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Sample records for isolation phylogenetic analysis

  1. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of caprine Orf virus in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ashwaq Ahmed; Ismail, Muhammad Farid Bin; Balakrishnan, Krishnan Nair; Bala, Jamilu Abubakar; Hani, Homayoun; Abba, Yusuf; Awang Isa, Mohd Kamaruddin; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Arshad, Siti Suri; Nazariah, Zeenatul Allaudin; Abdullah, Rasedee; Mustapha, Noordin Mohamed; Mohd-Lila, Mohd-Azmi

    2015-12-01

    Orf virus is a DNA virus that causes contiguous ecthyma in goat and sheep. Infection of animals with this virus cause high mortality in young animals resulting in huge economic losses. In this study, we investigated an outbreak of Orf in a goat farm in Malaysia. Samples were collected from infected animals and viral isolation was done using both LT and MDCK cell lines. Molecular detection was done by conventional PCR for specific primers; B2L and F1L genes and phylogenetic analysis was done on the sequence data obtained. Cytopathic effects (CPE) were observed in both cell lines after 3 days of inoculation and were 50 % by the sixth day. PCR showed positive bands for both B2L and F1L genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that the Malaysian strain had close homology to the Chinese and Indian Orf virus isolates. This study gives more insight into the existing Orf viral strains in Malaysia and their relationship with other strains globally. PMID:26645035

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sheeppox and goatpox virus isolates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sheeppox virus (SPPV) and goatpox virus (GTPV), members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family are causative agents of sheep pox and goat pox respectively, which are important contagious diseases and endemic in central and northern Africa, the Middle and Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. Both sheep pox and goat pox can cause wool and hide damage, and reduce the production of mutton and milk, which may result in significant economic losses and threaten the stockbreeding. In this study, three SPPVs and two GTPVs were collected from China in 2009 and 2011. We described the sequence features and phylogenetic analysis of the P32 gene, GPCR gene and RPO30 gene of the SPPVs and GTPVs to reveal their genetic relatedness. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship among SPPV/GanS/2/2011/China, SPPV/GanS/1/2011/China and SPPV/NingX/2009/China. They were clustered on the same SPPV clade. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 belonged to the GTPV lineage. GS-V1 was closely related to other GTPV vaccine strains. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 were clustered with GTPVs from China and some southern Asian countries. Conclusion This study may expand the datum for spread trend research of Chinese SPPVs and GTPVs, meanwhile provide theoretical references to improve the preventive and control strategy. PMID:22264255

  3. [Phylogenetic analysis of cytomegaloviruses isolated from man and different primate species].

    PubMed

    Agumava, A A; Chikobava, M G; Lapin, B A; Tonkonozhenko, O A; Pavlovsky, A N

    2011-01-01

    Institute of Medical Primatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Sochi The conserved regions of nucleotide sequences were found in primate cytomegaloviruses (CMV). Universal primers were designed for the consensus sequence of a conservative region of the UL56 gene of the betaherpesvirinae subfamily. Amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the fragments of CMV strains isolated from man and different primate species were made. Analysis of sequenced gene fragments showed that the UL56 gene area is most suitable for the phylogenetic analysis of primate CMV and could identify several groups of clusters by the degree of relationship among the viruses of this family. PMID:21545038

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of bluetongue virus serotype 4 field isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Legisa, D; Gonzalez, F; De Stefano, G; Pereda, A; Dus Santos, M J

    2013-03-01

    Bluetongue is an insect-transmitted viral disease of ruminant species, which represents a major barrier to the international trade of animals and their products. Bluetongue virus (BTV) has a genome composed of ten linear segments of dsRNA, which code for at least ten different viral proteins. In South America, serological evidence for the presence of BTV has been found in Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador and Chile. Brazil and Argentina are the only South American countries where BTV has been isolated. In Brazil, only one BTV isolate, serotype 12, has been reported, whereas in Argentina five BTV serotype 4 isolates have been obtained from cattle without clinical signs. Three of these five isolates were isolated during 1999-2001, whereas two of them were obtained as part of the present work. This study describes sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses of segment (Seg)-2, Seg-3, Seg-6, Seg-7 and Seg-10 of the first Argentinian field isolates of BTV. The analysis of Seg-2 and Seg-6 resulted in a single cluster of Argentinian sequences into the serotype 4 clade. In addition, the Argentinian sequences grouped within the nucleotype A clade, along with reference strains. The analysis of Seg-3, Seg-7 and Seg-10 showed that the Argentinian isolates grouped into the western topotype, indicating that the circulating virus had an African/European origin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Argentinian sequences present a South American genetic identity, suggesting an independent lineage evolution. PMID:23152367

  5. Phylogenetic and Pathotypical Analysis of Two Virulent Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Domestic Ducks in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shouping; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhao, Changguang; Liu, Dehua; Hu, Yanxin; Zhao, Jixun; Zhang, Guozhong

    2011-01-01

    Two velogenic Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) obtained from outbreaks in domestic ducks in China were characterized in this study. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both strains clustered with the class II viruses, with one phylogenetically close to the genotype VII NDVs and the other closer to genotype IX. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cleavage site of the fusion (F) protein confirmed that both isolates contained the virulent motif 112RRQK/RRF117 at the cleavage site. The two NDVs had severe pathogenicity in fully susceptible chickens, resulting in 100% mortality. One of the isolates also demonstrated some pathogenicity in domestic ducks. The present study suggests that more than one genotype of NDV circulates in domestic ducks in China and viral transmission may occur among chickens and domestic ducks. PMID:21949828

  6. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of glycoprotein of rabies virus isolated from several species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sato, Go; Itou, Takuya; Shoji, Youko; Miura, Yasuo; Mikami, Takeshi; Ito, Mikako; Kurane, Ichiro; Samara, Samir I; Carvalho, Adolorata A B; Nociti, Darci P; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2004-07-01

    Genetic and phylogenetic analyses of the region containing the glycoprotein (G) gene, which is related to pathogenicity and antigenicity, and the G-L intergenic region were carried out in 14 Brazilian rabies virus isolates. The isolates were classified as dog-related rabies virus (DRRV) or vampire bat-related rabies virus (VRRV), by nucleoprotein (N) analysis. The nucleotide and amino acid (AA) homologies of the area containing the G protein gene and G-L intergenic region were generally lower than those of the ectodomain. In both regions, nucleotide and deduced AA homologies were lower among VRRVs than among DRRVs. There were AA differences between DRRV and VRRV at 3 antigenic sites and epitopes (IIa, WB+ and III), suggesting that DRRV and VRRV can be distinguished by differences of antigenicity. In a comparison of phylogenetic trees between the ectodomain and the area containing the G protein gene and G-L intergenic region, the branching patterns of the chiropteran and carnivoran rabies virus groups differed, whereas there were clear similarities in patterns within the DRRV and VRRV groups. Additionally, the VRRV isolates were more closely related to chiropteran strains isolated from Latin America than to Brazilian DRRV. These results indicate that Brazilian rabies virus isolates can be classified as DRRV or VRRV by analysis of the G gene and the G-L intergenic region, as well as by N gene analysis. PMID:15297743

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique (2011-2016).

    PubMed

    Mapaco, Lourenço P; Monjane, Iolanda V A; Nhamusso, Antonieta E; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Dundon, William G; Achá, Sara J

    2016-10-01

    The complete sequence of the fusion (F) protein gene from 11 Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) isolated from commercial poultry in Mozambique between 2011 and 2016 has been generated. The F gene cleavage site motif for all 11 isolates was (112)RRRKRF(117) indicating that the viruses are virulent. A phylogenetic analysis using the full F gene sequence revealed that the viruses clustered within genotype VIIh and showed a higher similarity to NDVs from South Africa, China and Southeast Asia than to viruses previously described in Mozambique in 1994, 1995 and 2005. The identification of these new NDVs has important implications for Newcastle disease management and control in Mozambique. PMID:27277578

  8. Molecular typing and phylogenetic analysis of classical swine fever virus isolates from Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Nimisha; Ravishankar, Chintu; Rajasekhar, R; Sumod, K; Sumithra, T G; John, Koshy; Mini, M; Ravindran, Reghu; Shaji, Shiju; Aishwarya, J

    2015-12-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an economically important disease of pigs caused by CSF virus (CSFV) belonging to the genus Pestivirus within the family Flaviviridae. The disease is endemic in many countries including India. A comprehensive study was carried out to assess the type of CSFV circulating in the South Indian state of Kerala. During the period 2013-2014, clinical samples were collected from 19 suspected CSF outbreaks of domestic pigs in different districts of Kerala. The samples were tested using nested reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) targeting the E2 gene and RT-PCR for 5'UTR of the virus. Partial 5' UTR and E2 gene regions of six CSFV isolates were sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the CSFV isolates belonged to subgroup 2.2. The isolates showed close resemblance to the other CSFV isolates circulating in India. It was also observed that the CSFV viruses from Kannur district were distinct from those circulating in the other districts as evidenced by their divergence from other Kerala isolates in the phylogenetic tree. Close relationship was seen to the CSFV isolates from South East Asian countries. PMID:26645036

  9. Genotyping and Phylogenetic Analysis of Giardia duodenalis Isolates from Turkish Children

    PubMed Central

    Tamer, Gulden Sonmez; Kasap, Murat; Er, Doganhan Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Background Giardiasis is caused by the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis (synonyms: G. lamblia, G. intestinalis), which is one of the most frequent parasites that infect Turkish children. However, molecular characterization of G. duodenalis in Turkey is relatively scarce. The present work aimed at genotyping G. duodenalis isolates from Turkey using molecular techniques. Material/Methods In the present study, 145 fecal samples from children were collected to search for the presence of Giardia by microscopy and PCR screening. PCR generated a 384 bp fragment for β-giardin. The PCR products were sequenced and the sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by using PHYLIP. Results Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the sequences, assemblage A, B, and mixed subtypes were determined. Of 22 isolates, 11 were identified as assemblage A (50%), 7 were assemblage B (31.8%), and 4 were assemblage AB (18.2%). Association between G. duodenalis assemblages and the epidemiological data was analyzed. No correlation was found between symptoms and infection with specific assemblages (P>0.05), but we found statistically significant association between age and the assemblage AB (P=0.001). Conclusions The association between G. duodenalis and the epidemiologic data were analyzed. Since assemblage A is the more prevalent subgroup compared with assemblage B, this subgroup might be responsible for common Giardia infections in Turkey. This is the first study that included a detailed phylogenetic analysis of Giardia strains from Turkey. PMID:25689970

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolates occurring in India during 1989-2013.

    PubMed

    Desingu, P A; Singh, S D; Dhama, K; Karthik, K; Vinodh Kumar, O R; Malik, Y S

    2016-06-01

    The study details characterization of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from commercial poultry flocks (chicken) and wild birds (crane) of India during the time period from 1989 to 2013. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the NDV isolates belongs to class II, genotype XIIIa and a chicken isolate (108/BAREILLY/AD-IVRI/91) was of genotype VI, where it showed diversity of 3 % from the other viruses belonging to same genotype. Another chicken isolate (75/RAMPUR/AD-IVRI/89) grouped in genotype III and showed 4 % diversity with viruses of genotype III. The crane origin NDV identified as of genotype II corresponding to the vaccine virus. This appears to be the first report about existence of genotype XIIIa and its ancestral viruses are circulating in India for the last two decades in different species of birds. Furthermore, genetically distinct viruses belonging to genotypes II, III and VI are also circulating in India. PMID:27366774

  11. Phylogenetic and serological analysis of turnip ringspot virus and radish mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2012-03-01

    Turnip ringspot virus (TuRSV) has been proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Comovirus. Its remarkable host-range similarity to radish mosaic virus (RaMV) may have led to its misrecognition in the past. Findings from both sequence analysis and serological tests support the assignment of TuRSV to a new comovirus species. In addition, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the two genome segments of some TuRSV isolates have a heterogeneous origin. PMID:22160585

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of Indian rabies virus isolates targeting the complete glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Susan; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, K P; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Anjaneya; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sumithra, T G; Singh, R P

    2015-12-01

    Rabies a fatal viral zoonosis is endemic in India. There is no report on phylogenetic study of Indian rabies virus isolates based on the complete G gene. In the present study, a total of 25 rabies positive brain samples collected during 2001-2014 from North India (UP, MP, Delhi, Rajasthan), South India (Kerala and Karnataka) and Gujarat states belonging to six different host species were subjected to G gene amplification by RT-PCR as three overlapping fragments of 881 bp, 991 bp and 618 bp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Indian rabies virus isolates are genetically closely related with Arctic-like 1a lineage viruses. However, two distinct clusters were identified namely, India South and India North. All the Indian rabies isolates had 95.5-100% homology related to geography, but not to host species. Deduced amino acids on comparison revealed two amino acid changes, aa 356 in ECTO; N→K and aa 458; M→I, which were found to distinguish between the India South and India North isolates. PMID:26427850

  13. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of canine parvovirus isolates from Sichuan and Gansu provinces of China in 2011.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Guo, H-C; Wei, Y-Q; Shu, L; Wang, J; Li, J-S; Cao, S-Z; Sun, S-Q

    2015-02-01

    Canine parvovirus causes serious disease in dogs. Study of the genetic variation in emerging CPV strains is important for disease control strategy. The antigenic property of CPV is connected with specific amino acid changes, mainly in the capsid protein VP2. This study was carried out to characterize VP2 gene of CPV viruses from two provinces of China in 2011. The complete VP2 genes of the CPV-positive samples were amplified and sequenced. Genetic analysis based on the VP2 genes of CPV was conducted. All of the isolates screened and sequenced in this study were typed as CPV-2a except GS-K11 strain, which was typed as CPV-2b. Sequence comparison showed nucleotide identities of 98.8-100% among CPV strains, whereas the Aa similarities were 99.6-100%. Compared with the reference strains, there are three distinctive amino acid changes at VP2 gene residue 267, 324 and 440 of the strains isolated in this study. Of the 27 strains, fourteen (51.85%) had the 267 (Phe-Tyr) and 440 (Thr-Ala) substitution, all the 27 (100%) had 324 (Tyr-Ile) substitution. Phylogenetically, all of the strains isolated in this study formed a major monophyletic cluster together with one South Korean isolate, two Thailand isolates and four Chinese former isolates. PMID:23506473

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of canine parvovirus CPV-2 strains and its variants isolated in Poland.

    PubMed

    Majer-Dziedzic, B; Jakubczak, A; Zietek, J

    2011-01-01

    Canine parvovirus disease appeared in the world and in Europe during the second half of the 1970s. Over the course of 40 years the original CPV-2 strains mutated and variants 2a, 2b and 2c appeared. Their appearance is connected with specific amino acid changes, mainly in the capsid protein VP2. Strains isolated by the authors were adapted for in vitro cell culture. Phylogenetic analysis revealed differences between strains isolated in Poland in 1982-1985 and in 1995-2009. Strains from the 1980s were shown to belong to variant CPV-2a (11 strains) and variant 2b (2 strains), while no fundamental differences were found among the genetic profiles of the strains from 1995-2009, which were classified as belonging to variant 2c. PMID:21957731

  16. Isolation, molecular and phylogenetic analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus strain GS01 in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruofei; Zhang, Haixia; Wei, Jia; Li, Xiangrong; Xie, Jingying; Li, Mingsheng; Qiao, Zilin; Feng, Yuping; Ma, Zhongren

    2015-03-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is a small non-enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus. It can infect many host species and cause acute myocarditis and respiratory failure in piglets, reproductive failure in pregnant sows. Diseases caused by EMCV currently affect the swine industry worldwide. In this study, an EMCV strain was isolated from an aborted fetus in western China. It was identified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genome sequencing. The subsequent results showed that the virus could produce a specific cytopathic effect on BHK-21 cells and could cause severe clinical symptoms and pathological changes in mice. Complete genome sequencing and multiple sequence alignment indicated that the GS01 strain was 79.9-99.9% identical with other isolates worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EMCV isolates fell into five clusters: lineage 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 based on the nucleotide sequences of the entire ORF and VP3/VP1 junction, as well as 3D gene. GS01 isolate was grouped into lineage 1. The results of this study confirmed that an EMCV strain GS01 isolated from an aborted pig fetus in western China was fatal to mice and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. PMID:25497352

  17. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of Bartonella species from wild carnivores of the suborder Caniformia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Kabeya, Hidenori; Miura, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Kazuo; Bai, Ying; Kosoy, Michael; Sentsui, Hiroshi; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Soichi

    2012-12-28

    The prevalence of Bartonella species was investigated among wild carnivores of the suborder Caniformia, including 15 Japanese badgers (Meles anakuma), 8 Japanese martens (Martes melampus), 2 Japanese weasels (Mustela itatsi), 1 Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), 171 raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), and 977 raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Japan. Bartonella bacteria were isolated from one Japanese badger (6.7%) and from one Japanese marten (12.5%); however, no Bartonella species was found in other representatives of Caniformia. Phylogenetic analysis was based on concatenated sequences of six housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, ftsZ, gltA, groEL, ribC, and rpoB) and sequence of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region. The sequence analysis indicated that the isolate derived from the Japanese badger (strain JB-15) can represent a novel Bartonella species and the isolate from the Japanese marten (strain JM-1) was closely related to Bartonella washoensis. This is the first report on isolation of Bartonella from badger and marten. PMID:22841404

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo da Silva; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1-4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of Dengue virus 1 isolated from South Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Drumond, Betania Paiva; da Silva Fagundes, Luiz Gustavo; Rocha, Raissa Prado; Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge; Araki, Carlos Shigueru; Colombo, Tatiana Elisa; Nogueira, Mauricio Lacerda; Castilho, Thiago Elias; da Silveira, Nelson José Freitas; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Coelho, Luiz Felipe Leomil

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a major worldwide public health problem, especially in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Primary infection with a single Dengue virus serotype causes a mild, self-limiting febrile illness called dengue fever. However, a subset of patients who experience secondary infection with a different serotype can progress to a more severe form of the disease, called dengue hemorrhagic fever. The four Dengue virus serotypes (1–4) are antigenically and genetically distinct and each serotype is composed of multiple genotypes. In this study we isolated one Dengue virus 1 serotype, named BR/Alfenas/2012, from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever in Alfenas, South Minas Gerais, Brazil and molecular identification was performed based on the analysis of NS5 gene. Swiss mice were infected with this isolate to verify its potential to induce histopathological alterations characteristic of dengue. Liver histopathological analysis of infected animals showed the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, hepatic steatosis, as well as edema, hemorrhage and necrosis focal points. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses based on the envelope gene provided evidence that the isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 belongs to genotype V, lineage I and it is probably derived from isolates of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The isolate BR/Alfenas/2012 showed two unique amino acids substitutions (SER222THRE and PHE306SER) when compared to other Brazilian isolates from the same genotype/lineage. Molecular models were generated for the envelope protein indicating that the amino acid alteration PHE 306 SER could contribute to a different folding in this region located within the domain III. Further genetic and animal model studies using BR/Alfenas/2012 and other isolates belonging to the same lineage/genotype could help determine the relation of these genetic alterations and dengue hemorrhagic fever in a susceptible population. PMID:26887252

  20. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Rhizobium sullae isolated from Algerian Hedysarum flexuosum.

    PubMed

    Aliliche, Khadidja; Beghalem, Hamida; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Chriki, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Isolates from root nodules of Hedysarum flexuosum, sampled from north region of Algeria, were analyzed on the basis of their phenotypic and molecular characteristics. They were tested for their tolerance to NaCl, pH, temperatures, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance. Interestingly, the isolate Hf_04N appeared resistant to ZnCl2 (50 μg/mL) and grew at high saline concentration up to 9 %. The phylogenetic positions of five isolates were studied by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA, recA, nifH and nodD genes. There were grouped close to the Rhizobium sullae type strain in relation to their 16S rRNA, recA and nifH genes-based phylogenies. By contrast, the tree of nodD gene was not congruent with ribosomal, housekeeping and nitrogen fixation genes. We suggest that our strains have a novel nodD gene. The detection of conserved domains of NodD protein and nitrogenase reductase enzyme, confirm their ability to nodulate and fix nitrogen. PMID:27034287

  1. Phylogenetic and geographic analysis of fowl adenovirus field strains isolated from poultry in Poland.

    PubMed

    Niczyporuk, Jowita Samanta

    2016-01-01

    Fowl adenoviruses (FAdVs) are widely distributed in chickens in Poland and throughout the world. FAdV infections have been reported in the United States, Australia, Europe, and the Mediterranean basin. Detection of FAdVs strains is very important from the epidemiological point of view and for monitoring disease outbreaks and developing strategies for vaccine development. Several molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic studies have been performed, but the results obtained are still limited, because FAdV strains, even of the same serotype, have very diverse characteristics. Some strains are pathogenic and some are nonpathogenic. This report describes the successful isolation of 96 FAdV field strains from chickens in Poland. A PCR assay specific for the L1 loop region of the hexon gene was conducted, and the products were subjected to sequence analysis. The sequences were analysed using BLAST and Geneious 6.0 software and compared to adenovirus field and reference strain sequences from different parts of the world that are accessible in the NCBI GenBank database. The sequences of the adenovirus strains indicated that they belonged to five species, Fowl aviadenovirus A-E, represented by eight serotypes FAdV-1, FAdV-4, FAdV-5, FAdV-7, FAdV-8a, FAdV-8b, and FAdV-2/11 (FAdV-D). The relationships between FAdVs isolated in Poland and isolates from other regions of the world were determined. PMID:26446890

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of two putative Nosema isolates from Cruciferous Lepidopteran pests in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chin-Tai; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Tzeng, Ching-Chou; Wang, Chung-Hsiung

    2007-05-01

    In this study, a new microsporidian, PX2, was isolated from the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, and then compared with another isolate (PX1), and with Nosema spodopterae and N. bombycis. Sequence data showed that the rRNA gene organizations of PX1 and PX2 exhibited a typical Nosema-specific organization: 5'-LSUrRNA (large subunit ribosomal RNA)-ITS (internal transcribed spacer)-SSUrRNA-IGS (intergenic spacer)-5S-3'. Phylogenetic analysis (maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian analysis) of the LSUrRNA and SSUrRNA gene sequences, and the sequences of the alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin, and RPB1 (DNA dependent RNA polymerase II largest subunit) genes found that PX1 was closer to N. bombycis and N. spodopterae than to PX2. Comparison of the identities of the rRNA domains and of the other three genes showed a high divergence in the sequences of the rRNA spacer regions (ITS and IGS). This is consistent with the hypothesis that PX2, if not PX1, might represent a new Nosema species. PMID:17266983

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of VP2 gene of canine parvovirus and comparison with Indian and world isolates.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Chandra, M; Dwivedi, P N

    2016-03-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) causes hemorrhagic enteritis, especially in young dogs, leading to high morbidity and mortality. It has four main antigenic types CPV-2, CPV-2a, CPV-2b and CPV-2c. Virus protein 2 (VP2) is the main capsid protein and mutations affecting VP2 gene are responsible for the evolution of various antigenic types of CPV. Full length VP2 gene from field isolates was amplified and cloned for sequence analysis. The sequences were submitted to the GenBank and were assigned Acc. Nos., viz. KP406928.1 for P12, KP406927.1 for P15, KP406930.1 for P32, KP406926.1 for Megavac-6 and KP406929.1 for NobivacDHPPi. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the samples were forming a separate clad with vaccine strains. When the samples were compared with the world and Indian isolates, it was observed that samples formed a separate node indicating regional genetic variation in CPV. PMID:26982475

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Stenotrophomonas spp. Isolates Contributes to the Identification of Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cerezer, Vinicius Godoy; Pasternak, Jacyr; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas ssp. has a wide environmental distribution and is also found as an opportunistic pathogen, causing nosocomial or community-acquired infections. One species, S. maltophilia, presents multidrug resistance and has been associated with serious infections in pediatric and immunocompromised patients. Therefore, it is relevant to conduct resistance profile and phylogenetic studies in clinical isolates for identifying infection origins and isolates with augmented pathogenic potential. Here, multilocus sequence typing was performed for phylogenetic analysis of nosocomial isolates of Stenotrophomonas spp. and, environmental and clinical strains of S. maltophilia. Biochemical and multidrug resistance profiles of nosocomial and clinical strains were determined. The inferred phylogenetic profile showed high clonal variability, what correlates with the adaptability process of Stenotrophomonas to different habitats. Two clinical isolates subgroups of S. maltophilia sharing high phylogenetic homogeneity presented intergroup recombination, thus indicating the high permittivity to horizontal gene transfer, a mechanism involved in the acquisition of antibiotic resistance and expression of virulence factors. For most of the clinical strains, phylogenetic inference was made using only partial ppsA gene sequence. Therefore, the sequencing of just one specific fragment of this gene would allow, in many cases, determining whether the infection with S. maltophilia was nosocomial or community-acquired. PMID:24818127

  5. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of host-range genes of Camelpox virus isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Bera, B C; Barua, S; Shanmugasundaram, K; Anand, T; Riyesh, T; Vaid, R K; Virmani, N; Kundu, S; Yadav, N K; Malik, P; Singh, R K

    2015-09-01

    Camelpox virus (CMLV), a close variant of variola virus (VARV) infects camels worldwide. The zoonotic infections reported from India signify the need to study the host-range genes-responsible for host tropism. We report sequence and phylogenetic analysis of five host-range genes: cytokine response modifier B (crmB), chemokine binding protein (ckbp), viral schlafen-like (v-slfn), myxomavirus T4-like (M-T4-like) and b5r of CMLVs isolated from outbreaks in India. Comparative analysis revealed that these genes are conserved among CMLVs and shared 94.5-100 % identity at both nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) levels. All genes showed identity (59.3-98.4 %) with cowpox virus (CPXV) while three genes-crmB, ckbp and b5r showed similarity (92-96.5 %) with VARVs at both nt and aa levels. Interestingly, three consecutive serine residue insertions were observed in CKBP protein of CMLV-Delhi09 isolate which was similar to CPXV-BR and VACVs, besides five point mutations (K53Q, N67I, F84S, A127T and E182G) were also similar to zoonotic OPXVs. Further, few inconsistent point mutation(s) were also observed in other gene(s) among Indian CMLVs. These indicate that different strains of CMLVs are circulating in India and these mutations could play an important role in adaptation of CMLVs in humans. The phylogeny revealed clustering of all CMLVs together except CMLV-Delhi09 which grouped separately due to the presence of specific point mutations. However, the topology of the concatenated phylogeny showed close evolutionary relationship of CMLV with VARV and TATV followed by CPXV-RatGer09/1 from Germany. The availability of this genetic information will be useful in unveiling new strategies to control emerging zoonotic poxvirus infections. PMID:26396982

  6. Isolation and Phylogenetic Analysis of Mucambo Virus (Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Complex Subtype IIIA) in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, Albert J.; Volk, Sara M.; Arrigo, Nicole C.; Martinez, Raymond; Ramkissoon, Vernie; Adams, A. Paige; Thompson, Nadin N.; Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Chadee, Dave D.; Foster, Jerome E.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.A.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1950s and 1960s, alphaviruses in the Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) antigenic complex were the most frequently isolated arboviruses in Trinidad. Since then, there has been very little research performed with these viruses. Herein, we report on the isolation, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses of Mucambo virus (MUCV; VEE complex subtype IIIA), including 6 recently isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) portesi mosquitoes and 11 previously isolated in Trinidad and Brazil. Results show that nucleotide and amino acid identities across the complete structural polyprotein for the MUCV isolates were 96.6 – 100% and 98.7 – 100%, respectively, and the phylogenetic tree inferred for MUCV was highly geographically- and temporally- structured. Bayesian analyses suggest the sampled MUCV lineages have a recent common ancestry of approximately 198 years (with a 95% highest posterior density (HPD) interval of 63 – 448 years) prior to 2007, and an overall rate of evolution of 1.28 × 10−4 substitutions/site/yr. PMID:19631956

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Bunyamwera and Ngari viruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) isolated in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odhiambo, C; Venter, M; Lwande, O; Swanepoel, R; Sang, R

    2016-01-01

    Orthobunyaviruses, tri-segmented, negative-sense RNA viruses, have long been associated with mild to severe human disease in Africa, but not haemorrhagic fever. However, during a Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa in 1997-1998, Ngari virus was isolated from two patients and antibody detected in several others with haemorrhagic fever. The isolates were used to identify Ngari virus as a natural Orthobunyavirus reassortant. Despite their potential to reassort and cause severe human disease, characterization of orthobunyaviruses is hampered by paucity of genetic sequences. Our objective was to obtain complete gene sequences of two Bunyamwera virus and three Ngari virus isolates from recent surveys in Kenya and to determine their phylogenetic positioning within the Bunyamwera serogroup. Newly sequenced Kenyan Bunyamwera virus isolates clustered closest to a Bunyamwera virus isolate from the same locality and a Central African Republic isolate indicating that similar strains may be circulating regionally. Recent Kenyan Ngari isolates were closest to the Ngari isolates associated with the 1997-1998 haemorrhagic fever outbreak. We observed a temporal/geographical relationship among Ngari isolates in all three gene segments suggesting a geographical/temporal association with genetic diversity. These sequences in addition to earlier sequences can be used for future analyses of this neglected but potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:26118981

  8. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of Chinese Leishmania isolates based on multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Ying; Lu, Xiao-Jun; Du, Xiao-Qing; Jian, Jun; Shu, Ling; Ma, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a debilitating infectious disease that has a variety of clinical forms. In China, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the most common symptom, and L. donovani and/or L. infantum are the likely pathogens. In this study, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of five enzyme-coding genes (fh, g6pdh, icd, mpi, pgd) and two conserved genes (hsp70, lack) was used to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of Chinese Leishmania strains. Concatenated alignment of the nucleotide sequences of the seven genes was analyzed and phylogenetic trees were constructed using neighbor-joining and maximum parsimony models. A set of additional sequences from 25 strains (24 strains belong to the L. donovani complex and one strain belongs to L. gerbilli) were retrieved from GenBank to infer the molecular evolutionary history of Leishmania from China and other endemic areas worldwide. Phylogenetic analyses consolidated Chinese Leishmania into four groups: (i) one clade A population comprised 13 isolates from different foci in China, which were pathogenic to humans and canines. This population was subdivided into two subclades, clade A1 and clade A2, which comprised sister organisms to the remaining members of the worldwide L. donovani complex; (ii) a population in clade B consisted of one reference strain of L. turanica and five Chinese strains from Xinjiang; (iii) clade C (SELF-7 and EJNI-154) formed a population that was closely related to clade B, and both isolates were identified as L. gerbilli; and (iv) the final group, clade D, included Sauroleishmania (LIZRD and KXG-E) and was distinct from the other strains. We hypothesize that the phylogeny of Chinese Leishmania is associated with the geographical origins rather than with the clinical forms (VL or CL) of leishmaniasis. To conclude, this study provides further molecular information on Chinese Leishmania isolates and the Chinese isolates appear to have a more complex evolutionary history than previously thought. PMID

  9. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, J.; Olonitola, O. S.; Radu, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Listeria (L.) monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap). Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25%) were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9%) of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2%) from “Manshanu,” and 1 (2.8%) from “Kindrimo.” Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A), when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A) phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A) clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis) and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis) is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified. PMID:27597873

  10. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Milk and Milk Products in Kaduna, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Usman, U B; Kwaga, J K P; Kabir, J; Olonitola, O S; Radu, S; Bande, F

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Listeria (L.) monocytogenes isolated from milk and milk products in Kaduna, Nigeria, were subjected to a multiplex PCR assay to identify virulence-associated genes (such as prf A, inl A, hly A, act A, and iap). Of the 36 isolates, 9 (25%) were positive for one or two virulence-associated genes. Based on the sample type, 6 (16.9%) of the isolates that possessed virulence-associated genes were obtained from raw milk, 2 (3.2%) from "Manshanu," and 1 (2.8%) from "Kindrimo." Sequence and phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA revealed that Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, NGA 41A, and NGA 38A), when compared with reference L. monocytogenes, were grouped into two distinct clusters, A and B, with sequence (NGA 34A, NGA 35A, and NGA 41A) phylogenetically closer to J1776; N1-011A; R2-502; J1816; and J2-031, whereas L. monocytogenes isolate (NGA 38A) clustered with EDG; J1-220; J1926; J1817; and J2-1091. The separation of the Nigerian L. monocytogenes isolates into linage A (responsible for epidemic listeriosis) and lineage B (responsible for sporadic cases of listeriosis) is of public health concern and that local isolates might have potentials for human food borne listeriosis based on the virulence factors so far identified. PMID:27597873

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) isolates from China with high homology to PCV2c.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Sun, Na; Wu, Hua

    2016-06-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is an important emerging pathogen that has been causatively associated with multifactorial disease syndromes in pigs and other species. It has a worldwide distribution and causes significant economic losses in the swine industry. Its genome is dynamically evolving through recombination and mutation, and the circulating genotypes of PCV2 strains in Asia are PCV2a, PCV2b and PCV2d. In this study, 12 PCV isolates were evaluated and identified by amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis, and the results revealed a new monophyletic group of PCV in China. More importantly, three of these isolates shared high homology within the ORF1 region with a strain of genotype PCV2c that was detected only in Denmark. Phylogeographic analysis of these isolates suggested that the isolates may have arisen in Denmark and that they were then transported to China. PMID:27016927

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of some Newcastle disease virus isolates from the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Elmardi, N.A.; Bakheit, M.A.; Khalafalla, A.I.

    2016-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify 1412 bp of the fusion protein gene (F gene) of four Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates; two velogenic (TY-1/90 and DIK-90) and two lentogenic isolates (Dongla 88/1 and GD.S.1). Following sequencing, nucleotide sequences were annotated and 894 bp were compared phylogenetically with those from strains previously reported in the Sudan and the virus strains published on the GenBank. It could be demonstrated that TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains belong to the genotype VI of NDV and are in close genetic relationship to sub- genotype VIb. TY-1/90 and DIK-90 strains were observed to be genetically unrelated to the earlier Sudanese isolates of 1970/80s and the late of 2000s suggesting a different origin. The close genetic relationship to the European and African pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) suggests a common ancestor. Dongola, GD.S.1 strains were classified into genotype II that comprises non-pathogenic lentogenic NDV strains. The present genetic classification of NDV isolates of the Sudan provides valuable information on genotypes of NDV. Further molecular epidemiological investigations of the recent outbreaks of Newcastle disease in the Sudan are needed in order to improve the efficiency of control strategies and vaccine development. PMID:27419101

  13. [Phylogenetic analysis of Pleurotus species].

