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Sample records for isoprenoid biosynthesis studies

  1. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Ann M.; Amthor, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills nearly 1 million people each year, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has become increasingly resistant to current therapies. Isoprenoid synthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive target for the development of new antimalarials. The phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin is a specific inhibitor of isoprenoid synthesis and has been a helpful tool to outline the essential functions of isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum. Isoprenoids are a large, diverse class of hydrocarbons that function in a variety of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes. In P. falciparum, isoprenoids are used for tRNA isopentenylation and protein prenylation, as well as the synthesis of vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinone, and dolichols. Recently, isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum has been shown to be regulated by a sugar phosphatase. We outline what is known about isoprenoid function and the regulation of isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum, in order to identify valuable directions for future research. PMID:25217461

  2. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-01

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males. PMID:26632352

  3. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  4. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Seto, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  5. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    KUZUYAMA, Tomohisa; SETO, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  6. A photoactive isoprenoid diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonate linkage: synthesis and biochemical studies with prenyltransferases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of biochemical processes rely on isoprenoids, including the post-translational modification of signaling proteins and the biosynthesis of a wide array of compounds. Photoactivatable analogues have been developed to study isoprenoid utilizing enzymes such as the isoprenoid synthases and pren...

  7. Inhibition of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway; detection of intermediates by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Henneman, Linda; van Cruchten, Arno G; Kulik, Willem; Waterham, Hans R

    2011-04-01

    The isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway provides the cell with a variety of compounds which are involved in multiple cellular processes. Inhibition of this pathway with statins and bisphosphonates is widely applied in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and metabolic bone disease, respectively. In addition, since isoprenylation of proteins is an important therapeutic target in cancer research there is interest in interfering with isoprenoid biosynthesis, for which new inhibitors to block farnesylation and geranylgeranylation of small GTPases are being developed. We recently developed a sensitive method using UPLC-MS/MS that allows the direct detection and quantification of all intermediates of the mevalonate pathway from MVA to GGPP which can be used to verify the specificity of inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. We here investigated the specificity of several inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in HepG2 cells, fibroblasts and lymphoblasts. The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates pamidronate and zoledronate specifically inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase indicated by the accumulation of IPP/DMAPP. However, zaragozic acid A, a squalene synthase inhibitor, causes an increase of MVA in addition to the expected increase of FPP. Analysis of isoprenoid intermediate profiles after incubation with 6-fluoromevalonate showed a very nonspecific result with an increase in MVA, MVAP, MVAPP and IPP/DMAPP. These results show that inhibitors of a particular enzyme of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway can have additional effects on other enzymes of the pathway either direct or indirect through accumulation of isoprenoid intermediates. Our method can be used to test new inhibitors and their effect on overall isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:21237288

  8. Inhibitors of the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis as antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, H; Wiesner, J; Sanderbrand, S; Altincicek, B; Weidemeyer, C; Hintz, M; Türbachova, I; Eberl, M; Zeidler, J; Lichtenthaler, H K; Soldati, D; Beck, E

    1999-09-01

    A mevalonate-independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis present in Plasmodium falciparum was shown to represent an effective target for chemotherapy of malaria. This pathway includes 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) as a key metabolite. The presence of two genes encoding the enzymes DOXP synthase and DOXP reductoisomerase suggests that isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum depends on the DOXP pathway. This pathway is probably located in the apicoplast. The recombinant P. falciparum DOXP reductoisomerase was inhibited by fosmidomycin and its derivative, FR-900098. Both drugs suppressed the in vitro growth of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains. After therapy with these drugs, mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite P. vinckei were cured. PMID:10477522

