticed that even most of the general subjects which were going to be discussed in the lectures are of great importance in connection with metrological experiments and should be made accessible to the scientific community. This eventually resulted in the idea of the publication of the papers in a regular journal. We are grateful to the editor of Metrologia for providing this opportunity. We have included quite a number of papers from basic physical research. For example, certain aspects of high-energy physics and quantum optics, as well as the many-faceted role of Sommerfeld's fine-structure constant, are covered. We think that questions such as "What are the intrinsic fundamental parameters of nature?" or "What are we doing when we perform an experiment?" can shed new light on the art of metrology, and do, potentially, lead to new ideas. This appears to be especially necessary when we notice the increasing importance of the role of the fundamental constants and macroscopic quantum effects for the definition and the realization of the physical units. In some cases we have reached a point where the limitations of our knowledge of a fundamental constant and

  2. Space fundamentals for the war fighter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, William G.

    1994-02-01

    The quickening space technology revolution is as natural as life itself. Technology leads us to believe that anything is possible and that we are all privileged users. An understanding of some of the limitations of our space assets should moderate our expectations. The purpose of this paper is to provide a short and concise overview of the space environment and a fundamental understanding of space assets in order to understand their capabilities. The paper has been limited to the basic concepts of the atmosphere, rocket propulsion, launch vehicles, communications spectrum, and satellite assets. With the demise of the USSR threat, also gone are sufficient budgets that were going to provide the next generation of bigger and better satellites. We must accept the fact that next generation satellite security systems under development are now too expensive to field. Next generation satellite system funding may someday come again when a new threat diminishes our technological advantage.

  3. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F. ); Critser, J.K. ); Mazur, P. )

    1992-01-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  4. Sperm preservation: Fundamental cryobiology and practical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.F.; Critser, J.K.; Mazur, P.

    1992-07-01

    Human spermatozoa were first frozen successfully almost 40 years ago. While developments in packaging and storing have occurred in the intervening period, there is still little known specifically about how spermatozoa are adversely affected by freezing and thawing. This is largely due to the fact that sufficient cells survive the challenge to give a reasonable expectation of fertilization, but the shift to the exclusive use of cryopreserved semen for donor insemination, occasioned by the awareness of the risks particularly of AIDS transmission, has resulted in a renewed critical interest in the process of cryopreservation. This review will cover the more significant contributions over the past few years, and develop an argument for a sustained fundamental approach to sperm cryobiology.

  5. Fundamental Equation of State for Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, I. A.; Leachman, J. W.; Lemmon, E. W.

    2014-03-15

    World utilization of deuterium is anticipated to increase with the rise of fusion-energy machines such as ITER and NIF. We present a new fundamental equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of fluid deuterium. Differences between thermodynamic properties of orthodeuterium, normal deuterium, and paradeuterium are described. Separate ideal-gas functions were fitted for these separable forms together with a single real-fluid residual function. The equation of state is valid from the melting line to a maximum pressure of 2000 MPa and an upper temperature limit of 600 K, corresponding to available experimental measurements. The uncertainty in predicted density is 0.5% over the valid temperature range and pressures up to 300 MPa. The uncertainties of vapor pressures and saturated liquid densities are 2% and 3%, respectively, while speed-of-sound values are accurate to within 1% in the liquid phase.

  6. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nanoscale thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit-when the number of particles becomes very large. Here we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime-at both the nanoscale and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory, we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transitions, and, as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from non-equilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle. PMID:23800725

  7. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nanoscale thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit—when the number of particles becomes very large. Here we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime—at both the nanoscale and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory, we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transitions, and, as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from non-equilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle.

  8. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. PMID:23931503

  9. Photoacoustic tomography: fundamentals, advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Optical microscopy has been contributing to the development of life science for more than three centuries. However, due to strong optical scattering in tissue, its in vivo imaging ability has been restricted to studies at superficial depths. Advances in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) now allow multiscale imaging at depths from sub-millimeter to several centimeters, with spatial resolutions from sub-micrometer to sub-millimeter. Because of this high scalability and its unique optical absorption contrast, PAT is capable of performing anatomical, functional, molecular and fluid-dynamic imaging at various system levels, and is playing an increasingly important role in fundamental biological research and clinical practice. This Review discusses recent technical progress in PAT and presents corresponding applications. It ends with a discussion of several prospects and their technical challenges. PMID:22025335

  10. Loudness predicts prominence: Fundamental frequency lends little

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanski, G.; Grabe, E.; Coleman, J.; Rosner, B.

    2005-08-01

    We explored a database covering seven dialects of British and Irish English and three different styles of speech to find acoustic correlates of prominence. We built classifiers, trained the classifiers on human prominence/nonprominence judgments, and then evaluated how well they behaved. The classifiers operate on 452 ms windows centered on syllables, using different acoustic measures. By comparing the performance of classifiers based on different measures, we can learn how prominence is expressed in speech. Contrary to textbooks and common assumption, fundamental frequency (f0) played a minor role in distinguishing prominent syllables from the rest of the utterance. Instead, speakers primarily marked prominence with patterns of loudness and duration. Two other acoustic measures that we examined also played a minor role, comparable to f0. All dialects and speaking styles studied here share a common definition of prominence. The result is robust to differences in labeling practice and the dialect of the labeler.