Science.gov

Sample records for isochronous mass spectrometry

  1. Study of projectile fragmentation reaction with isochronous mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, X. L.; Mei, B.; Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Huang, W. J.; Podolyak, Z.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Zhang, W.; Litvinov, S. A.; Blaum, K.; Zhou, X. H.; Shuai, P.; Wang, M.; Gao, B. S.; Chen, X. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xia, J. W.; Yang, J. C.; Hu, Z. G.; Ma, X. W.; Sun, B. H.; Yan, X. L.; Mao, R. S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xu, X.; Walker, P. M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bosch, F.; Winckler, N.; Chen, R. J.; Xing, Y. M.; Fu, C. Y.; Liu, D. W.; Zeng, Q.; Ge, Z.; Sun, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Zhao, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Relative yields of fragments following the 78Kr projectile fragmentation in a beryllium target were measured in a storage ring by using isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS). Odd-even staggering of the relative fragment yields is observed and can be explained by the odd-even staggering of the particle-emission threshold energies. IMS is a complementary technique to γ-ray spectroscopy for measuring isomeric ratios, in particular for nuclides with long lifetimes. It was found that the isomeric yield ratios in 53Fe are almost constant for different longitudinal momenta.

  2. Simulations of the isochronous mass spectrometry at the HIRFL-CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. J.; Yuan, Y. J.; Wang, M.; Xu, X.; Shuai, P.; Zhang, Y. H.; Yan, X. L.; Xing, Y. M.; Xu, H. S.; Zhou, X. H.; Livinov, Y. A.; Litvinov, S.; Chen, X. C.; Fu, C. Y.; Ge, W. W.; Ge, Z.; Hu, X. J.; Huang, W. J.; Liu, D. W.; Zeng, Q.; Zhang, W.

    2015-11-01

    A Monte-Carlo simulation code, named as SimCSR, has been developed for the isochronous mass spectrometry experiments in the experimental storage ring (CSRe). The revolution times of the fragments ions stored in the CSRe, which were produced in the fragmentation of {}58{Ni} primary beam are reproduced very well by the SimCSR, although only linear components are considered. The standard deviation of the revolution time is found to be strongly affected by the phase slip factor, the width of the relative momentum difference and the instability of magnetic field. Based on the simulations, we outline and discuss the methods to reduce the standard deviation of the revolution time.

  3. An improvement of isochronous mass spectrometry: Velocity measurements using two time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, P.; Xu, X.; Zhang, Y. H.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Wang, M.; Tu, X. L.; Blaum, K.; Zhou, X. H.; Yuan, Y. J.; Yan, X. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, R. J.; Fu, C. Y.; Ge, Z.; Huang, W. J.; Xing, Y. M.; Zeng, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) in storage rings is a powerful tool for mass measurements of exotic nuclei with very short half-lives down to several tens of microseconds, using a multicomponent secondary beam separated in-flight without cooling. However, the inevitable momentum spread of secondary ions limits the precision of nuclear masses determined by using IMS. Therefore, the momentum measurement in addition to the revolution period of stored ions is crucial to reduce the influence of the momentum spread on the standard deviation of the revolution period, which would lead to a much improved mass resolving power of IMS. One of the proposals to upgrade IMS is that the velocity of secondary ions could be directly measured by using two time-of-flight (double TOF) detectors installed in a straight section of a storage ring. In this paper, we outline the principle of IMS with double TOF detectors and the method to correct the momentum spread of stored ions.

  4. Isochronicity corrections for isochronous mass measurements at the HIRFL-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Yuan, You-Jin; Yang, Jian-cheng; Litvinov, S.; Wang, Meng; Litvinov, Y.; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Da-Yu; Shen, Guo-Dong; Chai, Wei-ping; Shi, Jian; Shang, Peng

    2014-11-01

    Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) is a unique experimental method for mass measurement experiments on short-lived nuclei. Mass measurements of 78Kr projectile fragments were performed in HIRFL-CSRe at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. The short-lived secondary beams were produced by bombarding a 15 mm thick beryllium-target in the Radioactive Ion Beam Line (RIBLL2) and were then injected into the CSRe storage ring. The masses of stored ions were measured by employing the IMS technique, which is based on the determination of the ion revolution times. A dedicated time-of-flight (TOF) detector is used for the latter purpose. However, the isochronicity, and thus the mass resolving power, depends on the momentum spread and the transverse emittance of the injected beams, Here, we present the first-order isochronicity optimization, the chromaticity and second-order isochronicity corrections through the modification of the quadrupole and sextupole field strengths. With the help of these corrections, the mass resolution of Δm / m =10-6 can be achieved.

  5. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  6. First isochronous mass measurements with two time-of-flight detectors at CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Zhang, Y. H.; Shuai, P.; Xu, X.; Chen, R. J.; Yan, X. L.; Tu, X. L.; Zhang, W.; Fu, C. Y.; Xu, H. S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Blaum, K.; Chen, X. C.; Ge, Z.; Gao, B. S.; Huang, W. J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Liu, D. W.; Ma, X. W.; Mao, R. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zeng, Q.; Zhou, X. H.

    2015-11-01

    Isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) established in heavy-ion storage rings has proven to be a powerful tool for mass measurements of short-lived nuclides. In IMS, the revolution times of stored ions should be independent of their velocity spread. However, this isochronous condition is fulfilled only in the first order and in a small range of revolution times. To correct for non-isochronicity, an additional measure of the velocity or magnetic rigidity of each stored ion is required. For this purpose two new time-of-flight (TOF) detectors were installed in one of the straight sections of the experimental cooler storage ring in Lanzhou. It is expected that the resolving power of the IMS will significantly be improved with such a double-TOF arrangement. The double-TOF system was tested in a recent experiment with the 78Kr fragments. Some of the experimental results are presented in this contribution.

  7. Empirical Isochrones for Low Mass Stars in Nearby Young Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2015-07-01

    Absolute ages of young stars are important for many issues in pre-main-sequence stellar and circumstellar evolution but long have been recognized as difficult to derive and calibrate. In this paper, we use literature spectral types and photometry to construct empirical isochrones in Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams for low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the η Cha, ɛ Cha, and TW Hya Associations and the β Pic and Tuc-Hor Moving Groups. A successful theory of pre-main-sequence evolution should match the shapes of the stellar loci for these groups of young stars. However, when comparing the combined empirical isochrones to isochrones predicted from evolutionary models, discrepancies lead to a spectral type (mass) dependence in stellar age estimates. Improved prescriptions for convection and boundary conditions in the latest models of pre-main-sequence evolution lead to a significantly improved correspondence between empirical and model isochrones, with small offsets at low temperatures that may be explained by observational uncertainties or by model limitations. Independent of model predictions, linear fits to combined stellar loci of these regions provide a simple empirical method to order clusters by luminosity with a reduced dependence on spectral type. Age estimates calculated from various sets of modern models that reproduce Li depletion boundary ages of the β Pic Moving Group also imply a ˜4 Myr age for the low mass members of the Upper Sco OB Association, which is younger than the 11 Myr age that has been recently estimated for intermediate and high mass members.

  8. New Developments for Isochronous Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Boutin, D.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Winckler, N.; Sun, B.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Montes, F.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.

    2007-02-26

    The combination of the in-flight separator FRS and the storage-ring ESR at GSI offers unique possibilities for high accuracy mass and lifetime measurements of bare and few-electron fragments. Operating the ESR in the isochronous mode allows for measurements of revolution frequencies of stored ions without cooling. Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) can be applied to fragments with half-lives as short as several tens of microseconds. Newly developed magnetic rigidity tagging increases the resolving power of IMS to about 500000. IMS can be used to measure masses of nuclei with rates even lower than one ion per day, a property also needed for the purpose of the ILIMA project at the future facility FAIR.

  9. Mass loss in M67 giants - Evidence from isochrone fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripicco, Michael J.; Dorman, Ben; Bell, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison between the color-magnitude diagram of M67 and a new set of theoretical evolutionary models which include all phases from the unevolved main-sequence through core-helium burning and onto the AGB is presented. The present 5-Gyr solar abundance isochrone is found to yield an excellent fit to the whole of the M67 color-magnitude diagram. A differential technique that compares the gap in color between clump giants and normal red giants, on one hand, with the temperature gap between core He-burning tracks and first-ascent RGB tracks, on the other, strongly indicates that the clump giants in M67 have masses of 0.70 solar mass or less. The extremely large amount of mass loss that is deduced is well in excess of that found for globular cluster stars. Possible resolutions of this problem are that degree of mass loss increases with total stellar mass, or with metallicity.

  10. Mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burlingame, A.L.; Baillie, T.A.; Derrick, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It is the intention of the review to bring together in one source the direction of major developments in mass spectrometry and to illustrate these by citing key contributions from both fundamental and applied research. The Review is intended to provide the reader with a sense of the main currents, their breadth and depth, and probable future directions. It is also intended to provide the reader with a glimpse of the diverse discoveries and results that underpin the eventual development of new methods and instruments - the keys to obtaining new insights in all the physical, chemical, and biological sciences which depend on mass spectrometry at various levels of sophistication. Focal points for future interdisciplinary synergism might be selective quantitative derivatization of large peptides, which would convey properties that direct fragmentation providing specific sequence information, or optimization of LCMS for biooligomer sequencing and mixture analysis, or the perfect way to control or enhance the internal energy of ions of any size, or many others. 1669 references.

  11. Space charge effect in isochronous rings

    SciTech Connect

    Pozdeyev,E.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Marti, F.; York, R.

    2008-08-25

    Cyclotrons, rings for precise nuclear mass spectrometry, and some light sources with extremely short bunches are operated or planned to be operated in the isochronous or almost isochronous regime. Also, many hadron synchrotrons run in the isochronous regime for a short period of time during transition crossing. The longitudinal motion is frozen in the isochronous regime that leads to accumulation of the integral of the longitudinal space charge force. In low-gamma hadron machines, this can cause a fast growth of the beam energy spread even at modest beam intensities. Additionally, the transverse component of the space charge effectively modifies the dispersion function and the slip factor shifting the isochronous (transition) point. In this paper, we discuss space charge effects in the isochronous regime and present experimental results obtained in the Small Isochronous Ring, developed at Michigan State University specifically for studies of space charge in the isochronous regime.

  12. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Nier, A.O.C.

    1959-08-25

    A voltage switching apparatus is described for use with a mass spectrometer in the concentratron analysis of several components of a gas mixture. The system automatically varies the voltage on the accelerating electrode of the mass spectrometer through a program of voltages which corresponds to the particular gas components under analysis. Automatic operation may be discontinued at any time to permit the operator to manually select any desired predetermined accelerating voltage. Further, the system may be manually adjusted to vary the accelerating voltage over a wide range.

  13. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  14. Photometric Determination of Binary Mass Ratios in the WIYN Open Cluster Study (WOCS) Using Theoretical Isochrones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, K.; Durisen, R. H.; Deliyannis, C. P.

    2003-05-01

    Binary stars in Galactic open clusters are difficult to detect without spectroscopic observations. However, from theoretical isochrones, we find that binary stars with different primary masses M1 and mass ratios q = M2/M1 have measurably different behaviors in various UBVRI color-magnitude and color-color diagrams. By using appropriate Yonsei-Yale Isochrones, in the best cases we can evaluate M1 and q to within about +/- 0.1Msun and +/- 0.1, respectively, for individual proper-motion members that have multiple WOCS UBVRI measurements of high quality. The cluster metallicity, reddening, and distance modulus and best-fit isochrones are determined self-consistently from the same WOCS data. This technique allows us to detect binaries and determine their mass ratios in open clusters without time-consuming spectrocopy, which is only sensitive to a limited range of binary separations. We will report results from this photometric technique for WOCS cluster M35 for M1 in the range of 1 to 4 Msun. For the lower main sequence, we used the empirical colors to reduce the error introduced by the problematic color transformations of Y2 Isochrones. In addition to other sources of uncertainty, we have considered effects of rapid rotation and pulsational instability. We plan to apply our method to other WOCS clusters in the future and explore differences in binary fractions and/or mass ratio distributions as a function of cluster age, metallicity, and other parameters.

  15. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scigelova, Michaela; Hornshaw, Martin; Giannakopulos, Anastassios; Makarov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry. The key performance characteristics of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry, mass accuracy and resolution, are presented in the view of how they impact the interpretation of measurements in proteomic applications. The theory and principles of operation of two types of mass analyzer, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance and Orbitrap, are described. Major benefits as well as limitations of Fourier transform-based mass spectrometry technology are discussed in the context of practical sample analysis, and illustrated with examples included as figures in this text and in the accompanying slide set. Comparisons highlighting the performance differences between the two mass analyzers are made where deemed useful in assisting the user with choosing the most appropriate technology for an application. Recent developments of these high-performing mass spectrometers are mentioned to provide a future outlook. PMID:21742802

  16. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Michael L.; Rempel, Don L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature of Fourier transform mass spectrometry and its unique combination of high mass resolution, high upper mass limit, and multichannel advantage. Examines its operation, capabilities and limitations, applications (ion storage, ion manipulation, ion chemistry), and future applications and developments. (JN)

  17. Dating the Martian meteorite Zagami by the 87Rb-87Sr isochron method with a prototype in situ resonance ionization mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Scott Anderson, F; Levine, Jonathan; Whitaker, Tom J

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE The geologic history of the Solar System builds on an extensive record of impact flux models, crater counts, and ∼270 kg of lunar samples analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. However, estimates of impactor flux may be biased by the fact that most of the dated Apollo samples were only tenuously connected to an assumed geologic context. Moreover, uncertainties in the modeled cratering rates are significant enough to lead to estimated errors for dates on Mars and the Moon of ∼1 Ga. Given the great cost of sample return missions, combined with the need to sample multiple terrains on multiple planets, we have developed a prototype instrument that can be used for in situ dating to better constrain the age of planetary samples. METHODS We demonstrate the first use of laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometry for 87Rb-87Sr isochron dating of geological specimens. The demands of accuracy and precision have required us to meet challenges including regulation of the ambient temperature, measurement of appropriate backgrounds, sufficient ablation laser intensity, avoidance of the defocusing effect of the plasma created by ablation pulses, and shielding of our detector from atoms and ions of other elements. RESULTS To test whether we could meaningfully date planetary materials, we have analyzed a piece of the Martian meteorite Zagami. In each of four separate measurements we obtained 87Rb-87Sr isochron ages for Zagami consistent with its published age, and, in both of two measurements that reached completion, we obtained better than 200 Ma precision. Combining all our data into a single isochron with 581 spot analyses gives an 87Rb-87Sr age for this specimen of 360 ±90 Ma. CONCLUSIONS Our analyses of the Zagami meteorite represent the first successful application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to isochron geochronology. Furthermore, the technique is miniaturizable for spaceflight and in situ dating on other planetary bodies. © 2014 The

  18. Mass Spectrometry for the Masses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persinger, Jared D.; Hoops, Geoffrey, C.; Samide, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple, qualitative experiment is developed for implementation, where the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) plays an important role, into the laboratory curriculum of a chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. This laboratory experiment is well suited for the students as it helps them to determine the validity of their…

  19. Forensic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, William D; Jackson, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques. PMID:26070716

  20. Forensic Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, William D.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2015-07-01

    Developments in forensic mass spectrometry tend to follow, rather than lead, the developments in other disciplines. Examples of techniques having forensic potential born independently of forensic applications include ambient ionization, imaging mass spectrometry, isotope ratio mass spectrometry, portable mass spectrometers, and hyphenated chromatography-mass spectrometry instruments, to name a few. Forensic science has the potential to benefit enormously from developments that are funded by other means, if only the infrastructure and personnel existed to adopt, validate, and implement the new technologies into casework. Perhaps one unique area in which forensic science is at the cutting edge is in the area of chemometrics and the determination of likelihood ratios for the evaluation of the weight of evidence. Such statistical techniques have been developed most extensively for ignitable-liquid residue analyses and isotope ratio analysis. This review attempts to capture the trends, motivating forces, and likely impact of developing areas of forensic mass spectrometry, with the caveat that none of this research is likely to have any real impact in the forensic community unless: (a) The instruments developed are turned into robust black boxes with red and green lights for positives and negatives, respectively, or (b) there are PhD graduates in the workforce who can help adopt these sophisticated techniques.

  1. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  2. Analytical mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  3. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  4. Biological Cluster Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winograd, Nicholas; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the new physics and new applications of secondary ion mass spectrometry using cluster ion probes. These probes, particularly C60, exhibit enhanced molecular desorption with improved sensitivity owing to the unique nature of the energy-deposition process. In addition, these projectiles are capable of eroding molecular solids while retaining the molecular specificity of mass spectrometry. When the beams are microfocused to a spot on the sample, bioimaging experiments in two and three dimensions are feasible. We describe emerging theoretical models that allow the energy-deposition process to be understood on an atomic and molecular basis. Moreover, experiments on model systems are described that allow protocols for imaging on biological materials to be implemented. Finally, we present recent applications of imaging to biological tissue and single cells to illustrate the future directions of this methodology. PMID:20055679

  5. MASS SPECTROMETRY IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers applications of mass spectrometry to the environmental sciences. From the early applications of mass spectrometry to environmental research in the 1960s and 1970s, mass spectrometry has played an important role in aiding our understanding of environmental poll...

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  8. New results from isochronous mass measurements of neutron-rich uranium fission fragments with the FRS-ESR-facility at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knöbel, R.; Diwisch, M.; Geissel, H.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Patyk, Z.; Plaß, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sun, B.; Weick, H.; Bosch, F.; Boutin, D.; Chen, L.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Matoš, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nakajima, S.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.; Stadlmann, J.; Steck, M.; Suzuki, T.; Walker, P. M.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-05-01

    Masses of uranium fission fragments have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) combined with the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. A 410-415 MeV/u 238U projectile beam was fast extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 with an average intensity of 109/spill. The projectiles were focused on a 1g/cm2 beryllium target at the entrance of the FRS to create neutron-rich isotopes via abrasion-fission. The fission fragments were spatially separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for fast mass measurements without applying cooling. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B ρ-tagging at the high-resolution dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. The evaluation has been done for the combined data sets from both experiments with a new method of data analysis. The use of a correlation matrix has provided experimental mass values for 23 different neutron-rich isotopes for the first time and 6 masses with improved values. The new masses were obtained for nuclides in the element range from Se to Ce. The applied analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with an intensity of a few atoms per week. The novel data analysis and systematic error determination are described and the results are compared with extrapolations of experimental values and theoretical models.

  9. Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Screening.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ben; Feng, Yun Jiang; Vu, Hoan; McCormick, Brendan; Rowley, Jessica; Pedro, Liliana; Crowther, Gregory J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Forster, Paul I; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-02-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS or ESI-FTMS) was used to screen 192 natural product extracts and a 659-member natural product-based fragment library for bindings to a potential malaria drug target, Plasmodium falciparum Rab11a (PfRab11a, PF13_0119). One natural product extract and 11 fragments showed binding activity. A new natural product, arborside E, was identified from the active extract of Psydrax montigena as a weak binder. Its binding activity and inhibitory activity against PfRab11a were confirmed by ESI-FTMS titration experiments and an orthogonal enzyme assay. PMID:26773071

  10. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  11. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  12. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heumann, Klaus G.