  9. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Plastidic Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Poplar Leaves Emitting and Nonemitting Isoprene1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Wright, Louwrance Peter; Bi, Zhen; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Niinemets, Ülo; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is one of the most important pathways in plants and produces a large variety of essential isoprenoids. Its regulation, however, is still not well understood. Using the stable isotope 13C-labeling technique, we analyzed the carbon fluxes through the MEP pathway and into the major plastidic isoprenoid products in isoprene-emitting and transgenic isoprene-nonemitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens). We assessed the dependence on temperature, light intensity, and atmospheric [CO2]. Isoprene biosynthesis was by far (99%) the main carbon sink of MEP pathway intermediates in mature gray poplar leaves, and its production required severalfold higher carbon fluxes compared with NE leaves with almost zero isoprene emission. To compensate for the much lower demand for carbon, NE leaves drastically reduced the overall carbon flux within the MEP pathway. Feedback inhibition of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by accumulated plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate almost completely explained this reduction in carbon flux. Our data demonstrate that short-term biochemical feedback regulation of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate is an important regulatory mechanism of the MEP pathway. Despite being relieved from the large carbon demand of isoprene biosynthesis, NE plants redirected only approximately 0.5% of this saved carbon toward essential nonvolatile isoprenoids, i.e. β-carotene and lutein, most probably to compensate for the absence of isoprene and its antioxidant properties. PMID:24590857

  10. Biosynthesis of Sesterterpenes, Head-to-Tail Triterpenes, and Sesquarterpenes in Bacillus clausii: Identification of Multifunctional Enzymes and Analysis of Isoprenoid Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Daijiro; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Mizuki; Totsuka, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sato, Tsutomu

    2015-06-15

    We performed functional analysis of recombinant enzymes and analysis of isoprenoid metabolites in Bacillus clausii to gain insights into the biosynthesis of rare terpenoid groups of sesterterpenes, head-to-tail triterpenes, and sesquarterpenes. We have identified an (all-E)-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (E-IDS) homologue as a trifunctional geranylfarnesyl diphosphate (GFPP)/hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP)/heptaprenyl diphosphate (HepPP) synthase. In addition, we have redefined the function of a tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue as that of a trifunctional sesterterpene/triterpene/sesquarterpene synthase. This study has revealed that GFPP, HexPP, and HepPP, intermediates of two isoprenoid pathways (acyclic terpenes and menaquinones), are biosynthesized by one trifunctional E-IDS. In addition, GFPP/HexPP and HepPP are the primary substrates for the biosynthesis of acyclic terpenes and menaquinone-7, respectively. PMID:25882275

  11. A family of transketolases that directs isoprenoid biosynthesis via a mevalonate-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lange, B M; Wildung, M R; McCaskill, D; Croteau, R

    1998-03-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate, the common precursor of all isoprenoids, has been widely assumed to be synthesized by the acetate/mevalonate pathway in all organisms. However, based on in vivo feeding experiments, isopentenyl diphosphate formation in several eubacteria, a green alga, and plant chloroplasts has been demonstrated very recently to originate via a mevalonate-independent route from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as precursors. Here we describe the cloning from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of this pyruvate/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate pathway. This synthase gene contains an ORF of 2,172 base pairs. When the proposed plastid targeting sequence is excluded, the deduced amino acid sequence indicates the peppermint synthase to be about 650 residues in length, corresponding to a native size of roughly 71 kDa. The enzyme appears to represent a novel class of highly conserved transketolases and likely plays a key role in the biosynthesis of plastid-derived isoprenoids essential for growth, development, and defense in plants. PMID:9482845

  12. Upregulation of isoprenoid pathway genes during enhanced saikosaponin biosynthesis in the hairy roots of Bupleurum falcatum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Cho, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Juncheul; Hwang, Baik

    2006-12-31

    In order to characterize saikosaponin biosynthesis in Bupleurum falcatum, the expression of five isoprenoid pathway genes and their relationship to saikosaponin accumulation in the hairy roots were analyzed. The hairy roots exhibited a rapid accumulation of saikosaponins when incubated in a root culture medium (3XRCM). Homology-based RT-PCR was used to isolate core fragments of five genes, HMGR, IPPI, FPS, SS, and OSC, from the hairy roots. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited amino acid identities of more than 85% to previously reported genes. Using the fragments as probes, the expression of these five genes in the hairy roots during incubation in 3XRCM medium was examined. Expression of all five genes in the hairy roots increased soon after incubation. In particular, the SS and OSC genes were coordinately induced at 8 days of incubation, and their expression persisted throughout the incubation period. A quantitative HPLC analysis showed that the saikosaponin content of the hairy root culture also began to increase at 8 days of culture. The correlation between SS transcript level and saikosaponin content in the hairy roots suggests that transcriptional regulation plays a regulatory role in saikosaponin biosynthesis. PMID:17202854