    PubMed

    Shnyreva, A A; Shnyreva, A V

    2015-02-01

    We performed phylogenetic analysis for ten Pleurotus species, based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of rDNA. A phylogenetic tree was constructed on the basis of 31 oyster fungi strains of different origin and 10 reference sequences from GenBank. Our analysis demonstrates that the tested Pleurotus species are of monophyletic origin. We evaluated the evolutionary distances between these species. Classic genetic analysis of sexual compatibility based on monocaryon (mon)-mon crosses showed no reproductive barriers within the P. cornucopiae-P. euosmus species complex. Thus, despite the divergence (subclustering) between commercial strains and natural isolates of P. ostreatus revealed by phylogenetic analysis, there is no reproductive isolation between these groups. A common allele of the matB locus was identified for the commercial strains Sommer and L/4, supporting the common origin of these strains. PMID:25966583

  14. Evolution and Phylogenetic Analysis of Full-Length VP3 Genes of Eastern Mediterranean Bluetongue Virus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nomikou, Kyriaki; Dovas, Chrysostomos Ι.; Maan, Sushila; Anthony, Simon J.; Samuel, Alan R.; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Maan, Narender S.; Mangana, Olga; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2009-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the ‘type’ species of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae. The BTV genome is composed of ten linear segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), each of which codes for one of ten distinct viral proteins. Previous phylogenetic comparisons have evaluated variations in genome segment 3 (Seg-3) nucleotide sequence as way to identify the geographical origin (different topotypes) of BTV isolates. The full-length nucleotide sequence of genome Seg-3 was determined for thirty BTV isolates recovered in the eastern Mediterranean region, the Balkans and other geographic areas (Spain, India, Malaysia and Africa). These data were compared, based on molecular variability, positive-selection-analysis and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic reconstructions (using appropriate substitution models) to 24 previously published sequences, revealing their evolutionary relationships. These analyses indicate that negative selection is a major force in the evolution of BTV, restricting nucleotide variability, reducing the evolutionary rate of Seg-3 and potentially of other regions of the BTV genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the BTV-4 strains isolated over a relatively long time interval (1979–2000), in a single geographic area (Greece), showed a low level of nucleotide diversity, indicating that the virus can circulate almost unchanged for many years. These analyses also show that the recent incursions into south-eastern Europe were caused by BTV strains belonging to two different major-lineages: representing an ‘eastern’ (BTV-9, -16 and -1) and a ‘western’ (BTV-4) group/topotype. Epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these viruses originated from a geographic area to the east and southeast of Greece (including Cyprus and the Middle East), which appears to represent an important ecological niche for the virus that is likely to represent a continuing source of future BTV incursions into Europe. PMID:19649272

  15. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of bacteria with antimicrobial activities from the Mediterranean sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cavernicola.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, U; Schmid, M; Wagner, M; Fieseler, L; Gernert, C; Hacker, J

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activities from the marine sponges Aplysina aerophoba and Aplysina cavernicola. The obtained 27 isolates could be subdivided into eight phylogenetically different clusters based on comparative sequence analysis of their 16S rDNA genes. The sponge isolates were affiliated with the low (Bacillus) and high G+C Gram-positive bacteria (Arthobacter, Micrococcus), as well as the alpha-Proteobacteria (unknown isolate) and gamma-Proteobacteria (Vibrio, Pseudoalteromonas). One novel Bacillus species was identified and two species were closely related to previously uncharacterized strains. Isolates with antimicrobial activity were numerically most abundant in the genera Pseudoalteromonas and the alpha-Proteobacteria. The sponge isolates show antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative reference strains but not against the fungus Candida albicans. A general pattern was observed in that Gram-positive bacteria inhibited Gram-positive strains while Gram-negative bacteria inhibited Gram-negative isolates. Antimicrobial activities were also found against clinical isolates, i.e. multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from hospital patients. The high recovery of strains with antimicrobial activity suggests that marine sponges represent an ecological niche which harbors a hitherto largely uncharacterized microbial diversity and, concomitantly, a yet untapped metabolic potential. PMID:11311441

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of Polygalacturonase-Producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas Isolated From Plant Waste Material

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Muhammad; Latif, Zakia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keeping in mind the commercial application of polygalacturonase (PG) in juice and beverages industry, bacterial strains were isolated from rotten fruits and vegetables to screen for competent producers of PG. Objectives: In this study, the plate method was used for preliminary screening of polygalacturonase-producing bacteria, while the Dinitrosalicylic Acid (DNS) method was used for quantifications of PG. Materials and Methods: Biochemically-identified polygalacturonase-producing Bacillus and Pseudomonas species were further characterized by molecular markers. The genetic diversity among these selected strains was analyzed by investigating microsatellite distribution in their genome. Out of 110 strains, 17 competent strains of Bacillus and eight strains of Pseudomonas were selected, identified and confirmed biochemically. Selected strains were characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing and data was submitted to the national center for biotechnology information (NCBI) website for accession numbers. Results: Among the Bacillus, Bacillus vallismortis (JQ990307) isolated from mango was the most competent producer of PG; producing up to 4.4 U/µL. Amongst Pseudomonas, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (JQ990314) isolated from oranges was the most competent PG producer equivalent to B. vallismortis (JQ990307). To determine genetic diversity of different strains of Pseudomonas and Bacillus varying in PG production, fingerprinting was done on the basis of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) or microsatellites. The data was analyzed and a phylogenetic tree was constructed using the Minitab 3 software for comparison of bacterial isolates producing different concentrations of PG. Fingerprinting showed that presence or absence of certain microsatellites correlated with the ability of PG production. Conclusions: Bacteria from biological waste were competent producers of PG and must be used on an industrial scale to cope with the demand of PG in the food industry. PMID:27099686

  17. Descriptive distribution and phylogenetic analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolates of Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive distribution and phylogeny of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) were studied in cats suspected of having feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in Malaysia. Ascitic fluids and/or biopsy samples were subjected to a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeted for a conserved region of 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of the FCoV genome. Eighty nine percent of the sampled animals were positive for the presence of FCoV. Among the FCoV positive cats, 80% of cats were males and 64% were below 2 years of age. The FCoV positive cases included 56% domestic short hair (DSH), 40% Persian, and 4% Siamese cats. The nucleotide sequences of 10 selected amplified products from FIP cases were determined. The sequence comparison revealed that the field isolates had 96% homology with a few point mutations. The extent of homology decreased to 93% when compared with reference strains. The overall branching pattern of phylogenetic tree showed two distinct clusters, where all Malaysian isolates fall into one main genetic cluster. These findings provided the first genetic information of FCoV in Malaysia. PMID:20053278

  18. Descriptive distribution and phylogenetic analysis of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolates of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Saeed; Arshad, Siti S; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Omar, Abdul R; Zeenathul, Nazariah A; Fong, Lau S; Rahman, Nor-Alimah; Arshad, Habibah; Shamsudin, Shahirudin; Isa, Mohd-Kamarudin A

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive distribution and phylogeny of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) were studied in cats suspected of having feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) in Malaysia. Ascitic fluids and/or biopsy samples were subjected to a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeted for a conserved region of 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of the FCoV genome. Eighty nine percent of the sampled animals were positive for the presence of FCoV. Among the FCoV positive cats, 80% of cats were males and 64% were below 2 years of age. The FCoV positive cases included 56% domestic short hair (DSH), 40% Persian, and 4% Siamese cats. The nucleotide sequences of 10 selected amplified products from FIP cases were determined. The sequence comparison revealed that the field isolates had 96% homology with a few point mutations. The extent of homology decreased to 93% when compared with reference strains. The overall branching pattern of phylogenetic tree showed two distinct clusters, where all Malaysian isolates fall into one main genetic cluster. These findings provided the first genetic information of FCoV in Malaysia. PMID:20053278

  19. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Analysis of the First Usutu Virus Isolate from a Human Patient Presenting with Neurological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gaibani, Paolo; Cavrini, Francesca; Gould, Ernest A.; Rossini, Giada; Pierro, Anna; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, belonging to the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex, that circulates among mosquitoes and birds. We describe and analyze the complete genome sequence of the first USUV strain isolated from an immunocompromised patient with neuroinvasive disease. This USUV isolate showed an overall nucleotide identity of 99% and 96%, respectively, with the genomes of isolates from Europe and Africa. Comparison of the human USUV complete polyprotein sequence with bird-derived strains, showed two unique amino acid substitutions. In particular, one substitution (S595G) was situated in the DIII domain of the viral Envelope protein that is recognized by flavivirus neutralizing antibodies. An additional amino acid substitution (D3425E) was identified in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of the NS5 protein. This substitution is remarkable since E3425 is highly conserved among the other USUV isolates that were not associated with human infection. However, a similar substitution was observed in Japanese encephalitis and in West Nile viruses isolated from humans. Phylogenetic analysis of the human USUV strain revealed a close relationship with an Italian strain isolated in 2009. Analysis of synonymous nucleotide substitutions (SNSs) among the different USUV genomes showed a specific evolutionary divergence among different countries. In addition, 15 SNSs were identified as unique in the human isolate. We also identified four specific nucleotide substitutions in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) in the human isolate that were not present in the other USUV sequences. Our analyses provide the basis for further experimental studies aimed at defining the effective role of these mutations in the USUV genome, their potential role in the development of viral variants pathogenic for humans and their evolution and dispersal out of Africa. PMID:23741387

  20. Phylogenetic and 2D/3D Analysis of HCV 1a NS4A Gene/Protein in Pakistani Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abrar; Idrees, Muhammad; Asif, Muhammad; Ali, Liaqat; Rasool, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nonstructural protein NS4A of hepatitis C virus is composed of 54 amino acids. This small size protein has vital role in many cellular functions. The most important reported function is being a cofactor of viral enzymes serine protease and helicase. Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the phylogenetic variation, its impact in terms of translation and any functional change in protein structure at primary 2D/3D structure using computational tools from Pakistani patients isolates. Materials and Methods: Patient sera infected with Hepatitis C virus, genotype 1A, were obtained from Molecular Diagnostics lab, CEMB, University of the Punjab Lahore by using BD Vacutainer collection tubes (Becton Dickenson). Results: Phylogenetic analysis of the gene revealed that Pakistani 1a HCV strains are in the start of third cluster and there is a difference between inter Pakistani isolates at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Conclusions: Mutations were present in the central domain of NS4A (amino acids 21 - 34). PMID:26288631

  1. Use of a multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis method for molecular subtyping and phylogenetic analysis of Neisseria meningitidis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jui-Cheng; Li, Chun-Chin; Chiou, Chien-Shun

    2006-01-01

    Background The multilocus variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) technique has been developed for fine typing of many bacterial species. The genomic sequences of Neisseria meningitidis strains Z2491, MC58 and FAM18 have been available for searching potential VNTR loci by computer software. In this study, we developed and evaluated a MLVA method for molecular subtyping and phylogenetic analysis of N. meningitidis strains. Results A total of 12 VNTR loci were identified for subtyping and phylogenetic analysis of 100 N. meningitidis isolates, which had previously been characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. The number of alleles ranges from 3 to 40 for the 12 VNTR loci; theoretically, the numbers of alleles can generate more than 5 × 1011 MLVA types. In total, 93 MLVA types were identified in the 100 isolates, indicating that MLVA is powerful in discriminating N. meningitidis strains. In phylogenetic analysis with the minimal spanning tree method, clonal relationships, established with MLVA types, agreed well with those built with ST types. Conclusion Our study indicates that the MLVA method has a higher degree of resolution than PFGE in discriminating N. meningitidis isolates and may be a useful tool for phylogenetic studies of strains evolving over different time scales. PMID:16686962

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Taura syndrome virus isolates collected between 1993 and 2004 and virulence comparison between two isolates representing different genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2005-09-01

    Taura syndrome virus (TSV) is highly pathogenic to Litopenaeus vannamei (Pacific white shrimp) and has caused significant economic loss in the shrimp culture industry. It was first reported from Ecuador in 1992 and has since become widely distributed throughout the Americas and southeast Asia (SE Asia). To determine the genetic relationship among various geographic isolates, we amplified and sequenced a 1.3 kb fragment of the TSV capsid protein gene 2 (CP2) from each of 34 isolates collected from cultured penaeid shrimp stocks in Ecuador, Colombia, Honduras, USA, Mexico, Belize, Thailand, China, and Indonesia. An additional six CP2 sequences obtained from GenBank were included in the analysis. The results indicated low genetic variation (0--5.6% for nucleotide sequence and 0--7.0% for deduced amino acid sequence) among these 40 isolates. A phylogenetic analysis based on the deduced CP2 amino acid sequence revealed three distinct groups: Americas, Belize, and SE Asia. The Belize and SE Asia groups were separated from each other by a 4.7% difference in amino acid sequence. The Belize and Americas groups differed by 4.4%. The Americas and SE Asia groups were the closest, separated by a difference of only 3.3%. Comparison between Belize and Hawaii TSV (reference strain for Americas group) indicated that Belize TSV was more virulent than Hawaii TSV. In bioassays, the Belize isolate caused 50% mortality by 3 days, while the Hawaii isolate caused 50% mortality over 4--6 days. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and virulence comparison, the Belize TSV isolate should be considered as a new variant. PMID:16022902

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of endophytic bacterial isolates from leaves of the medicinal plant Trichilia elegans A. Juss. (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Rhoden, S A; Garcia, A; Santos e Silva, M C; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2015-01-01

    Various organisms such as fungi and bacteria can live inside plants, inhabiting the aerial parts (primarily the leaves) without causing damage. These microorganisms, called endophytes, produce an extensive variety of compounds that can be useful for medical and agronomic purposes. Trichilia elegans A. Juss., belonging to the Meliaceae family, shows wide dispersion in South America, and phytochemical analyses from these plants and endophyte isolates have shown biological activity. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to verify the diversity of bacterial endophytes from T. elegans using partial sequencing of 16S rRNA, followed by phylogenetic analysis. Isolation was performed by cutting the leaves, after disinfection with 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), in 1-2-mm² fragments, which were equally placed on dishes containing TSA and fungicide BENLATE at 75 μg/mL. All dishes were incubated at 28°C in the biochemical oxygen demand system for 5 days and periodically checked. Afterwards, the colonization frequency (%) was determined: (number of fragments colonized by bacteria/total number of fragments) x 100. Three isolations between September 2011 and March 2012 were performed; the growth frequency ranged between 1.6 and 13.6%. Following sequencing of 16S rRNA and phylogenetic analysis, the genera identified were: Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Microbacterium, Pseudomonas, and Pantoea. These results will provide important knowledge on the diversity of endophytic bacteria inhabiting medicinal plants, and a better understanding of the microbiome of T. elegans would reinforce the necessity of endophyte studies with a focus on their future applications in biotechnological areas of agriculture, medicine, and the environment. PMID:25730091

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of phylogenetically closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates from Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Romano, Christine; D'Imperio, Seth; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lasken, Roger; Shock, Everett L; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-05-01

    We describe the complete genome sequences of four closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates (≥ 99.7% 16S rRNA gene identity) that were isolated from the outflow channel of Dragon Spring (DS), Norris Geyser Basin, in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY. The genomes range in size from 1,552,607 to 1,552,931 bp, contain 1,667 to 1,676 predicted genes, and are highly syntenic. There are subtle differences among the DS isolates, which as a group are different from Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 that was previously isolated from a geographically distinct YNP geothermal feature. Genes unique to the DS genomes encode arsenite [As(III)] oxidation, NADH-ubiquinone-plastoquinone (complex I), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain, a DNA photolyase, and elements of a type II secretion system. Functions unique to strain Y04AAS1 include thiosulfate metabolism, nitrate respiration, and mercury resistance determinants. DS genomes contain seven CRISPR loci that are almost identical but are different from the single CRISPR locus in strain Y04AAS1. Other differences between the DS and Y04AAS1 genomes include average nucleotide identity (94.764%) and percentage conserved DNA (80.552%). Approximately half of the genes unique to Y04AAS1 are predicted to have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Fragment recruitment analysis and marker gene searches demonstrated that the DS metagenome was more similar to the DS genomes than to the Y04AAS1 genome, but that the DS community is likely comprised of a continuum of Hydrogenobaculum genotypes that span from the DS genomes described here to an Y04AAS1-like organism, which appears to represent a distinct ecotype relative to the DS genomes characterized. PMID:23435891

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Phylogenetically Closely Related Hydrogenobaculum sp. Isolates from Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Christine; D'Imperio, Seth; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lasken, Roger; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the complete genome sequences of four closely related Hydrogenobaculum sp. isolates (≥99.7% 16S rRNA gene identity) that were isolated from the outflow channel of Dragon Spring (DS), Norris Geyser Basin, in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY. The genomes range in size from 1,552,607 to 1,552,931 bp, contain 1,667 to 1,676 predicted genes, and are highly syntenic. There are subtle differences among the DS isolates, which as a group are different from Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 that was previously isolated from a geographically distinct YNP geothermal feature. Genes unique to the DS genomes encode arsenite [As(III)] oxidation, NADH-ubiquinone-plastoquinone (complex I), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain, a DNA photolyase, and elements of a type II secretion system. Functions unique to strain Y04AAS1 include thiosulfate metabolism, nitrate respiration, and mercury resistance determinants. DS genomes contain seven CRISPR loci that are almost identical but are different from the single CRISPR locus in strain Y04AAS1. Other differences between the DS and Y04AAS1 genomes include average nucleotide identity (94.764%) and percentage conserved DNA (80.552%). Approximately half of the genes unique to Y04AAS1 are predicted to have been acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Fragment recruitment analysis and marker gene searches demonstrated that the DS metagenome was more similar to the DS genomes than to the Y04AAS1 genome, but that the DS community is likely comprised of a continuum of Hydrogenobaculum genotypes that span from the DS genomes described here to an Y04AAS1-like organism, which appears to represent a distinct ecotype relative to the DS genomes characterized. PMID:23435891

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from wild birds in the Poyang Lake region of China

    PubMed Central

    FAN, Shengtao; WANG, Tiecheng; GAO, Xiaolong; YING, Ying; LI, Xue; LI, Yongcheng; LI, Yuanguo; MA, Jinzhu; SUN, Heting; CHU, Dong; XU, Yu; YANG, Songtao; LI, Qihan; GAO, Yuwei; XIA, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a highly contagious viral disease in poultry and wild birds, and it can cause significant economic loss worldwide. Eight viral strains were isolated by inoculating embryonated chicken eggs from the Poyang Lake region of China with swab samples. All eight of the NDV isolates were identified as class I genotype 3 strains, but they diverged notablely from class II viruses. Further analysis revealed that all eight NDV isolates were lentogenic strains containing the 112ERQER↓L117 motif at the F protein cleavage site. The strains were highly identical and were more species specific (chicken and waterfowl) than site specific (Nanchang and Duchang regions). The close phylogenetic proximity of these isolates indicates that viral transmission may happen between poultry and wild birds. Our study demonstrates that lentogenic class I NDVs exist in clinically healthy wild waterfowl and poultry within the Poyang Lake region. Active surveillance of these viruses to determine their evolution and origin is one of the most realistic strategies for preventing and controlling NDV outbreaks. PMID:25843743

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of Newcastle disease viruses isolated from wild birds in the Poyang Lake region of China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengtao; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Xiaolong; Ying, Ying; Li, Xue; Li, Yongcheng; Li, Yuanguo; Ma, Jinzhu; Sun, Heting; Chu, Dong; Xu, Yu; Yang, Songtao; Li, Qihan; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a highly contagious viral disease in poultry and wild birds, and it can cause significant economic loss worldwide. Eight viral strains were isolated by inoculating embryonated chicken eggs from the Poyang Lake region of China with swab samples. All eight of the NDV isolates were identified as class I genotype 3 strains, but they diverged notablely from class II viruses. Further analysis revealed that all eight NDV isolates were lentogenic strains containing the (112)ERQER↓L(117) motif at the F protein cleavage site. The strains were highly identical and were more species specific (chicken and waterfowl) than site specific (Nanchang and Duchang regions). The close phylogenetic proximity of these isolates indicates that viral transmission may happen between poultry and wild birds. Our study demonstrates that lentogenic class I NDVs exist in clinically healthy wild waterfowl and poultry within the Poyang Lake region. Active surveillance of these viruses to determine their evolution and origin is one of the most realistic strategies for preventing and controlling NDV outbreaks. PMID:25843743

  8. Multilocus sequence typing (and phylogenetic analysis) of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains isolated from clinical cases in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The molecular epidemiology of C. jejuni and C. coli clinical strains isolated from children with gastroenteritis, was investigated using the multilocus sequence typing method (MLST). This analysis establishes for the first time in Greece and constitutes an important tool for the epidemiological surveillance and control of Campylobacter infection in our country. Methods The MLST genotypes were compared with those gained by other typing methods (HS-typing, PFGE and FlaA typing) and were also phylogenetically analyzed, in order to uncover genetic relationships. Results Among 68 C. jejuni strains, 41 different MLST-Sequence Types (MLST-STs) were found. Fifty six strains or 34 MLST-STs could be sorted into 15 different MLST-Sequence Type Complexes (MLST-STCs), while twelve strains or seven MLST-STs did not match any of the MLST-STCs of the database. Twenty C. coli strains belonged to 14 different MLST-STs. Eleven MLST-STs were classified in the same MLST-STC (828), and three were unclassifiable. There was no significant association between the MLST-STs and the results of the other typing methods. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that some strains, classified to the species of C. jejuni, formed a separate, phylogenetically distinct group. In eight strains some alleles belonging to the taxonomic cluster of C. jejuni, were also detected in C. coli and vice versa, a phenomenon caused by the genetic mosaic encountered inside the genus Campylobacter. Conclusions The MLST-ST determination proved to be a very useful tool for the typing as well as the identification of Campylobacter on the species level. PMID:24010733

  9. Equine influenza outbreak in India (2008-09): virus isolation, sero-epidemiology and phylogenetic analysis of HA gene.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Nitin; Bera, B C; Singh, B K; Shanmugasundaram, K; Gulati, B R; Barua, Sanjay; Vaid, R K; Gupta, A K; Singh, R K

    2010-07-14

    An outbreak of equine influenza (EI) was reported in India in June, 2008 after a gap of two decades. The outbreak started from Jammu and Kashmir (Katra), northern state of India and spread to the other parts of the country affecting equines in 11 states. The virus (H3N8) was isolated from nasal swabs obtained from clinical cases in various locations in the country including Katra (Jammu and Kashmir), Mysore (Karnataka) and Ahmedabad (Gujarat) using embryonated chicken eggs. The virus isolates were identified as H3N8 by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test titration with standard serum and by sequencing of full-length haemagglutinin (HA) gene and partial sequence of neuraminidase (NA) gene. Paired serum samples (n=271) showing more than fourfold rise in antibody titres tested from 11 states confirmed equine influenza. Serum samples (n=2517) of equines from 13 states of the country screened by HI test revealed 687 (26.85%) samples positive for antibodies to EI (H3N8). Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA) gene confirmed the virus to be closely related to Clade 2 of the Florida sublineage in American lineage. Comparison of deduced amino acid sequence of HA gene with EIV isolates from various lineages showed substitutions in the antigenic regions C and D. HA1 gene sequence had highest amino acid identity to A/eq/Gansu/7/08 and A/eq/Hubei/6/08 isolates from China and Inner-Mongolia isolate, while the complete HA gene sequence was closest to A/eq/A/eq/Newmarket/5/03, A/eq/Bari/05 and A/eq/Kentucky/05/02 isolates. Recent outbreaks of Mongolia, China and India by clade 2 EI viruses imply their predominance in Asia in addition to Europe. PMID:20053509

  10. Biological activities of some Acacia spp. (Fabaceae) against new clinical isolates identified by ribosomal RNA gene-based phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mahmoud Fawzy; Alrumman, Sulaiman Abdullah; Hesham, Abd El-Latif

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays,most of the pathogenic bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Therefore,the pharmaceutical properties of the natural plant extracts have become of interest to researchers as alternative antimicrobial agents. In this study,antibacterial activities of extract gained from Acacia etbaica, Acacia laeta, Acacia origena and Acacia pycnantha have been evaluated against isolated pathogenic bacteria (Strains MFM-01, MFM-10 and AH-09) using agar well diffusion methods.The bacterial strains were isolated from infected individuals,and their exact identification was detected on the basis of 16S rRNA gene amplification and sequence determination. Alignment results and the comparison of 16 SrRN A gene sequences of the isolates to 16 SrRN A gene sequences available in Gen Bank data base as well as the phylogenetic analysis confirmed the accurate position of the isolates as Klebsiella oxytoca strain MFM-01, Staphylococcus aureus strain MFM-10 and Klebsiella pneumoniae strain AH-09. Except for cold water, all tested solvents (Chloroform, petroleum ether, methanol, diethyl ether, and acetone) showed variation in their activity against studied bacteria. GC-MS analysis of ethanol extracts showed that four investigated Acacia species have different phyto components. Eight important pharmaceutical components were found in the legume of Acacia etbaica, seven in the legume of Acacia laeta, fifteen in the legume of Acacia origena and nine in the leaves of Acacia pycnantha. A dendrogram was constructed based on chemical composition, revealed that Acacia laeta is more closely related to Acacia etbaica forming on eclade, whereas Acacia origena less similar to other species. Our results demonstrated that, investigated plants and chemical compounds present could be used as promising antibacterial agents. PMID:26826814

  11. Genetic diversity characterization of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates in Romania, based on phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zaulet, Mihaela; Gurau, Maria Rodica; Petrovan, Vlad; Buburuzan, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a disease produced by the (PRRS) virus, characterized by endemic evolution in the majority of countries, which remains in actuality being a permanent threat to health and economic free farms, as well as for those infected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of Romanian PRRSV isolates from the four most important pig farms in Romania by comparing the nucleotide sequences obtained for ORF5 and ORF7 with a wide range of sequences from GenBank belonging to the main types of PRRSV; the type 1. Eighteen different sequences were obtained for ORF5 gene and 10 for ORF7 gene. One Romanian isolate (Rom3) was found in three of the four different investigated farms. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Romanian PRRSV nucleotide sequences clustered in three groups within the subtype 1 of the virus. The analysis of amino acid sequences evidenced for GP5 and N-nucleocapsid proteins confirmed that the Romanian virus belonged to type 1. PMID:23109899

  12. ISOLATION AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA FROM ITS INVASIVE ALTERNATIVE HOST, PORCELAIN BERRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A strain of X. fastidiosa was isolated from an invasive alternative host species, porcelain berry. Its genetic relationship with strains isolated from a native alternative host, wild grape, and other economically important hosts including grape, peach, plum, oak, mulberry, maple and oleander was det...

  13. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of deformed wing viruses isolated from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Kim, Young-Ha; Kim, Nam-Hee; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Jung, Suk-Chan; Van Quyen, Dong; Kang, Seung-Won

    2013-12-27

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is one of the most common viral infection in honeybees. Phylogenetic trees were constructed for 16 partial nucleotide sequences of the structural polyprotein region and the RNA helicase region of South Korean DWVs. The sequences were compared with 10 previously reported DWV sequences from different countries and the sequences of two closely related viruses, Kakugo virus (KGV) and Varroa destructor virus-1 (VDV-1). The phylogeny based on these two regions, the Korean DWV genomes were highly conserved with 95-100% identity, while they also shared 93-97% similarity with genotypes from other countries, although they formed a separate cluster. To investigate this phenomenon in more detail, the complete DWV genome sequences of Korea-1 and Korea-2 were determined and aligned with six previously reported complete DWV genome sequences from different countries, as well as KGV and VDV-1, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The two Korean DWVs shared 96.4% similarity. Interestingly, the Korea-2 genome was more similar to the USA (96.5%) genome than the Korea-1. The Korean genotypes highly conserved with USA (96%) but low similarity with the United Kingdom3 (UK3) genome (89%). The end of the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the start of the open reading frame (ORF) region, and the 3' UTR were variable and contained several substitutions/transitions. This phenomenon may be explained by intramolecular recombination between the Korean and other DWV genotypes. PMID:24035266

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of dengue virus types 1 and 3 isolated in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988.

    PubMed

    Sjatha, Fithriyah; Takizawa, Yamato; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2012-12-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne viruses that cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, both of which are globally important diseases. These viruses have evolved in a transmission cycle between human hosts and mosquito vectors in various tropical and subtropical environments. We previously isolated three strains of dengue type 1 virus (DENV1) and 14 strains of dengue type 3 virus (DENV3) during an outbreak of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever in Jakarta, Indonesia in 1988. Here, we compared the nucleotide sequences of the entire envelope protein-coding region among these strains. The isolates were 97.6-100% identical for DENV1 and 98.8-100% identical for DENV3. All DENV1 isolates were included in two different clades of genotype IV and all DENV3 isolates were included in a single clade of genotype I. For DENV1, three Yap Island strains isolated in 2004 were the only strains closely related to the present isolates; the recently circulated Indonesian strains were in different clades. Molecular clock analyses estimated that ancestors of the genotype IV strains of DENV1 have been indigenous in Indonesia since 1948. We predict that they diverged frequently around 1967 and that their offspring distributed to Southeast Asia, the Western Pacific, and Africa. For DENV3, the clade containing all the present isolates also contained strains isolated from other Indonesian regions and other countries including Malaysia, Singapore, China, and East Timor from 1985-2010. Molecular clock analyses estimated that the common ancestor of the genotype I strains of DENV3 emerged in Indonesia around 1967 and diverged frequently until 1980, and that their offspring distributed mainly in Southeast Asia. The first dengue outbreak in 1968 and subsequent outbreaks in Indonesia might have influenced the divergence and distribution of the DENV1 genotype IV strains and the DENV3 genotype I strains in many countries. PMID:22959957

  15. PHYLOGENETIC AFFILIATION OF WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM BACTERIAL ISOLATES USING 16S RDNA SEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previously described study, only 15% of the bacterial strains isolated from a water distribution system (WDS) grown on R2A agar were identifiable using fatty acid methyl esthers (FAME) profiling. The lack of success was attributed to the use of fatty acid databases of bacter...

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of adenovirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrach, Balázs; Benko, Mária

    2007-01-01

    Members of the family Adenoviridae have been isolated from a large variety of hosts, including representatives from every major vertebrate class from fish to mammals. The high prevalence, together with the fairly conserved organization of the central part of their genomes, make the adenoviruses one of (if not the) best models for studying viral evolution on a larger time scale. Phylogenetic calculation can infer the evolutionary distance among adenovirus strains on serotype, species, and genus levels, thus helping the establishment of a correct taxonomy on the one hand, and speeding up the process of typing new isolates on the other. Initially, four major lineages corresponding to four genera were recognized. Later, the demarcation criteria of lower taxon levels, such as species or types, could also be defined with phylogenetic calculations. A limited number of possible host switches have been hypothesized and convincingly supported. Application of the web-based BLAST and MultAlin programs and the freely available PHYLIP package, along with the TreeView program, enables everyone to make correct calculations. In addition to step-by-step instruction on how to perform phylogenetic analysis, critical points where typical mistakes or misinterpretation of the results might occur will be identified and hints for their avoidance will be provided. PMID:17656792

  17. Phylogenetic analysis based on the PKS gene involved in fusaric acid biosynthesis production reveals close relationship between US race 1 lineage isolates & Australian biotype isolates of Fusarium Oxysporum f. sp. Vasinfectum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolates of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum, the causal agent of fusarium wilt of cotton, vary significantly in their virulence. Isolates have been further subcategorized into pathogenic races based on their differential interaction with host genotypes. Phylogenetic analysis based on three n...

  18. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin genes of H9N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from commercial chickens in Iran.

    PubMed

    Homayounimehr, Ali Reza; Dadras, Habibollah; Shoushtari, Abdolhamid; Pourbakhsh, Seyyed Ali

    2010-08-01

    To determine the genetic relationship of Iranian viruses, the haemagglutinin (HA) genes from ten isolates of H9N2 viruses isolated from commercial chickens in Iran during 1998-2002 were amplified and sequenced. Sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies were conducted by comparing each isolate with those of the available H9N2 strains at GenBank. All these ten isolates had the same sequence -R-S-S-R/G-L- of proteolytic cleavage site of the HA. Nucleotide sequence comparisons of HA gene from Iranian isolates showed 95.2-99.1% identity within the group. Five isolates had leucine (L) at position 226 instead of glutamine (Q). Phylogenetic analysis showed that all our isolates belonged to the G1-like sublineage. Also these isolates showed some degree of homology with other H9N2 isolates e.g., 94.3-96.9% with qu/HK/G1/97, 96.1-98.6% with pa/Chiba/1/97, 95.6-98.2% with pa/Narita/92A/98, and 94.0-96.3% with HK/1073/99. On the basis of phylogenetic and molecular characterization evidence, we concluded that the H9N2 subtype influenza viruses circulating in chicken flocks in Iran since 1998-2002 had a common origin. The results of this study indicated that all Iranian viruses have the potential to emerge as highly pathogenic influenza virus, and considering the homology of these isolates with human H9N2 strains, it seems that the potential of these avian influenza isolates to infect human should not be overlooked. PMID:20390351

  19. Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of matrix gene of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds and live bird markets in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Yogesh; Jindal, Naresh; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Stallknecht, David E.; Goyal, Sagar M.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Chander et al. (2012) Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of matrix gene of avian influenza viruses isolated from wild birds and live bird markets in the USA. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(4), 513–520. Background  Wild birds are the natural hosts for influenza A viruses (IAVs) and provide a niche for the maintenance of this virus. Objectives  This study was undertaken to analyze nucleotide sequences of the matrix (M) gene of AIVs isolated from wild birds and live bird markets (LBMs) to index the changes occurring in this gene. Methods  M‐gene of 229 avian influenza virus (AIV) isolates obtained from wild birds and LBMs was amplified and sequenced. Full‐length sequences (∼900 nt.) thus obtained were analyzed to identify changes that may be associated with resistance to adamantanes. Phylogenetic analysis of all sequences was performed using clustalw, and evolutionary distances were calculated by maximum composite likelihood method using mega (ver. 5.0) software. Results  Twenty‐seven different viral subtypes were represented with H3N8 being the most dominant subtype in wild birds and H7N2 being the predominant subtype among isolates from LBMs. Phylogenetic analysis of the M‐gene showed a high degree of nucleotide sequence identity with US isolates of AIVs but not with those of Asian or European lineages. While none of the isolates from wild birds had any antiviral resistance–associated mutations, 17 LBM isolates carried polymorphisms known to cause reduced susceptibility to antiviral drugs (adamantanes). Of these 17 isolates, 16 had S31N change and one isolate had V27A mutation. Conclusions  These results indicate independent evolution of M‐gene in the absence of any antiviral drugs leading to mutations causing resistance indicating the need for continued active surveillance of AIVs. PMID:22958470

  20. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  1. Phylogenetic analysis and pathogenicity of H3 subtype avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets in China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongrui; Shi, Ying; Ruan, Tao; Li, Xuesong; Teng, Qiaoyang; Chen, Hongjun; Yang, Jianmei; Liu, Qinfang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    H3 subtype influenza A virus is one of the main subtypes that threats both public and animal health. However, the evolution and pathogenicity of H3 avian influenza virus (AIV) circulating in domestic birds in China remain largely unclear. In this study, seven H3 AIVs (four H3N2 and three H3N8) were isolated from poultry in live poultry market (LPM) in China. Phylogenetic analyses of full genomes showed that all viruses were clustered into Eurasian lineage, except N8 genes of two H3N8 isolates fell into North American lineage. Intriguingly, the N8 gene of one H3N8 and PB2, PB1, NP and NS of two H3N2 isolates have close relationship with those of the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses circulating in Korea and United States, suggesting that the H3-like AIV may contribute internal genes to the highly pathogenic H5N8 viruses. Phylogenetic tree of HA gene and antigenic cross-reactivity results indicated that two antigenically different H3 viruses are circulating in LPM in China. Most of the H3 viruses replicated in mice lung and nasal turbinate without prior adaptation, and the representative H3 viruses infected chickens without causing clinical signs. The reassortment of H3 subtype influenza viruses warrants continuous surveillance in LPM in China. PMID:27270298

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of complete rRNA gene sequence of Nosema philosamiae isolated from the lepidopteran Philosamia cynthia ricini.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Shen, Zhongyuan; Xu, Xiaofang; Tao, Hengping; Dong, Shinan; Tang, Xudong; Xu, Li

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The microsporidian Nosema philosamiae is a pathogen that infects the eri-silkworm Philosamia cynthia ricini. The complete sequence of rRNA gene (4,314 bp) was obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification with specific primers and sequencing. The sequence analysis showed that the organization of the rRNA of N. philosamiae was similar to the pattern of Nosema bombycis. Phylogenetic analysis of rRNA gene sequences revealed that N. philosamiae had a close relationship with other Nosema species, confirming that N. philosamiae is correctly assigned to the genus Nosema. PMID:20384905

  3. Phylogenetic and pathogenic analysis of a novel H6N2 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in a wildlife park.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, D Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    H6 subtype avian influenza virus, which has been circulating among different species, causes considerable concern for both veterinary medicine and public health. We isolated a strain of H6N2 avian influenza virus from healthy green peafowl (Pavo muticus) in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in Hebei Province, China, in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N2 strain had the same gene constellation as southern China strains, which were predominantly isolated from waterfowl distributed in Shantou, Guangxi, and Hunan in 2001-2010. The isolate showed no and low pathogenicity in chickens and ducks, respectively. However, it replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinate of infected mice, resulting in thickened alveolar septa and moderate interstitial pneumonia. This finding raises concerns that the H6N2 subtype maybe evolve into a novel endemic avian influenza virus. Therefore, periodical surveillance of avian influenza viruses must be undertaken to monitor the advent of novel viruses. PMID:25619010

  4. Molecular Analysis of Isoniazid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from England and Wales Reveals the Phylogenetic Significance of the ahpC −46A Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Baker, L. V.; Brown, T. J.; Maxwell, O.; Gibson, A. L.; Fang, Z.; Yates, M. D.; Drobniewski, F. A.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence and diagnostic potential of the most commonly reported mutations associated with isoniazid resistance, katG 315Thr, katG 315Asn, inhA −15T, inhA −8A, and the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region, in a population sample of 202 isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and 176 randomly selected fully sensitive isolates from England and Wales identified by using a directed oligonucleotide array and limited DNA sequencing. The strains were recovered from patients originating from 29 countries; 41 isolates were multidrug resistant. Mutations affecting katG 315, the inhA promoter, and the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region were found in 62.7, 21.9, and 30% of 169 genotypically distinct isoniazid-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas they were found in 0, 0, and 8% of susceptible strains, respectively. The frequency of mutation at each locus was unrelated to the resistance profile or previous antituberculous drug therapy. The commonest mutation in the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region, ahpC −46A, was present in 23.7% of isoniazid-resistant isolates and 7.5% of susceptible isolates. This proved to be a phylogenetic marker for a subgroup of M. tuberculosis strains originating on the Indian subcontinent, which shared IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism and spoligotype features with the Delhi strain and Central Asian strain CAS1; and this marker is strongly associated with isoniazid resistance and the katG 315Thr mutation. In total, 82.8% of unrelated isoniazid-resistant isolates could be identified by analysis of just two loci: katG 315 and the inhA promoter. Analysis of the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region, although phylogenetically interesting, does not contribute significantly to further identification of isoniazid-resistant isolates. PMID:15793126

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Ara+ and Ara− Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates and Development of a Multiplex PCR Procedure for Rapid Discrimination between the Two Biotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dharakul, Tararaj; Tassaneetrithep, Boonratn; Trakulsomboon, Suwanna; Songsivilai, Sirirurg

    1999-01-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei-like organism has recently been identified among some soil isolates of B. pseudomallei in an area with endemic melioidosis. This organism is almost identical to B. pseudomallei in terms of morphological and biochemical profiles, except that it differs in ability to assimilate l-arabinose. These Ara+ isolates are also less virulent than the Ara− isolates in animal models. In addition, clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei available to date are almost exclusively Ara−. These features suggested that these two organisms may belong to distinctive species. In this study, the 16S rRNA-encoding genes from five clinical (four Ara− and one Ara+) and nine soil isolates (five Ara− and four Ara+) of B. pseudomallei were sequenced. The nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 16S rRNA-encoding gene of the Ara+ biotype was similar to but distinctively different from that of the Ara− soil isolates, which were identical to the classical clinical isolates of B. pseudomallei. The nucleotide sequence differences in the 16S rRNA-encoding gene appeared to be specific for the Ara+ or Ara− biotypes. The differences were, however, not sufficient for classification into a new species within the genus Burkholderia. A simple and rapid multiplex PCR procedure was developed to discriminate between Ara− and Ara+ B. pseudomallei isolates. This new method could also be incorporated into our previously reported nested PCR system for detecting B. pseudomallei in clinical specimens. PMID:10325345

