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Sample records for isolated rhodococcus erythropolis

  1. Production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid from acrylic acid by newly isolated rhodococcus erythropolis LG12.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Park, Si Jae; Park, Oh-Jin; Cho, Junhyeong; Rhee, Joo Won

    2009-05-01

    A novel microorganism, designated as LG12, was isolated from soil based on its ability to use acrylic acid as the sole carbon source. An electron microscopic analysis of its morphological characteristics and phylogenetic classification by 16S rRNA homology showed that the LG12 strain belongs to Rhodococcus erythropolis. R. erythropolis LG12 was able to metabolize a high concentration of acrylic acid (up to 40 g/l). In addition, R. erythropolis LG12 exhibited the highest acrylic acid-degrading activity among the tested microorganisms, including R. rhodochrous, R. equi, R. rubber, Candida rugosa, and Bacillus cereus. The effect of the culture conditions of R. erythropolis LG12 on the production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP) from acrylic acid was also examined. To enhance the production of 3HP, acrylic acid-assimilating activity was induced by adding 1 mM acrylic acid to the culture medium when the cell density reached an OD600 of 5. Further cultivation of R. erythropolis LG12 with 40 g/l of acrylic acid resulted in the production of 17.5 g/l of 3HP with a molar conversion yield of 44% and productivity of 0.22 g/I/h at 30 degrees after 72 h. PMID:19494695

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Carbendazim-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis djl-11

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Paul R.; Li, Hongmei; Ren, Yan; Li, Jishun; Wang, Jianing; Yang, Hetong

    2013-01-01

    Carbendazim (methyl 1H-benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate) is one of the most widely used fungicides in agriculture worldwide, but has been reported to have adverse effects on animal health and ecosystem function. A highly efficient carbendazim-degrading bacterium (strain dj1-11) was isolated from carbendazim-contaminated soil samples via enrichment culture. Strain dj1-11 was identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characters, including sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. In vitro degradation of carbendazim (1000 mg·L−1) by dj1-11 in minimal salts medium (MSM) was highly efficient, and with an average degradation rate of 333.33 mg·L−1·d−1 at 28°C. The optimal temperature range for carbendazim degradation by dj1-11 in MSM was 25–30°C. Whilst strain dj1-11 was capable of metabolizing cabendazim as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, degradation was significantly (P<0.05) increased by addition of 12.5 mM NH4NO3. Changes in MSM pH (4–9), substitution of NH4NO3 with organic substrates as N and C sources or replacing Mg2+ with Mn2+, Zn2+ or Fe2+ did not significantly affect carbendazim degradation by dj1-11. During the degradation process, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detected the metabolites 2-aminobenzimidazole and 2-hydroxybenzimidazole. A putative carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene was cloned from chromosomal DNA of djl-11 and showed 99% sequence homology to the mheI carbendazim-hydrolyzing esterase gene from Nocardioides sp. SG-4G. PMID:24098350

  3. Genome Sequence of the Quorum-Quenching Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain R138

    PubMed Central

    Kwasiborski, Anthony; Mondy, Samuel; Beury-Cirou, Amélie

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis strain R138 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Solanum tuberosum and selected for its capacity to degrade N-acyl-homoserine lactones, quorum-sensing signals used as communication molecules by the potato pathogens Pectobacterium and Dickeya. Here, we report the genome sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain R138. PMID:24675862

  4. Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain P27, a Highly Radiation-Resistant Actinomycete from Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Gouvêa Taketani, Rodrigo; Domingues Zucchi, Tiago; Soares de Melo, Itamar

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of radiation-resistant Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P27, isolated from leaves of Deschampsia antarctica Desv. (Poaceae) in the Admiralty Bay area, Antarctica. PMID:24072865

  5. [Antiadhesive potencial of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Gritsenko, N A; Konon, A D; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMB Ac-5017 biosurfactants (surface-active substances, SAS) with different degree of purification on attachment of bacteria (Escherichia coli IEM-1, Bacillus subtilis BT-2, Proteus vulgaris BT-1, Staphylococcus aureus BMC-1, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P-55, Enterobacter cloacae AC-22, Erwinia aroidaeae B-433), yeasts (Candida albicans D-6) and fungi (Aspergillus niger P-3, Fusarium culmorum T-7) to the abiotic surfaces (glass, plastic, ceramics, steel, linoleum) was studied. The dependence of microorganisms adhesion on degree of SAS purification (supernatant, purified SAS solution), SAS concentration (0,04-1,25 mg/ml), type of surface and test-cultures was established. The adhesion of majority investigated bacterial cells after treatment of abiotic surfaces with supernatant of cultural liquid with SAS concentration 0,06-0,25 mg/ml was on the average 20-45, yeasts C. albicans D-6--30-75% and was less than that purified SAS solution with the same concentration. Higher antiadhesive activity of supernatant as compared to purified SAS solution testifies to possibility of exception of the expensive stage of isolation and purification at obtaining of preparations with antiadhesive properties. PMID:25639039

  6. Initial hydrogenation during catabolism of picric acid by Rhodococcus erythropolis HL 24-2.

    PubMed Central

    Lenke, H; Knackmuss, H J

    1992-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis HL 24-2, which was originally isolated as a 2,4-dinitrophenol-degrading bacterium, could also utilize picric acid as a nitrogen source after spontaneous mutation. During growth, the mutant HL PM-1 transiently accumulated an orange-red metabolite, which was identified as a hydride-Meisenheimer complex of picric acid. This complex was formed as the initial metabolite and further converted with concomitant liberation of nitrite. 2,4,6-Trinitrocyclohexanone was identified as a dead-end metabolite of the degradation of picric acid, indicating the addition of two hydride ions to picric acid. PMID:1444408

  7. Multiple genes encoding 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl 1,2-dioxygenase in the gram-positive polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis TA421, isolated from a termite ecosystem.

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, M; Chung, S Y; Song, E; Kudo, T

    1995-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis TA421 was isolated from a termite ecosystem and is able to degrade a wide range of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the PCB catabolic pathway of this organism revealed that there are four different bphC genes (bphC1, bphC2, bphC3, and bphC4) which encode 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenases. As determined by Southern hybridization, none of the bphC genes exhibits homology to any other bphC gene. bphC1, bphC2, and bphC4 encode enzymes that have narrow substrate specificities and cleave the first aromatic ring in the meta position. In contrast, bphC3 encodes a meta cleavage dioxygenase with broad substrate specificity. Asturias et al. have shown that the closely related organism Rhodococcus globerulus P6 contains three different bphC genes (bphC1, bphC2, and bpHC3) which encode meta cleavage dioxygenases. The data suggest that there is a diverse family of bphC genes which encode PCB meta cleavage dioxygenases in members of the genus Rhodococcus. PMID:7574595

  8. Catabolic pathway of gamma-caprolactone in the biocontrol agent Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Cirou, Amélie; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Faure, Denis; Dessaux, Yves; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-caprolactone (GCL) is well-known as a food flavor and has been recently described as a biostimulant molecule promoting the growth of bacteria with biocontrol activity against soft-rot pathogens. Among these biocontrol agents, Rhodococcus erythropolis, characterized by a remarkable metabolic versatility, assimilates various γ-butyrolactone molecules with a branched-aliphatic chain, such as GCL. The assimilative pathway of GCL in R. erythropolis was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. This analysis suggests the involvement of the lactonase QsdA in ring-opening, a feature confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. According to proteome analysis, the open-chain form of GCL was degraded by β- and ω-oxidation coupled to the Krebs cycle and β-ketoadipate pathway. Ubiquity of qsdA gene among environmental R. erythropolis isolates was verified by PCR. In addition to a previous N-acyl homoserine lactone catabolic function, QsdA may therefore be involved in an intermediate degradative step of cyclic recalcitrant molecules or in synthesis of flavoring lactones. PMID:22085026

  9. Metabolism of carveol and dihydrocarveol in Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; Boot, A M

    2000-05-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 assimilates all stereoisomers of carveol and dihydrocarveol as sole source of carbon and energy. Induction experiments with carveol- or dihydrocarveol-grown cells showed high oxygen consumption rates with these two compounds and with carvone and dihydrocarvone. (Dihydro)carveol-grown cells of R. erythropolis DCL14 contained the following enzymic activities involved in the carveol and dihydrocarveol degradation pathways of this micro-organism: (dihydro)carveol dehydrogenase (both NAD+- and dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent activities), an unknown cofactor-dependent carvone reductase, (iso-)dihydrocarvone isomerase activity, NADPH-dependent dihydrocarvone monooxygenase (Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase), epsilon-lactone hydrolase and an NAD+-dependent 6-hydroxy-3-isopropenylheptanoate dehydrogenase. Product accumulation studies identified (4R)-carvone, (1R,4R)-dihydrocarvone, (4R,7R)-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, (3R)-6-hydroxy-3-isopropenylheptanoate, (3R)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate, (3S,6R)-6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxooxepanone and (5R)-6-hydroxy-5-isopropenyl-2-methylhexanoate as intermediates in the (4R)-carveol degradation pathway. The opposite stereoisomers of these compounds were identified in the (4S)-carveol degradation pathway. With dihydrocarveol, the same intermediates are involved except that carvone was absent. These results show that R. erythropolis DCL14 metabolizes all four diastereomers of carveol via oxidation to carvone, which is subsequently stereospecifically reduced to (1R)-(iso-) dihydrocarvone. At this point also dihydrocarveol enters the pathway, and this compound is directly oxidized to (iso-)dihydrocarvone. Cell extracts contained both (1R)-(iso-)dihydrocarvone 1,2-monooxygenase and (1S)-(iso)-dihydrocarvone 2,3-monooxygenase activity, resulting in a branch point of the degradation pathway; (1R)-(iso-)dihydrocarvone was converted to 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, while (1S

  10. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme. PMID:24846734

  11. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Contains a Novel Degradation Pathway for Limonene

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Swarts, Henk J.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain DCL14, which is able to grow on limonene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from a freshwater sediment sample. This organism was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis by chemotaxonomic and genetic studies. R. erythropolis DCL14 also assimilated the terpenes limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, carveol, carvone, and (−)-menthol, while perillyl alcohol was not utilized as a carbon and energy source. Induction tests with cells grown on limonene revealed that the oxygen consumption rates with limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and carveol were high. Limonene-induced cells of R. erythropolis DCL14 contained the following four novel enzymatic activities involved in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism: a flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADH-dependent limonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity, a cofactor-independent limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase activity, a dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent limonene-1,2-diol dehydrogenase activity, and an NADPH-dependent 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity. Product accumulation studies showed that (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1S,4R)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3R)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate were intermediates in the (4R)-limonene degradation pathway. The opposite enantiomers [(1R,2R,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1R,4S)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3S)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate] were found in the (4S)-limonene degradation pathway, while accumulation of (1R,2S,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol from (4S)-limonene was also observed. These results show that R. erythropolis DCL14 metabolizes both enantiomers of limonene via a novel degradation pathway that starts with epoxidation at the 1,2 double bond forming limonene-1,2-epoxide. This epoxide is subsequently converted to limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and 7-hydroxy-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone. This lactone spontaneously rearranges to form 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate. In

  12. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 contains a novel degradation pathway for limonene.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; Swarts, H J; de Bont, J A

    1999-05-01

    Strain DCL14, which is able to grow on limonene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from a freshwater sediment sample. This organism was identified as a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis by chemotaxonomic and genetic studies. R. erythropolis DCL14 also assimilated the terpenes limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, carveol, carvone, and (-)-menthol, while perillyl alcohol was not utilized as a carbon and energy source. Induction tests with cells grown on limonene revealed that the oxygen consumption rates with limonene-1,2-epoxide, limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and carveol were high. Limonene-induced cells of R. erythropolis DCL14 contained the following four novel enzymatic activities involved in the limonene degradation pathway of this microorganism: a flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADH-dependent limonene 1, 2-monooxygenase activity, a cofactor-independent limonene-1, 2-epoxide hydrolase activity, a dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent limonene-1,2-diol dehydrogenase activity, and an NADPH-dependent 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene 1,2-monooxygenase activity. Product accumulation studies showed that (1S,2S,4R)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1S, 4R)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3R)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate were intermediates in the (4R)-limonene degradation pathway. The opposite enantiomers [(1R,2R,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol, (1R, 4S)-1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and (3S)-3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate] were found in the (4S)-limonene degradation pathway, while accumulation of (1R,2S,4S)-limonene-1,2-diol from (4S)-limonene was also observed. These results show that R. erythropolis DCL14 metabolizes both enantiomers of limonene via a novel degradation pathway that starts with epoxidation at the 1,2 double bond forming limonene-1,2-epoxide. This epoxide is subsequently converted to limonene-1,2-diol, 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, and 7-hydroxy-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone. This lactone spontaneously rearranges to form 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate

  13. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, K V; Ianenko, A S

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases. PMID:25474901

  14. [Cloning of new acylamidase gene from Rhodococcus erythropolis and its expression in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    The gene for new Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37 acylamidase, which possesses unique substrate specificity, has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. Substrates for this enzyme are not only simple amides, such as acetamide and propionamide, but also N-substituted amides, such as 4'-nitroacetanilide. The 1431-bp gene was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells on pET16b plasmid under the control of a promoter of the φ 10 gene from the T7 phage. The molecular mass of recombinant acylamidase in E. coli was 55 kDa, which corresponded to that of native acylamidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis TA37. Recombinant acylamidase was able to hydrolize N-substituted amides. A search of a nucleotide database and multiple alignment revealed that acylamidase belonged to the Amidase protein family PF01425, but its nucleotide and amino acid sequences differed significantly from those of the described amidases. PMID:25508680

  15. Response of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain IBBPo1 to toxic organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the utilization of rhodococci in the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated environments. This study investigates the response of Rhodococcus erythropolis IBBPo1 cells to 1% organic solvents (alkanes, aromatics). A combination of microbiology, biochemical, and molecular approaches were used to examine cell adaptation mechanisms likely to be pursued by this strain after 1% organic solvent exposure. R. erythropolis IBBPo1 was found to utilize 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene) as the sole carbon source. Modifications in cell viability, cell morphology, membrane permeability, lipid profile, carotenoid pigments profile and 16S rRNA gene were revealed in R. erythropolis IBBPo1 cells grown 1 and 24 h on minimal medium in the presence of 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene). Due to its environmental origin and its metabolic potential, R. erythropolis IBBPo1 is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of soils contaminated with crude oils and other toxic compounds. Moreover, the carotenoid pigments produced by this nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium have a variety of other potential applications. PMID:26691458

  16. Response of Rhodococcus erythropolis strain IBBPo1 to toxic organic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recently, there has been a lot of interest in the utilization of rhodococci in the bioremediation of petroleum contaminated environments. This study investigates the response of Rhodococcus erythropolis IBBPo1 cells to 1% organic solvents (alkanes, aromatics). A combination of microbiology, biochemical, and molecular approaches were used to examine cell adaptation mechanisms likely to be pursued by this strain after 1% organic solvent exposure. R. erythropolis IBBPo1 was found to utilize 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene) as the sole carbon source. Modifications in cell viability, cell morphology, membrane permeability, lipid profile, carotenoid pigments profile and 16S rRNA gene were revealed in R. erythropolis IBBPo1 cells grown 1 and 24 h on minimal medium in the presence of 1% alkanes (cyclohexane, n-hexane, n-decane) and aromatics (toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene). Due to its environmental origin and its metabolic potential, R. erythropolis IBBPo1 is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of soils contaminated with crude oils and other toxic compounds. Moreover, the carotenoid pigments produced by this nonpathogenic Gram-positive bacterium have a variety of other potential applications. PMID:26691458

  17. Thiocarbamate herbicide-inducible nonheme haloperoxidase of Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21.

    PubMed Central

    De Schrijver, A; Nagy, I; Schoofs, G; Proost, P; Vanderleyden, J; van Pée, K H; De Mot, R

    1997-01-01

    During biodegradation of thiocarbamate herbicides by Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21, a protein with an M(r) of 30,000 is induced (I. Nagy, G. Schoofs, F. Compernolle, P. Proost, J. Vanderleyden, and R.De Mot, J. Bacteriol. 177:676-687, 1995). Based on N-terminal sequence data for the protein purified by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the corresponding structural gene, thcF, was cloned and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence of ThcF is homologous to those of nonheme haloperoxidases. A particularly high level of sequence identity (72.6%) was observed for the chloroperoxidase from Pseudomonas pyrrocinia. A polyclonal antibody against the latter enzyme cross-reacted with ThcF either produced by the original Rhodococcus cells or overexpressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. In both thiocarbamate-grown Rhodococcus cells and E. coli cells expressing thcF, the haloperoxidase activity of ThcF was demonstrated. The thiocarbamate-inducible R. erythropolis ThcF protein represents the first (nonheme) haloperoxidase to be identified in a nocardioform actinomycete. PMID:9143122

  18. Efficient Biostimulation of Native and Introduced Quorum-Quenching Rhodococcus erythropolis Populations Is Revealed by a Combination of Analytical Chemistry, Microbiology, and Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Cirou, Amélie; Mondy, Samuel; An, Shu; Charrier, Amélie; Sarrazin, Amélie; Thoison, Odile; DuBow, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of the quorum-sensing (QS) signals known as N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) by soil bacteria may be useful as a beneficial trait for protecting crops, such as potato plants, against the worldwide pathogen Pectobacterium. In this work, analytical chemistry and microbial and molecular approaches were combined to explore and compare biostimulation of native and introduced AHL-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis populations in the rhizosphere of potato plants cultivated in farm greenhouses under hydroponic conditions. We first identified gamma-heptalactone (GHL) as a novel biostimulating agent that efficiently promotes plant root colonization by AHL-degrading R. erythropolis population. We also characterized an AHL-degrading biocontrol R. erythropolis isolate, R138, which was introduced in the potato rhizosphere. Moreover, root colonization by AHL-degrading bacteria receiving different combinations of GHL and R138 treatments was compared by using a cultivation-based approach (percentage of AHL-degrading bacteria), pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified rrs loci (total bacterial community), and quantitative PCR (qPCR) of the qsdA gene, which encodes an AHL lactonase in R. erythropolis. Higher densities of the AHL-degrading R. erythropolis population in the rhizosphere were observed when GHL treatment was associated with biocontrol strain R138. Under this condition, the introduced R. erythropolis population displaced the native R. erythropolis population. Finally, chemical analyses revealed that GHL, gamma-caprolactone (GCL), and their by-products, gamma-hydroxyheptanoic acid and gamma-hydroxycaproic acid, rapidly disappeared from the rhizosphere and did not accumulate in plant tissues. This integrative study highlights biostimulation as a potential innovative approach for improving root colonization by beneficial bacteria. PMID:22081576

  19. Mathematic modeling for optimum conditions on aflatoxin B₁degradation by the aerobic bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Zhai, Cuiping; Guan, Bin; Li, Chunjuan; Shan, Shihua; Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-11-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB₁ by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD) and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production. PMID:23202311

  20. Mathematic Modeling for Optimum Conditions on Aflatoxin B1 Degradation by the Aerobic Bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Zhai, Cuiping; Guan, Bin; Li, Chunjuan; Shan, Shihua; Yu, Jiujiang

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the degradation conditions of AFB1 by Rhodococcus erythropolis in liquid culture. The most important factors that influence the degradation, as identified by a two-level Plackett-Burman design with six variables, were temperature, pH, liquid volume, inoculum size, agitation speed and incubation time. Central composite design (CCD) and response surface analysis were used to further investigate the interactions between these variables and to optimize the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis based on a second-order model. The results demonstrated that the optimal parameters were: temperature, 23.2 °C; pH, 7.17; liquid volume, 24.6 mL in 100-mL flask; inoculum size, 10%; agitation speed, 180 rpm; and incubation time, 81.9 h. Under these conditions, the degradation efficiency of R. erythropolis could reach 95.8% in liquid culture, which was increased by about three times as compared to non-optimized conditions. The result by mathematic modeling has great potential for aflatoxin removal in industrial fermentation such as in food processing and ethanol production. PMID:23202311

  1. L-pantoyl lactone dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis: genetic analyses and application to the stereospecific oxidation of L-pantoyl lactone.

    PubMed

    Si, Dayong; Urano, Nobuyuki; Nozaki, Shinya; Honda, Kohsuke; Shimizu, Sakayu; Kataoka, Michihiko

    2012-07-01

    The 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) inducible membrane-bound L-pantoyl lactone (L-PL) dehydrogenase (LPLDH) has been isolated from Rhodococcus erythropolis AKU2103 (Kataoka et al. in Eur J Biochem 204:799, 1992). Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of LPLDH and the highly conserved amino acid sequence in homology search results, the LPLDH gene (lpldh) was cloned. The gene consists of 1,179 bases and encodes a protein of 392 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to the proteins of the FMN-dependent α-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase/oxidase family. The overexpression vector pKLPLDH containing lpldh with its upstream region (1,940 bp) was constructed and introduced into R. erythropolis AKU2103. The recombinant R. erythropolis AKU2103 harboring pKLPLDH showed six times higher LPLDH activity than the wild-type strain. Conversion of L-PL to ketopantoyl lactone was achieved with 92% or 80% conversion yield when the substrate concentration was 0.768 or 1.15 M, respectively. Stereoinversion of L-PL to D-PL was also carried out by using the combination of recombinant R. erythropolis AKU2103 harboring pKLPLDH and ketopantoic acid-reducing Escherichia coli. PMID:22398860

  2. Desulfurization and denitrogenation of heavy gas oil by Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277.

    PubMed

    Maass, D; Todescato, D; Moritz, D E; Oliveira, J Vladimir; Oliveira, D; Ulson de Souza, A A; Guelli Souza, S M A

    2015-08-01

    Some of the noxious atmospheric pollutants such as nitrogen and sulfur dioxides come from the fossil fuel combustion. Biodesulfurization and biodenitrogenation are processes which remove those pollutants through the action of microorganisms. The ability of sulfur and nitrogen removal by the strain Rhodococcus erythropolis ATCC 4277 was tested in a biphasic system containing different heavy gas oil concentrations in a batch reactor. Heavy gas oil is an important fraction of petroleum, because after passing through, the vacuum distillation is incorporated into diesel oil. This strain was able to remove about 40% of the nitrogen and sulfur present in the gas heavy oil. Additionally, no growth inhibition occurred even when in the presence of pure heavy gas oil. Results present in this work are considered relevant for the development of biocatalytic processes for nitrogen and sulfur removal toward building feasible industrial applications. PMID:25759162

  3. Transcriptome of the quorum-sensing signal-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis responds differentially to virulent and avirulent Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Kwasiborski, A; Mondy, S; Chong, T-M; Barbey, C; Chan, K-G; Beury-Cirou, A; Latour, X; Faure, D

    2015-05-01

    Social bacteria use chemical communication to coordinate and synchronize gene expression via the quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory pathway. In Pectobacterium, a causative agent of the blackleg and soft-rot diseases on potato plants and tubers, expression of the virulence factors is collectively controlled by the QS-signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs). Several soil bacteria, such as the actinobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis, are able to degrade NAHLs, hence quench the chemical communication and virulence of Pectobacterium. Here, next-generation sequencing was used to investigate structural and functional genomics of the NAHL-degrading R. erythropolis strain R138. The R. erythropolis R138 genome (6.7 Mbp) contained a single circular chromosome, one linear (250 kbp) and one circular (84 kbp) plasmid. Growth of R. erythropolis and P. atrosepticum was not altered in mixed-cultures as compared with monocultures on potato tuber slices. HiSeq-transcriptomics revealed that no R. erythropolis genes were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the avirulent P. atrosepticum mutant expI, which is defective for QS-signal synthesis. By contrast 50 genes (<1% of the R. erythropolis genome) were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the NAHL-producing virulent P. atrosepticum. Among them, quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase-PCR confirmed that the expression of some alkyl-sulfatase genes decreased in the presence of a virulent P. atrosepticum, as well as deprivation of organic sulfur such as methionine, which is a key precursor in the synthesis of NAHL by P. atrosepticum. PMID:25585922

  4. Transcriptome of the quorum-sensing signal-degrading Rhodococcus erythropolis responds differentially to virulent and avirulent Pectobacterium atrosepticum

    PubMed Central

    Kwasiborski, A; Mondy, S; Chong, T-M; Barbey, C; Chan, K-G; Beury-Cirou, A; Latour, X; Faure, D

    2015-01-01

    Social bacteria use chemical communication to coordinate and synchronize gene expression via the quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory pathway. In Pectobacterium, a causative agent of the blackleg and soft-rot diseases on potato plants and tubers, expression of the virulence factors is collectively controlled by the QS-signals N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHLs). Several soil bacteria, such as the actinobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis, are able to degrade NAHLs, hence quench the chemical communication and virulence of Pectobacterium. Here, next-generation sequencing was used to investigate structural and functional genomics of the NAHL-degrading R. erythropolis strain R138. The R. erythropolis R138 genome (6.7 Mbp) contained a single circular chromosome, one linear (250 kbp) and one circular (84 kbp) plasmid. Growth of R. erythropolis and P. atrosepticum was not altered in mixed-cultures as compared with monocultures on potato tuber slices. HiSeq-transcriptomics revealed that no R. erythropolis genes were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the avirulent P. atrosepticum mutant expI, which is defective for QS-signal synthesis. By contrast 50 genes (<1% of the R. erythropolis genome) were differentially expressed when R. erythropolis was cultivated in the presence vs absence of the NAHL-producing virulent P. atrosepticum. Among them, quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase–PCR confirmed that the expression of some alkyl-sulfatase genes decreased in the presence of a virulent P. atrosepticum, as well as deprivation of organic sulfur such as methionine, which is a key precursor in the synthesis of NAHL by P. atrosepticum. PMID:25585922

  5. [Conversion of soybean sterols into 3,17-diketosteroids using actinobacteria Mycobacterium neoaurum, Pimelobacter simplex, and Rhodococcus erythropolis].

    PubMed

    Andriushina, V A; Rodina, N V; Stytsenko, T C; Luu, Duc Huy; Druzhinina, A V; Iaderets, V V; Voîshvillo, N E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract-Soybean sterols were converted into androst-4-ene-3,17-dione (AD) and 9alpha-hydroxyandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (9-OH-AD) using three actinobacterium strains. The transformation of a microcrystallic substrate (particle size 5-15 nm) or the transformation in the presence of randomly methylated beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) were carried out by Mycobacterium neoaurum with a phytosterol load of 30 g/l over 144 h with an AD content of 14.5 and 15.2 g/l, respectively. AD obtained in the presence of MCD was transformed into ADD (13.5 g/l) by Pimelobacter simplex cells over 3 h and into 9-OH-AD by Rhodococcus erythropolis cells after 22 h without the isolation of AD from the cultural liquid. The technical product ADD was obtained in 75% yield, based on phytosterol. It contained as impurity 1.25% of AD and 1.5% of 1,2-dehydrotestosterone. In a control experiment-the process of 1,2-dehydrogenation of 20 g/l AD in the water solution of MCD-no by products were isolated. Thus, it is more expedient to introduce the 1,2-double bond into pure AD, whereas R. erythropolis strain with low destructive activity towards steroid nucleus can be used in the mixed culture with M. neoaurum. The crystal product contained, according to HPLC, 80% of 9-OH-AD, and 1.5 AD was combined. The yield of 9-OH-AD (m.p. 218-220 degrees C) based on transformed phytosterol was 56%. PMID:21790029

  6. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. PMID:26697744

  8. Metabolic responses of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 grown on diesel oil and various hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Laczi, Krisztián; Kis, Ágnes; Horváth, Balázs; Maróti, Gergely; Hegedüs, Botond; Perei, Katalin; Rákhely, Gábor

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 is able to degrade diesel oil, normal-, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic compounds. The complete DNA content of the strain was previously sequenced and numerous oxygenase genes were identified. In order to identify the key elements participating in biodegradation of various hydrocarbons, we performed a comparative whole transcriptome analysis of cells grown on hexadecane, diesel oil and acetate. The transcriptomic data for the most prominent genes were validated by RT-qPCR. The expression of two genes coding for alkane-1-monooxygenase enzymes was highly upregulated in the presence of hydrocarbon substrates. The transcription of eight phylogenetically diverse cytochrome P450 (cyp) genes was upregulated in the presence of diesel oil. The transcript levels of various oxygenase genes were determined in cells grown in an artificial mixture, containing hexadecane, cycloparaffin and aromatic compounds and six cyp genes were induced by this hydrocarbon mixture. Five of them were not upregulated by linear and branched hydrocarbons. The expression of fatty acid synthase I genes was downregulated by hydrocarbon substrates, indicating the utilization of external alkanes for fatty acid synthesis. Moreover, the transcription of genes involved in siderophore synthesis, iron transport and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis was also upregulated, indicating their important role in hydrocarbon metabolism. Based on the results, complex metabolic response profiles were established for cells grown on various hydrocarbons. Our results represent a functional annotation of a rhodococcal genome, provide deeper insight into molecular events in diesel/hydrocarbon utilization and suggest novel target genes for environmental monitoring projects. PMID:26346267

  9. Crystallization and preliminary structural analysis of dibenzothiophene monooxygenase (DszC) from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaolu; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Daming; Ji, Kaihua; Ma, Ting; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Guoqiang; Li, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT) and its derivatives are typical sulfur compounds found in fossil fuels. These compounds show resistance to the hydrodesulfuriz­ation treatment that is commonly used in industry. Dibenzothiophene monooxygenase (DszC) is responsible for the oxidation of DBT, which is the first and the rate-limiting step in the DBT enzymatic desulfurization 4S pathway. In this study, the crystal structure of DszC from Rhodococcus erythropolis DS-3 is reported. The crystal of native DszC belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 96.16, b = 96.27, c = 98.56 Å, α = 81.03, β = 67.57, γ = 85.84°. To determine the phase, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected from a SeMet-derivative DszC crystal, which also belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 95.379, b = 95.167, c = 94.891 Å, α = 87.046, β = 70.536, γ = 79.738°. Further structural analysis of DszC is in progress. PMID:23722833

  10. Improvement of Biodesulfurization Rate of Alginate Immobilized Rhodococcus erythropolis R1

    PubMed Central

    Derikvand, Peyman; Etemadifar, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sulfur oxides released from the burning of oil causes severe environmental pollution. The sulfur can be removed via the 4S pathway in biodesulfurization (BDS). Immobilization approaches have been developed to prevent cell contamination of oil during the BDS process. Objectives: The encapsulation of Rhodococcus erythropolis R1 in calcium alginate beads was studied in order to enhance conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to 2-hydroxy biphenyl (2-HBP) as the final product. Also the effect of different factors on the BDS process was investigated. Materials and Methods: Calcium alginate capsules were prepared using peristaltic pumps with different needle sizes to control the beads sizes. Scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry methods were used to study the distribution and viability of encapsulated cells, respectively. Two non-ionic surfactants and also nano Ƴ-Al2O3were used with the ratio of 0.5% (v/v) and 1:5 (v/v) respectively to investigate their BDS efficiency. In addition, the effect of different bead sizes and different concentrations of sodium alginate in BDS activity was studied. Results: The 2% (w/v) sodium alginate beads with 1.5mm size were found to be the optimum for beads stability and efficient 2-HBP production. The viability of encapsulated cells decreased by 12% after 20 h of desulfurization, compared to free cells. Adding the non-ionic surfactants markedly enhanced the rate of BDS, because of increasing mass transfer of DBT to the gel matrix. In addition, Span 80 was more effective than Tween 80. The nanoƳ-Al2O3 particles could increase BDS rate by up to two-folds greater than that of the control beads. Conclusions: The nano Ƴ-Al2O3 can improve the immobilized biocatalyst for excellent efficiency of DBT desulfurization. Also the BDS activity can be enhanced by setting the other explained factors at optimum levels. PMID:25147685

  11. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  12. Cloning, purification and characterization of two components of phenol hydroxylase from Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1.