  13. A chemical rescue screen identifies a Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast inhibitor targeting MEP isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H; DeRisi, Joseph L; Yeh, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the "Malaria Box" library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  14. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  15. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  16. Isoprenoid biosynthesis as a target for antibacterial and antiparasitic drugs: phosphonohydroxamic acids as inhibitors of deoxyxylulose phosphate reducto-isomerase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate pathway is a target against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. 4-(Hydroxyamino)-4-oxobutylphosphonic acid and 4-[hydroxy(methyl)amino]-4-oxobutyl phosphonic acid, two novel inhibitors of DXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reducto-isomerase), the second enzyme of the pathway, have been synthesized and compared with fosmidomycin, the best known inhibitor of this enzyme. The latter phosphonohydroxamic acid showed a high inhibitory activity towards DXR, much like fosmidomycin, as well as significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in tests on Petri dishes. PMID:15473867

  17. Bioorganometallic Chemistry with IspG and IspH: Structure, Function and Inhibition of the [Fe4S4] Proteins Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis is an attractive anti-infective drug target. The last two enzymes of this pathway, IspG and IspH, are [Fe4S4] proteins not produced by humans that catalyze 2H+/2e− reductions with novel mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent advances in structural, mechanistic and inhibitory studies of these two enzymes. In particular, mechanistic proposals involving bioorganometallic intermediates are presented and compared with other mechanistic possibilities, and inhibitors based on substrate analogs, developed by rational design and compound library screening, are discussed. These results represent the first examples of bioorganometallic catalytic mechanisms of [Fe4S4] enzymes, and open up new routes to inhibitor design targeting [Fe4S4] clusters. PMID:24481599

  18. Expression of three isoprenoid biosynthesis genes and their effects on the carotenoid production of the zygomycete Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Csernetics, Arpád; Nagy, Gábor; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Szekeres, András; Eslava, Arturo P; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Papp, Tamás

    2011-07-01

    The zygomycete Mucor circinelloides accumulates β-carotene as the main carotenoid compound. In this study, the applicability of some early genes of the general isoprenoid pathway to improve the carotenoid production in this fungus was examined. The isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase gene (ipi) was cloned and used together with the genes encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (isoA) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (carG) in overexpression studies. Transformation experiments showed that the first bottleneck in the pathway, from the aspect of carotenoid production, is the step controlled by the carG gene, but overexpression of the ipi and isoA genes also contributes to the availability of the precursors. Transformations with these isoprenoid genes in combination with a bacterial β-carotene ketolase gene yielded Mucor strains producing canthaxanthin and echinenone. PMID:21443966

  19. Tandem Prenyltransferases Catalyze Isoprenoid Elongation and Complexity Generation in Biosynthesis of Quinolone Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi; Zhan, Zhajun; Li, Dehai; Tang, Mancheng; Watanabe, Kenji; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Modification of natural products with prenyl groups and the ensuing oxidative transformations are important for introducing structural complexity and biological activities. Understanding the different mechanisms Nature performs prenylation can lead to new enzymatic tools. Penigequinolones (1) are potent insecticidal alkaloids that contain a highly modified ten-carbon prenyl group. Here we reveal an iterative prenylation mechanism for installing the ten-carbon unit using two aromatic prenyltransferases (PenI and PenG) present in the gene cluster of 1 from Penicillium thymicola. The initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation is catalyzed by PenI to yield the dimethylallyl quinolone 6. The five-carbon side chain is then dehydrogenated by a Flavin-dependent monooxygenase to an aryldiene 9, which serves as the electron-rich substrate for a second alkylation with dimethylallyl diphosphate to yield a stryrenyl product 10. The completed, oxidized ten-carbon prenyl group is then shown to undergo further structural morphing to yield yaequinolone C 12, the immediate precursor of 1. Our studies therefore uncover an unprecedented prenyl chain extension mechanism in natural product biosynthesis. PMID:25859931