    1992-09-01

    In the past isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) has usually been applied using the formation of positive thermal ions of metals. Especially in calibrating other analytical methods and for the certification of standard reference materials this type of IDMS became a routine method. Today, the progress in this field lies in the determination of ultra trace amounts of elements, e.g. of heavy metals in Antarctic ice and in aerosols in remote areas down to the sub-pg g-1 and sub-pg m-3 levels respectively, in the analysis of uranium and thorium at concentrations of a few pg g-1 in sputter targets for the production of micro- electronic devices or in the determination of sub-picogram amounts of230Th in corals for geochemical age determinations and of226Ra in rock samples. During the last few years negative thermal ionization IDMS has become a frequently used method. The determination of very small amounts of selenium and technetium as well as of other transition metals such as vanadium, chromium, molybdenum and tungsten are important examples in this field. Also the measurement of silicon in connection with a re-determination of Avogadro's number and osmium analyses for geological age determinations by the Re/Os method are of special interest. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry is increasingly being used for multi-element analyses by the isotope dilution technique. Determinations of heavy metals in samples of marine origin are representative examples for this type of multi-element analysis by IDMS. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems have also been successfully applied after chelation of metals (for example Pt determination in clinical samples) or for the determination of volatile element species in the environment, e.g. dimethyl sulfide. However, IDMS--specially at low concentration levels in the environment--seems likely to be one of the most powerful analytical methods for speciation in the future. This has been shown, up to now, for species of

  13. Biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Vogel, John S.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasensitive SIMS with accelerator based spectrometers has recently begun to be applied to biomedical problems. Certain very long-lived radioisotopes of very low natural abundances can be used to trace metabolism at environmental dose levels ( [greater-or-equal, slanted] z mol in mg samples). 14C in particular can be employed to label a myriad of compounds. Competing technologies typically require super environmental doses that can perturb the system under investigation, followed by uncertain extrapolation to the low dose regime. 41Ca and 26Al are also used as elemental tracers. Given the sensitivity of the accelerator method, care must be taken to avoid contamination of the mass spectrometer and the apparatus employed in prior sample handling including chemical separation. This infant field comprises the efforts of a dozen accelerator laboratories. The Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been particularly active. In addition to collaborating with groups further afield, we are researching the kinematics and binding of genotoxins in-house, and we support innovative uses of our capability in the disciplines of chemistry, pharmacology, nutrition and physiology within the University of California. The field can be expected to grow further given the numerous potential applications and the efforts of several groups and companies to integrate more the accelerator technology into biomedical research programs; the development of miniaturized accelerator systems and ion sources capable of interfacing to conventional HPLC and GMC, etc. apparatus for complementary chemical analysis is anticipated for biomedical laboratories.

  14. Nanopore Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Joseph; Mihovilovic, Mirna; Maulbetsch, William; Frenchette, Layne; Moon, Wooyoung; Pruitt, Cole; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene; Weber, Peter; Stein, Derek

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterization of a nanopore-based ion source for mass spectrometry. Our goal is to field-extract ions directly from solution into the high vacuum to enable unit collection efficiency and temporal resolution of sequential ion emissions for DNA sequencing. The ion source features a capillary whose tip, measuring tens to hundreds of nanometers in inner diameter, is situated in the vacuum ~ 1.5 cm away from an extractor electrode. The capillary was filled with conductive solution and voltage-biased relative to the extractor. Applied voltages of hundreds of volts extracted tens to hundreds of nA of current from the tip. A mass analysis of the extracted ions showed primarily singly charged clusters comprising the cation or anion solvated by several solvent molecules. Our interpretation of these results, based on the works of Taylor and of de la Mora, is that the applied electric stresses distort the fluid meniscus into a Taylor cone, where electric fields reach ~ 1V/nm and induce significant ion evaporation. Accordingly, the abundances of extracted ionic clusters resemble a Boltzmann distribution. This work was supported by NIH grant NHGRI 1R21HG005100-01.

  15. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  16. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  17. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  18. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  19. Instrumentation for mass spectrometry: 1997

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-08-01

    All mass spectrometry experiments involve the manipulation of material, an interface with the mass spectrometer, ionization, ion manipulation/analysis, detection and data collection/reduction. Each of these elements involve instrumentation. The wide range of species now amenable to mass spectrometry and the diverse areas of physical science in which it plays a role have led to a seemingly unlimited array of instrumental combinations. However, only a limited number of mass analyzers, and their combinations, dominate. The dominant analyzers include time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance, the Paul trap, the mass filter, and the sector mass spectrometer. Why there are so few (or so many, depending upon one`s point of view) can be understood upon consideration of a set of mass analyzer figures of merit. These include mass resolution, mass accuracy, mass range, dynamic range, abundance sensitivity, precision, efficiency, speed, MS{sup n} capability, compatibility with the ionizer, cost, and size. The most appropriate form of mass spectrometry is determined by the priorities of the particular measurement placed on the various mass analyzer characteristics and the relative strengths of the analyzers in meeting the requirements. Each of the analyzer types has a unique set of figures of merit that makes it optimally suited for particular applications. This paper discusses these figures of merit, provides data illustrating recent developments for each analyzer type, and gives the figures of merit of each type of analyzer as they stand in 1997. 101 refs., 24 figs.

  20. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Casimir; Renz, Uwe; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84 ± 35) μm with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allows parallel imaging of selected masses. The digital imaging mass spectrometer proves high hit-multiplicity, straightforward image reconstruction, and potential for high-speed readout at 4 kHz or more. This device demonstrates a simple way of true image acquisition like a digital photographic camera. The technology may enable a fast analysis of biomolecular samples in near future.

  1. Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Greg C.

    2005-09-01

    This chapter describes research conducted in a few research groups in the 1990s in which RF quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers were coupled to a powerful atomic ion source, the inductively coupled plasma used in conventional ICP-MS instruments. Major section titles for this chapter are: RF Quadrupole Ion Traps Features of RF Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Selective Ion Trapping methods Inductively Coupled Plasma Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

  2. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  3. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  4. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  5. Mass spectrometry of large complexes.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Zenobi, Renato

    2009-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is becoming a more and more powerful tool for investigating protein complexes. Recent developments, based on different ionization techniques, electrospray, desorption/ionization and others are contributing to the usefulness of MS to describe the organization and structure of large non-covalent assemblies. PMID:19782560

  6. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  7. Efficiency and rate capability studies of the time-of-flight detector for isochronous mass measurements of stored short-lived nuclei with the FRS-ESR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminchuk-Feuerstein, Natalia; Fabian, Benjamin; Diwisch, Marcel; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Geissel, Hans; Ayet San Andrés, Samuel; Dickel, Timo; Knöbel, Ronja; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Sun, Baohua; Weick, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) detector is used for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) with the projectile fragment separator FRS and the heavy-ion storage ring ESR. Exotic nuclei are spatially separated in flight with the FRS at about 70% of the speed of light and are injected into the ESR. The revolution times of the stored ions circulating in the ESR are measured with a thin transmission foil detector. When the ions penetrate the thin detector foil, secondary electrons (SEs) are emitted from the surface and provide the timing information in combination with microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. The isochronous transport of the SEs is performed by perpendicular superimposed electric and magnetic fields. The detection efficiency and the rate capability of the TOF detector have been studied in simulations and experiments. As a result the performance of the TOF detector has been improved substantially: (i) The SE collection efficiency was doubled by use of an optimized set of electric and magnetic field values; now SEs from almost the full area of the foil are transmitted to the MCP detectors. (ii) The rate capability of the TOF detector was improved by a factor of four by the use of MCPs with 5 μm pore size. (iii) With these MCPs and a carbon foil with a reduced thickness of 10 μg/cm2 the number of recorded revolutions in the ESR has been increased by nearly a factor of 10. The number of recorded revolutions determine the precision of the IMS experiments. Heavy-ion measurements were performed with neon ions at 322 MeV/u and uranium fission fragments at about 370 MeV/u. In addition, measurements with an alpha source were performed in the laboratory with a duplicate of the TOF detector.

  8. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-07-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) techniques. Rapid analyses of gas, liquid, and solid samples are possible with the adoption of various sample-introduction methods. This review sorts different ambient ionization techniques into two main subcategories, primarily on the basis of the ionization processes, that are further differentiated in terms of the approach used for sampling.

  9. Accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Turteltaub, K.W.; Finkel, R.; Nelson, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    Accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) can be used for efficient detection of long-lived isotopes at part-per-quadrillion sensitivities with good precision. In this article we present an overview of AMS and its recent use in archaeology, geochemistry and biomolecular tracing. All AMS systems use cesium sputter ion sources to produce negative ions from a small button of a solid sample containing the element of interest, such as graphite, metal halide, or metal oxide, often mixed with a metal powder as binder and thermal conductor. Experience shows that both natural and biomedical samples are compatible in a single AMS system, but few other AMS sites make routine {sup 14}C measurements for both dating and tracing. AMS is, in one sense, just `a very sensitive decay counter`, but if AMS sensitivity is creatively coupled to analytical chemistry of certain isotopes, whole new areas of geosciences, archaeology, and life sciences can be explored. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED METABOLOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Katja; Aronov, Pavel A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the dynamically developing field of mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Metabolomics aims at the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of wide arrays of metabolites in biological samples. These numerous analytes have very diverse physico-chemical properties and occur at different abundance levels. Consequently, comprehensive metabolomics investigations are primarily a challenge for analytical chemistry and specifically mass spectrometry has vast potential as a tool for this type of investigation. Metabolomics require special approaches for sample preparation, separation, and mass spectrometric analysis. Current examples of those approaches are described in this review. It primarily focuses on metabolic fingerprinting, a technique that analyzes all detectable analytes in a given sample with subsequent classification of samples and identification of differentially expressed metabolites, which define the sample classes. To perform this complex task, data analysis tools, metabolite libraries, and databases are required. Therefore, recent advances in metabolomics bioinformatics are also discussed. PMID:16921475

  11. Mass spectrometry and renal calculi

    PubMed Central

    Purcarea, VL; Sisu, I; Sisu, E

    2010-01-01

    The present review represents a concise and complete survey of the literature covering 2004–2009, concerning the mass spectrometric techniques involved in the structural investigation of renal calculi. After a short presentation of the fundamental mass spectrometric techniques (MALDI–TOF, QTOF, MS–MS) as well as hyphenated methods (GC–MS, LC–MS, CE–MS), an extensive study of the urinary proteome analysis as well as the detection and quantification by mass spectrometry of toxins, drugs and metabolites from renal calculi is presented. PMID:20968197

  12. Mass spectrometry of aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is used for chemical analysis of aerospace materials and contaminants. Years of analytical aerospace experience have resulted in the development of specialized techniques of sampling and analysis which are required in order to optimize results. This work has resulted in the evolution of a hybrid method of indexing mass spectra which include both the largest peaks and the structurally significant peaks in a concise format. With this system, a library of mass spectra of aerospace materials was assembled, including the materials responsible for 80 to 90 percent of the contamination problems at Goddard Space Flight Center during the past several years.

  13. Imaging Mass Spectrometry in Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is an emerging technique of great potential for investigating the chemical architecture in biological matrices. Although the potential for studying neurobiological systems is evident, the relevance of the technique for application in neuroscience is still in its infancy. In the present Review, a principal overview of the different approaches, including matrix assisted laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry, is provided with particular focus on their strengths and limitations for studying different neurochemical species in situ and in vitro. The potential of the various approaches is discussed based on both fundamental and biomedical neuroscience research. This Review aims to serve as a general guide to familiarize the neuroscience community and other biomedical researchers with the technique, highlighting its great potential and suitability for comprehensive and specific chemical imaging. PMID:23530951

  14. Glycosaminoglycan Glycomics Using Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The fact that sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are necessary for the functioning of all animal physiological systems drives the need to understand their biology. This understanding is limited, however, by the heterogeneous nature of GAG chains and their dynamic spatial and temporal expression patterns. GAGs have a regulated structure overlaid by heterogeneity but lack the detail necessary to build structure/function relationships. In order to provide this information, we need glycomics platforms that are sensitive, robust, high throughput, and information rich. This review summarizes progress on mass-spectrometry-based GAG glycomics methods. The areas covered include disaccharide analysis, oligosaccharide profiling, and tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. PMID:23325770

  15. Mass spectrometry. [review of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Kimble, B. J.; Derrick, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry (MS) and its applications over the past decade are reviewed in depth, with annotated literature references. New instrumentation and techniques surveyed include: modulated-beam MS, chromatographic MS on-line computer techniques, digital computer-compatible quadrupole MS, selected ion monitoring (mass fragmentography), and computer-aided management of MS data and interpretation. Areas of application surveyed include: organic MS and electron impact MS, field ionization kinetics, appearance potentials, translational energy release, studies of metastable species, photoionization, calculations of molecular orbitals, chemical kinetics, field desorption MS, high pressure MS, ion cyclotron resonance, biochemistry, medical/clinical chemistry, pharmacology, and environmental chemistry and pollution studies.

  16. A mass spectrometry primer for mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), a rapidly growing subfield of chemical imaging, employs mass spectrometry (MS) technologies to create single- and multi-dimensional localization maps for a variety of atoms and molecules. Complimentary to other imaging approaches, MSI provides high chemical specificity and broad analyte coverage. This powerful analytical toolset is capable of measuring the distribution of many classes of inorganics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceuticals in chemically and structurally complex biological specimens in vivo, in vitro, and in situ. The MSI approaches highlighted in this Methods in Molecular Biology volume provide flexibility of detection, characterization, and identification of multiple known and unknown analytes. The goal of this chapter is to introduce investigators who may be unfamiliar with MS to the basic principles of the mass spectrometric approaches as used in MSI. In addition to guidelines for choosing the most suitable MSI method for specific investigations, cross-references are provided to the chapters in this volume that describe the appropriate experimental protocols. PMID:20680583

  17. Isochronous field study of the Rare-RI Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Wakasugi, M.; Uesaka, T.; Ozawa, A.; Suzaki, F.; Nagae, D.; Miura, H.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yano, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Construction of the Rare-RI Ring to measure masses of short-lived rare-RI with a relative precision of 10-6 is in progress at RIKEN. The Rare-RI Ring consists of six sectors where each sector consists of four dipole magnets. Since the mass measurement is done by the isochronous mass spectrometry in the Rare-RI Ring, creating isochronous magnetic field is one of the important issues in mass measurements with the Rare-RI Ring. In order to make an isochronous field, we installed ten trim coils in the two outer dipoles among the four dipoles in each sector magnet. The isochronism of the magnetic field have been confirmed by measuring time-of-flight (TOF) of alpha particles from an alpha-source (241Am). We measured TOF of alpha particles while changing the radial gradient of the magnetic field by trim coils and evaluated the isochronism from standard deviation of the TOF spectrum. The TOF width is minimum for a radial gradient of magnetic field (\\partial {B}z/\\partial r)/B0 = 0.205 m-1, which is in good agreement with the simulated value.

  18. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  19. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  20. Neuroscience and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Palmblad, M N; Buchholz, B A; Hillegonds, D J; Vogel, J S

    2004-08-02

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a mass spectrometric method for quantifying rare isotopes. It has had great impact in geochronology and archaeology and is now being applied in biomedicine. AMS measures radioisotopes such as {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca, with zepto- or attomole sensitivity and high precision and throughput, enabling safe human pharmacokinetic studies involving: microgram doses, agents having low bioavailability, or toxicology studies where administered doses must be kept low (<1 {micro}g/kg). It is used to study long-term pharmacokinetics, to identify biomolecular interactions, to determine chronic and low-dose effects or molecular targets of neurotoxic substances, to quantify transport across the blood-brain barrier and to resolve molecular turnover rates in the human brain on the timescale of decades. We will here review how AMS is applied in neurotoxicology and neuroscience.