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of a novel H6N6 avian influenza virus isolated from a green peafowl in China and its pathogenic potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhaobin; Ci, Yanpeng; Ma, Yixin; Liu, Liling; Wang, Deli; Ma, Jianzhang; Li, Yanbing; Chen, Hualan

    2014-12-01

    To explore the ecology of the H6 subtype avian influenza viruses in Hebei Province, China, a long-term surveillance was conducted in 2012 among domestic poultry and birds in a wildlife park. In this study, we report the characterization of a novel H6N6 avian influenza virus isolated from a healthy green peafowl in Qinghuangdao Wildlife Park in 2012. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that the isolated H6N6 strain has the same gene constellation as the ST3367-like strains, which are mainly distributed in southern and eastern China. A mouse experiment showed that the isolate replicated efficiently in the lungs and turbinates of infected mice without previous adaptation, resulting in locally thickened alveolar septa and interstitial pneumonia. Further studies of the H6 subtype viruses are required to clarify their evolutionary pattern in north China, which will benefit disease control and pandemic preparedness for novel viruses. PMID:25220620

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Paster, B J; Dewhirst, F E; Weisburg, W G; Tordoff, L A; Fraser, G J; Hespell, R B; Stanton, T B; Zablen, L; Mandelco, L; Woese, C R

    1991-01-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences were determined for species of Spirochaeta, Treponema, Borrelia, Leptospira, Leptonema, and Serpula, using a modified Sanger method of direct RNA sequencing. Analysis of aligned 16S rRNA sequences indicated that the spirochetes form a coherent taxon composed of six major clusters or groups. The first group, termed the treponemes, was divided into two subgroups. The first treponeme subgroup consisted of Treponema pallidum, Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, a thermophilic spirochete strain, and two species of Spirochaeta, Spirochaeta zuelzerae and Spirochaeta stenostrepta, with an average interspecies similarity of 89.9%. The second treponeme subgroup contained Treponema bryantii, Treponema pectinovorum, Treponema saccharophilum, Treponema succinifaciens, and rumen strain CA, with an average interspecies similarity of 86.2%. The average interspecies similarity between the two treponeme subgroups was 84.2%. The division of the treponemes into two subgroups was verified by single-base signature analysis. The second spirochete group contained Spirochaeta aurantia, Spirochaeta halophila, Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis, Spirochaeta litoralis, and Spirochaeta isovalerica, with an average similarity of 87.4%. The Spirochaeta group was related to the treponeme group, with an average similarity of 81.9%. The third spirochete group contained borrelias, including Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia anserina, Borrelia hermsii, and a rabbit tick strain. The borrelias formed a tight phylogenetic cluster, with average similarity of 97%. THe borrelia group shared a common branch with the Spirochaeta group and was closer to this group than to the treponemes. A single spirochete strain isolated fromt the shew constituted the fourth group. The fifth group was composed of strains of Serpula (Treponema) hyodysenteriae and Serpula (Treponema) innocens. The two species of this group were closely related, with a similarity of greater than 99%. Leptonema illini

  8. Analysis of kinetoplast cytochrome b gene of 16 Leishmania isolates from different foci of China: different species of Leishmania in China and their phylogenetic inference

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leishmania species belong to the family Trypanosomatidae and cause leishmaniasis, a geographically widespread disease that infects humans and other vertebrates. This disease remains endemic in China. Due to the large geographic area and complex ecological environment, the taxonomic position and phylogenetic relationship of Chinese Leishmania isolates remain uncertain. A recent internal transcribed spacer 1 and cytochrome oxidase II phylogeny of Chinese Leishmania isolates has challenged some aspects of their traditional taxonomy as well as cladistics hypotheses of their phylogeny. The current study was designed to provide further disease background and sequence analysis. Methods We systematically analyzed 50 cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequences of 19 isolates (16 from China, 3 from other countries) sequenced after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a special primer for cyt b as well as 31 sequences downloaded from GenBank. After alignment, the data were analyzed using the maximum parsimony, Bayesian and netwok methods. Results Sequences of six haplotypes representing 10 Chinese isolates formed a monophyletic group and clustered with Leishmania tarentolae. The isolates GS1, GS7, XJ771 of this study from China clustered with other isolates of Leishmania donovani complex. The isolate JS1 was a sister to Leishmania tropica, which represented an L. tropica complex instead of clustering with L. donovani complex or with the other 10 Chinese isolates. The isolates KXG-2 and GS-GER20 formed a monophyletic group with Leishmania turanica from central Asia. In the different phylogenetic trees, all of the Chinese isolates occurred in at least four groups regardless of geographic distribution. Conclusions The undescribed Leishmania species of China, which are clearly causative agents of canine leishmaniasis and human visceral leishmaniasis and are related to Sauroleishmania, may have evolved from a common ancestral parasite that came from the Americas and may have

  9. Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of the isolated type I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from 2007 to 2008 in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chulseung; Kim, Hyekwon; Kang, Bokyu; Yeom, Minjoo; Han, Sangyoon; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Park, Seongjun; Kim, Hyunil; Song, Daesub; Park, Bongkyun

    2010-04-01

    The first Korean strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was isolated in 1997, and it exhibited high similarity to strain VR-2332 (type II PRRSV; North American type). Recently, however, infection with type I PRRSV (European type) has also been reported in Korea. To date, preliminary data about type I PRRSV prevalence in Korea have not been reported. Here, using reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR, we analyzed 383 archived field samples from 101 pig farms in Korea that were collected from 2007 to 2008. We identified 155 samples from 68 farms that were positive for PRRSV. Fifty-one samples (51/155; 32.9%) and 20 farms (20/68; 29.4%) were type I PRRSV-positive/type II PRRSV-negative. Furthermore, we tried to isolate the type I PRRSV from positive samples and seven type I PRRSV were isolated using PAM. The phylogenetic analysis using the type I PRRSV isolates (7 isolates) was performed based on open reading frame (ORF)5 (accession numbers GU325642 to GU325648) and ORF7 (accession numbers GU325635 to GU325641). In the phylogenetic study, seven type I PRRSV isolates were closely related with panEuropean based on ORF7, while they were genetically distinct from Lelystad virus and made a unique clade based on ORF5. The results of this study demonstrate that infection with type I PRRSV is not uncommon in Korean pig farms, which suggests that diagnosis and control of type I PRRSV should be considered in Korea. A new approach to vaccination against, and epidemiological analysis of, Korean PRRSV is urgently needed. PMID:20063118

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of a circulating hepatitis C virus recombinant strain 1b/1a isolated in a French hospital centre.

    PubMed

    Morel, Virginie; Ghoubra, Faten; Izquierdo, Laure; Martin, Elodie; Oliveira, Catarina; François, Catherine; Brochot, Etienne; Helle, François; Duverlie, Gilles; Castelain, Sandrine

    2016-06-01

    Genetic recombination is now a well-established feature of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) variability and evolution, with the recent identification of circulating recombinant forms. In Amiens University Hospital Centre (France), a discrepancy of genotyping results was observed for 9 samples, between their 5' untranslated region assigned to genotype 1b and their NS5B region assigned to genotype 1a, suggesting the existence of a recombinant strain. In the present study, clinical and phylogenetic analyses of these isolates were conducted and a putative relationship with previously identified HCV 1b/1a recombinants was investigated. The results revealed that all 9 strains displayed a breakpoint within the beginning of the core protein, were closely related between each other and with the H23 strain identified in Uruguay (Moreno et al., 2009). Then, the clinical characteristics of the 9 unlinked individuals infected with this 1b/1a genotype were analysed. This is the first report on the circulation, in a French population, of a HCV recombinant strain 1b/1a. The identification of this genotype in other patients and in other geographical zones would allow to further investigate its prevalence in the population and to better understand its molecular epidemiology. PMID:26444584

  11. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic relationships among microsporidian isolates infecting silkworm, Bombyx mori using small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Nath, B Surendra; Gupta, S K; Bajpai, A K

    2012-12-01

    The life cycle, spore morphology, pathogenicity, tissue specificity, mode of transmission and small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequence analysis of the five new microsporidian isolates viz., NIWB-11bp, NIWB-12n, NIWB-13md, NIWB-14b and NIWB-15mb identified from the silkworm, Bombyx mori have been studied along with type species, NIK-1s_mys. The life cycle of the microsporidians identified exhibited the sequential developmental cycles that are similar to the general developmental cycle of the genus, Nosema. The spores showed considerable variations in their shape, length and width. The pathogenicity observed was dose-dependent and differed from each of the microsporidian isolates; the NIWB-15mb was found to be more virulent than other isolates. All of the microsporidians were found to infect most of the tissues examined and showed gonadal infection and transovarial transmission in the infected silkworms. SSU-rRNA sequence based phylogenetic tree placed NIWB-14b, NIWB-12n and NIWB-11bp in a separate branch along with other Nosema species and Nosema bombycis; while NIWB-15mb and NIWB-13md together formed another cluster along with other Nosema species. NIK-1s_mys revealed a signature sequence similar to standard type species, N. bombycis, indicating that NIK-1s_mys is similar to N. bombycis. Based on phylogenetic relationships, branch length information based on genetic distance and nucleotide differences, we conclude that the microsporidian isolates identified are distinctly different from the other known species and belonging to the genus, Nosema. This SSU-rRNA gene sequence analysis method is found to be more useful approach in detecting different and closely related microsporidians of this economically important domestic insect. PMID:23129193

  12. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase genes of H9N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from commercial broiler chicken in Iran (2008 and 2009).

    PubMed

    Soltanialvar, Masoud; Shoushtari, Hamid; Bozorgmehrifard, Mohamadhasan; Charkhkar, Saeed; Akbarnejad, Farshad

    2012-03-01

    A total of 512 tissue samples collected from 30 farms located in various states of Iran during 2008-2009 as part of a program to monitor avian influenza viruses (AIVs) infection in Iran's poultry population. To determine the genetic relationship of Iranian viruses, neuraminidase (NA) genes from ten isolates of H9N2 viruses isolated from commercial chickens in Iran during 2008-2009 were amplified and sequenced. The viruses' neuraminidase gene was >90% similar to those of A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 (H9N2) sublineage. The neuraminidase stalk regions in these Viruses had no deletion as compared to that of chicken/Beijing/1/94 sublineage (Beijing-like viruses) and the two human isolates A/HK/1073/99, A/HK/1074/99. Phylogenetic analysis of neuraminidase (NA) gene showed that it shares a common ancestor A/Quail/Hong Kong/G1/97 isolate which had contributed the internal genes of the H5N1 virus. The results of this study indicated that No (Beijing-like) virus and (Korean-like) virus were found in chickens in Iran, and the NA genes of H9N2 influenza viruses circulating in Iran during the past years were well conserved and the earlier Iranian isolates may be considered to represent such a progenitor. PMID:21744029

  13. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates from Pakistan during 2009–2013 reveals circulation of new sub genotype

    SciTech Connect

    Siddique, Naila; Naeem, Khalid; Abbas, Muhammad Athar; Ali Malik, Akbar; Rashid, Farooq; Rafique, Saba; Ghafar, Abdul; Rehman, Abdul

    2013-09-15

    Despite observing the standard bio-security measures at commercial poultry farms and extensive use of Newcastle disease vaccines, a new genotype VII-f of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) got introduced in Pakistan during 2011. In this regard 300 ND outbreaks recorded so far have resulted into huge losses of approximately USD 200 million during 2011–2013. A total of 33 NDV isolates recovered during 2009–2013 throughout Pakistan were characterized biologically and phylogenetically. The phylogenetic analysis revealed a new velogenic sub genotype VII-f circulating in commercial and domestic poultry along with the earlier reported sub genotype VII-b. Partial sequencing of Fusion gene revealed two types of cleavage site motifs; lentogenic {sup 112}GRQGRL{sup 117} and velogenic {sup 112}RRQKRF{sup 117} along with some point mutations indicative of genetic diversity. We report here a new sub genotype of virulent NDV circulating in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan and provide evidence for the possible genetic diversity which may be causing new NDV out breaks. - Highlights: • The first report of isolation of new genotype VII-f of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in Pakistan. • We report the partial Fusion gene sequences of new genotype VII-f of virulent NDV from Pakistan. • We report the phylogenetic relationship of new NDV strains with reported NDV strains. • Provide outbreak history of new virulent NDV strain in commercial and backyard poultry in Pakistan. • We provide possible evidence for the role of backyard poultry in NDV outbreaks.

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Hemagglutinin Genes of H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Chickens in Shandong, China, between 1998 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Song; Zhou, Yufa; Song, Wengang; Tang, Yujing; Pang, Quanhai; Miao, Zengmin

    2015-01-01

    Since H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) was first isolated in Guangdong province of China, the virus has been circulating in chicken flocks in mainland China. However, a systematic phylogenetic analysis of H9N2 AIV from chickens in Shandong of China has not been conducted. Based on hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences of H9N2 AIVs isolated from chickens in Shandong of China between 1998 and 2013, genetic evolution of 35 HA gene sequences was systematically analyzed in this study. Our findings showed that the majority of H9N2 AIVs (21 out of 35) belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5. Most of isolates (33 out of 35) had a PSRSSR↓GLF motif in HA cleavage site. Importantly, 29 out of these 35 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q226L) in the receptor-binding site. The substitution showed that H9N2 AIVs had the potential affinity to bind to human-like receptor. The currently prevalent H9N2 AIVs in Shandong belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5 which are different from the vaccine strain SS/94 clade h9.4.2.3. Therefore, the long-term surveillance of H9N2 AIVs is of significance to combat the possible H9N2 AIV outbreaks. PMID:26609523

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein demonstrates the isolated emergence of resistance-breaking strains in pepper.

    PubMed

    Almási, Asztéria; Csilléry, Gábor; Csömör, Zsófia; Nemes, Katalin; Palkovics, László; Salánki, Katalin; Tóbiás, István

    2015-02-01

    Resurgence of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) worldwide as well as in Hungary causing heavy economic losses directed the attention to the factors contributing to the outbreak of this serious epidemics. The introgression of Tsw resistance gene into various pepper cultivars seemed to solve TSWV control, but widely used resistant pepper cultivars bearing the same, unique resistance locus evoked the rapid emergence of resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains. In Hungary, the sporadic appearance of RB strains in pepper-producing region was first observed in 2010-2011, but in 2012 it was detected frequently. Previously, the non-structural protein (NSs) encoded by small RNA (S RNA) of TSWV was verified as the avirulence factor for Tsw resistance, therefore we analyzed the S RNA of the Hungarian RB and wild type (WT) isolates and compared to previously analyzed TSWV strains with RB properties from different geographical origins. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the different RB strains had the closest relationship with the local WT isolates and there is no conserved mutation present in all the NSs genes of RB isolates from different geographical origins. According to these results, we concluded that the RB isolates evolved separately in geographic point of view, and also according to the RB mechanism. PMID:25331341

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of Hemagglutinin Genes of H9N2 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Chickens in Shandong, China, between 1998 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Song; Zhou, Yufa; Song, Wengang; Tang, Yujing; Pang, Quanhai; Miao, Zengmin

    2015-01-01

    Since H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) was first isolated in Guangdong province of China, the virus has been circulating in chicken flocks in mainland China. However, a systematic phylogenetic analysis of H9N2 AIV from chickens in Shandong of China has not been conducted. Based on hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences of H9N2 AIVs isolated from chickens in Shandong of China between 1998 and 2013, genetic evolution of 35 HA gene sequences was systematically analyzed in this study. Our findings showed that the majority of H9N2 AIVs (21 out of 35) belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5. Most of isolates (33 out of 35) had a PSRSSR↓GLF motif in HA cleavage site. Importantly, 29 out of these 35 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q226L) in the receptor-binding site. The substitution showed that H9N2 AIVs had the potential affinity to bind to human-like receptor. The currently prevalent H9N2 AIVs in Shandong belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5 which are different from the vaccine strain SS/94 clade h9.4.2.3. Therefore, the long-term surveillance of H9N2 AIVs is of significance to combat the possible H9N2 AIV outbreaks. PMID:26609523

  17. A Phylogenetic Analysis of Greek Isolates of Aspergillus Species Based on Morphology and Nuclear and Mitochondrial Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Krimitzas, Antonios; Kouvelis, Vassili N.; Kapsanaki-Gotsi, Evangelia; Typas, Milton A.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus species originating from Greece were examined by morphological and molecular criteria to explore the diversity of this genus. The phylogenetic relationships of these species were determined using sequences from the ITS and IGS region of the nuclear rRNA gene complex, two nuclear genes (β-tubulin (benA) and RNA polymerase II second largest subunit (rpb2)) and two mitochondrial genes (small rRNA subunit (rns) and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1)) and, where available, related sequences from databases. The morphological characters of the anamorphs and teleomorphs, and the single gene phylogenetic trees, differentiated and placed the species examined in the well-supported sections of Aenei, Aspergillus, Bispori, Candidi, Circumdati, Clavati, Cremei, Flavi, Flavipedes, Fumigati, Nidulantes, Nigri, Restricti, Terrei, Usti, and Zonati, with few uncertainties. The combined use of the three commonly employed nuclear genes (benA, rpb2, and ITS), the IGS region, and two less often used mitochondrial gene sequences (rns and cox1) as a single unit resolved several taxonomic ambiguities. A phylogenetic tree was inferred using Neighbour-Joining, Maximum Parsimony, and Bayesian methods. The strains examined formed seven well-supported clades within the genus Aspergillus. Altogether, the concatenated nuclear and mitochondrial sequences offer additional tools for an improved understanding of phylogenetic relationships within this genus. PMID:23762830

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial isolates from man-made high-pH, high-salt environments and identification of gene-cassette-associated open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M; Grant, Susan; Grant, William D; Heaphy, Shaun

    2006-06-01

    Environmental samples were collected from high-pH sites in Pakistan, including a uranium heap set up for carbonate leaching, the lime unit of a tannery, and the Khewra salt mine. Another sample was collected from a hot spring on the shore of the soda lake, Magadi, in Kenya. Microbial cultures were enriched from Pakistani samples. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates was carried out by sequencing 16S rRNA genes. Genomic DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using integron gene-cassette-specific primers. Different gene-cassette-linked genes were recovered from the cultured strains related to Halomonas magadiensis, Virgibacillus halodenitrificans, and Yania flava and from the uncultured environmental DNA sample. The usefulness of this technique as a tool for gene mining is indicated. PMID:16732461

  19. Trypanosoma rangeli isolates of bats from Central Brazil: genotyping and phylogenetic analysis enable description of a new lineage using spliced-leader gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Maia da Silva, F; Marcili, A; Lima, L; Cavazzana, M; Ortiz, P A; Campaner, M; Takeda, G F; Paiva, F; Nunes, V L B; Camargo, E P; Teixeira, M M G

    2009-03-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli infects several mammalian orders but has never confidently been described in Chiroptera, which are commonly parasitized by many trypanosome species. Here, we described trypanosomes from bats captured in Central Brazil identified as T. rangeli, T. dionisii, T. cruzimarinkellei and T. cruzi. Two isolates, Tra643 from Platyrrhinus lineatus and Tra1719 from Artibeus planirostris were identified as T. rangeli by morphological, biological and molecular methods, and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses. Analysis using SSU rDNA sequences clustered these bat trypanosomes together with T. rangeli from other hosts, and separated them from other trypanosomes from bats. Genotyping based on length and sequence polymorphism of PCR-amplified intergenic spliced-leader gene sequences assigned Tra1719 to the lineage A whereas Tra643 was shown to be a new genotype and was assigned to the new lineage E. To our knowledge, these two isolates are the earliest T. rangeli from bats and the first isolates from Central Brazil molecularly characterized. Rhodnius stali captured for this study was found infected by T. rangeli and T. cruzi. PMID:19063857

  20. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus isolated from diseased ostriches (Struthio camelus) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mahmoud Moussa; El-Sabagh, I M; Al-Ankari, Abdul-Rahman

    2014-06-01

    During 2007, two outbreaks of avian influenza virus (AIV) in backyard and commercial ostrich flocks were first reported in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The infected ostriches suffered from depression, anorexia, and diarrhea and some exhibited sudden death. A rapid AIV-group antigen detection and real-time reverse-transcription PCR (rtRT-PCR) were initially performed on cloacal and tracheal swabs collected from diseased birds. Pools from positive-tested swabs for each flock were utilized for virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonating chicken eggs. H5N1 AIV was identified in the harvested allantoic fluids by hemagglutination followed by hemagglutination inhibition and rtRT-PCR. The viruses responsible for these two outbreaks were sequenced and characterized as HPAIV H5N1 (A/ostrich/Saudi Arabia/6732-3/2007 and A/ostrich/Saudi Arabia/3489-73VIR08/ 2007) from backyard and commercial flocks, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of both isolates revealed that the two viruses belong to clade 2.2 sublineage II and cluster with the HPAIV H5N1 isolated from falcons and turkeys during 2007 in KSA. PMID:25055639

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of otospiralin protein

    PubMed Central

    Torktaz, Ibrahim; Behjati, Mohaddeseh; Rostami, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fibrocyte-specific protein, otospiralin, is a small protein, widely expressed in the central nervous system as neuronal cell bodies and glia. The increased expression of otospiralin in reactive astrocytes implicates its role in signaling pathways and reparative mechanisms subsequent to injury. Indeed, otospiralin is considered to be essential for the survival of fibrocytes of the mesenchymal nonsensory regions of the cochlea. It seems that other functions of this protein are not yet completely understood. Materials and Methods: Amino acid sequences of otospiralin from 12 vertebrates were derived from National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Phylogenetic analysis and phylogeny estimation were performed using MEGA 5.0.5 program, and neighbor-joining tree was constructed by this software. Results: In this computational study, the phylogenetic tree of otospiralin has been investigated. Therefore, dendrograms of otospiralin were depicted. Alignment performed in MUSCLE method by UPGMB algorithm. Also, entropy plot determined for a better illustration of amino acid variations in this protein. Conclusion: In the present study, we used otospiralin sequence of 12 different species and by constructing phylogenetic tree, we suggested out group for some related species. PMID:27099854

  2. Isolation and phylogenetic footprinting analysis of the 5'-regulatory region of the floral homeotic gene OrcPI from Orchis italica (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Aceto, Serena; Cantone, Carmela; Chiaiese, Pasquale; Ruotolo, Gianluca; Sica, Maria; Gaudio, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of regulatory elements from homologous genes can be strongly divergent. Phylogenetic footprinting, a comparative analysis of noncoding regions, can detect putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) shared among the regulatory regions of 2 or more homologous genes. These conserved motifs have the potential to serve the same regulatory function in distantly related taxa. We isolated the 5'-noncoding region of the OrcPI gene, a MADS-box transcription factor involved in flower development in Orchis italica, using the thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction technique. This region (comprising 1352 bp) induced transient beta-glucuronidase expression in the petal tissue of white Rosa hybrida flowers and represents the 5'-regulatory sequence of the OrcPI gene. Phylogenetic footprinting analysis detected conserved regions within the 5'-regulatory sequence of OrcPI and the homologous regions of Oryza sativa, Lilium regale, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these sequences are known TFBSs described in databases of plant regulatory elements. Nucleotide sequence data reported are available in the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank databases under the following accession numbers: AF198055 promoter region of the PISTILLATA (PI) gene of A. thaliana; AB094985 cDNA of OrcPI (PI/GLOBOSA [PI/GLO] homologue) of O. italica; AB378089 5'-regulatory region of the OrcPI gene of O. italica; AP008211 putative promoter region of OSMADS2 (PI/GLO homologue) of O. sativa; AP008207 putative promoter region of OSMADS4 (PI/GLO homologue) of O. sativa; and AB158292 putative promoter region of the PI/GLO homologue of L. regale. PMID:19861638

  3. Mobuck virus genome sequence and phylogenetic analysis: identification of a novel Orbivirus isolated from a white-tailed deer in Missouri, USA.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elyse; Anbalagan, Srivishnupriya; Klumper, Patricia; Scherba, Gail; Simonson, Randy R; Hause, Ben M

    2014-01-01

    The genus Orbivirus includes a diverse group of segmented dsRNA viruses that are transmitted via arthropods, have a global distribution and affect a wide range of hosts. A novel orbivirus was co-isolated with epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) exhibiting clinical signs characteristic of EHDV. Using antiserum generated against EHDV, a pure isolate of the novel non-cytopathic orbivirus was obtained in Aedes albopictus cell culture. Genomic sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of predicted ORFs showed that eight of the ten ORFs were most homologous to Peruvian horse sickness virus (PHSV), with amino acid identities of 44.3-73.7 %. The remaining two ORFs, VP3 and VP5, were most similar to Middle Point orbivirus (35.9 %) and Yunnan orbivirus (59.8 %), respectively. Taxonomic classification of orbiviruses is largely based on homology of the major subcore structural protein VP2(T2), encoded by segment 2 for mobuck virus. With only 69.1 % amino acid identity to PHSV, we propose mobuck virus as the prototype of a new species of Orbivirus. PMID:24114792

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, suggests genetic isolation of some Caribbean island populations following colonization from South America.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, L; García, R; Stevens, J R

    2009-06-01

    Larval infestations of the New World screwworm (NWS) fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, cause considerable economic losses through the direct mortality and reduced production of livestock. Since the 1950s, NWS populations in North and Central America have been the target of virtually continuous eradication attempts by sterile insect technique (SIT). Nevertheless, in some areas, such as Jamaica, SIT-based control programmes have failed. Reasons for the failure of SIT-based programmes in some locations are unknown, but it is hypothesized that failure may be related to the mating incompatibility between sterile and wild flies or to the existence of sexually incompatible cryptic species. Accordingly, the current research investigates intraspecific phylogenetic relationships and associated biogeographic patterns between NWS populations from the Caribbean and South America, which represent those populations involved in, or earmarked for, forthcoming SIT programmes. Uniquely, this study also includes analyses of two North American samples, collected in Texas in 1933 and 1953 prior to initiation of the SIT-based eradication programme. The study utilizes three nucleotide datasets: elongation factor-1alpha (nuclear); cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (mitochondrial), and 12S rRNA (mitochondrial). Phylogenetic analysis of these data, representing populations from across the Caribbean, South America and Texas, indicates sub-structuring of fly populations on several of the larger Caribbean islands, suggesting a period of isolation and/or founder effects following colonization from South America; significantly, our findings do not support a North American origin for Cuban flies. The importance of these findings in the light of proposed SIT programmes in the region is discussed. PMID:19335826

  5. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H5N1 in Africa: A Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cattoli, Giovanni; Monne, Isabella; Fusaro, Alice; Joannis, Tony M.; Lombin, Lami H.; Aly, Mona M.; Arafa, Abdel S.; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine M.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Awuni, Joseph A.; Batawui, Komla B.; Awoume, Kodzo A.; Aplogan, Gilbert L.; Sow, Adama; Ngangnou, Andrè C.; El Nasri Hamza, Iman M.; Gamatié, Djibo; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Domenech, Joseph M.; Capua, Ilaria

    2009-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus A/H5N1 was first officially reported in Africa in early 2006. Since the first outbreak in Nigeria, this virus spread rapidly to other African countries. From its emergence to early 2008, 11 African countries experienced A/H5N1 outbreaks in poultry and human cases were also reported in three of these countries. At present, little is known of the epidemiology and molecular evolution of A/H5N1 viruses in Africa. We have generated 494 full gene sequences from 67 African isolates and applied molecular analysis tools to a total of 1,152 A/H5N1 sequences obtained from viruses isolated in Africa, Europe and the Middle East between 2006 and early 2008. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the 8 gene viral segments confirmed that 3 distinct sublineages were introduced, which have persisted and spread across the continent over this 2-year period. Additionally, our molecular epidemiological studies highlighted the association between genetic clustering and area of origin in a majority of cases. Molecular signatures unique to strains isolated in selected areas also gave us a clearer picture of the spread of A/H5N1 viruses across the continent. Mutations described as typical of human influenza viruses in the genes coding for internal proteins or associated with host adaptation and increased resistance to antiviral drugs have also been detected in the genes coding for transmembrane proteins. These findings raise concern for the possible human health risk presented by viruses with these genetic properties and highlight the need for increased efforts to monitor the evolution of A/H5N1 viruses across the African continent. They further stress how imperative it is to implement sustainable control strategies to improve animal and public health at a global level. PMID:19290041

  6. Antimicrobial Activity and Phylogenetic Analysis of Streptomyces Parvulus Dosmb-D105 Isolated from the Mangrove Sediments of Andaman Islands.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, R; Mohan, P M; Sivakumar, K; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Actinomycetes, especially species of Streptomyces are prolific producers of pharmacologically significant compounds accounting for about 70% of the naturally derived antibiotics that are presently in clinical use. In this study, we used five solvents to extract the secondary metabolites from marine Streptomyces parvulus DOSMB-D105, which was isolated from the mangrove sediments of the South Andaman Islands. Among them, ethyl acetate crude extract showed maximum activity against 11 pathogenic bacteria and six fungi. Presence of bioactive compounds in the ethyl acetate extract was determined using GC-MS and the compounds detected in the ethyl acetate extract were matched with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) library. Totally eight compounds were identified and the prevalent compounds were 2 steroids, 2 alkaloids, 2 plasticizers, 1 phenolic and 1 alkane. Present study revealed that S. parvulus DOSMB-D105 is a promising species for the isolation of valuable bioactive compounds to combat pathogenic microbes. PMID:27020867

  7. Phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis of lactic acid bacteria isolated from forage crops and grasses in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Pang, Huili; Tan, Zhongfang; Qin, Guangyong; Wang, Yanping; Li, Zongwei; Jin, Qingsheng; Cai, Yimin

    2012-02-01

    A total of 140 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from corn, alfalfa, clover, sainfoin, and Indian goosegrass in the Tibetan Plateau. According to phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence, and recA gene PCR amplification, these LAB isolates were identified as belonging to five genera and nine species. Corn contained more LAB species than other forage crops. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Weissella paramesenteroides were dominant members of the LAB population on alfalfa, clover, sainfoin, and Indian goosegrass, respectively. The comprehensive 16S rDNA and recA-based approach effectively described the LAB community structure of the relatively abundant LAB species distributed on different forage crops. This is the first report describing the diversity and natural populations of LAB associated with Tibetan forage crops, and most isolates grow well at or below 10°C. The results will be valuable for the future design of appropriate inoculants for silage fermentation in this very cold area. PMID:22367939

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis and Polyphasic Characterization of Clavibacter michiganensis Strains Isolated from Tomato Seeds Reveal that Nonpathogenic Strains Are Distinct from C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Karine; Orgeur, Geoffrey; Balidas, Samuel; Fricot, Céline; Bonneau, Sophie; Quillévéré, Anne; Audusseau, Corinne; Olivier, Valérie; Grimault, Valérie; Mathis, René

    2012-01-01

    The genus Clavibacter comprises one species and five subspecies of plant-pathogenic bacteria, four of which are classified as quarantine organisms due to the high economic threat they pose. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is one of the most important pathogens of tomato, but the recommended diagnostic tools are not satisfactory due to false-negative and/or -positive results. To provide a robust analysis of the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains, relatives (strains from the four other C. michiganensis subspecies), and nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains isolated from tomato, we performed multilocus sequence-based analysis and typing (MLSA and MLST) based on six housekeeping genes (atpD, dnaK, gyrB, ppK, recA, and rpoB). We compared this “framework” with phenotypic and genotypic characteristics such as pathogenicity on tomato, reaction to two antisera by immunofluorescence and to five PCR identification tests, and the presence of four genes encoding the main C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis pathogenicity determinants. We showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is monophyletic and is distinct from its closest taxonomic neighbors. The nonpathogenic Clavibacter-like strains were identified as C. michiganensis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These strains, while cross-reacting with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis identification tools, are phylogenetically distinct from the pathogenic strains but belong to the C. michiganensis clade. C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis clonal complexes linked strains from highly diverse geographical origins and also strains isolated over long periods of time in the same location. This illustrates the importance of seed transmission in the worldwide dispersion of this pathogen and its survival and adaptation abilities in a new environment once introduced. PMID:23001675

  9. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses isolated during 2006–2008 outbreaks in Pakistan reveals genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since the first outbreak recorded in northern areas of Pakistan in early 2006, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses were isolated from commercial poultry and wild/domestic birds from different areas of Pakistan up to July 2008. Different isolates of H5N1 were sequenced to explore the genetic diversity of these viruses. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed close clustering and highest sequence identity in all 8 genes to HPAI H5N1 isolates belonging to unified H5 clade 2.2, sub-lineage EMA-3 recovered from Afghanistan during the same time period. Two subgroups within Pakistani H5N1 viruses, from domestic and wild birds, were observed on the basis of their sequence homology and mutations. HPAI motif, preferred receptor specificity for α-(2, 3) linkages, potential N-linked glycosylation sites and an additional glycosylation site at the globular head of HA protein of four Pakistani H5N1 isolates. While, the amino acids associated with sensitivities to various antiviral drugs (Oseltamivir, Zanamivir, Amantadine) were found conserved for the Pakistani H5N1 isolates. Conspicuously, some important mutations observed at critical positions of antigenic sites (S141P, D155S, R162I & P181S) and at receptor binding pocket (A185T, R189K & S217P) of HA-1. A high sequence similarity between Pakistani HP H5N1 and LP H9N2 viruses was also observed. Avian like host specific markers with the exception of E627K in PB2, K356R in PA, V33I in NP, I28V in M2 and L107F in NS2 proteins were also observed. Conclusions Various point mutations in different genes of H5 viruses from Pakistan were observed during its circulation in the field. The outbreaks started in Khyber Pakhtoon Khawa (North West) province in 2006 and spread to the Southern regions over a period of time. Though migratory birds may have a role for this continued endemicity of clade 2.2 H5N1 viruses during 2006–2008 in Pakistan, the possibility of their transmission through legal or illegal poultry trade

  10. Surveillance of influenza virus B circulation in Northern Italy: summer-fall 2008 isolation of three strains and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerna, Giuseppe; Percivalle, Elena; Piralla, Antonio; Rognoni, Vanina; Marchi, Antonietta; Baldanti, Fausto

    2009-10-01

    Influenza virus type B strains were unexpectedly detected and isolated in Italy during summer-fall 2008 from three patients travelling to Italy from Lebanon, Senegal and Uzbekistan. The three summer-fall strains matched to a high degree the hemagglutinin (HA1) of influenza virus type B strains circulating in Italy in the second part (January through April) of the 2007/2008 season, and HA1 of the type B strains included in the 2008/2009 vaccine (B/Yamagata/16/88 lineage). Surveillance of influenza virus circulation in Western countries also during the summer-fall season may help to trace and anticipate the appearance of new influenza virus variants. PMID:20128448

  11. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analysis of human papillomavirus type 11 isolated from juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yang; Wang, Jun; Ma, Lijing; Ren, Jiaming; Yang, Molei

    2016-04-01

    To assess the association between sequence variants of human papillomavirus (HPV) 11 and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and the taxonomy and evolutionary history of HPV 11. Complete HPV 11 nucleotide sequences were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq2000 Analyzers and compared with the HPV 11 prototype isolate (GenBank accession number: M14119) using Blast 2.0 server software. Eighteen full-length HPV 11 genomic sequences were amplified and sequenced. A total of 49 nucleotide mutations were identified, 12 of which resulted in amino acid changes. HPV 11 variants were highly conserved; the maximum pairwise difference was approximately 0.49%. The maximum pairwise difference of the 18 variants in our research was 0.39%. HPV 11 is less polymorphic than the majority of studied HPV genotypes. PMID:26369639

  12. Implementation of a National Measles Elimination Program in Iran: Phylogenetic Analysis of Measles Virus Strains Isolated during 2010–2012 Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Vahid; Abbasi, Simin; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Fatemi-Nasab, Ghazal; Adjaminezhad-Fard, Fatemeh; Shadab, Azadeh; Ghavami, Nastaran; Zareh-Khoshchehre, Raziyeh; Soltanshahi, Rambod; Bont, Louis; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2014-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) causes small and large outbreaks in Iran. Molecular assays allow identifying and the sources of measles imported from neighboring countries. We carried out a phylogenetic analysis of measles virus circulating in Iran over the period 2010–2012. Specimens from suspected cases of measles were collected from different regions of Iran. Virus isolation was performed on urine and throat swabs. Partial nucleoprotein gene segments of MV were amplified by RT-PCR. PCR products of 173 samples were sequenced and analyzed. The median age of confirmed cases was 2 years. Among all confirmed cases, 32% had unknown vaccination status, 20% had been vaccinated, and 48% had not been vaccinated. Genotypes B3 and D8 (for the first time), H1 and D4 were detected mainly in unvaccinated toddlers and young children. Genotype B3 became predominant in 2012 and was closely related to African strains. H1 strains were also found in small and large outbreaks during 2012 but were not identical to Iranian H1-2009 strains. A majority of the Iranian D4 strains during 2010–2012 outbreaks were linked to the D4 strain identified in the Pakistan in 2007. We identified a single case in 2010 belonging to D8 genotype with 99.7% identity to Indian isolates. Although the vaccination program is currently good enough to prevent nationwide epidemics and successfully decreased measles incidence in Iran, the fraction of protected individuals in the population was not high enough to prevent continuous introduction of cases from abroad. Due to increasing number of susceptible individuals in some areas, sustained transmission of the newly introduced viral genotype remains possible. PMID:24736720