  20. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Pablo D; Sonawane, Prashant D; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  1. GAME9 regulates the biosynthesis of steroidal alkaloids and upstream isoprenoids in the plant mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Pablo D.; Sonawane, Prashant D.; Pollier, Jacob; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Dewangan, Veena; Weithorn, Efrat; Tal, Lior; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Malitsky, Sergey; Giri, Ashok P.; Goossens, Alain; Burdman, Saul; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) are cholesterol-derived molecules produced by solanaceous species. They contribute to pathogen defence but are toxic to humans and considered as anti-nutritional compounds. Here we show that GLYCOALKALOID METABOLISM 9 (GAME9), an APETALA2/Ethylene Response Factor, related to regulators of alkaloid production in tobacco and Catharanthus roseus, controls SGA biosynthesis. GAME9 knockdown and overexpression in tomato and potato alters expression of SGAs and upstream mevalonate pathway genes including the cholesterol biosynthesis gene STEROL SIDE CHAIN REDUCTASE 2 (SSR2). Levels of SGAs, C24-alkylsterols and the upstream mevalonate and cholesterol pathways intermediates are modified in these plants. Δ(7)-STEROL-C5(6)-DESATURASE (C5-SD) in the hitherto unresolved cholesterol pathway is a direct target of GAME9. Transactivation and promoter-binding assays show that GAME9 exerts its activity either directly or cooperatively with the SlMYC2 transcription factor as in the case of the C5-SD gene promoter. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of SGA biosynthesis and means for manipulating these metabolites in crops. PMID:26876023

  2. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression by Cholesterol Biosynthesis Inhibitors That Reduce (Pravastatin) or Enhance (Squalestatin 1) Nonsterol Isoprenoid Levels in Primary Cultured Mouse and Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia; Cukovic, Daniela; Dombkowski, Alan A; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2016-08-01

    Squalene synthase inhibitors (SSIs), such as squalestatin 1 (SQ1), reduce cholesterol biosynthesis but cause the accumulation of isoprenoids derived from farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), which can modulate the activity of nuclear receptors, including the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In comparison, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (e.g., pravastatin) inhibit production of both cholesterol and nonsterol isoprenoids. To characterize the effects of isoprenoids on hepatocellular physiology, microarrays were used to compare orthologous gene expression from primary cultured mouse and rat hepatocytes that were treated with either SQ1 or pravastatin. Compared with controls, 47 orthologs were affected by both inhibitors, 90 were affected only by SQ1, and 51 were unique to pravastatin treatment (P < 0.05, ≥1.5-fold change). When the effects of SQ1 and pravastatin were compared directly, 162 orthologs were found to be differentially coregulated between the two treatments. Genes involved in cholesterol and unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis were up-regulated by both inhibitors, consistent with cholesterol depletion; however, the extent of induction was greater in rat than in mouse hepatocytes. SQ1 induced several orthologs associated with microsomal, peroxisomal, and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and repressed orthologs involved in cell cycle regulation. By comparison, pravastatin repressed the expression of orthologs involved in retinol and xenobiotic metabolism. Several of the metabolic genes altered by isoprenoids were inducible by a PPARα agonist, whereas cytochrome P450 isoform 2B was inducible by activators of CAR. Our findings indicate that SSIs uniquely influence cellular lipid metabolism and cell cycle regulation, probably due to FPP catabolism through the farnesol pathway. PMID:27225895