  1. The life sciences mass spectrometry research unit.

    PubMed

    Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    The Life Sciences Mass Spectrometry (LSMS) research unit focuses on the development of novel analytical workflows based on innovative mass spectrometric and software tools for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds, peptides and proteins in complex biological matrices. The present article summarizes some of the recent work of the unit: i) the application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of drug of abuse in hair, ii) the use of high resolution mass spectrometry for simultaneous qualitative/quantitative analysis in drug metabolism and metabolomics, and iii) the absolute quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry using the selected reaction monitoring mode. PMID:22867547

  2. MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FATTY ALDEHYDES

    PubMed Central

    Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2011-01-01

    Fatty aldehydes are important components of the cellular lipidome. Significant interest has been developed towards the analysis of the short chain α,β-unsaturated and hydroxylated aldehydes formed as a result of oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Multiple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and subsequently liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) approaches have been developed to identify and quantify short-chain as well as long-chain fatty aldehydes. Due to the ability to non-enzymaticaly form Schiff bases with amino groups of proteins, lipids, and with DNA guanidine, free aldehydes are viewed as a marker or metric of fatty acid oxidation and not the part of intracellular signaling pathways which has significantly limited the overall attention this group of molecules have received. This review provides an overview of current GC/MS and LC/MS approaches of fatty aldehyde analysis as well as discusses technical challenges standing in the way of free fatty aldehyde quantitation. PMID:21930240

  3. Counting Molecules by Desorption Ionization and Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, R. G.; Busch, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses two newer methods in mass spectrometry and shows how they can increase signal and signal-to-noise ratios, respectively. The first method, desorption ionization (DI), increases sensitivity while the second method, mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS), increases specificity. Together, the two methods offer improved analytical…

  4. Nanotip Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Lee, Jae Kyoo; Kim, Samuel C; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    A method called nanotip ambient ionization mass spectrometry (NAIMS) is described, which applies high voltage between a tungsten nanotip and a metal plate to generate a plasma in which ionized analytes on the surface of the metal plate are directed to the inlet and analyzed by a mass spectrometer. The dependence of signal intensity is investigated as a function of the tip-to-plate distance, the tip size, the voltage applied at the tip, and the current. These parameters are separately optimized to achieve sensitivity or high spatial resolution. A partially observable Markov decision process is used to achieve a stabilized plasma as well as high ionization efficiency. As a proof of concept, the NAIMS technique has been applied to phenanthrene and caffeine samples for which the limits of detection were determined to be 0.14 fmol for phenanthrene and 4 amol for caffeine and to a printed caffeine pattern for which a spatial resolution of 8 ± 2 μm, and the best resolution of 5 μm, was demonstrated. The limitations of NAIMS are also discussed. PMID:27087600

  5. The Seven Sisters DANCe. I. Empirical isochrones, luminosity, and mass functions of the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouy, H.; Bertin, E.; Sarro, L. M.; Barrado, D.; Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Berihuete, A.; Olivares, J.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The DANCe survey provides photometric and astrometric (position and proper motion) measurements for approximately 2 million unique sources in a region encompassing ~80 deg2 centered on the Pleiades cluster. Aims: We aim at deriving a complete census of the Pleiades and measure the mass and luminosity functions of the cluster. Methods: Using the probabilistic selection method previously described, we identified high probability members in the DANCe (i ≥ 14 mag) and Tycho-2 (V ≲ 12 mag) catalogues and studied the properties of the cluster over the corresponding luminosity range. Results: We find a total of 2109 high-probability members, of which 812 are new, making it the most extensive and complete census of the cluster to date. The luminosity and mass functions of the cluster are computed from the most massive members down to ~0.025 M⊙. The size, sensitivity, and quality of the sample result in the most precise luminosity and mass functions observed to date for a cluster. Conclusions: Our census supersedes previous studies of the Pleiades cluster populations, in terms of both sensitivity and accuracy. Based on service observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Table 1 and Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgDANCe catalogs (Tables 6 and 7) and full Tables 2-5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/577/A148

  6. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  7. Inorganic trace analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine; Dietze, Hans-Joachim

    1998-10-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for the trace analysis of inorganic materials with their ability to provide a very sensitive multielemental analysis have been established for the determination of trace and ultratrace elements in high-purity materials (metals, semiconductors and insulators), in different technical samples (e.g. alloys, pure chemicals, ceramics, thin films, ion-implanted semiconductors), in environmental samples (waters, soils, biological and medical materials) and geological samples. Whereas such techniques as spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have multielemental capability, other methods such as thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) have been used for sensitive mono- or oligoelemental ultratrace analysis (and precise determination of isotopic ratios) in solid samples. The limits of detection for chemical elements using these mass spectrometric techniques are in the low ng g -1 concentration range. The quantification of the analytical results of mass spectrometric methods is sometimes difficult due to a lack of matrix-fitted multielement standard reference materials (SRMs) for many solid samples. Therefore, owing to the simple quantification procedure of the aqueous solution, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is being increasingly used for the characterization of solid samples after sample dissolution. ICP-MS is often combined with special sample introduction equipment (e.g. flow injection, hydride generation, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrothermal vaporization) or an off-line matrix separation and enrichment of trace impurities (especially for characterization of

  8. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context. PMID:25980644

  9. Broadband Analysis of Bioagents by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenselau, Catherine; Wynne, Colin; Edwards, Nathan

    Mass spectrometry was first reported to provide analysis of intact metabolite biomarkers from whole cells in 1975.1 Since then advances in ionization techniques have extended our capabilities to polar lipids and, eventually, to proteins.2, 3 Mass spectrometry provides a broadband detection system, which, however, has great specificity. Bioinformatics plays an important role in providing flexible and rapid characterization of species, based on protein and peptide mass spectra collected in the field.

  10. Methods for recalibration of mass spectrometry data

    DOEpatents

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-03-03

    Disclosed are methods for recalibrating mass spectrometry data that provide improvement in both mass accuracy and precision by adjusting for experimental variance in parameters that have a substantial impact on mass measurement accuracy. Optimal coefficients are determined using correlated pairs of mass values compiled by matching sets of measured and putative mass values that minimize overall effective mass error and mass error spread. Coefficients are subsequently used to correct mass values for peaks detected in the measured dataset, providing recalibration thereof. Sub-ppm mass measurement accuracy has been demonstrated on a complex fungal proteome after recalibration, providing improved confidence for peptide identifications.

  11. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  13. Mass Spectrometry in the Home and Garden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, Christopher J.; Bain, Ryan M.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R. Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application.

  14. Microorganism characterization by single particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years a major effort by several groups has been undertaken to identify bacteria by mass spectrometry at the single cell level. The intent of this review is to highlight the recent progress made in the application of single particle mass spectrometry to the analysis of microorganisms. A large portion of the review highlights improvements in the ionization and mass analysis of bio-aerosols, or particles that contain biologically relevant molecules such as peptides or proteins. While these are not direct applications to bacteria, the results have been central to a progression toward single cell mass spectrometry. Developments in single particle matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are summarized. Recent applications of aerosol laser desorption/ionization (LDI) to the analysis of single microorganisms are highlighted. Successful applications of off-line and on-the-fly aerosol MALDI to microorganism detection are discussed. Limitations to current approaches and necessary future achievements are also addressed. PMID:18949817

  15. Mass Spectrometry of Intact Membrane Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Reading, Eamonn; Hopper, Jonathan T.S.; Robinson, Carol V.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry of intact soluble protein complexes has emerged as a powerful technique to study the stoichiometry, structure-function and dynamics of protein assemblies. Recent developments have extended this technique to the study of membrane protein complexes where it has already revealed subunit stoichiometries and specific phospholipid interactions. Here, we describe a protocol for mass spectrometry of membrane protein complexes. The protocol begins with preparation of the membrane protein complex enabling not only the direct assessment of stoichiometry, delipidation, and quality of the target complex, but also evaluation of the purification strategy. A detailed list of compatible non-ionic detergents is included, along with a protocol for screening detergents to find an optimal one for mass spectrometry, biochemical and structural studies. This protocol also covers the preparation of lipids for protein-lipid binding studies and includes detailed settings for a Q-ToF mass spectrometer after introduction of complexes from gold-coated nanoflow capillaries. PMID:23471109

  16. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  17. The Pisa pre-main sequence tracks and isochrones. A database covering a wide range of Z, Y, mass, and age values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognelli, E.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2011-09-01

    Context. In recent years new observations of pre-main sequence stars (pre-MS) with Z ≤ Z⊙ have been made available. To take full advantage of the continuously growing amount of data of pre-MS stars in different environments, we need to develop updated pre-MS models for a wide range of metallicity to assign reliable ages and masses to the observed stars. Aims: We present updated evolutionary pre-MS models and isochrones for a fine grid of mass, age, metallicity, and helium values. Methods: We use a standard and well-tested stellar evolutionary code (i.e. FRANEC), that adopts outer boundary conditions from detailed and realistic atmosphere models. In this code, we incorporate additional improvements to the physical inputs related to the equation of state and the low temperature radiative opacities essential to computing low-mass stellar models. Results: We make available via internet a large database of pre-MS tracks and isochrones for a wide range of chemical compositions (Z = 0.0002-0.03), masses (M = 0.2-7.0 M⊙), and ages (1-100 Myr) for a solar-calibrated mixing length parameter α (i.e. 1.68). For each chemical composition, additional models were computed with two different mixing length values, namely α = 1.2 and 1.9. Moreover, for Z ≥ 0.008, we also provided models with two different initial deuterium abundances. The characteristics of the models have been discussed in detail and compared with other work in the literature. The main uncertainties affecting theoretical predictions have been critically discussed. Comparisons with selected data indicate that there is close agreement between theory and observation. Tracks and isochrones are available on the web at the http://astro.df.unipi.it/stellar-models/Tracks and isochrones are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/533/A109

  18. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  19. Mass spectrometry and the environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hites, Ronald A.

    1992-09-01

    Research in environmental mass spectrometry focuses on two broad areas: development of new methods for a wide range of pollutants; and using existing methods to understand the fate of pollutants in nature. This paper will present examples of both types of research. In some environmental settings it is important to have rapid analytical turnaround, which suggests that samples should be analyzed in the field rather than in a remote laboratory. Thus, there has been considerable interest in "fieldable" mass spectrometers. Volatile and water soluble analytes can be introduced into a mass spectrometer by passing the water sample over a semi-permeable membrane. The analytes of interest pass through the membrane, but the water does not. This method may be useful in situations that require a continuous readout of concentration. Like mass spectrometrists everywhere, environmental scientists have explored the many facets of liquid chromatographic mass spectrometry. Work in our laboratory has centered on continuous flow fast atom bombardment (CF-FAB) as the LCMS interface. In addition, flow injection analysis is possible using CF-FAB. By avoiding chromatographic separation, the throughput of the analytical system is increased. Frequently, tandem mass spectrometry is necessary to unscramble the chemical signals produced by this technique. Electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry can achieve sensitivities of a few attomoles for selected compounds; furthermore, the technique can be remarkably specific. These features make it ideal for the analysis of highly chlorinated environmental contaminants such as chlorinated dioxins. Such an application will be presented in detail.

  20. BANYAN. IV. Fundamental parameters of low-mass star candidates in nearby young stellar kinematic groups—isochronal age determination using magnetic evolutionary models

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Albert, Loïc; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Étienne; Gagné, Jonathan; Feiden, Gregory A.; Riedel, Adric E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-09-01

    Based on high-resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we determine fundamental parameters (T {sub eff}, R, L {sub bol}, log g, and metallicity) for 59 candidate members of nearby young kinematic groups. The candidates were identified through the BANYAN Bayesian inference method of Malo et al., which takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, color, radial velocity, and parallax (when available) to establish a membership probability. The derived parameters are compared to Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models and field stars with the goal of constraining the age of our candidates. We find that, in general, low-mass stars in our sample are more luminous and have inflated radii compared to older stars, a trend expected for pre-main-sequence stars. The Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models show a good fit to observations of field K and M stars, assuming a magnetic field strength of a few kG, as typically observed for cool stars. Using the low-mass members of the β Pictoris moving group, we have re-examined the age inconsistency problem between lithium depletion age and isochronal age (Hertzspring-Russell diagram). We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field in evolutionary models increases the isochronal age estimates for the K5V-M5V stars. Using these models and field strengths, we derive an average isochronal age between 15 and 28 Myr and we confirm a clear lithium depletion boundary from which an age of 26 ± 3 Myr is derived, consistent with previous age estimates based on this method.

  1. Mass spectrometry in natural product chemistry.

    PubMed

    Clayton, E; Hill, H C; Reed, R I

    1966-01-01

    Some mass spectrometric techniques are described which seem applicable to investigating problems in natural product chemistry. One example is of a sample of 5 mcg of a compound being identified by comparison with an authentic sample of prostaglandin derivative. Compared were mass, ion content, and structure. In the prostaglandin/unknown substance comparison, high-resolution mass spectrometry resolved a quandary: apparent additional ions present in the unknown substance were shown to be an impurity. PMID:12262324

  2. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Severs, J.C.

    1999-11-30

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an analyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  4. Analysis of Electroblotted Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Identification of proteins by mass spectrometry is crucial for better understanding of many biological, biochemical, and biomedical processes. Here we describe two methods for the identification of electroblotted proteins by on-membrane digestion prior to analysis by mass spectrometry. These on-membrane methods take approximately half the time of in-gel digestion and provide better digestion efficiency, due to the better accessibility of the protease to the proteins adsorbed onto the nitrocellulose, and better protein sequence coverage, especially for membrane proteins where large and hydrophobic peptides are commonly present. PMID:26139272

  5. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  6. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  7. Development of Gas Chromatographic Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hites, Ronald A

    2016-07-19

    Gas chromatographic mass spectrometry is now widely used for the quantitation and identification of organic compounds in almost any imaginable sample. These applications include the measurement of chlorinated dioxins in soil samples, the identification of illicit drugs in human blood, and the quantitation of accelerants in arson investigations, to name just a few. How did GC/MS get so popular? It turns out that it required parallel developments in mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, and computing and that no one person "invented" the technique. This Perspective traces this history from the 1950s until today. PMID:27384908

  8. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, Kenneth L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses reactions and characteristics of fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectroscopy in which samples are ionized in a condensed state by bombardment with xenon or argon atoms, yielding positive/negative secondary ions. Includes applications of FAB to structural problems and considers future developments using the technique. (Author/JN)

  9. Continuous Simultaneous Detection in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2007-10-15

    In mass spectrometry, several advantages can be derived when multiple mass-to-charge values are detected simultaneously. One such advantage is an improved duty cycle, which leads to superior limits of detection, better precision, shorter analysis times, and reduced sample sizes. A second advantage is the ability to reduce correlated noise by taking the ratio of two or more simultaneously collected signals, enabling greatly enhanced isotope ratio data. A final advantage is the elimination of spectral skew, leading to more accurate transient signal analysis. Here, these advantages are demonstrated by means of a novel Faraday-strip array detector coupled to a Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrograph. The same system is used to monitor elemental fractionation phenomena in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  10. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  11. Mass spectrometry in the home and garden.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Christopher J; Bain, Ryan M; Wiley, Joshua S; Ouyang, Zheng; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-01

    Identification of active components in a variety of chemical products used directly by consumers is described at both trace and bulk levels using mass spectrometry. The combination of external ambient ionization with a portable mass spectrometer capable of tandem mass spectrometry provides high chemical specificity and sensitivity as well as allowing on-site monitoring. These experiments were done using a custom-built portable ion trap mass spectrometer in combination with the ambient ionization methods of paper spray, leaf spray, and low temperature plasma ionization. Bactericides, garden chemicals, air fresheners, and other products were examined. Herbicide applied to suburban lawns was detected in situ on single leaves 5 d after application. PMID:25510934

  12. Nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry biometrics

    DOEpatents

    Leclerc, Marion; Bowen, Benjamin; Northen, Trent

    2015-09-08

    Several embodiments described herein are drawn to methods of identifying an analyte on a subject's skin, methods of generating a fingerprint, methods of determining a physiological change in a subject, methods of diagnosing health status of a subject, and assay systems for detecting an analyte and generating a fingerprint, by nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS).

  13. Atmospheric pressure femtosecond laser imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Yves; Gunaratne, Tissa C.; Dantus, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    We present a novel imaging mass spectrometry technique that uses femtosecond laser pulses to directly ionize the sample. The method offers significant advantages over current techniques by eliminating the need of a laser-absorbing sample matrix, being suitable for atmospheric pressure sampling, and by providing 10μm resolution, as demonstrated here with a chemical image of vegetable cell walls.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstock, Günther; Heinzl, Johann; Korschinek, Gunther; Morinaga, Haruhiko; Nolte, Eckehart; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Kato, Kazuo; Wolf, Manfred

    1986-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements with fully stripped 36Cl ions have been performed at the Munich accelerator laboratory in order to date groundwaters and palaeontological samples, to study anthropogenic 36Cl produced through nuclear tests and to determine the fast neutron flux of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  15. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different aspects of the proteome can be explored by choosing the right combination of sample preparation, MS instrumentation and data processing. This chapter gives an outline for some of these commonly used setups and some of the key concepts, many of which are explored in greater depth in later chapters. PMID:23666720

  16. Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry of Complex Organic Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Illustrates the state of the art in pyrolysis mass spectrometry techniques through applications in: (1) structural determination and quality control of synthetic polymers; (2) quantitative analysis of polymer mixtures; (3) classification and structural characterization of fossil organic matter; and (4) nonsupervised numerical extraction of…

  17. Optimization Of A Mass Spectrometry Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Jose; Alegria, F. Correa; Redondo, Luis; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Rocha, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present and discuss a system developed in order to optimize the mass spectrometry process of an ion implanter. The system uses a PC to control and display the mass spectrum. The operator interacts with the I/O board, that interfaces with the computer and the ion implanter by a LabVIEW code. Experimental results are shown and the capabilities of the system are discussed.

  18. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS. PMID:16787159

  19. Space Applications of Mass Spectrometry. Chapter 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John H.; Griffin, Timothy P.; Limero, Thomas; Arkin, C. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometers have been involved in essentially all aspects of space exploration. This chapter outlines some of these many uses. Mass spectrometers have not only helped to expand our knowledge and understanding of the world and solar system around us, they have helped to put man safely in space and expand our frontier. Mass spectrometry continues to prove to be a very reliable, robust, and flexible analytical instrument, ensuring that its use will continue to help aid our investigation of the universe and this small planet that we call home.

  20. Evolution of Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliuk, Shannon; Makarov, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the evolution of OrbitrapTM mass spectrometry (MS) from its birth in the late 1990s to its current role as one of the most prominent techniques for MS. The Orbitrap mass analyzer is the first high-performance mass analyzer that employs trapping of ions in electrostatic fields. Tight integration with the ion injection process enables the high-resolution, mass accuracy, and sensitivity that have become essential for addressing analytical needs in numerous areas of research, as well as in routine analysis. We examine three major families of instruments (related to the LTQ Orbitrap, Q Exactive, and Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometers) in the context of their historical development over the past ten eventful years. We discuss as well future trends and perspectives of Orbitrap MS. We illustrate the compelling potential of Orbitrap-based mass spectrometers as (ultra) high-resolution platforms, not only for high-end proteomic applications, but also for routine targeted analysis.

  1. Nuclear applications of inorganic mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Laeter, John

    2010-01-01

    There are several basic characteristics of mass spectrometry that are not always fully appreciated by the science community. These characteristics include the distinction between relative and absolute isotope abundances, and the influence of isotope fractionation on the accuracy of isotopic measurements. These characteristics can be illustrated in the field of nuclear physics with reference to the measurement of nuclear parameters, which involve the use of enriched isotopes, and to test models of s-, r-, and p-process nucleosynthesis. The power of isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) to measure trace elements in primitive meteorites to produce accurate Solar System abundances has been essential to the development of nuclear astrophysics. The variety of mass spectrometric instrumentation used to measure the isotopic composition of elements has sometimes been accompanied by a lack of implementation of basic mass spectrometric protocols which are applicable to all instruments. These metrological protocols are especially important in atomic weight determinations, but must also be carefully observed in cases where the anomalies might be very small, such as in studies of the daughter products of extinct radionuclides to decipher events in the early history of the Solar System. There are occasions in which misleading conclusions have been drawn from isotopic data derived from mass spectrometers where such protocols have been ignored. It is important to choose the mass spectrometer instrument most appropriate to the proposed experiment. The importance of the integrative nature of mass spectrometric measurements has been demonstrated by experiments in which long, double beta decay and geochronological decay half-lives have been measured as an alternative to costly radioactive-counting experiments. This characteristic is also illustrated in the measurement of spontaneous fission yields, which have accumulated over long periods of time. Mass spectrometry is also a

  2. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  3. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  4. High resolution laser mass spectrometry bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kermit K; Seneviratne, Chinthaka A; Ghorai, Suman

    2016-07-15

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was introduced more than five decades ago with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and a decade later with laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Large biomolecule imaging by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was developed in the 1990s and ambient laser MS a decade ago. Although SIMS has been capable of imaging with a moderate mass range at sub-micrometer lateral resolution from its inception, laser MS requires additional effort to achieve a lateral resolution of 10μm or below which is required to image at the size scale of single mammalian cells. This review covers untargeted large biomolecule MSI using lasers for desorption/ionization or laser desorption and post-ionization. These methods include laser microprobe (LDI) MSI, MALDI MSI, laser ambient and atmospheric pressure MSI, and near-field laser ablation MS. Novel approaches to improving lateral resolution are discussed, including oversampling, beam shaping, transmission geometry, reflective and through-hole objectives, microscope mode, and near-field optics. PMID:26972785

  5. Mass Spectrometry Imaging under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunping; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Ifa, Demian R.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has emerged as an important tool in the last decade and it is beginning to show potential to provide new information in many fields owing to its unique ability to acquire molecularly specific images and to provide multiplexed information, without the need for labeling or staining. In MSI, the chemical identity of molecules present on a surface is investigated as a function of spatial distribution. In addition to now standard methods involving MSI in vacuum, recently developed ambient ionization techniques allow MSI to be performed under atmospheric pressure on untreated samples outside the mass spectrometer. Here we review recent developments and applications of MSI emphasizing the ambient ionization techniques of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI), probe electrospray ionization (PESI), desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI), femtosecond laser desorption ionization (fs-LDI), laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS), infrared laser ablation metastable-induced chemical ionization (IR-LAMICI), liquid microjunction surface sampling probe mass spectrometry (LMJ-SSP MS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI), and plasma sources such as the low temperature plasma (LTP) probe and laser ablation coupled to flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (LA-FAPA). Included are discussions of some of the features of ambient MSI including the ability to implement chemical reactions with the goal of providing high abundance ions characteristic of specific compounds of interest and the use of tandem mass spectrometry to either map the distribution of targeted molecules with high specificity or to provide additional MS information in the structural identification of compounds. We also describe the role of bioinformatics in acquiring and interpreting the chemical and spatial information obtained through MSI, especially in biological applications for tissue

  6. Choosing between high-resolution mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry: Environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.J. ); Tondeur, Y. )

    1990-12-01

    Selectivity in environmental analyses requires the use of fractionation techniques and HRMS or MS/MS to eliminate specific and nonspecific interferences. In the analysis of TCDDs and TCDFs, HRMS is the method of choice when specific interferences arising from compounds with molecular or fragment ions can be separated from TCDD and TCDF ions at a resolving power of 10,000. In cases where HRMS does not provide adequate selectivity at this resolving power, MS/MS is needed. Analyses on a pulp and paper effluent extract show that MS/MS was able to substantially eliminate interferences due to the presence of methyl and ethyl tetrachlorinated dibenzofurans that were not removed by HRMS at resolving powers of 10,000 and 18,000. Nonspecific interferences may also be present due to coelution of compounds that cause changes in the response of the mass spectrometer and are best eliminated by fractionation techniques or by altering conditions of analyses.