  13. Genetic Studies of Vibrio cholerae in South West Cameroon—A Phylogenetic Analysis of Isolates from the 2010-2011 Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Moise C.; Masalla, Thomas; Esemu, Seraphine; Fumoloh, Foche Francis; Kracalik, Ian; Cella, Eleonora; Alam, Meer Taifur; Akoachere, Jane-Francis; Liang, Song; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Ndip, Lucy M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: During the cholera outbreak from 2010 to 2011 in Cameroon, 33,192 cases with 1,440 deaths (case fatality ratio 4.34%) were reported to the World Health Organization. Of these, the South West Region reported 3,120 clinical cases. This region is in the Equatorial Monsoon climatic subzone of Cameroon, close to the coast, raising questions as to whether cases were linked with development of environmental reservoirs. Methods: In an investigation conducted by the Laboratory for Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Buea, toxigenic V. cholerae O1 were isolated from diarrheal stool samples from 18 patients, with ages ranging from <3 to 70 years. Coordinates for clinical centers at which cases were identified were obtained using a handheld GPS, and were mapped using ArcGIS. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby ‘Bauer agar disc diffusion method. The full genomes of these strains were sequenced with the Illumina MiSeq platform. De novo assembly of cholera genomes and multiple sequence alignment were carried out using the bioinformatics pipeline developed in the Emerging Pathogens Institute laboratory at the University of Florida. Results/Discussion: Genetic comparisons showed that isolates were closely related, with pairwise p-distances ranging from 2.25 to 14.52 10-5 nt substitutions per site, and no statistically significant correlation between the pairwise genetic distances and the geographic distances among sampling locations. Indeed, the phylogeny of the Cameroonian strains displays the typical star-like topology and intermixing of strains from different locations that are characteristic of an exponential outbreak localized around a relatively restricted area with occasional spillover to other parts of the country, likely mediated by direct human contact and human movement. Findings highlight the utility of whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis in understanding transmission patterns at the local level. PMID

  14. Phylogenetic and Recombination Analysis of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jisuk; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV. PMID:23696821

  15. Phylogenetic Characterization of Genotype 4 Hepatitis C Virus Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Victoria; Flichman, Diego; Sookoian, Silvia; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2001-01-01

    Among 114 patients infected with hepatitis C virus, three genotype 4 isolates, unusual in Argentina, were detected by phylogenetic analysis over different genomic regions. The patients were not related. One sample was associated with Egyptian sequences, and the others were associated with a Zairean isolate, a fact which reinforces the idea that they are from independent sources. PMID:11326031

  16. Novel papillomavirus isolates from Erinaceus europaeus (Erinaceidae, Insectivora) and the Cervidae (Artiodactyla), Cervus timorensis and Pudu puda, and phylogenetic analysis of partial sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Wittstatt, Ulrich; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2008-04-01

    The diversity of papillomaviruses (PVes) infecting stratified squamous epithelia of warm-blooded animals, such as birds and mammals, is only fragmentarily documented. The PV types are sequenced from 9 of 18 placental taxa at the order level to date. Current phylogenetic analyses of PV sequences frequently do not consider evolutionary polarity and statistical evaluation of internal nodes, that are required for robust evolutionary conclusions. In this study, we isolated and characterized three putatively novel animal PV types from hair follicles comprising the first known insectivoran PV and two cervid PVes. With the help of the primer pair FAP59/FAP64, we amplified L1 gene fragments consisting of approximately 470 base pairs. Phylogenetic analyses were performed with a representative set of 73 PV sequences that included the three novel PVes using Maximum Likelihood, Bayesian inference, Maximum Parsimony, and distance-based methods on amino acid alignments. The three novel PVes appear to be components of the beta+gamma+pi+xi-PV supertaxon, within which the insectivoran PV has an isolated phylogenetic position. The two cervid PVes constitute a distinct group that is only distantly related to the core cervid PVes of the delta-PVes. The molecular data supports a complex evolutionary scenario for PVes which is driven by multiple mechanisms comprising host-linked evolution, adaptive radiation establishing different ecological niches, and multiple infections across species borders. PMID:18210195

  17. [Phylogenetic analysis of bacteria of extreme ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Romanovskaia, V A; Parfenova, V V; Bel'kova, N L; Sukhanova, E V; Gladka, G V; Tashireva, A A

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria of the two extreme regions (Dead Sea and West Antarctic) was performed on the basis of the nucleotide sequences of the 16S rRNA gene. Thermotolerant and halotolerant spore-forming bacteria 7t1 and 7t3 of terrestrial ecosystems Dead Sea identified as Bacillus licheniformis and B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, respectively. Taking into account remote location of thermotolerant strain 6t1 from closely related strains in the cluster Staphylococcus, 6t1 strain can be regarded as Staphylococcus sp. In terrestrial ecosystems, Galindez Island (Antarctic) detected taxonomically diverse psychrotolerant bacteria. From ornithogenic soil were isolated Micrococcus luteus O-1 and Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum O-3. Strains 4r5, 5r5 and 40r5, isolated from grass and lichens, can be referred to the genus Frondihabitans. These strains are taxonomically and ecologically isolated and on the tree diagram form the joint cluster with three isolates Frondihabitans sp., isolated from the lichen Austrian Alps, and psychrotolerant associated with plants F. cladoniiphilus CafT13(T). Isolates from black lichen in the different stationary observation points on the south side of a vertical cliff identified as: Rhodococcus fascians 181n3, Sporosarcina aquimarina O-7, Staphylococcus sp. 0-10. From orange biofilm of fouling on top of the vertical cliff isolated Arthrobacter sp. 28r5g1, from the moss-- Serratia sp. 6r1g. According to the results, Frondihabitans strains most frequently encountered among chemoorganotrophic aerobic bacteria in the Antarctic phytocenoses. PMID:25007437

  18. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  19. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  20. Phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Sleator, Roy D

    2011-04-01

    The recent rapid expansion in the DNA and protein databases, arising from large-scale genomic and metagenomic sequence projects, has forced significant development in the field of phylogenetics: the study of the evolutionary relatedness of the planet's inhabitants. Advances in phylogenetic analysis have greatly transformed our view of the landscape of evolutionary biology, transcending the view of the tree of life that has shaped evolutionary theory since Darwinian times. Indeed, modern phylogenetic analysis no longer focuses on the restricted Darwinian-Mendelian model of vertical gene transfer, but must also consider the significant degree of lateral gene transfer, which connects and shapes almost all living things. Herein, I review the major tree-building methods, their strengths, weaknesses and future prospects. PMID:21249334

  1. EcoR phylogenetic analysis and virulence genotyping of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and Escherichia coli isolates from commercial chicken carcasses in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Renata K T; Aquino, Ivani; Ferreira, Ana Lívia da S; Vidotto, Marilda C

    2011-05-01

    Escherichia coli strains designated as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) are responsible for avian colibacillosis, an acute and largely systemic disease that promotes significant economic losses in poultry industry worldwide because of mortality increase, medication costs, and condemnation of carcasses. APEC is a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli pathotype, which includes uropathogenic E. coli, neonatal meningitis E. coli, and septicemic E. coli. We isolated E. coli from commercial chicken carcasses in a Brazilian community and compared by polymerase chain reaction-defined phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, or D) with APEC strains isolated from sick chickens from different poultry farms. A substantial number of strains assigned to phylogenetic E. coli reference collection group B2, which is known to harbor potent extraintestinal human and animal E. coli pathogens, were identified as APEC (26.0%) in both commercial chicken carcasses and retail poultry meat (retail poultry E. coli [RPEC]) (21.25%). The majority of RPEC were classified as group A (35%), whereas the majority of APEC were groups B1 (30.8) and A (27.6%). APEC and RPEC presented the genes pentaplex, iutA, hly, iron, ompT, and iss, but with different virulence profiles. The similarity between APEC and RPEC indicates RPEC as potentially pathogenic strains and supports a possible zoonotic risk for humans. PMID:21254888

  2. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we…

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of West Nile Virus, Nuevo Leon State, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Contreras-Cordero, Juan F.; Loroño-Pino, María A.; Marlenee, Nicole L.; Díaz, Francisco J.; González-Rojas, José I.; Obregón-Martínez, Nelson; Chiu-García, Jorge A.; Black, William C.

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus RNA was detected in brain tissue from a horse that died in June 2003 in Nuevo Leon State, Mexico. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the premembrane and envelope genes showed that the virus was most closely related to West Nile virus isolates collected in Texas in 2002. PMID:15324558

  4. Isolation and phylogenetic characterization of Canine distemper virus from India.

    PubMed

    Swati; Deka, Dipak; Uppal, Sanjeev Kumar; Verma, Ramneek

    2015-09-01

    Canine distemper (CD), caused by canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious disease that infects a variety of carnivores. Sequence analysis of CDVs from different geographical areas has shown a lot of variation in the genome of the virus especially in haemagglutinin gene which might be one of the causes of vaccine failure. In this study, we isolated the virus (place: Ludhiana, Punjab; year: 2014) and further cloned, sequenced and analyzed partial haemagglutinin (H) gene and full length genes for fusion protein (F), phosphoprotein (P) and matrix protein (M) from an Indian wild-type CDV. Higher sequence homology was observed with the strains from Switzerland, Hungary, Germany; and lower with the vaccine strains like Ondersteport, CDV3, Convac for all the genes. The multiple sequence alignment showed more variation in partial H (45 nucleotide and 5 amino acid substitutions) and complete F (79 nucleotide and 30 amino acid substitutions) than in complete P (44 nucleotide and 22 amino acid substitutions) and complete M (22 nucleotide and 4 amino acid substitutions) gene/protein. Predicted potential N-linked glycosylation sites in H, F, M and P proteins were similar to the previously known wild-type CDVs but different from the vaccine strains. The Indian CDV formed a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree clearly separated from the previously known wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26396979

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Poliovirus Sequences.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomic sequencing is a major surveillance tool in the Polio Laboratory Network. Due to the rapid evolution of polioviruses (~1 % per year), pathways of virus transmission can be reconstructed from the pathways of genomic evolution. Here, we describe three main phylogenetic methods; estimation of genetic distances, reconstruction of a maximum-likelihood (ML) tree, and estimation of substitution rates using Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The data set used consists of complete capsid sequences from a survey of poliovirus sequences available in GenBank. PMID:26983737

  6. Phylogenetic analysis of Ostreococcus virus sequences from the Patagonian Coast.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Julieta M; Calvo, Andrea Y; Jones, Leandro R

    2012-10-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of new Ostreococcus virus (OV) sequences from the Patagonian Coast, Argentina, and homologous sequences from public databases was performed. This analysis showed that the Patagonian sequences represented a divergent viral clade and that the rest of OV sequences analyzed here were clustered into six additional phylogenetic groups. Analyses of 18S gene libraries supported a close relationship of the Patagonian Ostreococcus host with clade A sequences described elsewhere, corroborating previous studies indicating that clade A strains are ubiquitous. Besides the Patagonian OV sequences, several phylogenetic groupings were linked to particular geographic locations, suggesting a role for allopatric cladogenesis in viral diversification. However, and in agreement with previous observations, other viral lineages included sequences with diverse geographic origins. These findings, together with analyses of ancestral trait trajectories performed here, are consistent with an evolutionary dynamics in which geographical isolation has a role in OV diversification but can be followed by rapid dispersion to remote places. PMID:22674355

  7. Phylogenetic diversity of acidophilic sporoactinobacteria isolated from various soils.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Heun; Han, Ji-Hye; Seong, Chi Nam; Kim, Seung Bum

    2006-12-01

    Spore forming actinobacteria (sporoactinobacteria) isolated from soils with an acidic pH in Pinus thunbergii forests and coal mine waste were subjected to taxonomic characterization. For the isolation of acidophilic actinobacteria, acidified starch casein agar (pH adjusted to 4-5) was used. The numbers of actinobacteria growing in acidic media were between 3.2 x 10(4) and 8.0 x 10(6) CFU/g soil. Forty three acidophilic actinobacterial strains were isolated and their 16S rDNA sequences were determined. The isolates were divided into eight distinctive phylogenetic clusters within the variation encompassed by the family Streptomycetaceae. Four clusters among them were assigned to the genus Streptacidiphilus, whereas the remaining four were assigned to Streptomyces. The clusters belonging to either Streptomyces or Streptacidiphilus did not form monophyletic clade. The growth pH profiles indicated that the representative isolates grew best between pH 5 and 6. It is evident from this study that acidity has played a critical role in the differentiation of the family Streptomycetaceae, and also that different mechanisms might have resulted in the evolution of two groups, Streptacidiphilus (strict acidophiles) and neutrotolerant acidophilic Streptomyces. The effect of geographic separation was clearly seen among the Streptacidiphilus isolates, which may be a key factor in speciation of the genus. PMID:17205037

  8. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin gene of H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens in South China from 2012 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Han-Qin; Yan, Zhuan-Qiang; Zeng, Fan-Gui; Liao, Chang-Tao; Zhou, Qing-Feng; Qin, Jian-Ping; Xie, Qing-Mei; Bi, Ying-Zuo

    2015-01-01

    As part of our ongoing influenza surveillance program in South China, 19 field strains of H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from dead or diseased chicken flocks in Guangdong province, South China, between 2012 and 2013. Hemagglutinin (HA) genes of these strains were sequenced and analyzed and phylogenic analysis showed that 12 of the 19 isolates belonged to the lineage h9.4.2.5, while the other seven belonged to h9.4.2.6. Specifically, we found that all of the viruses isolated in 2013 belonged to lineage h9.4.2.5. The lineage h9.4.2.5 viruses contained a PSRSSR↓GLF motif at HA cleavage site, while the lineage h9.4.2.6 viruses contained a PARSSR↓GLF at the same position. Most of the isolates in lineage h9.4.2.5 lost one potential glycosylation site at residues 200-202, and had an additional one at residues 295-297 in HA1. Notably, 19 isolates had an amino acid exchange (Q226L) in the receptor binding site, which indicated that the viruses had potential affinity of binding to human like receptor. The present study shows the importance of continuing surveillance of new H9N2 strains to better prepare for the next epidemic or pandemic outbreak of H9N2 AIV infections in chicken flocks. PMID:25643797

  9. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of culturable Actinobacteria isolated from freshwater fish gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Jami, Mansooreh; Ghanbari, Mahdi; Kneifel, Wolfgang; Domig, Konrad J

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of Actinobacteria isolated from the gut microbiota of two freshwater fish species namely Schizothorax zarudnyi and Schizocypris altidorsalis was investigated employing classical cultivation techniques, repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), partial and full 16S rDNA sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. A total of 277 isolates were cultured by applying three different agar media. Based on rep-PCR profile analysis a subset of 33 strains was selected for further phylogenetic investigations, antimicrobial activity testing and diversity analysis of secondary-metabolite biosynthetic genes. The identification based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that the isolates belong to eight genera distributed among six families. At the family level, 72% of the 277 isolates belong to the family Streptomycetaceae. Among the non-streptomycetes group, the most dominant group could be allocated to the family of Pseudonocardiaceae followed by the members of Micromonosporaceae. Phylogenetic analysis clearly showed that many of the isolates in the genera Streptomyces, Saccharomonospora, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium and Agromyces formed a single and distinct cluster with the type strains. Notably, there is no report so far about the occurrence of these Actinobacteria in the microbiota of freshwater fish. Of the 33 isolates, all the strains exhibited antibacterial activity against a set of tested human and fish pathogenic bacteria. Then, to study their associated potential capacity to synthesize diverse bioactive natural products, diversity of genes associated with secondary-metabolite biosynthesis including PKS I, PKS II, NRPS, the enzyme PhzE of the phenazine pathways, the enzyme dTGD of 6-deoxyhexoses glycosylation pathway, the enzyme Halo of halogenation pathway and the enzyme CYP in polyene polyketide biosynthesis were investigated among the isolates. All the strains possess at least two types of the investigated

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic thermophilic bacteria: aid for their reclassification.

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, F A; Ward, N L; Morgan, H W; Toalster, R; Stackebrandt, E

    1993-01-01

    Small subunit rDNA sequences were determined for 20 species of the genera Acetogenium, Clostridium, Thermoanaerobacter, Thermoanaerobacterium, Thermoanaerobium, and Thermobacteroides, 3 non-validly described species, and 5 isolates of anaerobic thermophilic bacteria, providing a basis for a phylogenetic analysis of these organisms. Several species contain a version of the molecule significantly longer than that of Escherichia coli because of the presence of inserts. On the basis of normal evolutionary distances, the phylogenetic tree indicates that all bacteria investigated in this study with a maximum growth temperature above 65 degrees C form a supercluster within the subphylum of gram-positive bacteria that also contains Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium thermoaceticum, which have been previously sequenced. This supercluster appears to be equivalent in its phylogenetic depth to the supercluster of mesophilic clostridia and their nonspore-forming relatives. Several phylogenetically and phenotypically coherent clusters that are defined by sets of signature nucleotides emerge within the supercluster of thermophiles. Clostridium thermobutyricum and Clostridium thermopalmarium are members of Clostridium group I. A phylogenetic tree derived from transversion distances demonstrated the artificial clustering of some organisms with high rDNA G+C moles percent, i.e., Clostridium fervidus and the thermophilic, cellulolytic members of the genus Clostridium. The results of this study can be used as an aid for future taxonomic restructuring of anaerobic sporogenous and asporogenous thermophillic, gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7687600

  11. On the analysis of phylogenetically paired designs

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L; Rakovski, Cyril S; Macpherson, J Michael

    2015-01-01

    As phylogenetically controlled experimental designs become increasingly common in ecology, the need arises for a standardized statistical treatment of these datasets. Phylogenetically paired designs circumvent the need for resolved phylogenies and have been used to compare species groups, particularly in the areas of invasion biology and adaptation. Despite the widespread use of this approach, the statistical analysis of paired designs has not been critically evaluated. We propose a mixed model approach that includes random effects for pair and species. These random effects introduce a “two-layer” compound symmetry variance structure that captures both the correlations between observations on related species within a pair as well as the correlations between the repeated measurements within species. We conducted a simulation study to assess the effect of model misspecification on Type I and II error rates. We also provide an illustrative example with data containing taxonomically similar species and several outcome variables of interest. We found that a mixed model with species and pair as random effects performed better in these phylogenetically explicit simulations than two commonly used reference models (no or single random effect) by optimizing Type I error rates and power. The proposed mixed model produces acceptable Type I and II error rates despite the absence of a phylogenetic tree. This design can be generalized to a variety of datasets to analyze repeated measurements in clusters of related subjects/species. PMID:25750719

  12. Patterns of Reproductive Isolation in Eucalyptus-A Phylogenetic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Matthew J; Holland, Barbara; Steane, Dorothy A; Jones, Rebecca C; Nicolle, Dean; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M

    2015-07-01

    We assess phylogenetic patterns of hybridization in the speciose, ecologically and economically important genus Eucalyptus, in order to better understand the evolution of reproductive isolation. Eucalyptus globulus pollen was applied to 99 eucalypt species, mainly from the large commercially important subgenus, Symphyomyrtus. In the 64 species that produce seeds, hybrid compatibility was assessed at two stages, hybrid-production (at approximately 1 month) and hybrid-survival (at 9 months), and compared with phylogenies based on 8,350 genome-wide DArT (diversity arrays technology) markers. Model fitting was used to assess the relationship between compatibility and genetic distance, and whether or not the strength of incompatibility "snowballs" with divergence. There was a decline in compatibility with increasing genetic distance between species. Hybridization was common within two closely related clades (one including E. globulus), but rare between E. globulus and species in two phylogenetically distant clades. Of three alternative models tested (linear, slowdown, and snowball), we found consistent support for a snowball model, indicating that the strength of incompatibility accelerates relative to genetic distance. Although we can only speculate about the genetic basis of this pattern, it is consistent with a Dobzhansky-Muller-model prediction that incompatibilities should snowball with divergence due to negative epistasis. Different rates of compatibility decline in the hybrid-production and hybrid-survival measures suggest that early-acting postmating barriers developed first and are stronger than later-acting barriers. We estimated that complete reproductive isolation can take up to 21-31 My in Eucalyptus. Practical implications for hybrid eucalypt breeding and genetic risk assessment in Australia are discussed. PMID:25777461

  13. Phylogenetic relationships among Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical samples in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Farzad; Ghanbari, Fahimeh; Mellmann, Alexander; Najafzadeh, Mohammad J; Khaledi, Azad

    2016-01-01

    The spa gene occurs in all strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), can function as a genetic marker and might be used distinguish strains at the species level. Hence, due to these advantages, we used spa typing and the Based Upon Repeat Pattern (BURP) to assign the clonal and phylogenetic relationships of S. aureus strains. The sensitivity of S. aureus strains to methicillin was determined using agar disk diffusion. The extracted DNA from 56 isolates of S. aureus was subjected to PCR to detect the spa gene with specific primers. The spa typing method was performed for each of the isolates, and then, BURP was used to cluster spa types (spa-CCs). Finally, using relevant software, the phylogenic tree was drawn. The results of this study showed that 25 out of 56 (44.6%) isolates were resistant to methicillin. The typing of S. aureus isolates revealed 24 different spa types among 56 isolates, and BURP analysis clustered the 24 spa types into 5 spa clonal complexes (CCs) and 12 singletons. The process of spa typing, in combination with BURP analysis, provides an efficient method for investigating phylogenetic and clonal relationships among clinical isolates and can be useful for monitoring bacterial spread between hospitals and communities as well as between and within hospitals. PMID:26924254

  14. A deliberate practice approach to teaching phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, F Collin; Johnson, Daniel J; Kearns, Katherine D

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or "one-shot," in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we designed a set of five assignments for a 300-level plant systematics course that incrementally introduces the concepts and skills used in phylogenetic analysis. In our assignments, students learned the process of constructing phylogenetic trees through a series of increasingly difficult tasks; thus, skill development served as a framework for building content knowledge. We present results from 5 yr of final exam scores, pre- and postconcept assessments, and student surveys to assess the impact of our new pedagogical materials on student performance related to constructing and interpreting phylogenetic trees. Students improved in their ability to interpret relationships within trees and improved in several aspects related to between-tree comparisons and tree construction skills. Student feedback indicated that most students believed our approach prepared them to engage in tree construction and gave them confidence in their abilities. Overall, our data confirm that instructional approaches implementing deliberate practice address student misconceptions, improve student experiences, and foster deeper understanding of difficult scientific concepts. PMID:24297294

  15. A Deliberate Practice Approach to Teaching Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, F. Collin; Johnson, Daniel J.; Kearns, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of postsecondary education is to assist students in developing expert-level understanding. Previous attempts to encourage expert-level understanding of phylogenetic analysis in college science classrooms have largely focused on isolated, or “one-shot,” in-class activities. Using a deliberate practice instructional approach, we designed a set of five assignments for a 300-level plant systematics course that incrementally introduces the concepts and skills used in phylogenetic analysis. In our assignments, students learned the process of constructing phylogenetic trees through a series of increasingly difficult tasks; thus, skill development served as a framework for building content knowledge. We present results from 5 yr of final exam scores, pre- and postconcept assessments, and student surveys to assess the impact of our new pedagogical materials on student performance related to constructing and interpreting phylogenetic trees. Students improved in their ability to interpret relationships within trees and improved in several aspects related to between-tree comparisons and tree construction skills. Student feedback indicated that most students believed our approach prepared them to engage in tree construction and gave them confidence in their abilities. Overall, our data confirm that instructional approaches implementing deliberate practice address student misconceptions, improve student experiences, and foster deeper understanding of difficult scientific concepts. PMID:24297294

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Phylogenetic Analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from the Ocean▿

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nurul Huda; Ahsan, Mahbuba; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Hosoya, Shoichi; Yokota, Akira; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Recent isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains from the open ocean and subsequent pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses indicate that these strains have a unique genotype (N. H. Khan, Y. Ishii, N. Kimata-Kino, H. Esaki, T. Nishino, M. Nishimura, and K. Kogure, Microb. Ecol. 53:173-186, 2007). We hypothesized that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have a unique phylogenetic position relative to other strains. The objective of this study was to clarify the intraspecies phylogenetic relationship between marine strains and other strains from various geographical locations. Considering the advantages of using databases, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was chosen for the typing and discrimination of ocean P. aeruginosa strains. Seven housekeeping genes (acsA, aroE, guaA, mutL, nuoD, ppsA, and trpE) were analyzed, and the results were compared with data on the MLST website. These genes were also used for phylogenetic analysis of P. aeruginosa. Rooted and unrooted phylogenetic trees were generated for each gene locus and the concatenated gene fragments. MLST data showed that all the ocean strains were new. Trees constructed for individual and concatenated genes revealed that ocean P. aeruginosa strains have clusters distinct from those of other P. aeruginosa strains. These clusters roughly reflected the geographical locations of the isolates. These data support our previous findings that P. aeruginosa strains are present in the ocean. It can be concluded that the ocean P. aeruginosa strains have diverged from other isolates and form a distinct cluster based on MLST and phylogenetic analyses of seven housekeeping genes. PMID:18757570

  17. Phylogenetic and physiological diversity of microorganisms isolated from a deep greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miteva, V. I.; Sheridan, P. P.; Brenchley, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied a sample from the GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) ice core to determine the diversity and survival of microorganisms trapped in the ice at least 120,000 years ago. Previously, we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences in a clone library obtained by PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from anaerobic enrichments. Here we report the isolation of nearly 800 aerobic organisms that were grouped by morphology and amplified rDNA restriction analysis patterns to select isolates for further study. The phylogenetic analyses of 56 representative rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four major phylogenetic groups: the high-G+C gram-positives, low-G+C gram-positives, Proteobacteria, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the high-G+C gram-positive cluster that had not been represented in the clone library. The Jukes-Cantor evolutionary distance matrix results suggested that at least 7 isolates represent new species within characterized genera and that 49 are different strains of known species. The isolates were further categorized based on the isolation conditions, temperature range for growth, enzyme activity, antibiotic resistance, presence of plasmids, and strain-specific genomic variations. A significant observation with implications for the development of novel and more effective cultivation methods was that preliminary incubation in anaerobic and aerobic liquid prior to plating on agar media greatly increased the recovery of CFU from the ice core sample.

  18. Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Microorganisms Isolated from a Deep Greenland Glacier Ice Core

    PubMed Central

    Miteva, V. I.; Sheridan, P. P.; Brenchley, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied a sample from the GISP 2 (Greenland Ice Sheet Project) ice core to determine the diversity and survival of microorganisms trapped in the ice at least 120,000 years ago. Previously, we examined the phylogenetic relationships among 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences in a clone library obtained by PCR amplification from genomic DNA extracted from anaerobic enrichments. Here we report the isolation of nearly 800 aerobic organisms that were grouped by morphology and amplified rDNA restriction analysis patterns to select isolates for further study. The phylogenetic analyses of 56 representative rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four major phylogenetic groups: the high-G+C gram-positives, low-G+C gram-positives, Proteobacteria, and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the high-G+C gram-positive cluster that had not been represented in the clone library. The Jukes-Cantor evolutionary distance matrix results suggested that at least 7 isolates represent new species within characterized genera and that 49 are different strains of known species. The isolates were further categorized based on the isolation conditions, temperature range for growth, enzyme activity, antibiotic resistance, presence of plasmids, and strain-specific genomic variations. A significant observation with implications for the development of novel and more effective cultivation methods was that preliminary incubation in anaerobic and aerobic liquid prior to plating on agar media greatly increased the recovery of CFU from the ice core sample. PMID:14711643

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses isolated in 2015 in Germany indicates significant genetic divergence from vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Ahmed; Abdelwhab, El-Sayed M; Slanina, Heiko; Hussein, Mohamed A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Schüttler, Christian G; Ziebuhr, John; Pleschka, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Infections by H3N2-type influenza A viruses (IAV) resulted in significant numbers of hospitalization in several countries in 2014-2015, causing disease also in vaccinated individuals and, in some cases, fatal outcomes. In this study, sequence analysis of H3N2 viruses isolated in Germany from 1998 to 2015, including eleven H3N2 isolates collected early in 2015, was performed. Compared to the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 (H3N2), the 2015 strains from Germany showed up to 4.5 % sequence diversity in their HA1 protein, indicating substantial genetic drift. The data further suggest that two distinct phylogroups, 3C.2 and 3C.3, with 1.6-2.3 % and 0.3-2.4 % HA1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence diversity, respectively, co-circulated in Germany in the 2014/2015 season. Distinct glycosylation patterns and amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins were identified, possibly contributing to the unusually high number of H3N2 infections in this season and providing important information for developing vaccines that are effective against both genotypes. PMID:26973232

  20. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of Neisseria meningitidis using DNA probes.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, H.; Knight, A. I.; Cartwright, K. A.; McFadden, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The genetic relationships between various serotypes and serogroups of meningococcal strains were investigated by restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis using a number of random DNA probes and a probe containing a truncated copy of the meningococcal insertion sequence IS1106. The data were used to estimate genetic distance between all pairs of strains and to construct phylogenetic trees for meningococcal strains. B15:P1.16R strains isolated from cases of systemic meningococcal disease in two health districts with a high incidence of disease were clonal in contrast to similar strains from cases occurring in other parts of the UK. Strains from these areas, which contain a similar genomic deletion, were found to be derived from two distinct lineages within the B15:P1.16R phylogenetic group. RFLP data demonstrated that present serological typing systems for the meningococcus do not necessarily reflect true genetic relationships. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1356820

  1. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of a Geographically and Temporally Matched Set of Candida albicans Isolates from Humans and Nonmigratory Wildlife in Central Illinois ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Lauren; Whittington, Julia K.; Pujol, Claude; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Ruiz, Marilyn O.; Pfaller, Michael A.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored whether wildlife species serve as the reservoir for human Candida albicans strains in a given geographic area. C. albicans isolates were collected from nonmigratory wildlife admitted to the University of Illinois Wildlife Medical Clinic. A geographically and temporally matched set of C. albicans oral isolates was collected from healthy human volunteers. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign strains to genetic clades. Clade 1 isolates, particularly diploid sequence type 69 (DST 69), were most common in humans. Clade 1 strains were less frequently recovered from wildlife, while clade 8 strains, particularly DST 90, were overrepresented in the wildlife collection. All instances where a wildlife and human isolate shared the same DST occurred within clade 1. Clade distributions between human and wildlife isolates were significantly different, demonstrating population isolation between the groups. These differences may indicate limited strain transfer between groups or differential selection of C. albicans isolates in humans and wildlife. Wildlife strains had an amphotericin B MIC significantly lower than that of human isolates; strains with increased susceptibility were from several clades. C. albicans isolates were collected from domestic animals to provide comparisons with human and wildlife data sets. C. albicans isolation from canine and feline oral and anal swabs was infrequent; companion animal isolates were closely related to clade 1 human isolates. Collectively, the data suggest a greater likelihood of C. albicans transfer from humans to animals than from animals to humans. The nontransient human population may maintain the connection between geography and the C. albicans genetic groups recovered from humans. PMID:18621922

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of honey bee behavioral evolution.

    PubMed

    Raffiudin, Rika; Crozier, Ross H

    2007-05-01

    DNA sequences from three mitochondrial (rrnL, cox2, nad2) and one nuclear gene (itpr) from all 9 known honey bee species (Apis), a 10th possible species, Apis dorsata binghami, and three outgroup species (Bombus terrestris, Melipona bicolor and Trigona fimbriata) were used to infer Apis phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian analysis. The dwarf honey bees were confirmed as basal, and the giant and cavity-nesting species to be monophyletic. All nodes were strongly supported except that grouping Apis cerana with A. nigrocincta. Two thousand post-burnin trees from the phylogenetic analysis were used in a Bayesian comparative analysis to explore the evolution of dance type, nest structure, comb structure and dance sound within Apis. The ancestral honey bee species was inferred with high support to have nested in the open, and to have more likely than not had a silent vertical waggle dance and a single comb. The common ancestor of the giant and cavity-dwelling bees is strongly inferred to have had a buzzing vertical directional dance. All pairwise combinations of characters showed strong association, but the multiple comparisons problem reduces the ability to infer associations between states between characters. Nevertheless, a buzzing dance is significantly associated with cavity-nesting, several vertical combs, and dancing vertically, a horizontal dance is significantly associated with a nest with a single comb wrapped around the support, and open nesting with a single pendant comb and a silent waggle dance. PMID:17123837

  3. The phylogenetic structure of plant-pollinator networks increases with habitat size and isolation.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Marcelo A; Gleiser, Gabriela; Sabatino, Malena; Gilarranz, Luis J; Bascompte, Jordi; Verdú, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Similarity among species in traits related to ecological interactions is frequently associated with common ancestry. Thus, closely related species usually interact with ecologically similar partners, which can be reinforced by diverse co-evolutionary processes. The effect of habitat fragmentation on the phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions and correspondence between plant and animal phylogenies is, however, unknown. Here, we address to what extent phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic congruence of plant-animal interactions depend on habitat size and isolation by analysing the phylogenetic structure of 12 pollination webs from isolated Pampean hills. Phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions differed among webs, being stronger for flower-visiting insects than plants. Phylogenetic signal and overall co-phylogenetic congruence increased independently with hill size and isolation. We propose that habitat fragmentation would erode the phylogenetic structure of interaction webs. A decrease in phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic correspondence in plant-pollinator interactions could be associated with less reliable mutualism and erratic co-evolutionary change. PMID:26493295

  4. Phylogenetic Analysis of Astrovirus and Kobuvirus in Korean Dogs

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Sarah; LIM, Seong-In; KIM, Yong Kwan; CHO, Yoon-Young; SONG, Jae-Young; AN, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Astroviruses and kobuviruses are frequently found in mammalian feces, including that of humans. The present study examined fecal samples from 91 Korean dogs suffering from diarrhea. Canine astroviruses (CAstVs) and canine kobuviruses (CKoVs) were identified in 2 (2.1%) and 46 (50.6%) dogs, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analysis coupled with phylogenetic analysis using the neighbor-joining method showed that CAstVs clustered into four genetically diverse groups. Two Korean CAstVs belonged to group 2 alongside strains isolated in Italy and France. Twelve of the Korean CKoVs belonged to a single clade, along with strain UK003 identified in the UK and six CKoVs identified in the USA. Thus, the results suggest that the Korean strain of CAstV is closely related to strains isolated in Europe. Surely, CKoV in South Korea could identify the circulation among dogs population. PMID:24784439

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of Brazilian isolates of Pythium insidiosum based on ITS rDNA and cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, M I; Botton, S A; Pereira, D I B; Robe, L J; Jesus, F P K; Mahl, C D; Costa, M M; Alves, S H; Santurio, J M

    2012-09-14

    Pythium insidiosum is an aquatic oomycete that is the causative agent of pythiosis. Advances in molecular methods have enabled increased accuracy in the diagnosis of pythiosis, and in studies of the phylogenetic relationships of this oomycete. To evaluate the phylogenetic relationships among isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil, and also regarding to other American and Thai isolates, in this study a total of thirty isolates of P. insidiosum from different regions of Brazil was used and had their ITS1, 5.8S rRNA and ITS2 rDNA (ITS) region and the partial sequence of cytochrome oxidase II (COX II) gene sequenced and analyzed. The outgroup consisted of six isolates of other Pythium species and one of Lagenidium giganteum. Phylogenetic analyses of ITS and COX II genes were conducted, both individually and in combination, using four different methods: Maximum parsimony (MP); Neighbor-joining (NJ); Maximum likelihood (ML); and Bayesian analysis (BA). Our data supported P. insidiosum as monophyletic in relation to the other Pythium species, and COX II showed that P. insidiosum appears to be subdivided into three major polytomous groups, whose arrangement provides the Thai isolates as paraphyletic in relation to the Brazilian ones. The molecular analyses performed in this study suggest an evolutionary proximity among all American isolates, including the Brazilian and the Central and North America isolates, which were grouped together in a single entirely polytomous clade. The COX II network results presented signals of a recent expansion for the American isolates, probably originated from an Asian invasion source. Here, COX II showed higher levels bias, although it was the source of higher levels of phylogenetic information when compared to ITS. Nevertheless, the two markers chosen for this study proved to be entirely congruent, at least with respect to phylogenetic relationships between different isolates of P. insidiosum. PMID:22483240

  6. A Distance Measure for Genome Phylogenetic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minh Duc; Allison, Lloyd; Dix, Trevor

    Phylogenetic analyses of species based on single genes or parts of the genomes are often inconsistent because of factors such as variable rates of evolution and horizontal gene transfer. The availability of more and more sequenced genomes allows phylogeny construction from complete genomes that is less sensitive to such inconsistency. For such long sequences, construction methods like maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood are often not possible due to their intensive computational requirement. Another class of tree construction methods, namely distance-based methods, require a measure of distances between any two genomes. Some measures such as evolutionary edit distance of gene order and gene content are computational expensive or do not perform well when the gene content of the organisms are similar. This study presents an information theoretic measure of genetic distances between genomes based on the biological compression algorithm expert model. We demonstrate that our distance measure can be applied to reconstruct the consensus phylogenetic tree of a number of Plasmodium parasites from their genomes, the statistical bias of which would mislead conventional analysis methods. Our approach is also used to successfully construct a plausible evolutionary tree for the γ-Proteobacteria group whose genomes are known to contain many horizontally transferred genes.