  3. FR-900098, an antimalarial development candidate that inhibits the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway, shows no evidence of acute toxicity and genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Jochen; Ziemann, Christina; Hintz, Martin; Reichenberg, Armin; Ortmann, Regina; Schlitzer, Martin; Fuhst, Rainer; Timmesfeld, Nina; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Jomaa, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FR-900098 is an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase, the second enzyme in the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. In previous studies, FR-900098 was shown to possess potent antimalarial activity in vitro and in a murine malaria model. In order to provide a basis for further preclinical and clinical development, we studied the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of FR-900098. We observed no acute toxicity in rats, i.e. there were no clinical signs of toxicity and no substance-related deaths after the administration of a single dose of 3000 mg/kg body weight orally or 400 mg/kg body weight intravenously. No mutagenic potential was detected in the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test) or an in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test using mouse lymphoma L5178Y/TK+/− cells (clone 3.7.2C), both with and without metabolic activation. In addition, FR-900098 demonstrated no clastogenic or aneugenic capability or significant adverse effects on blood formation in an in vivo micronucleus test with bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice. We conclude that FR-900098 lacks acute toxicity and genotoxicity, supporting its further development as an antimalarial drug. PMID:27260413

  4. FR-900098, an antimalarial development candidate that inhibits the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway, shows no evidence of acute toxicity and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Jochen; Ziemann, Christina; Hintz, Martin; Reichenberg, Armin; Ortmann, Regina; Schlitzer, Martin; Fuhst, Rainer; Timmesfeld, Nina; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Jomaa, Hassan

    2016-08-17

    FR-900098 is an inhibitor of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase, the second enzyme in the non-mevalonate isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. In previous studies, FR-900098 was shown to possess potent antimalarial activity in vitro and in a murine malaria model. In order to provide a basis for further preclinical and clinical development, we studied the acute toxicity and genotoxicity of FR-900098. We observed no acute toxicity in rats, i.e. there were no clinical signs of toxicity and no substance-related deaths after the administration of a single dose of 3000 mg/kg body weight orally or 400 mg/kg body weight intravenously. No mutagenic potential was detected in the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test) or an in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test using mouse lymphoma L5178Y/TK(+/-) cells (clone 3.7.2C), both with and without metabolic activation. In addition, FR-900098 demonstrated no clastogenic or aneugenic capability or significant adverse effects on blood formation in an in vivo micronucleus test with bone marrow erythrocytes from NMRI mice. We conclude that FR-900098 lacks acute toxicity and genotoxicity, supporting its further development as an antimalarial drug. PMID:27260413

  5. Surfactants, Aromatic and Isoprenoid Compounds, and Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Suppress Staphylococcus aureus Production of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1▿

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Peter J.; Syverson, Rae Ellen; Milligan-Myhre, Kathy; Frolova, Olga; Schroeder, Sarah; Kidder, Joshua; Hoang, Thanh; Proctor, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Menstrual toxic shock syndrome is a rare but potentially life-threatening illness manifest through the actions of Staphylococcus aureus toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Previous studies have shown that tampon additives can influence staphylococcal TSST-1 production. We report here on the TSST-1-suppressing activity of 34 compounds that are commonly used additives in the pharmaceutical, food, and perfume industries. Many of the tested chemicals had a minimal impact on the growth of S. aureus and yet were potent inhibitors of TSST-1 production. The TSST-1-reducing compounds included surfactants with an ether, amide, or amine linkage to their fatty acid moiety (e.g., myreth-3-myristate, Laureth-3, disodium lauroamphodiacetate, disodium lauramido monoethanolamido, sodium lauriminodipropionic acid, and triethanolamine laureth sulfate); aromatic compounds (e.g. phenylethyl and benzyl alcohols); and several isoprenoids and related compounds (e.g., terpineol and menthol). The membrane-targeting and -altering effects of the TSST-1-suppressing compounds led us to assess the activity of molecules that are known to inhibit fatty acid biosynthesis (e.g., cerulenin, triclosan, and hexachlorophene). These compounds also reduced S. aureus TSST-1 production. This study suggests that more additives than previously recognized inhibit the production of TSST-1. PMID:19223628

  6. Crystal structure of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, a crucial enzyme for isoprenoids biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Song; Usunow, Gerlinde; Lange, Gudrun; Busch, Marco; Tong, Liang