  7. Mass spectrometry in Chronic Kidney Disease research

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into an invaluable tool for biomedical research and for research on renal diseases. A central player in the proteomic revolution is the mass spectrometer and its application to analyze biological samples. Our need to understand both the identity of proteins and their abundance has led to improvements in mass spectrometers and their ability to analyze complex tryptic peptide mixtures with high sensitivity and high mass accuracy in a high throughput fashion (such as the LTQ-Orbitrap). It should not be surprising that this occurred coincident with dramatic improvements in our understanding chronic kidney disease (CKD), the mechanisms through which CKD progresses and the development of candidate CKD biomarkers. This review attempts to present a basic framework for the operational components of mass spectrometers, basic insight into how they are used in renal research and a discussion of CKD research that was driven by mass spectrometry. PMID:21044768

  8. Storage-Ring Mass Spectrometry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzaki, Fumi; Yamaguchi, Takayuki

    Atomic masses are a fundamental ground-state property of nuclei, reflecting a wide variety of structures and dynamics among nucleons. High-precision mass values of short-lived, in particular neutron-rich, nuclei are a key issue toward full understanding of astrophysical nucleosynthesis, as well as nuclear shell evolution far from stability. Beyond the precision mass measurements performed at worldwide ion-trap facilities, a new method of storage-ring mass spectrometry is now being developed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory in Japan. Combined with the highest intensities of intermediate-energy radioactive ion beams currently available through in-flight separation of uranium fission products, the present method will enable us to measure the masses of extremely neutron-rich, rare species located on the r-process pathway, with a tiny yield (as low as ~1 counts/day).

  9. Laser-Cooling-Assisted Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Christian; Schowalter, Steven J.; Chen, Kuang; Sullivan, Scott T.; Hudson, Eric R.

    2014-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is used in a wide range of scientific disciplines including proteomics, pharmaceutics, forensics, and fundamental physics and chemistry. Given this ubiquity, there is a worldwide effort to improve the efficiency and resolution of mass spectrometers. However, the performance of all techniques is ultimately limited by the initial phase-space distribution of the molecules being analyzed. Here, we dramatically reduce the width of this initial phase-space distribution by sympathetically cooling the input molecules with laser-cooled, cotrapped atomic ions, improving both the mass resolution and detection efficiency of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer by over an order of magnitude. Detailed molecular-dynamics simulations verify the technique and aid with evaluating its effectiveness. This technique appears to be applicable to other types of mass spectrometers.

  10. Biological particle analysis by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilker, V. L.; Platz, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    An instrument that analyzes the chemical composition of biological particles in aerosol or hydrosol form was developed. Efforts were directed toward the acquisition of mass spectra from aerosols of biomolecules and bacteria. The filament ion source was installed on the particle analysis by mass spectrometry system. Modifications of the vacuum system improved the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. After the modifications were incorporated, detailed mass spectra of simple compounds from the three major classes of biomolecules, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates were obtained. A method of generating bacterial aerosols was developed. The aerosols generated were collected and examined in the scanning electron microscope to insure that the bacteria delivered to the mass spectrometer were intact and free from debris.

  11. Mass spectrometry imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The development of mass spectrometry imaging technologies is of significant current research interest. Mass spectrometry potentially is capable of providing highly specific information about the distribution of chemical compounds on tissues at highly sensitive levels. The required in-situ analysis for the tissue imaging forced MS analysis being performed off the traditional conditions optimized in pharmaceutical applications with intense sample preparation. This critical review seeks to present an overview of the current status of the MS imaging with different sampling ionization methods and to discuss the 3D imaging and quantitative imaging capabilities needed to be further developed, the importance of the multi-modal imaging, and a balance between the pursuit of the high imaging resolution and the practical application of MS imaging in biomedicine. PMID:23539099

  12. Antibodies as means for selective mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boström, Tove; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia

    2016-05-15

    For protein analysis of biological samples, two major strategies are used today; mass spectrometry (MS) and antibody-based methods. Each strategy offers advantages and drawbacks. However, combining the two using an immunoenrichment step with MS analysis brings together the benefits of each method resulting in increased sensitivity, faster analysis and possibility of higher degrees of multiplexing. The immunoenrichment can be performed either on protein or peptide level and quantification standards can be added in order to enable determination of the absolute protein concentration in the sample. The combination of immunoenrichment and MS holds great promise for the future in both proteomics and clinical diagnostics. This review describes different setups of immunoenrichment coupled to mass spectrometry and how these can be utilized in various applications. PMID:26565067

  13. Biomarker Signature Discovery from Mass Spectrometry Data.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ao; Gupta, Chinmaya; Ferrari, Mauro; Agostini, Marco; Bedin, Chiara; Bouamrani, Ali; Tasciotti, Ennio; Azencott, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based high throughput proteomics are used for protein analysis and clinical diagnosis. Many machine learning methods have been used to construct classifiers based on mass spectrometry data, for discrimination between cancer stages. However, the classifiers generated by machine learning such as SVM techniques typically lack biological interpretability. We present an innovative technique for automated discovery of signatures optimized to characterize various cancer stages. We validate our signature discovery algorithm on one new colorectal cancer MALDI-TOF data set, and two well-known ovarian cancer SELDI-TOF data sets. In all of these cases, our signature based classifiers performed either better or at least as well as four benchmark machine learning algorithms including SVM and KNN. Moreover, our optimized signatures automatically select smaller sets of key biomarkers than the black-boxes generated by machine learning, and are much easier to interpret. PMID:26356346

  14. Spatial neuroproteomics using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanrieder, Jörg; Malmberg, Per; Ewing, Andrew G

    2015-07-01

    The nervous system constitutes arguably the most complicated and least understood cellular network in the human body. This consequently manifests itself in the fact that the molecular bases of neurodegenerative diseases remain unknown. The limited understanding of neurobiological mechanisms relates directly to the lack of appropriate bioanalytical technologies that allow highly resolved, sensitive, specific and comprehensive molecular imaging in complex biological matrices. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is an emerging technique for molecular imaging. The technique is characterized by its high chemical specificity allowing comprehensive, spatial protein and peptide profiling in situ. Imaging MS represents therefore a powerful approach for investigation of spatio-temporal protein and peptide regulations in CNS derived tissue and cells. This review aims to provide a concise overview of major developments and applications concerning imaging mass spectrometry based protein and peptide profiling in neurobiological and biomedical research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in Neuroscience and Neurology. PMID:25582083

  15. High-sensitivity mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristic features of accelerator mass spectrometry are discussed. A short overview is given of the current status of mass spectrometry with high-energy (MeV/nucleon) heavy-ion accelerators. Emphasis is placed on studies with tandem accelerators and on future mass spectrometry of heavier isotopes with the new generation of higher-voltage tandems.

  16. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  17. Mass Spectrometry in Plant-omics.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, Erin; Keller, Caitlin; Li, Lingjun

    2016-04-01

    Plant-omics is rapidly becoming an important field of study in the scientific community due to the urgent need to address many of the most important questions facing humanity today with regard to agriculture, medicine, biofuels, environmental decontamination, ecological sustainability, etc. High-performance mass spectrometry is a dominant tool for interrogating the metabolomes, peptidomes, and proteomes of a diversity of plant species under various conditions, revealing key insights into the functions and mechanisms of plant biochemistry. PMID:26889688

  18. A Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Data Management Platform*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vagisha; Eng, Jimmy K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Riffle, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in biomedical research. These experiments typically generate a large volume of highly complex data, and the volume and complexity are only increasing with time. There exist many software pipelines for analyzing these data (each typically with its own file formats), and as technology improves, these file formats change and new formats are developed. Files produced from these myriad software programs may accumulate on hard disks or tape drives over time, with older files being rendered progressively more obsolete and unusable with each successive technical advancement and data format change. Although initiatives exist to standardize the file formats used in proteomics, they do not address the core failings of a file-based data management system: (1) files are typically poorly annotated experimentally, (2) files are “organically” distributed across laboratory file systems in an ad hoc manner, (3) files formats become obsolete, and (4) searching the data and comparing and contrasting results across separate experiments is very inefficient (if possible at all). Here we present a relational database architecture and accompanying web application dubbed Mass Spectrometry Data Platform that is designed to address the failings of the file-based mass spectrometry data management approach. The database is designed such that the output of disparate software pipelines may be imported into a core set of unified tables, with these core tables being extended to support data generated by specific pipelines. Because the data are unified, they may be queried, viewed, and compared across multiple experiments using a common web interface. Mass Spectrometry Data Platform is open source and freely available at http://code.google.com/p/msdapl/. PMID:22611296

  19. Dissecting SUMO Dynamics by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Drabikowski, Krzysztof; Dadlez, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Protein modification by SUMO proteins is one of the key posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes. Here, we describe a workflow to analyze SUMO dynamics in response to different stimuli, purify SUMO conjugates, and analyze the changes in SUMOylation level in organisms, tissues, or cell culture. We present a protocol for lysis in denaturing conditions that is compatible with downstream IMAC and antibody affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and data analysis. PMID:27613044

  20. Advances in Mass Spectrometry for Lipidomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanksby, Stephen J.; Mitchell, Todd W.

    2010-07-01

    Recent expansion in research in the field of lipidomics has been driven by the development of new mass spectrometric tools and protocols for the identification and quantification of molecular lipids in complex matrices. Although there are similarities between the field of lipidomics and the allied field of mass spectrometry (e.g., proteomics), lipids present some unique advantages and challenges for mass spectrometric analysis. The application of electrospray ionization to crude lipid extracts without prior fractionation—the so-called shotgun approach—is one such example, as it has perhaps been more successfully applied in lipidomics than in any other discipline. Conversely, the diverse molecular structure of lipids means that collision-induced dissociation alone may be limited in providing unique descriptions of complex lipid structures, and the development of additional, complementary tools for ion activation and analysis is required to overcome these challenges. In this article, we discuss the state of the art in lipid mass spectrometry and highlight several areas in which current approaches are deficient and further innovation is required.

  1. Mass spectrometry imaging: Towards a lipid microscope?

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain; Laprévote, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Biological imaging techniques are the most efficient way to locally measure the variation of different parameters on tissue sections. These analyses are gaining increasing interest since 20 years and allow observing extremely complex biological phenomena at lower and lower time and resolution scale. Nevertheless, most of them only target very few compounds of interest, which are chosen a priori, due to their low resolution power and sensitivity. New chemical imaging technique has to be introduced in order to overcome these limitations, leading to more informative and sensitive analyses for biologists and physicians. Two major mass spectrometry methods can be efficiently used to generate the distribution of biological compounds over a tissue section. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS) needs the co-crystallization of the sample with a matrix before to be irradiated by a laser, whereas the analyte is directly desorbed by a primary ion bombardment for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) experiments. In both cases, energy used for desorption/ionization is locally deposited -some tens of microns for the laser and some hundreds of nanometers for the ion beam- meaning that small areas over the surface sample can be separately analyzed. Step by step analysis allows spectrum acquisitions over the tissue sections and the data are treated by modern informatics software in order to create ion density maps, i.e., the intensity plot of one specific ion versus the (x,y) position. Main advantages of SIMS and MALDI compared to other chemical imaging techniques lie in the simultaneous acquisition of a large number of biological compounds in mixture with an excellent sensitivity obtained by Time-of-Flight (ToF) mass analyzer. Moreover, data treatment is done a posteriori, due to the fact that no compound is selectively marked, and let us access to the localization of different lipid classes in only one complete acquisition. PMID:20570708

  2. Uncoiling collagen: a multidimensional mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Simon, H J; van Agthoven, M A; Lam, P Y; Floris, F; Chiron, L; Delsuc, M-A; Rolando, C; Barrow, M P; O'Connor, P B

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry can be used to determine structural information about ions by activating precursors and analysing the resulting series of fragments. Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (2D FT-ICR MS) is a technique that correlates the mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio of fragment and precursor ions in a single spectrum. 2D FT-ICR MS records the fragmentation of all ions in a sample without the need for isolation. To analyse specific precursors, horizontal cross-sections of the spectrum (fragment ion scans) are taken, providing an alternative to conventional tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. In this work, 2D FT-ICR MS has been used to study the tryptic digest of type I collagen, a large protein. Fragment ion scans have been extracted from the 2D FT-ICR MS spectrum for precursor m/z ratios: 951.81, 850.41, 634.34, and 659.34, and 2D FT-ICR MS spectra are compared with a set of 1D MS/MS spectra using different fragmentation methods. The results show that two-dimensional mass spectrometry excells at MS/MS of complex mixtures, simplifying spectra by eliminating contaminant peaks, and aiding the identification of species in the sample. Currently, with desktop computers, 2D FT-ICR MS is limited by data processing power, a limitation which should be alleviated using cluster parallel computing. In order to explore 2D FT-ICR MS for collagen, with reasonable computing time, the resolution in the fragment ion dimension is limited to 256k data points (compared to 4M data points in 1D MS/MS spectra), but the vertical precursor ion dimension has 4096 lines, so the total data set is 1G data points (4 Gbytes). The fragment ion coverage obtained with a blind, unoptimized 2D FT-ICR MS experiment was lower than conventional MS/MS, but MS/MS information is obtained for all ions in the sample regardless of selection and isolation. Finally, although all 2D FT-ICR MS peak assignments were made with the aid of 1D FT-ICR MS data, these results

  3. Alpha spectrometry applications with mass separated samples.

    PubMed

    Dion, M P; Eiden, Gregory C; Farmer, Orville T; Liezers, Martin; Robinson, John W

    2016-01-01

    (241)Am has been deposited using a novel technique that employs a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This work presents results of high-resolution alpha spectrometry on the (241)Am samples using a small area passivated implanted planar silicon detector. We have also investigated the mass-based separation capability by developing a (238)Pu sample, present as a minor constituent in a (244)Pu standard, and performed subsequent radiometric counting. With this new sample development method, the (241)Am samples achieved the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector used for these measurements. There was no detectable trace of any other isotopes contained in the (238)Pu implant demonstrating the mass-based separation (or enhancement) attainable with this technique. PMID:26583262

  4. Computational mass spectrometry for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules from mass spectrometry (MS) data remains a major challenge in the interpretation of MS data. This review covers the computational aspects of identifying small molecules, from the identification of a compound searching a reference spectral library, to the structural elucidation of unknowns. In detail, we describe the basic principles and pitfalls of searching mass spectral reference libraries. Determining the molecular formula of the compound can serve as a basis for subsequent structural elucidation; consequently, we cover different methods for molecular formula identification, focussing on isotope pattern analysis. We then discuss automated methods to deal with mass spectra of compounds that are not present in spectral libraries, and provide an insight into de novo analysis of fragmentation spectra using fragmentation trees. In addition, this review shortly covers the reconstruction of metabolic networks using MS data. Finally, we list available software for different steps of the analysis pipeline. PMID:23453222

  5. Analysis of Glycosaminoglycans Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Gregory O.; Zaia, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides expressed on animal cell surfaces and in extracellular matrices. Their biosynthesis is under complex control and confers a domain structure that is essential to their ability to bind to protein partners. Key to understanding the functions of GAGs are methods to determine accurately and rapidly patterns of sulfation, acetylation and uronic acid epimerization that correlate with protein binding or other biological activities. Mass spectrometry (MS) is particularly suitable for the analysis of GAGs for biomedical purposes. Using modern ionization techniques it is possible to accurately determine molecular weights of GAG oligosaccharides and their distributions within a mixture. Methods for direct interfacing with liquid chromatography have been developed to permit online mass spectrometric analysis of GAGs. New tandem mass spectrometric methods for fine structure determination of GAGs are emerging. This review summarizes MS-based approaches for analysis of GAGs, including tissue extraction and chromatographic methods compatible with LC/MS and tandem MS. PMID:25705143

  6. Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry of low molecular weight synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Anthony T; Williams, Jonathan P; Scrivens, James H

    2006-01-01

    A range of low molecular weight synthetic polymers has been characterised by means of desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) combined with both mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accurate mass experiments were used to aid the structural determination of some of the oligomeric materials. The polymers analysed were poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polypropylene glycol (PPG), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(alpha-methyl styrene). An application of the technique for characterisation of a polymer used as part of an active ingredient in a pharmaceutical tablet is described. The mass spectra and tandem mass spectra of all of the polymers were obtained in seconds, indicating the sensitivity of the technique. PMID:16912984

  7. Membrane composition analysis by imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, S G; Kraft, M L; Longo, M; Hutcheon, I D; Weber, P K

    2006-03-29

    Membranes on solid supports offer an ideal format for imaging. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be used to obtain composition information on membrane-associated components. Using the NanoSIMS50, images of composition variations in membrane domains can be obtained with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm. By suitable calibration, these variations in composition can be translated into a quantitative analysis of the membrane composition. Progress towards imaging small phase-separated lipid domains, membrane-associated proteins and natural biological membranes will be described.