  7. A phylogenetic analysis of the mycoplasmas: basis for their classification.

    PubMed Central

    Weisburg, W G; Tully, J G; Rose, D L; Petzel, J P; Oyaizu, H; Yang, D; Mandelco, L; Sechrest, J; Lawrence, T G; Van Etten, J

    1989-01-01

    Small-subunit rRNA sequences were determined for almost 50 species of mycoplasmas and their walled relatives, providing the basis for a phylogenetic systematic analysis of these organisms. Five groups of mycoplasmas per se were recognized (provisional names are given): the hominis group (which included species such as Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma lipophilum, Mycoplasma pulmonis, and Mycoplasma neurolyticum), the pneumoniae group (which included species such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Mycoplasma muris), the spiroplasma group (which included species such as Mycoplasma mycoides, Spiroplasma citri, and Spiroplasma apis), the anaeroplasma group (which encompassed the anaeroplasmas and acholeplasmas), and a group known to contain only the isolated species Asteroleplasma anaerobium. In addition to these five mycoplasma groups, a sixth group of variously named gram-positive, walled organisms (which included lactobacilli, clostridia, and other organisms) was also included in the overall phylogenetic unit. In each of these six primary groups, subgroups were readily recognized and defined. Although the phylogenetic units identified by rRNA comparisons are difficult to recognize on the basis of mutually exclusive phenotypic characters alone, phenotypic justification can be given a posteriori for a number of them. PMID:2592342

  8. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Navidinia, Masoumeh; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Fallah, Fatemeh; Bakhshi, Bita; Sajadinia, Raheleh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A) and intI1 (encoding a class 1 integrase) in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI) during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intI1 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54%) and D (34%) whereas group A (44%) and D (26%) are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05). intI1 gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24%) in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%). Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC. PMID:25242935

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin genes of 12 H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from chickens in Iran from 2003 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Moosakhani, F; Shoshtari, A H; Pourbakhsh, S A; Keyvanfar, H; Ghorbani, A

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the hemagglutinin genes from 12 influenza viruses of the H9N2 subtype were isolated from chicken flocks in different provinces of Iran from 2003 to 2005, amplified and sequenced. All of the 12 isolates showed similar sequences at the cleavage site, RSSF/GLF, bearing eight potential glycosylation sites and sharing the characteristic deduced amino acid residues alanine-190, glutamine-226, and glutamine-227 at the receptor-binding site. Ten out of these 12 isolates possessed leucine at position 226, which prevails in the sequences found in human H2 and H3 strains. Overall, the presence in these Iranian poultry H9N2 viruses of the sequence known to bind to human-type receptors and the presence of antibodies in the human population of Iran to H9N2 showed that it is possible for circulating H9N2 avian influenza viruses in Iran to infect humans. Hence, extensive surveillance of H9N2 in this country is highly recommended. PMID:20608532

  10. Antifungal Drug Susceptibility and Phylogenetic Diversity among Cryptococcus Isolates from Dogs and Cats in North America

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Lisa M.; Meyer, Wieland; Firacative, Carolina; Thompson, George R.; Samitz, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Molecular types of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex that infect dogs and cats differ regionally and with host species. Antifungal drug susceptibility can vary with molecular type, but the susceptibility of Cryptococcus isolates from dogs and cats is largely unknown. Cryptococcus isolates from 15 dogs and 27 cats were typed using URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP), PCR fingerprinting, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Susceptibility was determined using a microdilution assay (Sensititre YeastOne; Trek Diagnostic Systems). MICs were compared among groups. The 42 isolates studied comprised molecular types VGI (7%), VGIIa (7%), VGIIb (5%), VGIIc (5%), VGIII (38%), VGIV (2%), VNI (33%), and VNII (2%), as determined by URA5 RFLP. The VGIV isolate was more closely related to VGIII according to MLST. All VGIII isolates were from cats. All sequence types identified from veterinary isolates clustered with isolates from humans. VGIII isolates showed considerable genetic diversity compared with other Cryptococcus molecular types and could be divided into two major subgroups. Compared with C. neoformans MICs, C. gattii MICs were lower for flucytosine, and VGIII MICs were lower for flucytosine and itraconazole. For all drugs except itraconazole, C. gattii isolates exhibited a wider range of MICs than C. neoformans. MICs varied with Cryptococcus species and molecular type in dogs and cats, and MICs of VGIII isolates were most variable and may reflect phylogenetic diversity in this group. Because sequence types of dogs and cats reflect those infecting humans, these observations may also have implications for treatment of human cryptococcosis. PMID:24696030

  11. Antifungal drug susceptibility and phylogenetic diversity among Cryptococcus isolates from dogs and cats in North America.

    PubMed

    Singer, Lisa M; Meyer, Wieland; Firacative, Carolina; Thompson, George R; Samitz, Eileen; Sykes, Jane E

    2014-06-01

    Molecular types of the Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex that infect dogs and cats differ regionally and with host species. Antifungal drug susceptibility can vary with molecular type, but the susceptibility of Cryptococcus isolates from dogs and cats is largely unknown. Cryptococcus isolates from 15 dogs and 27 cats were typed using URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP), PCR fingerprinting, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Susceptibility was determined using a microdilution assay (Sensititre YeastOne; Trek Diagnostic Systems). MICs were compared among groups. The 42 isolates studied comprised molecular types VGI (7%), VGIIa (7%), VGIIb (5%), VGIIc (5%), VGIII (38%), VGIV (2%), VNI (33%), and VNII (2%), as determined by URA5 RFLP. The VGIV isolate was more closely related to VGIII according to MLST. All VGIII isolates were from cats. All sequence types identified from veterinary isolates clustered with isolates from humans. VGIII isolates showed considerable genetic diversity compared with other Cryptococcus molecular types and could be divided into two major subgroups. Compared with C. neoformans MICs, C. gattii MICs were lower for flucytosine, and VGIII MICs were lower for flucytosine and itraconazole. For all drugs except itraconazole, C. gattii isolates exhibited a wider range of MICs than C. neoformans. MICs varied with Cryptococcus species and molecular type in dogs and cats, and MICs of VGIII isolates were most variable and may reflect phylogenetic diversity in this group. Because sequence types of dogs and cats reflect those infecting humans, these observations may also have implications for treatment of human cryptococcosis. PMID:24696030

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of three new microsporidian isolates from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nageswara Rao, S; Muthulakshmi, M; Kanginakudru, S; Nagaraju, J

    2004-07-01

    The pathogenicity, mode of transmission, tissue specificity of infection and the small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequences of the three new microsporidian isolates from the silkworm Bombyx mori were studied. Out of the three, NIK-2r revealed life cycle features and SSU-rRNA gene sequence similar to Nosema bombycis, suggesting that it is N. bombycis. The other two, NIK-4m and NIK-3h, differed from each other as well as from N. bombycis. NIK-4m was highly pathogenic and did not show any vertical transmission, in accordance with the apparent lack of gonadal infection, whereas NIK-3h was less pathogenic and vertical transmission was not detected but could not be excluded. Phylogenetic analysis based on SSU-rRNA gene sequence placed NIK-3h and NIK-4m in a distinct clade that included almost all the Vairimorpha species and Nosema species that infect lepidopteran and non-lepidopteran hosts, while NIK-2r was included in a clade containing almost all the Nosema isolates that infect only lepidopteran hosts. Thus, we have presented molecular evidence that one of the three isolates is in fact the type species N. bombycis, while the other two isolates are Vairimorpha spp. There was distinct separation of microsporidian isolates infecting only lepidopteran hosts and those infecting lepidopteran and non-lepidopteran hosts, reflecting possible co-evolution of hosts and microsporidian isolates. PMID:15261772

  13. Genetic and phylogenetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from wildlife and livestock in Paraiba, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Sato, G; Gomes, A A B; Itou, T; Ito, F H; Sakai, T

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-four rabies virus (RV) isolates from foxes (8), insectivore bats (9), cattle (14), sheep (1), a goat (1) and a donkey (1) from Paraiba state, northeastern Brazil, were genetically characterized. Sequences of 890 nts of nucleoprotein (N) genes of these isolates were analyzed and compared with those of other Brazilian isolates characterized earlier. Phylogenetic analysis revealed three genetical lineages of RV co-existing in this region. Each lineage was found to be associated with particular host species and to circulate independently of each other. The first lineage was found in foxes (Dusicyon sp.) and could be discriminated from domestic carnivore isolates from Sao Paulo, Goias and Minas Gerais in the southern and central Brazil. The second lineage was associated with insectivorous bats (Molossus spp.) and differed from vampire bat-associated RV isolates. The third lineage was found in livestock and clustered with vampire bat-associated RV isolates from Sao Paulo, Tocantins, Goias and Matto Grosso. These results indicate that RV of these genetic lineages are cocirculating in the Paraiba state and that livestock in this region are infected with vampire bat-associated RV, suggesting that the vampire bat is the main reservoir of livestock rabies in this region. PMID:16599183

  14. The phylogenetic analysis of avipoxvirus in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hye Jeong; Howe, Laryssa; Alley, Maurice; Gartrell, Brett

    2011-05-12

    Avipoxvirus is known to be endemic in New Zealand and it is a cause of ongoing mortalities in the endangered black robin and shore plover populations. There is no information on the strains of avipoxvirus occurring in New Zealand and their likely origin or pathogenicity. This study was designed to identify the phylogenetic relationships of pathogenic avipoxvirus strains infecting introduced, native, and endemic bird species in New Zealand. Avipoxvirus 4b core protein gene was detected in tissue samples from 25/48 birds (52.1%) from 15 different species in New Zealand. Bootstrap analysis of avipoxvirus 4b core protein gene revealed that the New Zealand avipoxvirus isolates comprised of three different subclades. The majority of New Zealand avipoxvirus isolates (74%) belonged to A1 subclade which shared 100% genetic similarity with the fowlpox HPB strain. An isolate from a wood-pigeon (kereru) belonged to subclade A3, displaying 100% sequence homology to albatrosspox virus. An additional group, isolated from two shore plovers and one South Island saddleback, grouped within subclade B1 and presented 99% sequence homology to European PM33/2007 and Hawaiian HAAM 22.10H8 isolates. The results suggest that a variety of New Zealand bird species are susceptible to avipoxvirus infection, that there are more than two distinctive avipoxvirus subclades in New Zealand, and that the most prevalent A1 strain may have been introduced to New Zealand through introduced avian hosts such as passerines or poultry. PMID:21316164

  15. Taxonomic review and phylogenetic analysis of Enchodontoidei.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hilda M A; Gallo, Valéria

    2011-06-01

    Enchodontoidei are extinct marine teleost fishes with a long temporal range and a wide geographic distribution. As there has been no comprehensive phylogenetic study of this taxon, we performed a parsimony analysis using a data matrix with 87 characters, 31 terminal taxa for ingroup, and three taxa for outgroup. The analysis produced 93 equally parsimonious trees (L = 437 steps; CI = 0. 24; RI = 0. 49). The topology of the majority rule consensus tree was: (Sardinioides + Hemisaurida + (Nardorex + (Atolvorator + (Protostomias + Yabrudichthys ) + (Apateopholis + (Serrilepis + (Halec + Phylactocephalus ) + (Cimolichthys + (Prionolepis + ( (Eurypholis + Saurorhamphus ) + (Enchodus + (Paleolycus + Parenchodus ))))))) + ( (Ichthyotringa + Apateodus ) + (Rharbichthys + (Trachinocephalus + ( (Apuliadercetis + Brazilodercetis ) + (Benthesikyme + (Cyranichthys + Robertichthys ) + (Dercetis + Ophidercetis )) + (Caudadercetis + (Pelargorhynchus + (Nardodercetis + (Rhynchodercetis + (Dercetoides + Hastichthys )))))). The group Enchodontoidei is not monophyletic. Dercetidae form a clade supported by the presence of very reduced neural spines and possess a new composition. Enchodontidae are monophyletic by the presence of middorsal scutes, and Rharbichthys was excluded. Halecidae possess a new composition, with the exclusion of Hemisaurida. This taxon and Nardorex are Aulopiformes incertae sedis. PMID:21670874

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of probable non-human genes of group A rotaviruses isolated from children with acute gastroenteritis in Belém, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Régis Piloni; Kaiano, Jane Haruko Lima; Neri, Darivaldo Luz; Soares, Luana da Silva; Guerra, Sylvia de Fatima Dos Santos; Oliveira, Darleise de Souza; Farias, Yasmin Nascimento; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the main cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in both humans and young animals of various species such as calves, horses, pigs, dogs, cats, and birds. The genetic diversity of RVs is related to a variety of evolutionary mechanisms, including point mutation, and genome reassortment. The objective of this study was to characterize molecularly genes that encode structural and nonstructural proteins in unusual RV strains. The clinical specimens selected for this study were obtained from children and newborn with RV gastroenteritis, who participated in research projects on viral gastroenteritis conducted at the Evandro Chagas Institute. Structural (VP1-VP4, VP6, and VP7) and nonstructural (NSP1-NSP6) genes were amplified from stool samples by the polymerase chain reaction and subsequently sequenced. Eight unusual RV strains isolated from children and newborn with gastroenteritis were studied. Reassortment between genes of animal origin were observed in 5/8 (62.5%) strains analyzed. These results demonstrate that, although rare, interspecies (animal-human) transmission of RVs occurs in nature, as observed in the present study in strains NB150, HSP034, HSP180, HST327, and RV10109. This study is the first to be conducted in the Amazon region and supports previous data showing a close relationship between genes of human and animal origin, representing a challenge to the large-scale introduction of RV vaccines in national immunization programs. PMID:23080508

  17. Phylogenetic position of Leishmania isolates from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazma Habib; Messenger, Louisa A; Wahid, Sobia; Sutherland, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    Several species of the genus Leishmania are causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Pakistan. This study aimed to determine phylogenetic placement of Leishmania species causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan (34 Leishmania tropica, 3 Leishmania infantum), in-relation to species from other geographical areas using gene sequences encoding cytochrome b (cytb) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (its2). Based on cytochrome b sequence analysis, L. tropica strains from Pakistan and other geographical regions were differentiated into two genotype groups, A and B. Within the province, five distinct L. tropica genotypes were recognized; two in group A, three in group B. Two L. infantum isolates from the province were closely associated with both Afro-Eurasian and American species of the Leishmania donovani complex, including Leishmania chagasi, L. infantum and L. donovani from Sudan and Ethiopia; while a third L. infantum isolate could not be differentiated from visceralizing Kenyan and Indian L. donovani. We observed apposite phylogenetic placement of CL-causing L. tropica and L. infantum from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Affinities ascribed to Leishmania spp. From the region are valuable in tracing potential importation of leishmaniasis. PMID:27233810

  18. A Detailed Phylogenetic Analysis of FIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus associated with AIDS-like illnesses in cats and has been used as a model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A feature of HIV and FIV infection is the continually increasing divergence among viral isolates between different individuals, as well as within the same individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings The goal of this study was to determine the phylogenetic patterns of viral isolates obtained within the United States (U.S.) by focusing on the variable, V3-V4, region of the FIV envelope gene. Conclusions/Significance Data indicate that FIV, from within the U.S., localize to four viral clades, A, B, C, and F. Also shown is the geographic isolation of strains where clade A and clade B are found predominately on the west coast; however, clade B is also found throughout the U.S. and represents the predominant clade. This study presents a complete and conclusive analysis of FIV isolates from within the U.S. and may be used as the essential basis for the development of an effective multi-clade vaccine. PMID:20711253

  19. Interpretation of bootstrap values in phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wiesemüller, Bernhard; Rothe, Hartmut

    2006-06-01

    Bootstrap Analysis is a common tool in cladistics, and consequently many authors tend to believe that it could be close to a test of monophyly. In fact, it is only a procedure to calculate the redundancy of a certain character pattern among taxa. To demonstrate this, we set up a study with questionable data: Four skulls of great apes and humans were digitally photographed, and the pixels' brightness values were simply transformed to a one-zero-matrix, which was then used to calculate a Wagner tree with PHYLIP. As a rule, the higher the resolution of the photos is, the higher are the bootstrap values of supported taxa (and the lower are the bootstrap values of non-supported data). Redundancy of intertaxic information might indeed be an indicator of phylogenetic relationship, but can also be due to other reasons, like functional-adaptive needs in morphology, or semantic needs in a DNA-code. As a result, we tend to believe that high bootstrap values are actually less important than low ones. It is safer, based on a low bootstrap value, to claim that a certain taxon is not well supported by certain data. Therefore, we recommend discussions of low bootstrap values in future publications. PMID:16850767

  20. Phenotypic and phylogenetic characterization of an abamectin-degrading bacterial strain isolated from a citrus orchard.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Yu, Fang-Bo; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Yan, Xin; Li, Shun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial strain GB-01 was isolated from abamectin-contaminated soils by continuous enrichment culture. The preliminary identification of strain GB-01 as a Burkholderia species was based mainly on simple biochemical and substrate utilization tests; however, these tests alone cannot accurately differentiate all the species within the genus Burkholderia. The strain GB-01 was subjected to taxonomic analysis through a polyphasic approach, in which phenotypic, genotypic, and phylogenetic information was gathered to conclude the classification of this microbe. Phenotypic information comes from basic bacteriological tests and substrate utilization patterns using the Biolog GN2 MicroPlating system and automated miniature biochemical test kits, i.e. API 20 NE, ID 32 GN and API 50 CH, as well as analyzing the whole cell fatty acid profile. Genotypic information was gathered from whole genome DNA base composition (G+C mol%), and DNA-DNA hybridization with its closest species, while phylogenetic information was collected from the comparative analysis of 16S rRNA and recA gene sequences. The results of polyphasic analysis concluded that strain GB-01 is an atypical strain of the Burkholderia diffusa species. PMID:23863292

  1. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the “harmful” internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis and Pathogenicity Assessment of Two Strains of Avian Influenza Virus Subtype H9N2 Isolated from Migratory Birds: High Homology of Internal Genes with Human H10N8 Virus.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ge; Liang, Chai Hong; Hua, Deng Guo; Song, Lei Yong; Xiang, Yang Guo; Guang, Chen; Lan, Chen Hua; Ping, Hua Yu

    2016-01-01

    Two human-infecting avian influenza viruses (AIVs), H7N9 and H10N8, have emerged in China, which further indicate that the H9N2 subtype of AIVs, as an internal gene donor, may have an important role in the generation of new viruses with cross-species transmissibility and pathogenicity. H9N2 viruses that contain such internal genes widely exist in poultry but are rarely reported in migratory birds. In this study, two strains of the H9N2 virus were isolated from fecal samples of migratory birds in 2014: one strain from Caizi Lake in Anhui Province and one from Chen Lake in Hubei Province of China. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed high homology of all six internal genes of these two strains with the internal genes of the human H10N8 virus in Jiangxi Province, as well as with the human H7N9 virus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated a possible origin of these two strains from poultry in South China. Both of the two viruses tested could replicated in respiratory organs of infective mice without adaption, by both strains of the H9N2 AIVs from wild birds, suggesting their potential capacity for directly infecting mammals. Our findings indicate the existence of H9N2 viruses that contain internal genes highly homologous with human H10N8 or H7N9 viruses. Wild birds can contribute to the spread of the H9N2 virus that contains the "harmful" internal gene complex, leading to gene rearrangement with other influenza viruses and to the generation of new pathogenic viruses. Therefore, strengthening AIV surveillance in wild birds can promote an understanding of the presence and prevalence of viruses and provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of AIVs and human-infecting AIVs. PMID:26973600

  3. Open Reading Frame Phylogenetic Analysis on the Cloud

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus. PMID:23671843

  4. Open reading frame phylogenetic analysis on the cloud.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Chun-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has become essential in researching the evolutionary relationships between viruses. These relationships are depicted on phylogenetic trees, in which viruses are grouped based on sequence similarity. Viral evolutionary relationships are identified from open reading frames rather than from complete sequences. Recently, cloud computing has become popular for developing internet-based bioinformatics tools. Biocloud is an efficient, scalable, and robust bioinformatics computing service. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based open reading frame phylogenetic analysis service. The proposed service integrates the Hadoop framework, virtualization technology, and phylogenetic analysis methods to provide a high-availability, large-scale bioservice. In a case study, we analyze the phylogenetic relationships among Norovirus. Evolutionary relationships are elucidated by aligning different open reading frame sequences. The proposed platform correctly identifies the evolutionary relationships between members of Norovirus. PMID:23671843

  5. Genetic variability of the coat protein sequence of pea seed-borne mosaic virus isolates and the current relationship between phylogenetic placement and resistance groups.

    PubMed

    Wylie, S J; Coutts, B A; Jones, R A C

    2011-07-01

    Nucleotide sequences of complete or partial coat protein (CP) genes were determined for 11 isolates of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) from Australia and one from China, and compared with known sequences of 20 other isolates. On phylogenetic analysis, the isolates from Australia and China grouped into 2 of 3 clades. Clade A contained three sub-clades (Ai, Aii and Aiii), Australian isolates were in Ai or Aiii, and the Chinese isolate in Aii. Clade A contained isolates in pathotypes P-1, P-2 and U-2; clade B, one isolate in P-2; and clade C, only isolates in P-4. PMID:21519930

  6. Isolation and molecular and phylogenetic analyses of encephalomyocarditis virus from wild boar in central China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; He, Xiuyuan; Song, Xiaofeng; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Yun; Zhou, Guoli; Zhu, Wenjiao; Chang, Chen; Yin, Zhian; Shi, Yuhang; Wang, Chuanqing; Chang, Hongtao

    2016-06-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) can infect many host species and cause acute myocarditis and respiratory failure in piglets, reproductive failure in pregnant sows. In this study, an EMCV strain, designated JZ1202, was isolated from semi-captive wild boars that presented with acute myocarditis and sudden death in central China. It was identified by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genome sequencing. The subsequent results showed that the virus could produce a specific cytopathic effect on BHK cells and could cause clinical symptoms and pathological changes in mice. Complete genome sequencing and multiple sequence alignment indicated that JZ1202 strain was 81.3%-99.9% identical with other isolates worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome, ORF, VP3/VP1 and 3D genes using neighbor-joining method revealed that JZ1202 isolate was grouped into lineage 1. The results of this study confirmed that an EMCV strain JZ 1202 isolated from wild boar in central China was fatal to mice and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. PMID:26917364

  7. Phylogenetic characterization of three morphs of mussels (Bivalvia, Mytilidae) inhabiting isolated marine environments in Palau Islands.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tadasuke V; Tamate, Hidetoshi B; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2011-08-01

    Marine lakes in the Palau Islands are known to harbor unique marine fauna that have remained isolated since the formation of the lakes after the Last Glacial Maximum. We analyzed mussels from marine lakes located on different islands and conducted morphological, phylogenetic and population genetic characterization to clarify their evolutionary history. The mussels were morphologically classified into three differentiated morphs: NS, ON, and MC. Their common characteristics were consistent with the Brachidontes-Hormomya complex of the Mytilidae family. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene supported the taxonomic position of the mussels among the Mytilidae. In the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene lineage, NS-and MC-morphs were highly diverged from each other; their estimated time of divergence dates back to the mid-Pleistocene. ON-morph was more closely related to MC-morph, although the shell morphologies of ON- and MC-morphs were easily distinguishable. Population genetic analysis revealed the coexistence of highly diverged haplotypes within a population of ON-morph, indicating introgression of mtDNA among the morphs. Our data suggest that morphological differentiation of marine lake mussels can occur in a relatively short period under different environmental conditions. Thus, the marine lakes provide a unique site for the study of diversification in mussels. PMID:21800997

  8. Phylogenetically Novel LuxI/LuxR-Type Quorum Sensing Systems Isolated Using a Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nasuno, Eri; Fujita, Masaki J.; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research has been done to understand bacterial cell-to-cell signaling systems, but there is still a large gap in our current knowledge because the majority of microorganisms in natural environments do not have cultivated representatives. Metagenomics is one approach to identify novel quorum sensing (QS) systems from uncultured bacteria in environmental samples. In this study, fosmid metagenomic libraries were constructed from a forest soil and an activated sludge from a coke plant, and the target genes were detected using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based Escherichia coli biosensor strain whose fluorescence was screened by spectrophotometry. DNA sequence analysis revealed two pairs of new LuxI family N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) synthases and LuxR family transcriptional regulators (clones N16 and N52, designated AubI/AubR and AusI/AusR, respectively). AubI and AusI each produced an identical AHL, N-dodecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL), as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry. Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequences suggested that AusI/AusR was from an uncultured member of the Betaproteobacteria and AubI/AubR was very deeply branched from previously described LuxI/LuxR homologues in isolates of the Proteobacteria. The phylogenetic position of AubI/AubR indicates that they represent a QS system not acquired recently from the Proteobacteria by horizontal gene transfer but share a more ancient ancestry. We demonstrated that metagenomic screening is useful to provide further insight into the phylogenetic diversity of bacterial QS systems by describing two new LuxI/LuxR-type QS systems from uncultured bacteria. PMID:22983963

  9. Isolation of an Enterovirus D68 from Blood from a Child with Pneumonia in Rural Haiti: Close Phylogenetic Linkage with New York Strain.

    PubMed

    ElBadry, Maha; Lednicky, John; Cella, Eleonora; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Loeb, Julia; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Beau De Rochars, Valery Madsen; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-09-01

    We report the detection and isolation of enterovirus D68 from the blood of a 6-year-old child in rural Haiti, who presented with high fever and clinical signs suggestive of pneumonia. On phylogenetic analysis, this Haitian isolate was virtually identical to an enterovirus D68 strain circulating in New York during the same time period. PMID:27331858

  10. TREEFINDER: a powerful graphical analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Jobb, Gangolf; von Haeseler, Arndt; Strimmer, Korbinian

    2004-01-01

    Background Most analysis programs for inferring molecular phylogenies are difficult to use, in particular for researchers with little programming experience. Results TREEFINDER is an easy-to-use integrative platform-independent analysis environment for molecular phylogenetics. In this paper the main features of TREEFINDER (version of April 2004) are described. TREEFINDER is written in ANSI C and Java and implements powerful statistical approaches for inferring gene tree and related analyzes. In addition, it provides a user-friendly graphical interface and a phylogenetic programming language. Conclusions TREEFINDER is a versatile framework for analyzing phylogenetic data across different platforms that is suited both for exploratory as well as advanced studies. PMID:15222900

  11. Use of Phylogenetic and Phenotypic Analyses To Identify Nonhemolytic Streptococci Isolated from Bacteremic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tomonori; Fujiwara, Taku; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate molecular and phenotypic methods for the identification of nonhemolytic streptococci. A collection of 148 strains consisting of 115 clinical isolates from cases of infective endocarditis, septicemia, and meningitis and 33 reference strains, including type strains of all relevant Streptococcus species, were examined. Identification was performed by phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences of four housekeeping genes, ddl, gdh, rpoB, and sodA; by PCR analysis of the glucosyltransferase (gtf) gene; and by conventional phenotypic characterization and identification using two commercial kits, Rapid ID 32 STREP and STREPTOGRAM and the associated databases. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated sequences of the four housekeeping genes allowed unequivocal differentiation of recognized species and was used as the reference. Analysis of single gene sequences revealed deviation clustering in eight strains (5.4%) due to homologous recombination with other species. This was particularly evident in S. sanguinis and in members of the anginosus group of streptococci. The rate of correct identification of the strains by both commercial identification kits was below 50% but varied significantly between species. The most significant problems were observed with S. mitis and S. oralis and 11 Streptococcus species described since 1991. Our data indicate that identification based on multilocus sequence analysis is optimal. As a more practical alternative we recommend identification based on sodA sequences with reference to a comprehensive set of sequences that is available for downloading from our server. An analysis of the species distribution of 107 nonhemolytic streptococci from bacteremic patients showed a predominance of S. oralis and S. anginosus with various underlying infections. PMID:16333101

  12. Four new Candida cretensis strains isolated from Spanish fermented sausages (chorizo): taxonomic and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Martorell, Patricia; Querol, Amparo; Barrio, Eladio; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2008-05-01

    Four yeast strains were isolated from Spanish traditional fermented sausages (chorizo) spoiled by gas production. Using the classical identification procedures, they were identified as Debaryomyces hansenii. However, they fermented galactose and did not produce positive results in Debaryomyces differential medium (DDM), a growth medium highly specific for this species. Phylogenetic analysis showed identical sequences for the D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene and almost identical sequences for the 5.8S-ITS region with those of the recently described yeast species Candida cretensis. This result was confirmed by sequencing the gene encoding actin of the type and the new strains. Candida cretensis is a new species included in the so-called Candida kruisii clade that was described from a single strain, isolated from a decaying mushroom in Crete, Greece. The discovery of new strains of C. cretensis in fermented food expands its physiological and ecological diversity. With the description of these new strains isolated from food, three groups of strains can be distinguished within C. cretensis according to the restriction patterns of the intergenic spacer rRNA gene region and on the basis of some physiological properties that are of ecological relevance. PMID:18248417

  13. A phylogenetic analysis of Aquifex pyrophilus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Olsen, G. J.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    The 16S rRNA of the bacterion Aquifex pyrophilus, a microaerophilic, oxygen-reducing hyperthermophile, has been sequenced directly from the the PCR amplified gene. Phylogenetic analyses show the Aq. pyrophilus lineage to be probably the deepest (earliest) in the (eu)bacterial tree. The addition of this deep branching to the bacterial tree further supports the argument that the Bacteria are of thermophilic ancestry.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lonergan, D.J.; Jenter, H.L.; Coates, J.D.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Schmidt, T.M.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)- reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher- order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch with the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lonergan, D J; Jenter, H L; Coates, J D; Phillips, E J; Schmidt, T M; Lovley, D R

    1996-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among strictly anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria obtained from a diversity of sedimentary environments were examined by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Members of the genera Geobacter, Desulfuromonas, Pelobacter, and Desulfuromusa formed a monophyletic group within the delta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. On the basis of their common ancestry and the shared ability to reduce Fe(III) and/or S0, we propose that this group be considered a single family, Geobacteraceae. Bootstrap analysis, characteristic nucleotides, and higher-order secondary structures support the division of Geobacteraceae into two subgroups, designated the Geobacter and Desulfuromonas clusters. The genus Desulfuromusa and Pelobacter acidigallici make up a distinct branch within the Desulfuromonas cluster. Several members of the family Geobacteraceae, none of which reduce sulfate, were found to contain the target sequences of probes that have been previously used to define the distribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacterium-like microorganisms. The recent isolations of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms distributed throughout the domain Bacteria suggest that development of 16S rRNA probes that would specifically target all Fe(III) reducers may not be feasible. However, all of the evidence suggests that if a 16S rRNA sequence falls within the family Geobacteraceae, then the organism has the capacity for Fe(III) reduction. The suggestion, based on geological evidence, that Fe(III) reduction was the first globally significant process for oxidizing organic matter back to carbon dioxide is consistent with the finding that acetate-oxidizing Fe(III) reducers are phylogenetically diverse. PMID:8636045

  16. The First Outbreak of Eastern Equine Encephalitis in Vermont: Outbreak Description and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Virus Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Ledermann, Jeremy P.; Kenney, Joan L.; Berl, Erica; Graham, Alan C.; Russo, Joel M.; Powers, Ann M.; Mutebi, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    The first known outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) in Vermont occurred on an emu farm in Rutland County in 2011. The first isolation of EEE virus (EEEV) in Vermont (VT11) was during this outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VT11 was most closely related to FL01, a strain from Florida isolated in 2001, which is both geographically and temporally distinct from VT11. EEEV RNA was not detected in any of the 3,905 mosquito specimens tested, and the specific vectors associated with this outbreak are undetermined. PMID:26043136

  17. Species discrimination and phylogenetic inference of 17 Chinese Leishmania isolates based on internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin-Bin; Guo, Xian-Guang; Hu, Xiao-Su; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Liao, Lin; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2010-10-01

    Leishmaniasis is a geographically widespread disease, caused by protozoan flagellates of the genus Leishmania. This disease still remains endemic in China, especially in the west and northwest frontier regions. To date, the phylogenetic relationships among Chinese Leishmania isolates are still unclear, and the possible taxonomic diversity remains to be established. In this study, the ITS1-5.8S fragments of ten isolates collected from different foci in China were determined. To infer the phylogenetic relationships among them, seven sequences of Chinese Leishmania isolates retrieved from GenBank were also included. Both parsimony and Bayesian analyses reveal an unexpected but strongly supported clade comprising eight newly determined isolates, which is sister to other members of subgenus Leishmania. In combination with genetic distance analysis, this provides evidence of the occurrence of an undescribed species of Leishmania. Our results also suggest that (1) the isolate IPHL/CN/77/XJ771 from Bachu County, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region is not Leishmania infantum but Leishmania donovani; (2) the status referring to an isolate MRHO/CN/88/KXG-2 from a great gerbil in Karamay as Leishmania turanica, formerly based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, is recognized; (3) an earlier finding demonstrating the L. donovani identity of isolate MHOM/CN/80/801 from Kashi city is corroborated; (4) the three isolates from eastern Jiashi County, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, causing desert type of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (see Wang et al., Parasitol Int (in press), 2010), belong to L. donovani instead of L. infantum. In addition, the results of this study make an important contribution to understanding the heterogeneity and relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates, further indicating that the isolates from China may have had a more complex evolutionary history than expected. PMID:20617444

  18. Phylogenetic diversity of endophytic leaf fungus isolates from the medicinal tree Trichilia elegans (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Rhoden, S A; Garcia, A; Rubin Filho, C J; Azevedo, J L; Pamphile, J A

    2012-01-01

    Various types of organisms, mainly fungi and bacteria, live within vegetal organs and tissues, without causing damage to the plant. These microorganisms, which are called endophytes, can be useful for biological control and plant growth promotion; bioactive compounds from these organisms may have medical and pharmaceutical applications. Trichilia elegans (Meliaceae) is a native tree that grows abundantly in several regions of Brazil. Preparations using the leaves, seeds, bark, and roots of many species of the Meliaceae family have been widely used in traditional medicine, and some members of the Trichilia genus are used in Brazilian popular medicine. We assessed the diversity of endophytic fungi from two wild specimens of T. elegans, collected from a forest remnant, by sequencing ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 of rDNA of the isolates. The fungi were isolated and purified; 97 endophytic fungi were found; they were separated into 17 morpho-groups. Of the 97 endophytic fungi, four genera (Phomopsis, Diaporthe, Dothideomycete, and Cordyceps) with 11 morpho-groups were identified. Phomopsis was the most frequent genus among the identified endophytes. Phylogenetic analysis showed two major clades: Sordariomycetes, which includes three genera, Phomopsis, Diaporthe, and Cordyceps, and the clade Dothideomycetes, which was represented by the order Pleosporales. PMID:22782630

  19. Isolation and phylogenetic relationships of bat trypanosomes from different biomes in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marcili, Arlei; da Costa, Andrea P; Soares, Herbert S; Acosta, Igor da C L; de Lima, Julia T R; Minervino, Antonio H H; Melo, Andréia T L; Aguiar, Daniel M; Pacheco, Richard C; Gennari, Solange M

    2013-12-01

    In the order Chiroptera, more than 30 trypanosome species belonging to the subgenera Herpetosoma, Schizotrypanum, Megatrypanum, and Trypanozoon have been described. The species Trypanosoma cruzi , Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, and Trypanosoma dionisii are the most common in bats and belong to the Schizotrypanum subgenus. Bats from 2 different biomes, Pantanal and Amazonia/Cerrado in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, were evaluated according to the presence of trypanosome parasites by means of hemoculture and PCR in primary samples (blood samples). A total of 211 bats from 20 different species were caught and the trypanosome prevalence, evaluated through hemoculture, was 9.0% (19), 15.5% (13), and 4.8% (6) in the municipalities of Confresa (Amazonia/Cerrado biome) and Poconé (Pantanal biome). Among the 123 primary samples obtained from the bats, only 3 (2.4%) were positive. Phylogenetic analysis using trypanosomatid barcoding (V7V8 region of SSU rDNA) identified all the isolates and primary samples as T. c. marinkellei. The sequences of the isolates were segregated according to the bat host genus or species and suggest that co-evolutionary patterns exist between hosts and parasites. Further studies in different Brazilian regions and biomes need to be conducted in order to gain real understanding of the diversity of trypanosomes in bats. PMID:23859496

  20. Phylogenetic and genomic diversity in isolates from the globally distributed Acinetobacter baumannii ST25 lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sahl, Jason W.; Del Franco, Mariateresa; Pournaras, Spyros; Colman, Rebecca E.; Karah, Nabil; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Zarrilli, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a globally distributed nosocomial pathogen that has gained interest due to its resistance to most currently used antimicrobials. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) and phylogenetics has begun to reveal the global genetic diversity of this pathogen. The evolution of A. baumannii has largely been defined by recombination, punctuated by the emergence and proliferation of defined clonal lineages. In this study we sequenced seven genomes from the sequence type (ST)25 lineage and compared them to 12 ST25 genomes deposited in public databases. A recombination analysis identified multiple genomic regions that are homoplasious in the ST25 phylogeny, indicating active or historical recombination. Genes associated with antimicrobial resistance were differentially distributed between ST25 genomes, which matched our laboratory-based antimicrobial susceptibility typing. Differences were also observed in biofilm formation between ST25 isolates, which were demonstrated to produce significantly more extensive biofilm than an isolate from the ST1 clonal lineage. These results demonstrate that within A. baumannii, even a fairly recently derived monophyletic lineage can still exhibit significant genotypic and phenotypic diversity. These results have implications for associating outbreaks with sequence typing as well as understanding mechanisms behind the global propagation of successful A. baumannii lineages. PMID:26462752