    PubMed

    Saa, Laura; Jaureguibeitia, Arrate; Largo, Eneko; Llama, María J; Serra, Juan L

    2010-03-01

    Phenol hydroxylase that catalyzes the conversion of phenol to catechol in Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1 was identified as a two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase. The two proteins are encoded by the genes pheA1 and pheA2, located very closely in the genome. The sequenced pheA1 gene was composed of 1,629 bp encoding a protein of 542 amino acids, whereas the pheA2 gene consisted of 570 bp encoding a protein of 189 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequences of both genes showed high homology with several two-component aromatic hydroxylases. The genes were cloned separately in cells of Escherichia coli M15 as hexahistidine-tagged proteins, and the recombinant proteins His(6)PheA1 and His(6)PheA2 were purified and its catalytic activity characterized. His(6)PheA1 exists as a homotetramer of four identical subunits of 62 kDa that has no phenol hydroxylase activity on its own. His(6)PheA2 is a homodimeric flavin reductase, consisting of two identical subunits of 22 kDa, that uses NAD(P)H in order to reduce flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), according to a random sequential kinetic mechanism. The reductase activity was strongly inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents. The hydroxylation of phenol in vitro requires the presence of both His(6)PheA1 and His(6)PheA2 components, in addition to NADH and FAD, but the physical interaction between the proteins is not necessary for the reaction. PMID:19787347

  13. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  14. Initial Transformations in the Biodegradation of Benzothiazoles by Rhodococcus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Helene; Vereecken, Karen; Stolz, Andreas; Verachtert, Hubert

    1998-01-01

    Benzothiazole-2-sulfonate (BTSO3) is one of the side products occurring in 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) production wastewater. We are the first to isolate an axenic culture capable of BTSO3 degradation. The isolate was identified as a Rhodococcus erythropolis strain and also degraded 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OBT) and benzothiazole (BT), but not MBT, which was found to inhibit the biodegradation of OBT, BT, and BTSO3. In anaerobic resting cell assays, BTSO3 was transformed into OBT in stoichiometric amounts. Under aerobic conditions, OBT was observed as an intermediate in BT breakdown and an unknown compound transiently accumulated in several assays. This product was identified as a dihydroxybenzothiazole. Benzothiazole degradation pathways seem to converge into OBT, which is then transformed further into the dihydroxy derivative. PMID:9726870

  15. Stereoselective carveol dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. A novel nicotinoprotein belonging to the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van der Ven, C; Barbirato, F; Eppink, M H; de Bont, J A; van Berkel, W J

    1999-09-10

    A novel nicotinoprotein, catalyzing the dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent oxidation of carveol to carvone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. The enzyme is specifically induced after growth on limonene and carveol. Dichlorophenolindophenol-dependent carveol dehydrogenase (CDH) is a homotetramer of 120 kDa with each subunit containing a tightly bound NAD(H) molecule. The enzyme is optimally active at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C and displays a broad substrate specificity with a preference for substituted cyclohexanols. When incubated with a diastereomeric mixture of (4R)- or (4S)-carveol, CDH stereoselectively catalyzes the conversion of the (6S)-carveol stereoisomers only. Kinetic studies with pure stereoisomers showed that this is due to large differences in V(max)/K(m) values and simultaneous product inhibition by (R)- or (S)-carvone. The R. erythropolis CDH gene (limC) was identified in an operon encoding the enzymes involved in limonene degradation. The CDH nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 831 base pairs encoding a 277-amino acid protein with a deduced mass of 29,531 Da. The CDH primary structure shares 10-30% sequence identity with members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. Structure homology modeling with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea suggests that CDH from R. erythropolis DCL14 is an alpha/beta one-domain protein with an extra loop insertion involved in NAD binding and a flexible C-terminal part involved in monoterpene binding. PMID:10473585

  16. Simple Preparation of Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 44534 as Biocatalyst to Oxidize Diols into the Optically Active Lactones.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Olejniczak, Teresa; Neumann, Konrad; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Boratyñski, Filip

    2016-09-01

    In the current study, we present a green toolbox to produce ecological compounds like lactone moiety. Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 44534 cells have been used to oxidize both decane-1,4-diol () and decane-1,5-diol () into the corresponding γ- () and δ-decalactones () with yield of 80% and enantiomeric excess (ee) = 75% and ee = 90%, respectively. Among oxidation of meso diols, (-)-(1S,5R)-cis-3-oxabicyclo[4.3.0]non-7-en-2-one (5a) with 56% yield and ee = 76% as well as (-)-(2R,3S)-cis-endo-3-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]dec-7-en-2-one (6a) with 100% yield and ee = 90% were formed. It is worth mentioning that R. erythropolis DSM 44534 grew in a mineral medium containing ethanol as the sole source of energy and carbon Chirality 28:623-627, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27496202

  17. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  18. In Planta Biocontrol of Pectobacterium atrosepticum by Rhodococcus erythropolis Involves Silencing of Pathogen Communication by the Rhodococcal Gamma-Lactone Catabolic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Corinne; Crépin, Alexandre; Bergeau, Dorian; Ouchiha, Asma; Mijouin, Lily; Taupin, Laure; Orange, Nicole; Feuilloley, Marc; Dufour, Alain; Burini, Jean-François; Latour, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of numerous Gram-negative bacteria is under the control of a quorum sensing process based on synthesis and perception of N-acyl homoserine lactones. Rhodococcus erythropolis, a Gram-positive bacterium, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent for plant protection against soft-rot bacteria, including Pectobacterium. Here, we show that the γ-lactone catabolic pathway of R. erythropolis disrupts Pectobacterium communication and prevents plant soft-rot. We report the first characterization and demonstration of N-acyl homoserine lactone quenching in planta. In particular, we describe the transcription of the R. erythropolis lactonase gene, encoding the key enzyme of this pathway, and the subsequent lactone breakdown. The role of this catabolic pathway in biocontrol activity was confirmed by deletion of the lactonase gene from R. erythropolis and also its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The γ-lactone catabolic pathway is induced by pathogen communication rather than by pathogen invasion. This is thus a novel and unusual biocontrol pathway, differing from those previously described as protecting plants from phytopathogens. These findings also suggest the existence of an additional pathway contributing to plant protection. PMID:23805254

  19. Selective cleavage of the two CS bonds in asymmetrically alkylated dibenzothiophenes by Rhodococcus erythropolis KA2-5-1.

    PubMed

    Onaka, T; Kobayashi, M; Ishii, Y; Konishi, J; Maruhashi, K

    2001-01-01

    The Rhodococcus erythropolis strain KA2-5-1 was characterized by its ability to cleave carbon-sulfur bonds in the dibenzothiophene (DBT) ring by asymmetrically alkyl substitution, such as C2-DBTs (e.g., dimethyl and ethyl DBTs) and C3-DBTs (e.g., trimethyl and propyl DBTs), which are known to remain in hydrodesulfurization-treated diesel fuels. After treatment by solid-phase extraction (SPE) of solvents from microbial reactions of alkylated DBTs (Cx-DBTs), we used gas chromatography (GC), GC-atomic emission detection, GC-mass spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify and quantitatively evaluate the Cx-DBT metabolites. Molar ratios of metabolic isomers of the desulfurization products suggested that resting-cell reactions of KA2-5-1 against these Cx-DBTs occurrs through specific carbon-sulfur-bond-targeted cleavages, yielding alkylated hydroxybiphenyls, and that the manner of the attack on the DBT skeleton is affected not only by the position but also by the number and length of the alkyl substituents. PMID:16233063

  20. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of a Novel Monoterpene ɛ-Lactone Hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    PubMed Central

    van der Vlugt-Bergmans, Cécile J. B; van der Werf, Mariët J.

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ɛ-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is active with (4R)-4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and (6R)-6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, lactones derived from (4R)-dihydrocarvone, and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone, the lactone derived from menthone. Both enantiomers of 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone were converted at equal rates, suggesting that the enzyme is not stereoselective. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9.5 and 30°C. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified MLH enabled cloning of the corresponding gene by a combination of PCR and colony screening. The gene, designated mlhB (monoterpene lactone hydrolysis), showed up to 43% similarity to members of the GDXG family of lipolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the adjacent regions revealed two other open reading frames, one encoding a protein with similarity to the short-chain dehydrogenase reductase family and the second encoding a protein with similarity to acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenases. Both enzymes are possibly also involved in the monoterpene degradation pathways of this microorganism. PMID:11157238

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1

    PubMed Central

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2012-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in the early steps of steroid degradation by introducing a double bond between the C1 and C2 atoms of the A-ring of its 3-ketosteroid substrates. The 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1, a 56 kDa flavoprotein, was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. The crystals grew in various buffers over a wide pH range (from pH 5.5 to 10.5), but the best crystallization condition consisted of 2%(v/v) PEG 400, 0.1 M HEPES pH 7.5, 2.0 M ammonium sulfate. A native crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.0 Å resolution. It belonged to the primitive orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 107.4, b = 131.6, c = 363.2 Å, and contained eight molecules in the asymmetric unit. The initial structure of the enzyme was solved using multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data collected from a Pt-derivatized crystal. PMID:22691786

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain 311R

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Elham; Jauregui, Ruy; Geffers, Robert; Jareck, Michael; Boon, Nico; Pieper, Dietmar H.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain 311R, which was isolated from a site contaminated with alkanes and aromatic compounds. Strain 311R shares 90% of the genome of Rhodococcus erythropolis SK121, which is the closest related bacteria. PMID:25999565

  3. [Synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Sofilkanich, A P; Pokora, K A; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinskaia, G A

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of surfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 on industrial waste (food and oil-processing industry, production of biodiesel) was investigated. The possibility of replacing the expensive substrates (n-hexadecane and ethanol) by industrial waste (oil and fat industry, fried sunflower oil, glycerol, liquid paraffin) for the surfactant biosynthesis was established. The conditional concentration of surfactants was maximal on oil containing substrates and exceeded those on n-hexadecane and ethanol 2-3 times. The highest rates of surfactants synthesis were observed on fried sunflower oil with the use of inoculum grown on carbohydrate substrates (glucose, molasses). It was established that the addition of glucose (0.1%) was accompanied by 2-4-fold intensification of surfactants synthesis by R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 on fried sunflower oil (2%). PMID:25000725

  4. Targeted Disruption of the kstD Gene Encoding a 3-Ketosteroid Δ1-Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme of Rhodococcus erythropolis Strain SQ1

    PubMed Central

    van der Geize, R.; Hessels, G. I.; van Gerwen, R.; Vrijbloed, J. W.; van der Meijden, P.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Microbial phytosterol degradation is accompanied by the formation of steroid pathway intermediates, which are potential precursors in the synthesis of bioactive steroids. Degradation of these steroid intermediates is initiated by Δ1-dehydrogenation of the steroid ring structure. Characterization of a 2.9-kb DNA fragment of Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 revealed an open reading frame (kstD) showing similarity with known 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase genes. Heterologous expression of kstD yielded 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase (KSTD) activity under the control of the lac promoter in Escherichia coli. Targeted disruption of the kstD gene in R. erythropolis SQ1 was achieved, resulting in loss of more than 99% of the KSTD activity. However, growth on the steroid substrate 4-androstene-3,17-dione or 9α-hydroxy-4-androstene-3,17-dione was not abolished by the kstD gene disruption. Bioconversion of phytosterols was also not blocked at the level of Δ1-dehydrogenation in the kstD mutant strain, since no accumulation of steroid pathway intermediates was observed. Thus, inactivation of kstD is not sufficient for inactivation of the Δ1-dehydrogenase activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cell extracts stained for KSTD activity showed that R. erythropolis SQ1 in fact harbors two activity bands, one of which is absent in the kstD mutant strain. PMID:10788377

  5. Molecular biological enhancement of coal desulfurization: Cloning and expression of the sulfoxide/sulfone/sulfonate/sulfate genes in Pseudomonads and Thiobacillae. [Rhodococcus erythropolis, Thiobacillus acidophilus, Thiobacillus novellus

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, S.

    1992-01-01

    Research continues on desulfurization of coal using microorganisms. Topics reported on this quarter include: desulfurization with N1-36 (presumptively identified as Rhodochrous erythropolis), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA's of Thiobacillus spp., and fresh isolates with the presumptive capacity to desulfurize dibenzothiophenes.

  6. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A

    PubMed Central

    Hijri, Mohamed; Sylvestre, Michel

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation, we determined the concentration of flavanone at

  7. Genetic analysis around aminoalcohol dehydrogenase gene of Rhodococcus erythropolis MAK154: a putative GntR transcription factor in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Urano, Nobuyuki; Kataoka, Michihiko; Ishige, Takeru; Kita, Shinji; Sakamoto, Keiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2011-02-01

    NADP(+)-dependent aminoalcohol dehydrogenase (AADH) of Rhodococcus erythropolis MAK154 catalyzes the reduction of (S)-1-phenyl-1-keto-2-methylaminopropane ((S)-MAK) to d-pseudoephedrine, which is used as a pharmaceutical. AADH is suggested to participate in aminoalcohol or aminoketone metabolism in this organism because it is induced by the addition of several aminoalcohols, such as 1-amino-2-propanol. Genetic analysis of around the aadh gene showed that some open reading frames (ORFs) are involved in this metabolic pathway. Four of these ORFs might form a carboxysome-like polyhedral organelle, and others are predicted to encode aminotransferase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, phosphotransferase, and regulator protein. OrfE, a homologous ORF of the FadR subfamily of GntR transcriptional regulators, lies downstream from aadh. To investigate whether or not orfE plays a role in the regulation of aadh expression, the gene disruption mutant of R. erythropolis MAK154 was constructed. The ΔorfE strain showed higher AADH activity than wild-type strain. In addition, a transformed strain, which harbored multi-orfE, showed no AADH activity even in the induced condition with 1-amino-2-propanol. These results suggest that OrfE is a negative regulator that represses aadh expression in the absence of 1-amino-2-propanol. PMID:20953603

  8. Studies on the isopropylbenzene 2,3-dioxygenase and the 3-isopropylcatechol 2,3-dioxygenase genes encoded by the linear plasmid of Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2.

    PubMed

    Kesseler, M; Dabbs, E R; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1996-11-01

    The enzymes responsible for the degradation of isopropylbenzene (IPB) and co-oxidation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2 are encoded by the linear plasmid pBD2. Fragments containing IPB catabolic genes were cloned from pBD2 and the nucleotide sequence was determined. By means of database searches and expression of the cloned genes in recombinant strains, we identified five clustered genes, ipbA1A2A3A4C, which encode the three components of the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase system, reductaseIPB (ipbA4), ferredoxinIPB (ipbA3) and the two subunits of the terminal dioxygenase (ipbA1A2), as well as the 3-isopropylcatechol (IPC) 2,3-dioxygenase (ipbC). The protein sequences deduced from the ipbA1A2A3A4C gene cluster exhibited significant homology with the corresponding proteins of analogous degradative pathways in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but the gene order differed from most of them. IPB 2,3-dioxygenase and 3-IPC 2,3-dioxygenase could both be expressed in Escherichia coli, but the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase activities were too low to be detected by polarographic and TCE degradative means. However, inhibitor studies with the R. erythropolis BD2 wild-type are in accordance with the involvement of the IPB 2,3-dioxygenase in TCE oxidation. PMID:8969521

  9. [Destruction of oil in the presence of Cu2+ and surfactants of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405].

    PubMed

    Pirog, T P; Konon, A D; Sofilkanich, A P; Shevchuk, T A; Iutinska, G O

    2015-01-01

    The effect of copper cations (0.01-1.0 mM) and surface-active agents (surfactants) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241, Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Alc-5017 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 in the form of culture liquid on the destruction of oil in water (3.0-6.0 g/L) and soil (20 g/kg), including in the presence of Cd2+ and Pb2+ (0.01-0.5 mM), was investigated. It was shown that the degree of oil degradation in water and soil after 20 days in the presence of low concentrations of Cu2+ (0.01-0.05 mM) and culture liquid of strains IMV B-7241, IMV Ac-5017, and IMV B-7405 was 15 - 25% higher than without copper cations. The activating effect of Cu2+ on the decomposition of complex oil and Cd2+ and Pb2+ pollution was established: after treatment with surfactant of A. calcoacelicus IMV B-7241 and R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017 destruction of oil in water and soil was 85-95%, and after removal of the copper cations decreased to 45-70%. Intensification of oil destruction in the presence of copper cations may be due to their stimulating effect on the activity of alkane hydroxylases as in surfactant-producing strains, and natural (autochthonous) oxidizing microbiota. PMID:26036026

  10. LplR, a Repressor Belonging to the TetR Family, Regulates Expression of the l-Pantoyl Lactone Dehydrogenase Gene in Rhodococcus erythropolis

    PubMed Central

    Si, Dayong; Urano, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2012-01-01

    The l-pantoyl lactone (l-PL) dehydrogenase (LPLDH) gene (lpldh) has been cloned from Rhodococcus erythropolis AKU2103, and addition of 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) was shown to be required for lpldh expression in this strain. In this study, based on an exploration of the nucleotide sequence around lpldh, a TetR-like regulator gene, which we designated lplR, was found upstream of lpldh, and three putative open reading frames existed between the two genes. Disruption of lplR led to 22.8 times higher lpldh expression, even without 1,2-PD induction, than that in wild-type R. erythropolis AKU2103 without 1,2-PD addition. Introduction of a multicopy vector carrying lplR (multi-lplR) into the wild-type and ΔlplR strains led to no detectable LPLDH activity even in the presence of 1,2-PD. The results of an electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that purified LplR bound to a 6-bp inverted-repeat sequence located in the promoter/operator region of the operon containing lpldh. These results indicated that LplR is a negative regulator in lpldh expression. Based on the clarification of the expression mechanism of lpldh, recombinant cells showing high LPLDH activity were constructed and used as a catalyst for the conversion of l-PL to ketopantoyl lactone. Finally, a promising production process of d-PL from dl-PL was constructed. PMID:22941082

  11. Biodegradation of phenol in synthetic and industrial wastewater by Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1 immobilized in an air-stirred reactor with clarifier.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M B; Hidalgo, A; Rodríguez-Fernández, C; Serra, J L; Llama, M J

    2002-05-01

    Phenol biodegradation by suspended and immobilized cells of Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1 was studied in discontinuous and continuous mode under optimum culture conditions. Phenol-acclimated cells were adsorbed on diatomaceous earth, where they grew actively forming a biofilm of short filaments. Immobilization protected cells against phenol and resulted in a remarkable enhancement of their respiratory activity and a shorter lag phase preceding active phenol degradation. Under optimum operation conditions in a laboratory-scale air-stirred reactor, the immobilized cells were able to completely degrade phenol in synthetic wastewater at a volumetric productivity of 11.5 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1). Phenol biodegradation was also tested in two different industrial wastewaters (WW1 and WW2) obtained from local resin manufacturing companies, which contained both phenols and formaldehyde. In this case, after wastewater conditioning (i.e., dilution, pH, nitrogen and phosphorous sources and micronutrient amendments) the immobilized cells were able to completely remove the formaldehyde present in both waters. Moreover, they biodegraded phenols completely at a rate of 0.5 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1) in the case of WW1 and partially (but at concentrations lower than 50 mg l(-1)) at 0.1 and 1.0 kg phenol m(-3) day(-1) in the cases of WW2 and WW1, respectively. PMID:12021809

  12. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, M J

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMKMO) is a monomeric enzyme of molecular mass 60 kDa. It contains 1 mol of FAD/monomer as the prosthetic group. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with many other NADPH-dependent and FAD-containing (Type 1) BVMOs. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9 and 35 degrees C. MMKMO has a broad substrate specificity, catalysing the lactonization of a large number of monocyclic monoterpene ketones and substituted cyclohexanones. The natural substrates 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone were converted stoichiometrically into 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate (the spontaneous rearrangement product of the lactone formed by MMKMO), 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone respectively. The MMKMO-catalysed conversion of iso-dihydrocarvone showed an opposite regioselectivity to that of dihydrocarvone; in this case, 6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone was formed as the product. MMKMO converted all enantiomers of the natural substrates with almost equal efficiency. MMKMO is involved in the conversion of the monocyclic monoterpene ketone intermediates formed in the degradation pathways of all stereoisomers of three different monocyclic monoterpenes, i.e. limonene, (dihydro)carveol and menthol. PMID:10769172

  13. Crystal structure and site-directed mutagenesis of 3-ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 explain its catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2013-12-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ(1)-dehydrogenases are FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the 1,2-desaturation of 3-ketosteroid substrates to initiate degradation of the steroid nucleus. Here we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of the 56-kDa enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 (Δ(1)-KSTD1). The enzyme contains two domains: an FAD-binding domain and a catalytic domain, between which the active site is situated as evidenced by the 2.3 Å resolution structure of Δ(1)-KSTD1 in complex with the reaction product 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione. The active site contains four key residues: Tyr(119), Tyr(318), Tyr(487), and Gly(491). Modeling of the substrate 4-androstene-3,17-dione at the position of the product revealed its interactions with these residues and the FAD. The C1 and C2 atoms of the substrate are at reaction distance to the N5 atom of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and the hydroxyl group of Tyr(318), respectively, whereas the C3 carbonyl group is at hydrogen bonding distance from the hydroxyl group of Tyr(487) and the backbone amide of Gly(491). Site-directed mutagenesis of the tyrosines to phenylalanines confirmed their importance for catalysis. The structural features and the kinetic properties of the mutants suggest a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr(487) and Gly(491) work in tandem to promote keto-enol tautomerization and increase the acidity of the C2 hydrogen atoms of the substrate. With assistance of Tyr(119), the general base Tyr(318) abstracts the axial β-hydrogen from C2 as a proton, whereas the FAD accepts the axial α-hydrogen from the C1 atom of the substrate as a hydride ion. PMID:24165124

  14. Crystal Structure and Site-directed Mutagenesis of 3-Ketosteroid Δ1-Dehydrogenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 Explain Its Catalytic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Rohman, Ali; van Oosterwijk, Niels; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2013-01-01

    3-Ketosteroid Δ1-dehydrogenases are FAD-dependent enzymes that catalyze the 1,2-desaturation of 3-ketosteroid substrates to initiate degradation of the steroid nucleus. Here we report the 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of the 56-kDa enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis SQ1 (Δ1-KSTD1). The enzyme contains two domains: an FAD-binding domain and a catalytic domain, between which the active site is situated as evidenced by the 2.3 Å resolution structure of Δ1-KSTD1 in complex with the reaction product 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione. The active site contains four key residues: Tyr119, Tyr318, Tyr487, and Gly491. Modeling of the substrate 4-androstene-3,17-dione at the position of the product revealed its interactions with these residues and the FAD. The C1 and C2 atoms of the substrate are at reaction distance to the N5 atom of the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and the hydroxyl group of Tyr318, respectively, whereas the C3 carbonyl group is at hydrogen bonding distance from the hydroxyl group of Tyr487 and the backbone amide of Gly491. Site-directed mutagenesis of the tyrosines to phenylalanines confirmed their importance for catalysis. The structural features and the kinetic properties of the mutants suggest a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr487 and Gly491 work in tandem to promote keto-enol tautomerization and increase the acidity of the C2 hydrogen atoms of the substrate. With assistance of Tyr119, the general base Tyr318 abstracts the axial β-hydrogen from C2 as a proton, whereas the FAD accepts the axial α-hydrogen from the C1 atom of the substrate as a hydride ion. PMID:24165124

  15. Spheroplast formation and plasmid isolation from Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Assaf, N A; Dick, W A

    1993-12-01

    The genus Rhodococcus comprises aerobic gram-positive actinomycetes that show considerable morphological and metabolic diversity and are known to be involved in the development of plant diseases and degradation of environmental pollutants. We describe a method for cell lysis and large plasmid DNA isolation from Rhodococcus by creating lysozyme susceptible cells by predigestion with the enzyme mutanolysin. Mutanolysin action resulted in the liberation of reducing sugars and free amino acids from the peptidoglycan layers of the cell wall. A 1-h predigestion with mutanolysin followed by a 0.5-h incubation with lysozyme resulted in spheroplast formation. Complete lysis of cells and efficient isolation of intact large plasmid DNA (108 kb) from wild-type Rhodococcus strains was confirmed. PMID:8292332

  16. Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov., isolated from subarctic rainwater.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C Y; Lee, I; Cho, Y; Lee, Y M; Baek, K; Jung, Y-J; Yang, Y Y; Lee, T; Rhee, T S; Lee, H K

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile strain, designated PAMC 27367(T), was isolated from rainwater collected on the Bering Sea. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the strain showed an affiliation with the genus Rhodococcus. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain PAMC 27367(T) formed a robust clade with the type strains of Rhodococcus rhodnii, Rhodococcus aetherivorans and Rhodococcus ruber with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.3 %, 95.8 % and 95.5 %, respectively. Cells of the strain grew optimally at 25 °C and at pH 6.5-7.0 in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) sea salts. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and three unknown phospholipids. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C16 : 0, C17 : 1ω8c and 10-methyl C17 : 0. Cell wall analysis showed that strain PAMC 27367(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 77.1 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data presented here, we propose a novel species with the name Rhodococcus aerolatus sp. nov., with PAMC 27367(T) ( = KCTC 29240(T) = JCM 19485(T)) as the type strain. PMID:25385992

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rhodococcus Species Isolated from the Winter Skate Leucoraja ocellata

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Julia; Ho, Ryan; Fernando, Dinesh; Kumar, Ayush; Loewen, Peter C.; Anderson, W. Gary

    2016-01-01

    We report here a genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. isolate UM008 isolated from the renal/interrenal tissue of the winter skate Leucoraja ocellata. Genome sequence analysis suggests that Rhodococcus bacteria may act in a novel mutualistic relationship with their elasmobranch host, serving as biocatalysts in the steroidogenic pathway of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone. PMID:27587827

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rhodococcus Species Isolated from the Winter Skate Leucoraja ocellata.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Julia; Ho, Ryan; Fernando, Dinesh; Kumar, Ayush; Loewen, Peter C; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Anderson, W Gary

    2016-01-01

    We report here a genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. isolate UM008 isolated from the renal/interrenal tissue of the winter skate Leucoraja ocellata Genome sequence analysis suggests that Rhodococcus bacteria may act in a novel mutualistic relationship with their elasmobranch host, serving as biocatalysts in the steroidogenic pathway of 1α-hydroxycorticosterone. PMID:27587827

  19. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences for Rhodococcus fascians D188 and Draft Sequences for Rhodococcus Isolates PBTS 1 and PBTS 2

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, Rio A.; Vereecke, Danny; Zhang, Yucheng; Schilkey, Faye; Devitt, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen that alters plant development, inflicts significant losses in plant production around the world. We report here the complete genome sequence of R. fascians D188, a well-characterized model isolate, and Rhodococcus species PBTS (pistachio bushy top syndrome) 1 and 2, which were shown to be responsible for a disease outbreak in pistachios. PMID:27284129

  20. Complete Genome and Plasmid Sequences for Rhodococcus fascians D188 and Draft Sequences for Rhodococcus Isolates PBTS 1 and PBTS 2.