  8. Study of CPP Mechanisms by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sagan, Sandrine; Bechara, Chérine; Burlina, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms of entry of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) requires reliable methods to measure their cellular uptake efficiency, monitor their metabolic stability, and identify their intracellular localization. We describe here a protocol based on the direct detection of peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which allows the absolute quantification of the intact internalized species and the analysis of their intracellular degradation. This protocol can be easily applied to the simultaneous quantification of different species, for example mixtures of CPPs. PMID:26202265

  9. Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Characterization of Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-07-01

    Advances in instrumentation, proteomics, and bioinformatics have contributed to the successful applications of mass spectrometry (MS) for detection, identification, and classification of microorganisms. These MS applications are based on the detection of organism-specific biomarker molecules, which allow differentiation between organisms to be made. Intact proteins, their proteolytic peptides, and nonribosomal peptides have been successfully utilized as biomarkers. Sequence-specific fragments for biomarkers are generated by tandem MS of intact proteins or proteolytic peptides, obtained after, for instance, microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. In combination with proteome database searching, individual biomarker proteins are unambiguously identified from their tandem mass spectra, and from there the source microorganism is also identified. Such top-down or bottom-up proteomics approaches permit rapid, sensitive, and confident characterization of individual microorganisms in mixtures and are reviewed here. Examples of MS-based functional assays for detection of targeted microorganisms, e.g., Bacillus anthracis, in environmental or clinically relevant backgrounds are also reviewed.

  10. Quantification of diacylglycerol by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    vom Dorp, Katharina; Dombrink, Isabel; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DAG) is an important intermediate of lipid metabolism and a component of phospholipase C signal transduction. Quantification of DAG in plant membranes represents a challenging task because of its low abundance. DAG can be measured by direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS) on a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer after purification from the crude plant lipid extract via solid-phase extraction on silica columns. Different internal standards are employed to compensate for the dependence of the MS and MS/MS signals on the chain length and the presence of double bonds in the acyl moieties. Thus, using a combination of single MS and MS/MS experiments, quantitative results for the different molecular species of DAGs from Arabidopsis can be obtained. PMID:23681522

  11. Protein Sequencing with Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziady, Assem G.; Kinter, Michael

    The recent introduction of electrospray ionization techniques that are suitable for peptides and whole proteins has allowed for the design of mass spectrometric protocols that provide accurate sequence information for proteins. The advantages gained by these approaches over traditional Edman Degradation sequencing include faster analysis and femtomole, sometimes attomole, sensitivity. The ability to efficiently identify proteins has allowed investigators to conduct studies on their differential expression or modification in response to various treatments or disease states. In this chapter, we discuss the use of electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, a technique whereby protein-derived peptides are subjected to fragmentation in the gas phase, revealing sequence information for the protein. This powerful technique has been instrumental for the study of proteins and markers associated with various disorders, including heart disease, cancer, and cystic fibrosis. We use the study of protein expression in cystic fibrosis as an example.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry: Proceedings of the fourth international symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gove, H.E.; Litherland, A.E.; Elmore, D.

    1987-01-01

    This report is a volume of the journal Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms. This particular volume is concerned with accelerator mass spectrometry. The sections of this issue are: Advances in AMS techniques; Archaeology and ecology; Glaciology and climatology; Cosmochemistry and in situ production; Ocean and atmospheric sciences; Hydrology and geology; Astrophysics, nuclear physics and lasers.

  13. Mass Spectrometry on Future Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry investigations on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the 2018 ExoMars missions will address core science objectives related to the potential habitability of their landing site environments and more generally the near-surface organic inventory of Mars. The analysis of complex solid samples by mass spectrometry is a well-known approach that can provide a broad and sensitive survey of organic and inorganic compounds as well as supportive data for mineralogical analysis. The science value of such compositional information is maximized when one appreciates the particular opportunities and limitations of in situ analysis with resource-constrained instrumentation in the context of a complete science payload and applied to materials found in a particular environment. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation on MSL and the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation on ExoMars will thus benefit from and inform broad-based analog field site work linked to the Mars environments where such analysis will occur.

  14. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  15. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Fernando; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Domingo, Diego; Tudó, Griselda

    2016-06-01

    To date, more than 170 species of mycobacteria have been described, of which more than one third may be pathogenic to humans, representing a significant workload for microbiology laboratories. These species must be identified in clinical practice, which has long been a major problem due to the shortcomings of conventional (phenotypic) methods and the limitations and complexity of modern methods largely based on molecular biology techniques. The aim of this review was to briefly describe different aspects related to the use of MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) for the identification of mycobacteria. Several difficulties are encountered with the use of this methodology in these microorganisms mainly due to the high pathogenicity of some mycobacteria and the peculiar structure of their cell wall, requiring inactivation and special protein extraction protocols. We also analysed other relevant aspects such as culture media, the reference methods employed (gold standard) in the final identification of the different species, the cut-off used to accept data as valid, and the databases of the different mass spectrometry systems available. MS has revolutionized diagnosis in modern microbiology; however, specific improvements are needed to consolidate the use of this technology in mycobacteriology. PMID:27389290

  16. Spatial Autocorrelation in Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cassese, Alberto; Ellis, Shane R; Ogrinc Potočnik, Nina; Burgermeister, Elke; Ebert, Matthias; Walch, Axel; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; McDonnell, Liam A; Heeren, Ron M A; Balluff, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful molecular imaging technique. In microprobe MSI, images are created through a grid-wise interrogation of individual spots by mass spectrometry across a surface. Classical statistical tests for within-sample comparisons fail as close-by measurement spots violate the assumption of independence of these tests, which can lead to an increased false-discovery rate. For spatial data, this effect is referred to as spatial autocorrelation. In this study, we investigated spatial autocorrelation in three different matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MSI data sets. These data sets cover different molecular classes (metabolites/drugs, lipids, and proteins) and different spatial resolutions ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Significant spatial autocorrelation was detected in all three data sets and found to increase with decreasing pixel size. To enable statistical testing for differences in mass signal intensities between regions of interest within MSI data sets, we propose the use of Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) models. We show that, by accounting for spatial autocorrelation, discovery rates (i.e., the ratio between the features identified and the total number of features) could be reduced between 21% and 69%. The reliability of this approach was validated by control mass signals based on prior knowledge. In light of the advent of larger MSI data sets based on either an increased spatial resolution or 3D data sets, accounting for effects due to spatial autocorrelation becomes even more indispensable. Here, we propose a generic and easily applicable workflow to enable within-sample statistical comparisons. PMID:27180608

  17. Neutral particle mass spectrometry with nanomechanical systems

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Eric; Brenac, Ariel; Alava, Thomas; Morel, Robert; Dupré, Cécilia; Hanay, Mehmet Selim; Roukes, Michael L.; Duraffourg, Laurent; Masselon, Christophe; Hentz, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to mass spectrometry (MS) require ionization of the analytes of interest. For high-mass species, the resulting charge state distribution can be complex and difficult to interpret correctly. Here, using a setup comprising both conventional time-of-flight MS (TOF-MS) and nano-electromechanical systems-based MS (NEMS-MS) in situ, we show directly that NEMS-MS analysis is insensitive to charge state: the spectrum consists of a single peak whatever the species’ charge state, making it significantly clearer than existing MS analysis. In subsequent tests, all the charged particles are electrostatically removed from the beam, and unlike TOF-MS, NEMS-MS can still measure masses. This demonstrates the possibility to measure mass spectra for neutral particles. Thus, it is possible to envisage MS-based studies of analytes that are incompatible with current ionization techniques and the way is now open for the development of cutting-edge system architectures with unique analytical capability. PMID:25753929

  18. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  19. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  20. New analytical scheme for regular old ordinary mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.M.; Russell, D.

    1994-12-31

    A unified scheme was developed to define the composition, improve detection and qualitative identification of water soluble organics in heavy oil retort. Elements of the scheme included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), hybrid mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (EB-TOF) with electron impact (EI) and fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionization and a computerized library search program. As part of the development of the process, each element of the analytical scheme was applied to complex samples of aqueous organic materials extracted from heavy oil retorts. Preliminary investigations have indicated that the heavy oil retort contains hundreds of compounds in ppm/ppb concentrations.

  1. Laser Microprobe Mass Spectrometry 1: Basic Principles and Performance Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denoyer, Eric; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes the historical development, performance characteristics (sample requirements, analysis time, ionization characteristics, speciation capabilities, and figures of merit), and applications of laser microprobe mass spectrometry. (JN)

  2. Feature extraction and dimensionality reduction for mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihui

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is being used to generate protein profiles from human serum, and proteomic data obtained from mass spectrometry have attracted great interest for the detection of early stage cancer. However, high dimensional mass spectrometry data cause considerable challenges. In this paper we propose a feature extraction algorithm based on wavelet analysis for high dimensional mass spectrometry data. A set of wavelet detail coefficients at different scale is used to detect the transient changes of mass spectrometry data. The experiments are performed on 2 datasets. A highly competitive accuracy, compared with the best performance of other kinds of classification models, is achieved. Experimental results show that the wavelet detail coefficients are efficient way to characterize features of high dimensional mass spectra and reduce the dimensionality of high dimensional mass spectra. PMID:19646687

  3. Characterisation of DEFB107 by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Bryan J.; Eastwood, Hayden; Clark, Dave J.; Polfer, Nick C.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Dorin, Julia A.; Maxwell, Alison; Langley, Ross J.; Govan, John R. W.; Bernstein, Summer L.; Bowers, Michael T.; Barran, Perdita E.

    2006-05-01

    Mammalian defensins are small endogenous cationic proteins which form a class of antimicrobial peptides that is part of the innate immune response of all mammalian species [R. Lehrer, Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2 (9) (2004) 727; T. Ganz, R.I. Lehrer, Curr. Opin. Immunol. 6 (4) (1994) 584] [1] and [2]. We have developed mass spectrometry based strategies for characterising the structure-activity relationship of defensins [D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, N.C. Polfer, P.E. Barran, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (47) (2004) 48671; P.E. Barran, N.C. Polfer, D.J. Campopiano, D.J. Clarke, P.R.R. Langridge-Smith, R.J. Langley, J.R.W. Govan, A. Maxwell, J.R. Dorin, R.P. Millar, M.T. Bowers, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 240 (2005) 273] [3] and [4], and here we present data obtained from a five cysteine containing [beta]-defensin, DEFB107. The synthetic product of this human defensin exists with a glutathione capping group, its oxidation state and disulphide connectivity have been determined via accurate mass measurements and peptide mass mapping respectively, and despite possessing three disulphide bridges, it does not fit the [beta]-defensin canonical motif. With the use of molecular modelling, we have generated candidate geometries to discern the influence of disulphide bridging on the overall tertiary structure of DEFB107. These are compared with experimental results from ion mobility measurements. Defensins display activity against a wide variety of pathogens including both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Their mechanism of mode of action is unknown, but is believed to involve defensin aggregation at cell surfaces, followed by cell permeabilisation and hence deathE To probe this mechanism, the localisation of DEFB107 in synthetic vesicles was studied using H/D exchange and mass spectrometry. The results obtained are used to analyse the antimicrobial activity of DEFB107.

  4. Quantitative mass spectrometry of urinary biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jerebtsova, Marina; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of treatment of renal diseases is limited because the lack of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic markers. Despite the more than a decade of intensive investigation of urinary biomarkers, no new clinical biomarkers were approved. This is in part because the early expectations toward proteomics in biomarkers discovery were significantly higher than the capability of technology at the time. However, during the last decade, proteomic technology has made dramatic progress in both the hardware and software methods. In this review we are discussing modern quantitative methods of mass-spectrometry and providing several examples of their applications for discovery and validation of renal disease biomarkers. We are optimistic about future prospects for the development of novel of specific clinical urinary biomarkers. PMID:25984422

  5. Recent trends in inorganic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; Barshick, C.M.; Duckworth, D.C.; Riciputi, L.R.

    1996-10-01

    The field of inorganic mass spectrometry has seen substantial change in the author`s professional lifetime (over 30 years). Techniques in their infancy 30 years ago have matured; some have almost disappeared. New and previously unthought of techniques have come into being; some of these, such as ICP-MS, are reasonably mature now, while others have some distance to go before they can be so considered. Most of these new areas provide fertile fields for researchers, both in the development of new analytical techniques and by allowing fundamental studies to be undertaken that were previously difficult, impossible, or completely unforeseen. As full coverage of the field is manifestly impossible within the framework of this paper, only those areas with which the author has personal contact will be discussed. Most of the work originated in his own laboratory, but that of other laboratories is covered where it seemed appropriate.

  6. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Robert W.; McLachlin, Katherine M.; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS–based bioimaging instruments for general users. PMID:27500232

  7. Mass Spectrometry Methodology in Lipid Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Han, Juanjuan; Wang, Zhenpeng; Liu, Jian’an; Wei, Jinchao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Zhao, Zhenwen

    2014-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging field, where the structures, functions and dynamic changes of lipids in cells, tissues or body fluids are investigated. Due to the vital roles of lipids in human physiological and pathological processes, lipidomics is attracting more and more attentions. However, because of the diversity and complexity of lipids, lipid analysis is still full of challenges. The recent development of methods for lipid extraction and analysis and the combination with bioinformatics technology greatly push forward the study of lipidomics. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) is the most important technology for lipid analysis. In this review, the methodology based on MS for lipid analysis was introduced. It is believed that along with the rapid development of MS and its further applications to lipid analysis, more functional lipids will be identified as biomarkers and therapeutic targets and for the study of the mechanisms of disease. PMID:24921707

  8. [Application of mass spectrometry in mycology].

    PubMed

    Quiles Melero, Inmaculada; Peláez, Teresa; Rezusta López, Antonio; Garcia-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-06-01

    MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming an essential tool in most microbiology laboratories. At present, by using a characteristic fungal profile obtained from whole cells or through simple extraction protocols, MALDI-TOF MS allows the identification of pathogenic fungi with a high performance potential. This methodology decreases the laboratory turnaround time, optimizing the detection of mycoses. This article describes the state-of-the-art of the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the detection of human clinical fungal pathogens in the laboratory and discusses the future applications of this technology, which will further improve routine mycological diagnosis. PMID:27389289

  9. China's food safety regulation and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Feng; Nie, Xuemei; Wang, Wenzhi; Feng, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Food safety is essential to people's health and people's livelihood. To ensure that food safety is an important current strategy of the governments, both regulation and standardization are important support for implementing this strategic initiative effectively. The status and prospects of China's food laws, regulations, and standards system are introduced. China now has established a complete law regime providing a sound foundation and good environment for keeping the health of people, maintaining the order of social economy and promoting the international trade of food. At the same time, it is undoubtedly important to strengthen standardization and improve the food safety standards system. In the administration of food safety, mass spectrometry is becoming more and more important and many analytical methods developed in China are based on its application. PMID:21643903

  10. Electrostatic-spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Sartor, Romain; Gasilova, Natalia; Lu, Yu; Tobolkina, Elena; Liu, Baohong; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-09-01

    An electrostatic-spray ionization (ESTASI) method has been used for mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of samples deposited in or on an insulating substrate. The ionization is induced by a capacitive coupling between an electrode and the sample. In practice, a metallic electrode is placed close to but not in direct contact with the sample. Upon application of a high voltage pulse to the electrode, an electrostatic charging of the sample occurs leading to a bipolar spray pulse. When the voltage is positive, the bipolar spray pulse consists first of cations and then of anions. This method has been applied to a wide range of geometries to emit ions from samples in a silica capillary, in a disposable pipet tip, in a polymer microchannel, or from samples deposited as droplets on a polymer plate. Fractions from capillary electrophoresis were collected on a polymer plate for ESTASI MS analysis. PMID:22876737

  11. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  12. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. PMID:15384154

  13. Visualizing nanoparticle dissolution by imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Szakal, Christopher; Ugelow, Melissa S; Gorham, Justin M; Konicek, Andrew R; Holbrook, R David

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the ability to visualize nanoparticle dissolution while simultaneously providing chemical signatures that differentiate between citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), AgNPs forced into dissolution via exposure to UV radiation, silver nitrate (AgNO3), and AgNO3/citrate deposited from aqueous solutions and suspensions. We utilize recently developed inkjet printing (IJP) protocols to deposit the different solutions/suspensions as NP aggregates and soluble species, which separate onto surfaces in situ, and collect mass spectral imaging data via time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Resulting 2D Ag(+) chemical images provide the ability to distinguish between the different Ag-containing starting materials and, when coupled with mass spectral peak ratios, provide information-rich data sets for quick and reproducible visualization of NP-based aqueous constituents. When compared to other measurements aimed at studying NP dissolution, the IJP-TOF-SIMS approach offers valuable information that can potentially help in understanding the complex equilibria in NP-containing solutions and suspensions, including NP dissolution kinetics and extent of overall dissolution. PMID:24611464

  14. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents. PMID:19241065

  15. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  16. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  17. Mass Spectrometry of Acoustically Levitated Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Westphall, Michael S.; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2008-01-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air–droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-μL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing chargere combination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  18. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    PubMed

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption. PMID:18582090

  19. Single-protein nanomechanical mass spectrometry in real time

    PubMed Central

    Hanay, M.S.; Kelber, S.; Naik, A.K.; Chi, D.; Hentz, S.; Bullard, E.C.; Colinet, E.; Duraffourg, L.; Roukes, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) resonators can detect mass with exceptional sensitivity. Previously, mass spectra from several hundred adsorption events were assembled in NEMS-based mass spectrometry using statistical analysis. Here, we report the first realization of single-molecule NEMS-based mass spectrometry in real time. As each molecule in the sample adsorbs upon the NEMS resonator, its mass and the position-of-adsorption are determined by continuously tracking two driven vibrational modes of the device. We demonstrate the potential of multimode NEMS-based mass spectrometry by analyzing IgM antibody complexes in real-time. NEMS-MS is a unique and promising new form of mass spectrometry: it can resolve neutral species, provides resolving power that increases markedly for very large masses, and allows acquisition of spectra, molecule-by-molecule, in real-time. PMID:22922541

  20. Compressed sensing in imaging mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Andreas; Dülk, Patrick; Trede, Dennis; Alexandrov, Theodore; Maaß, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a technique of analytical chemistry for spatially resolved, label-free and multipurpose analysis of biological samples that is able to detect the spatial distribution of hundreds of molecules in one experiment. The hyperspectral IMS data is typically generated by a mass spectrometer analyzing the surface of the sample. In this paper, we propose a compressed sensing approach to IMS which potentially allows for faster data acquisition by collecting only a part of the pixels in the hyperspectral image and reconstructing the full image from this data. We present an integrative approach to perform both peak-picking spectra and denoising m/z-images simultaneously, whereas the state of the art data analysis methods solve these problems separately. We provide a proof of the robustness of the recovery of both the spectra and individual channels of the hyperspectral image and propose an algorithm to solve our optimization problem which is based on proximal mappings. The paper concludes with the numerical reconstruction results for an IMS dataset of a rat brain coronal section.