  1. Exploration of phylogenetic data using a global sequence analysis method

    PubMed Central

    Chapus, Charles; Dufraigne, Christine; Edwards, Scott; Giron, Alain; Fertil, Bernard; Deschavanne, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Background Molecular phylogenetic methods are based on alignments of nucleic or peptidic sequences. The tremendous increase in molecular data permits phylogenetic analyses of very long sequences and of many species, but also requires methods to help manage large datasets. Results Here we explore the phylogenetic signal present in molecular data by genomic signatures, defined as the set of frequencies of short oligonucleotides present in DNA sequences. Although violating many of the standard assumptions of traditional phylogenetic analyses – in particular explicit statements of homology inherent in character matrices – the use of the signature does permit the analysis of very long sequences, even those that are unalignable, and is therefore most useful in cases where alignment is questionable. We compare the results obtained by traditional phylogenetic methods to those inferred by the signature method for two genes: RAG1, which is easily alignable, and 18S RNA, where alignments are often ambiguous for some regions. We also apply this method to a multigene data set of 33 genes for 9 bacteria and one archea species as well as to the whole genome of a set of 16 γ-proteobacteria. In addition to delivering phylogenetic results comparable to traditional methods, the comparison of signatures for the sequences involved in the bacterial example identified putative candidates for horizontal gene transfers. Conclusion The signature method is therefore a fast tool for exploring phylogenetic data, providing not only a pretreatment for discovering new sequence relationships, but also for identifying cases of sequence evolution that could confound traditional phylogenetic analysis. PMID:16280081

  2. Zebrafish melanopsin: isolation, tissue localisation and phylogenetic position.

    PubMed

    Bellingham, James; Whitmore, David; Philp, Alisdair R; Wells, Dominic J; Foster, Russell G

    2002-11-15

    Photoreception is best understood in retinal rods and cones, but it is not confined to these cells. In non-mammals, intrinsically photosensitive cells have been identified within several structures including the pineal, hypothalamus and skin. More recently novel light sensitive cells have been identified in the inner/basal retina of both teleosts and rodents. Melanopsin has been proposed as the photopigment mediating many of these non-rod, non-cone responses to light. However, much about the melanopsin gene family remains to be clarified including their potential role as photopigments, and taxonomic distribution. We have isolated the first orthologue of melanopsin from a teleost fish and show expression of this gene in a sub-set of retinal horizontal cells (type B). Zebrafish melanopsin, and orthologues of this gene, differ markedly from the vertebrate photopigment opsins. The putative counterion is not a glutamate but a tyrosine, the putative G-protein binding domain in the third cytoplasmic loop is not conserved, and they show low levels of amino acid identity (approximately 27%) to both the known photopigment opsins and to other members of the melanopsin family. Mouse melanopsin is only 58% identical to Xenopus, and 68% identical to zebrafish. By contrast, the photosensory opsin families show approximately 75% conservation. On the basis of their structure, genomic organisation, discrete evolutionary lineage, and their co-expression with other opsins, the melanopins are not obvious photosensory opsins. They might represent a separate branch of photopigment evolution in the vertebrates or they may have a non-direct photosensory function, perhaps as a photoisomerase, in non-rod, non-cone light detection. PMID:12487121

  3. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses of arsenic-reducing bacteria isolated from an old tin mine area in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jareonmit, Pechrada; Mehta, Misha; Sadowsky, Michael J; Sajjaphan, Kannika

    2012-05-01

    An agar plate screening assay was used to determine whether 100 arsenic-resistant bacterial isolates, previously obtained from arsenic-contaminated soils, had the ability to transform arsenite and arsenate. Ninety-five percent of the isolates were capable of reducing arsenate on agar plates. The isolates also grew in the presence of high concentrations of arsenite, but none of the bacterial isolates oxidized arsenite to arsenate under the growth conditions tested. About 14 % (13 of 95) of the tested isolates transformed high levels of arsenate (33-70 μM) when tested using the molybdenum blue method. Partial sequence analysis of 16S rDNA genes indicated that the isolates belonged to two broad taxonomic groups: Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Ten isolates were assigned to four species in the genus Bacillus, and three isolates belonged to two species in the genera Enterobacter and Ochrobactrum. Taken together these results indicate that phylogenetically diverse bacteria isolated from arsenic-contaminated soils in an old tin mine area in Thailand have the ability to transform arsenate to arsenite. PMID:22806053

  4. Phylogenetic comparative methods complement discriminant function analysis in ecomorphology.

    PubMed

    Barr, W Andrew; Scott, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    In ecomorphology, Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) has been used as evidence for the presence of functional links between morphometric variables and ecological categories. Here we conduct simulations of characters containing phylogenetic signal to explore the performance of DFA under a variety of conditions. Characters were simulated using a phylogeny of extant antelope species from known habitats. Characters were modeled with no biomechanical relationship to the habitat category; the only sources of variation were body mass, phylogenetic signal, or random "noise." DFA on the discriminability of habitat categories was performed using subsets of the simulated characters, and Phylogenetic Generalized Least Squares (PGLS) was performed for each character. Analyses were repeated with randomized habitat assignments. When simulated characters lacked phylogenetic signal and/or habitat assignments were random, <5.6% of DFAs and <8.26% of PGLS analyses were significant. When characters contained phylogenetic signal and actual habitats were used, 33.27 to 45.07% of DFAs and <13.09% of PGLS analyses were significant. False Discovery Rate (FDR) corrections for multiple PGLS analyses reduced the rate of significance to <4.64%. In all cases using actual habitats and characters with phylogenetic signal, correct classification rates of DFAs exceeded random chance. In simulations involving phylogenetic signal in both predictor variables and predicted categories, PGLS with FDR was rarely significant, while DFA often was. In short, DFA offered no indication that differences between categories might be explained by phylogenetic signal, while PGLS did. As such, PGLS provides a valuable tool for testing the functional hypotheses at the heart of ecomorphology. PMID:24382658

  5. Phycas: software for Bayesian phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul O; Holder, Mark T; Swofford, David L

    2015-05-01

    Phycas is open source, freely available Bayesian phylogenetics software written primarily in C++ but with a Python interface. Phycas specializes in Bayesian model selection for nucleotide sequence data, particularly the estimation of marginal likelihoods, central to computing Bayes Factors. Marginal likelihoods can be estimated using newer methods (Thermodynamic Integration and Generalized Steppingstone) that are more accurate than the widely used Harmonic Mean estimator. In addition, Phycas supports two posterior predictive approaches to model selection: Gelfand-Ghosh and Conditional Predictive Ordinates. The General Time Reversible family of substitution models, as well as a codon model, are available, and data can be partitioned with all parameters unlinked except tree topology and edge lengths. Phycas provides for analyses in which the prior on tree topologies allows polytomous trees as well as fully resolved trees, and provides for several choices for edge length priors, including a hierarchical model as well as the recently described compound Dirichlet prior, which helps avoid overly informative induced priors on tree length. PMID:25577605

  6. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology. PMID:25423096

  7. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Reverse Transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology. PMID:25423096

  8. A phylogenetic analysis of the megadiverse Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are extremely diverse with an estimated 500,000 species. We present the first phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily based on a cladistic analysis of both morphological and molecular data. A total of 233 morphological characters were scored for 300 taxa and 265 genera, a...

  9. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  10. Phylogenetically Diverse Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria Isolated from Epilithic Biofilms in Tama River, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Setsuko; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria in freshwater environments, particularly in rivers, has not been examined in as much detail as in ocean environments. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic and physiological diversities of AAP bacteria in biofilms that developed on submerged stones in a freshwater river using culture methods. The biofilms collected were homogenized and inoculated on solid media and incubated aerobically in the dark. Sixty-eight red-, pink-, yellow-, orange-, or brown-colored colonies were isolated, and, of these, 28 isolates contained the photosynthetic pigment, bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolates were classified into 14 groups in 8 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and distributed in the orders Rhodospirillales, Rhodobacterales, and Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria and in Betaproteobacteria. Physiological analyses confirmed that none of the representative isolates from any of the groups grew under anaerobic phototrophic conditions. Seven isolates in 4 OTUs showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence identity of 98.0% or less with any established species, suggesting the presence of previously undescribed species of AAP bacteria. Six isolates in 2 other OTUs had the closest relatives, which have not been reported to be AAP bacteria. Physiological comparisons among the isolates revealed differences in preferences for nutrient concentrations, BChl contents, and light-harvesting proteins. These results suggest that diverse and previously unknown AAP bacteria inhabit river biofilms. PMID:27453124

  11. Genetic and resistance phenotypic subtyping of Salmonella Saintpaul isolates from various food sources and humans: Phylogenetic concordance in combinatory analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Alice E; Brown, Eric W; Zhao, Shaohua; Mammel, Mark K; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Abbott, Jason W; Friedman, Sharon L; Ayers, Sherry L; Lewis, Jada L; Lacher, David W; McDermott, Patrick; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial pathogen subtyping for public health traceback of foodborne outbreaks has increasingly produced a number of disparate molecular techniques of varying resolution. Here, we bridge the molecular divide across three methodologies, transform data types for cross-comparison, and test phylogenetic concordance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery was combined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for identifying and differentiating 183 strains of closely related Salmonella enterica serovar Saintpaul isolates from retail meats, produce-associated outbreaks, and clinical sources. Fifty-six SNPs across 30 different genes were identified by comparative genomic analysis. These SNPs stratified general, monophyletic S. Saintpaul serovar specific signatures down to informative strain-specific markers. This SNP panel resulted in 17 distinct genotypes that, in concert with standard PFGE profiling, generated additional discriminatory power among clonal swarms of isolates when the data were transformed into a cross-comparable binary format. In a limited number of cases, antimicrobial susceptibility profiles (ASP) provided additional attributes for some strains when combined similarly. However, as expected from presumably acquired elements, resistant and susceptible populations produced some conflicting signals in most clonal complexes but they remained largely undisruptive to the general concordance. Taken in concert together, the three datasets (SNPs, PFGE,ASP) yielded a matrix of 156 independent phylogenetic characters that were statistically evaluated and found to be largely congruent, resulting in a consistently structured, non-homoplastic, phylogenetic signal and tree topology. PMID:26299886

  12. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of SSU rRNA gene of five microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Dong, ShiNan; Shen, ZhongYuan; Xu, Li; Zhu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    The complete small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequences of five microsporidia including Nosema heliothidis, and four novel microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, Hemerophila atrilineata, and Bombyx mori, respectively, were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing. Two phylogenetic trees based on SSU rRNA sequences had been constructed by using Neighbor-Joining of Phylip software and UPGMA of MEGA4.0 software. The taxonomic status of four novel microsporidia was determined by analysis of phylogenetic relationship, length, G+C content, identity, and divergence of the SSU rRNA sequences. The results showed that the microsporidia isolated from Pieris rapae, Phyllobrotica armta, and Hemerophila atrilineata have close phylogenetic relationship with the Nosema, while another microsporidium isolated from Bombyx mori is closely related to the Endoreticulatus. So, we temporarily classify three novel species of microsporidia to genus Nosema, as Nosema sp. PR, Nosema sp. PA, Nosema sp. HA. Another is temporarily classified into genus Endoreticulatus, as Endoreticulatus sp. Zhenjiang. The result indicated as well that it is feasible and valuable to elucidate phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of microsporidian species by analyzing information from SSU rRNA sequences of microsporidia. PMID:19768503

  13. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses, pullulan production and xylanase activity of tropical isolates of Aureobasidium pullulans.

    PubMed

    Manitchotpisit, Pennapa; Leathers, Timothy D; Peterson, Stephen W; Kurtzman, Cletus P; Li, Xin-Liang; Eveleigh, Douglas E; Lotrakul, Pongtharin; Prasongsuk, Sehanat; Dunlap, Christopher A; Vermillion, Karl E; Punnapayak, Hunsa

    2009-10-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans is the source of the commercially valuable polysaccharide pullulan and the enzyme xylanase. Isolates are typically off-white to pale pink or black on solid media, while some tropical isolates have been described as 'color variants' with bright pigments of red, yellow or purple. We sequenced 5 loci (internal transcribed spacer, intergenic spacer 1, translation elongation factor-1 alpha, beta tubulin, and RNA polymerase II) from 45 new isolates from Thailand. Based on the phylogenetic analyses, isolates were classified into 12 clades. Each clade showed different colors on different culture media including two clades with 'color variants' and some clades exhibited high levels of pullulan production or xylanase activity. Colony characteristics do not correlate perfectly with DNA sequence phylogeny or the physiological characters, but DNA sequence differences rapidly identify isolates with genetic novelty. PMID:19619651

  14. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis presents two different cDNAs encoding homologues of the fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase: protein isolation, cloning of the cDNAs and genes, structural, phylogenetic, and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Lílian Carla; de Faria, Fabrícia P; Felipe, M Sueli S; Pereira, Maristela; de Almeida Soares, Célia M

    2005-01-01

    A proteomic approach was used to identify a 39 kDa antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Amino acid sequences of the N-terminal and of endoproteinase Lys-C digested peptides revealed the protein to be a fructose 1,6-biphosphate aldolase (FBA) Class II of P. brasiliensis. Two cDNA homologues, Pbfba1 and Pbfba2, were cloned and characterized. Pbfba1 encoded a predicted polypeptide of 360 amino acids that was highly homologous in the primary structure to the same enzyme from fungi and bacteria. The other DNA, Pbfba2, encoded a polypeptide predicted to be 363 amino acids. The sequence of Pbfba2 differed significantly from Pbfba1. Phylogenetic and molecular analysis supports the concept of gene duplication for FBAs in P. brasiliensis, constituting a two-member family. Expression analysis demonstrated differential expression for both fbas genes in P. brasiliensis cells. PMID:15588996

  15. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence, and phylogenetic characteristics of Escherichia coli isolates from clinically healthy swine.

    PubMed

    Lay, Khin Khin; Koowattananukul, Chailai; Chansong, Nisit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2012-11-01

    A total of 344 commensal Escherichia coli isolates from clinically healthy pigs were examined for antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, class 1 integrons, resistance genes, virulence gene profile, and phylogenetic groups. The majority of E. coli isolates were resistant to tetracycline (96.2%) and ampicillin (91.6%). Up to 98% were multidrug resistant. Seventy-three percent of the isolates carried class 1 integrons. Inserted-gene cassette arrays in variable regions included incomplete sat, aadA22, aadA1, dfrA12-aadA2, and sat-psp-aadA2, of which the aadA2 gene cassette was most prevalent (42.9%). Horizontal transfer was detected in eight E. coli isolates carrying class 1 integrons with dfrA12-aadA2 gene cassette array. Sixteen resistance genes were identified among the E. coli isolates with corresponding resistance phenotype. Ten virulence genes (including elt, estA, estB, astA, faeG, fasA, fedA, eaeA, paa, and sepA) were detected, of which fasA was most commonly found (98.3%). Most of the E. coli isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B1. Significantly positive associations were observed between some virulence genes and some resistance phenotypes and genotypes (p < 0.05). The results support a finding that commensal E. coli have a role as reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance-encoding genes and virulence determinants. PMID:22953741

  16. Molecular Phylogenetic Diversity of Dermatologic and Other Human Pathogenic Fusarial Isolates from Hospitals in Northern and Central Italy▿

    PubMed Central

    Migheli, Quirico; Balmas, Virgilio; Harak, Henry; Sanna, Silvana; Scherm, Barbara; Aoki, Takayuki; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-eight fusaria isolated from 50 Italian patients between 2004 and 2007 were subject to multilocus DNA sequence typing to characterize the spectrum of species and circulating sequence types (STs) associated with dermatological infections, especially onychomycoses and paronychia, and other fusarioses in northern and central Italy. Sequence typing revealed that the isolates were nearly evenly divided among the Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC; n = 18), the F. oxysporum species complex (FOSC; n = 20), and the Gibberella (Fusarium) fujikuroi species complex (GFSC; n = 20). The three-locus typing scheme used for members of the FSSC identified 18 novel STs distributed among six phylogenetically distinct species, yielding an index of discrimination of 1.0. Phylogenetic analysis of the FOSC two-locus data set identified nine STs, including four which were novel, and nine isolates of ST 33, the previously described widespread clonal lineage. With the inclusion of eight epidemiologically unrelated ST 33 isolates, the FOSC typing scheme scored a discrimination index of 0.787. The two-locus GFSC typing scheme, which was primarily designed to identify species, received the lowest discrimination index, with a score of 0.492. The GFSC scheme, however, was used to successfully identify 17 isolates as F. verticillioides, 2 as F. sacchari, and 1 as F. guttiforme. This is the first report that F. guttiforme causes a human mycotic infection, which was supported by detailed morphological analysis. In addition, the results of a pathogenicity experiment revealed that the human isolate of F. guttiforme was able to induce fusariosis of pineapple, heretofore its only known host. PMID:20107100

  17. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Jospin, Guillaume; Lowe, Eric; Matsen, Frederick A.; Bik, Holly M.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection. In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata. These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454). PMID:24482762

  18. Phylogenetic analysis on the soil bacteria distributed in karst forest

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, JunPei; Huang, Ying; Mo, MingHe

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in soil of a karst forest was analyzed by culture-independent molecular approach. The bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified directly from soil DNA and cloned to generate a library. After screening the clone library by RFLP, 16S rRNA genes of representative clones were sequenced and the bacterial community was analyzed phylogenetically. The 16S rRNA gene inserts of 190 clones randomly selected were analyzed by RFLP and generated 126 different RFLP types. After sequencing, 126 non-chimeric sequences were obtained, generating 113 phylotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the bacteria distributed in soil of the karst forest included the members assigning into Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Planctomycetes, Chloroflexi (Green nonsulfur bacteria), Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, Actinobacteria (High G+C Gram-positive bacteria), Firmicutes (Low G+C Gram-positive bacteria) and candidate divisions (including the SPAM and GN08). PMID:24031430

  19. Phylogenetic Identification of Fungi Isolated from the Marine Sponge Tethya aurantium and Identification of Their Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Jutta; Ohlendorf, Birgit; Blümel, Martina; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi associated with the marine sponge Tethya aurantium were isolated and identified by morphological criteria and phylogenetic analyses based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. They were evaluated with regard to their secondary metabolite profiles. Among the 81 isolates which were characterized, members of 21 genera were identified. Some genera like Acremonium, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Phoma, and Trichoderma are quite common, but we also isolated strains belonging to genera like Botryosphaeria, Epicoccum, Parasphaeosphaeria, and Tritirachium which have rarely been reported from sponges. Members affiliated to the genera Bartalinia and Volutella as well as to a presumably new Phoma species were first isolated from a sponge in this study. On the basis of their classification, strains were selected for analysis of their ability to produce natural products. In addition to a number of known compounds, several new natural products were identified. The scopularides and sorbifuranones have been described elsewhere. We have isolated four additional substances which have not been described so far. The new metabolite cillifuranone (1) was isolated from Penicillium chrysogenum strain LF066. The structure of cillifuranone (1) was elucidated based on 1D and 2D NMR analysis and turned out to be a previously postulated intermediate in sorbifuranone biosynthesis. Only minor antibiotic bioactivities of this compound were found so far. PMID:21731550

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of marine mammal herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Maness, Heather T D; Nollens, Hendrik H; Jensen, Eric D; Goldstein, Tracey; LaMere, Sarah; Childress, April; Sykes, John; St Leger, Judy; Lacave, Géraldine; Latson, F Ed; Wellehan, James F X

    2011-04-21

    Five novel DNA-dependent DNA polymerase (Dpol) herpesviral sequences were generated using nested consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in clinical samples from a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), orca (Orcinus orca), California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), and a Phocid herpesvirus 2 (PhHV-2) isolate from a harbor seal (used as positive control). These novel sequences and other representative herpesvirus sequences were included in Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses to illustrate the phylogeny of herpesviruses amongst the marine mammal host species and in comparison to those of other animals. All 19 novel and known marine mammal herpesviruses included in the analyses aligned with members of the Alphaherpesvirinae or Gammaherpesvirinae subfamilies. The novel harbor seal herpesvirus clustered with members of the Macavirus genus, subfamily Gammaherpesvirinae. The novel bottlenose dolphin herpesvirus clustered together in a monophyletic group with another delphinid alphaherpesvirus but could not be associated with an established genus. The orca herpesvirus also clustered with a delphinid alphaherpesvirus and formed a separate clade. The sea lion herpesvirus clustered with PhHV-2. PhHV-1 clustered with varicelloviruses and PhHV-2 clustered strongly in the Gammaherpesvirinae genus Percavirus. All cetacean gammaherpesviruses formed a monophyletic clade and could not be associated with an established gammaherpesviral genus. PMID:21055885

  1. Species delimitation and phylogenetic relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates reexamined using kinetoplast cytochrome oxidase II gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Cao, De-Ping; Guo, Xian-Guang; Chen, Da-Li; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Leishmaniasis is a geographically widespread disease caused by protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Leishmania and transmitted by certain species of sand fly. This disease still remains endemic in China, especially in the west and northwest frontier regions. A recent ITS1 phylogeny of Chinese Leishmania isolates has challenged some aspects for their traditional taxonomy and cladistic hypotheses of their phylogeny. However, disagreement with respect to relationships within Chinese Leishmania isolates highlights the need for additional data and analyses. Here, we test the phylogenetic relationships among Chinese isolates and their relatives by analyzing kinetoplast cytochrome oxidase II (COII) gene sequences, including 14 Chinese isolates and three isolates from other countries plus 17 sequences retrieved from GenBank. The COII gene might have experienced little substitution saturation, and its evolutionary process was likely to have been stationary, reversible, and homogeneous. Both neighbor-joining and Bayesian analyses reveal a moderately supported group comprising ten newly determined isolates, which is closely related to Leishmania tarentolae and Endotrypanum monterogeii. In combination with genetic distance analysis as well as Bayesian hypothesis testing, this further corroborates the occurrence of an undescribed species of Leishmania. Our results also suggest that (1) isolate MHOM/CN/93/GS7 and isolate IPHL/CN/77/XJ771 are Leishmania donovani; (2) isolate MHOM/CN/84/JS1 is Leishmania tropica; (3) the status referring to an isolate MRHO/CN/62/GS-GER20 from a great gerbil in Gansu, China, as Leishmania gerbilli, formerly based on multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, is recognized; and (4) E. monterogeii is nested within the genus Leishmania, resulting in a paraphyletic Leishmania. In addition, the results of this study enrich our understanding of the heterogeneity and relationships of Chinese Leishmania isolates. PMID:21221640

  2. Determining the Position of Storks on the Phylogenetic Tree of Waterbirds by Retroposon Insertion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuramoto, Tae; Nishihara, Hidenori; Watanabe, Maiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite many studies on avian phylogenetics in recent decades that used morphology, mitochondrial genomes, and/or nuclear genes, the phylogenetic positions of several birds (e.g., storks) remain unsettled. In addition to the aforementioned approaches, analysis of retroposon insertions, which are nearly homoplasy-free phylogenetic markers, has also been used in avian phylogenetics. However, the first step in the analysis of retroposon insertions, that is, isolation of retroposons from genomic libraries, is a costly and time-consuming procedure. Therefore, we developed a high-throughput and cost-effective protocol to collect retroposon insertion information based on next-generation sequencing technology, which we call here the STRONG (Screening of Transposons Obtained by Next Generation Sequencing) method, and applied it to 3 waterbird species, for which we identified 35,470 loci containing chicken repeat 1 retroposons (CR1). Our analysis of the presence/absence of 30 CR1 insertions demonstrated the intra- and interordinal phylogenetic relationships in the waterbird assemblage, namely 1) Loons diverged first among the waterbirds, 2) penguins (Sphenisciformes) and petrels (Procellariiformes) diverged next, and 3) among the remaining families of waterbirds traditionally classified in Ciconiiformes/Pelecaniformes, storks (Ciconiidae) diverged first. Furthermore, our genome-scale, in silico retroposon analysis based on published genome data uncovered a complex divergence history among pelican, heron, and ibis lineages, presumably involving ancient interspecies hybridization between the heron and ibis lineages. Thus, our retroposon-based waterbird phylogeny and the established phylogenetic position of storks will help to understand the evolutionary processes of aquatic adaptation and related morphological convergent evolution. PMID:26527652

  3. Phylogenetic isolation of host trees affects assembly of local Heteroptera communities

    PubMed Central

    Vialatte, A.; Bailey, R. I.; Vasseur, C.; Matocq, A.; Gossner, M. M.; Everhart, D.; Vitrac, X.; Belhadj, A.; Ernoult, A.; Prinzing, A.

    2010-01-01

    A host may be physically isolated in space and then may correspond to a geographical island, but it may also be separated from its local neighbours by hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary history, and may form in this case an evolutionarily distinct island. We test how this affects the assembly processes of the host's colonizers, this question being until now only invoked at the scale of physically distinct islands or patches. We studied the assembly of true bugs in crowns of oaks surrounded by phylogenetically more or less closely related trees. Despite the short distances (less than 150 m) between phylogenetically isolated and non-isolated trees, we found major differences between their Heteroptera faunas. We show that phylogenetically isolated trees support smaller numbers and fewer species of Heteroptera, an increasing proportion of phytophages and a decreasing proportion of omnivores, and proportionally more non-host-specialists. These differences were not due to changes in the nutritional quality of the trees, i.e. species sorting, which we accounted for. Comparison with predictions from meta-community theories suggests that the assembly of local Heteroptera communities may be strongly driven by independent metapopulation processes at the level of the individual species. We conclude that the assembly of communities on hosts separated from their neighbours by long periods of evolutionary history is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that on hosts established surrounded by closely related trees. Potentially, the biotic selection pressure on a host might thus change with the evolutionary proximity of the surrounding hosts. PMID:20335208

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of the endoribonuclease Dicer family.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zeqian; Wang, Miao; Blair, David; Zheng, Yadong; Dou, Yongxi

    2014-01-01

    Dicers are proteins of the ribonuclease III family with the ability to process dsRNA, involved in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Dicers are conserved from basal metazoans to higher metazoans and contain a number of functional domains that interact with dsRNA. The completed genome sequences of over 34 invertebrate species allowed us to systematically investigate Dicer genes over a diverse range of phyla. The majority of invertebrate Dicers clearly fell into the Dicer1 or Dicer2 subfamilies. Most nematodes possessed only one Dicer gene, a member of the Dicer1 subfamily, whereas two Dicer genes (Dicer1 and Dicer2) were present in all platyhelminths surveyed. Analysis of the key domains showed that a 5' pocket was conserved across members of the Dicer1 subfamily, with the exception of the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Interestingly, Nematostella vectensis DicerB grouped into Dicer2 subfamily harbored a 5' pocket, which is commonly present in Dicer1. Similarly, the 3' pocket was also found to be conserved in all Dicer proteins with the exceptions of Schmidtea mediterranea Dicer2 and Trichoplax adherens Dicer A. The loss of catalytic residues in the RNase III domain was noted in platyhelminths and cnidarians, and the 'ball' and 'socket' junction between two RNase III domains in platyhelminth Dicers was different from the canonical junction, suggesting the possibility of different conformations. The present data suggest that Dicers might have duplicated and diversified independently, and have evolved for various functions in invertebrates. PMID:24748168

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of Elymus (Poaceae) in western China.

    PubMed

    Song, H; Nan, Z B; Tian, P

    2015-01-01

    Elymus L. is often planted in temperate and subtropical regions as forage. Species in the genus have 5 allopolyploid genomes that are found in the grass tribe Triticeae. To determine the phylogenetic relationships in Elymus species from western China, we estimated phylogenetic trees using sequences from the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and non-coding chloroplast DNA sequences from 56 accessions (871 samples) of 9 polyploid Elymus species and 42 accessions from GenBank. Tetraploid and hexaploid Elymus species from western China had independent origins, and Elymus species from the same area or neighboring geographic regions were the most closely related. Based on the phylogenetic tree topology, the St- and Y-genomes were not derived from the same donor and Y-genome likely originated from the H-genome of Hordeum species, or they shared the same origin or underwent introgression. The maternal genome of tetraploid and hexaploid Elymus species originated from species of Hordeum or Pseudoroegneria. Additionally, Elymus species in western China began diverging 17-8.5 million years ago, during a period of increased aridification as a consequence of the Messinian salinity crisis. Elymus species adapted to drought and high salinity may have developed based on the environmental conditions during this period. Elymus evolution in western China may have been affected by the uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (5 million years ago), when Elymus seeds were dispersed by gravity or wind into a newly heterogeneous habitat, resulting in isolation. PMID:26505371

  6. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Endoribonuclease Dicer Family

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zeqian; Wang, Miao; Blair, David; Zheng, Yadong; Dou, Yongxi

    2014-01-01

    Dicers are proteins of the ribonuclease III family with the ability to process dsRNA, involved in regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Dicers are conserved from basal metazoans to higher metazoans and contain a number of functional domains that interact with dsRNA. The completed genome sequences of over 34 invertebrate species allowed us to systematically investigate Dicer genes over a diverse range of phyla. The majority of invertebrate Dicers clearly fell into the Dicer1 or Dicer2 subfamilies. Most nematodes possessed only one Dicer gene, a member of the Dicer1 subfamily, whereas two Dicer genes (Dicer1 and Dicer2) were present in all platyhelminths surveyed. Analysis of the key domains showed that a 5′ pocket was conserved across members of the Dicer1 subfamily, with the exception of the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Interestingly, Nematostella vectensis DicerB grouped into Dicer2 subfamily harbored a 5′ pocket, which is commonly present in Dicer1. Similarly, the 3′ pocket was also found to be conserved in all Dicer proteins with the exceptions of Schmidtea mediterranea Dicer2 and Trichoplax adherens Dicer A. The loss of catalytic residues in the RNase III domain was noted in platyhelminths and cnidarians, and the ‘ball’ and ‘socket’ junction between two RNase III domains in platyhelminth Dicers was different from the canonical junction, suggesting the possibility of different conformations. The present data suggest that Dicers might have duplicated and diversified independently, and have evolved for various functions in invertebrates. PMID:24748168

  7. Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis of the Lipocalin Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Balasubramanian; Mishra, Madhulika; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins constitute a superfamily of extracellular proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life. Although very divergent in their sequences and functions, they show remarkable similarity in 3-D structures. Lipocalins bind and transport small hydrophobic molecules. Earlier sequence-based phylogenetic studies of lipocalins highlighted that they have a long evolutionary history. However the molecular and structural basis of their functional diversity is not completely understood. The main objective of the present study is to understand functional diversity of the lipocalins using a structure-based phylogenetic approach. The present study with 39 protein domains from the lipocalin superfamily suggests that the clusters of lipocalins obtained by structure-based phylogeny correspond well with the functional diversity. The detailed analysis on each of the clusters and sub-clusters reveals that the 39 lipocalin domains cluster based on their mode of ligand binding though the clustering was performed on the basis of gross domain structure. The outliers in the phylogenetic tree are often from single member families. Also structure-based phylogenetic approach has provided pointers to assign putative function for the domains of unknown function in lipocalin family. The approach employed in the present study can be used in the future for the functional identification of new lipocalin proteins and may be extended to other protein families where members show poor sequence similarity but high structural similarity. PMID:26263546

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) Isolates from Japan Reveals Emergence of CTX-M-14-Producing EAEC O25:H4 Clones Related to Sequence Type 131.

    PubMed

    Imuta, Naoko; Ooka, Tadasuke; Seto, Kazuko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Koriyama, Toyoyasu; Kojyo, Tsuyoshi; Iguchi, Atsushi; Tokuda, Koichi; Kawamura, Hideki; Yoshiie, Kiyotaka; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nishi, Junichiro

    2016-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) causes acute or persistent diarrhea. The aggR gene is widely used as a marker for typical EAEC. The heterogeneity of EAEC is well known; however, there are few reports on the phylogenetic relationships of EAEC. Recently, CTX-M extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing EAEC strains have been reported worldwide. To characterize EAEC strains in Japan, we investigated the population structure of EAEC. A total of 167 aggR-positive strains isolated from stool specimens from diarrheal patients in Kagoshima (139 strains) and Osaka (28 strains), Japan, between 1992 and 2010 were examined for the prevalence of EAEC virulence markers, the blaCTX-M gene, and the capacity to form biofilms. Multilocus sequence typing was also conducted. EAEC strains were widely distributed across four major E. coli phylogroups. Strains of O111:H21/clonal group 40 (CG40) (30 strains), O126:H27/CG200 (13 strains), and O86a:H27/CG3570 (11 strains) in phylogroup B1 are the historical EAEC clones in Japan, and they exhibited strong biofilm formation. Twenty-nine strains of EAEC O25:H4/CG131 were identified in phylogroup B2, 79% of which produced CTX-M-14. This clone has emerged since 2003. The clone harbored plasmid-encoded EAEC virulence genes but not chromosomal virulence genes and had lower biofilm-forming capacity than historical EAEC strains. This clone most likely emerged from a pandemic uropathogenic O25:H4/sequence type 131 clone by acquiring an EAEC virulence plasmid from canonical EAEC. Surveillance of the horizontal transfer of both virulence and ESBL genes among E. coli strains is important for preventing a worldwide increase in antimicrobial drug resistance. PMID:27252465

  9. Phylogenetic and chemical diversity of fungal endophytes isolated from Silybum marianum (L) Gaertn. (milk thistle)

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Huzefa A.; Kaur, Amninder; El-Elimat, Tamam; Figueroa, Mario; Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh; Faeth, Stanley H.; Cech, Nadja B.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2015-01-01

    Use of the herb milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is widespread, and its chemistry has been studied for over 50 years. However, milk thistle endophytes have not been studied previously for their fungal and chemical diversity. We examined the fungal endophytes inhabiting this medicinal herb to determine: (1) species composition and phylogenetic diversity of fungal endophytes; (2) chemical diversity of secondary metabolites produced by these organisms; and (3) cytotoxicity of the pure compounds against the human prostate carcinoma (PC-3) cell line. Forty-one fungal isolates were identified from milk thistle comprising 25 operational taxonomic units based on BLAST search via GenBank using published authentic sequences from nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequence data. Maximum likelihood analyses of partial 28S rRNA gene showed that these endophytes had phylogenetic affinities to four major classes of Ascomycota, the Dothideomycetes, Sordariomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, and Leotiomycetes. Chemical studies of solid–substrate fermentation cultures led to the isolation of four new natural products. In addition, 58 known secondary metabolites, representing diverse biosynthetic classes, were isolated and characterized using a suite of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry techniques. Selected pure compounds were tested against the PC-3 cell line, where six compounds displayed cytotoxicity. PMID:26000195

  10. Butyrate production in phylogenetically diverse Firmicutes isolated from the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhaut, Venessa; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska; De Baere, Siegrid; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Ducatelle, Richard; Louis, Petra; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sixteen butyrate‐producing bacteria were isolated from the caecal content of chickens and analysed phylogenetically. They did not represent a coherent phylogenetic group, but were allied to four different lineages in the Firmicutes phylum. Fourteen strains appeared to represent novel species, based on a level of ≤ 98.5% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity towards their nearest validly named neighbours. The highest butyrate concentrations were produced by the strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, clusters which are predominant in the chicken caecal microbiota. In only one of the 16 strains tested, the butyrate kinase operon could be amplified, while the butyryl‐CoA : acetate CoA‐transferase gene was detected in eight strains belonging to clostridial clusters IV, XIVa and XIVb. None of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates carried this gene based on degenerate PCR analyses. However, another CoA‐transferase gene more similar to propionate CoA‐transferase was detected in the majority of the clostridial cluster XVI isolates. Since this gene is located directly downstream of the remaining butyrate pathway genes in several human cluster XVI bacteria, it may be involved in butyrate formation in these bacteria. The present study indicates that butyrate producers related to cluster XVI may play a more important role in the chicken gut than in the human gut. PMID:21375722

  11. Fusarium culmorum is a single phylogenetic species based on multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Obanor, Friday; Erginbas-Orakci, G; Tunali, B; Nicol, J M; Chakraborty, S

    2010-09-01

    Fusarium culmorum is a major pathogen of wheat and barley causing head blight and crown rot in cooler temperate climates of Australia, Europe, West Asia and North Africa. To better understand its evolutionary history we partially sequenced single copy nuclear genes encoding translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF), reductase (RED) and phosphate permease (PHO) in 100 F. culmorum isolates with 11 isolates of Fusarium crookwellense, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium pseudograminearum. Phylogenetic analysis of multilocus sequence (MLS) data using Bayesian inference and maximum parsimony analysis showed that F. culmorum from wheat is a single phylogenetic species with no significant linkage disequilibrium and little or no lineage development along geographic origin. Both MLS and TEF and RED gene sequence analysis separated the four Fusarium species used and delineated three to four groups within the F. culmorum clade. But the PHO gene could not completely resolve isolates into their respective species. Fixation index and gene flow suggest significant genetic exchange between the isolates from distant geographic regions. A lack of strong lineage structure despite the geographic separation of the three collections indicates a frequently recombining species and/or widespread distribution of genotypes due to international trade, tourism and long-range dispersal of macroconidia. Moreover, the two mating type genes were present in equal proportion among the F. culmorum collection used in this study, leaving open the possibility of sexual reproduction. PMID:20943185

  12. Phylogenetic Diversity and Biological Activity of Actinobacteria Isolated from the Chukchi Shelf Marine Sediments in the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:24663116

  13. Phylogenetic diversity and biological activity of actinobacteria isolated from the Chukchi Shelf marine sediments in the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng; Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Dong, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2014-03-01

    Marine environments are a rich source of Actinobacteria and have the potential to produce a wide variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this study, we used four selective isolation media to culture Actinobacteria from the sediments collected from the Chukchi Shelf in the Arctic Ocean. A total of 73 actinobacterial strains were isolated. Based on repetitive DNA fingerprinting analysis, we selected 30 representatives for partial characterization according to their phylogenetic diversity, antimicrobial activities and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis genes. Results from the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the 30 strains could be sorted into 18 phylotypes belonging to 14 different genera: Agrococcus, Arsenicicoccus, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Citricoccus, Janibacter, Kocuria, Microbacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Nocardiopsis, Saccharopolyspora, Salinibacterium and Streptomyces. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report on the isolation of Microlunatus genus members from marine habitats. Of the 30 isolates, 11 strains exhibited antibacterial and/or antifungal activity, seven of which have activities against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. All 30 strains have at least two biosynthetic genes, one-third of which possess more than four biosynthetic genes. This study demonstrates the significant diversity of Actinobacteria in the Chukchi Shelf sediment and their potential for producing biologically active compounds and novel material for genetic manipulation or combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:24663116

  14. Endometriosis Gene Expression Heterogeneity and Biosignature: A Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Asab, Mones; Zhang, Ming; Amini, Dennis; Abu-Asab, Nihad; Amri, Hakima

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease with poorly understood etiology, and reflecting an evolutionary nature where genetic alterations accumulate throughout pathogenesis. Our objective was to characterize the heterogeneous pathological process using parsimony phylogenetics. Gene expression microarray data of ovarian endometriosis obtained from NCBI database were polarized and coded into derived (abnormal) and ancestral (normal) states. Such alterations are referred to as synapomorphies in a phylogenetic sense (or biomarkers). Subsequent gene linkage was modeled by Genomatix BiblioSphere Pathway software. A list of clonally shared derived (abnormal) expressions revealed the pattern of heterogeneity among specimens. In addition, it has identified disruptions within the major regulatory pathways including those involved in cell proliferation, steroidogenesis, angiogenesis, cytoskeletal organization and integrity, and tumorigenesis, as well as cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, the analysis supported the potential central involvement of ESR2 in the initiation of endometriosis. The pathogenesis mapping showed that eutopic and ectopic lesions have different molecular biosignatures. PMID:22203846

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Canine Parvovirus VP2 Gene in China.