    PubMed

    Stamler, Rio A; Vereecke, Danny; Zhang, Yucheng; Schilkey, Faye; Devitt, Nico; Randall, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus fascians, a phytopathogen that alters plant development, inflicts significant losses in plant production around the world. We report here the complete genome sequence of R. fascians D188, a well-characterized model isolate, and Rhodococcus species PBTS (pistachio bushy top syndrome) 1 and 2, which were shown to be responsible for a disease outbreak in pistachios. PMID:27284129

  1. Enhanced translocation and growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 in the alkane phase of aqueous-alkane two phase cultures were mediated by GroEL2 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Hayato; Ogihara, Jun; Yoshida, Takao; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakajima, Mutsuyasu; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sunairi, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that R. erythropolis PR4 translocated from the aqueous to the alkane phase, and then grew in two phase cultures to which long-chain alkanes had been added. This was considered to be beneficial for bioremediation. In the present study, we investigated the proteins involved in the translocation of R. erythropolis PR4. The results of our proteogenomic analysis suggested that GroEL2 was upregulated more in cells that translocated inside of the pristane (C19) phase than in those located at the aqueous-alkane interface attached to the n-dodecane (C12) surface. PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) and PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) strains were constructed to confirm the effects of the upregulation of GroEL2 in translocated cells. The expression of GroEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) was 15.5-fold higher than that in PR4 (pK4-ΔEL2-1) in two phase cultures containing C12. The growth and cell surface lipophilicity of PR4 were enhanced by the introduction of pK4-EL2-1. These results suggested that the plasmid overexpression of groEL2 in PR4 (pK4-EL2-1) led to changes in cell localization, enhanced growth, and increased cell surface lipophilicity. Thus, we concluded that the overexpression of GroEL2 may play an important role in increasing the organic solvent tolerance of R. erythropolis PR4 in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. PMID:25311591

  2. Draft Genome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, Isolated from the Coast of Trindade Island, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Edmo M; Pylro, Victor S; Dobbler, Priscila T; Victoria, Filipe; Roesch, Luiz F W; Tótola, Marcos R

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, isolated from Trindade Island, Brazil, which will provide genetic data to benefit the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:26941155

  3. Draft Genome of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, Isolated from the Coast of Trindade Island, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Edmo M.; Pylro, Victor S.; Dobbler, Priscila T.; Victoria, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a draft genome and annotation of Rhodococcus rhodochrous TRN7, isolated from Trindade Island, Brazil, which will provide genetic data to benefit the understanding of its metabolism. PMID:26941155

  4. Rhodococcus baikonurensis BTM4c, a boron-tolerant actinobacterial strain isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Miwa, Hiroki; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Yokota, Akira; Fujiwara, Toru

    2010-01-01

    By screening a bacterial population from the soil in Tokyo, Japan, we isolated a boron-tolerant bacterium, strain BTM4c. Strain BTM4c grew under the boron excess conditions with 100 mM boric acid, which is generally toxic to bacteria. Molecular phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic, and physiological data showed that the strain belongs to the genus Rhodococcus, and is to be identified as Rhodococcus baikonurensis. PMID:20057133

  5. Degradation of estrogens by Rhodococcus zopfii and Rhodococcus equi isolates from activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Nagai, Fumiko; Fujimoto, Junji; Watanabe, Koichi; Mizukoshi, Harumi; Makino, Takashi; Kimura, Kazumasa; Saino, Hideyuki; Sawada, Haruji; Omura, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    We have isolated four strains of Rhodococcus which specifically degrade estrogens by using enrichment culture of activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants. Strain Y 50158, identified as Rhodococcus zopfii, completely and rapidly degraded 100 mg of 17beta-estradiol, estrone, estriol, and ethinyl estradiol/liter, as demonstrated by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Strains Y 50155, Y 50156, and Y 50157, identified as Rhodococcus equi, showed degradation activities comparable with that of Y 50158. Using the random amplified polymorphism DNA fingerprinting test, these three strains were confirmed to have been derived from different sources. R. zopfii Y 50158, which showed the highest activity among these four strains, revealed that the strain selectively degraded 17beta-estradiol during jar fermentation, even when glucose was used as a readily utilizable carbon source in the culture medium. Measurement of estrogenic activities with human breast cancer-derived MVLN cells showed that these four strains each degraded 100 mg of 17beta-estradiol/liter to 1/100 of the specific activity level after 24 h. It is thus suggested that these strains degrade 17beta-estradiol into substances without estrogenic activity. PMID:15345411

  6. Mg2+-Dependent Control of the Spatial Arrangement of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 Cells in Aqueous-Alkane Two Phase Culture Containing n-Dodecane

    PubMed Central

    Takihara, Hayato; Akase, Yumiko; Sunairi, Michio; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that a close relationship exists between alkane carbon-chain length, cell growth, and translocation frequency in Rhodococcus. In the present study, we examined the regulation of the spatial arrangement of cells in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. An analysis of the effects of minerals on cell localization revealed that changes in the concentration of MgSO4 in two phase cultures containing n-dodecane (C12) altered cell localization from translocation to adhesion and vice versa. Our results indicate that the spatial arrangement of cells in two phase culture systems is controlled through the regulation of MgSO4 concentrations. PMID:27180641

  7. Mg(2+)-Dependent Control of the Spatial Arrangement of Rhodococcus erythropolis PR4 Cells in Aqueous-Alkane Two Phase Culture Containing n-Dodecane.

    PubMed

    Takihara, Hayato; Akase, Yumiko; Sunairi, Michio; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki

    2016-06-25

    We recently reported that a close relationship exists between alkane carbon-chain length, cell growth, and translocation frequency in Rhodococcus. In the present study, we examined the regulation of the spatial arrangement of cells in aqueous-alkane two phase cultures. An analysis of the effects of minerals on cell localization revealed that changes in the concentration of MgSO4 in two phase cultures containing n-dodecane (C12) altered cell localization from translocation to adhesion and vice versa. Our results indicate that the spatial arrangement of cells in two phase culture systems is controlled through the regulation of MgSO4 concentrations. PMID:27180641

  8. Comparison of three techniques for isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from contaminated sources.

    PubMed

    Barton, M D; Hughes, K L

    1981-01-01

    Inoculation of a liquid medium comprised of Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems), cycloheximide, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and potassium tellurite and subcultured onto M3 medium plus potassium tellurite was highly successful for the isolation of Rhodococcus (Corynebacterium) equi from soil. PMID:7007424

  9. Isolation and characterization of RDX-degrading Rhodococcus species from a contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Adar, Eilon; Nejidat, Ali; Ronen, Zeev

    2011-09-01

    Groundwater contamination by the explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a global problem. Israel's coastal aquifer was contaminated with RDX. This aquifer is mostly aerobic and we therefore sought aerobic bacteria that might be involved in natural attenuation of the compound in the aquifer. RDX-degrading bacteria were captured by passively sampling the indigenous bacteria onto sterile sediments placed within sampling boreholes. Aerobic RDX biodegradation potential was detected in the sediments sampled from different locations along the plume. RDX degradation with the native sampled consortium was accompanied by 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal formation. Two bacterial strains of the genus Rhodococcus were isolated from the sediments and identified as aerobic RDX degraders. The xplA gene encoding the cytochrome P450 enzyme was partially (~500 bp) sequenced from both isolates. The obtained DNA sequences had 99% identity with corresponding gene fragments of previously isolated RDX-degrading Rhodococcus strains. RDX degradation by both strains was prevented by 200 μM of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor metyrapone, suggesting that cytochrome P450 indeed mediates the initial step in RDX degradation. RDX biodegradation activity by the T7 isolate was inhibited in the presence of nitrate or ammonium concentrations above 1.6 and 5.5 mM, respectively (100 mg l(-1)) while the T9N isolate's activity was retarded only by ammonium concentrations above 5.5 mM. This study shows that bacteria from the genus Rhodococcus, potentially degrade RDX in the saturated zone as well, following the same aerobic degradation pathway defined for other Rhodococcus species. RDX-degrading activity by the Rhodococcus species isolate T9N may have important implications for the bioremediation of nitrate-rich RDX-contaminated aquifers. PMID:21327803

  10. Cyanobactericidal effect of Rhodococcus sp. isolated from eutrophic lake on Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ki; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Kim, Hee-Sik; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2010-11-01

    A bacterium, which was observed in all cultivations of Microcystis sp., was isolated and designated as Rhodococcus sp. KWR2. The growth of bloom-forming cyanobacteria, including four strains of Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena variabilis, was suppressed by up to 75-88% by 2% (v/v) culture broth of KWR2 after 5 days. But KWR2 did not inhibit eukaryotic algae, Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus sp. An extracellular algicidal substance produced by KWR2 showed a cyanobactericidal activity of 94% and was water-soluble with a molecular weight of lower than 8 kDa. PMID:20640876

  11. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  12. Draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 17895

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Otten, Linda G.; Resch, Verena; Muyzer, Gerard; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 17895 possesses an array of mono- and dioxygenases, as well as hydratases, which makes it an interesting organism for biocatalysis. R. rhodochrous is a Gram-positive aerobic bacterium with a rod-like morphology. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 6,869,887 bp long genome contains 6,609 protein-coding genes and 53 RNA genes. Based on small subunit rRNA analysis, the strain is more likely to be a strain of Rhodococcus erythropolis rather than Rhodococcus rhodochrous. PMID:24501654

  13. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism. PMID:26882131

  14. Analysis and optimization of triacylglycerol synthesis in novel oleaginous Rhodococcus and Streptomyces strains isolated from desert soil.

    PubMed

    Röttig, Annika; Hauschild, Philippa; Madkour, Mohamed H; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Almakishah, Naief H; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2016-05-10

    As oleaginous microorganisms represent an upcoming novel feedstock for the biotechnological production of lipids or lipid-derived biofuels, we searched for novel, lipid-producing strains in desert soil. This was encouraged by the hypothesis that neutral lipids represent an ideal storage compound, especially under arid conditions, as several animals are known to outlast long periods in absence of drinking water by metabolizing their body fat. Ten lipid-accumulating bacterial strains, affiliated to the genera Bacillus, Cupriavidus, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces, were isolated from arid desert soil due to their ability to synthesize poly(β-hydroxybutyrate), triacylglycerols or wax esters. Particularly two Streptomyces sp. strains and one Rhodococcus sp. strain accumulate significant amounts of TAG under storage conditions under optimized cultivation conditions. Rhodococcus sp. A27 and Streptomyces sp. G49 synthesized approx. 30% (w/w) fatty acids from fructose or cellobiose, respectively, while Streptomyces isolate G25 reached a cellular fatty acid content of nearly 50% (w/w) when cultivated with cellobiose. The stored triacylglycerols were composed of 30-40% branched fatty acids, such as anteiso-pentadecanoic or iso-hexadecanoic acid. To date, this represents by far the highest lipid content described for streptomycetes. A biotechnological production of such lipids using (hemi)cellulose-derived raw material could be used to obtain sustainable biodiesel with a high proportion of branched-chain fatty acids to improve its cold-flow properties and oxidative stability. PMID:27034020

  15. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15-17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85-90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  16. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15–17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85–90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  17. Gene Cloning and Nucleotide Sequencing and Properties of a Cocaine Esterase from Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB1

    PubMed Central

    Bresler, Matthew M.; Rosser, Susan J.; Basran, Amrik; Bruce, Neil C.

    2000-01-01

    A strain of Rhodococcus designated MB1, which was capable of utilizing cocaine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen for growth, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of the tropane alkaloid-producing plant Erythroxylum coca. A cocaine esterase was found to initiate degradation of cocaine, which was hydrolyzed to ecgonine methyl ester and benzoate; both of these esterolytic products were further metabolized by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1. The structural gene encoding a cocaine esterase, designated cocE, was cloned from Rhodococcus sp. strain MB1 genomic libraries by screening recombinant strains of Rhodococcus erythropolis CW25 for growth on cocaine. The nucleotide sequence of cocE corresponded to an open reading frame of 1,724 bp that codes for a protein of 574 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of cocaine esterase has a region of similarity with the active serine consensus of X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidases, suggesting that the cocaine esterase is a serine esterase. The cocE coding sequence was subcloned into the pCFX1 expression plasmid and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant cocaine esterase was purified to apparent homogeneity and was found to be monomeric, with an Mr of approximately 65,000. The apparent Km of the enzyme (mean ± standard deviation) for cocaine was measured as 1.33 ± 0.085 mM. These findings are of potential use in the development of a linked assay for the detection of illicit cocaine. PMID:10698749

  18. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth. PMID:26637477

  19. Identification of Atypical Rhodococcus-Like Clinical Isolates as Dietzia spp. by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pilares, Lilian; Agüero, Jesús; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navas, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi and Dietzia spp. are closely related actinomycetes that show similar phenotypic properties. In humans, R. equi is an opportunistic pathogen associated with severe immunodeficiency. Dietzia spp. are environmental bacteria that have been isolated recently from clinical material and are presumptively associated with human infections. During the last 5 years, 15 bacterial isolates from human clinical samples collected at the Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain, were identified as R. equi by the API Coryne test. 16S rRNA gene sequencing confirmed seven isolates to be true R. equi strains, whereas the other eight were identified as members of the genus Dietzia, including Dietzia maris (four isolates), Dietzia natronolimnaea (two isolates), and Dietzia timorensis and Dietzia sp. (one isolate each). The eight Dietzia isolates were highly sensitive to 12 antimicrobial compounds. PMID:20220156

  20. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  1. Characterization of the Genome of the Polyvalent Lytic Bacteriophage GTE2, Which Has Potential for Biocontrol of Gordonia-, Rhodococcus-, and Nocardia-Stabilized Foams in Activated Sludge Plants ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Petrovski, Steve; Seviour, Robert J.; Tillett, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic Actinobacteria are commonly associated with the stabilization of foams in activated sludge systems. One possible attractive approach to control these foam-stabilizing organisms is the use of specific bacteriophages. We describe the genome characterization of a novel polyvalent DNA phage, GTE2, isolated from activated sludge. This phage is lytic for Gordonia terrae, Rhodococcus globerulus, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, and Nocardia brasiliensis. Phage GTE2 belongs to the family Siphoviridae, possessing a characteristic icosahedral head encapsulating a double-stranded DNA linear genome (45,530 bp) having 10-bp 3′-protruding cohesive ends. The genome sequence is 98% unique at the DNA level and contains 57 putative genes. The genome can be divided into two components, where the first is modular and encodes phage structural proteins and lysis genes. The second is not modular, and the genes harbored there are involved in DNA replication, repair, and metabolism. Some have no known function. GTE2 shows promising results in controlling stable foam production by its host bacteria under laboratory conditions, suggesting that it may prove useful in the field as a biocontrol agent. PMID:21498753

  2. Classification of strain CCM 4446T as Rhodococcus degradans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Vojtková, Hana; Pantůček, Roman; Cnockaert, Margo; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Králová, Stanislava; Vandamme, Peter; Sedláček, Ivo

    2015-12-01

    Strain CCM 4446T, with notable biodegradation capabilities, was investigated in this study in order to elucidate its taxonomic position. Chemotaxonomic analyses of quinones, polar lipids, mycolic acids, polyamines and the diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan corresponded with characteristics of the genus Rhodococcus. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, assigned strain CCM 4446T to the genus Rhodococcus and placed it in the Rhodococcus erythropolis 16S rRNA gene clade. Further analysis of catA and gyrB gene sequences, automated ribotyping with EcoRI restriction endonuclease, whole-cell protein profiling, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biotyping enabled differentiation of strain CCM 4446T from all phylogenetically closely related species, i.e., Rhodococcus baikonurensis, Rhodococcus qingshengii, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Rhodococcus globerulus. The results obtained show that the strain investigated represents a novel species within the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus degradans sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is CCM 4446T ( = LMG 28633T). PMID:26385412

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain KG-21, a Soil Isolate from Oil Fields of Krishna-Godavari Basin, India

    PubMed Central

    Dawar, Chhavi

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present the 6.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain KG-21, a soil isolate from the oil fields of Krishna-Godavari Basin in Andhra Pradesh, India. This genomic resource may help in the identification of the gene(s) involved in hydrocarbon degradation and their possible deployment for bioremediation. PMID:26472842

  4. Isolation and characterization of styrene metabolism genes from styrene-assimilating soil bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-01-01

    Styrene metabolism genes were isolated from styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10. Strain ST-5 had a gene cluster containing four open reading frames which encoded styrene degradation enzymes. The genes showed high similarity to styABCD of Pseudomonas sp. Y2. On the other hand, strain ST-10 had only two genes which encoded styrene monooxygenase and flavin oxidoreductase (styAB). Escherichia coli transformants possessing the sty genes of strains ST-5 and ST-10 produced (S)-styrene oxide from styrene, indicating that these genes function as styrene degradation enzymes. Metabolite analysis by resting-cell reaction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that strain ST-5 converts styrene to phenylacetaldehyde via styrene oxide by styrene oxide isomerase (styC) reaction. On the other hand, strain ST-10 lacked this enzyme, and thus accumulated styrene oxide as an intermediate. HPLC analysis showed that styrene oxide was spontaneously isomerized to phenylacetaldehyde by chemical reaction. The produced phenylacetaldehyde was converted to phenylacetic acid (PAA) in strain ST-10 as well as in strain ST-5. Furthermore, phenylacetic acid was converted to phenylacetyl-CoA by the catalysis of phenylacetate-CoA ligase in strains ST-5 and ST-10. This study proposes possible styrene metabolism pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strains ST-5 and ST-10. PMID:21996027

  5. An Invertron-Like Linear Plasmid Mediates Intracellular Survival and Virulence in Bovine Isolates of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Valero-Rello, Ana; Hapeshi, Alexia; Anastasi, Elisa; Alvarez, Sonsiray; Scortti, Mariela; Meijer, Wim G.; MacArthur, Iain

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel host-associated virulence plasmid in Rhodococcus equi, pVAPN, carried by bovine isolates of this facultative intracellular pathogenic actinomycete. Surprisingly, pVAPN is a 120-kb invertron-like linear replicon unrelated to the circular virulence plasmids associated with equine (pVAPA) and porcine (pVAPB variant) R. equi isolates. pVAPN is similar to the linear plasmid pNSL1 from Rhodococcus sp. NS1 and harbors six new vap multigene family members (vapN to vapS) in a vap pathogenicity locus presumably acquired via en bloc mobilization from a direct predecessor of equine pVAPA. Loss of pVAPN rendered R. equi avirulent in macrophages and mice. Mating experiments using an in vivo transconjugant selection strategy demonstrated that pVAPN transfer is sufficient to confer virulence to a plasmid-cured R. equi recipient. Phylogenetic analyses assigned the vap multigene family complement from pVAPN, pVAPA, and pVAPB to seven monophyletic clades, each containing plasmid type-specific allelic variants of a precursor vap gene carried by the nearest vap island ancestor. Deletion of vapN, the predicted “bovine-type” allelic counterpart of vapA, essential for virulence in pVAPA, abrogated pVAPN-mediated intramacrophage proliferation and virulence in mice. Our findings support a model in which R. equi virulence is conferred by host-adapted plasmids. Their central role is mediating intracellular proliferation in macrophages, promoted by a key vap determinant present in the common ancestor of the plasmid-specific vap islands, with host tropism as a secondary trait selected during coevolution with specific animal species. PMID:25895973

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Endophytic Strain Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10, a Potential Biodegrading and Antibacterial Bacterium Isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jo, Sung Hee; Jeong, Haeyoung; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus kyotonensis KB10 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana The organism showed mild antibacterial activity against the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. This study reports the genome sequence of R. kyotonensis KB10. This bacterium contains an ectoine biosynthesis gene cluster and has the potential to degrade nitroaromatic compounds. The identified bacterium may be a suitable biocontrol agent and degrader of environmental pollutants. PMID:27389269

  8. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1990-08-28

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors. 2 figs.

  9. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, William R.; Singer, Mary E.

    1990-01-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors.

  10. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi Isolates of horse breeding farms from an endemic region in South of Brazil by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Krewer, Cristina da Costa; Spricigo, Dênis Augusto; de Avila Botton, Sônia; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Schrank, Irene; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2008-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive coco-bacillus and an intracellular opportunistic pathogen which causes pneumonia in foals. It is widely detected in environment and has been isolated from several sources, as soil, feces and gut from health and sick foals. The goal of this study was to characterize the epidemiological status (endemic, sporadic or no infection) of horse breeding farms from Bage County in South of Brazil, using a multiplex PCR. One hundred and eighteen R. equi isolates were identified by biochemical tests and submitted to a specie-specific and vapA multiplex PCR. These isolates were obtained from: three farms where the R. equi infection has been noticed, two farms where the disease has been not reported and one farm where the disease is frequent. All clinical isolates from horse breeding farms where the disease is endemic and/or sporadic were vapA-positive. None environmental isolates were vapA-positive. In three horse breeding farms with sporadic R. equi infection, 11.54% of the isolates from adult horse feces were vapA-positive. The multiplex PCR technique has proven to be effective for the molecular and epidemiological characterization of the R. equi isolates in horse breeding farms. An important finding in this study was the isolation of vapApositive R. equi from adult horse feces, which is an evidence for other routes of dissemination of this pathogen in the farms. PMID:24031201

  11. Isolation of hydrocarbon-degrading and biosurfactant-producing bacteria and assessment their plant growth-promoting traits.

    PubMed

    Pacwa-Płociniczak, Magdalena; Płociniczak, Tomasz; Iwan, Joanna; Żarska, Monika; Chorążewski, Mirosław; Dzida, Marzena; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2016-03-01

    Forty-two hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains were isolated from the soil heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. Forty-one strains were identified based on their whole-cell fatty acid profiles using the MIDI-MIS method. Thirty-three of them belong to species Rhodococcus erythropolis, while the others to the genera Rahnella (4), Serratia (3) and Proteus (1). Isolates were screened for their ability to produce biosurfactants/bioemulsifiers. For all of them the activity of several mechanisms characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria was also determined. In order to investigate surface active and emulsifying abilities of isolates following methods: oil-spreading, blood agar, methylene blue agar and determination of emulsification index, were used. Among studied bacteria 12 strains (CD 112, CD 126, CD 131, CD 132, CD 135, CD 147, CD 154, CD 155, CD 158, CD 161, CD 166 and CD 167) have been chosen as promising candidates for the production of biosurfactants and/or bioemulsifiers. Among them 2 strains (R. erythropolis CD 126 and Rahnella aquatilis CD 132) had the highest potential to be used in the bioaugmentation of PH-contaminated soil. Moreover, 15 of tested strains (CD 105, CD 106, CD 108, CD 111, CD 116, CD 120, CD 124, CD 125, CD 130, CD 132, CD 134, CD 154, CD 156, CD 161 and CD 170) showed the activity of four mechanisms (ACC deaminase activity, IAA and siderophore production, phosphate solubilization) considered to be characteristic for plant growth-promoting bacteria. Two of them (R. erythropolis CD 106 and R. erythropolis CD 111) showed the highest activity of above-mentioned mechanisms and thus are considered as promising agents in microbe assisted phytoremediation. PMID:26708648

  12. Uptake of radioiodide by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., Burkholderia sp. and Rhodococcus sp. isolated from a boreal nutrient-poor bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, Merja; Lehto, Jukka; Aromaa, Hanna; Knuutinen, Jenna; Bomberg, Malin

    2016-06-01

    Radionuclides, like radioiodine ((129)I), may escape deep geological nuclear waste repositories and migrate to the surface ecosystems. In surface ecosystems, microorganisms can affect their movement. Iodide uptake of six bacterial strains belonging to the genera Paenibacillus, Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus isolated from an acidic boreal nutrient-poor bog was tested. The tests were run in four different growth media at three temperatures. All bacterial strains removed iodide from the solution with the highest efficiency shown by one of the Paenibacillus strains with >99% of iodide removed from the solution in one of the used growth media. Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and one of the two Paenibacillus strains showed highest iodide uptake in 1% yeast extract with maximum values for the distribution coefficient (Kd) ranging from 90 to 270L/kg DW. The Burkholderia strain showed highest uptake in 1% Tryptone (maximum Kd 170L/kg DW). The Paenibacillus strain V0-1-LW showed exceptionally high uptake in 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth (maximum Kd>1,000,000L/kg DW). Addition of 0.1% glucose to the 0.5% peptone +0.25% yeast extract broth reduced iodide uptake at 4°C and 20°C and enhanced iodide uptake at 37°C compared to the uptake without glucose. This indicates that the uptake of glucose and iodide may be competing processes in these bacteria. We estimated that in in situ conditions of the bog, the bacterial uptake of iodide accounts for approximately 0.1%-0.3% of the total sorption of iodide in the surface, subsurface peat, gyttja and clay layers. PMID:27266299

  13. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  14. Isolation of endosulfan sulfate-degrading Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1 from endosulfan contaminated soil and identification of a novel metabolite, endosulfan diol monosulfate.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koji; Kawashima, Fujimasa; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Ryota; Kotake, Masaaki; Kiyota, Hiromasa; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Futa; Okada, Sanae

    2016-05-13

    An aerobic endosulfan sulfate-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus koreensis strain S1-1, was isolated from soil to which endosulfan had been applied annually for more than 10 years until 2008. The strain isolated in this work reduced the concentration of endosulfan sulfate (2) from 12.25 μM to 2.11 μM during 14 d at 30 °C. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-ESI-MS), a new highly water-soluble metabolite possessing six chlorine atoms was found to be endosulfan diol monosulfate (6), derived from 2 by hydrolysis of the cyclic sulfate ester ring. The structure of 6 was elucidated by chemical synthesis of the candidate derivatives and by HR-MS and UPLC-MS analyses. Therefore, it was suggested that the strain S1-1 has a new metabolic pathway of 2. In addition, 6 was expected to be less toxic among the metabolites of 1 because of its higher water-solubility. PMID:27073164

  15. Differences in Rhodococcus equi Infections Based on Immune Status and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Clinical Isolates in a Case Series of 12 Patients and Cases in the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Ribes, Julie A.; Thornton, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual zoonotic pathogen that can cause life-threatening diseases in susceptible hosts. Twelve patients with R. equi infection in Kentucky were compared to 137 cases reported in the literature. Although lungs were the primary sites of infection in immunocompromised patients, extrapulmonary involvement only was more common in immunocompetent patients (P < 0.0001). Mortality in R. equi-infected HIV patients was lower in the HAART era (8%) than in pre-HAART era (56%) (P < 0.0001), suggesting that HAART improves prognosis in these patients. Most (85–100%) of clinical isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, clarithromycin, rifampin, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem. Interestingly, there was a marked difference in susceptibility of the isolates to cotrimoxazole between Europe (35/76) and the US (15/15) (P < 0.0001). Empiric treatment of R. equi infection should include a combination of two antibiotics, preferably selected from vancomycin, imipenem, clarithromycin/azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampin, or cotrimoxazole. Local antibiograms should be checked prior to using cotrimoxazole due to developing resistance.

  16. Construction of an Escherichia coli-rhodococcus shuttle vector and plasmid transformation in Rhodococcus spp

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M.E.V.; Finnerty, W.R.

    1988-02-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A was developed by using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid constructed in this study. Rhodococcus sp. strain H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200, and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5, and 13.4 kilobases (kb), respectively. A 3.8-kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3-kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla), as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1-kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococccus sp. strain AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A. The cloned 3.8-kb fragment of Rhodococcus DNA in pMVS301 contains a Rhodococcus origin of replication, since the hybrid plasmid was capable of replication in both genera. The plasmid was identical in E. coli and Rhodococcus transformants as determined by restriction analysis and was maintained as a stable, independent replicon in both organisms. A restriction map demonstrated 14 unique restriction sites in pMVS301, some of which are potentially useful for molecular cloning in Rhodococcus spp. and other actinomycetes. This is the first report of plasmid transformation and of heterologous gene expression in a Rhodococcus sp.

  17. Disposition of oral telithromycin in foals and in vitro activity of the drug against macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant Rhodococcus equi isolates.