  1. Multidimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics (MDMS-SL) has become a foundational analytical technology platform among current lipidomics practices due to its high efficiency, sensitivity, and reproducibility, as well as its broad coverage. This platform has been broadly used to determine the altered content and/or composition of lipid classes, subclasses, and individual molecular species induced by diseases, genetic manipulations, drug treatments, and aging, among others. Herein, we briefly discuss the principles underlying this technology and present a protocol for routine analysis of many of the lipid classes and subclasses covered by MDMS-SL directly from lipid extracts of biological samples. In particular, lipid sample preparation from a variety of biological materials, which is one of the key components of MDMS-SL, is described in detail. The protocol for mass spectrometric analysis can readily be expanded for analysis of other lipid classes not mentioned as long as appropriate sample preparation is conducted, and should aid researchers in the field to better understand and manage the technology for analysis of cellular lipidomes. PMID:25270931

  2. ISO: Isochrone construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotter, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    ISO transforms MESA history files into a uniform basis for interpolation and then constructs new stellar evolution tracks and isochrones from that basis. It is written in Fortran and requires MESA (ascl:1010.083), primarily for interpolation. Though designed to ingest MESA star history files, tracks from other stellar evolution codes can be incorporated by loading the tracks into the data structures used in the codes.

  3. US Food and Drug Administration Perspectives on Clinical Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Jeffery, Douglas A; Shea, Yvonne R; Scholl, Peter F; Chan, Maria M

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based in vitro diagnostic devices that measure proteins and peptides are underutilized in clinical practice, and none has been cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for marketing or for use in clinical trials. One way to increase their utilization is through enhanced interactions between the FDA and the clinical mass spectrometry community to improve the validation and regulatory review of these devices. As a reference point from which to develop these interactions, this article surveys the FDA's regulation of mass spectrometry-based devices, explains how the FDA uses guidance documents and standards in the review process, and describes the FDA's previous outreach to stakeholders. Here we also discuss how further communication and collaboration with the clinical mass spectrometry communities can identify opportunities for the FDA to provide help in the development of mass spectrometry-based devices and enhance their entry into the clinic. PMID:26553791

  4. Applications of Mass Spectrometry to Lipids and Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Harkewicz, Richard; Dennis, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Lipidomics, a major part of metabolomics, constitutes the detailed analysis and global characterization, both spatial and temporal, of the structure and function of lipids (the lipidome) within a living system. As with proteomics, mass spectrometry has earned a central analytical role in lipidomics, and this role will continue to grow with technological developments. Currently, there exist two mass spectrometry-based lipidomics approaches, one based on a division of lipids into categories and classes prior to analysis, the “comprehensive lipidomics analysis by separation simplification” (CLASS), and the other in which all lipid species are analyzed together without prior separation, shotgun. In exploring the lipidome of various living systems, novel lipids are being discovered, and mass spectrometry is helping characterize their chemical structure. Deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) is being used to investigate the association of lipids and membranes with proteins and enzymes, and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is being applied to the in situ analysis of lipids in tissues. PMID:21469951

  5. Glycosaminoglycan Characterization by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Including Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Laremore, Tatiana N.; Leach, Franklin E.; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Amster, I. Jonathan; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) is a versatile analytical technique in glycomics of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Combined with enzymology, ESI MS is used for assessing changes in disaccharide composition of GAGs biosynthesized under different environmental or physiological conditions. ESI coupled with high-resolution mass analyzers such as a Fourier transform mass spectrometer (FTMS) permits accurate mass measurement of large oligosaccharides and intact GAGs as well as structural characterization of GAG oligosaccharides using information-rich fragmentation methods such as electron detachment dissociation. The first part of this chapter describes methods for disaccharide compositional profiling using ESI MS and the second part is dedicated to FTMS and tandem MS methods of GAG compositional and structural analysis. PMID:20816475

  6. Illustrating the Concepts of Isotopes and Mass Spectrometry in Introductory Courses: A MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke, Nancy Carter; Lovett, Timothy Neal

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used and versatile tool for scientists in many different fields. Soft ionization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) allow for the analysis of biomolecules, polymers, and clusters. This article describes a MALDI mass spectrometry experiment designed for students in introductory…

  7. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  8. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, S.; Hübner, S.; Schneider, S.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.; Matejčík, S.; Benedikt, J.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas (APPs) are effective source of radicals, metastables and a variety of ions and photons, ranging into the vacuum UV spectral region. A detailed study of these species is important to understand and tune desired effects during the interaction of APPs with solid or liquid materials in industrial or medical applications. In this contribution, the opportunities and challenges of mass spectrometry for detection of neutrals and ions from APPs, fundamental physical phenomena related to the sampling process and their impact on the measured densities of neutrals and fluxes of ions, will be discussed. It is shown that the measurement of stable neutrals and radicals requires a proper experimental design to reduce the beam-to-background ratio, to have little beam distortion during expansion into vacuum and to carefully set the electron energy in the ionizer to avoid radical formation through dissociative ionization. The measured ion composition depends sensitively on the degree of impurities present in the feed gas as well as on the setting of the ion optics used for extraction of ions from the expanding neutral-ion mixture. The determination of the ion energy is presented as a method to show that the analyzed ions are originating from the atmospheric pressure plasma.

  9. Femtosecond laser ablation elemental mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hergenröder, Roland; Samek, Ota; Hommes, Vanja

    2006-01-01

    Laser ablation mass spectrometry (LA-MS) has always been an interesting method for the elemental analysis of solid samples. Chemical analysis with a laser requires small amounts of material. Depending on the analytical detection system, subpicogram quantities may be sufficient. In addition, a focused laser beam permits the spatial characterization of heterogeneity in solid samples typically with micrometer resolution in terms of lateral and depth dimensions. With the advent of high-energy, ultra-short pulse lasers, new possibilities arise. The task of this review is to discuss the principle differences between the ablation process of short (>1 ps) and ultra-short (<1 ps) pulses. Based on the timescales and the energy balance of the process that underlies an ablation event, it will be shown that ultra-short pulses are less thermal and cause less collateral damages than longer pulses. The confinement of the pulse energy to the focal region guarantees a better spatial resolution in all dimensions and improves the analytical figures of merit (e.g., fractionation). Applications that demonstrate these features and that will be presented are in-depth profiling of multi-layer samples and the elemental analysis of biological materials. PMID:16477613

  10. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  11. Tandem mass spectrometry: analysis of complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Applications of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for the analysis of complex mixtures results in increased specificity and selectivity by using a variety of reagent gases in both negative and positive ion modes. Natural isotopic abundance ratios were examined in both simple and complex mixtures using parent, daughter and neutral loss scans. MS/MS was also used to discover new compounds. Daughter scans were used to identify seven new alkaloids in a cactus species. Three of these alkaloids were novel compounds, and included the first simple, fully aromatic isoquinoline alkaloids reported in Cactaceae. MS/MS was used to characterize the chemical reaction products of coal in studies designed to probe its macromolecular structure. Negative ion chemical ionization was utilized to study reaction products resulting from the oxidation of coal. Possible structural units in the precursor coal were predicted based on the reaction products identified, aliphatic and aromatic acids and their anhydrides. The MS/MS method was also used to characterize reaction products resulting from coal liquefaction and/or extraction. These studies illustrate the types of problems for which MS/MS is useful. Emphasis has been placed on characterization of complex mixtures by selecting experimental parameters which enhance the information obtained. The value of using MS/MS in conjunction with other analytical techniques as well as the chemical pretreatment is demonstrated.

  12. Signatures for Mass Spectrometry Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring data quality and proper instrument functionality is a prerequisite for scientific investigation. Manual quality assurance is time-consuming and subjective. Metrics for describing liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS) data have been developed; however, the wide variety of LC–MS instruments and configurations precludes applying a simple cutoff. Using 1150 manually classified quality control (QC) data sets, we trained logistic regression classification models to predict whether a data set is in or out of control. Model parameters were optimized by minimizing a loss function that accounts for the trade-off between false positive and false negative errors. The classifier models detected bad data sets with high sensitivity while maintaining high specificity. Moreover, the composite classifier was dramatically more specific than single metrics. Finally, we evaluated the performance of the classifier on a separate validation set where it performed comparably to the results for the testing/training data sets. By presenting the methods and software used to create the classifier, other groups can create a classifier for their specific QC regimen, which is highly variable lab-to-lab. In total, this manuscript presents 3400 LC–MS data sets for the same QC sample (whole cell lysate of Shewanella oneidensis), deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD000320–PXD000324. PMID:24611607

  13. Laser-induced electron capture mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Wang; Giese

    2000-02-15

    Two techniques are reported for detection of electrophorederivatized compounds by laser-induced electron capture time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-EC-TOF-MS). In both cases, a nitrogen laser is used to induce the electron capture. The analyte is deposited in a matrix consisting of a compound with a low ionization potential such as benzo[ghi]perylene in the first technique, where the electron for electron capture apparently comes from this matrix. In the second technique, the analyte is deposited on a silver surface in the absence of matrix. It seems that "monoenergetic" ions instantly desorb from the target surface in the latter case, since the peak width in the continuous extraction mode essentially matches the pulse width of the laser (4 ns). Ten picomoles of 3-O-(pentafluorobenzyl)-alpha-estradiol were detected at a S/N > or = 50, where the spot size of the laser was approximately 0.25% of the sample spot. It is attractive that simple conditions can enable sensitive detection of electrophores on routine TOF-MS equipment. The technique can be anticipated to broaden the range of analytes in both polarity and size that can be detected by EC-MS relative to the range for GC/EC-MS. PMID:10701262

  14. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  15. MSSimulator: Simulation of mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Bielow, Chris; Aiche, Stephan; Andreotti, Sandro; Reinert, Knut

    2011-07-01

    Mass spectrometry coupled to liquid chromatography (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) is commonly used to analyze the protein content of biological samples in large scale studies, enabling quantitation and identification of proteins and peptides using a wide range of experimental protocols, algorithms, and statistical models to analyze the data. Currently it is difficult to compare the plethora of algorithms for these tasks. So far, curated benchmark data exists for peptide identification algorithms but data that represents a ground truth for the evaluation of LC-MS data is limited. Hence there have been attempts to simulate such data in a controlled fashion to evaluate and compare algorithms. We present MSSimulator, a simulation software for LC-MS and LC-MS/MS experiments. Starting from a list of proteins from a FASTA file, the simulation will perform in-silico digestion, retention time prediction, ionization filtering, and raw signal simulation (including MS/MS), while providing many options to change the properties of the resulting data like elution profile shape, resolution and sampling rate. Several protocols for SILAC, iTRAQ or MS(E) are available, in addition to the usual label-free approach, making MSSimulator the most comprehensive simulator for LC-MS and LC-MS/MS data. PMID:21526843

  16. Mass Spectrometry of Nanoparticles is Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C.-K.; Eller, M. J.; Verkhoturov, S. V.; Schweikert, Emile A.

    2015-08-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, is a method of choice for the characterization of nanoparticles, NPs. For NPs with large surface-to-volume ratios, heterogeneity is a concern. Assays should thus be on individual nano-objects rather than an ensemble of NPs; however, this may be difficult or impossible. This limitation can be side-stepped by probing a large number of dispersed NPs one-by-one and recording the emission from each NP separately. A large collection of NPs will likely contain subsets of like-NPs. The experimental approach is to disperse the NPs and hit an individual NP with a single massive cluster (e.g., C-60, Au-400). At impact energies of ~1 keV/atom, they generate notable secondary ion (SI) emission. Examination of small NPs (≤20 nm in diameter) shows that the SI emission is size-dependent and impacts are not all equivalent. Accurate identification of the type of impact is key for qualitative assays of core or outer shell composition. For quantitative assays, the concept of effective impacts is introduced. Selection of co-emitted ejecta combined with rejection (anticoincidence) of substrate ions allows refining chemical information within the projectile interaction volume. Last, to maximize the SI signal, small NPs (≤5 nm in diameter) can be examined in the transmission mode where the SI yields are enhanced ~10-fold over those in the (conventional) reflection direction. Future endeavors should focus on schemes acquiring SIs, electrons, and photons concurrently.

  17. Cytotoxicity Test and Mass Spectrometry of IPMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Kazuto; Kamamichi, Norihiro; Yagi, Tohru; Asaka, Kinji; Mukai, Toshiharu

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is a promising material in biomedical actuators and sensors because IPMC is soft and flexible, leading to the safety of the device itself. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biocompatibility of IPMC by in vitro experiments, in order to evaluate the applicability in biomedical fields. In addition to an IPMC specimen prepared by the conventional “impregnation-reduction method” using cationic gold complexes and reducing agents, two specimens were prepared by processes in addition to that used for the conventional IPMC specimen. One specimen was reduced in Na2SO3 solution and another specimen was cleaned in H2O2 solution. Colony-forming test using Chinese hamster V79 cells shows high cytotoxicity of all IPMC specimens. Examination of direct inlet mass spectrometry (DI-MS) revealed that the peak intensity of gold complex (particularly, m/z=180) was different from that of Nafion film. Monitoring the peak at m/z=180 showed a remnant with the structure of phenanthroline in IPMC specimens which were not cleaned in H2O2 solution.

  18. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry in Laboratory Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusair, O.; Bauder, W.; Gyürky, G.; Paul, M.; Collon, P.; Fülöp, Zs; Greene, J.; Kinoshita, N.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Rehm, K. E.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme sensitivity and discrimination power of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allows for the search and the detection of rare nuclides either in natural samples or produced in the laboratory. At Argonne National Laboratory, we are developing an AMS setup aimed in particular at the detection of medium and heavy nuclides, relying on the high ion energy achievable with the ATLAS superconducting linear accelerator and on gas-filled magnet isobaric separation. The setup was recently used for the detection of the 146Sm p-process nuclide and for a new determination of the 146Sm half-life (68.7 My). AMS plays an important role in the measurement of stellar nuclear reaction cross sections by the activation method, extending thus the technique to the study of production of long-lived radionuclides. Preliminary measurements of the 147Sm(γ,n)146Sm are described. A measurement of the 142Nd(α,γ)146Sm and 142Nd(α,n)145Sm reactions is in preparation. A new laser-ablation method for the feeding of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is described.

  19. MESA Isochrones and Stellar Tracks (MIST) 0: Methods for the Construction of Stellar Isochrones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotter, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    I describe a method to transform a set of stellar evolution tracks onto a uniform basis and then interpolate within that basis to construct stellar isochrones. This method accommodates a broad range of stellar types, from substellar objects to high-mass stars, and phases of evolution, from the pre-main sequence to the white dwarf cooling sequence. I discuss situations in which stellar physics leads to departures from the otherwise monotonic relation between initial stellar mass and lifetime, and how these may be dealt with in isochrone construction. I close with convergence tests and recommendations for the number of points in the uniform basis and the mass between tracks in the original grid required to achieve a certain level accuracy in the resulting isochrones. The programs that implement these methods are free and open-source; they may be obtained from the project webpage.1

  20. Mass spectrometry of Natural Products: Current, Emerging and Future Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bouslimani, Amina; Sanchez, Laura M; Garg, Neha; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2014-01-01

    Although mass spectrometry is a century old technology, we are entering into an exciting time for the analysis of molecular information directly from complex biological systems. In this viewpoint article, we highlight emerging mass spectrometric methods and tools used by the natural product community and give a perspective of future directions where the mass spectrometry field is migrating towards over the next decade. PMID:24801551

  1. Imaging mass spectrometry in biological tissues by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Becker, J Su; Zoriy, M V; Dobrowolska, J; Matucsh, A

    2007-01-01

    Of all the inorganic mass spectrometric techniques, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) plays a key role as a powerful and sensitive microanalytical technique enabling multi- element trace analysis and isotope ratio measurements at trace and ultratrace level. LA-ICP-MS was used to produce images of detailed regionally-specific element distribution in 20 microm thin sections of different parts of the human brain. The quantitative determination of copper, zinc, lead and uranium distribution in thin slices of human brain samples was performed using matrix-matched laboratory standards via external calibration procedures. Imaging mass spectrometry provides new information on the spatially inhomogeneous element distribution in thin sections of human tissues, for example, of different brain regions (the insular region) or brain tumor tissues. The detection limits obtained for Cu, Zn, Pb and U were in the ng g(-1) range. Possible strategies of LA-ICP-MS in brain research and life sciences include the elemental imaging of thin slices of brain tissue or applications in proteome analysis by combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization MS to study phospho- and metal- containing proteins will be discussed. PMID:17885277

  2. Membrane introduction mass spectrometry: trends and applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R C; Cooks, R G; Allen, T M; Cisper, M E; Hemberger, P H

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) are reviewed. On-line monitoring is treated by focusing on critical variables, including the nature and dimensions of the membrane, and the analyte vapor pressure, diffusivity, and solubility in the membrane barrier. Sample introduction by MIMS is applied in (i) on-line monitoring of chemical and biological reactors, (ii) analysis of volatile organic compounds in environmental matrices, including air, water and soil, and (iii) in more fundamental studies, such as measurements of thermochemical properties, reaction mechanisms, and kinetics. New semipermeable membranes are discussed, including those consisting of thin polymers, low vapor pressure liquids, and zeolites. These membranes have been used to monitor polar compounds, selectively differentiate compounds through affinity-binding, and provide isomer differentiation based on molecular size. Measurements at high spatial resolution, for example, using silicone-capped hypodermic needle inlets, are also covered, as is electrically driven sampling through microporous membranes. Other variations on the basic MIMS experiment include analyte preconcentration through cryotrapping (CT-MIMS) or trapping in the membrane (trap-and-release), as well as differential thermal release methods and reverse phase (i.e., organic solvent) MIMS. Method limitations center on semivolatile compounds and complex mixture analysis, and novel solutions are discussed. Semivolatile compounds have been monitored with thermally assisted desorption, ultrathin membranes and derivatization techniques. Taking advantage of the differences in time of membrane permeation, mixtures of structurally similar compounds have been differentiated by using sample modulation techniques and by temperature-programmed desorption from a membrane interface. Selective ionization techniques that increase instrument sensitivity towards polar compounds are also described, and comparisons are made with

  3. Foreword: Collision and reaction cell techniques in atomic mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Eiden, Greg C.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution is a guest editorial statement and technical assessment for a special issue of the Royal Society of Chemistry journal entitled Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry (JAAS). The editorial introduces the subject area of collision and reaction cells in atomic mass spectrometry, reviews current literature and commercial instrumentation trends, and previews four perspective and numerous research articles contained in the special journal issue.