    2007-01-26

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a common precursor for the synthesis of all isoprenoids, which have important functions in living organisms. IPP is produced by the mevalonate pathway in archaea, fungi, and animals. In contrast, IPP is synthesized by a mevalonate-independent pathway in most bacteria, algae, and plant plastids. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the first and the rate-limiting step of the mevalonate-independent pathway and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibiotics, antimalarials, and herbicides. We report here the first structural information on DXS, from Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans, in complex with the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The structure contains three domains (I, II, and III), each of which bears homology to the equivalent domains in transketolase and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. However, DXS has a novel arrangement of these domains as compared with the other enzymes, such that the active site of DXS is located at the interface of domains I and II in the same monomer, whereas that of transketolase is located at the interface of the dimer. The coenzyme TPP is mostly buried in the complex, but the C-2 atom of its thiazolium ring is exposed to a pocket that is the substrate-binding site. The structures identify residues that may have important roles in catalysis, which have been confirmed by our mutagenesis studies. PMID:17135236

  7. Crystal Structure of 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase, A Crucial Enzyme for Isoprenoids Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Usunow, G.; Busch, G.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a common precursor for the synthesis of all isoprenoids, which have important functions in living organisms. IPP is produced by the mevalonate pathway in archaea, fungi, and animals. In contrast, IPP is synthesized by a mevalonate-independent pathway in most bacteria, algae, and plant plastids. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the first and the rate-limiting step of the mevalonate-independent pathway and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibiotics, antimalarials, and herbicides. We report here the first structural information on DXS, from Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans, in complex with the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The structure contains three domains (I, II, and III), each of which bears homology to the equivalent domains in transketolase and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. However, DXS has a novel arrangement of these domains as compared with the other enzymes, such that the active site of DXS is located at the interface of domains I and II in the same monomer, whereas that of transketolase is located at the interface of the dimer. The coenzyme TPP is mostly buried in the complex, but the C-2 atom of its thiazolium ring is exposed to a pocket that is the substrate-binding site. The structures identify residues that may have important roles in catalysis, which have been confirmed by our mutagenesis studies.

  8. Helper component-proteinase enhances the activity of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase and promotes the biosynthesis of plastidic isoprenoids in Potato virus Y-infected tobacco.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Ma, Dongyuan; Jin, Yongsheng; Tu, Yayi; Liu, Liping; Leng, Chunxu; Dong, Jiangli; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Virus-infected plants show strong morphological and physiological alterations. Many physiological processes in chloroplast are affected, including the plastidic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway [the 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway]; indeed, isoprenoid contents have been demonstrated to be altered in virus-infected plants. In this study, we found that the levels of photosynthetic pigments and abscisic acid (ABA) were altered in Potato virus Y (PVY)-infected tobacco. Using yeast two-hybrid assays, we demonstrated an interaction between virus protein PVY helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) and tobacco chloroplast protein 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (NtDXS). This interaction was confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays and pull-down assays. The Transket_pyr domain (residues 394-561) of NtDXS was required for interaction with HC-Pro, while the N-terminal region of HC-Pro (residues 1-97) was necessary for interaction with NtDXS. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, PVY HC-Pro was found to promote the synthase activity of NtDXS. We observed increases in photosynthetic pigment contents and ABA levels in transgenic plants with HC-Pro accumulating in the chloroplasts. During virus infection, the enhancement of plastidic isoprenoid biosynthesis was attributed to the enhancement of DXS activity by HC-Pro. Our study reveals a new role of HC-Pro in the host plant metabolic system and will contribute to the study of host-virus relationships. PMID:25736930

  9. Studies of the isoprenoid-mediated inhibition of mevalonate synthesis applied to cancer chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Elson, Charles E