    PubMed

    Javsicas, L H; Giguère, S; Womble, Ariel Y

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the serum and pulmonary disposition of telithromycin in foals and to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of telithromycin against macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant Rhodococcus equi isolates. A single dose of telithromycin (15 mg/kg of body weight) was administered to six healthy 6-10-week-old foals by the intragastric route. Activity of telithromycin was measured in serum, pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells using a microbiological assay. The broth macrodilution method was used to determine the MIC of telithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin and erythromycin against R. equi. Following intragastric administration, mean +/- SD time to peak serum telithromycin activity (T(max)) was 1.75 +/- 0.76 h, maximum serum activity (C(max)) was 1.43 +/- 0.37 microg/mL, and terminal half-life (t(1/2)) was 3.81 +/- 0.40 h. Telithromycin activity, 4 h postadministration was significantly higher in BAL cells (50.9 +/- 14.5 microg/mL) than in PELF (5.07 +/- 2.64 microg/mL), and plasma (0.84 +/- 0.25 microg/mL). The MIC(90) of telithromycin for macrolide-resistant R. equi isolates (8 microg/mL) was significantly higher than that of macrolide-susceptible isolates (0.25 microg/mL). The MIC of telithromycin for macrolide-resistant isolates (MIC(50)=4.0 microg/mL) was significantly lower than that of clarithromycin (MIC(50)=24.0 microg/mL), azithromycin (MIC(50)=256 microg/mL) and erythromycin (MIC(50)=24 microg/mL). PMID:20646201

  18. Isopropylbenzene (cumene)--a new substrate for the isolation of trichloroethene-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dabrock, B; Riedel, J; Bertram, J; Gottschalk, G

    1992-01-01

    Various bacterial isolates from enrichments with isopropylbenzene (cumene), toluene or phenol as carbon and energy sources were tested as to their potential to oxidize trichloroethene (TCE). In contrast to toluene and phenol, all isolates enriched on isopropylbenzene were able to oxidize TCE. Two isolates, strain JR1 and strain BD1, were identified as Pseudomonas spec. and as Rhodococcus erythropolis, respectively. TCE oxidation was accompanied by the liberation of stoichiometric amounts of chloride. Initial TCE oxidation rate increased proportional to the substrate concentration from 25 to 200 microM TCE. Maximal initial TCE-degradation rates found here were 4 to 5 nmol.min-1.mg protein-1. The TCE degradation rate decreased with time. The two isolates showed a temperature optimum for TCE degradation between 10 and 20 degrees C. In addition to TCE, R. erythropolis BD1 degraded only cis- and trans-dichloroethene whereas Pseudomonas spec. JR1 was able to oxidize also 1,1-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane. PMID:1444717

  19. Isolation of an aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicide-degrading strain Rhodococcus ruber JPL-2 and the cloning of a novel carboxylesterase gene (feh).

    PubMed

    Hongming, Liu; Xu, Lou; Zhaojian, Ge; Fan, Yang; Dingbin, Chen; Jianchun, Zhu; Jianhong, Xu; Shunpeng, Li; Qing, Hong

    2015-06-01

    The strain JPL-2, capable of degrading fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE), was isolated from the soil of a wheat field and identified as Rhodococcus ruber. This strain could utilize FE as its sole carbon source and degrade 94.6% of 100 mg L(-1) FE in 54 h. Strain JPL-2 could also degrade other aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicides. The initial step of the degradation pathway is to hydrolyze the carboxylic acid ester bond. A novel esterase gene feh, encoding the FE-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (FeH) responsible for this initial step, was cloned from strain JPL-2. Its molecular mass was approximately 39 kDa, and the catalytic efficiency of FeH followed the order of FE > quizalofop-P-ethyl > clodinafop-propargyl > cyhalofop-butyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methy, which indicated that the chain length of the alcohol moiety strongly affected the hydrolysis activity of the FeH toward AOPP herbicides. PMID:26273257

  20. Isolation of an aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicide-degrading strain Rhodococcus ruber JPL-2 and the cloning of a novel carboxylesterase gene (feh)

    PubMed Central

    Hongming, Liu; Xu, Lou; Zhaojian, Ge; Fan, Yang; Dingbin, Chen; Jianchun, Zhu; Jianhong, Xu; Shunpeng, Li; Qing, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The strain JPL-2, capable of degrading fenoxaprop-P-ethyl (FE), was isolated from the soil of a wheat field and identified as Rhodococcus ruber. This strain could utilize FE as its sole carbon source and degrade 94.6% of 100 mg L−1 FE in 54 h. Strain JPL-2 could also degrade other aryloxyphenoxy propanoate (AOPP) herbicides. The initial step of the degradation pathway is to hydrolyze the carboxylic acid ester bond. A novel esterase gene feh, encoding the FE-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (FeH) responsible for this initial step, was cloned from strain JPL-2. Its molecular mass was approximately 39 kDa, and the catalytic efficiency of FeH followed the order of FE > quizalofop-P-ethyl > clodinafop-propargyl > cyhalofop-butyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methy, which indicated that the chain length of the alcohol moiety strongly affected the hydrolysis activity of the FeH toward AOPP herbicides. PMID:26273257

  1. Use of whole genome sequences to develop a molecular phylogenetic framework for Rhodococcus fascians and the Rhodococcus genus

    PubMed Central

    Creason, Allison L.; Davis, Edward W.; Putnam, Melodie L.; Vandeputte, Olivier M.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2014-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria requires a stable species classification. Rhodococcus fascians is the only documented member of its ill-defined genus that is capable of causing disease on a wide range of agriculturally important plants. Comparisons of genome sequences generated from isolates of Rhodococcus associated with diseased plants revealed a level of genetic diversity consistent with them representing multiple species. To test this, we generated a tree based on more than 1700 homologous sequences from plant-associated isolates of Rhodococcus, and obtained support from additional approaches that measure and cluster based on genome similarities. Results were consistent in supporting the definition of new Rhodococcus species within clades containing phytopathogenic members. We also used the genome sequences, along with other rhodococcal genome sequences to construct a molecular phylogenetic tree as a framework for resolving the Rhodococcus genus. Results indicated that Rhodococcus has the potential for having 20 species and also confirmed a need to revisit the taxonomic groupings within Rhodococcus. PMID:25237311

  2. [Isolation and identification of a low temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain and its degradation characteristics].

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Li, Dan; Sun, Dan; Xie, Yu-juan; Ma, Ting; Liang, Feng-lai; Liu, Ru-lin

    2007-09-01

    A low-temperature hydrocarbon-degrading strain T7-2 was isolated from sea-mud of Bohai polluted area and identified as Rhodococcus erythropolis, which could use diesel oil as carbon source. The optimal temperature and pH for the strain utilizing ethanol was 15 degrees C and 7.8, and the optimal concentration of ethanol and the seed culture was 0.5% and 10(8) CFU/mL, respectively. Inoculated to artificial seawater which was added (NH4)2SO5 2.64 g/L, Na2HPO4 2.5 g/L and yeast extract 0.015 g/L after 7 days of culture at the temperature of 15 degrees C, the rate of degradation was 73.2%. The strain could degrade a large range of n-alkane from C12 to C36. PMID:17990565

  3. Growth of rhodococcus S1 on anthracene.

    PubMed

    Tongpim, S; Pickard, M A

    1996-03-01

    Three slow-growing bacteria were isolated from a mixed culture enriched for growth on anthracene, using creosote-contaminated soil as the inoculum. Organisms were shown to use anthracene by the production of a clear zone around the colony after a mineral salts agar plate was sprayed with anthracene. All three bacteria were nonmotile, nonsporulating, gram-positive rods and stained acid-fast. Physiological and biochemical tests, GC content, and cell wall lipid patterns of whole cell methanolysates indicated that they belonged to the Nocardia-Mycobacterium-Rhodococcus group. On the basis of these characteristics and pyrolysis gas chromatography, they were assigned to the genus Rhodococcus. Growth of the isolates was slow on crystalline anthracene, giving a doubling time of 1.5-3 days, and they grew mainly on the crystal surface. When anthracene was supplied by precipitation from a solvent, doubling time was reduced to 1 day. All three isolates mineralized anthracene but not phenanthrene or naphthalene, nor could they grow on naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluorene, fluoranthene, acenaphthene, pyrene, chrysene, or naphthacene as sole carbon source. One isolate, Rhodococcus S1, was able to use 2-methylanthracene or 2-chloroanthracene as carbon source but not 1- or 9-substituted analogs. These results suggest that the initial enzyme attacking anthracene in these isolates has a narrow substrate specificity. PMID:8868237

  4. Biodegradation of the Organic Disulfide 4,4′-Dithiodibutyric Acid by Rhodococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Khairy, Heba; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Four Rhodococcus spp. exhibited the ability to use 4,4′-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB) as a sole carbon source for growth. The most important step for the production of a novel polythioester (PTE) using DTDB as a precursor substrate is the initial cleavage of DTDB. Thus, identification of the enzyme responsible for this step was mandatory. Because Rhodococcus erythropolis strain MI2 serves as a model organism for elucidation of the biodegradation of DTDB, it was used to identify the genes encoding the enzymes involved in DTDB utilization. To identify these genes, transposon mutagenesis of R. erythropolis MI2 was carried out using transposon pTNR-TA. Among 3,261 mutants screened, 8 showed no growth with DTDB as the sole carbon source. In five mutants, the insertion locus was mapped either within a gene coding for a polysaccharide deacetyltransferase, a putative ATPase, or an acetyl coenzyme A transferase, 1 bp upstream of a gene coding for a putative methylase, or 176 bp downstream of a gene coding for a putative kinase. In another mutant, the insertion was localized between genes encoding a putative transcriptional regulator of the TetR family (noxR) and an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (nox). Moreover, in two other mutants, the insertion loci were mapped within a gene encoding a hypothetical protein in the vicinity of noxR and nox. The interruption mutant generated, R. erythropolis MI2 noxΩtsr, was unable to grow with DTDB as the sole carbon source. Subsequently, nox was overexpressed and purified, and its activity with DTDB was measured. The specific enzyme activity of Nox amounted to 1.2 ± 0.15 U/mg. Therefore, we propose that Nox is responsible for the initial cleavage of DTDB into 2 molecules of 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB). PMID:26407888

  5. Inoculation methods using Rhodococcus erythropolis strain P30 affects bacterial assisted phytoextraction capacity of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-López, V; Prieto-Fernández, A; Janssen, J; Herzig, R; Vangronsveld, J; Kidd, P S

    2016-01-01

    In this study different bacterial inoculation methods were tested for tobacco plants growing in a mine-soil contaminated with Pb, Zn, and Cd. The inoculation methods evaluated were: seed inoculation, soil inoculation, dual soil inoculation event, and seed+soil inoculation. Each inoculum was added at two bacterial densities (10(6) CFUs mL(-1) and 10(8) CFUs mL(-1)). The objectives were to evaluate whether or not the mode of inoculation or the number of applied microorganisms influences plant response. The most pronounced bacterial-induced effect was found for biomass production, and the soil inoculation treatment (using 10(6) CFUs mL(-1)) led to the highest increase in shoot dry weight yield (up to 45%). Bacterial-induced effects on shoot metal concentrations were less pronounced; although a positive effect was found on shoot Pb concentration when using 10(8) CFUs mL(-1) in the soil inoculation (29% increase) and in the seed+soil inoculation (34% increase). Also shoot Zn concentration increased by 24% after seed inoculation with 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). The best effects on the total metal yield were not correlated with an increasing number of inoculated bacteria. In fact the best results were found after a single soil inoculation using the lower cellular density of 10(6) CFUs mL(-1). PMID:26552496

  6. Rhodococcus enclensis sp. nov., a novel member of the genus Rhodococcus.

    PubMed

    Dastager, Syed G; Mawlankar, Rahul; Tang, Shan-Kun; Krishnamurthi, Srinivasan; Ramana, V Venkata; Joseph, Neeta; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2014-08-01

    A novel actinobacterial strain, designated, NIO-1009(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from Chorao Island, Goa, India. Phylogenetic analysis comparisons based on 16S rRNA gene sequences between strain NIO-1009(T) and other members of the genus Rhodococcus revealed that strain NIO-1009(T) had the closest sequence similarity to Rhodococcus kroppenstedtii DSM 44908(T) and Rhodococcus corynebacterioides DSM 20151(T) with 99.2 and 99.1%, respectively. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization results showed that R. kroppenstedtii DSM 44908(T) and R. corynebacterioides DSM 20151(T) were 39.5 (3.0%) and 41.7 (2.0%) with strain NIO-1009(T), respectively, which were well below the 70% limit for any novel species proposal. Phylogenetically strain NIO-1009(T) forms a stable clade with and R. kroppenstedtii DSM 44908(T) and R. corynebacterioides DSM 20151(T) with 100% bootstrap values. Strain NIO-1009(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and galactose and arabinose as the cell wall sugars. The major fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)ω9c, C(16 : 1)(ω6c and/or ω7c) and 10-methyl C(18 : 0). The only menaquinone detected was MK-8(H2), while the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and one unknown phospholipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.9 mol%. The phenotypic and genotypic data showed that strain NIO-1009(T) warrants recognition as a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus for which the name Rhodococcus enclensis sp. nov., is proposed; the type strain is NIO-1009(T) ( = NCIM 5452(T) = DSM 45688(T)). PMID:24854006

  7. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W.; Inniss, W.E.

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  8. Novel methylotrophic bacteria isolated from the River Thames (London, UK).

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Thomas, Elizabeth; Savani, Parita; Kelly, Donovan P; Wood, Ann P

    2008-12-01

    Enrichment and elective culture for methylotrophs from sediment of the River Thames in central London yielded a diversity of pure cultures representing several genera of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which were mainly of organisms not generally regarded as typically methylotrophic. Substrates leading to successful isolations included methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, methanesulfonate and dimethylsulfone. Several isolates were studied in detail and shown by their biochemical and morphological properties and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to be Sphingomonas melonis strain ET35, Mycobacterium fluoranthenivorans strain DSQ3, Rhodococcus erythropolis strain DSQ4, Brevibacterium casei strain MSQ5, Klebsiella oxytoca strains MMA/F and MMA/1, Pseudomonas mendocina strain TSQ4, and Flavobacterium sp. strains MSA/1 and MMA/2. The results show that facultative methylotrophy is present across a wide range of Bacteria, suggesting that turnover of diverse C(1)-compounds is of much greater microbiological and environmental significance than is generally thought. The origins of the genes encoding the enzymes of methylotrophy in diverse heterotrophs need further study, and could further our understanding of the phylogeny and antiquity of methylotrophic systems. PMID:18681896

  9. Salt-tolerant phenol-degrading microorganisms isolated from Amazonian soil samples.

    PubMed

    Bastos, A E; Moon, D H; Rossi, A; Trevors, J T; Tsai, S M

    2000-11-01

    Two phenol-degrading microorganisms were isolated from Amazonian rain forest soil samples after enrichment in the presence of phenol and a high salt concentration. The yeast Candida tropicalis and the bacterium Alcaligenes faecoalis were identified using several techniques, including staining, morphological observation and biochemical tests, fatty acid profiles and 16S/18S rRNA sequencing. Both isolates, A. faecalis and C. tropicalis, were used in phenol degradation assays, with Rhodococcus erythropolis as a reference phenol-degrading bacterium, and compared to microbial populations from wastewater samples collected from phenol-contaminated environments. C. tropicalis tolerated higher concentrations of phenol and salt (16 mM and 15%, respectively) than A. faecalis (12 mM and 5.6%). The yeast also tolerated a wider pH range (3-9) during phenol degradation than A. faecalis (pH 7-9). Phenol degradation was repressed in C. tropicalis by acetate and glucose, but not by lactate. Glucose and acetate had little effect, while lactate stimulated phenol degradation in A. faecalis. To our knowledge, these soils had never been contaminated with man-made phenolic compounds and this is the first report of phenol-degrading microorganisms from Amazonian forest soil samples. The results support the idea that natural uncontaminated environments contain sufficient genetic diversity to make them valid choices for the isolation of microorganisms useful in bioremediation. PMID:11131025

  10. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance

    PubMed Central

    D’Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  11. Isolation and Characterisation of 1-Alkyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Tolerant and Biodegrading Marine Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Megaw, Julianne; Busetti, Alessandro; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify marine-derived bacteria which exhibited high tolerance to, and an ability to biodegrade, 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquids. The salinity and hydrocarbon load of some marine environments may induce selective pressures which enhance the ability of microbes to grow in the presence of these liquid salts. The isolates obtained in this study generally showed a greater ability to grow in the presence of the selected ionic liquids compared to microorganisms described previously, with two marine-derived bacteria, Rhodococcus erythropolis and Brevibacterium sanguinis growing in concentrations exceeding 1 M 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. The ability of these bacteria to degrade the selected ionic liquids was assessed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and three were shown to degrade the selected ionic liquids by up to 59% over a 63-day test period. These bacterial isolates represent excellent candidates for further potential applications in the bioremediation of ionic liquid-containing waste or following accidental environmental exposure. PMID:23560109

  12. Rhodococcus equi: an animal and human pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, J F

    1991-01-01

    Recent isolations of Rhodococcus equi from cavitatory pulmonary disease in patients with AIDS have aroused interest among medical microbiologists in this unusual organism. Earlier isolations from humans had also been in immunosuppressed patients following hemolymphatic tumors or renal transplantation. This organism has been recognized for many years as a cause of a serious pyogranulomatous pneumonia of young foals and is occasionally isolated from granulomatous lesions in several other species, in some cases following immunosuppression. The last decade has seen many advances in understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and immunity to infection in foals. The particular susceptibility of the foal is not understood but can be explained in part by a combination of heavy challenge through the respiratory route coinciding with declining maternally derived antibody in the absence of fully competent foal cellular immune mechanisms. R. equi is largely a soil organism but is widespread in the feces of herbivores. Its growth in soil is considerably improved by simple nutrients it obtains from herbivore manure. About one-third of human patients who have developed R. equi infections had contact in some way with herbivores or their manure. Others may have acquired infection from contact with soil or wild bird manure. R. equi is an intracellular parasite, which explains the typical pyogranulomatous nature of R. equi infections, the predisposition to infection in human patients with defective cell-mediated immune mechanisms, and the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs that penetrate phagocytic cells. Images PMID:2004346

  13. Analysis of Genome Sequences from Plant Pathogenic Rhodococcus Reveals Genetic Novelties in Virulence Loci

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edward W.; Putnam, Melodie L.; Hu, Erdong; Swader-Hines, David; Mol, Adeline; Baucher, Marie; Prinsen, Els; Zdanowska, Magdalena; Givan, Scott A.; Jaziri, Mondher El; Loper, Joyce E.; Mahmud, Taifo; Chang, Jeff H.

    2014-01-01

    Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of three loci present on a linear plasmid, with the fas operon central to virulence. The Fas proteins synthesize, modify, and activate a mixture of growth regulating cytokinins, which cause a hormonal imbalance in plants, resulting in abnormal growth. We sequenced and compared the genomes of 20 isolates of Rhodococcus to gain insights into the mechanisms and evolution of virulence in these bacteria. Horizontal gene transfer was identified as critical but limited in the scale of virulence evolution, as few loci are conserved and exclusive to phytopathogenic isolates. Although the fas operon is present in most phytopathogenic isolates, it is absent from phytopathogenic isolate A21d2. Instead, this isolate has a horizontally acquired gene chimera that encodes a novel fusion protein with isopentyltransferase and phosphoribohydrolase domains, predicted to be capable of catalyzing and activating cytokinins, respectively. Cytokinin profiling of the archetypal D188 isolate revealed only one activate cytokinin type that was specifically synthesized in a fas-dependent manner. These results suggest that only the isopentenyladenine cytokinin type is synthesized and necessary for Rhodococcus phytopathogenicity, which is not consistent with the extant model stating that a mixture of cytokinins is necessary for Rhodococcus to cause leafy gall symptoms. In all, data indicate that only four horizontally acquired functions are sufficient to confer the trait of phytopathogenicity to members of the genetically diverse clade of Rhodococcus. PMID:25010934

  14. Comparison of Etest, disk diffusion, and broth macrodilution for in vitro susceptibility testing of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Londa J; Giguère, Steeve; Guldbech, Kristen; Warner, Eleanor; Ugorji, Ukachi; Berghaus, Roy D

    2015-01-01

    MICs of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, gentamicin, and doxycycline against 101 isolates of Rhodococcus equi were determined by broth macrodilution, disk diffusion, and Etest. Categorical agreement ranged between 85.1 and 100%. Overall, the agreement between Etest and disk diffusion was better than the agreement between broth macrodilution and the agar-based methods. PMID:25378571

  15. Comparison of Etest, Disk Diffusion, and Broth Macrodilution for In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Berghaus, Londa J.; Guldbech, Kristen; Warner, Eleanor; Ugorji, Ukachi; Berghaus, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    MICs of erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, gentamicin, and doxycycline against 101 isolates of Rhodococcus equi were determined by broth macrodilution, disk diffusion, and Etest. Categorical agreement ranged between 85.1 and 100%. Overall, the agreement between Etest and disk diffusion was better than the agreement between broth macrodilution and the agar-based methods. PMID:25378571

  16. Analysis of genome sequences from plant pathogenic Rhodococcus reveals genetic novelties in virulence loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of Gram-positive Actinobacteria cause economically important diseases to plants. Within the Rhodococcus genus, some members can cause growth deformities and persist as pathogens on a wide range of host plants. The current model predicts that phytopathogenic isolates require a cluster of thre...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of an Aldoxime Degrader, Rhodococcus sp. Strain YH3-3

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain YH3-3 has been isolated as an (E)-pyridine-3-aldoxime degrader. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this strain, with a size of 7,316,908 bp, average G+C content of 62.15%, and 7,281 predicted protein-coding sequences. PMID:27198031

  18. A Leaf-Inhabiting Endophytic Bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. KB6, Enhances Sweet Potato Resistance to Black Rot Disease Caused by Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Jeong, Haeyoung; Jo, Sung Hee; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Kwon, Suk Yoon; An, Donghwan; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-03-01

    Rhodococcus species have become increasingly important owing to their ability to degrade a wide range of toxic chemicals and produce bioactive compounds. Here, we report isolation of the Rhodococcus sp. KB6, which is a new leaf-inhabiting endophytic bacterium that suppresses black rot disease in sweet potato leaves. We determined the 7.0 Mb draft genome sequence of KB6 and have predicted 19 biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites, including heterobactins, which are a new class of siderophores. Notably, we showed the first internal colonization of host plants with Rhodococcus sp. KB6 and discuss its potential as a biocontrol agent for sustainable agriculture. PMID:26767576

  19. In vitro activities of polycationic peptides alone and in combination with clinically used antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Ancarani, F; Del Prete, M S; Fortuna, M; Scalise, G

    1999-08-01

    The in vitro activities of magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin alone and in combination with other antimicrobial agents against six clinical isolates of Rhodococcus equi were investigated by MIC and time-kill studies. All isolates were more susceptible to nisin. A positive interaction was observed when the peptides were combined with ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifabutin, rifampin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and vancomycin. PMID:10428947

  20. Rhodococcus biphenylivorans sp. nov., a polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomei; Liu, Yindong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Hu, Jinxing; Ding, Linxian; Wu, Min; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile and rod-coccus shaped novel actinobacterial strain, designated as TG9(T), was isolated from a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment in Taizhou city, Zhejiang province, eastern China. The isolate was observed to grow at 10-45 °C (optimum 28-32 °C), pH 5.0-11.0 (optimum pH 7.0-8.0) and with 0-9.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 0-3.0 %). Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strain TG9(T) and other members of the genus Rhodococcus showed that strain TG9(T) shared highest similarities with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans DSM 44555(T) (99.4 %), R. rhodochrous DSM 43241(T) (99.2 %), R. gordoniae DSM 44689(T) (99.2 %) and R. artemisiae DSM 45380(T) (98.2 %). However, low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness (15-48 %), which are below the 70 % limit for prokaryotic species identification, were obtained by DNA-DNA hybridization. Strain TG9(T) was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid and arabinose and galactose in the whole-cell hydrolysate. Mycolic acids were found to be present. The major fatty acids were identified as C16:0, C16:1 ω7c and/or iso-C15:0 2-OH, 10-methyl C18:0 and C18:1 ω9c. The only menaquinone detected was MK-8 (H2). The major polar lipids detected were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, glycolipid and traces of some unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain TG9(T) was determined to be 62.8 %. The combined phenotypic and genotypic data show that the strain represents a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus for which the name Rhodococcus biphenylivorans sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain TG9(T) (=CGMCC 1.12975(T) = KCTC 29673(T) = MCCC 1K00286(T)). PMID:25315102

  1. Rhodococcus empyema in a heart transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Richard; Nord, John; Lanspa, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare cause of pneumonia and empyema almost exclusively occurring in immunocompromised patients. Most people who become infected have direct exposure to livestock. We present a case where the exposure was presumed to be through a family member in close contact with horses. Our case describes an infection in a heart transplant patient that was initially identified as a probable intra-abdominal infection and later reidentified as Rhodococcus equi empyema, and was treated with surgery and prolonged antibiotics. PMID:25473561

  2. Investigation of the biotransformation of TNT by a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Tharakan, J.P.; Welsh, G.; Johnson, J.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Tri-nitro-toluene (TNT) has contaminated waterways and soils as a result of its widespread military and non-military uses. Several researches have isolated or constructed strains of microorganisms that are able to utilize TNT as sole carbon, nitrogen or energy sources. Researchers have also reported high TNT concentrations (> 50 mg/l) as inhibitory to bacteria, yeast and fungi. This study examines the degradation of TNT and pyrene using a Rhodococcus sp. isolated based on its ability to survive on pyrene as the sole carbon source. The experiments were designed to study both the direct and cometabolic transformation of TNT by the microbes in both batch and continuous modes, and to determine the optimum conditions under which TNT would be degradable.

  3. Survival and replication of Rhodococcus equi in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Mosser, D M

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that can cause serious pneumonia in both young horses and immunocompromised people. Essential to understanding rhodococcus pathogenesis is a quantitative documentation of the intracellular events that follow macrophage phagocytosis of the organism. By using a bacterial immunofluorescence staining assay, we verified the intracellular survival and replicative potential of R. equi in both murine peritoneal macrophages and equine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Following an initial lag period of 6 to 12 h, the intracellular numbers of R. equi begin to rise, often reaching macrophage-compromising levels by 48 h. A quantitative determination of bacterial growth by a novel image analysis cytometry technique confirmed our fluorescence microscopic results. By 48 h postinfection, bacterial numbers had increased by more than fivefold, and the majority of infected macrophages in the monolayer contained 10 or more bacteria per cell. The intracellular organisms were viable, as evidenced by the ability to incorporate radiolabeled uracil. The use of these techniques has identified differences in the in vitro replicative capacities of a virulent strain and an avirulent strain of R. equi. A clinical isolate of R. equi expressing a 17-kDa virulence-associated plasmid-encoded antigen was able to survive and replicate within macrophages, whereas an avirulent, non-plasmid-containing strain replicated poorly. These results suggest that plasmid-encoded bacterial virulence factors may contribute to the ability of R. equi to replicate within its host cell, the macrophage. Images PMID:7927672

  4. Metabolism of 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole by Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    PubMed Central

    Haroune, Nicolas; Combourieu, Bruno; Besse, Pascale; Sancelme, Martine; Kloepfer, Achim; Reemtsma, Thorsten; De Wever, Heleen; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2004-01-01

    2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, which is mainly used in the rubber industry as a vulcanization accelerator, is very toxic and is considered to be recalcitrant. We show here for the first time that it can be biotransformed and partially mineralized by a pure-culture bacterial strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. Three metabolites, among four detected, were identified. PMID:15466583

  5. 3-nitroadipate, a metabolic intermediate for mineralization of 2, 4-dinitrophenol by a new strain of a Rhodococcus species.

    PubMed

    Blasco, R; Moore, E; Wray, V; Pieper, D; Timmis, K; Castillo, F

    1999-01-01

    The bacterial strain RB1 has been isolated by enrichment cultivation with 2,4-dinitrophenol as the sole nitrogen, carbon, and energy source and characterized, on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, as a Rhodococcus species closely related to Rhodococcus opacus. Rhodococcus sp. strain RB1 degrades 2,4-dinitrophenol, releasing the two nitro groups from the compound as nitrite. The release of nitro groups from 2,4-dinitrophenol occurs in two steps. First, the 2-nitro group is removed as nitrite, with the production of an aliphatic nitro compound identified by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry as 3-nitroadipate. Then, this metabolic derivative is further metabolized, releasing its nitro group as nitrite. Full nitrite assimilation upon reduction to ammonia requires that an additional carbon source be supplied to the medium. PMID:9864324

  6. Transfer of the virulence-associated protein A-bearing plasmid between field strains of virulent and avirulent Rhodococcus equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent and avirulent isolates coexist in equine feces and the environment and serve as a source of infection for foals. The extent to which conjugative plasmid transfer occurs between these strains is unknown and is important for understanding the epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi infections of fo...