  4. Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Hemoglobin on Clinical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Lescuyer, Pierre; Clerici, Lorella; Tsybin, Yury O.; Hartmer, Ralf; Meyer, Markus; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Scherl, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A mass spectrometry-based assay combining the specificity of selected reaction monitoring and the protein ion activation capabilities of electron transfer dissociation was developed and employed for the rapid identification of hemoglobin variants from whole blood without previous proteolytic cleavage. The analysis was performed in a robust ion trap mass spectrometer operating at nominal mass accuracy and resolution. Subtle differences in globin sequences, resulting with mass shifts of about one Da, can be unambiguously identified. These results suggest that mass spectrometry analysis of entire proteins using electron transfer dissociation can be employed on clinical samples in a workflow compatible with diagnostic applications.

  5. Ambient mass spectrometry imaging: plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging and its applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baosheng; Zhang, Jialing; Chang, Cuilan; Li, Liping; Li, Min; Xiong, Xingchuang; Guo, Chengan; Tang, Fei; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2014-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has been widely used in many research areas for the advantages of providing informative molecular distribution with high specificity. Among the recent progress, ambient MSI has attracted increasing interests owing to its characteristics of ambient, in situ, and nonpretreatment analysis. Here, we are presenting the ambient MSI for traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and authentication of work of art and documents using plasma assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PALDI-MS). Compared with current ambient MSI methods, an excellent average resolution of 60 μm × 60 μm pixel size was achieved using this system. The feasibility of PALDI-based MSI was confirmed by seal imaging, and its authentication applications were demonstrated by imaging of printed Chinese characters. Imaging of the Radix Scutellariae slice showed that the two active components, baicalein and wogonin, mainly were distributed in the epidermis of the root, which proposed an approach for distinguishing TCMs' origins and the distribution of active components of TCMs and exploring the environmental effects of plant growth. PALDI-MS imaging provides a strong complement for the MSI strategy with the enhanced spatial resolution, which is promising in many research fields, such as artwork identification, TCMs' and botanic research, pharmaceutical applications, etc. PMID:24670045

  6. Applications of Hadamard transform to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Huang; Kaneta, Takashi; Chen, Hung-Ming; Chen, Wen-Xiong; Chang, Hung-Wei; Liu, Ju-Tsung

    2008-08-01

    Successful application of the Hadamard transform (HT) technique to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is described. Novel sample injection devices were developed to achieve multiple sample injections in both GC and LC instruments. Air pressure was controlled by an electromagnetic valve in GC, while a syringe pump and Tee connector were employed for the injection device in LC. Two well-known, abused drugs, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), were employed as model samples. Both of the injection devices permitted precise successive injections, resulting in clearly modulated chromatograms encoded by Hadamard matrices. After inverse Hadamard transformation of the encoded chromatogram, the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of the signals were substantially improved compared with those expected from theoretical values. The S/N ratios were enhanced approximately 10-fold in HT-GC/MS and 6.8 in HT-LC/MS, using the matrices of 1023 and 511, respectively. The HT-GC/MS was successfully applied to the determination of MDMA in the urine sample of a suspect. PMID:18570388

  7. imzML: Imaging Mass Spectrometry Markup Language: A common data format for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Römpp, Andreas; Schramm, Thorsten; Hester, Alfons; Klinkert, Ivo; Both, Jean-Pierre; Heeren, Ron M A; Stöckli, Markus; Spengler, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry is the method of scanning a sample of interest and generating an "image" of the intensity distribution of a specific analyte. The data sets consist of a large number of mass spectra which are usually acquired with identical settings. Existing data formats are not sufficient to describe an MS imaging experiment completely. The data format imzML was developed to allow the flexible and efficient exchange of MS imaging data between different instruments and data analysis software.For this purpose, the MS imaging data is divided in two separate files. The mass spectral data is stored in a binary file to ensure efficient storage. All metadata (e.g., instrumental parameters, sample details) are stored in an XML file which is based on the standard data format mzML developed by HUPO-PSI. The original mzML controlled vocabulary was extended to include specific parameters of imaging mass spectrometry (such as x/y position and spatial resolution). The two files (XML and binary) are connected by offset values in the XML file and are unambiguously linked by a universally unique identifier. The resulting datasets are comparable in size to the raw data and the separate metadata file allows flexible handling of large datasets.Several imaging MS software tools already support imzML. This allows choosing from a (growing) number of processing tools. One is no longer limited to proprietary software, but is able to use the processing software which is best suited for a specific question or application. On the other hand, measurements from different instruments can be compared within one software application using identical settings for data processing. All necessary information for evaluating and implementing imzML can be found at http://www.imzML.org . PMID:21063949

  8. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, T.; Booth, M.; Benyezzar, M.; Bacak, A.; Alfarra, M. R. R.; Topping, D. O.; Percival, C.

    2015-12-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  9. Application of Lithium Attachment Mass Spectrometry for Knudsen Evaporation and Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (KEMS, CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannan, Thomas; Booth, A. Murray; Alfarra, Rami; Bacak, Asan; Pericval, Carl

    2016-04-01

    Lithium ion attachment mass spectrometry provides a non-specific, non-fragmenting and sensitive method for detection of volatile species in the gas phase. The design, manufacture, and results from lithium ion attachment ionisation sources for two mass spectrometry systems are presented. Trace gas analysis is investigated using a modified Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and vapour pressure (VP) measurements using a modified Knudsen Effusion Mass Spectrometer (KEMS) are presented. The Li+ modified CIMS provided limits of detection of 4 ppt for acetone, 0.2 ppt for formic acid, 15 ppt for nitric acid and 120 ppt from ammonia. Despite improvements, the problem of burnout remained persistent. The Li+ CIMS would unlikely be suitable for field or aircraft work, but could be appropriate for certain lab applications. The KEMS currently utilizes an electron impact (EI) ionisation source which provides a highly sensitive source, with the drawback of fragmentation of ionized molecules (Booth et al., 2009). Using Li+ KEMS the VP of samples can be measured without fragmentation and can therefore be used to identify VPs of individual components in mixtures. The validity of using Li+ for determining the VP of mixtures was tested by making single component VP measurements, which showed good agreement with EI measurements of Poly ethylene glycol (PEG) 3 and PEG 4, both when individually measured and when mixed. The Li+ KEMS was then used to investigate a system of atmospheric relevance, α-pinene secondary organic aerosol, generated in a reaction chamber (Alfarra et al., 2012). The VPs of the individual components from this generated sample are within the range we expect for compounds capable of partitioning between the particle and gas phase of an aerosol (0.1-10-5 Pa). Li+ source has a calculated sensitivity approximately 75 times less than that of EI, but the lack of fragmentation using the Li+ source is a significant advantage.

  10. Process for increasing ionic charge in mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, Scott A; He, Min

    2009-06-23

    Processes and apparatus are described for the analysis of molecules or fragments thereof, which are capable of carrying multiple charges, by reacting the multiply charged molecules or fragments thereof with other ions using mass spectrometry.

  11. Quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. M.; Beaver, M. R.; St. Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J. D.; Paulot, F.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) enables online, fast, in situ detection and quantification of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde. Two different CIMS approaches are demonstrated employing the strengths of single quadrupole mass spectrometry and triple quadrupole (tandem) mass spectrometry. Both methods are capable of the measurement of hydroxyacetone, an analyte with minimal isobaric interferences. Tandem mass spectrometry provides direct separation of the isobaric compounds glycolaldehyde and acetic acid using distinct, collision-induced dissociation daughter ions. Measurement of hydroxyacetone and glycolaldehyde by these methods was demonstrated during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 campaign and the BEARPEX 2009 campaign. Enhancement ratios of these compounds in ambient biomass burning plumes are reported for the ARCTAS-CARB campaign. BEARPEX observations are compared to simple photochemical box model predictions of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation at the site.

  12. Recent applications of mass spectrometry in forensic toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, Rodger L.

    1992-09-01

    This review encompasses applications of mass spectrometry reported during the years 1989, 1990 and 1991 for the analysis of cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and their metabolites in physiological specimens.

  13. The use of elemental mass spectrometry in phosphoproteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Maes, Evelyne; Tirez, Kristof; Baggerman, Geert; Valkenborg, Dirk; Schoofs, Liliane; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Mertens, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications in mammalian cells. Because this molecular switch is an important mechanism that diversifies and regulates proteins in cellular processes, knowledge about the extent and quantity of phosphorylation is very important to understand the complex cellular interplay. Although phosphoproteomics strategies are applied worldwide, they mainly include only molecular mass spectrometry (like MALDI or ESI)-based experiments. Although identification and relative quantification of phosphopeptides is straightforward with these techniques, absolute quantification is more complex and usually requires for specific isotopically phosphopeptide standards. However, the use of elemental mass spectrometry, and in particular inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), in phosphoproteomics-based experiments, allow one to absolutely quantify phosphopeptides. Here, these phosphoproteomic applications with ICP-MS as elemental detector are reviewed. Pioneering work and recent developments in the field are both described. Additionally, the advantage of the parallel use of molecular and elemental mass spectrometry is stressed. PMID:25139451

  14. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Zhu, Y.F.; Chung, C.N.; Allman, S.L.

    1997-03-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, the authors recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Snager`s enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. The preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possibly be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, the authors applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  15. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  16. Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. NREL has six MBMS systems that researchers and industry partners can use to understand thermochemical biomass conversion and biomass composition recalcitrance.

  17. The clinical utility of mass spectrometry based protein assays.

    PubMed

    Lassman, Michael E; McAvoy, Thomas; Chappell, Derek L; Lee, Anita Y; Zhao, Xuemei X; Laterza, Omar F

    2016-08-01

    Reports of mass spectrometry based assays for peptides and proteins have become increasingly common in the literature. The growing interest of mass spectrometry for use in clinical laboratories has been primarily driven by the inherent selectivity of the platform relative to more traditional platforms such as immunoassays. However, the adoption of mass spectrometry for peptide and protein analysis in the clinic has been relatively slow compared its adoption in non-clinical laboratories such as in biomarker discovery efforts or within laboratories that support pharmaceutical and academic research. Here, we review some of the successful reports of MS based assays for human proteins in multiple stages of assay research, and describe how and why the platform was employed in order to demonstrate where and when mass spectrometry based assays will have value in the future. PMID:27259466

  18. Laser mass spectrometry for DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, and fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. Winston; Taranenko, N. I.; Zhu, Y. F.; Chung, C. N.; Allman, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    Since laser mass spectrometry has the potential for achieving very fast DNA analysis, we recently applied it to DNA sequencing, DNA typing for fingerprinting, and DNA screening for disease diagnosis. Two different approaches for sequencing DNA have been successfully demonstrated. One is to sequence DNA with DNA ladders produced from Sanger's enzymatic method. The other is to do direct sequencing without DNA ladders. The need for quick DNA typing for identification purposes is critical for forensic application. Our preliminary results indicate laser mass spectrometry can possible be used for rapid DNA fingerprinting applications at a much lower cost than gel electrophoresis. Population screening for certain genetic disease can be a very efficient step to reducing medical costs through prevention. Since laser mass spectrometry can provide very fast DNA analysis, we applied laser mass spectrometry to disease diagnosis. Clinical samples with both base deletion and point mutation have been tested with complete success.

  19. Photodissociation mass spectrometry: New tools for characterization of biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Photodissociation mass spectrometry combines the ability to activate and fragment ions using photons with the sensitive detection of the resulting product ions by mass spectrometry. The resulting combination affords a versatile tool for characterization of biological molecules. The scope and breadth of photodissociation mass spectrometry have increased substantially over the past decade as new research groups have entered the field and developed a number of innovative applications that illustrate the ability of photodissociation to produce rich fragmentation patterns, to cleave bonds selectively, and to target specific molecules based on incorporation of chromophores. This review focuses on many of the key developments in photodissociation mass spectrometry over the past decade with a particular emphasis on its applications to biological molecules. PMID:24481009

  20. Mass Spectrometry of Membrane Proteins: A Focus on Aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Kevin L.; Grey, Angus C.; Nicklay, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are abundant, critically important biomolecules that conduct essential functions in all cells and are the targets of a significant number of therapeutic drugs. However, the analysis of their expression, modification, protein–protein interactions, and structure by mass spectrometry has lagged behind similar studies of soluble proteins. Here we review the limitations to analysis of integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins and highlight advances in sample preparation and mass spectrometry methods that have led to the successful analysis of this protein class. Advances in the analysis of membrane protein posttranslational modification, protein–protein interaction, protein structure, and tissue distributions by imaging mass spectrometry are discussed. Furthermore, we focus our discussion on the application of mass spectrometry for the analysis of aquaporins as a prototypical integral membrane protein and how advances in analytical methods have revealed new biological insights into the structure and function of this family of proteins. PMID:23394619

  1. Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry of proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was evaluated for the detection of proteins ranging in molecular mass from 12 to 66 kDa. Proteins were uniformly deposited on a solid surface without pretreatment and analyzed with a DESI source coupled to a quadrupole ion trap mass spec...

  2. THE APPLICATION OF MASS SPECTROMETRY TO THE STUDY OF MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this research project is to use state-of-the-art mass spectrometric techniques, such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS), to provide "protein mass fingerprinting" and protein sequencing i...

  3. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based imaging of metabolites and proteins.

    PubMed

    Peukert, Manuela; Becker, Michael; Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Imaging techniques based on mass spectrometry (MS) have become powerful approaches to decipher the spatial distribution of metabolites and proteins. MS imaging (MSI) mostly relies on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled to MS detection, but desorption electrospray ionization is also frequently used. Here we describe our current protocols for MALDI-MSI of seed sections and for root tissue. Detailed procedures for cryo-sectioning, matrix application, image capture, mass spectrometry measurement and data analysis are given. PMID:24136526

  5. Determination of nitrofuran and chloramphenicol residues by high resolution mass spectrometry versus tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A; Butcher, P; Maden, K; Walker, S; Widmer, M

    2015-03-01

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography based method, coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS), was developed to permit the detection and quantification of various nitrofuran and chloramphenicol residues in a number of animal based food products. This method is based on the hydrolysis of covalently bound metabolites and derivatization with 2-nitrobenzaldehyde. Clean-up is achieved by a liquid/liquid and a reversed phase/solid phase extraction. Not only are the four conventional nitrofurans (nitrofurantoin, furazolidone, nitrofurazone and furaltadone) detected, but also nifursol, nitrovin and nifuroxazide. Furthermore, an underivatizable nitrofuran (nifurpirinol) and another banned drug (chloramphenicol) can be quantified as well. The compounds are detected in the form of their precursor ions, [M+H](+) and [M-H](-), respectively. The mass resolving power of 70,000 FWHM, and the applied mass window ensure sufficient selectivity and sensitivity. Confirmation is obtained by monitoring the HRMS resolved product ions which were derived from the unit-mass resolved precursor ions. The multiplexing capability of the utilized Orbitrap instrument provides not only highly selective, but also sensitive confirmatory signals. This method has been validated according to the CD 2002/657/EC for the following matrices: muscle, liver, kidney, fish, honey, eggs and milk. PMID:25682427

  6. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  7. NCBI Peptidome: a new repository for mass spectrometry proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Li; Barrett, Tanya; Ayanbule, Oluwabukunmi; Troup, Dennis B.; Rudnev, Dmitry; Muertter, Rolf N.; Tomashevsky, Maxim; Soboleva, Alexandra; Slotta, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptidome is a public repository that archives and freely distributes tandem mass spectrometry peptide and protein identification data generated by the scientific community. Data from all stages of a mass spectrometry experiment are captured, including original mass spectra files, experimental metadata and conclusion-level results. The submission process is facilitated through acceptance of data in commonly used open formats, and all submissions undergo syntactic validation and curation in an effort to uphold data integrity and quality. Peptidome is not restricted to specific organisms, instruments or experiment types; data from any tandem mass spectrometry experiment from any species are accepted. In addition to data storage, web-based interfaces are available to help users query, browse and explore individual peptides, proteins or entire Samples and Studies. Results are integrated and linked with other NCBI resources to ensure dissemination of the information beyond the mass spectroscopy proteomics community. Peptidome is freely accessible at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/peptidome. PMID:19942688

  8. Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Eric J.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging and profiling of individual cells and subcellular structures provide unique analytical capabilities for biological and biomedical research, including determination of the biochemical heterogeneity of cellular populations and intracellular localization of pharmaceuticals. Two mass spectrometry technologies—secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS)—are most often used in micro-bioanalytical investigations. Recent advances in ion probe technologies have increased the dynamic range and sensitivity of analyte detection by SIMS, allowing two- and three-dimensional localization of analytes in a variety of cells. SIMS operating in the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) mode can routinely reach spatial resolutions at the submicron level; therefore, it is frequently used in studies of the chemical composition of subcellular structures. MALDI MS offers a large mass range and high sensitivity of analyte detection. It has been successfully applied in a variety of single-cell and organelle profiling studies. Innovative instrumentation such as scanning microprobe MALDI and mass microscope spectrometers enable new subcellular MSI measurements. Other approaches for MS-based chemical imaging and profiling include those based on near-field laser ablation and inductively-coupled plasma MS analysis, which offer complementary capabilities for subcellular chemical imaging and profiling. PMID:22498881

  9. Analytical techniques in biomedical stable isotope applications: (isotope ratio) mass spectrometry or infrared spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Stellaard, Frans; Elzinga, Henk

    2005-12-01

    An overview is presented of biomedical applications of stable isotopes in general, but mainly focused on the activities of the Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases of the University Medical Center Groningen. The aims of metabolic studies in the areas of glucose, fat, cholesterol and protein metabolism are briefly explained, as well as the principle of breath testing and the techniques to study body composition and energy expenditure. Much attention is paid to the analytical considerations based upon metabolite concentrations, sample size restrictions, the availability of stable isotope labelled substrates and dose requirements in relation to compound-specific isotope analysis. The instrumental advantages and limitations of the generally used techniques gas chromatography/reaction/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are described as well as the novelties of the recently commercialised liquid chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The present use and future perspective of infrared (IR) spectrometry for clinical and biomedical stable isotope applications are reviewed. In this respect, the analytical demands on IR spectrometry are discussed to enable replacement of isotope ratio mass spectrometry by IR spectrometry, in particular, for the purpose of compound-specific isotope ratio analysis in biological matrices. PMID:16543190

  10. Schottky Mass Spectrometry on 152Sm Projectile Fragments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. L.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knöbel, R.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S. A.; Münzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Plass, W. R.; Sanjari, M. S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Tu, X. L.; Wang, M.; Weick, H.; Winckler, N.; Winkler, M.; Xu, H. S.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. H.

    Direct mass measurements of neutron-deficient 152Sm projectile fragments were conducted at the FRS-ESR facility at GSI by employing the time-resolved Schottky Mass Spectrometry. 311 different nuclides were identified by means of their revolution frequencies. Charge-dependent systematic differences between the fitted mass values and the literature mass values are observed in the data analysis. The origin of this systematic deviation is still under discussion. The latest progress on the data analysis is presented.