    PubMed

    Yi, L; Tong, M; Cheng, Y; Song, W; Cheng, S

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a total of 37 samples (58.0%) were found through PCR assay to be positive for canine parvovirus (CPV) of 66 suspected faecal samples of dogs collected from various cities throughout China. Eight CPV isolates could be obtained in the CRFK cell line. The sequencing of the VP2 gene of CPV identified the predominant CPV strain as CPV-2a (Ser297Ala), with two CPV-2b (Ser297Ala). Sequence comparison revealed homologies of 99.3-99.9%, 99.9% and 99.3-99.7% within the CPV 2a isolates, within the CPV 2b isolates and between the CPV 2a and 2b isolates, respectively. In addition, several non-synonymous and synonymous mutations were also recorded. The phylogenetic tree revealed that most of the CPV strains from different areas in China were located in the formation of a large branch, which were grouped together along with the KU143-09 strain from Thailand and followed the same evolution. In this study, we provide an updated molecular characterization of CPV 2 circulation in China. PMID:25209922

  16. Phylogenetic and pathogenic characterization of novel adenoviruses isolated from long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis).

    PubMed

    Counihan, Katrina L; Skerratt, Lee F; Franson, J Christian; Hollmén, Tuula E

    2015-11-01

    Novel adenoviruses were isolated from a long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) mortality event near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska in 2000. The long-tailed duck adenovirus genome was approximately 27 kb. A 907 bp hexon gene segment was used to design primers specific for the long-tailed duck adenovirus. Nineteen isolates were phylogenetically characterized based on portions of their hexon gene and 12 were most closely related to Goose adenovirus A. The remaining 7 shared no hexon sequences with any known adenoviruses. Experimental infections of mallards with a long-tailed duck reference adenovirus caused mild lymphoid infiltration of the intestine and paint brush hemorrhages of the mucosa and dilation of the intestine. This study shows novel adenoviruses from long-tailed ducks are diverse and provides further evidence that they should be considered in cases of morbidity and mortality in sea ducks. Conserved and specific primers have been developed that will help screen sea ducks for adenoviral infections. PMID:26342465

  17. [A phylogenetic analysis of plant communities of Teberda Biosphere Reserve].

    PubMed

    Shulakov, A A; Egorov, A V; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of communities is based on the comparison of distances on the phylogenetic tree between species of a community under study and those distances in random samples taken out of local flora. It makes it possible to determine to what extent a community composition is formed by more closely related species (i.e., "clustered") or, on the opposite, it is more even and includes species that are less related with each other. The first case is usually interpreted as a result of strong influence caused by abiotic factors, due to which species with similar ecology, a priori more closely related, would remain: In the second case, biotic factors, such as competition, may come to the fore and lead to forming a community out of distant clades due to divergence of their ecological niches: The aim of this' study Was Ad explore the phylogenetic structure in communities of the northwestern Caucasus at two spatial scales - the scale of area from 4 to 100 m2 and the smaller scale within a community. The list of local flora of the alpine belt has been composed using the database of geobotanic descriptions carried out in Teberda Biosphere Reserve at true altitudes exceeding.1800 m. It includes 585 species of flowering plants belonging to 57 families. Basal groups of flowering plants are.not represented in the list. At the scale of communities of three classes, namely Thlaspietea rotundifolii - commumties formed on screes and pebbles, Calluno-Ulicetea - alpine meadow, and Mulgedio-Aconitetea subalpine meadows, have not demonstrated significant distinction of phylogenetic structure. At intra level, for alpine meadows the larger share of closely related species. (clustered community) is detected. Significantly clustered happen to be those communities developing on rocks (class Asplenietea trichomanis) and alpine (class Juncetea trifidi). At the same time, alpine lichen proved to have even phylogenetic structure at the small scale. Alpine (class Salicetea herbaceae) that

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Human Campylobacter jejuni Isolates and Association with Phylogenetic Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Wonhee; Mosci, Rebekah; Wengert, Samantha L.; Singh, Pallavi; Newton, Duane W.; Salimnia, Hossein; Lephart, Paul; Khalife, Walid; Mansfield, Linda S.; Rudrik, James T.; Manning, Shannon D.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic pathogen and the most common bacterial cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. With the increase of antibiotic resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides, the drugs of choice for treatment, C. jejuni was recently classified as a serious antimicrobial resistant threat. Here, we characterized 94 C. jejuni isolates collected from patients at four Michigan hospitals in 2011 and 2012 to determine the frequency of resistance and association with phylogenetic lineages. The prevalence of resistance to fluoroquinolones (19.1%) and macrolides (2.1%) in this subset of C. jejuni isolates from Michigan was similar to national reports. High frequencies of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates, however, were recovered from patients with a history of foreign travel. A high proportion of these resistant isolates were classified as multilocus sequence type (ST)-464, a fluoroquinolone-resistant lineage that recently emerged in Europe. A significantly higher prevalence of tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni was also found in Michigan and resistant isolates were more likely to represent ST-982, which has been previously recovered from ruminants and the environment in the U.S. Notably, patients with tetracycline-resistant C. jejuni infections were more likely to have contact with cattle. These outcomes prompt the need to monitor the dissemination and diversification of imported fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni strains and to investigate the molecular epidemiology of C. jejuni recovered from cattle and farm environments to guide mitigation strategies. PMID:27199922

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Anaerobic Psychrophilic Enrichment Cultures Obtained from a Greenland Glacier Ice Core

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at −9°C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 × 107 cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at −2°C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years. PMID:12676695

  20. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Indonesia Solanaceae based on DNA sequences of internal transcribed spacer region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Topik; Priyandoko, Didik; Islami, Dina Karina; Wardiny, Putri Yunitha

    2016-02-01

    Solanaceae is one of largest family in Angiosperm group with highly diverse in morphological character. In Indonesia, this group of plant is very popular due to its usefulness as food, ornamental and medicinal plants. However, investigation on phylogenetic relationship among the member of this family in Indonesia remains less attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phylogenetics relationship of the family especially distributed in Indonesia. DNA sequences of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of 19 species of Solanaceae and three species of outgroup, which belongs to family Convolvulaceae, Apocynaceae, and Plantaginaceae, were isolated, amplified, and sequenced. Phylogenetic tree analysis based on parsimony method was conducted with using data derived from the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2, separately, and the combination of all. Results indicated that the phylogenetic tree derived from the combined data established better pattern of relationship than separate data. Thus, three major groups were revealed. Group 1 consists of tribe Datureae, Cestreae, and Petunieae, whereas group 2 is member of tribe Physaleae. Group 3 belongs to tribe Solaneae. The use of the ITS region as a molecular markers, in general, support the global Solanaceae relationship that has been previously reported.

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of anaerobic psychrophilic enrichment cultures obtained from a greenland glacier ice core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Peter P.; Miteva, Vanya I.; Brenchley, Jean E.

    2003-01-01

    The examination of microorganisms in glacial ice cores allows the phylogenetic relationships of organisms frozen for thousands of years to be compared with those of current isolates. We developed a method for aseptically sampling a sediment-containing portion of a Greenland ice core that had remained at -9 degrees C for over 100,000 years. Epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry results showed that the ice sample contained over 6 x 10(7) cells/ml. Anaerobic enrichment cultures inoculated with melted ice were grown and maintained at -2 degrees C. Genomic DNA extracted from these enrichments was used for the PCR amplification of 16S rRNA genes with bacterial and archaeal primers and the preparation of clone libraries. Approximately 60 bacterial inserts were screened by restriction endonuclease analysis and grouped into 27 unique restriction fragment length polymorphism types, and 24 representative sequences were compared phylogenetically. Diverse sequences representing major phylogenetic groups including alpha, beta, and gamma Proteobacteria as well as relatives of the Thermus, Bacteroides, Eubacterium, and Clostridium groups were found. Sixteen clone sequences were closely related to those from known organisms, with four possibly representing new species. Seven sequences may reflect new genera and were most closely related to sequences obtained only by PCR amplification. One sequence was over 12% distant from its closest relative and may represent a novel order or family. These results show that phylogenetically diverse microorganisms have remained viable within the Greenland ice core for at least 100,000 years.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a scattered distribution of autumn colours

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf colour in autumn is rarely considered informative for taxonomy, but there is now growing interest in the evolution of autumn colours and different hypotheses are debated. Research efforts are hindered by the lack of basic information: the phylogenetic distribution of autumn colours. It is not known when and how autumn colours evolved. Methods Data are reported on the autumn colours of 2368 tree species belonging to 400 genera of the temperate regions of the world, and an analysis is made of their phylogenetic relationships in order to reconstruct the evolutionary origin of red and yellow in autumn leaves. Key Results Red autumn colours are present in at least 290 species (70 genera), and evolved independently at least 25 times. Yellow is present independently from red in at least 378 species (97 genera) and evolved at least 28 times. Conclusions The phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that autumn colours have been acquired and lost many times during evolution. This scattered distribution could be explained by hypotheses involving some kind of coevolutionary interaction or by hypotheses that rely on the need for photoprotection. PMID:19126636

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of Maverick/Polinton giant transposons across organisms.

    PubMed

    Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Wahlberg, Niklas; Savilahti, Harri

    2014-09-01

    Polintons are a recently discovered group of large transposable elements (<40Kb in size) encoding up to 10 different proteins. The increasing number of genome sequencing projects has led to the discovery of these elements in genomes of protists, fungi, and animals, but not in plants. The RepBase database of eukaryotic repetitive elements currently contains consensus sequences and information of 70 Polinton elements from 28 organisms. Previous phylogenetic analyses have shown the relationship of Polintons to linear plasmids, bacteriophages, and retroviruses. However, a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of all known Polintons has been lacking. We retrieved the Polinton consensus sequences from the most recent version of RepBase, and compiled amino acid sequences for the two most common Polinton-specific genes, the DNA polymerase-B and retroviral-like integrase. Open reading frame predictions and homology comparisons revealed partial or full sequences for 54 polymerases and 55 Polinton integrases. Multiple sequence alignments portrayed conservation in several functional motifs of these proteins. Phylogenetic analyses based on Bayesian inference using single- and combined-gene datasets revealed seven distinct lineages of Polintons that broadly follow the tree of life. Two of the seven lineages are found within the same species, indicating that ancient divergences have been retained to this day. PMID:24882428

  4. Phylogenetic and Ecological Analysis of Novel Marine Stramenopiles

    PubMed Central

    Massana, Ramon; Castresana, Jose; Balagué, Vanessa; Guillou, Laure; Romari, Khadidja; Groisillier, Agnès; Valentin, Klaus; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Culture-independent molecular analyses of open-sea microorganisms have revealed the existence and apparent abundance of novel eukaryotic lineages, opening new avenues for phylogenetic, evolutionary, and ecological research. Novel marine stramenopiles, identified by 18S ribosomal DNA sequences within the basal part of the stramenopile radiation but unrelated to any previously known group, constituted one of the most important novel lineages in these open-sea samples. Here we carry out a comparative analysis of novel stramenopiles, including new sequences from coastal genetic libraries presented here and sequences from recent reports from the open ocean and marine anoxic sites. Novel stramenopiles were found in all major habitats, generally accounting for a significant proportion of clones in genetic libraries. Phylogenetic analyses indicated the existence of 12 independent clusters. Some of these were restricted to anoxic or deep-sea environments, but the majority were typical components of coastal and open-sea waters. We specifically identified four clusters that were well represented in most marine surface waters (together they accounted for 74% of the novel stramenopile clones) and are the obvious targets for future research. Many sequences were retrieved from geographically distant regions, indicating that some organisms were cosmopolitan. Our study expands our knowledge on the phylogenetic diversity and distribution of novel marine stramenopiles and confirms that they are fundamental members of the marine eukaryotic picoplankton. PMID:15184153

  5. Detection and phylogenetic analysis of bacteriophage WO in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Qian; Qiao, Huping; Gao, Jin; Yun, Yueli; Liu, Fengxiang; Peng, Yu

    2015-11-01

    Phage WO is a bacteriophage found in Wolbachia. Herein, we represent the first phylogenetic study of WOs that infect spiders (Araneae). Seven species of spiders (Araneus alternidens, Nephila clavata, Hylyphantes graminicola, Prosoponoides sinensis, Pholcus crypticolens, Coleosoma octomaculatum, and Nurscia albofasciata) from six families were infected by Wolbachia and WO, followed by comprehensive sequence analysis. Interestingly, WO could be only detected Wolbachia-infected spiders. The relative infection rates of those seven species of spiders were 75, 100, 88.9, 100, 62.5, 72.7, and 100 %, respectively. Our results indicated that both Wolbachia and WO were found in three different body parts of N. clavata, and WO could be passed to the next generation of H. graminicola by vertical transmission. There were three different sequences for WO infected in A. alternidens and two different WO sequences from C. octomaculatum. Only one sequence of WO was found for the other five species of spiders. The discovered sequence of WO ranged from 239 to 311 bp. Phylogenetic tree was generated using maximum likelihood (ML) based on the orf7 gene sequences. According to the phylogenetic tree, WOs in N. clavata and H. graminicola were clustered in the same group. WOs from A. alternidens (WAlt1) and C. octomaculatum (WOct2) were closely related to another clade, whereas WO in P. sinensis was classified as a sole cluster. PMID:25903547

  6. Computational Tools for Parsimony Phylogenetic Analysis of Omics Data.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Jose; Amri, Hakima; Noursi, David; Abu-Asab, Mones

    2015-08-01

    High-throughput assays from genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and next generation sequencing produce massive omics datasets that are challenging to analyze in biological or clinical contexts. Thus far, there is no publicly available program for converting quantitative omics data into input formats to be used in off-the-shelf robust phylogenetic programs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on creation of two Windows-based programs, OmicsTract and SynpExtractor, to address this gap. We note, as a way of introduction and development of these programs, that one particularly useful bioinformatics inferential modeling is the phylogenetic cladogram. Cladograms are multidimensional tools that show the relatedness between subgroups of healthy and diseased individuals and the latter's shared aberrations; they also reveal some characteristics of a disease that would not otherwise be apparent by other analytical methods. The OmicsTract and SynpExtractor were written for the respective tasks of (1) accommodating advanced phylogenetic parsimony analysis (through standard programs of MIX [from PHYLIP] and TNT), and (2) extracting shared aberrations at the cladogram nodes. OmicsTract converts comma-delimited data tables through assigning each data point into a binary value ("0" for normal states and "1" for abnormal states) then outputs the converted data tables into the proper input file formats for MIX or with embedded commands for TNT. SynapExtractor uses outfiles from MIX and TNT to extract the shared aberrations of each node of the cladogram, matching them with identifying labels from the dataset and exporting them into a comma-delimited file. Labels may be gene identifiers in gene-expression datasets or m/z values in mass spectrometry datasets. By automating these steps, OmicsTract and SynpExtractor offer a veritable opportunity for rapid and standardized phylogenetic analyses of omics data; their model can also be extended to next generation sequencing

  7. When phylogenetic analysis complements the epidemiological investigation: a case of HIV-2 infection, Italy.

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Callegaro, Annapaola; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Salpini, Romina; Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Farina, Claudio; Maggiolo, Franco; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) infection is geographically restricted, affecting West African countries such as Guinea- Bissau and Cape Verde. We describe a recent case of HIV-2 infection in an Italian patient. Phylogenetic analysis of the V3 region of HIV-2 indicated that the Italian patient was infected by HIV-2 subtype A2. The sequence obtained from the Italian patient clustered significantly with a sequence isolated from Senegal. A phylogenetic doubt may arise from a Guinea Bissau sequence because it was in a major clade with the Italian and Senegal sequences, but was not statistically significant. The discovery of another Italian case over a short time frame stresses the importance of strengthening the surveillance system for HIV-2 because of the increase in migration from endemic areas to Italy. PMID:23435822

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis and Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 2 in Tunisia, North Africa.

    PubMed

    Rajhi, Mouna; Ghedira, Kais; Chouikha, Anissa; Djebbi, Ahlem; Cheikh, Imed; Ben Yahia, Ahlem; Sadraoui, Amel; Hammami, Walid; Azouz, Msaddek; Ben Mami, Nabil; Triki, Henda

    2016-01-01

    HCV genotype 2 (HCV-2) has a worldwide distribution with prevalence rates that vary from country to country. High genetic diversity and long-term endemicity were suggested in West African countries. A global dispersal of HCV-2 would have occurred during the 20th century, especially in European countries. In Tunisia, genotype 2 was the second prevalent genotype after genotype 1 and most isolates belong to subtypes 2c and 2k. In this study, phylogenetic analyses based on the NS5B genomic sequences of 113 Tunisian HCV isolates from subtypes 2c and 2k were carried out. A Bayesian coalescent-based framework was used to estimate the origin and the spread of these subtypes circulating in Tunisia. Phylogenetic analyses of HCV-2c sequences suggest the absence of country-specific or time-specific variants. In contrast, the phylogenetic grouping of HCV-2k sequences shows the existence of two major genetic clusters that may represent two distinct circulating variants. Coalescent analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of Tunisian HCV-2c around 1886 (1869-1902) before the introduction of HCV-2k in 1901 (1867-1931). Our findings suggest that the introduction of HCV-2c in Tunisia is possibly a result of population movements between Tunisia and European population following the French colonization. PMID:27100294

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis and Epidemic History of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 2 in Tunisia, North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Rajhi, Mouna; Ghedira, Kais; Chouikha, Anissa; Djebbi, Ahlem; Cheikh, Imed; Ben Yahia, Ahlem; Sadraoui, Amel; Hammami, Walid; Azouz, Msaddek; Ben Mami, Nabil; Triki, Henda

    2016-01-01

    HCV genotype 2 (HCV-2) has a worldwide distribution with prevalence rates that vary from country to country. High genetic diversity and long-term endemicity were suggested in West African countries. A global dispersal of HCV-2 would have occurred during the 20th century, especially in European countries. In Tunisia, genotype 2 was the second prevalent genotype after genotype 1 and most isolates belong to subtypes 2c and 2k. In this study, phylogenetic analyses based on the NS5B genomic sequences of 113 Tunisian HCV isolates from subtypes 2c and 2k were carried out. A Bayesian coalescent-based framework was used to estimate the origin and the spread of these subtypes circulating in Tunisia. Phylogenetic analyses of HCV-2c sequences suggest the absence of country-specific or time-specific variants. In contrast, the phylogenetic grouping of HCV-2k sequences shows the existence of two major genetic clusters that may represent two distinct circulating variants. Coalescent analysis indicated a most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of Tunisian HCV-2c around 1886 (1869–1902) before the introduction of HCV-2k in 1901 (1867–1931). Our findings suggest that the introduction of HCV-2c in Tunisia is possibly a result of population movements between Tunisia and European population following the French colonization. PMID:27100294

  10. Phylogenetic relationship of dengue virus type 3 isolated in Brazil and Paraguay and global evolutionary divergence dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Dengue virus comprises four antigenically related viruses named dengue virus type 1 to 4 (DENV1-4). DENV-3 was re-introduced into the Americas in 1994 causing outbreaks in Nicaragua and Panama. DENV-3 was introduced in Brazil in 2000 and then spread to most of the Brazilian States, reaching the neighboring country, Paraguay in 2002. In this study, we have analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of DENV-3 isolated in Brazil and Paraguay with viruses isolated worldwide. We have also analyzed the evolutionary divergence dynamics of DENV-3 viruses. Results The entire open reading frame (ORF) of thirteen DENV-3 isolated in Brazil (n = 9) and Paraguay (n = 4) were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. DENV-3 grouped into three main genotypes (I, II and III). Several internal clades were found within each genotype that we called lineage and sub-lineage. Viruses included in this study belong to genotype III and grouped together with viruses isolated in the Americas within the lineage III. The Brazilian viruses were further segregated into two different sub-lineage, A and B, and the Paraguayan into the sub-lineage B. All three genotypes showed internal grouping. The nucleotide divergence was in average 6.7% for genotypes, 2.7% for lineages and 1.5% for sub-lineages. Phylogenetic trees constructed with any of the protein gene sequences showed the same segregation of the DENV-3 in three genotypes. Conclusion Our results showed that two groups of DENV-3 genotypes III circulated in Brazil during 2002–2009, suggesting different events of introduction of the virus through different regions of the country. In Paraguay, only one group DENV-3 genotype III is circulating that is very closely related to the Brazilian viruses of sub-lineage B. Different degree of grouping can be observed for DENV-3 and each group showed a characteristic evolutionary divergence. Finally, we have observed that any

  11. A phylogenetic analysis of macroevolutionary patterns in fermentative yeasts.

    PubMed

    Paleo-López, Rocío; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F; Solano-Iguaran, Jaiber J; Sanchez-Salazar, Angela M; Gaitan-Espitia, Juan D; Nespolo, Roberto F

    2016-06-01

    When novel sources of ecological opportunity are available, physiological innovations can trigger adaptive radiations. This could be the case of yeasts (Saccharomycotina), in which an evolutionary novelty is represented by the capacity to exploit simple sugars from fruits (fermentation). During adaptive radiations, diversification and morphological evolution are predicted to slow-down after early bursts of diversification. Here, we performed the first comparative phylogenetic analysis in yeasts, testing the "early burst" prediction on species diversification and also on traits of putative ecological relevance (cell-size and fermentation versatility). We found that speciation rates are constant during the time-range we considered (ca., 150 millions of years). Phylogenetic signal of both traits was significant (but lower for cell-size), suggesting that lineages resemble each other in trait-values. Disparity analysis suggested accelerated evolution (diversification in trait values above Brownian Motion expectations) in cell-size. We also found a significant phylogenetic regression between cell-size and fermentation versatility (R (2) = 0.10), which suggests correlated evolution between both traits. Overall, our results do not support the early burst prediction both in species and traits, but suggest a number of interesting evolutionary patterns, that warrant further exploration. For instance, we show that the Whole Genomic Duplication that affected a whole clade of yeasts, does not seems to have a statistically detectable phenotypic effect at our level of analysis. In this regard, further studies of fermentation under common-garden conditions combined with comparative analyses are warranted. PMID:27516851

  12. A New Chemolithoautotrophic Arsenite-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from a Gold Mine: Phylogenetic, Physiological, and Preliminary Biochemical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Joanne M.; Sly, Lindsay I.; Schnagl, Roger D.; Macy, Joan M.

    2000-01-01

    A previously unknown chemolithoautotrophic arsenite-oxidizing bacterium has been isolated from a gold mine in the Northern Territory of Australia. The organism, designated NT-26, was found to be a gram-negative motile rod with two subterminal flagella. In a minimal medium containing only arsenite as the electron donor (5 mM), oxygen as the electron acceptor, and carbon dioxide-bicarbonate as the carbon source, the doubling time for chemolithoautotrophic growth was 7.6 h. Arsenite oxidation was found to be catalyzed by a periplasmic arsenite oxidase (optimum pH, 5.5). Based upon 16S rDNA phylogenetic sequence analysis, NT-26 belongs to the Agrobacterium/Rhizobium branch of the α-Proteobacteria and may represent a new species. This recently discovered organism is the most rapidly growing chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidizer known. PMID:10618208

  13. Epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis of institutional mouse parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Proctor, Mary L; Ditslear, Janice L; King, William W; Sundberg, John P; Jenson, A Bennett; Ghim, Shin-Je

    2013-08-01

    Mouse parvoviruses (MPVs) are small, single-stranded, 5 kb DNA viruses that are subclinical and endemic in many laboratory mouse colonies. MPVs cause more distinctive deleterious effects in immune-compromised or genetically-engineered mice than immuno-competent mice. At the University of Louisville (U of L), there was an unexpected increase of MPV sero-positivity for MPV infections in mouse colonies between January 2006 and February 2007, resulting in strategic husbandry changes aimed at controlling MPV spread throughout the animal facility. To investigate these MPVs, VP2 genes of seven MPVs were cloned and sequenced from eight documented incidences by PCR technology. The mutations in these VP2 genes were compared to those found at the Genbank database (NCBI; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and an intra-institutional phylogenetic tree for MPV infections at U of L was constructed. We discovered that the seven MPV isolates were different from those in Genbank and were not identical to each other. These MPVs were designated MPV-UL1 to 7; none of them were minute virus of mice (MVMs). Four isolates could be classified as MPV1, one was classified as MPV2, and two were defined as novel types with less than 96% and 94% homology with existing MPV types. Considering that all seven isolates had mutations in their VP2 genes and no mutations were observed in VP2 genes of MPV during a four-month time period of incubation, we concluded that all seven MPVs isolated at U of L between 2006 and 2007 probably originated from different sources. Serological survey for MPV infections verified that each MPV outbreak was controlled without further contamination within the institution. PMID:23545399

  14. Molecular Taxonomic Evidence for Two Distinct Genotypes of Mycobacterium yongonense via Genome-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Bo-Ram; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ga-Na; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a distinct Mycobacterium intracellulare INT-5 genotype, distantly related to other genotypes of M. intracellulare (INT-1 to -4). The aim of this study is to determine the exact taxonomic status of the M. intracellulare INT-5 genotype via genome-based phylogenetic analysis. To this end, genome sequences of the two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y were compared with M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T and Mycobacterium yongonense DSM 45126T. Our phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) of 35 target genes, and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis indicated that the two INT-5 strains were more closely related to M. yongonense DSM 45126T than the M. intracellulare strains. These results suggest their taxonomic transfer from M. intracellulare into M. yongonense. Finally, we selected 5 target genes (argH, dnaA, deaD, hsp65, and recF) and used SNPs for the identification of M. yongonese strains from other M. avium complex (MAC) strains. The application of the SNP analysis to 14 MAC clinical isolates enabled the selective identification of 4 M. yongonense clinical isolates from the other MACs. In conclusion, our genome-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the taxonomic status of two INT-5 strains, MOTT-H4Y and MOTT-36Y should be revised into M. yongonense. Our results also suggest that M. yongonense could be divided into 2 distinct genotypes (the Type I genotype with the M. parascrofulaceum rpoB gene and the Type II genotype with the M. intracellulare rpoB gene) depending on the presence of the lateral gene transfer of rpoB from M. parascrofulaceum. PMID:27031100

  15. Phylogenetic Diversity of the Bacillus pumilus Group and the Marine Ecotype Revealed by Multilocus Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunming; Sun, Fengqin; Wang, Liping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria closely related to Bacillus pumilus cannot be distinguished from such other species as B. safensis, B. stratosphericus, B. altitudinis and B. aerophilus simply by 16S rRNA gene sequence. In this report, 76 marine strains were subjected to phylogenetic analysis based on 7 housekeeping genes to understand the phylogeny and biogeography in comparison with other origins. A phylogenetic tree based on the 7 housekeeping genes concatenated in the order of gyrB-rpoB-pycA-pyrE-mutL-aroE-trpB was constructed and compared with trees based on the single genes. All these trees exhibited a similar topology structure with small variations. Our 79 strains were divided into 6 groups from A to F; Group A was the largest and contained 49 strains close to B. altitudinis. Additional two large groups were presented by B. safensis and B. pumilus respectively. Among the housekeeping genes, gyrB and pyrE showed comparatively better resolution power and may serve as molecular markers to distinguish these closely related strains. Furthermore, a recombinant phylogenetic tree based on the gyrB gene and containing 73 terrestrial and our isolates was constructed to detect the relationship between marine and other sources. The tree clearly showed that the bacteria of marine origin were clustered together in all the large groups. In contrast, the cluster belonging to B. safensis was mainly composed of bacteria of terrestrial origin. Interestingly, nearly all the marine isolates were at the top of the tree, indicating the possibility of the recent divergence of this bacterial group in marine environments. We conclude that B. altitudinis bacteria are the most widely spread of the B. pumilus group in marine environments. In summary, this report provides the first evidence regarding the systematic evolution of this bacterial group, and knowledge of their phylogenetic diversity will help in the understanding of their ecological role and distribution in marine environments. PMID:24244618

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Formin Homology 2 DomainD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Henry N.; Peterson, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    Formin proteins are key regulators of eukaryotic actin filament assembly and elongation, and many species possess multiple formin isoforms. A nomenclature system based on fundamental features would be desirable, to aid the rapid identification and characterization of novel formins. In this article, we attempt to systematize the formin family by performing phylogenetic analyses of the formin homology 2 (FH2) domain, an independently folding region common to all formins, which alone can influence actin dynamics. Through database searches, we identify 101 FH2 domains from 26 eukaryotic species, including 15 in mice. Sequence alignments reveal a highly conserved yeast-specific insert in the “knob loop” region of the FH2 domain, with unknown functional consequences. Phylogenetic analysis using minimum evolution (ME), maximum parsimony (MP), and maximum likelihood (ML) algorithms strongly supports the existence of seven metazoan groups. Yeast FH2 domains segregate from all other eukaryotes, including metazoans, other fungi, plants, and protists. Sequence comparisons of non-FH2 regions support relationships between three metazoan groups (Dia, DAAM, and FRL) and examine previously identified coiled-coil and Diaphanous auto-regulatory domain sequences. This analysis allows for a formin nomenclature system based on sequence relationships, as well as suggesting strategies for the determination of biochemical and cellular activities of these proteins. PMID:15509653

  17. Large-scale reconstruction and phylogenetic analysis of metabolic environments

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Elhanan; Kupiec, Martin; Feldman, Marcus W.; Ruppin, Eytan

    2008-01-01

    The topology of metabolic networks may provide important insights not only into the metabolic capacity of species, but also into the habitats in which they evolved. Here we introduce the concept of a metabolic network's “seed set”—the set of compounds that, based on the network topology, are exogenously acquired—and provide a methodological framework to computationally infer the seed set of a given network. Such seed sets form ecological “interfaces” between metabolic networks and their surroundings, approximating the effective biochemical environment of each species. Analyzing the metabolic networks of 478 species and identifying the seed set of each species, we present a comprehensive large-scale reconstruction of such predicted metabolic environments. The seed sets' composition significantly correlates with several basic properties characterizing the species' environments and agrees with biological observations concerning major adaptations. Species whose environments are highly predictable (e.g., obligate parasites) tend to have smaller seed sets than species living in variable environments. Phylogenetic analysis of the seed sets reveals the complex dynamics governing gain and loss of seeds across the phylogenetic tree and the process of transition between seed and non-seed compounds. Our findings suggest that the seed state is transient and that seeds tend either to be dropped completely from the network or to become non-seed compounds relatively fast. The seed sets also permit a successful reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree of life. The “reverse ecology” approach presented lays the foundations for studying the evolutionary interplay between organisms and their habitats on a large scale. PMID:18787117

  18. RFLP analysis of mtDNA from six platyrrhine genera: phylogenetic inferences.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, M; Alvarez, D

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of 10 species of platyrrhine primates using RFLP analysis of mtDNA. Three restriction enzymes were used to determine the restriction site haplotypes for a total of 276 individuals. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony was employed to construct phylogenetic trees. We found close phylogenetic relationships between Alouatta, Lagothrix and Ateles. We also found a close relationship between Cebus and Aotus, with Saimiri clustering with the atelines. Haplotype diversity was found in four of the species studied, in Cebus albifrons, Saimiri sciureus, Lagothrix lagotricha and Ateles fusciceps. These data provide additional information concerning the phylogenetic relationships between these platyrrhine genera and species. PMID:12759493

  19. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of Korean bovine viral diarrhea viruses.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Cha, Sang-Ho; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Kyu; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2009-11-18

    Thirty-six bovine viral disease viruses (BVDVs) were identified in bovine feces (n=16), brains (n=2), and aborted fetuses (n=18) in Korea. To reveal the genetic diversity and characteristics of these Korean strains, the sequences of their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs) were determined and then compared with published reference sequences. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the Korean viruses were of the BVDV subtypes 1a (n=17) or 2a (n=17). The remaining strains were of subtypes 1b (n=1) and 1n (n=1). This analysis indicates that the 1a and 2a BVDV subtypes are predominant and widespread in Korea. In addition, the prevalence of BVDV-2 was markedly higher in aborted fetuses than in other samples and was more often associated with reproductive problems and significant mortality in cattle. PMID:19589650

  20. [Phylogenetic and Bioinformatics Analysis of Replicase Gene Sequence of Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus].

    PubMed

    Liang, Chaoqiong; Meng, Yan; Luo, Laixin; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-11-01

    kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. The current results that there was no significant difference between the replicase gene sequences, it was stable and conservative for intra-species and clearly difference for inter-species. CGMMV-No. 1, CGMMV-No. 3, CGMMV-No. 4 and CGMMV-No. 5 had. a close genetic relationship with Shandong and Liangning isolates (Accession No. KJ754195 and EF611826), they are potentially originate from the same source. CGMMV-No. 2 was closer with Korea isolate. High sequence similarity of tested samples were gathered for a class in phylogenetic tree. It didn't show regularity of the bioinformatics analysis results of 129 kD and 57 kD proteins of tested CGMMV isolates. There was no corresponding relationship among the molecular phylogeny and the bioinformatics analysis of the tested CGMMV isolates. PMID:26951006

  1. Applying Logic Analysis to Genomic Data and Phylogenetic Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, Todd

    2005-03-01

    One of the main goals of comparative genomics is to understand how all the various proteins in a cell relate to each other in terms of pathways and interaction networks. Various computational ideas have been explored with this goal in mind. In the original phylogenetic profile method, `functional linkages' were inferred between pairs of proteins when the two proteins, A and B, showed identical (or statistically similar) patterns of presence vs. absence across a set of completely sequenced genomes. Here we describe a new generalization, logic analysis of phylogenetic profiles (LAPP), from which higher order relationships can be identified between three (or more) different proteins. For instance, in one type of triplet logic relation -- of which there are eight distinct types -- a protein C may be present in a genome iff proteins A and B are both present (C=AB). An application of the LAPP method identifies thousands of previously unidentified relationships between protein triplets. These higher order logic relationships offer insights -- not available from pairwise approaches -- into branching, competition, and alternate routes through cellular pathways and networks. The results also make it possible to assign tentative cellular functions to many novel proteins of unknown function. Co-authors: Peter Bowers, Shawn Cokus, Morgan Beeby, and David Eisenberg

  2. Pathogenesis and Phylogenetic Analyses of Two Avian Influenza H7N1 Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hongmei; Wang, Deli; Sun, Jing; Cui, Yanfang; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jiajie; Li, Xiang; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Yanbing; Hua, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of human infections with a novel H7N9 influenza strain has raised global concerns about a potential human pandemic. To further understand the character of other influenza viruses of the H7 subtype, we selected two H7N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from wild birds during routine surveillance in China: A/Baer's Pochard/Hunan/414/2010 (BP/HuN/414/10) (H7N1) and A/Common Pochard/Xianghai/420/2010 (CP/XH/420/10) (H7N1). To better understand the molecular characteristics of these two isolated H7N1 viruses, we sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed their entire genomes. The results showed that the two H7N1 strains belonged to a Eurasian branch, originating from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of their hemagglutinin (HA) genes showed that BP/HuN/414/10 and CP/XH/420/10 have a more distant genetic relationship with A/Shanghai/13/2013 (H7N9), with similarities of 91.6 and 91.4%, respectively. To assess the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in different hosts, they were inoculated in chickens, ducks and mice. Although, both CP/XH/420/10 and BP/HuN/414/10 can infect chickens, ducks and mice, they exhibited different replication capacities in these animals. The results of this study demonstrated that two low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N1 viruses of the Eurasian branch could infect mammals and may even have the potential to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to monitor H7 viruses in both domestic and wild birds. PMID:27458455

  3. Pathogenesis and Phylogenetic Analyses of Two Avian Influenza H7N1 Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongmei; Wang, Deli; Sun, Jing; Cui, Yanfang; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jiajie; Li, Xiang; Chai, Hongliang; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Yanbing; Hua, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of human infections with a novel H7N9 influenza strain has raised global concerns about a potential human pandemic. To further understand the character of other influenza viruses of the H7 subtype, we selected two H7N1 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) isolated from wild birds during routine surveillance in China: A/Baer's Pochard/Hunan/414/2010 (BP/HuN/414/10) (H7N1) and A/Common Pochard/Xianghai/420/2010 (CP/XH/420/10) (H7N1). To better understand the molecular characteristics of these two isolated H7N1 viruses, we sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed their entire genomes. The results showed that the two H7N1 strains belonged to a Eurasian branch, originating from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analysis of their hemagglutinin (HA) genes showed that BP/HuN/414/10 and CP/XH/420/10 have a more distant genetic relationship with A/Shanghai/13/2013 (H7N9), with similarities of 91.6 and 91.4%, respectively. To assess the replication and pathogenicity of these viruses in different hosts, they were inoculated in chickens, ducks and mice. Although, both CP/XH/420/10 and BP/HuN/414/10 can infect chickens, ducks and mice, they exhibited different replication capacities in these animals. The results of this study demonstrated that two low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H7N1 viruses of the Eurasian branch could infect mammals and may even have the potential to infect humans. Therefore, it is important to monitor H7 viruses in both domestic and wild birds. PMID:27458455

  4. Morphological and Phylogenetic Characterization of New Gephyrocapsa Isolates Suggests Introgressive Hybridization in the Emiliania/Gephyrocapsa Complex (Haptophyta).