  7. Non-pulmonary Rhodococcus equi infections in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, J; Wolf, P; Seed, L; Gay, T; Noonan, K; Haghighi, P

    1987-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, formerly known as Corynebacterium equi, was isolated repeatedly from the blood of two patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Neither of the patients had pneumonia while they were bacteraemic, whereas pneumonia has been present in all previously reported cases of human infection with R equi. One of our patients had diarrhoea and the organism was isolated from a stool culture; the other patient had a large granulomatous soft tissue mass in his pelvis caused by R equi. Both isolates were resistant to penicillin and one produced a beta-lactamase. Both patients were treated with vancomycin but only one recovered. Images Figure PMID:3584508

  8. Insight on RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus strains using 13C and 15N kinetic isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2013-01-01

    The explosive Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is known to be degraded aerobically by various isolates of the Rhodococcus species, with denitration being the key step, mediated by Cytochrome P450. Our study aimed at gaining insight into the RDX degradation mechanism by Rhodococcus species and comparing isotope effects associated with RDX degradation by distinct Rhodococcus strains. For these purposes, enrichment in (13)C and (15)N isotopes throughout RDX denitration was studied for three distinct Rhodococcus strains, isolated from soil and groundwater in an RDX-contaminated site. The observable (15)N enrichment throughout the reaction, together with minor (13)C enrichment, suggests that N-N bond cleavage is likely to be the key rate-limiting step in the reaction. The similarity in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect between the three tested strains suggests that either isotope-masking effects are negligible, or are of a similar extent for all tested strains. The lack of variability in the kinetic (15)N isotope effect allows the interpretation of environmental studies with greater confidence. PMID:23215036

  9. Rhodococcus equi: clinical manifestations, virulence, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Giguère, S; Cohen, N D; Chaffin, M Keith; Hines, S A; Hondalus, M K; Prescott, J F; Slovis, N M

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of disease and death in foals. Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen, is a common cause of pneumonia in foals. This article reviews the clinical manifestations of infection caused by R. equi in foals and summarizes current knowledge regarding mechanisms of virulence of, and immunity to, R. equi. A complementary consensus statement providing recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of infections caused by R. equi in foals can be found in the same issue of the Journal. PMID:22092609

  10. Attempts to find phenotypic markers of the virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed Central

    De La Peña-Moctezuma, A; Prescott, J F; Goodfellow, M

    1996-01-01

    Four isolates of Rhodococcus equi, from pneumonic foals, and containing the 85 kb virulence plasmid, a porcine isolate containing an 80 kb plasmid, and their plasmid cured derivatives, were examined for 239 phenotypic properties in an attempt to find characters other than the virulence-associated protein (VapA) which might be encoded by the virulence plasmid in organisms grown at 37 degrees C. Tests chosen included those which have previously given variable results for R. equi isolates, since such variability might be attributed to plasmid curing, and characteristics which have been described as properties of plasmids of Rhodococcus species other than R. equi. Tests included cadmium resistance, Congo red binding, resistance to 26 antibiotics, conventional clinical microbiological tests, utilization of 95 different carbon sources, enzymatic activities in API ZYM, fluorogenic assays for exo- and endopeptidase, glycosidase activities, and testosterone degradation. Apart from production of VapA by foal isolates, no phenotypic property was identified in the plasmid-positive isolates. Phenotypic characteristics of R. equi that have not been described before, and might be useful in identification were: metabolism of N-acetyl-beta D-glucopyranoside, alpha- and beta-hydroxybutyric, alpha-ketobutyric and N-acetyl-glutamic acids, of methylpyruvate, heptanoate, nonanoate and stearate esters; exopeptidase activity against alanine-alanine-tyrosine, alanine-phenylalanine-lysine, glycine-arginine, lysine-alanine, and valine-glycine-alanine; endopeptidase activity against arginine and methionine; and hydrolysis of bis-phosphate ester. PMID:8825990

  11. Isolation of the toluene degrading bacteria and application to the biotrickling filtration system of off-gas treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Shigeki

    1999-07-01

    The period of acclimation in biotrickling filtration system was studied using toluene degrading bacteria. Toluene degrading bacteria were isolated from the test biotrickling filtration apparatus used for the degradation of toluene off-gas. Five colonies found in an agar culture medium were identified to be toluene degrading bacteria; one was classified Acinetobacter genospecies 10 and the other four were Rhodococcus erythropolis. The count of the toluene degrading bacteria was 5.6 x 10 to the power 8th Colony Forming Units/ml-packing space. The toluene elimination activity was found to be 7.4 and 2.0 mg-toluene/g-dry cell/min for colony {number{underscore}sign}1 and colony {number{underscore}sign}2, respectively, using batch vial system. They were higher than that obtained when the original sludge in the test biotrickling filtration apparatus was applied to the same system. The performance of colony {number{underscore}sign}1 was also tested by the test biotrickling filtration system. Urethane foam, which constituted a lattice-like structure internally, was used as the microbial carrier. The artificial off-gas of 100ppm toluene/air was prepared with reagent grade chemical. The space velocity (versus the packed bed) was 100/h. Immediately after the start-up, the removal percentages of toluene was 39%, and it became 84% after two days continuous treatment. This result indicates that addition of colony {number{underscore}sign}1 was thus shown to be an effective means of shortening the acclimation period of a trickle bed biofilter.

  12. Coexisting bacterial populations responsible for multiphasic mineralization kinetics in soil. [Janthinobacterium sp. Rhodococcus sp

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.K.; Gier, M.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to study populations of indigenous microorganisms capable of mineralizing 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) in two soils. Previous kinetic analyses indicated the presence of two coexisting populations of DNP-mineralizing microorganisms in a forest soil (soil 1). Studies in which eucaryotic and procaryotic inhibitors were added to this soil indicated that both populations were bacterial. Most-probable-number counts with media containing different concentrations of DNP indicated that more bacteria could mineralize low concentrations of DNP than could metabolize high concentrations of it. Enrichments with varying concentrations of DNP and various combinations of inhibitors consistently resulted in the isolation of the same two species of bacteria from soil 1. This soil contained a large number and variety of fungi, but no fungi capable of mineralizing DNP were isolated. The two bacterial isolates were identified as a Janthinobacterium sp. and a Rhodococcus sp. The Janthinobacterium sp. had a low {mu}{sub max} and a low K{sub m} for DNP mineralization, whereas the Rhodococcus sp. had much higher values for both parameters. These differences between the two species of bacteria were similar to differences seen when soil was incubated with different concentrations of DNP. Values for {mu}{sub max} from soil incubations were similar to {mu}{sub max} values obtained in pure culture studies. In contrast, K{sub s} and K{sub m} values showed greater variation between soil and pure culture studies.

  13. A physical map of the 85 kb virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus equi 103.

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña-Moctezuma, A; Prescott, J F

    1995-01-01

    A physical map of the 85 kb virulence plasmid pOTS from Rhodococcus equi 103 was constructed. The restriction map contains 2 AsnI, 5 BglII, 9 EcoRI, 4 HindIII, and 3 XbaI sites. The positions of the EcoRI and HindIII of pOTS are identical to that of the 85 kb virulence plasmid of R. equi ATCC 33701 reported recently by others. EcoRI restriction fragment sizes were similar in the 85 kb plasmids isolated from 4 horse derived R. equi but, except apparently for the 28.3 and possibly 2.0 and 1.5 kb fragments, were different in an 80.1 kb plasmid isolated from a pig source R. equi. PMID:8521357

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain ATCC 21198

    SciTech Connect

    Shields-Menard, Sara A.; Brown, Steven D; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Indest, Karl; Hancock, Dawn; Wewalwela, Jayani; French, Todd; Donaldson, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous is a Gram-positive red-pigmented bacterium commonly found in the soil. The draft genome sequence for R. rhodochrous strain ATCC 21198 is presented here to provide genetic data for a better understanding of its lipid-accumulating capabilities.

  15. Detection of genes for alkane and naphthalene catabolism in Rhodococcus sp. strain 1BN.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, V; Bernasconi, S; Colombo, M; van Beilen, J B; Cavalca, L

    2000-10-01

    Rhodococcus sp. 1BN was isolated from a contaminated site and showed various biodegradative capabilities. Besides naphthalene, strain 1BN degraded medium- (C6) and long-chain alkanes (C16-C28), benzene and toluene, alone or when the hydrocarbons were mixed in equal proportions. The nucleotide sequence of an alk polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment revealed a 59% nucleotide homology to the Pseudomonas oleovorans alkB gene. The nar fragments were highly homologous to genes coding for large and small subunits of cis-naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase (narAa and narAb) and to cis-naphthalene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (narB) from other rhodococci. The oxidation of indene to cis-(1S,2R)-1,2-dihydroxyindan by toluene-induced cells allows to hypothesize that strain 1BN also carries a toluene dioxygenase-like system. PMID:11233165

  16. Rhodococcus equi pneumonia and sepsis in an allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Lokesh

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an aerobic facultative intracellular organism that is known to infect cells of the macrophage–monocyte lineage. It is a common veterinary pathogen; however, the incidence of this infection in humans has risen and it has been recognised as an emerging opportunistic pathogen among the immunocompromised patients. We present the case of a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia who had received allogenic stem cell transplant and presented to the hospital with clinical picture of pneumonia. Her condition worsened on initial broad spectrum antimicrobials and 3 weeks into her hospitalisation, R. equi was isolated from her broncheoalveolar lavage and blood cultures. Based on the susceptibility, therapy was changed to four active antimicrobials; however, the patient failed to improve and eventually died. This case highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of R. equi among immunosuppressed patients early in the right clinical setting due to the high virulence associated with this organism. PMID:24943142

  17. Antibiotic failure in a renal transplant patient with Rhodococcus equi infection: an indication for surgical lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Ursales, A; Klein, J A; Beal, S G; Koch, M; Clement-Kruzel, S; Melton, L B; Spak, C W

    2014-12-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that causes infrequent but challenging infections in immunocompromised individuals, few of which have been described in solid organ transplant recipients. Common clinical presentations include indolent cough, fever, and dyspnea, with necrotizing pneumonia and cavitation. We report a case of a dense right upper lung pneumonia with resultant R. equi bacteremia in a renal transplant recipient. Our patient initially responded to antibiotic treatment with resolution of bacteremia and clinical recovery, followed by interval progression in her right upper lobe consolidation on follow-up computed tomography scans. She underwent lobectomy for definitive therapy with resolution of symptoms. Lobectomy can be utilized in isolated infection after antibiotic failure with excellent clinical outcomes. PMID:25412764

  18. [Genetics and biochemistry of surfactant synthesis in Rhodococcus sp. H13-A]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The rationale for these studies resides is that biosurfactant synthesis occurs only when cells are grown with alkanes as sole source of carbon and energy. It is reasoned that biosurfactant synthesis is linked genetically to alkane oxidation and that the identification and characterization of the alk genes would provide information about the structural and regulator genes involved, in biosurfactant synthesis. Rhodococcus H13-A chromosomal DNA was isolated and digested with the restriction endonuclease Sau3A. The shuttle vector, pMVS301, was single site cleaved with Bgl II, phosphorylated, and the chromosomal DNA fragments agated into linearized pMVS301. The ligation mixture was used to transform competent E. coli HB101. The chromosomal DNA fragment has been cloned into pMVS301 which appears to contain genes encoding the initial oxidation of alkane. Electrophoration of Rhodococaus indicates transformation by this technique. Further studies are required to optimize conditions.

  19. (Genetics and biochemistry of surfactant synthesis in Rhodococcus sp. H13-A)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The rationale for these studies resides is that biosurfactant synthesis occurs only when cells are grown with alkanes as sole source of carbon and energy. It is reasoned that biosurfactant synthesis is linked genetically to alkane oxidation and that the identification and characterization of the alk genes would provide information about the structural and regulator genes involved, in biosurfactant synthesis. Rhodococcus H13-A chromosomal DNA was isolated and digested with the restriction endonuclease Sau3A. The shuttle vector, pMVS301, was single site cleaved with Bgl II, phosphorylated, and the chromosomal DNA fragments agated into linearized pMVS301. The ligation mixture was used to transform competent E. coli HB101. The chromosomal DNA fragment has been cloned into pMVS301 which appears to contain genes encoding the initial oxidation of alkane. Electrophoration of Rhodococaus indicates transformation by this technique. Further studies are required to optimize conditions.

  20. Remodulation of central carbon metabolic pathway in response to arsenite exposure in Rhodococcus sp. strain NAU‐1

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raina; Adhikary, Hemanta; Jha, Sanjay; Jha, Anamika; Kumar, G. Naresh

    2012-01-01

    Summary Arsenite‐tolerant bacteria were isolated from an organic farm of Navsari Agricultural University (NAU), Gujarat, India (Latitude: 20°55′39.04″N; Longitude: 72°54′6.34″E). One of the isolates, NAU‐1 (aerobic, Gram‐positive, non‐motile, coccobacilli), was hyper‐tolerant to arsenite (AsIII, 23 mM) and arsenate (AsV, 180 mM). 16S rRNA gene of NAU‐1 was 99% similar to the 16S rRNA genes of Rhodococcus (Accession No. HQ659188). Assays confirmed the presence of membrane bound arsenite oxidase and cytoplasmic arsenate reductase in NAU‐1. Genes for arsenite transporters (arsB and ACR3(1)) and arsenite oxidase gene (aoxB) were confirmed by PCR. Arsenite oxidation and arsenite efflux genes help the bacteria to tolerate arsenite. Specific activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione S‐transferase) increased in dose‐dependent manner with arsenite, whereas glutathione reductase activity decreased with increase in AsIII concentration. Metabolic studies revealed that Rhodococcus NAU‐1 produces excess of gluconic and succinic acids, and also activities of glucose dehydrogenase, phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate lyase were increased, to cope with the inhibited activities of glucose‐6‐phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and α‐ketoglutarate dehydrogenase enzymes respectively, in the presence of AsIII. Enzyme assays revealed the increase in direct oxidative and glyoxylate pathway in Rhodococcus NAU‐1 in the presence of AsIII. PMID:23062201

  1. Molecular biological enhancement of coal biodesulfurization. [Rhodococcus rhodochrous

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J.; Bielaga, B.A.

    1990-07-01

    The overall objective of this project is to sue molecular genetics to develop strains of bacteria with enhanced ability to remove sulfur from coal and to obtain data that will allow the performance and economics of a coal biodesulfurization process to be predicted. The work planned for the current quarter (May 1990 to July 1990) includes the following activities: (1) Construct a cloning vector that can be used in Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 from the small cryptic plasmid found in Rhodococcus rhodochrous ATCC 190607; (2) Develop techniques for the genetic analysis of IGTS8; (3) Continue biochemical experiments, particularly those that may allow the identification of desulfurization-related enzymes; (4) Continue experiments with coal to determine the kinetics of organic sulfur removal.

  2. Rhodococcus equi (Prescottella equi) vaccines; the future of vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Giles, C; Vanniasinkam, T; Ndi, S; Barton, M D

    2015-09-01

    For decades researchers have been targeting prevention of Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagui/Prescottella equi) by vaccination and the horse breeding industry has supported the ongoing efforts by researchers to develop a safe and cost effective vaccine to prevent disease in foals. Traditional vaccines including live, killed and attenuated (physical and chemical) vaccines have proved to be ineffective and more modern molecular-based vaccines including the DNA plasmid, genetically attenuated and subunit vaccines have provided inadequate protection of foals. Newer, bacterial vector vaccines have recently shown promise for R. equi in the mouse model. This article describes the findings of key research in R. equi vaccine development and looks at alternative methods that may potentially be utilised. PMID:24945608

  3. Abortion in a thoroughbred mare associated with an infection with avirulent Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Nishi, H; Katayama, Y; Niwa, H; Matsumura, T; Anzai, T; Ohtsu, Y; Tsukano, K; Shimizu, N; Takai, S

    2007-09-01

    An eight-year-old thoroughbred mare with no previous history of illness aborted a fetus at 196 days of gestation, and its internal tissues were examined immunohistologically and bacteriologically. The placenta was not examined, but specimens of the intrauterine fluids and the dam's faeces were collected four days after the abortion and examined bacteriologically. No significant histological lesions were found in the fetus but the amnion and the umbilical cord were oedematous and had petechial haemorrhages. Rhodococcus equi was isolated in pure culture from the lung, heart and stomach contents of the fetus and from an intrauterine specimen and faeces of the dam. The anti-R equi antibody titre of the mare was high after the abortion. The diagnosis was confirmed in the lung of the fetus by immunohistochemical staining with R equi-specific antibodies. Isolates from the fetus and mare were identified as avirulent R equi by pcr and the mouse pathogenicity test. The avirulent isolates were characterised by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, which yielded only one VspI profile in all the isolates from the fetus and its dam. PMID:17827474

  4. In vitro susceptibilities of Rhodococcus equi and other common equine pathogens to azithromycin, clarithromycin, and 20 other antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Jacks, Stephanie S; Giguère, Steeve; Nguyen, An

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine in vitro activities of azithromycin (AZM), clarithromycin (CLR), and 20 other antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi and other common equine bacterial pathogens. A total of 201 bacterial isolates from various equine clinical samples were examined. CLR was more active than AZM against R. equi, with MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited of 0.12 and 1.0 micro g/ml, respectively. Other antimicrobial agents highly active against at least 90% of R. equi isolates in vitro included rifampin, gentamicin, and imipenem. Both AZM and CLR showed good activity against beta-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus spp. AZM was more active than other macrolides against Pasteurella spp. and Salmonella enterica. PMID:12709351

  5. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    SciTech Connect

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  6. Degradation of trichloroethene by a linear-plasmid-encoded alkene monooxygenase in Rhodococcus corallinus (Nocardia corallina) B-276.

    PubMed

    Saeki, H; Akira, M; Furuhashi, K; Averhoff, B; Gottschalk, G

    1999-07-01

    Rhodococcus corallinus (formerly Nocardia corallina) B-276, isolated with propene as sole carbon and energy source, is able to oxidize trichloroethene (TCE). Glucose- or propene-grown R. corallinus B-276 cells exhibited no difference in TCE degradation efficiency. TCE degradation was found to be growth-phase-dependent and maximum rates were monitored with stationary-phase cells. K(m) and Vmax values for TCE degradation of R. corallinus B-276 grown in nutrient broth medium in the presence of glucose were 187 microM and 2.4 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1, respectively. Escherichia coli recombinants harbouring and expressing the alkene monooxygenase genes of R. corallinus B-276 exhibited the ability to degrade TCE. This result provides clear evidence that the alkene monooxygenase of R. corallinus B-276 catalyses TCE oxidation. R. corallinus B-276 was shown to contain four linear plasmids, pNC10 (70 kb), pNC20 (85 kb), pNC30 (185 kb) and pNC40 (235 kb). The observation that pNC30-deficient strains had lost the ability to grow on propene suggested that the genes of the propene degradation pathway are encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Southern blot analysis with cloned alkene monooxygenase genes from R. corallinus B-276 revealed a positive hybridization signal with the linear plasmid pNC30. This result clearly shows that the alkene monooxygenase is encoded by the linear plasmid pNC30. Eleven short-chain-alkene-oxidizing strains were screened for the presence of linear plasmids. Among these, four propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus strains and one ethene-oxidizing Mycobacterium strain were found to contain linear megaplasmids. Southern blot analysis with the alkene monooxygenase revealed positive signals with linear plasmids of two propene-oxidizing Rhodococcus ruber strains. These results indicate that homologous alkene monooxygenases are encoded by linear plasmids in R. ruber strains. PMID:10439411

  7. Biodegradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 to N-isopropylammelide with subsequent assessment of toxicity of biodegraded metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kolekar, Parag D; Phugare, Swapnil S; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2014-02-01

    Atrazine is a persistent organic pollutant in the environment which affects not only terrestrial and aquatic biota but also human health. Since its removal from the environment is needed, atrazine biodegradation is achieved in the present study using the bacterium Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 isolated from soil, long-term treated with atrazine. The bacterium was capable of degrading about 75 % atrazine in liquid medium having pH 7 under aerobic and dark condition within 7 days. The degradation ability of the bacterium at various temperatures (20-60 °C), pH (range 3-11), carbon (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch, lactose, and maltose), and nitrogen (ammonium molybdate, sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, and urea) sources were studied for triumph optimum atrazine degradation. The results indicate that atrazine degradation at higher concentrations (100 ppm) was pH and temperature dependent. However, glucose and potassium nitrate were optimum carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Atrazine biodegradation analysis was carried out by using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (LC/Q-TOF-MS) techniques. LC/Q-TOF-MS analysis revealed formation of various intermediate metabolites including hydroxyatrazine, N-isopropylammelide, deisopropylhydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, and deisopropyldeethylatrazine which was helpful to propose biochemical degradation pathway of atrazine. Furthermore, the toxicological studies of atrazine and its biodegraded metabolites were executed on earthworm Eisenia foetida as a model organism with respect to enzymatic (SOD and Catalase) antioxidant defense mechanism and lipid peroxidation studies. These results suggest innocuous degradation of atrazine by Rhodococcus sp. BCH2 in nontoxic form. Therefore the Rhodococcus sp.BCH2 could prove a valuable source for the eco-friendly biodegradation of atrazine pesticide. PMID

  8. Rhodococcus equi Infection after Alemtuzumab Therapy for T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Herman G.; van Assen, Sander; Leduc, Dominique; Daenen, Simon M.G.J.; Arends, Jan P.; van der Werf, Tjip S.

    2007-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, mainly known from veterinary medicine as a pathogen in domestic animals, can also cause infections in immunocompromised humans, especially in those with defects in cellular immunity. Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody, causes lymphocytopenia by eliminating CD52-positive cells. We report a patient in whom Rhodococcus equi infection developed after alemtuzumab therapy. PMID:18258054

  9. Prevalence and Antibiogram study of Rhodococcus equi in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    MIR, Irfan Ahmad; KUMAR, Bablu; TAKU, Anil; BHARDWAJ, Rajinder Kumar; BHAT, Mohd Altaf; BADROO, Gulzar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Rhodococcus equi infection in equines of Jammu and Kashmir, India, and evaluate the zoonotic threat posed by this organism to equine owners and tourists. One hundred and forty-one samples (98 samples from adult animals ≥5 years old and 43 samples from foals less than 6 months old) were collected in duplicate from nasopharyngeal tract of equines for isolation and direct PCR. A total of 12 isolates of R. equi were recovered, of which 9 were from foals and 3 from adult animals. Therefore, the present study recorded prevalence rates of 20.93% and 3.06% among foals and adult equines respectively. The prevalence rates were found to be 25.58% and 4.08% by 16S rRNA species-specific PCR among foals and adult animals respectively. Thus, the PCR-based assay was found to be more sensitive and helped in quick detection of R. equi than the culture based method which is time consuming and laborious. However, the culture-based method is still preferred due to some limitations of PCR. The antibiogram of the isolates revealed that erythromycin and rifampicin were the most effective antimicrobials with 100% sensitivity, followed by amoxicillin (66.67%), lincomycin (58.3%) and kanamycin (58.3%). The results also revealed that resistance was highest for penicillin G (50%), followed by kanamycin (25%) and streptomycin (25%). PMID:25829867

  10. Degradation of chloronitrobenzenes by a coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.S.; Lim, S.J.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, H.S.; Livingston, A.G.

    1999-03-01

    A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs of coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed.

  11. Comparative Genomics and Metabolic Analysis Reveals Peculiar Characteristics of Rhodococcus opacus Strain M213 Particularly for Naphthalene Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jochen; Indest, Karl J.; Jung, Carina M.; Stothard, Paul; Bera, Gopal; Green, Stefan J.; Ogram, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Rhodococcus opacus strain M213, isolated from a fuel-oil contaminated soil, was sequenced and annotated which revealed a genome size of 9,194,165 bp encoding 8680 putative genes and a G+C content of 66.72%. Among the protein coding genes, 71.77% were annotated as clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs); 55% of the COGs were present as paralog clusters. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of M213 revealed the presence of three different sized replicons- a circular chromosome and two megaplasmids (pNUO1 and pNUO2) estimated to be of 750Kb 350Kb in size, respectively. Conversely, using an alternative approach of optical mapping, the plasmid replicons appeared as a circular ~1.2 Mb megaplasmid and a linear, ~0.7 Mb megaplasmid. Genome-wide comparative analysis of M213 with a cohort of sequenced Rhodococcus species revealed low syntenic affiliation with other R. opacus species including strains B4 and PD630. Conversely, a closer affiliation of M213, at the functional (COG) level, was observed with the catabolically versatile R. jostii strain RHA1 and other Rhodococcii such as R. wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016, R. imtechensis strain RKJ300, Rhodococcus sp. strain JVH1, and Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17, respectively. An in-depth, genome-wide comparison between these functional relatives revealed 971 unique genes in M213 representing 11% of its total genome; many associating with catabolic functions. Of major interest was the identification of as many as 154 genomic islands (GEIs), many with duplicated catabolic genes, in particular for PAHs; a trait that was confirmed by PCR-based identification of naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) as a representative gene, across PFGE-resolved replicons of strain M213. Interestingly, several plasmid/GEI-encoded genes, that likely participate in degrading naphthalene (NAP) via a peculiar pathway, were also identified in strain M213 using a combination of bioinformatics, metabolic analysis and gene

  12. Comparative Genomics and Metabolic Analysis Reveals Peculiar Characteristics of Rhodococcus opacus Strain M213 Particularly for Naphthalene Degradation.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Chauhan, Ashvini; Blom, Jochen; Indest, Karl J; Jung, Carina M; Stothard, Paul; Bera, Gopal; Green, Stefan J; Ogram, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Rhodococcus opacus strain M213, isolated from a fuel-oil contaminated soil, was sequenced and annotated which revealed a genome size of 9,194,165 bp encoding 8680 putative genes and a G+C content of 66.72%. Among the protein coding genes, 71.77% were annotated as clusters of orthologous groups of proteins (COGs); 55% of the COGs were present as paralog clusters. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of M213 revealed the presence of three different sized replicons- a circular chromosome and two megaplasmids (pNUO1 and pNUO2) estimated to be of 750Kb 350Kb in size, respectively. Conversely, using an alternative approach of optical mapping, the plasmid replicons appeared as a circular ~1.2 Mb megaplasmid and a linear, ~0.7 Mb megaplasmid. Genome-wide comparative analysis of M213 with a cohort of sequenced Rhodococcus species revealed low syntenic affiliation with other R. opacus species including strains B4 and PD630. Conversely, a closer affiliation of M213, at the functional (COG) level, was observed with the catabolically versatile R. jostii strain RHA1 and other Rhodococcii such as R. wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016, R. imtechensis strain RKJ300, Rhodococcus sp. strain JVH1, and Rhodococcus sp. strain DK17, respectively. An in-depth, genome-wide comparison between these functional relatives revealed 971 unique genes in M213 representing 11% of its total genome; many associating with catabolic functions. Of major interest was the identification of as many as 154 genomic islands (GEIs), many with duplicated catabolic genes, in particular for PAHs; a trait that was confirmed by PCR-based identification of naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) as a representative gene, across PFGE-resolved replicons of strain M213. Interestingly, several plasmid/GEI-encoded genes, that likely participate in degrading naphthalene (NAP) via a peculiar pathway, were also identified in strain M213 using a combination of bioinformatics, metabolic analysis and gene

  13. Novel 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation Genes from Oligotrophic Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain HW13 Isolated from a Pristine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Wataru; Takami, Sachiko; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Masai, Eiji; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tiedje, James M.; Fukuda, Masao

    2002-01-01

    The tfd genes of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 are the only well-characterized set of genes responsible for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) degradation among 2,4-D-degrading bacteria. A new family of 2,4-D degradation genes, cadRABKC, was cloned and characterized from Bradyrhizobium sp. strain HW13, a strain that was isolated from a buried Hawaiian soil that has never experienced anthropogenic chemicals. The cadR gene was inferred to encode an AraC/XylS type of transcriptional regulator from its deduced amino acid sequence. The cadABC genes were predicted to encode 2,4-D oxygenase subunits from their deduced amino acid sequences that showed 46, 44, and 37% identities with the TftA and TftB subunits of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) oxygenase of Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 and with a putative ferredoxin, ThcC, of Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21, respectively. They are thoroughly different from the 2,4-D dioxygenase gene, tfdA, of R. eutropha JMP134. The cadK gene was presumed to encode a 2,4-D transport protein from its deduced amino acid sequence that showed 60% identity with the 2,4-D transporter, TfdK, of strain JMP134. Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 cells containing cadRABKC transformed several phenoxyacetic acids, including 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, to corresponding phenol derivatives. Frameshift mutations indicated that each of the cadRABC genes was essential for 2,4-D conversion in strain Rm1021 but that cadK was not. Five 2,4-D degraders, including Bradyrhizobium and Sphingomonas strains, were found to have cadA gene homologs, suggesting that these 2,4-D degraders share 2,4-D degradation genes similar to those of strain HW13 cadABC. PMID:11751829

  14. Importance of Rhodococcus strains in a bacterial consortium degrading a mixture of hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives revealed by metatranscriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Marc D; Yergeau, Etienne; Labbé, Diane; Fayolle-Guichard, Françoise; Greer, Charles W

    2015-03-01

    A bacterial consortium (Mix3) composed of microorganisms originating from different environments (soils and wastewater) was obtained after enrichment in the presence of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons, gasoline, and diesel oil additives. After addition of the mixture, the development of the microbial composition of Mix3 was monitored at three different times (35, 113, and 222 days) using fingerprinting method and dominant bacterial species were identified. In parallel, 14 bacteria were isolated after 113 days and identified. Degradation capacities for Mix3 and the isolated bacterial strains were characterized and compared. At day 113, we induced the expression of catabolic genes in Mix3 by adding the substrate mixture to resting cells and the metatranscriptome was analyzed. After addition of the substrate mixture, the relative abundance of Actinobacteria increased at day 222 while a shift between Rhodococcus and Mycobacterium was observed after 113 days. Mix3 was able to degrade 13 compounds completely, with partial degradation of isooctane and 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, but tert-butyl alcohol was not degraded. Rhodococcus wratislaviensis strain IFP 2016 isolated from Mix3 showed almost the same degradation capacities as Mix3: these results were not observed with the other isolated strains. Transcriptomic results revealed that Actinobacteria and in particular, Rhodococcus species, were major contributors in terms of total and catabolic gene transcripts while other species were involved in cyclohexane degradation. Not all the microorganisms identified at day 113 were active except R. wratislaviensis IFP 2016 that appeared to be a major player in the degradation activity observed in Mix3. PMID:25343979

  15. Benzoate degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after dormancy: Characterization of dioxygenases involved in the process.