    2004-07-01

    Pools of farnesyl diphosphate and other phosphorylated products of the mevalonate pathway are essential to the post-translational processing and physiological function of small G proteins, nuclear lamins, and growth factor receptors. Inhibitors of enzyme activities providing those pools, namely, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase, and of activities requiring substrates from the pools, the prenyl protein transferases, have potential for development as novel chemotherapeutic agents. Their potentials as suggested by the clinical responses recorded in Phase I and II investigations of inhibitors of HMG CoA reductase (the statins), of mevalonic acid-pyrophosphate decarboxylase (sodium phenylacetate and sodium phenylbutyrate), and of farnesyl protein transferase (R115777, SCH66336, BMS-214662, Tipifarnib, L-778,123, and, prematurely, perillyl alcohol) are dimmed by dose-limiting toxicities. These nondiscriminant growth-suppressive agents induce G1 arrest and initiate apoptosis and differentiation, effects attributed to modulation of cell signaling pathways either by modulating gene expression, suppressing the post-translational processing of signaling proteins and growth factor receptors, or altering diacylglycerol signaling. Diverse isoprenoids and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor, lovastatin, modulate cell growth, induce cell cycle arrest, initiate apoptosis, and suppress cellular signaling activities. Perillyl alcohol, the isoprenoid of greatest clinical interest, initially was considered to inhibit farnesyl protein transferase; follow-up studies revealed that perillyl alcohol suppresses the synthesis of small G proteins and HMG CoA reductase. In sterologenic tissues, sterol feedback control, mediated by sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) 1a and 2, exerts the primary regulation on HMG CoA reductase activity at the transcriptional level. Secondary regulation, a nonsterol isoprenoid

  10. Structure-activity analysis and antiprion mechanism of isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Taichi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-12-01

    The prion strain-specific mechanism by which normal prion protein is converted to abnormal prion protein remains largely unknown. This study found that insect juvenile hormone III reduced abnormal prion protein levels only in cells infected with the RML prion. We conducted a structure-activity analysis using juvenile hormone III biosynthetic intermediates in the isoprenoid pathway. Both farnesol and geranylgeraniol, the most potent inhibitors of abnormal prion protein formation, behaved in an RML prion-dependent fashion. Neither of them modified cellular and cell surface prion protein levels. Events downstream of this pathway include cholesterol biosynthesis and protein prenylation. However, neither of these isoprenoid compounds modified lipid raft microdomains and cellular cholesterol levels and neither affected the representative prenylated protein expression levels of prenylation pathways. Therefore, these isoprenoid compounds are a new class of prion strain-dependent antiprion compounds. They are useful for exploring strain-specific prion biology. PMID:26402376

  11. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  12. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  13. Characterization of Arabidopsis FPS Isozymes and FPS Gene Expression Analysis Provide Insight into the Biosynthesis of Isoprenoid Precursors in Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Verónica; Manzano, David; Fernández, Francisco J.; Closa, Marta; Andrade, Paola; Caudepón, Daniel; Bortolotti, Cristina; Vega, M. Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana contains two genes encoding farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase (FPS), the prenyl diphoshate synthase that catalyzes the synthesis of FPP from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In this study, we provide evidence that the two Arabidopsis short FPS isozymes FPS1S and FPS2 localize to the cytosol. Both enzymes were expressed in E. coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Despite FPS1S and FPS2 share more than 90% amino acid sequence identity, FPS2 was found to be more efficient as a catalyst, more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of NaCl, and more resistant to thermal inactivation than FPS1S. Homology modelling for FPS1S and FPS2 and analysis of the amino acid differences between the two enzymes revealed an increase in surface polarity and a greater capacity to form surface salt bridges of FPS2 compared to FPS1S. These factors most likely account for the enhanced thermostability of FPS2. Expression analysis of FPS::GUS genes in seeds showed that FPS1 and FPS2 display complementary patterns of expression particularly at late stages of seed development, which suggests that Arabidopsis seeds have two spatially segregated sources of FPP. Functional complementation studies of the Arabidopsis fps2 knockout mutant seed phenotypes demonstrated that under normal conditions FPS1S and FPS2 are functionally interchangeable. A putative role for FPS2 in maintaining seed germination capacity under adverse environmental conditions is discussed. PMID:23145086

  14. Engineering Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L. for the Production of Taxadiene: A Key Intermediate of Taxol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meiya; Jiang, Fusheng; Yu, Xiangli; Miao, Zhiqi