  11. DETERMINATION OF ELEMENTAL COMPOSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY WITHOUT MASS CALIBRANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widely applicable mass calibrants, including perfluorokerosene, are available for gas-phase introduction of analytes ionized by electron impact (EI) prior to analysis using high resolution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, no all-purpose calibrants are available for recently dev...

  12. Incorporating Biological Mass Spectrometry into Undergraduate Teaching Labs, Part 2: Peptide Identification via Molecular Mass Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Beussman, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine analytical tool in the undergraduate curriculum in the form of GC-MS. While relatively few undergraduate programs have incorporated biological mass spectrometry into their programs, the importance of these techniques, as demonstrated by their recognition with the 2002 Nobel Prize, will hopefully lead to…

  13. A Developmental History of Polymer Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergne, Matthew J.; Hercules, David M.; Lattimer, Robert P.

    2007-01-01

    The history of the development of mass spectroscopic methods used to characterize polymers is discussed. The continued improvements in methods and instrumentation will offer new and better ways for the mass spectral characterization of polymers and mass spectroscopy (MS) should be recognized as a complementary polymer characterization method along…

  14. Mass spectrometry and hyphenated instruments in food analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has come a long way since the record of the first mass spectra of a simple low molecular weight substance by J.J. Thomson in 1912. Especially over the past decades, MS has been the subject of many developments. Particularly, the hyphenation of MS to gas chromatography (GC) a...

  15. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  16. Analysis of intact bacteria using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Nicole; Jones, Emrys A; Veselkov, Kirill A; Rebec, Monica; Bundy, Jacob G; Takats, Zoltan

    2013-07-14

    An identification system for microorganisms based on recently developed rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) is presented. Nine bacterial species cultured on various growth media were correctly identified to family-, genus-, and species-level based on their different mass spectral fingerprints using a cross-validated maximum margin criterion model. PMID:23736664

  17. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Tissue Imaging of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Fowler, Joseph W.M.; Waxer, Jonathan F.; Gatti, Richard A.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of tissue samples is a promising analytical tool that has quickly become associated with biomedical and pharmacokinetic studies. It eliminates several labor-intensive protocols associated with more classical imaging techniques, and provides accurate, histological data at a rapid pace. Because mass spectrometry is used as the readout, MSI can be applied to almost any molecule, especially those that are biologically relevant. Many examples of its utility in the study of peptides and proteins have been reported; here we discuss its value in the mass range of small molecules. We explore its success and potential in the analysis of lipids, medicinals, and metal-based compounds by featuring representative studies from mass spectrometry imaging laboratories around the globe. PMID:24952187

  19. Use of mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Jin; Perdian, David; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  20. Use of Mass spectrometry for imaging metabolites in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Jin; Perdian, David C.; Song, Zhihong; Yeung, Edward S.; Nikolau, Basil

    2012-03-27

    We discuss and illustrate recent advances that have been made to image the distribution of metabolites among cells and tissues of plants using different mass spectrometry technologies. These technologies include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, desorption electrospray ionization, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. These are relatively new technological applications of mass spectrometry and they are providing highly spatially resolved data concerning the cellular distribution of metabolites. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each of these mass spectrometric methods, and provide a description of the technical barriers that are currently limiting the technology to the level of single-cell resolution. However, we anticipate that advances in the next few years will increase the resolving power of the technology to provide unprecedented data on the distribution of metabolites at the subcellular level, which will increase our ability to decipher new knowledge concerning the spatial organization of metabolic processes in plants.

  1. An Isochronous Lattice for PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    With e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings operating in a quasi-isochronous mode, it might be possible to produce short bunches with length {sigma}{sub z} < 1 cm. The unique characteristics of the short bunches could then be utilized for synchrotron radiation applications or colliders with mm-scale {beta}*. In principle, the design of a quasi-isochronous storage ring is relatively straight-forward, but experimental studies with electron storage rings in this configuration have not been carried out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an isochronous lattice design is compatible with PEP given a minimum of hardware modifications.

  2. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  3. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  5. Integrating Mass Spectrometry of Intact Protein Complexes into Structural Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mass spectrometry analysis of intact protein complexes has emerged as an established technology for assessing the composition and connectivity within dynamic, heterogeneous multiprotein complexes at low concentrations and in the context of mixtures. As this technology continues to move forward, one of the main challenges is to integrate the information content of such intact protein complex measurements with other mass spectrometry approaches in structural biology. Methods such as H/D exchange, oxidative foot-printing, chemical cross-linking, affinity purification, and ion mobility separation add complementary information that allows access to every level of protein structure and organization. Here, we survey the structural information that can be retrieved by such experiments, demonstrate the applicability of integrative mass spectrometry approaches in structural proteomics, and look to the future to explore upcoming innovations in this rapidly-advancing area. PMID:22611037

  6. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  7. Ion mobility–mass spectrometry for structural proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yueyang; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2012-01-01

    Ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry has been an important tool in the fields of chemical physics and analytical chemistry for decades, but its potential for interrogating the structure of proteins and multiprotein complexes has only recently begun to be realized. Today, ion mobility– mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of protein assemblies that have failed high-throughput crystallization or NMR spectroscopy screens. Here, we highlight the technology, approaches and data that have led to this dramatic shift in use, including emerging trends such as the integration of ion mobility–mass spectrometry data with more classical (e.g., ‘bottom-up’) proteomics approaches for the rapid structural characterization of protein networks. PMID:22292823

  8. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated With Azithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-01-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reducing pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production. PMID:25801585

  9. Automated protein-ligand interaction screening by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maple, Hannah J; Garlish, Rachel A; Rigau-Roca, Laura; Porter, John; Whitcombe, Ian; Prosser, Christine E; Kennedy, Jeff; Henry, Alistair J; Taylor, Richard J; Crump, Matthew P; Crosby, John

    2012-01-26

    Identifying protein-ligand binding interactions is a key step during early-stage drug discovery. Existing screening techniques are often associated with drawbacks such as low throughput, high sample consumption, and dynamic range limitations. The increasing use of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) demands that these techniques also detect very weak interactions (mM K(D) values). This paper presents the development and validation of a fully automated screen by mass spectrometry, capable of detecting fragment binding into the millimolar K(D) range. Low sample consumption, high throughput, and wide dynamic range make this a highly attractive, orthogonal approach. The method was applied to screen 157 compounds in 6 h against the anti-apoptotic protein target Bcl-x(L). Mass spectrometry results were validated using STD-NMR, HSQC-NMR, and ITC experiments. Agreement between techniques suggests that mass spectrometry offers a powerful, complementary approach for screening. PMID:22148839

  10. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA analysis and sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.; Taranenko, N.I.; Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.

    1995-03-01

    Laser desorption mass spectrometry has been considered as a potential new method for fast DNA sequencing. Our approach is to use matrix-assisted laser desorption to produce parent ions of DNA segments and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to identify the sizes of DNA segments. Thus, the approach is similar to gel electrophoresis sequencing using Sanger`s enzymatic method. However, gel, radioactive tagging, and dye labeling are not required. In addition, the sequencing process can possibly be finished within a few hundred microseconds instead of hours and days. In order to use mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing, the following three criteria need to be satisfied. They are (1) detection of large DNA segments, (2) sensitivity reaching the femtomole region, and (3) mass resolution good enough to separate DNA segments of a single nucleotide difference. It has been very difficult to detect large DNA segments by mass spectrometry before due to the fragile chemical properties of DNA and low detection sensitivity of DNA ions. We discovered several new matrices to increase the production of DNA ions. By innovative design of a mass spectrometer, we can increase the ion energy up to 45 KeV to enhance the detection sensitivity. Recently, we succeeded in detecting a DNA segment with 500 nucleotides. The sensitivity was 100 femtomole. Thus, we have fulfilled two key criteria for using mass spectrometry for fast DNA sequencing. The major effort in the near future is to improve the resolution. Different approaches are being pursued. When high resolution of mass spectrometry can be achieved and automation of sample preparation is developed, the sequencing speed to reach 500 megabases per year can be feasible.

  11. Microbeam titanium isotopic analysis by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, D.R.; Davis, A.M.; Clayton, R.N. . Enrico Fermi Inst.); Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Burnett, J.W.; Coon, S.R.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The importance of isotopic anomalies in refractory inclusions in meteorites is well established. Measurements of the anomalies using conventional mass spectrometry are often rendered difficult, however, by isobarically interfering isotopes: for example, {sup 48}Ti and {sup 48}Ca. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) can substantially reduce isobaric interferences in a number of systems. We have employed RIMS for the in situ detection of Ti atoms sputtered from pure Ti metal and from several terrestrial oxides containing both Ti and Ca. Tunable lasers were employed to resonantly ionize neutral Ti atoms. We have chosen Ti specifically because of the importance of Ti isotopic anomalies in cosmochemistry.

  12. Mass spectrometry and inhomogeneous ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    Work done in several areas to advance the state of the art of magnetic mass spectrometers is described. The calculations and data necessary for the design of inhomogeneous field mass spectrometers, and the calculation of ion trajectories through such fields are presented. The development and testing of solid state ion detection devices providing the capability of counting single ions is discussed. New techniques in the preparation and operation of thermal-ionization ion sources are described. Data obtained on the concentrations of copper in rainfall and uranium in air samples using the improved thermal ionization techniques are presented. The design of a closed system static mass spectrometer for isotopic analyses is discussed. A summary of instrumental aspects of a four-stage mass spectrometer comprising two electrostatic and two 90 deg. magnetic lenses with a 122-cm radius used to study the interaction of ions with solids is presented.

  13. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  14. Determination of water content using mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.; Hughes, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometer is used to measure small quantities of water present in different materials. System has been applied in measuring water and gases desorbed from microcircuitry insulation, can also be used with foods, polymeric materials, and organic solvents.

  15. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed. PMID:20680602

  16. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts. PMID:26161970

  17. Ion microprobe mass spectrometry using sputtering atomization and resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, D.L.; Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has recently been developed into a useful technique for isotope ratio measurements. Studies performed in our laboratory (1-6) have been reported for a variety of elements using thermal vaporization sources to produce the atom reservoir for laser-induced resonance ionization. A commercial ion microprobe mass analyzer (IMMA) has been interfaced with a tunable pulsed dye laser for carrying out resonance ionization mass spectrometry of sputtered atoms. The IMMA instrument has many advantages for this work, including a micro-focused primary ion beam (2 ..mu..m in diameter) of selected mass, complete sample manipulation and viewing capability, and a double-focusing mass spectrometer for separation and detection of the secondary or laser-generated ions. Data were obtained demonstrating the number and type of ions formed along with optical spectral information showing the wavelengths at which resonance ionization occurs. 7 refs.

  18. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging, an Emerging Technology in Neuropsychopharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Svenningsson, Per; Andrén, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging is a powerful tool for directly determining the distribution of proteins, peptides, lipids, neurotransmitters, metabolites and drugs in neural tissue sections in situ. Molecule-specific imaging can be achieved using various ionization techniques that are suited to different applications but which all yield data with high mass accuracies and spatial resolutions. The ability to simultaneously obtain images showing the distributions of chemical species ranging from metal ions to macromolecules makes it possible to explore the chemical organization of a sample and to correlate the results obtained with specific anatomical features. The imaging of biomolecules has provided new insights into multiple neurological diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Mass spectrometry imaging can also be used in conjunction with other imaging techniques in order to identify correlations between changes in the distribution of important chemical species and other changes in the properties of the tissue. Here we review the applications of mass spectrometry imaging in neuroscience research and discuss its potential. The results presented demonstrate that mass spectrometry imaging is a useful experimental method with diverse applications in neuroscience. PMID:23966069

  20. Perspectives and retrospectives in mass spectrometry: one view.

    PubMed

    Cooks, R Graham; Ifa, Demian R; Sharma, Gautam; Tadjimukhamedov, Fatkhulla Kh; Ouyang, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry benefits from a flexible definition which equates it with many aspects of the science of matter in the ionized state. The field continues to expand rapidly, not only to encompass larger and more complex molecules through more powerful instruments, but simultaneously towards in-situ measurements made using smaller, more flexible and just-sufficiently-powerful instruments. The senior author has been fortunate to work in mass spectrometry from 1967 to the present and has been involved in a wide range of efforts which have covered analytical, biological, organic, instrumental and physical aspects of the subject. This effort has been made in the company of a remarkable set of colleagues. From this vantage, it is possible to look both backwards and forwards in this prospective and retrospective piece. This presentation involves a personal look at places, people, instruments, and concepts engaged in along a path through Mass Spectrometry. The journey goes from Natal, South Africa, via Cambridge, UK, through Kansas and on to Purdue University, in the great state of Indiana. It starts with natural products chemistry and moves to the physical chemistry of fragmentation and energy partitioning on to complex mixture analysis by tandem mass spectrometry and hence to the concepts of thermochemical determination by the kinetic method, preparation of materials by ion soft landing, the possible role of amino acid clusters in the origin of homochiral life, and the elaboration of a set of ambient ionization methods for chemical analysis performed using samples in their native state. Special attention is given to novel concepts and instrumentation and to the emerging areas of ambient ionization, molecular imaging and miniature mass spectrometers. Personal mass spectrometers appear to be just over the horizon as is the large-scale use of mass spectrometry in field-based analysis, including point-of-care medical diagnostics. PMID:20530836

  1. Calculation of 230Th U isochrons, ages, and errors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Titterington, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    If analytical errors are responsible for the scatter of points on a 230Th-234U-238U isochron diagram, the isochron should be fitted by a technique that 1. (1) weights the points according to their analytical errors and error correlations, and 2. (2) either takes into account the presence of some of the same data in two coupled XY isochrons or (equivalently) uses a single, three-dimensional XYZ isochron. A method based on maximum-likelihood estimation is presented that fulfills these requirements, and the relevant equations for errors in age and initial 234U 238U are given. Equations for estimating the necessary isotope-ratio errors and error-correlations for both alpha-spectrometric and mass-spectrometric data are also developed. ?? 1994.

  2. Electrospray and tandem mass spectrometry in biochemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, W J; Jonsson, A P; Liu, S; Rai, D K; Wang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, biological MS has changed out of all recognition. This is primarily due to the development in the 1980s of 'soft ionization' methods that permit the ionization and vaporization of large, polar, and thermally labile biomolecules. These developments in ionization mode have driven the design and manufacture of smaller and cheaper mass analysers, making the mass spectrometer a routine instrument in the biochemistry laboratory today. In the present review the revolutionary 'soft ionization' methods will be discussed with particular reference to electrospray. The mass analysis of ions will be described, and the concept of tandem MS introduced. Where appropriate, examples of the application of MS in biochemistry will be provided. Although the present review will concentrate on the MS of peptides/proteins and lipids, all classes of biomolecules can be analysed, and much excellent work has been done in the fields of carbohydrate and nucleic acid biochemistry. PMID:11311115

  3. A New Accelerator-Based Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    Tandem electrostatic accelerators produce beams of positive ions which are used to penetrate atomic nuclei in a target, inducing nuclear reactions whose study elucidates varied properties of the nucleus. Uses of the system, which acts like a mass spectrometer, are discussed. These include radiocarbon dating measurements. (JN)

  4. ALTERNATIVE IONIZATION METHODS FOR PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to enhance the capabilities of a real-time airborne particle mass spectrometer by implementing matrix-independent methods for sample ionization. The enhancements should result in improved sensitivity for trace substances and, more importantly, per...

  5. Seismic metamaterials based on isochronous mechanical oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Finocchio, G. Garescì, F.; Azzerboni, B.; Casablanca, O.; Chiappini, M.; Ricciardi, G.; Alibrandi, U.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter introduces a seismic metamaterial (SM) composed by a chain of mass-in-mass system able to filter the S-waves of an earthquake. We included the effect of the SM into the mono dimensional model for the soil response analysis. The SM modifies the soil behavior and in presence of an internal damping the amplitude of the soil amplification function is reduced also in a region near the resonance frequency. This SM can be realized by a continuous structure with inside a 3d-matrix of isochronous oscillators based on a sphere rolling over a cycloidal trajectory.

  6. A non-isochronous rocking oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipponi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of an unbalanced rocking cylinder is investigated as an example of a non-isochronous oscillator. The dependence of the period on the maximum angular swing is found to be more pronounced than in the pendulum case and tunable with a suitable choice of masses and moments of inertia. Computer acquisition of the force exerted on the horizontal plane allows comparison of the dynamical behavior of the system with computational predictions. The system deserves consideration for theoretical and experimental investigations in undergraduate physics courses for the nontrivial effects arising from the displacement of the center of mass from the geometrical cylinder axis and the anharmonic character of the oscillations.

  7. A new derivative for oxosteroid analysis by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rigdova, K.; Wang, Y.; Ward, M.; Griffiths, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a new method for oxosteroid identification utilizing “tandem mass tag hydrazine” (TMTH) carbonyl-reactive derivatisation reagent. TMTH is a reagent with a chargeable tertiary amino group attached through a linker to a carbonyl-reactive hydrazine group. Thirty oxosteroids were analysed after derivatisation with TMTH by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and were found to give high ion-currents compared to underivatised molecules. ESI-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis of the derivatives yielded characteristic fragmentation patterns with specific mass reporter ions derived from the TMT group. A shotgun ESI-MS method incorporating TMTH derivatisation was applied to a urine sample. PMID:24525129

  8. Characterization of plant materials by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry: high-resolution mass spectrometry, time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry, and Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of spruce needles

    SciTech Connect

    Schulten, H.F.; Simmleit, N.; Mueller, R.

    1989-02-01

    In the course of a forest damage research project spruce needles are analyzed, without pretreatment except drying and milling, by in-source pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry. The mass signals are assigned by using high-resolution mass measurements and thermal degradation products identified by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography. It is demonstrated that the thermal degradation products characterize the main chemical constituents of spruce needs such as polysaccharides and lignin. Furthermore, thermostable constituents such as lipids, steroids, and flavons are detected. The thermal degradation process is studied by temperature-programmed microfurnace pyrolysis in combination with time-resolved high-resolution mass spectrometry. The integrated interpretation of results achieved by the presented methods can be applied for the universal characterization of complex and in particular nonsoluble, polydisperse biological and geochemical materials.

  9. Investigation of protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sinz, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    The rate of drug discovery is greatly dependent on the development and improvement of rapid and reliable analytical methods that allow screening for protein-ligand interactions. The solution-based methods for investigating protein-ligand interactions by mass spectrometry (MS), which are discussed in this paper, are hydrogen/deuterium exchange of protein backbone amide hydrogens, and photoaffinity labeling. Moreover, MS analysis of intact noncovalent protein-ligand complexes is described. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) with its ultra-high resolution and excellent mass accuracy is also considered herein as it is gaining increasing popularity for a mass spectrometric investigation of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:17299828

  10. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.