    PubMed

    Solyanikova, Inna P; Emelyanova, Elena V; Borzova, Oksana V; Golovleva, Ludmila A

    2016-01-01

    The process of benzoate degradation by strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP after a five-year dormancy was investigated and its peculiarities were revealed. The strain was shown to be capable of growth on benzoate at a concentration of up to 10 g L(-1). The substrate specificity of benzoate dioxygenase (BDO) during the culture growth on a medium with a low (200-250 mg L(-1)) and high (4 g L(-1)) concentration of benzoate was assessed. BDO of R. opacus 1CP was shown to be an extremely narrow specificity enzyme. Out of 31 substituted benzoates, only with one, 3-chlorobenzoate, its activity was higher than 9% of that of benzoate. Two dioxygenases, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (Cat 1,2-DO) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCA 3,4-DO), were identified in a cell-free extract, purified and characterized. The substrate specificity of Cat 1,2-DO isolated from cells of strain 1CP after the dormancy was found to differ significantly from that of Cat 1,2-DO isolated earlier from cells of this strain grown on benzoate. By its substrate specificity, the described Cat 1,2-DO was close to the Cat 1,2-DO from strain 1CP grown on 4-methylbenzoate. Neither activity nor inhibition by protocatechuate was observed during the reaction of Cat 1,2-DO with catechol, and catechol had no inhibitory effect on the reaction of PCA 3,4-DO with protocatechuate. PMID:26669259

  16. Colonization, biofilm formation and biodegradation of polyethylene by a strain of Rhodococcus ruber.

    PubMed

    Orr, I Gilan; Hadar, Y; Sivan, A

    2004-07-01

    A two-step enrichment procedure led to the isolation of a strain of Rhodococcus ruber (C208) that utilized polyethylene films as sole carbon source. In liquid culture, C208 formed a biofilm on the polyethylene surface and degraded up to 8% (gravimetrically) of the polyolefin within 30 days of incubation. The bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay and the salt aggregation test both showed that the cell-surface hydrophobicity of C208 was higher than that of three other isolates which were obtained from the same consortium but were less efficient than C208 in the degradation of polyethylene. Mineral oil, but not nonionic surfactants, enhanced the colonization of polyethylene and increased biodegradation by about 50%. Fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis and protein content analysis were used to test the viability and biomass density of the C208 biofilm on the polyethylene, respectively. Both FDA activity and protein content of the biofilm in a medium containing mineral oil peaked 48-72 h after inoculation and then decreased sharply. This finding apparently reflected rapid utilization of the mineral oil adhering to the polyethylene. The remaining biofilm population continued to proliferate moderately and presumably played a major role in biodegradation of the polyethylene. Fourier transform infrared spectra of UV-photooxidized polyethylene incubated with C208 indicated that biodegradation was initiated by utilization of the carbonyl residues formed in the photooxidized polyethylene. PMID:15221232

  17. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M.C.; Takai, S.; Leite, D.S.; Pinto, J.P.A.N.; Brandão, P.E.; Santarém, V.A.; Listoni, F.J.P.; Da Silva, A.V.; Ribeiro, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places. PMID:24294244

  18. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain BCP1, a Biodegrader of Alkanes and Chlorinated Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, M.; Di Gennaro, P.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Landini, M.; Fedi, S.; Frascari, D.; Presentato, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 cometabolizes chlorinated compounds and mineralizes a broad range of alkanes, as it is highly tolerant to them. The high-quality draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1, consisting of 6,231,823 bp, with a G+C content of 70.4%, 5,902 protein-coding genes, and 58 RNA genes, is presented here. PMID:24158549

  19. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable State in Rhodococcus and Transcriptome Analysis Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomei; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Qu, Kun; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) bacteria, which maintain the viability with loss of culturability, universally exist in contaminated and non-contaminated environments. In this study, two strains, Rhodococcus sp. TG13 and TN3, which were isolated from PCB-contaminated sediment and non-contaminated sediment respectively, were investigated under low temperature and oligotrophic conditions. The results indicated that the two strains TG13 and TN3 could enter into the VBNC state with different incubation times, and could recover culturability by reversal of unfavourable factors and addition of resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), respectively. Furthermore, the gene expression variations in the VBNC response were clarified by Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis demonstrated that up-regulated genes in the VBNC cells of the strain TG13 related to protein modification, ATP accumulation and RNA polymerase, while all differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the VBNC cells of the strain TN3 were down-regulated. However, the down-regulated genes in both the two strains mainly encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit, catalase, oxidoreductase, which further verified that cold-induced loss of ability to defend oxidative stress may play an important role in induction of the VBNC state. This study further verified that the molecular mechanisms underlying the VBNC state varied with various bacterial species. Study on the VBNC state of non-pathogenic bacteria will provide new insights into the limitation of environmental micro-bioremediation and the cultivation of unculturable species. PMID:26808070

  20. Development of a genetic transformation system for benzene-tolerant Rhodococcus opacus strains.

    PubMed

    Na, Kyung-Su; Nagayasu, Kan; Kuroda, Akio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2005-04-01

    Rhodococcus opacus B-4 and B-9 are tolerant to various organic solvents including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene, and are suitable bacterial hosts for the production of chemical products from hydrophobic substrates. A 4.4-kb endogenous plasmid (pKNR 01) was isolated from R. opacus B-4 and sequenced completely. Plasmid pKNR 01 encodes proteins that share similarity to replication proteins from the enteric bacterial and actinomycete theta-replication plasmids. A 7.4-kb chimeric plasmid, designated pKNR 01.1, was constructed by fusing XhoI-digested pKNR 01 and Escherichia coli vector pSTV 28. Plasmid pKNR 01.1 had the ability to replicate in B-4 and B-9. A protocol for transformation of B-9 by electroporation was optimized employing pKNR 01.1. Frequencies of 4.1 x 10(5) transformants per mug of plasmid DNA were obtained for B-9 cells, whereas B-4 harboring naturally occurring pKNR 01 was transformed at lower frequencies (approximately 1 x 10(4) transformants per mug of plasmid DNA). Deletion analysis of pKNR 01.1 showed that the 1.9-kb SphI-XhoI region containing the repA and rep B genes and the 0.6-kb region upstream of repA was essential for plasmid maintenance in R. opacus strains. PMID:16233810

  1. Induction of Viable but Nonculturable State in Rhodococcus and Transcriptome Analysis Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomei; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Qu, Kun; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Viable but nonculturable (VBNC) bacteria, which maintain the viability with loss of culturability, universally exist in contaminated and non-contaminated environments. In this study, two strains, Rhodococcus sp. TG13 and TN3, which were isolated from PCB-contaminated sediment and non-contaminated sediment respectively, were investigated under low temperature and oligotrophic conditions. The results indicated that the two strains TG13 and TN3 could enter into the VBNC state with different incubation times, and could recover culturability by reversal of unfavourable factors and addition of resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf), respectively. Furthermore, the gene expression variations in the VBNC response were clarified by Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis demonstrated that up-regulated genes in the VBNC cells of the strain TG13 related to protein modification, ATP accumulation and RNA polymerase, while all differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the VBNC cells of the strain TN3 were down-regulated. However, the down-regulated genes in both the two strains mainly encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit, catalase, oxidoreductase, which further verified that cold-induced loss of ability to defend oxidative stress may play an important role in induction of the VBNC state. This study further verified that the molecular mechanisms underlying the VBNC state varied with various bacterial species. Study on the VBNC state of non-pathogenic bacteria will provide new insights into the limitation of environmental micro-bioremediation and the cultivation of unculturable species. PMID:26808070

  2. Rhodococcus equi venous catheter infection: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rhodococcus equi is an animal pathogen that was initially isolated from horses and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans with impaired cellular immunity. However, this pathogen is underestimated as a challenging antagonist and is frequently considered to be a mere contaminant despite the potential for life-threatening infections. Most case reports have occurred in immunocompromised patients who have received organ transplants (for example kidney, heart, bone marrow) or those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Infections often manifest as pulmonary involvement or soft tissue abscesses. Bacteremia related to R. equi infections of tunneled central venous catheters has rarely been described. Case presentation We report the case of a 63-year-old non-transplant recipient, non-HIV infected Caucasian woman with endometrial carcinoma who developed recurrent bloodstream infections and septic shock due to R. equi and ultimately required the removal of her port catheter, a subcutaneous implantable central venous catheter. We also review the medical literature related to human infections with R. equi. Conclusion R. equi should be considered a serious pathogen, not a contaminant, particularly in an immunocompromised patient who presents with a central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection. Counseling patients with central venous catheters who participate in activities involving exposure to domesticated animals is recommended. PMID:21827681

  3. Modulation of Cytokine Response of Pneumonic Foals by Virulent Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Steeve; Wilkie, Bruce N.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of Rhodococcus equi to induce pneumonia in foals depends on the presence of an 85- to 90-kb plasmid. In this study, we evaluated whether plasmid-encoded products mediate virulence by modulating the cytokine response of foals. Foals infected intrabronchially with a virulence plasmid-containing strain of R. equi had similar gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) p35 but significantly higher IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lung tissue compared to foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. IFN-γ mRNA expression levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from bronchial lymph nodes (BLN) were similar for the two groups of R. equi-infected foals on day 3 postinfection. However, on day 14, in association with pneumonia and marked multiplication of virulent R. equi but with complete clearance of the plasmid-cured derivative, IFN-γ mRNA expression in BLN CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. These results suggests an immunomodulating role for R. equi virulence plasmid-encoded products in downregulating IFN-γ mRNA expression by CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:10496876

  4. Biodesulfurization of water-soluble coal-derived material by Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II; Jackowski, K.

    1991-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 was previously isolated because of its ability to use coal as its sole source of sulfur for growth. Subsequent growth studies have revealed that IGTS8 is capable of using a variety of organosulfur compounds as sources of sulfur but not carbon. In this paper, the ability of IGTS8 to selectively remove organic sulfur from water-soluble coal-derived material is investigated. The microbial removal of organic sulfur from coal requires microorganisms capable of cleaving carbonsulfur bonds and the accessibility of these bonds to microorganisms. The use of water-soluble coal-derived material effectively overcomes the problem of accessibility and allows the ability of microorganisms to cleave carbonsulfur bonds present in coal-derived material to be assessed directly. Three coals, two coal solubilization procedures, and two methods of biodesulfurization were examined. The results of these experiments reveal that the microbial removal of significant amounts of organic sulfur from watersoluble coal-derived material with treatment times as brief as 24 hours is possible. Moreover, the carbon content and calorific value of biotreated products are largely unaffected. Biotreatment does, however, result in increases in the hydrogen and nitrogen content and a decreased oxygen content of the coal-derived material. The aqueous supernatant obtained from biodesulfurization experiments does not contain sulfate, sulfite, or other forms of soluble sulfur at increased concentrations in comparison with control samples. Sulfur removed from water-soluble coal-derived material appears to be incorporated into biomass.

  5. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins. PMID:25084333

  6. Genomic and Functional Analyses of Rhodococcus equi Phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiPoco6, ReqiPine5, and ReqiDocB7 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Summer, E. J.; Liu, M.; Gill, J. J.; Grant, M.; Chan-Cortes, T. N.; Ferguson, L.; Janes, C.; Lange, K.; Bertoli, M.; Moore, C.; Orchard, R. C.; Cohen, N. D.; Young, R.

    2011-01-01

    The isolation and results of genomic and functional analyses of Rhodococcus equi phages ReqiPepy6, ReqiDocB7, ReqiPine5, and ReqiPoco6 (hereafter referred to as Pepy6, DocB7, Pine5, and Poco6, respectively) are reported. Two phages, Pepy6 and Poco6, more than 75% identical, exhibited genome organization and protein sequence likeness to Lactococcus lactis phage 1706 and clostridial prophage elements. An unusually high fraction, 27%, of Pepy6 and Poco6 proteins were predicted to possess at least one transmembrane domain, a value much higher than the average of 8.5% transmembrane domain-containing proteins determined from a data set of 36,324 phage protein entries. Genome organization and protein sequence comparisons place phage Pine5 as the first nonmycobacteriophage member of the large Rosebush cluster. DocB7, which had the broadest host range among the four isolates, was not closely related to any phage or prophage in the database, and only 23 of 105 predicted encoded proteins could be assigned a functional annotation. Because of the relationship of Rhodococcus to Mycobacterium, it was anticipated that these phages should exhibit some of the features characteristic of mycobacteriophages. Traits that were identified as shared by the Rhodococcus phages and mycobacteriophages include the prevalent long-tailed morphology and the presence of genes encoding LysB-like mycolate-hydrolyzing lysis proteins. Application of DocB7 lysates to soils amended with a host strain of R. equi reduced recoverable bacterial CFU, suggesting that phage may be useful in limiting R. equi load in the environment while foals are susceptible to infection. PMID:21097585

  7. [Diagnosis and therapy of Rhodococcus equi infection in the horse].

    PubMed

    Boswinkel, M; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M

    2006-09-01

    Infection with Rhodococcus equi is an important cause of pneumonia in foals, but other organ systems may also be affected. The intracellular presence of R. equi and the formation of granulomatous and suppurative inflammatory tissue mean that prolonged treatment is needed. The pharmacological properties of the combination of erythromycin and rifampicin have improved the survival of foals infected with R. equi; however, erythromycin can cause adverse reactions in foals and mares, which has prompted the search for alternative therapies. The combination of azithromycin or clarithromycin with rifampicin seems to be a promising alternative. However these combinations are expensive and adverse effects remain to be determined, especially in the dams of treated foals. Thus correct diagnosis and appropriate use of drugs are essential for the treatment of R. equi infection in foals. PMID:16989420

  8. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D.; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  9. An Adenoviral Vector Based Vaccine for Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giles, Carla; Ndi, Olasumbo; Barton, Mary D; Vanniasinkam, Thiru

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a respiratory pathogen which primarily infects foals and is endemic on farms around the world with 50% mortality and 80% morbidity in affected foals. Unless detected early and treated appropriately the disease can be fatal. Currently, there is no vaccine available to prevent this disease. For decades researchers have endeavoured to develop an effective vaccine to no avail. In this study a novel human adenoviral vector vaccine for R. equi was developed and tested in the mouse model. This vaccine generated a strong antibody and cytokine response and clearance of R. equi was demonstrated following challenge. These results show that this vaccine could potentially be developed further for use as a vaccine to prevent R. equi disease in foals. PMID:27008624

  10. Isopropanol and acetone induces vinyl chloride degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Robin L; Brown, Lewis R; Zappi, Mark E; French, W Todd

    2003-11-01

    In situ bioremediation of vinyl chloride (VC)-contaminated waste sites requires a microorganism capable of degrading VC. While propane will induce an oxygenase to accomplish this goal, its use as a primary substrate in bioremediation is complicated by its flammability and low water solubility. This study demonstrates that two degradation products of propane, isoproponal and acetone, can induce the enzymes in Rhodococcus rhodochrous that degrade VC. Additionally, a reasonable number of cells for bioremediation can be grown on conventional solid bacteriological media (nutrient agar, tryptic soy agar, plate count agar) in an average microbiological laboratory and then induced to produce the necessary enzymes by incubation of a resting cell suspension with isopropanol or acetone. Since acetone is more volatile than isopropanol and has other undesirable characteristics, isopropanol is the inducer of choice. It offers a non-toxic, water-soluble, relatively inexpensive alternative to propane for in situ bioremediation of waste sites contaminated with VC. PMID:14605909

  11. Radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wicky, S; Cartei, F; Mayor, B; Frija, J; Gevenois, P A; Giron, J; Laurent, F; Perri, G; Schnyder, P

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi (R. equi) infections have been incidentally reported as a cause of pulmonary infection in severely immunocompromised hosts, including AIDS patients. Our purpose is to describe the radiological findings in nine AIDS patients with R. equi pneumonia assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), biopsies, cultures of sputum, and hemocultures. All patients were examined by chest radiographs and contrast-medium-enhanced chest CT. Dense pulmonary consolidations with or without cavitations accounted for the most striking radiological patterns. Chest CT also revealed six mediastinal involvements, strongly mimicking a lymphoma. Two of them had multiple bilateral pulmonary nodular opacities. Pleural effusion was not identified. Although intensive therapies were administered, seven among nine patients died within few months. In an AIDS patient living in a rural area or exposed to horses and presenting these radiological patterns, the possibility of R. equi pneumonia should be considered in the differential diagnosis along with other infectious diseases or lymphomas. PMID:8972317

  12. In vitro synergy, pharmacodynamics, and postantibiotic effect of 11 antimicrobial agents against Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Lee, Elise A; Guldbech, Kristen M; Berghaus, Londa J

    2012-11-01

    There are no studies investigating interactions between clarithromycin or azithromycin and rifampin or other commonly used antimicrobial agents against virulent isolates of Rhodococcus equi. In addition, there is no published data on the postantibiotic effects (PAEs) and pharmacodynamics properties of antimicrobial agents against R. equi. The objectives were to assess in vitro interactions, pharmacodynamics, and PAEs of 11 antimicrobial agents belonging to various antimicrobial classes against R. equi. Antimicrobial agents investigated (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, ceftiofur, and doxycycline) were selected based on in vitro activity against large numbers of isolates of R. equi and frequency of use in foals or humans infected with R. equi. Three virulent strains of R. equi were evaluated by time-kill curves and checkerboard assays, and the postantibiotic effect was measured at 5×MIC. Only amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, and vancomycin were bactericidal against R. equi. Combinations including a macrolide (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin) and either rifampin or doxycycline, and the combination doxycycline-rifampin were synergistic. Combinations containing amikacin and erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, or rifampin and the combination gentamicin-rifampin were antagonistic. The PAEs of rifampin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, vancomycin, and doxycycline were relatively long with median values ranging between 4.5 and 6.5h. Azithromycin, gentamicin, and imipenem had intermediate PAEs ranging between 3.3 and 3.5h. Amikacin, enrofloxacin, and ceftiofur had shorter PAEs ranging between 1.3 and 2.1h. Gentamicin, amikacin, enrofloxacin, and doxycycline exhibited concentration-dependent activity whereas erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, imipenem, and vancomycin exhibited time-dependent activity against R. equi. PMID:22704561

  13. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an antigenically related 20-kDa protein (herein designated VapB). These two proteins are not expressed by the same R. equi isolate. We describe here the substantial similarity between VapA and VapB. Moreover, we identify three additional genes carried on the virulence plasmid, vapC, -D, and -E, that are tandemly arranged downstream of vapA. These new genes are members of a gene family and encode proteins that are approximately 50% homologous to VapA, VapB, and each other. vapC, -D, and -E are found only in R. equi strains that express VapA and are highly conserved in VapA-positive isolates from both horses and humans. VapC, -D, and -E are secreted proteins coordinately regulated by temperature with VapA; the proteins are expressed when R. equi is cultured at 37°C but not at 30°C, a finding that is compatible with a role in virulence. As secreted proteins, VapC, -D, and -E may represent targets for the prevention of rhodococcal pneumonia. An immunologic study using VapA-specific antibodies and recombinant Vap proteins revealed no evidence of cross-reactivity despite extensive sequence similarity over the carboxy terminus of all four proteins. PMID:11159951

  14. Molecular characterization of Rhodococcus equi from horse-breeding farms by means of multiplex PCR for the vap gene family.

    PubMed

    Monego, Fernanda; Maboni, Franciele; Krewer, Cristina; Vargas, Agueda; Costa, Mateus; Loreto, Elgion

    2009-04-01

    This study evaluated the molecular characteristics of Rhodococcus equi isolates obtained from horses by a multiplex PCR assay that amplifies the vap gene family (vapA, -B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, and -H). A total of 180 R. equi isolates were studied from four different sources, namely healthy horse feces (112), soil (12), stalls (23), and clinical isolates (33) from horse-breeding farms. The technique was performed and confirmed by sequencing of amplified vap gene family controls. Thirty-two (17.8%) of the R. equi isolates were positive for the vapA gene and carried at least three other vap genes. All 147 isolates from equine feces, stalls, and soil failed to demonstrate any genes associated with virulence-inducing proteins. About 32 (97.0%) out of the 33 clinical equine isolates tested positive for the multiplex PCR assay for the vap gene family. They demonstrated six molecular profiles: 100% featured the vapA, vapD, and vapG genes, 86.6% vapF, 76.6% vapH, 43.3% vapC, 36.6% vapE, and none vapB. The most frequent molecular profile was vap A, -D, -F, G, and -H, where this profile was present in 37.5% of the strains. Moreover, there was no molecular epidemiological pattern for R. equi isolates that uniquely mapped to each horse-breeding farm studied. Our proposed technique allows the identification of eight members of the vap gene family (vapA, B, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, and -H). It is a practical and efficient method of conducting clinical and epidemiological studies on R. equi isolates. PMID:19205798

  15. A 2-Hydroxypyridine Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus rhodochrous Strain PY11

    PubMed Central

    Gasparavičiūtė, Renata; Rutkienė, Rasa; Tauraitė, Daiva; Meškys, Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 (DSM 101666) is able to use 2-hydroxypyridine as a sole source of carbon and energy. By investigating a gene cluster (hpo) from this bacterium, we were able to reconstruct the catabolic pathway of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation. Here, we report that in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11, the initial hydroxylation of 2-hydroxypyridine is catalyzed by a four-component dioxygenase (HpoBCDF). A product of the dioxygenase reaction (3,6-dihydroxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-2-one) is further oxidized by HpoE to 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine, which spontaneously forms a blue pigment. In addition, we show that the subsequent 2,3,6-trihydroxypyridine ring opening is catalyzed by the hypothetical cyclase HpoH. The final products of 2-hydroxypyridine degradation in Rhodococcus rhodochrous PY11 are ammonium ion and α-ketoglutarate. PMID:26655765

  16. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  17. Blastogenic response of lymphocytes from foals infected with Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Y; Noda, H; Nagahata, H

    1996-04-01

    The blastogenic response of lymphocytes from 16 newborn foals naturally infected with Rhodococcus equi was investigated, in order to evaluate the relationship between R. equi infection and depressed host response. Naturally infected foals showed evidence of R. equi infection at 5-6 weeks of age, as determined by clinical, haematological, bacteriological and serological methods. The blastogenic response of lymphocytes against phytohaemagglutinin was significantly depressed (stimulation index < 1.80; P < 0.01, P < 0.05) in R. equi-infected foals at 5-6 weeks of age compared with those of control foals. Serum IgG concentration decreased rapidly after foals reached 1 week of age, and minimum levels of IgG were observed at 5-7 weeks of age in R. equi-infected foals. This study suggests that the onset of R. equi infection may be associated with the depressed immune function of naturally infected foals during the first 5-6 weeks after birth. PMID:8693847

  18. Association between radiographic pattern and outcome in foals with pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Roberts, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize the association between types of radiographic findings and outcome in foals with pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi. Admission lateral thoracic radiographs of 62 foals with culture-confirmed R. equi pneumonia were reviewed retrospectively. A scoring system was developed to individually assess the severity of alveolar pattern, interstitial pattern, tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy, pleural effusion, and the number of nodular opacities and cavitary lesions. Individual scores were added to obtain a total radiographic score ranging from 0 (normal) to 22. Forty-three of 62 foals (69%) survived to discharge. The median total radiographic score of nonsurvivors (14; range, 9-16) was significantly (P = 0.007) higher than that of survivors (11; range, 4-15). Foals with a total radiographic score of greater than or equal to 15 were 6.15 times (95% CI: 1.35 to 28.2) less likely to survive than foals with a lower score (P = 0.019). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify the potential associations between specific types of radiographic lesions and outcome. The model was statistically significant (P = 0.002) and correctly classified 75.8% of foals. Only severity of alveolar pattern and number of cavitary lesions made statistically significant contributions to the model. There was no significant association between concurrent isolation of other bacteria along with R. equi and the types or severity of radiographic lesions. Based on the results of this study, severity of alveolar pattern and number of cavitary lesions are the radiographic findings significantly associated with a poor outcome in foals with R. equi pneumonia. PMID:22742474

  19. IcgA Is a Virulence Factor of Rhodococcus equi That Modulates Intracellular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Virulence of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi depends on a 21.3-kb pathogenicity island located on a conjugative plasmid. To date, the only nonregulatory pathogenicity island-encoded virulence factor identified is the cell envelope-associated VapA protein. Although the pathogenicity islands from porcine and equine R. equi isolates have undergone major rearrangements, the virR operon (virR-icgA-vapH-orf7-virS) is highly conserved in both, suggesting these genes play an important role in pathogenicity. VirR and VirS are transcriptional regulators controlling expression of pathogenicity island genes, including vapA. Here, we show that while vapH and orf7 are dispensable for intracellular growth of R. equi, deletion of icgA, formerly known as orf5, encoding a major facilitator superfamily transport protein, elicited an enhanced growth phenotype in macrophages and a significant reduction in macrophage viability, while extracellular growth in broth remained unaffected. Transcription of virS, located downstream of icgA, and vapA was not affected by the icgA deletion during growth in broth or in macrophages, showing that the enhanced growth phenotype caused by deletion of icgA was not mediated through abnormal transcription of these genes. Transcription of icgA increased 6-fold within 2 h following infection of macrophages and remained significantly higher 48 h postinfection compared to levels at the start of the infection. The major facilitator superfamily transport protein IcgA is the first factor identified in R. equi that negatively affects intracellular replication. Aside from VapA, it is only the second pathogenicity island-encoded structural protein shown to play a direct role in intracellular growth of this pathogenic actinomycete. PMID:24549327

  20. Comparative and Functional Genomics of Rhodococcus opacus PD630 for Biofuels Development

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Jason W.; Ulrich, Jil C.; DeBono, Anthony C.; Godfrey, Paul A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Zucker, Jeremy; Zeng, Qiandong; Leach, Alex L. B.; Ghiviriga, Ion; Dancel, Christine; Abeel, Thomas; Gevers, Dirk; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Desany, Brian; Affourtit, Jason P.; Birren, Bruce W.; Sinskey, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    The Actinomycetales bacteria Rhodococcus opacus PD630 and Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 bioconvert a diverse range of organic substrates through lipid biosynthesis into large quantities of energy-rich triacylglycerols (TAGs). To describe the genetic basis of the Rhodococcus oleaginous metabolism, we sequenced and performed comparative analysis of the 9.27 Mb R. opacus PD630 genome. Metabolic-reconstruction assigned 2017 enzymatic reactions to the 8632 R. opacus PD630 genes we identified. Of these, 261 genes were implicated in the R. opacus PD630 TAGs cycle by metabolic reconstruction and gene family analysis. Rhodococcus synthesizes uncommon straight-chain odd-carbon fatty acids in high abundance and stores them as TAGs. We have identified these to be pentadecanoic, heptadecanoic, and cis-heptadecenoic acids. To identify bioconversion pathways, we screened R. opacus PD630, R. jostii RHA1, Ralstonia eutropha H16, and C. glutamicum 13032 for growth on 190 compounds. The results of the catabolic screen, phylogenetic analysis of the TAGs cycle enzymes, and metabolic product characterizations were integrated into a working model of prokaryotic oleaginy. PMID:21931557

  1. First Report of Sepsis Caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Yuka; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of sepsis caused by Rhodococcus corynebacterioides, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a myelodysplastic syndrome patient who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This is the first report of R. corynebacterioides infection in a human. PMID:22205796

  2. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus opacus Strain R7, a Biodegrader of Mono- and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zampolli, J.; Presti, I.; Cappelletti, M.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus strain R7 (CIP107348) degrades several mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of strain R7, consisting of 10,118,052 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0%, 9,602 protein-coding genes, and 62 RNAs genes. PMID:25146139

  3. Deep Desulfurization of Extensively Hydrodesulfurized Middle Distillate Oil by Rhodococcus sp. Strain ECRD-1

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, M. J.; Lee, M. K.; Prince, R. C.; Minak-Bernero, V.; George, G. N.; Pickering, I. J.

    2001-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in particular substituted DBTs, are resistant to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and can persist in fuels even after aggressive HDS treatment. Treatment by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 of a middle distillate oil whose sulfur content was virtually all substituted DBTs produced extensive desulfurization and a sulfur level of 56 ppm. PMID:11282654

  4. Rhodococcus equi hyperimmune plasma decreases pneumonia severity after a randomised experimental challenge of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M G; Loynachan, A; Horohov, D W

    2016-03-12

    Since a vaccine is not available against Rhodococcus equi, R equi-specific hyperimmune plasma (HIP) is commonly used, although its efficacy remains controversial. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a commercially available HIP to prevent clinical rhodococcal pneumonia in neonatal foals after experimental challenge. PMID:26932206

  5. Pyogenic Liver Abscess Due to Rhodococcus equi in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Napoleão, Fátima; Vieira Damasco, Paulo; Ferreira Camello, Thereza Cristina; Damasceno do Vale, Márcio; Braga de Andrade, Arnaldo Feitosa; Hirata, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2005-01-01

    A case of pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent individual was successfully treated by combining surgery and antibiotics. The R. equi-targeted antimicrobial agents erythromycin and rifampin were used only after surgical resection of the lesion and identification of the infective organism. PMID:15695730

  6. Deep desulfurization of extensively hydrodesulfurized middle distillate oil by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M J; Lee, M K; Prince, R C; Minak-Bernero, V; George, G N; Pickering, I J

    2001-04-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), and in particular substituted DBTs, are resistant to hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and can persist in fuels even after aggressive HDS treatment. Treatment by Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 of a middle distillate oil whose sulfur content was virtually all substituted DBTs produced extensive desulfurization and a sulfur level of 56 ppm. PMID:11282654

  7. Establishment of Cellobiose Utilization for Lipid Production in Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    PubMed Central

    Hetzler, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus PD630, which is known for its ability to accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG), was metabolically engineered, and a cellobiose utilization pathway was introduced. Activities of β-glucosidases were determined, and recombinant strains accumulated fatty acids up to 39.5 ± 5.7% (wt/wt) of cell dry mass from cellobiose. PMID:23435878

  8. Conservation of Rhodococcus equi (Magnusson 1923) Goodfellow and Alderson 1977 and rejection of Corynebacterium hoagii (Morse 1912) Eberson 1918.