    PubMed

    Bendif, El Mahdi; Probert, Ian; Young, Jeremy R; von Dassow, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The coccolithophore genus Gephyrocapsa contains a cosmopolitan assemblage of pelagic species, including the bloom-forming Gephyrocapsa oceanica, and is closely related to the emblematic coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi within the Noëlaerhabdaceae. These two species have been extensively studied and are well represented in culture collections, whereas cultures of other species of this family are lacking. We report on three new strains of Gephyrocapsa isolated into culture from samples from the Chilean coastal upwelling zone using a novel flow cytometric single-cell sorting technique. The strains were characterized by morphological analysis using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis of 6 genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial 16S and tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes). Morphometric features of the coccoliths indicate that these isolates are distinct from G. oceanica and best correspond to G. muellerae. Surprisingly, both plastidial and mitochondrial gene phylogenies placed these strains within the E. huxleyi clade and well separated from G. oceanica isolates, making Emiliania appear polyphyletic. The only nuclear sequence difference, 1bp in the 28S rDNA region, also grouped E. huxleyi with the new Gephyrocapsa isolates and apart from G. oceanica. Specifically, the G. muellerae morphotype strains clustered with the mitochondrial β clade of E. huxleyi, which, like G. muellerae, has been associated with cold (temperate and sub-polar) waters. Among putative evolutionary scenarios that could explain these results we discuss the possibility that E. huxleyi is not a valid taxonomic unit, or, alternatively the possibility of past hybridization and introgression between each E. huxleyi clade and older Gephyrocapsa clades. In either case, the results support the transfer of Emiliania to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for relating morphological species concepts to ecological and evolutionary units of diversity. PMID

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of Dichelobacter nodosus serogroup-specific fimA gene from ovine footrot in Andhra Pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Vinod; Karthik, A.; Vijayalakhsmi, S.; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Identification of different serogroups of Dichelobacter nodosus prevailing in the region and to understand the degree of genetic heterogeneities among the different isolates of D. nodosus. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 exudate samples of footrot lesions with a lesion score of 2-4 were collected from naturally infected sheep. The samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting D. nodosus specific 16srRNA. Of 150 samples screened, 70 samples were found to be positive. The positive samples were attempted for isolation of D. nodosus, out of which 16 isolates were recovered. All the isolates were subjected to serogrouping by multiplex PCR targeting fimA gene using A-I serogroup specific primers. Results: Of 16 isolates, 7 (43.75%) isolates were serogroup B, 4 (25.00%) isolates were serogroup A, 3 isolates (18.75%) were serogroup I and 2 (12.5%) isolates yielded both serogroup A and B. phylogenetic analysis was performed using neighbor-joining algorithm of the ClustelX2 software in order to study whether the serogroups isolated in the present investigation differed genetically from other published serogroups. The fimA gene sequence of present isolates of serogroups A, B, and I were segregated into three distinct groups with high bootstrap values. The serogroup B clustered with Australian isolate of serotype B1 suggesting high genetic similarity of the present isolate with serotype B1. Conclusions: The clinical samples were collected from suspected outbreaks of footrot and identified the prevalence of D. nodosus by PCR targeting 16srRNA gene. Identified serogroups A, B, and I from different districts of Andhra Pradesh. The phylogenetic analysis will help for the tentative identification of serotypes present in the serogroup and to understand the degree of genetic heterogeneities among the different isolates of D. nodosus. PMID:27047136

  6. Genetic Variability and Phylogenetic Relationships within Trypanosoma cruzi I Isolated in Colombia Based on Miniexon Gene Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Claudia; Guhl, Felipe; Falla, Alejandra; Fajardo, Anabella; Montilla, Marleny; Adolfo Vallejo, Gustavo; Bargues, M. Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi have identified the existence of two groups: T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. There are aspects that still remain unknown about the genetic variability within the T. cruzi I group. Given its epidemiological importance, it is necessary to have a better understanding of T. cruzi transmission cycles. Our purpose was to corroborate the existence of haplotypes within the T. cruzi I group and to describe the genetic variability and phylogenetic relationships, based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the miniexon gene intergenic region, for the isolates from different hosts and epidemiological transmission cycles in Colombian regions. 31 T. cruzi isolates were molecularly characterized. Phylogenetic relationships within T. cruzi I isolates showed four haplotype groups (Ia–Id), associated with their transmission cycle. In previous studies, we reported that haplotype Ia is mainly associated with the domestic cycle and domiciliated Rhodnius prolixus. Haplotype Ib is associated with the domestic cycle and peridomestic cycle, haplotype Ic is closely related with the peridomestic cycle, and haplotype Id is strongly associated with the sylvatic cycle. The phylogenetic methodologies applied in this study are tools that bolster the associations among isolates and thus shed light on Chagas disease epidemiology. PMID:20798881

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Paracobitis variegates and its phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang Zhong; Wei, Guang Hui; Hu, Jian He; Liu, Xing You

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Paracobitis variegates was first reported. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,571 bp long with the A + T content of 55.6%. It contains the typical structure, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and one D-loop region. The protein-coding genes start with the typical ATG codon, while COI gene uses GTG as the initiation codon. Most tRNA genes could form typical secondary structures except tRNA(ser), which had an absence of the DHU arm. There are 43 helices structures in 12S rRNA, and six domains, 53 helices structures in 16S rRNA. According to the phylogenetic analysis, Paracobitis variegates has a closer relationship with Barbatula toni. PMID:25922960

  8. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a new porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) strain in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; He, Kongwang; Wen, Libin; Fan, Hongjie

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the etiological agent associated with several pig diseases that are collectively referred to as porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). Unfortunately, PCV2 has had a serious economic impact on the swine industry. In this study, we report the genome sequence of a novel PCV2 isolate (JS2015) identified in pigs in Jiang Su, China. The complete DNA sequence was 1766 nucleotides long with an A+T content of 52.7%. It lacked a guanine (G) at nucleotide position 1045 compared to other reference PCV2 strains with a sequence length of 1766 nucleotides. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate JS2015 was most closely related to members of the PCV2d (AY181946) lineage. Our data provide insight into the epidemiology of porcine circovirus and may facilitate further study of the origin and evolution of PCV2. PMID:26395090

  9. Phylogenetic analysis reveals multiple introductions of Cynodon species in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jewell, M; Frère, C H; Harris-Shultz, K; Anderson, W F; Godwin, I D; Lambrides, C J

    2012-11-01

    The distinction between native and introduced flora within isolated land masses presents unique challenges. The geological and colonisation history of Australia, the world's largest island, makes it a valuable system for studying species endemism, introduction, and phylogeny. Using this strategy we investigated Australian cosmopolitan grasses belonging to the genus Cynodon. While it is believed that seven species of Cynodon are present in Australia, no genetic analyses have investigated the origin, diversity and phylogenetic history of Cynodon within Australia. To address this gap, 147 samples (92 from across Australia and 55 representing global distribution) were sequenced for a total of 3336bp of chloroplast DNA spanning six genes. Data showed the presence of at least six putatively introduced Cynodon species (C. transvaalensis, C. incompletus, C. hirsutus, C. radiatus, C. plectostachyus and C. dactylon) in Australia and suggested multiple recent introductions. C. plectostachyus, a species often confused with C. nlemfuensis, was not previously considered to be present in Australia. Most significantly, we identified two common haplotypes that formed a monophyletic clade diverging from previously identified Cynodon species. We hypothesise that these two haplotypes may represent a previously undescribed species of Cynodon. We provide further evidence that two Australian native species, Brachyachne tenella and B. convergens belong in the genus Cynodon and, therefore, argue for the taxonomic revision of the genus Cynodon. PMID:22797088

  10. Distribution and Phylogenetic Analysis of Family 19 Chitinases in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Tomokazu; Saito, Akihiro; Sato, Toshiya; Kanai, Ryo; Fujii, Takeshi; Nikaidou, Naoki; Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    In organisms other than higher plants, family 19 chitinase was first discovered in Streptomyces griseus HUT6037, and later, the general occurrence of this enzyme in Streptomyces species was demonstrated. In the present study, the distribution of family 19 chitinases in the class Actinobacteria and the phylogenetic relationship of Actinobacteria family 19 chitinases with family 19 chitinases of other organisms were investigated. Forty-nine strains were chosen to cover almost all the suborders of the class Actinobacteria, and chitinase production was examined. Of the 49 strains, 22 formed cleared zones on agar plates containing colloidal chitin and thus appeared to produce chitinases. These 22 chitinase-positive strains were subjected to Southern hybridization analysis by using a labeled DNA fragment corresponding to the catalytic domain of ChiC, and the presence of genes similar to chiC of S. griseus HUT6037 in at least 13 strains was suggested by the results. PCR amplification and sequencing of the DNA fragments corresponding to the major part of the catalytic domains of the family 19 chitinase genes confirmed the presence of family 19 chitinase genes in these 13 strains. The strains possessing family 19 chitinase genes belong to 6 of the 10 suborders in the order Actinomycetales, which account for the greatest part of the Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that there is a close evolutionary relationship between family 19 chitinases found in Actinobacteria and plant class IV chitinases. The general occurrence of family 19 chitinase genes in Streptomycineae and the high sequence similarity among the genes found in Actinobacteria suggest that the family 19 chitinase gene was first acquired by an ancestor of the Streptomycineae and spread among the Actinobacteria through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:14766598

  11. Phylogenetic and Structural Analysis of Polyketide Synthases in Aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Bhetariya, Preetida J.; Prajapati, Madhvi; Bhaduri, Asani; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Varma, Anupam; Madan, Taruna; Singh, Yogendra; Sarma, P. Usha

    2016-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) of Aspergillus species are multidomain and multifunctional megaenzymes that play an important role in the synthesis of diverse polyketide compounds. Putative PKS protein sequences from Aspergillus species representing medically, agriculturally, and industrially important Aspergillus species were chosen and screened for in silico studies. Six candidate Aspergillus species, Aspergillus fumigatus Af293, Aspergillus flavus NRRL3357, Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, Aspergillus terreus NIH2624, Aspergillus oryzae RIB40, and Aspergillus clavatus NRRL1, were selected to study the PKS phylogeny. Full-length PKS proteins and only ketosynthase (KS) domain sequence were retrieved for independent phylogenetic analysis from the aforementioned species, and phylogenetic analysis was performed with characterized fungal PKS. This resulted into grouping of Aspergilli PKSs into nonreducing (NR), partially reducing (PR), and highly reducing (HR) PKS enzymes. Eight distinct clades with unique domain arrangements were classified based on homology with functionally characterized PKS enzymes. Conserved motif signatures corresponding to each type of PKS were observed. Three proteins from Protein Data Bank corresponding to NR, PR, and HR type of PKS (XP_002384329.1, XP_753141.2, and XP_001402408.2, respectively) were selected for mapping of conserved motifs on three-dimensional structures of KS domain. Structural variations were found at the active sites on modeled NR, PR, and HR enzymes of Aspergillus. It was observed that the number of iteration cycles was dependent on the size of the cavity in the active site of the PKS enzyme correlating with a type with reducing or NR products, such as pigment, 6MSA, and lovastatin. The current study reports the grouping and classification of PKS proteins of Aspergilli for possible exploration of novel polyketides based on sequence homology; this information can be useful for selection of PKS for polyketide exploration and

  12. Phylogenetic Analysis of Fusarium solani Associated with the Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Scott M.; Scully, Erin D.; Jimenez-Gasco, Maria del Mar; Carlson, John E.; Tien, Ming; Hoover, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Culture-independent analysis of the gut of a wood-boring insect, Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), revealed a consistent association between members of the fungal Fusarium solani species complex and the larval stage of both colony-derived and wild A. glabripennis populations. Using the translation elongation factor 1-alpha region for culture-independent phylogenetic and operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses, only two OTUs were detected, suggesting that genetic variance at this locus was low among A. glabripennis-associated isolates. To better survey the genetic variation of F. solani associated with A. glabripennis, and establish its phylogenetic relationship with other members of the F. solani species complex, single spore isolates were created from different populations and multi-locus phylogenetic analysis was performed using a combination of the translation elongation factor alpha-1, internal transcribed spacer, and large subunit rDNA regions. These analyses revealed that colony-derived larvae reared in three different tree species or on artificial diet, as well as larvae from wild populations collected from three additional tree species in New York City and from a single tree species in Worcester, MA, consistently harbored F. solani within their guts. While there is some genetic variation in the F. solani carried between populations, within-population variation is low. We speculate that F. solani is able to fill a broad niche in the A. glabripennis gut, providing it with fungal lignocellulases to allow the larvae to grow and develop on woody tissue. However, it is likely that many F. solani genotypes could potentially fill this niche, so the relationship may not be limited to a single member of the F. solani species complex. While little is known about the role of filamentous fungi and their symbiotic associations with insects, this report suggests that larval A. glabripennis has developed an intimate relationship with F. solani

  13. Halotia gen. nov., a phylogenetically and physiologically coherent cyanobacterial genus isolated from marine coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Vaz, Marcelo Gomes Marçal Vieira; Hentschke, Guilherme Scotta; Sant'Anna, Célia Leite; Fiore, Marli Fátima

    2015-02-01

    Nostoc is a common and well-studied genus of cyanobacteria and, according to molecular phylogeny, is a polyphyletic group. Therefore, revisions of this genus are urged in an attempt to clarify its taxonomy. Novel strains isolated from underexplored environments and assigned morphologically to the genus Nostoc are not genetically related to the 'true Nostoc' group. In this study, four strains isolated from biofilms collected in Antarctica and five strains originated from Brazilian mangroves were evaluated. Despite their morphological similarities to other morphotypes of Nostoc, these nine strains differed from other morphotypes in ecological, physiological and genetic aspects. Based on the phylogeny of the 16S rRNA gene, the Antarctic sequences were grouped together with the sequences of the Brazilian mangrove isolates and Nostoc sp. Mollenhauer 1 : 1-067 in a well-supported cluster (74 % bootstrap value, maximum-likelihood). This novel cluster was separated phylogenetically from the 'true Nostoc' clade and from the clades of the morphologically similar genera Mojavia and Desmonostoc. The 16S rRNA gene sequences generated in this study exhibited 96 % similarity to sequences from the nostocacean genera mentioned above. Physiologically, these nine strains showed the capacity to grow in a salinity range of 1-10 % NaCl, indicating their tolerance of saline conditions. These results provide support for the description of a new genus, named Halotia gen. nov., which is related morphologically to the genera Nostoc, Mojavia and Desmonostoc. Within this new genus, three novel species were recognized and described based on morphology and internal transcribed spacer secondary structures: Halotia branconii sp. nov., Halotia longispora sp. nov. and Halotia wernerae sp. nov., under the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants. PMID:25424485

  14. Ancient and recent patterns of geographic speciation in the oyster mushroom Pleurotus revealed by phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Vilgalys, R; Sun, B L

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from molecular systematic studies suggests that many mushroom species may be quite ancient. Gene phylogenies were developed to examine the relationship between reproductive isolation, genetic divergence, and biogeography in oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus). Sequence data were obtained for two regions of DNA from populations belonging to eight intersterility groups (biological species). Phylogenetic analysis of sequences from the 5' portion of the nuclear encoded large subunit rDNA demonstrates an ancient origin for four intersterility groups of broad geographic distribution (world-wide), with a more recent radiation of several intersterility groups that are restricted to the Northern Hemisphere. An expanded analysis using sequence data from the more variable rDNA internal transcribed spacer region also reveals a phylogenetically based pattern of genetic divergence associated with allopatric speciation among populations from different continents in the Northern Hemisphere. The ability of rDNA sequences to resolve phylogenetic relationships among geographically isolated populations within intersterility groups illustrates the importance of biogeography for understanding speciation in Pleurotus. Patterns of geographic distribution among intersterility groups suggest that several species lineages evolved quite early, with recently evolved groups restricted to the Northern Hemisphere and older lineages occurring throughout the world. Based on phylogenetic evidence, analysis of historical biogeography using area cladograms shows that multiple dispersal and vicariance events are responsible for patterns of speciation observed. Images PMID:8183955

  15. Analysis of Iranian Potato virus S isolates.

    PubMed

    Salari, Khadijeh; Massumi, Hossein; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Hosseini Pour, Akbar; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-10-01

    Two hundred forty potato samples with one or more symptoms of leaf mosaic, distortion, mottling and yellowing were collected between 2005 and 2008 from seven Iranian provinces. Forty-four of these samples tested positive with double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (DAS-ELISA) using a Potato virus S (PVS) polyclonal antibody. Of these 12 isolates of PVS were selected based on the geographical location for biological and molecular characterization. The full coat protein (CP) and 11K genes from 12 PVS isolates were PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced. All 12 PVS isolates showed mosaic symptoms on Nicotiana debneyii and N. tabacum cv. Whiteburly and local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa and C. album. The Iranian isolates share between 93 and 100% pairwise nucleotide identity with other PVS(O) isolates. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis coupled with pairwise identity analysis, we propose 15 genotypes for the PVS(O) strain and 3 genotypes for the PVS(A) strain. PMID:21567245

  16. Phylogenetic analyses of some extremely halophilic archaea isolated from Dead Sea water, determined on the basis of their 16S rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Arahal, D R; Dewhirst, F E; Paster, B J; Volcani, B E; Ventosa, A

    1996-10-01

    Twenty-two extremely halophilic aerobic archaeal strains were isolated from enrichments prepared from Dead Sea water samples collected 57 years ago. The isolates were phenotypically clustered into five different groups, and a representative from each group was chosen for further study. Almost the entire sequences of the 16S rRNA genes of these representatives, and of Haloarcula hispanica ATCC 33960, were determined to establish their phylogenetic positions. The sequences of these strains were compared to previously published sequences of 27 reference halophilic archaea (members of the family Halobacteriaceae) and two other archaea, Methanobacterium formicicum DSM 1312 and Methanospirillum hungatei DSM 864. Phylogenetic analysis using approximately 1,400 base comparisons of 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences demonstrated that the five isolates clustered closely to species belonging to three different genera--Haloferax, Halobacterium, and Haloarcula. Strains E1 and E8 were closely related and identified as members of the species Haloferax volcanii, and strain E12 was closely related and identified as a member of the species Halobacterium salinarum. However, strains E2 and E11 clustered in the Haloarcula branch with Haloarcula hispanica as the closest relative at 98.9 and 98.8% similarity, respectively. Strains E2 and E11 could represent two new species of the genus Haloarcula. However, because strains of these two new species were isolated from a single source, they will not be named until additional strains are isolated from other sources and fully characterized. PMID:8837434

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Demodex caprae based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Demodex caprae infests the hair follicles and sebaceous glands of goats worldwide, which not only seriously impairs goat farming, but also causes a big economic loss. However, there are few reports on the DNA level of D. caprae. To reveal the taxonomic position of D. caprae within the genus Demodex, the present study conducted phylogenetic analysis of D. caprae based on mt16S rDNA sequence data. D. caprae adults and eggs were obtained from a skin nodule of the goat suffering demodicidosis. The mt16S rDNA sequences of individual mite were amplified using specific primers, and then cloned, sequenced, and aligned. The sequence divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversion rate were computed, and the phylogenetic trees in Demodex were reconstructed. Results revealed the 339-bp partial sequences of six D. caprae isolates were obtained, and the sequence identity was 100% among isolates. The pairwise divergences between D. caprae and Demodex canis or Demodex folliculorum or Demodex brevis were 22.2-24.0%, 24.0-24.9%, and 22.9-23.2%, respectively. The corresponding average genetic distances were 2.840, 2.926, and 2.665, and the average transition/transversion rates were 0.70, 0.55, and 0.54, respectively. The divergences, genetic distances, and transition/transversion rates of D. caprae versus the other three species all reached interspecies level. The five phylogenetic trees all presented that D. caprae clustered with D. brevis first, and then with D. canis, D. folliculorum, and Demodex injai in sequence. In conclusion, D. caprae is an independent species, and it is closer to D. brevis than to D. canis, D. folliculorum, or D. injai. PMID:23996126

  18. Virulence Profiles, Phylogenetic Background, and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Turkeys with Airsacculitis

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier; de Oliveira, Mirela Caroline Vilela; da Silva, Ketrin Cristina; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-01-01

    Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) has been studied for decades because of its economic impact on the poultry industry. Recently, the zoonotic potential of APEC and multidrug-resistant strains have emerged. The aim of this study was to characterize 225 APEC isolated from turkeys presenting airsacculitis. The results showed that 92% of strains presented a multidrug-resistance (MDR), and the highest levels of resistance were to sulfamethazine (94%) and tetracycline (83%). Half of these strains were classified in phylogenetic group B2, followed by B1 (28.6%), A (17.1%), and D (4.8%). The prevalence of virulence genes was as follows: salmochelin (iroN, 95%), increased serum survival (iss, 93%), colicin V (cvi/cva, 67%), aerobactin (iucD, 67%), temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh, 56%), iron-repressible protein (irp2, 51%), invasion brain endothelium (ibeA, 31%), vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat, 24%), K1 antigen (neuS, 19%), enteroaggregative heat-stable cytotoxin (astA, 17%), and pilus associated with pyelonephritis (papC, 15%). These results demonstrate that the majority of the investigated strains belonged to group B2 and were MDR. These data suggest that turkeys may serve as a reservoir of pathogenic and multidrug-resistance strains, reinforcing the idea that poultry plays a role in the epidemiological chain of ExPEC. PMID:25105155

  19. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage.

    PubMed

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-07-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  20. Phylogenetic Studies of the Three RNA Silencing Suppressor Genes of South American CTV Isolates Reveal the Circulation of a Novel Genetic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Benítez-Galeano, María José; Rubio, Leticia; Bertalmío, Ana; Maeso, Diego; Rivas, Fernando; Colina, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) is the most economically important virus of citrus worldwide. Genetic diversity and population structure of CTV isolates from all citrus growing areas from Uruguay were analyzed by RT-PCR and cloning of the three RNA silencing suppressor genes (p25, p20 and p23). Bayesian phylogenetic analysis revealed the circulation of three known genotypes (VT, T3, T36) in the country, and the presence of a new genetic lineage composed by isolates from around the world, mainly from South America. Nucleotide and amino acid identity values for this new genetic lineage were both higher than 97% for the three analyzed regions. Due to incongruent phylogenetic relationships, recombination analysis was performed using Genetic Algorithms for Recombination Detection (GARD) and SimPlot software. Recombination events between previously described CTV isolates were detected. High intra-sample variation was found, confirming the co-existence of different genotypes into the same plant. This is the first report describing: (1) the genetic diversity of Uruguayan CTV isolates circulating in the country and (2) the circulation of a novel CTV genetic lineage, highly present in the South American region. This information may provide assistance to develop an effective cross-protection program. PMID:26205407

  1. Spatiotemporal phylogenetic analysis and molecular characterization of coxsackievirus A4.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Yu; Lu, Po-Liang; Tsai, Yu-Ling; Hsi, Edward; Yao, Ching-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Hsu, Li-Ching; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Ying; Su, Hui-Ju; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang

    2011-08-01

    Coxsackievirus A4 outbreaks occurred in Taiwan in 2004 and 2006. The spatiotemporal transmission of this error-prone RNA virus involves a continuous interaction between rapid sequence variation and natural selection. To elucidate the molecular characteristics of CV-A4 and the spatiotemporal dynamic changes in CV-A4 transmission, worldwide sequences of the 3' VP1 region (420 nt) obtained from GenBank were analyzed together with sequences isolated in Taiwan from 2002 to 2009. Sequences were characterized in terms of recombination, variability, and selection. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood and Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods. Spatiotemporal dynamics of CV-A4 transmission were further estimated by a Bayesian statistical inference framework. No recombination was detected in the 420 nt region. The estimated evolution rate of CV-A4 was 8.65 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year, and a purifying selection (d(N)/d(S)=0.032) was noted over the 3' VP1 region. All trees had similar topology: two genotypes (GI and GII), each including two subgenotypes (A and B), with the prototype and a Kenyan strain in separate branches. The results revealed that the virus first appeared in USA in 1950. Since 1998, it has evolved into the Kenya, GI-A (Asia) and GII-A (Asia and Europe) strains. Since 2004, GI-B and GII-B have evolved continuously and have remained prevalent. The co-existence of several positive selection lineages of GI-B in 2006 indicates that the subgenotype might have survived lineage extinction. This study revealed rapid lineage turnover of CV-A4 and the replacement of previously circulating strains by a new dominant variant. Therefore, continuous surveillance for further CV-A4 transmission is essential. PMID:21635970

  2. BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYLOGENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO NOVEL DEEP-SEA THERMOCOCCUS ISOLATES WITH POTENTIALLY BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partial 16S rDNA gene sequences of two thermophilic archaeal strains, TY and TYS, previously isolated from the Guaymas Basin hydrothermal vent site were determined. Lipid analyses and a comparative analysis performed with 16S rDNA sequences of similar thermophilic species sho...

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis Reveals a Cryptic Species Blastomyces gilchristii, sp. nov. within the Human Pathogenic Fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Elizabeth M.; McTaggart, Lisa R.; Zhang, Sean X.; Low, Donald E.; Stevens, David A.; Richardson, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Analysis of the population genetic structure of microbial species is of fundamental importance to many scientific disciplines because it can identify cryptic species, reveal reproductive mode, and elucidate processes that contribute to pathogen evolution. Here, we examined the population genetic structure and geographic differentiation of the sexual, dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis, the causative agent of blastomycosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Criteria for Genealogical Concordance Phylogenetic Species Recognition (GCPSR) applied to seven nuclear loci (arf6, chs2, drk1, fads, pyrF, tub1, and its-2) from 78 clinical and environmental isolates identified two previously unrecognized phylogenetic species. Four of seven single gene phylogenies examined (chs2, drk1, pyrF, and its-2) supported the separation of Phylogenetic Species 1 (PS1) and Phylogenetic Species 2 (PS2) which were also well differentiated in the concatenated chs2-drk1-fads-pyrF-tub1-arf6-its2 genealogy with all isolates falling into one of two evolutionarily independent lineages. Phylogenetic species were genetically distinct with interspecific divergence 4-fold greater than intraspecific divergence and a high Fst value (0.772, P<0.001) indicative of restricted gene flow between PS1 and PS2. Whereas panmixia expected of a single freely recombining population was not observed, recombination was detected when PS1 and PS2 were assessed separately, suggesting reproductive isolation. Random mating among PS1 isolates, which were distributed across North America, was only detected after partitioning isolates into six geographic regions. The PS2 population, found predominantly in the hyper-endemic regions of northwestern Ontario, Wisconsin, and Minnesota, contained a substantial clonal component with random mating detected only among unique genotypes in the population. Conclusions/Significance These analyses provide evidence for a genetically divergent clade within Blastomyces

  4. Evolutionary and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Hepaciviruses and Pegiviruses.

    PubMed

    Thézé, Julien; Lowes, Sophia; Parker, Joe; Pybus, Oliver G

    2015-11-01

    The known genetic diversity of the hepaciviruses and pegiviruses has increased greatly in recent years through the discovery of viruses related to hepatitis C virus and human pegivirus in bats, bovines, equines, primates, and rodents. Analysis of these new species is important for research into animal models of hepatitis C virus infection and into the zoonotic origins of human viruses. Here, we provide the first systematic phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of these two genera at the whole-genome level. Phylogenies confirmed that hepatitis C virus is most closely related to viruses from horses whereas human pegiviruses clustered with viruses from African primates. Within each genus, several well-supported lineages were identified and viral diversity was structured by both host species and location of sampling. Recombination analyses provided evidence of interspecific recombination in hepaciviruses, but none in the pegiviruses. Putative mosaic genome structures were identified in NS5B gene region and were supported by multiple tests. The identification of interspecific recombination in the hepaciviruses represents an important evolutionary event that could be clarified by future sampling of novel viruses. We also identified parallel amino acid changes shared by distantly related lineages that infect similar types of host. Notable parallel changes were clustered in the NS3 and NS4B genes and provide a useful starting point for experimental studies of the evolution of Hepacivirus host-virus interactions. PMID:26494702

  5. Phylogenetic relationships between European and Chinese truffles based on parsimony and distance analysis of ITS sequences.

    PubMed

    Roux, C; Séjalon-Delmas, N; Martins, M; Parguey-Leduc, A; Dargent, R; Bécard, G

    1999-11-15

    Phylogenetic relationships among truffle species from Europe and China were investigated through parsimony analysis of the ITS sequences. Three major clades were obtained among the species analysed. The so-called white truffles appeared polyphyletic since Tuber magnatum was grouped with brown truffles and not with the other white species (T. maculatum, T. borchii, T. dryophilum, T. puberulum). The black truffles investigated in this study, T. brumale, T. melanosporum, T. indicum and T. himalayense, were grouped in an independent clade. The Périgord black truffle T. melanosporum and the Chinese black truffles T. indicum and T. himalayense, were very closely related. The delimitation of these species was estimated by a distance analysis on several isolates collected from different geographic areas. In spite of intraspecific variations of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) sequences, T. melanosporum and the Chinese black truffles can be unambiguously attributed to distinct taxa. PMID:10556705

  6. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND AUTECOLOGY OF SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS.

    PubMed

    Gladka, G V; Romanovskaya, V A; Tashyreva, H O; Tashyrev, O B

    2015-01-01

    Multi-resistant to extreme factors spore-forming bacteria of Bacillus genus are isolated from hypersaline environments of the Crimea (Ukraine) and the Dead Sea (Israel). Phylogenetic analysis showed distinction of dominating extremophilic culturable species in studied regions. In Crimean environments they are B. mojavensis and B. simplex, in the Dead Sea ecosystem--B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. simplex. Isolates are simultaneously halotolerant and resistant to UV radiation. Strains isolated from the Dead Sea and the Crimea environments were resistant to UV: LD90 and LD99.99 made 100-170 J/m2 and 750-1500 J/m2 respectively. Spores showed higher UV-resistance (LD99.99-2500 J/m2) than the vegetative cells. However the number of spores made 0.02-0.007% of the whole cell population, and should not significantly affect the UV LD99.99 value. Isolates of both environments were halotolerant in the range of 0.1-10% NaCl and thermotolerant in the range of 20-50 °C, and didn't grow at 15 °C. Survival strategy of spore-forming bacteria from hypersaline environments under high UV radiation level can be performed by spore formation which minimize cell damage as well as efficient DNA-repair systems that remove damages. PMID:26829837

  7. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of mango mealybug, Drosicha mangiferae from Punjab.

    PubMed

    Banta, Geetika; Jindal, Vikas; Mohindru, Bharathi; Sharma, Sachin; Kaur, Jaimeet; Gupta, V K

    2016-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are major pests of a wide range of crops and ornamental plants worldwide. Their high degree of morphological similarity makes them difficult to identify and limits their study and management. In the present study, four Indian populations of mango mealybug (mango, litchi, guava from Gurdaspur and mango from Jalandhar) were analyzed. The mtCOI region was amplified, cloned, the nucleotide sequences were determined and analysed. All the four species were found to be D. mangiferae. The population from Litchi and Mango from Gurdaspur showed 100% homologus sequence. The population of Guava-Gurdaspur and Mango-Jalandhar showed a single mutation of 'C' instead of 'T' at 18th and 196th position, respectively. Indian populations were compared with populations from Pakistan (21) and Japan (1). The phylogenetic tree resulted in two main clusters. Cluster1 represent all the 4 populations of Punjab, India, 20 of Pakistan (Punjab, Sind, Lahore, Multan, Faisalabad and Karak districts) with homologous sequences. The two population collected from Faisalabad district of Pakistan and Japan made a separate cluster 2 because the gene sequence used in analysis was from the COI-3p region. However, all the other sequence of D. mangiferae samples under study showed a low nucleotide divergence. The homologus mtCO1 sequence of Indian and Pakistan population concluded that the genetic diversity in mealybug population was quite less over a large geographical area. PMID:26930860

  8. Phylogenetic footprint analysis of IGF2 in extant mammals.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Jennifer R; Murphy, Susan K; Nolan, Catherine M; Dietrich, Fred S; Jirtle, Randy L

    2004-09-01

    Genomic imprinting results in monoallelic gene transcription that is directed by cis-acting regulatory elements epigenetically marked in a parent-of-origin-dependent manner. We performed phylogenetic sequence and epigenetic comparisons of IGF2 between the nonimprinted platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and imprinted opossum (Didelphis virginiana), mouse (Mus musculus), and human (Homo sapiens) to determine if their divergent imprint status would reflect differences in the conservation of genomic elements important in the regulation of imprinting. We report herein that IGF2 imprinting does not correlate evolutionarily with differential intragenic methylation, nor is it associated with motif 13, a reported IGF2-specific "imprint signature" located in the coding region. Instead, IGF2 imprinting is strongly associated with both the lack of short interspersed transposable elements (SINEs) and an intragenic conserved inverted repeat that contains candidate CTCF-binding sites, a role not previously ascribed to this particular sequence element. Our results are the first to demonstrate that comparative footprint analysis of species from evolutionarily distant mammalian clades, and exhibiting divergent imprint status is a powerful bioinformatics-based approach for identifying cis-acting elements potentially involved not only in the origins of genomic imprinting, but also in its maintenance in humans. PMID:15342558

  9. Fluoroquinolone-resistance mechanisms and phylogenetic background of clinical Escherichia coli strains isolated in south-east Poland.

    PubMed

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Skrzypek, Kinga; Siwiec, Radosław; Wrobel, Andrzej; Malm, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Fluorochinolones are a class of broad-spectrum antimicrobials in the treatment of several infections, including those caused by Escherichia coli. Due to the increasing resistance of bacteria to antimicrobials, an understanding of fluoroquinolone resistance is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility of clinical E. coli strains to fluoroquinolones and characterize their mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Totally, 79 non-duplicate clinical E. coli isolates included in this study were mainly from skin lesion -36 (45.6%) isolates; 54 (68.4%) isolates were assigned to phylogenetic B2 group. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was found in 20 isolates. In the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) region of gyrA and parC, 4 types of point mutations were detected. Mutations in parC gene were found in all strains with gyrA mutations. Predominance of double mutation in codon 83 and 87 of gyrA (90%) and in codon 80 of parC (90%) was found. Moreover, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMRQ) determinants (qnrA or qnrB and/or aac(6')-Ib-cr) were present in 5 (25%) out of 20 fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates. Resistance to fluoroquinolones in all of the tested clinical E. coli isolates correlated with point mutations in both gyrA and parC. The majority of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains belonged to D and B2 phylogenetic groups. PMID:27602420

  10. Phylogenetic Distribution of Virulence Genes Among ESBL-producing Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Long-term Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruike; Shi, Jinfang; Shen, Yimin; Li, Yanmeng; Han, Qingzhen; Zhang, Xianfeng; Gu, Guohao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study was aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance, virulence potential and phylogenetic grouping of ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (EP-UPEC) isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods EP-UPEC isolates from September 2013 to June 2014 at a tertiary care hospital of China were screened for ESBL-production by the double disk diffusion test. Isolates with ESBL-phenotype were further characterized by antibiotic resistance testing, PCR of different ESBL and virulence genes, and phylogenetic grouping. Results One hundred and twenty EP-UPEC were isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. All EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, Cefazolin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, Cefoperazone and Ceftriaxone, and the majority of EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Piperacillin (82.5%), Ciprofloxacin (81.2%), Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (72.5%). The isolates showed the highest sensitivity against Imipenem (98.4%), Piperacillin/tazobactam (96.7%), Cefoperazone/sulbactam (91.7%), Amikacin (90.8%) and Cefepime (75.8%). Nine different ESBL genotype patterns were observed and CTX-M type was the most prevalent ESBL genotype (42.5%, 51/120). Majority of EP-UPEC isolates possess more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC isolates belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2(36.7%) and D(35.0%). The prevalence of traT, ompT, iss, PAI, afa, fimH and papC were 75.8%, 63.3%, 63.3%, 60.8%, 40.8%, 19.2% and 6.7%, respectively. The number of virulence genes (VGs) detected was significantly higher in group B2 than in group A (ANOVA, p<0.001), group B1(ANOVA, p= 0.012) and D (ANOVA, p<0.001). Conclusions EP-UPEC strains showed multidrug resistance and co-resistance to other non β-lactam antibiotics. CTX-M was the most prevalent ESBL genotype and majority of EP-UPEC strains more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC strains belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2 and D, and most of the virulence genes were more prevalent in group B2. PMID