    PubMed

    Garrity, George M

    2014-01-01

    A recent review of the nomenclatural history of Rhodococcus equi and its heterotypic synonyms reveals a situation in which the strict application of the Rules of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes have resulted in the renaming of this known zoonotic pathogen, which may be reasonably viewed as a perilous name. This situation can be remedied only by the Judicial Commission rendering an opinion to conserve the name Rhodococcus equi and to reject its earlier heterotypic synonym, Corynebacterium hoagii. PMID:24408953

  9. Enantioselective Metabolism of Chiral 3-Phenylbutyric Acid, an Intermediate of Linear Alkylbenzene Degradation, by Rhodococcus rhodochrous PB1

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, S.; Klinke, S.; Zipper, C.; Angst, W.; Kohler, H. E.

    1996-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous PB1 was isolated from compost soil by selective culture with racemic 3-phenylbutyric acid as the sole carbon and energy source. Growth experiments with the single pure enantiomers as well as with the racemate showed that only one of the two enantiomers, (R)-3-phenylbutyric acid, supported growth of strain PB1. Nevertheless, (S)-3-phenylbutyric acid was cometabolically transformed to, presumably, (S)-3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)butyric acid (the absolute configuration at the C-3 atom is not known yet) by (R)-3-phenylbutyric acid-grown cells of strain PB1, as shown by (sup1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the partially purified compound and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the trimethylsilyl derivative. Oxygen uptake rates suggest that either 3-phenylpropionic acid or cinnamic acid (trans-3-phenyl-2-propenoic acid) is the substrate for aromatic ring hydroxylation. This view is substantiated by the fact that 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid was a substrate for meta cleavage in cell extracts of (R)-3-phenylbutyric acid-grown cells of strain PB1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of trimethylsilane-treated ethyl acetate extracts of incubation mixtures showed that both the meta-cleavage product, 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-2,4-nonadiene-1,9-dicarboxylic acid, and succinate, a hydrolysis product thereof, were formed during such incubations. PMID:16535265

  10. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-09-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  11. Serum antibody responses of foals to virulence-associated 15- to 17-kilodalton antigens of Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Tákai, S; Hidaka, D; Fujii, M; Shindoh, Y; Murata, T; Nakanishi, S; Sasaki, Y; Tsubaki, S; Kamada, M

    1996-09-01

    Humoral immune responses in 16 foals to virulence-associated 15- to 17-kDa antigens of Rhodococcus equi were studied during the first fourteen weeks of life on two horse-breeding farms with a persistent incidence of R. equi infection. Serum antibody levels specific for 15- to 17-kDa antigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western immunoblotting. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies specific to 15- to 17-kDa antigens were detected by all the foals. R. equi was found in the feces of foals during week 1 of life, and the number of fecal R. equi rapidly increased to the highest level. Virulent R. equi were isolated from the feces of the foals at a high frequency and from their environmental soil on the farms. Evidence that serum antibody response to 15- to 17-kDa antigens of virulent R. equi occurred naturally in every foal in correlation with the quantitative changes of fecal R. equi during the first 1 to 3 months of life suggests that intestinal virulent R. equi might be the most important source of antigenic stimulation in foals from contaminated farms. PMID:8914251

  12. Rhodococcus sp. strain TM1 plays a synergistic role in the degradation of piperidine by Mycobacterium sp. strain THO100.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak; Kang, Un-Beom; Konishi, Kyoko; Lee, Cheolju

    2006-09-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain THO100 and Rhodococcus sp. strain TM1 were isolated from a morpholine-containing enrichment culture of activated sewage sludge. Strain THO100, but not strain TM1, was able to degrade alicyclic amines such as morpholine, piperidine, and pyrrolidine. The mixed strains THO100 and TM1 showed a better growth on piperidine as the substrate than the pure strain THO100 because strain TM1 was able to reduce the level of glutaraldehyde (GA) produced during piperidine degradation. GA was toxic to strain THO100 (IC(50) = 28.3 microM) but less toxic to strain TM1 (IC(50) = 215 microM). Strain THO100 possessed constitutive semialdehyde dehydrogenases, namely Sad1 and Sad2, whose activities toward succinic semialdehyde (SSA) were strongly inhibited by GA. The two isozymes were identified as catalase-peroxidase (KatG = Sad1) and semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Sad2) based on mass spectrometric analyses of tryptic peptides and database searches of the partial DNA sequences of their genes. In contrast, strain TM1 containing another constitutive enzyme Gad1 could oxidize both SSA and GA. This study suggested that strain TM1 possessing Gad1 played a synergistic role in reducing the toxic and inhibitory effects of GA produced in the degradation of piperidine by strain THO100. PMID:16832627

  13. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of efflux pump in Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Pötter, Luciana; da Silveira, Bibiana Petri; Sangioni, Luis Antônio; de Avila Botton, Sônia

    2014-01-01

    The req_39680 gene, associated to a putative efflux system, was detected in 60% (54/90) of R. equi isolates by PCR. The phenotypic expression of efflux mechanism was verified in 20% of the isolates using ethidium bromide. For the first time, the expression of efflux mechanism was demonstrated in R. equi. PMID:25242956

  15. Activity of Clarithromycin or Rifampin Alone or in Combination against Experimental Rhodococcus equi Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Alexandra J.; Berghaus, Londa J.; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of mice with the combination of clarithromycin with rifampin resulted in a significantly lower number of Rhodococcus equi CFU in the organs of mice than treatment with either drug alone or placebo. There was no significant difference in the number of R. equi CFU between mice treated with clarithromycin monotherapy, rifampin monotherapy, or placebo. The combination of clarithromycin with rifampin conferred a clear advantage over either drug as monotherapy in this model of chronic R. equi infection. PMID:25824218

  16. Rhodococcus jostii porin A (RjpA) functions in cholate uptake.

    PubMed

    Somalinga, Vijayakumar; Mohn, William W

    2013-10-01

    RjpA in Rhodococcus jostii is the ortholog of a channel-forming porin, MspA. Deletion of rjpA delayed growth of R. jostii on cholate but not on cholesterol. Eventual growth on cholate involved increased expression of other porins, namely, RjpB, RjpC, and RjpD. Porins appear essential for the uptake of bile acids by mycolic acid bacteria. PMID:23892747

  17. Membrane transport systems and the biodegradation potential and pathogenicity of genus Rhodococcus

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Carla C. C. R.; Costa, Sofia S.; Fernandes, Pedro; Couto, Isabel; Viveiros, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The Rhodococcus genus contains species with remarkable ability to tolerate toxic compounds and to degrade a myriad of substrates. These substrates have to cross a distinctive cell envelope dominated by mycolic acids anchored in a scaffold of arabinogalactan covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan, and a cellular membrane with phospholipids, whose composition in fatty acids can be rapidly altered in response to environmental conditions. The hydrophobic nature of the cell envelope facilitates the entrance of hydrophobic molecules but some substrates require active transport systems. Additionally, toxic compounds may also be extruded by energy spending efflux systems. In this review, physiological evidences of the use of transport systems by Rhodococcus strains and genomic studies that corroborate their existence are presented and discussed. The recently released complete genomes of several Rhodococcus strains will be the basis for an in silico correlation analysis between the efflux pumps present in the genome and their role on active transport of substrates. These transport systems will be placed on an integrative perspective of the impact of this important genus on biotechnology and health, ranging from bioremediation to antibiotic and biocide resistance. PMID:24772091

  18. Analysis of Genes for Succinoyl Trehalose Lipid Production and Increasing Production in Rhodococcus sp. Strain SD-74

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Tomohiro; Tokumoto, Yuta; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Inoue, Naoyuki; Maseda, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Succinoyl trehalose lipids (STLs) are promising glycolipid biosurfactants produced from n-alkanes that are secreted by Rhodococcus species bacteria. These compounds not only exhibit unique interfacial properties but also demonstrate versatile biochemical actions. In this study, three novel types of genes involved in the biosynthesis of STLs, including a putative acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) transferase (tlsA), fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (fda), and alkane monooxygenase (alkB), were identified. The predicted functions of these genes indicate that alkane metabolism, sugar synthesis, and the addition of acyl groups are important for the biosynthesis of STLs. Based on these results, we propose a biosynthesis pathway for STLs from alkanes in Rhodococcus sp. strain SD-74. By overexpressing tlsA, we achieved a 2-fold increase in the production of STLs. This study advances our understanding of bacterial glycolipid production in Rhodococcus species. PMID:24038682

  19. Cometabolic Degradation of Trichloroethene by Rhodococcus sp. Strain L4 Immobilized on Plant Materials Rich in Essential Oils▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Suttinun, Oramas; Müller, Rudolf; Luepromchai, Ekawan

    2010-01-01

    The cometabolic degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by Rhodococcus sp. L4 was limited by the loss of enzyme activity during TCE transformation. This problem was overcome by repeated addition of inducing substrates, such as cumene, limonene, or cumin aldehyde, to the cells. Alternatively, Rhodococcus sp. L4 was immobilized on plant materials which contain those inducers in their essential oils. Cumin seeds were the most suitable immobilizing material, and the immobilized cells tolerated up to 68 μM TCE and degraded TCE continuously. The activity of immobilized cells, which had been inactivated partially during TCE degradation, could be reactivated by incubation in mineral salts medium without TCE. These findings demonstrate that immobilization of Rhodococcus sp. L4 on plant materials rich in essential oils is a promising method for efficient cometabolic degradation of TCE. PMID:20472723

  20. Immunoglobulin G Subisotype Responses of Pneumonic and Healthy, Exposed Foals and Adult Horses to Rhodococcus equi Virulence-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hooper-McGrevy, Kathleen E.; Wilkie, Bruce N.; Prescott, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and in immunocompromised humans. Replication of virulent isolates within macrophages correlates with the presence of a large plasmid which encodes a family of seven virulence-associated proteins (VapA and VapC to VapH), whose functions are unknown. Although cell-mediated immunity is thought to be crucial in eliminating R. equi infection, antibody partially protects foals. The antibody response to both VapA and VapC was similar in six adult horses and six naturally exposed but healthy foals, as well as in eight foals with R. equi pneumonia. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) subisotype response of pneumonic foals to Vap proteins was significantly IgGb biased and also had a trend toward higher IgGT association compared to the isotype association of antibody in adult horses and healthy exposed foals. This suggests that in horses, IgGb and IgGT are Th2 isotypes and IgGa is a Th1 isotype. Furthermore, it suggests that foals which develop R. equi pneumonia have a Th2-biased, ineffective immune response whereas foals which become immune develop a Th1-biased immune response. Pneumonic foals had significantly more antibody to VapD and VapE than did healthy exposed foals. This may indicate a difference in the expression of these two Vap proteins during persistent infection. Alternatively, in pneumonic foals the deviation of the immune response toward VapD and VapE may reflect a bias unfavorable to R. equi resistance. These data indicate possible age-related differences in the equine immune response affecting Th1-Th2 bias as well as antibody specificity bias, which together favor the susceptibility of foals to R. equi pneumonia. PMID:12738629

  1. Immunoglobulin G subisotype responses of pneumonic and healthy, exposed foals and adult horses to Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Hooper-McGrevy, Kathleen E; Wilkie, Bruce N; Prescott, John F

    2003-05-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals and in immunocompromised humans. Replication of virulent isolates within macrophages correlates with the presence of a large plasmid which encodes a family of seven virulence-associated proteins (VapA and VapC to VapH), whose functions are unknown. Although cell-mediated immunity is thought to be crucial in eliminating R. equi infection, antibody partially protects foals. The antibody response to both VapA and VapC was similar in six adult horses and six naturally exposed but healthy foals, as well as in eight foals with R. equi pneumonia. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) subisotype response of pneumonic foals to Vap proteins was significantly IgGb biased and also had a trend toward higher IgGT association compared to the isotype association of antibody in adult horses and healthy exposed foals. This suggests that in horses, IgGb and IgGT are Th2 isotypes and IgGa is a Th1 isotype. Furthermore, it suggests that foals which develop R. equi pneumonia have a Th2-biased, ineffective immune response whereas foals which become immune develop a Th1-biased immune response. Pneumonic foals had significantly more antibody to VapD and VapE than did healthy exposed foals. This may indicate a difference in the expression of these two Vap proteins during persistent infection. Alternatively, in pneumonic foals the deviation of the immune response toward VapD and VapE may reflect a bias unfavorable to R. equi resistance. These data indicate possible age-related differences in the equine immune response affecting Th1-Th2 bias as well as antibody specificity bias, which together favor the susceptibility of foals to R. equi pneumonia. PMID:12738629

  2. Rhodococcus opacus B4: a promising bacterium for production of biofuels and biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ana Rita; Rocha, Isabel; Alves, Maria Madalena; Pereira, Maria Alcina

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial lipids have relevant applications in the production of renewable fuels and biobased oleochemicals. The genus Rhodococcus is one of the most relevant lipid producers due to its capability to accumulate those compounds, mainly triacylglycerols (TAG), when cultivated on different defined substrates, namely sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons but also on complex carbon sources present in industrial wastes. In this work, the production of storage lipids by Rhodococcus opacus B4 using glucose, acetate and hexadecane is reported for the first time and its productivity compared with Rhodococcus opacus PD630, the best TAG producer bacterium reported. Both strains accumulated mainly TAG from all carbon sources, being influenced by the carbon source itself and by the duration of the accumulation period. R. opacus B4 produced 0.09 and 0.14 g L(-1) at 24 and 72 h, with hexadecane as carbon source, which was 2 and 3.3 fold higher than the volumetric production obtained by R. opacus PD630. Both strains presented similar fatty acids (FA) profiles in intact cells while in TAG produced fraction, R. opacus B4 revealed a higher variability in fatty acid composition than R. opacus PD630, when both strains were cultivated on hexadecane. The obtained results open new perspectives for the use of R. opacus B4 to produce TAG, in particular using oily (alkane-contaminated) waste and wastewater as cheap raw-materials. Combining TAG production with hydrocarbons degradation is a promising strategy to achieve environmental remediation while producing added value compounds. PMID:27179529

  3. Cavitary pneumonia due to Rhodococcus equi in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kwak, E J; Strollo, D C; Kulich, S M; Kusne, S

    2003-03-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an uncommon human pathogen that usually affects immunocompromised patients. We present a case of a 68-year-old male heart transplant recipient, who developed rhodococcal pneumonia with secondary bacteremia 10 months post-transplant. The patient was a retired carpenter who was involved in breeding of horses. He responded completely to the treatment with vancomycin and imipenem/cilastin, followed by oral ciprofloxacin and minocycline for total treatment duration of 5 months. This case highlights the association between an animal exposure and infection with a unique opportunistic pathogen. PMID:12791074

  4. Diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of infections caused by Rhodococcus equi in foals.

    PubMed

    Giguère, S; Cohen, N D; Chaffin, M Keith; Slovis, N M; Hondalus, M K; Hines, S A; Prescott, J F

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen, is one of the most common causes of pneumonia in foals. Although R. equi can be cultured from the environment of virtually all horse farms, the clinical disease in foals is endemic at some farms, sporadic at others, and unrecognized at many. On farms where the disease is endemic, costs associated with morbidity and mortality attributable to R. equi may be very high. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide recommendations regarding the diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of infections caused by R. equi in foals. PMID:22092608

  5. Failure of hyperimmune plasma to prevent pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in foals.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J R; Begg, A P

    1995-11-01

    A trial was conducted on a Thoroughbred stud to determine whether or not the administration of anti-Rhodococcus equi hyperimmune plasma would reduce the prevalence of R equi pneumonia (rattles) in foals born in the 1992 horse breeding season. Hyperimmune plasma was administered to 34 foals; another 57 foals were untreated. There was no significant difference in the number of transfused foals developing R equi pneumonia compared with the untreated foals. The time required for recovery from pneumonia between the 2 groups was not significantly different. PMID:8929188

  6. Hydrophobised sawdust as a carrier for immobilisation of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterium Rhodococcus ruber.

    PubMed

    Podorozhko, Elena A; Lozinsky, Vladimir I; Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S; Krivorutchko, Anastasiya B; Philp, Jim C; Cunningham, Colin J

    2008-04-01

    Pine sawdust treated by a series of hydrophobising agents (drying oil, organosilicon emulsion, n-hexadecane and paraffin) was examined as carrier for adsorption immobilisation of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacterial cells Rhodococcus ruber. It was shown that hydrophobising agents based on drying oil turned out to be optimal (among the other modifiers examined) for the preparation of sawdust carriers suitable for the efficient immobilisation. The results obtained demonstrate promising possibilities in developing a wide range of available and cheap, biodegradable cellulose-containing carriers that possess varying surface hydrophobicity. PMID:17481891

  7. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  8. Role of the 85-Kilobase Plasmid and Plasmid-Encoded Virulence-Associated Protein A in Intracellular Survival and Virulence of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K.; Yager, Julie A.; Darrah, Patricia; Mosser, David M.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype. PMID:10377138

  9. Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Kocuria, Gordonia, Tsukamurella, and Listeria Species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Fen; Du, Shin-Hei; Teng, Shih-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Hui; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated whether the Bruker Biotyper matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system provides accurate species-level identifications of 147 isolates of aerobically growing Gram-positive rods (GPRs). The bacterial isolates included Nocardia (n = 74), Listeria (n = 39), Kocuria (n = 15), Rhodococcus (n = 10), Gordonia (n = 7), and Tsukamurella (n = 2) species, which had all been identified by conventional methods, molecular methods, or both. In total, 89.7% of Listeria monocytogenes, 80% of Rhodococcus species, 26.7% of Kocuria species, and 14.9% of Nocardia species (n = 11, all N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum) were correctly identified to the species level (score values, ≥2.0). A clustering analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper identified six clusters of Nocardia species, i.e., cluster 1 (N. cyriacigeorgica), cluster 2 (N. brasiliensis), cluster 3 (N. farcinica), cluster 4 (N. puris), cluster 5 (N. asiatica), and cluster 6 (N. beijingensis), based on the six peaks generated by ClinProTools with the genetic algorithm, i.e., m/z 2,774.477 (cluster 1), m/z 5,389.792 (cluster 2), m/z 6,505.720 (cluster 3), m/z 5,428.795 (cluster 4), m/z 6,525.326 (cluster 5), and m/z 16,085.216 (cluster 6). Two clusters of L. monocytogenes spectra were also found according to the five peaks, i.e., m/z 5,594.85, m/z 6,184.39, and m/z 11,187.31, for cluster 1 (serotype 1/2a) and m/z 5,601.21 and m/z 11,199.33 for cluster 2 (serotypes 1/2b and 4b). The Bruker Biotyper system was unable to accurately identify Nocardia (except for N. nova and N. otitidiscaviarum), Tsukamurella, or Gordonia species. Continuous expansion of the MALDI-TOF MS databases to include more GPRs is necessary. PMID:24759706

  10. Nonhealing Wound Due to Rhodococcus equi in an Apparently Immunocompetent Patient, Revealing CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Deficiency ▿

    PubMed Central

    Denes, Eric; Peignon-Orsoni, Dominique; Terrade, François-Xavier

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of a nonhealing wound due to Rhodococcus equi. Failure of the wound to heal led to immunological investigations and the discovery of a previously unknown CD8+ T-lymphocyte deficit responsible for the chronic infection. The infection was cured after a 3-month course of a combination of antibiotics. PMID:20881171

  11. Sequence and molecular characterization of a DNA region encoding the dibenzothiophene desulfurization operon of Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8.

    PubMed Central

    Piddington, C S; Kovacevich, B R; Rambosek, J

    1995-01-01

    Dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model compound for sulfur-containing organic molecules found in fossil fuels, can be desulfurized to 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) by Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. Complementation of a desulfurization (dsz) mutant provided the genes from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 responsible for desulfurization. A 6.7-kb TaqI fragment cloned in Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vector pRR-6 was found to both complement this mutation and confer desulfurization to Rhodococcus fascians, which normally is not able to desulfurize DBT. Expression of this fragment in E. coli also conferred the ability to desulfurize DBT. A molecular analysis of the cloned fragment revealed a single operon containing three open reading frames involved in the conversion of DBT to 2-HBP. The three genes were designated dszA, dszB, and dszC. Neither the nucleotide sequences nor the deduced amino acid sequences of the enzymes exhibited significant similarity to sequences obtained from the GenBank, EMBL, and Swiss-Prot databases, indicating that these enzymes are novel enzymes. Subclone analyses revealed that the gene product of dszC converts DBT directly to DBT-sulfone and that the gene products of dszA and dszB act in concert to convert DBT-sulfone to 2-HBP. PMID:7574582

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Piezotolerant and Crude Oil-Degrading Bacterium Rhodococcus qingshengii Strain TUHH-12

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Valladares Juárez, Ana Gabriela; Schedler, Martina; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Müller, Rudolf; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Rhodococcus qingshengii strain TUHH-12. The ability of this piezotolerant bacterium to grow on crude oil and tetracosane as sole carbon sources at 150 × 105 Pa makes it useful in studies of hydrocarbon degradation under simulated deep-sea conditions. PMID:25858843

  13. Metagenome Sequencing Revealed Rhodococcus Dominance in Farpuk Cave, Mizoram, India, an Eastern Himalayan Biodiversity Hot Spot Region

    PubMed Central

    De Mandal, Surajit; Sanga, Zothan

    2015-01-01

    The present study employed 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing to survey the prokaryotic microbiota on Farpuk Cave, revealing a diverse bacterial community with 4,021 operational taxonomical units (OTUs), mainly dominated by the genus Rhodococcus. Moreover, 18.17% of the OTUs were unclassified at the phylum level, suggesting the existence of novel bacterial species. PMID:26067958

  14. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin- or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes. PMID:24325207

  15. Enhanced biofilm production by a toluene-degrading Rhodococcus observed after exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Tess S; Higgins, Christopher P; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2015-05-01

    This study focuses on interactions between aerobic soil-derived hydrocarbon degrading bacteria and a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates that are found in aqueous film-forming foams used for fire suppression. No effect on toluene degradation rate or induction time was observed when active cells of Rhodococcus jostii strain RHA1 were exposed to toluene and a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) at concentrations near the upper bounds of groundwater relevance (11 PFAAs at 10 mg/L each). However, exposure to aqueous PFAA concentrations above 2 mg/L (each) was associated with enhanced aggregation of bacterial cells and significant increases in extracellular polymeric substance production. Flocculation was only observed during exponential growth and not elicited when PFAAs were added to resting incubations; analogous flocculation was also observed in soil enrichments. Aggregation was accompanied by 2- to 3-fold upregulation of stress-associated genes, sigF3 and prmA, during growth of this Rhodococcus in the presence of PFAAs. These results suggest that biological responses, such as microbial stress and biofilm formation, could be more prominent than suppression of co-contaminant biodegradation in subsurface locations where poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances occur with hydrocarbon fuels. PMID:25806435

  16. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  17. Characterization and genome functional analysis of a novel metamitron-degrading strain Rhodococcus sp. MET via both triazinone and phenyl rings cleavage.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Xu, Tianheng; Cao, Duantao; Cheng, Longyin; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterium capable of utilizing metamitron as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from contaminated soil and identified as Rhodococcus sp. MET based on its morphological characteristics, BIOLOG GP2 microplate profile, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. Genome sequencing and functional annotation of the isolate MET showed a 6,340,880 bp genome with a 62.47% GC content and 5,987 protein-coding genes. In total, 5,907 genes were annotated with the COG, GO, KEGG, Pfam, Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and nr databases. The degradation rate of metamitron by the isolate MET obviously increased with increasing substrate concentrations from 1 to 10 mg/l and subsequently decreased at 100 mg/l. The optimal pH and temperature for metamitron biodegradation were 7.0 and 20-30 °C, respectively. Based on genome annotation of the metamitron degradation genes and the metabolites detected by HPLC-MS/MS, the following metamitron biodegradation pathways were proposed: 1) Metamitron was transformed into 2-(3-hydrazinyl-2-ethyl)-hydrazono-2-phenylacetic acid by triazinone ring cleavage and further mineralization; 2) Metamitron was converted into 3-methyl-4-amino-6(2-hydroxy-muconic acid)-1,2,4-triazine-5(4H)-one by phenyl ring cleavage and further mineralization. The coexistence of diverse mineralization pathways indicates that our isolate may effectively bioremediate triazinone herbicide-contaminated soils. PMID:27578531

  18. Characterization and genome functional analysis of a novel metamitron-degrading strain Rhodococcus sp. MET via both triazinone and phenyl rings cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Hua; Xu, Tianheng; Cao, Duantao; Cheng, Longyin; Yu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    A novel bacterium capable of utilizing metamitron as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated from contaminated soil and identified as Rhodococcus sp. MET based on its morphological characteristics, BIOLOG GP2 microplate profile, and 16S rDNA phylogeny. Genome sequencing and functional annotation of the isolate MET showed a 6,340,880 bp genome with a 62.47% GC content and 5,987 protein-coding genes. In total, 5,907 genes were annotated with the COG, GO, KEGG, Pfam, Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and nr databases. The degradation rate of metamitron by the isolate MET obviously increased with increasing substrate concentrations from 1 to 10 mg/l and subsequently decreased at 100 mg/l. The optimal pH and temperature for metamitron biodegradation were 7.0 and 20–30 °C, respectively. Based on genome annotation of the metamitron degradation genes and the metabolites detected by HPLC-MS/MS, the following metamitron biodegradation pathways were proposed: 1) Metamitron was transformed into 2-(3-hydrazinyl-2-ethyl)-hydrazono-2-phenylacetic acid by triazinone ring cleavage and further mineralization; 2) Metamitron was converted into 3-methyl-4-amino-6(2-hydroxy-muconic acid)-1,2,4-triazine-5(4H)-one by phenyl ring cleavage and further mineralization. The coexistence of diverse mineralization pathways indicates that our isolate may effectively bioremediate triazinone herbicide-contaminated soils. PMID:27578531

  19. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  20. The titanium binding protein of Rhodococcus ruber GIN1 (NCIMB 40340) is a cell-surface homolog of the cytosolic enzyme dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Siegmann, Ari; Komarska, Avital; Betzalel, Yifaat; Brudo, Irene; Jindou, Sadanari; Mor, Gil; Fleminger, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    Rhodococcus ruber GIN1 (formally Rh. strain GIN1) was previously isolated on the basis of its strong adherence to coal fly ash (CFA) and titanium dioxide particles from CFA sedimentation ponds of an electrical power plant in Israel. The interaction of the bacterium with oxides has been shown to be mediated by a cell surface protein designated TiBP (titanium binding protein) involving primarily strong, non-electrostatic forces. In this work, we set forward to identify this unique exocellular protein. Sequence analysis of the purified protein by mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) following trypsinization revealed 11 peptides. All of them showed >90% amino acid residues identity with sequences of one of the orthologs (dldh1) of the cytosolic enzyme dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH), based on the genome sequence of Rhodococcus strain RHA1. This genome was selected as a reference since currently it is the only sequenced Rhodococcal genome. Altogether, these peptides covered over 25% of the 52 kDa protein molecule. N- and C-termini primers were prepared and used to sequence the paralog gene from Rh. ruber GIN1 after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. All 11 peptides showed 100% identity with the sequence of this gene. The homology of TiBP with the supposedly cytosolic DLDH raised the question of whether the exocellular TiBP possesses DLDH activity. Indeed, intact late logarithmic phase Rh. ruber GIN1 cells, previously shown to express TiBP, were found to possess such activity, while very low activity was associated with stationary phase cells which possess diminished TiBP expression on their surface. Further evidence for the exocellular location of TiBP/DLDH was achieved using specific anti-TiBP polyclonal antibodies by whole cell and protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showing high reactivity of the logarithmic phase cell surface and substantially lower reactivity with the stationary phase cells. As expected, logarithmic phase spheroplasts were

  1. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs.

    PubMed

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2014-07-01

    Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology. PMID:25005079

  2. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-06-18

    The structure of VapB, a member of the Vap protein family that is involved in virulence of the bacterial pathogen R. equi, was determined by SAD phasing and reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel similar to avidin, suggestive of a binding function. Made up of two Greek-key motifs, the topology of VapB is unusual or even unique. Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology.

  3. Structure of Rhodococcus equi virulence-associated protein B (VapB) reveals an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel consisting of two Greek-key motifs

    PubMed Central

    Geerds, Christina; Wohlmann, Jens; Haas, Albert; Niemann, Hartmut H.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the virulence-associated protein (Vap) family from the pathogen Rhodococcus equi regulate virulence in an unknown manner. They do not share recognizable sequence homology with any protein of known structure. VapB and VapA are normally associated with isolates from pigs and horses, respectively. To contribute to a molecular understanding of Vap function, the crystal structure of a protease-resistant VapB fragment was determined at 1.4 Å resolution. The structure was solved by SAD phasing employing the anomalous signal of one endogenous S atom and two bound Co ions with low occupancy. VapB is an eight-stranded antiparallel β-barrel with a single helix. Structural similarity to avidins suggests a potential binding function. Unlike other eight- or ten-stranded β-barrels found in avidins, bacterial outer membrane proteins, fatty-acid-binding proteins and lysozyme inhibitors, Vaps do not have a next-neighbour arrangement but consist of two Greek-key motifs with strand order 41238567, suggesting an unusual or even unique topology. PMID:25005079

  4. Identification of fluoropyrogallols as new intermediates in biotransformation of monofluorophenols in Rhodococcus opacus 1cp

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Z.I.; Baskunov, B.P.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, J.; Golovlev, E.L.; Berkel, W.J.H. van; Golovleva, L.A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2000-05-01

    The transformation of monofluorophenols by whole cells of Rhodococcus opacus 1cp was investigated, with special emphasis on the nature of hydroxylated intermediates formed. Thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrum analysis, and {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated the formation of fluorocatechol and trihydroxyfluorobenzene derivatives from each of three monofluorophenols. The {sup 19}F chemical shifts and proton-coupled splitting patterns of the fluorine resonances of the trihydroxyfluorobenzene products established that the trihydroxylated aromatic metabolites contained hydroxyl substituents on three adjacent carbon atoms. Thus, formation of 1,2,3-trihydroxy-4-fluorobenzene (4-fluoropyrogallol) from 2-fluorophenol and formation of 1,2,3-trihydroxy-5-fluorobenzene (5-fluoropyrogallol) from 3-fluorophenol and 4-fluorophenol were observed. These results indicate the involvement of fluoropyrogallols as previously unidentified metabolites in the biotransformation of monofluorophenols in R. opacus 1cp.

  5. Nitrile Hydratase and Amidase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous Hydrolyze Acrylic Fibers and Granular Polyacrylonitriles

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, M. M.; Cavaco-Paulo, A.; Robra, K.-H.; Gübitz, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 11216 produced nitrile hydratase (320 nkat mg of protein−1) and amidase activity (38.4 nkat mg of protein−1) when grown on a medium containing propionitrile. These enzymes were able to hydrolyze nitrile groups of both granular polyacrylonitriles (PAN) and acrylic fibers. Nitrile groups of PAN40 (molecular mass, 40 kDa) and PAN190 (molecular mass, 190 kDa) were converted into the corresponding carbonic acids to 1.8 and 1.0%, respectively. In contrast, surfacial nitrile groups of acrylic fibers were only converted to the corresponding amides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 16% of the surfacial nitrile groups were hydrolyzed by the R. rhodochrous enzymes. Due to the enzymatic modification, the acrylic fibers became more hydrophilic and thus, adsorption of dyes was enhanced. This was indicated by a 15% increase in the staining level (K/S value) for C.I. Basic Blue 9. PMID:10742253

  6. Enzymatic degradation of aliphatic nitriles by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2, a versatile nitrile-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shumei; An, Xuejiao; Liu, Hongyuan; Cheng, Yi; Hou, Ning; Feng, Lu; Huang, Xinning; Li, Chunyan

    2015-06-01

    Nitriles are common environmental pollutants, and their removal has attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered to be the most acceptable method for removal. In this work, we investigated the biodegradation of three aliphatic nitriles (acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and crotononitrile) by Rhodococcus rhodochrous BX2 and the expression of their corresponding metabolic enzymes. This organism can utilize all three aliphatic nitriles as sole carbon and nitrogen sources, resulting in the complete degradation of these compounds. The degradation kinetics were described using a first-order model. The degradation efficiency was ranked according to t1/2 as follows: acetonitrile>trans-crotononitrile>acrylonitrile>cis-crotononitrile. Only ammonia accumulated following the three nitriles degradation, while amides and carboxylic acids were transient and disappeared by the end of the assay. mRNA expression and enzyme activity indicated that the tested aliphatic nitriles were degraded via both the inducible NHase/amidase and the constitutive nitrilase pathways, with the former most likely preferred. PMID:25746475

  7. VapI, a new member of the Rhodococcus equi Vap family.

    PubMed

    Polidori, Marco; Haas, Albert

    2006-10-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium which can cause bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. In this report we show that the ORF13-protein coded by the virulence associated plasmid of R. equi is clearly homologous to VapE. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed frame shift mutations that shorten the sequence of the ORF13-protein. A theoretical extension of the sequence of ORF13 by the introduction of a single nucleotide yields a translated amino acid sequence that is highly homologous to VapE and other members of the Vap family. The data provided in this study indicate that the ORF13-protein is a novel member of the Vap family and is therefore designated VapI. PMID:16871422

  8. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-08-15

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments.

  9. The genome of a pathogenic rhodococcus: cooptive virulence underpinned by key gene acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Letek, Michal; González, Patricia; Macarthur, Iain; Rodríguez, Héctor; Freeman, Tom C; Valero-Rello, Ana; Blanco, Mónica; Buckley, Tom; Cherevach, Inna; Fahey, Ruth; Hapeshi, Alexia; Holdstock, Jolyon; Leadon, Desmond; Navas, Jesús; Ocampo, Alain; Quail, Michael A; Sanders, Mandy; Scortti, Mariela M; Prescott, John F; Fogarty, Ursula; Meijer, Wim G; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2010-09-01

    We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid-rich intestine and manure of herbivores--two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT) pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl) and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI) required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche-adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT-acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi. PMID:20941392

  10. The Genome of a Pathogenic Rhodococcus: Cooptive Virulence Underpinned by Key Gene Acquisitions

    PubMed Central

    Letek, Michal; González, Patricia; MacArthur, Iain; Rodríguez, Héctor; Freeman, Tom C.; Valero-Rello, Ana; Blanco, Mónica; Buckley, Tom; Cherevach, Inna; Fahey, Ruth; Hapeshi, Alexia; Holdstock, Jolyon; Leadon, Desmond; Navas, Jesús; Ocampo, Alain; Quail, Michael A.; Sanders, Mandy; Scortti, Mariela M.; Prescott, John F.; Fogarty, Ursula; Meijer, Wim G.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Vázquez-Boland, José A.

    2010-01-01

    We report the genome of the facultative intracellular parasite Rhodococcus equi, the only animal pathogen within the biotechnologically important actinobacterial genus Rhodococcus. The 5.0-Mb R. equi 103S genome is significantly smaller than those of environmental rhodococci. This is due to genome expansion in nonpathogenic species, via a linear gain of paralogous genes and an accelerated genetic flux, rather than reductive evolution in R. equi. The 103S genome lacks the extensive catabolic and secondary metabolic complement of environmental rhodococci, and it displays unique adaptations for host colonization and competition in the short-chain fatty acid–rich intestine and manure of herbivores—two main R. equi reservoirs. Except for a few horizontally acquired (HGT) pathogenicity loci, including a cytoadhesive pilus determinant (rpl) and the virulence plasmid vap pathogenicity island (PAI) required for intramacrophage survival, most of the potential virulence-associated genes identified in R. equi are conserved in environmental rhodococci or have homologs in nonpathogenic Actinobacteria. This suggests a mechanism of virulence evolution based on the cooption of existing core actinobacterial traits, triggered by key host niche–adaptive HGT events. We tested this hypothesis by investigating R. equi virulence plasmid-chromosome crosstalk, by global transcription profiling and expression network analysis. Two chromosomal genes conserved in environmental rhodococci, encoding putative chorismate mutase and anthranilate synthase enzymes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly coregulated with vap PAI virulence genes and required for optimal proliferation in macrophages. The regulatory integration of chromosomal metabolic genes under the control of the HGT–acquired plasmid PAI is thus an important element in the cooptive virulence of R. equi. PMID:20941392

  11. Expression and characterization of an N-oxygenase from Rhodococcus jostii RHAI.

    PubMed

    Indest, Karl J; Eberly, Jed O; Hancock, Dawn E

    2015-01-01

    Nitro group-containing natural products are rare in nature. There are few examples of N-oxygenases, enzymes that incorporate atmospheric oxygen into primary and secondary amines, characterized in the literature. N-oxygenases have yet to be characterized from the Corynebacterineae, a metabolically diverse group of organisms that includes the genera Rhodococcus, Gordonia, and Mycobacterium. A preliminary in silico search for N-oxygenase AurF gene orthologs revealed multiple protein candidates present in the genome of the Actinomycete Rhodococcus jostii RHAI (RHAI_ro06104). Towards the goal of identifying novel biocatalysts with potential utility for the biosynthesis of nitroaromatics, AurF ortholog RHAI_ro6104 was cloned, expressed and purified in E. coli and amine and nitro containing phenol substrates tested for activity. RHAI-ro06104 showed the highest activity with 4-aminophenol, producing a Vmax of 18.76 μM s(-1) and a Km of 15.29 mM and demonstrated significant activities with 2-aminophenol and 2-amino-5-methylphenol, producing a Vmax of 12.86 and 12.72 μM s(-1) with a Km of 8.34 and 2.81 mM, respectively. These findings are consistent with a substrate range observed in other N-oxygenases, which seem to accommodate substrates that lack halogenated substitutions and side groups directly flanking the amine group. Attempts to identify modulators of RHAI-ro06104 gene activity demonstrated that aromatic amino acids inhibit expression by almost 50%. PMID:26782651

  12. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain PML026, a Trehalolipid Biosurfactant Producer and Biodegrader of Oil and Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain PML026 produces an array of trehalolipid biosurfactant compounds in order to utilize hydrophobic carbon sources, such as oils and alkanes. Here, we report the high-quality draft genome sequence of this strain, which has a total length of 5,168,404 bp containing 4,835 protein-coding sequences, 12 rRNAs, and 45 tRNAs. PMID:25953162

  13. Clinical application of a polymerase chain reaction assay in the diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi in a horse.

    PubMed

    Vivrette, S L; Sellon, D C; Gibbons, D S

    2000-11-01

    Diagnosis of pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi can be made more rapidly by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay than by use of conventional bacteriologic culture techniques. Use of a PCR assay aids in the differentiation between virulent and avirulent strains of R equi, and the assay may be used to identify R equi in feces and soil of breeding farms. PMID:11061388

  14. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  15. The roles of bacterial biofilm and oxidizing enzymes in the biodegradation of plastic by the bacterium Rhodococcus ruber (C208)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivan, A.; Gilan, I.; Santo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic polymers such as polyethylene are amongst the most durable plastic materials and, therefore are resistant to natural biodegradation resulting in their accumulation in the environment posing a global hazard. We have carried out a two-step enrichment procedure aimed at the isolation of polyethylene-degrading bacteria from soil. The initial enrichment was carried out in soil and the second, in a liquid mineral medium supplemented with linear low-density polyethylene (LDPE; MW 191,000) as the sole carbon source. UV-photooxidation may enhance biodegradation by the formation of carbonyl residues that can be utilized by microorganisms. This screening gave rise to several bacterial strains that were capable of degrading polyethylene. One of these strains (C208), identified as the actinomycete Rhodococcus ruber, colonized the polyethylene producing a biofilm which eventually lead to the degradation of the polyethylene. Adherence and colonization of planktonic C208 cells to the polyethylene surface occurred within minutes from exposure to the polyolefin. This resulted in formation of an initial biofilm that differentiated into cell-aggregation-forming microcolonies. Further organization yielded three-dimensional sessile structures as the mature biofilm. The ratio between the population densities, of the biofilm and planktonic, was about 60:1, indicating a high preference for the biofilm mode of growth. Analysis of the extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the biofilm of C208 revealed that the polysaccharides level was up to 2.5 folds higher than that of the protein. Surprisingly, the EPS also contained DNA that is actively excreted from live bacterial cells. This is supported by the reduction in biofilm content (but not in viability) following addition, of DNase 1 and RNAse A. The biofilm showed a high viability even after 60 days of incubation in a carbon free medium. This durability of the biofilm, can be attributed to biodegradation of polyethylene. A

  16. Development and evaluation of the internal-controlled real-time PCR assay for Rhodococcus equi detection in various clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    STEFAŃSKA, Ilona; WITKOWSKI, Lucjan; RZEWUSKA, Magdalena; DZIECIĄTKOWSKI, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the causative agent of rhodococcosis in horses, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in foals. This bacterium has also been isolated from a variety of animals and is being increasingly reported as a cause of infection in humans, mainly in immunosuppressed individuals. Laboratory diagnostics of R. equi infections based only on conventional microbiological methods shows low accuracy and can lead to misidentification. The objective of the study was to develop and evaluate a real-time PCR assay for direct detection of R. equi in various clinical specimens, including tissue samples. The species-specific region of the gene encoding R. equi cholesterol oxidase, choE, was used as a qPCR-target. The diagnostic applicability of the assay was confirmed by testing various tissue specimens obtained from horses with clinical signs of rhodoccocal infection and swine submaxillary lymph nodes. The rate of R. equi detection in clinical specimens by the developed assay was higher in comparison to the culture method (90% vs. 60.0% of positive samples) and conventional PCR (90.0% vs. 20.0% of positive samples). In case of 13 samples that were negative in the culture-based method, R. equi was detected by the developed assay. Only in one case, it gave negative result for culture-positive sample. The assay may provide a simple and rapid tool to complement the classical methods of R. equi detection based on culture and phenotypic identification of isolates, as the performed evaluation indicated a high specificity and accuracy of the results. PMID:26655770

  17. Metabolic versatility of Gram-positive microbial isolates from contaminated river sediments.

    PubMed

    Narancic, Tanja; Djokic, Lidija; Kenny, Shane T; O'Connor, Kevin E; Radulovic, Vanja; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Vasiljevic, Branka

    2012-05-15

    Gram-positive bacteria from river sediments affected by the proximity of a petrochemical industrial site were isolated and characterized with respect to their ability to degrade a wide range of aromatic compounds. In this study we identified metabolically diverse Gram-positive bacteria capable of growth on wide range aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals and with the ability to accumulate biopolymers. Thirty-four isolates that were able to use 9 or more common aromatic pollutants, such as benzene, biphenyl, naphthalene etc. as a sole source of carbon and energy included members of Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Streptomyces, and Staphylococcus genus. Rhodococcus sp. TN105, Gordonia sp. TN103 and Arthrobacter sp. TN221 were identified as novel strains. Nine isolates were able to grow in the presence of one or more metals (mercury, cadmium, nickel) at high concentration (100mM). Seven isolates could degrade 15 different aromatic compounds and could grow in the presence of one or more heavy metals. Two of these isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics including erythromycin and nalidixic acid. One third of isolates could accumulate at least one biopolymer. Twelve isolates (mainly Bacillus sp. and Arthrobacter sp.) accumulated polyphosphate, 3 Bacillus sp. accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate, while 4 isolates could accumulate exopolysaccharides. PMID:22421345

  18. Identification, characterization and molecular analysis of the viable but nonculturable Rhodococcus biphenylivorans

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaomei; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Yalin; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous bacteria, including pollutant-degrading bacteria can enter the viable but nonculturable state (VBNC) when they encounter harsh environmental conditions. VBNC bacteria, as a vast majority of potent microbial resource can be of great significance in environmental rehabilitation. It is necessary to study the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria under various stress conditions. The aim of this study was to determine whether Rhodococcus biphenylivorans could enter the VBNC state under oligotrophic and low temperature conditions, and to examine the changes of morphology, enzymatic activity and gene expressions that might underline such state. The obtained results indicated that R. biphenylivorans TG9T could enter into the VBNC state and recover culturability under favorable environmental conditions. Results from Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing revealed that the up-regulated genes related to ATP accumulation, protein modification, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and RNA polymerase were found in the VBNC cells, and the down-regulated genes mainly encoded hypothetical protein, membrane protein and NADH dehydrogenase subunit, which render VBNC cells more tolerant to survive under inhospitable conditions. This study provides new insights into prevention and control of the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria for their better capabilities in environmental rehabilitation. PMID:26687808

  19. Immunogenicity of an Electron Beam Inactivated Rhodococcus equi Vaccine in Neonatal Foals

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Angela I.; Pillai, Suresh D.; Brake, Courtney; Bagley, Kaytee B.; Bourquin, Jessica R.; Coleman, Michelle; Oliveira, Fabiano N.; Mwangi, Waithaka; McMurray, David N.; Love, Charles C.; Felippe, Maria Julia B.; Cohen, Noah D.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important pathogen of foals that causes severe pneumonia. To date, there is no licensed vaccine effective against R. equi pneumonia of foals. The objectives of our study were to develop an electron beam (eBeam) inactivated vaccine against R. equi and evaluate its immunogenicity. A dose of eBeam irradiation that inactivated replication of R. equi while maintaining outer cell wall integrity was identified. Enteral administration of eBeam inactivated R. equi increased interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to stimulation with virulent R. equi and generated naso-pharyngeal R. equi-specific IgA in newborn foals. Our results indicate that eBeam irradiated R. equi administered enterally produce cell-mediated and upper respiratory mucosal immune responses, in the face of passively transferred maternal antibodies, similar to those produced in response to enteral administration of live organisms (a strategy which previously has been documented to protect foals against intrabronchial infection with virulent R. equi). No evidence of adverse effects was noted among vaccinated foals. PMID:25153708

  20. Disseminated rhodococcus equi infection in HIV infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rhodococcus equi (R.equi) is an acid fast, GRAM + coccobacillus, which is widespread in the soil and causes pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections in immunocompromised people. In the context of HIV infection, R.equi infection (rhodococcosis) is regarded as an opportunistic disease, and its outcome is influenced by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case presentation We report two cases of HIV-related rhodococcosis that disseminated despite suppressive HAART and anti-rhodococcal treatment; in both cases there was no immunological recovery, with CD4+ cells count below 200/μL. In the first case, pulmonary rhodococcosis presented 6 months after initiation of HAART, and was followed by an extracerebral intracranial and a cerebral rhodococcal abscess 1 and 8 months, respectively, after onset of pulmonary infection. The second case was characterized by a protracted course with spread of infection to various organs, including subcutaneous tissue, skin, colon and other intra-abdominal tissues, and central nervous system; the spread started 4 years after clinical resolution of a first pulmonary manifestation and progressed over a period of 2 years. Conclusions Our report highlights the importance of an effective immune recovery, despite fully suppressive HAART, along with anti-rhodococcal therapy, in order to clear rhodococcal infection. PMID:22168333

  1. Transformation of Rhodococcus fascians by high-voltage electroporation and development of R. fascians cloning vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Desomer, J.; Dhaese, P.; Montagu, M.V. )

    1990-09-01

    The analysis of the virulence determinants of phytopathogenic Rhodococcus fascians has been hampered by the lack of a system for introducing exogenous DNA. We investigated the possibility of genetic transformation of R. fascians by high-voltage electroporation of intact bacterial cells in the presence of plasmid DNA. Electrotransformation in R. fascians D188 resulted in transformation frequencies ranging from 10{sup 5}/{mu}g of DNA to 10{sup 7}/{mu}g of DNA, depending on the DNA concentration. The effects of different electrical parameters and composition of electroporation medium on transformation efficiency are present. By this transformation method, a cloning vector (pRF28) for R. fascians based on an indigenous 160-kilobase (chloramphenicol and cadmium resistance-encoding) plasmid pRF2 from strain NCPPB 1675 was developed. The origin of replication and the chloramphenicol resistance gene on pRF28 were used to construct cloning vectors that are capable of replication in R. fascians and Escherichia coli. The electroporation method presented was efficient enough to allow detection of the rare integration of replication-deficient pRF28 derivatives in the R.fascians D188 genome via either homologous or illegitimate recombination.

  2. Maturation of Rhodococcus equi-containing vacuoles is arrested after completion of the early endosome stage.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mora, Eugenia; Polidori, Marco; Lührmann, Anja; Schaible, Ulrich E; Haas, Albert

    2005-08-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium that can cause bronchopneumonia in foals and AIDS patients. Here, we have analyzed R. equi-containing vacuoles (RCVs) in murine macrophages by confocal laser scanning microscopy, by transmission electron microscopy and by immunochemistry upon purification. We show that RCVs progress normally through the early stages of phagosome maturation acquiring PI3P, early endosome antigen-1, and Rab5, and loosing all or much of them within minutes. Although mature RCVs possess the normally late endocytic markers, lysosome-associated membrane proteins, lysobisphosphatidic acid and Rab7, they lack other hallmark features of late endocytic organelles such as possession of cathepsin D, acid beta-glucuronidase, proton-pumping ATPase and the ability to fuse with prelabeled lysosomes. Bacterial strains possessing a virulence-associated plasmid maintain a nonacidified compartment for 48 h, whereas isogenic strains lacking such plasmids acidify progressively. In summary, RCVs represent a novel phagosome maturation stage positioned after completion of the early endosome stage and before reaching a fully mature late endosome compartment. In addition, vacuole biogenesis can be influenced by bacterial plasmids. PMID:15998320

  3. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R; Goldner, Nicholas K; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products. PMID:26837573

  4. Bioadsorption Behavior of Rhodococcus Opacus on the Surface of Calcium and Magnesium Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongxu; Zhang, Mingming; Li, Chao; Yang, Xie; Li, An; Zhang, Lifeng

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of minerals can be influenced and changed by microbial activities when microorganisms adhere to the mineral surface. The change of mineral surface properties and thus mineral floatability can be used to separate gangues from valuable minerals. This study investigated the Rhodococcus opacus ( R. opacus) adsorption behavior on the surfaces of calcite, serpentine, and dolomite by bioadhesive test, contact angle measurements, Zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that R. opacus could be absorbed well onto the surfaces of calcite, serpentine, and dolomite in a few minutes, with adsorption rate up to 96%. The cell adsorption was dependent on the pH value and the most suitable pH is 7.2, whereas no significant influence of temperature on adsorption was found. Increasing pulp density could provide more adsorption sites to R. opacus cells and increase the adsorption rate consequently. The contact angle of three minerals decreased after R. opacus attached, which indicated that the dispersibility of the mineral surface was improved and in favor of being separated. Zeta potential measurements showed that the cell with the charge was opposite to that of minerals on a broad of pH value. The SEM images showed that R. opacus attached very tightly onto the mineral surface, with a large number of small mineral particles gathered around the cell. FTIR spectra showed the presence of polymer groups on the cell wall that could have given a net charge on the mineral surface.

  5. Identification, characterization and molecular analysis of the viable but nonculturable Rhodococcus biphenylivorans.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaomei; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Yalin; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Guo, Li; Ding, Linxian; Shen, Chaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Numerous bacteria, including pollutant-degrading bacteria can enter the viable but nonculturable state (VBNC) when they encounter harsh environmental conditions. VBNC bacteria, as a vast majority of potent microbial resource can be of great significance in environmental rehabilitation. It is necessary to study the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria under various stress conditions. The aim of this study was to determine whether Rhodococcus biphenylivorans could enter the VBNC state under oligotrophic and low temperature conditions, and to examine the changes of morphology, enzymatic activity and gene expressions that might underline such state. The obtained results indicated that R. biphenylivorans TG9(T) could enter into the VBNC state and recover culturability under favorable environmental conditions. Results from Illumina high throughput RNA-sequencing revealed that the up-regulated genes related to ATP accumulation, protein modification, peptidoglycan biosynthesis and RNA polymerase were found in the VBNC cells, and the down-regulated genes mainly encoded hypothetical protein, membrane protein and NADH dehydrogenase subunit, which render VBNC cells more tolerant to survive under inhospitable conditions. This study provides new insights into prevention and control of the VBNC state of pollutant-degrading bacteria for their better capabilities in environmental rehabilitation. PMID:26687808

  6. Trehalose promotes Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL colonization in activated sludge under tetrahydrofuran (THF) stress

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Haixia; Lv, Zhenmei

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the role of compatible solutes in changing the microbial community structure in bioaugmentation systems. In this study, we investigated the influence of trehalose as a biostimulant on the microbial community in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-treated wastewater bioaugmentation systems with Rhodococcus sp. YYL. Functional gene profile changes were used to study the variation in the microbial community. Soluble di-iron monooxygenases (SDIMO), particularly group-5 SDIMOs (i.e., tetrahydrofuran and propane monooxygenases), play a significant role in the initiation of the ring cleavage of tetrahydrofuran. Group-5 SDIMOs genes are enriched upon trehalose addition, and exogenous tetrahydrofuran monooxygenase (thmA) genes can successfully colonize bioaugmentation systems. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) have a significant role in catalyzing the region- and stereospecific oxidation of non-activated hydrocarbons, and THF was reported to inhibit P450s in the environment. The CYP153 family was chosen as a representative P450 to study the inhibitory effects of THF. The results demonstrated that CYP153 family genes exhibited significant changes upon THF treatment and that trehalose helped maintain a rich diversity and high abundance of CYP153 family genes. Biostimulation with trehalose could alleviate the negative effects of THF stress on microbial diversity in bioaugmentation systems. Our results indicated that trehalose as a compatible solute plays a significant role for environmental strains under extreme conditions. PMID:26029182

  7. Dynamic Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiling of Rhodococcus sp. Strain YYL during the Degradation of Tetrahydrofuran

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhixing; Yao, Yanlai

    2014-01-01

    Although tetrahydrofuran-degrading Rhodococcus sp. strain YYL possesses tetrahydrofuran (THF) degradation genes similar to those of other tetrahydrofuran-degrading bacteria, a much higher degradation efficiency has been observed in strain YYL. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics analyses were performed to explore the metabolic profiling response of strain YYL to exposure to THF. Exposure to THF slightly influenced the metabolome of strain YYL when yeast extract was present in the medium. The metabolic profile of strain YYL over time was also investigated using THF as the sole carbon source to identify the metabolites associated with high-efficiency THF degradation. Lactate, alanine, glutarate, glutamate, glutamine, succinate, lysine, trehalose, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), NAD+, and CTP were significantly altered over time in strain YYL grown in 20 mM THF. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed changes in the transcriptional expression levels of 15 genes involved in THF degradation, suggesting that strain YYL could accumulate several disturbances in osmoregulation (trehalose, glutamate, glutamine, etc.), with reduced glycolysis levels, an accelerated tricarboxylic acid cycle, and enhanced protein synthesis. The findings obtained through 1H NMR metabolomics analyses and the transcriptional expression of the corresponding genes are complementary for exploring the dynamic metabolic profile in organisms. PMID:24532074

  8. Directed Evolution and Mutant Characterization of Nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous tg1-A6.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Ma, Jinwei; Chang, Yanhong; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a molecularly directed evolution-based approach was applied to modify the nitrilase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous tg1-A6 for improving properties in catalyzing nitriles. In the process of error-prone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the wild-type nitrilase gene acting as the template, a library of the randomly mutated nitrilase gene was constructed. Since the pH value of catalyzing solution decreased when glycolonitrile was used as the substrate of nitrilase, a high-throughput strategy based on the color change of a pH-sensitive indicator was established for rapid screening of the mutated nitrilase. After three rounds of random mutation and screening about 5000 clones, a variant (Mut3) with 5.3-fold activity of the wild-type counterpart was obtained. Five amino acid substitutions (D27E, N97K, L246F, D108E, and S111R) were found in the variant Mut3. The properties of three mutated enzymes obtained in the three-round mutation were investigated. In the conversion of glycolonitrile, the variant (Mut2) accumulated the highest concentration of glycolic acid at 10.6 g l(-1), a much higher value than the wild type (3.2 g l(-1)). PMID:26712248

  9. Bacterial O-methylation of halogen-substituted phenols. [Rhodococcus; Acinetobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, A.S.; Remberger, M.; Neilson, A.H.

    1987-04-01

    Two strains of bacteria capable of carrying out the O-methylation of phenolic compounds, one from the gram-positive genus Rhodococcus and one from the gram-negative genus Acinetobacter, were used to examine the O-methylation of phenols carrying fluoro-, chloro-, and bromo-substituents. Zero-order rates of O-methylation were calculated from data for the chloro- and bromophenols; there was no simple relationship between the rate of reaction and the structure of the substrates, and significant differences were observed in the responses of the two test organisms. For the gram-negative strain, the pattern of substitution was as important as the number of substituents. Hexachlorophene was resistant to O-methylation by both strains, and tetrabromobisphenol-A was O-methylated only by the gram-positive strain. It is suggested that in the natural environment, bacterial O-methylation of phenols carrying electron-attracting substituents might be a significant alternative to biodegradation.

  10. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Intracellular Growth Restriction of Pathogenic Rhodococcus equi Can Be Prevented by Iron▿

    PubMed Central

    von Bargen, Kristine; Wohlmann, Jens; Taylor, Gregory Alan; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Haas, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an intracellular pathogen which causes pneumonia in young horses and in immunocompromised humans. R. equi arrests phagosome maturation in macrophages at a prephagolysosome stage and grows inside a privileged compartment. Here, we show that, in murine macrophages activated with gamma interferon and lipopolysaccharide, R. equi does not multiply but stays viable for at least 24 h. Whereas infection control of other intracellular pathogens by activated macrophages is executed by enhanced phagosome acidification or phagolysosome formation, by autophagy or by the interferon-inducible GTPase Irgm1, none of these mechanisms seems to control R. equi infection. Growth control by macrophage activation is fully mimicked by treatment of resting macrophages with nitric oxide donors, and inhibition of bacterial multiplication by either activation or nitric oxide donors is annihilated by cotreatment of infected macrophages with ferrous sulfate. Transcriptional analysis of the R. equi iron-regulated gene iupT demonstrates that intracellular R. equi encounters iron stress in activated, but not in resting, macrophages and that this stress is relieved by extracellular addition of ferrous sulfate. Our results suggest that nitric oxide is central to the restriction of bacterial access to iron in activated macrophages. PMID:21383050