    2015-01-01

    Taxadiene is the first committed precursor to paclitaxel, marketed as Taxol, arguably the most important anticancer agent against ovarian and breast cancer. In Taxus, taxadiene is directly synthesized from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) that is the common precursor for diterpenoids and is found in most plants and microbes. In this study, Artemisia annua L., a Chinese medicinal herb that grows fast and is rich in terpenoids, was used as a genetic engineering host to produce taxadiene. The TXS (taxadiene synthase) gene, cloned from Taxus and inserted into pCAMBIA1304, was transformed into Artemisia annua L. using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated method. Thirty independent transgenic plants were obtained, and GC-MS analysis was used to confirm that taxadiene was produced and accumulated up to 129.7 μg/g dry mass. However, the high expression of TXS did not affect plant growth or photosynthesis in transgenic Artemisia annua L. It is notable that artemisinin is produced and stored in leaves and most taxadiene accumulated in the stem of transgenic Artemisia annua L., suggesting a new way to produce two important compounds in one transgenic plant: leaves for artemisinin and stem for taxadiene. Overall, this study demonstrates that genetic engineering of the taxane biosynthetic pathway in Artemisia annua L. for the production of taxadiene is feasible. PMID:25705665

  15. Enabling technologies to advance microbial isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Microbial production of isoprenoids provides an attractive alternative to biomass extraction and chemical synthesis. Although widespread research aims for isoprenoid biosynthesis, it is still in its infancy in terms of delivering commercial products. Large barriers remain in realizing a cost-competitive process, for example, developing an optimal microbial cell factory. Here, we summarize the many tools and methods that have been developed in the metabolic engineering of isoprenoid production, with the advent of systems biology and synthetic biology, and discuss how these technologies advance to accelerate the design-build-test engineering cycle to obtain optimum microbial systems. It is anticipated that innovative combinations of new and existing technologies will continue to emerge, which will enable further development of microbial cell factories for commercial isoprenoid production. PMID:25549781

  16. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  17. Strategies for strain improvement in Fusarium fujikuroi: overexpression and localization of key enzymes of the isoprenoid pathway and their impact on gibberellin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Albermann, Sabine; Linnemannstöns, Pia; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-04-01

    The rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi is known to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, such as the pigments bikaverin and fusarubins, the mycotoxins fusarins and fusaric acid, and the phytohormones gibberellic acids (GAs), which are applied as plant growth regulators in agri- and horticulture. The development of high-producing strains is a prerequisite for the efficient biotechnological production of GAs. In this work, we used different molecular approaches for strain improvement to directly affect expression of early isoprenoid genes as well as GA biosynthetic genes. Overexpression of the first GA pathway gene ggs2, encoding geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase 2, or additional integration of ggs2 and cps/ks, the latter encoding the bifunctional ent-copalyldiphosphate synthase/ent-kaurene synthase, revealed an enhanced production level of 150%. However, overexpression of hmgR and fppS, encoding the key enzymes of the mevalonate pathway, hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and farnesyldiphosphate synthase, resulted in a reduced production level probably due to a negative feedback regulation of HmgR. Subsequent deletion of the transmembrane domains of HmgR and overexpression of the remaining catalytic domain led to an increased GA content (250%). Using green fluorescent protein and mCherry fusion constructs, we localized Cps/Ks in the cytosol, Ggs2 in small point-like structures, which are not the peroxisomes, and HmgR at the endoplasmatic reticulum. In summary, it was shown for the first time that amplification or truncation of key enzymes of the isoprenoid and GA pathway results in elevated production levels (2.5-fold). Fluorescence microscopy revealed localization of the key enzymes in different compartments. PMID:22983595

  18. Developmental and stress regulation of gene expression for plastid and cytosolic isoprenoid pathways in pepper fruits.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; Quennemet, J; d'Harlingue, A; Camara, B

    1996-01-01

    Plant cells synthesize a myriad of isoprenoid compounds in different subcellular compartments, which include the plastid, the mitochondria, and the endoplasmic reticulum cytosol. To start the study of the regulation of these parallel pathways, we used pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit as a model. Using different isoprenoid biosynthetic gene probes from cloned cDNAs, we showed that only genes encoding the plastid enzymes (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and capasanthin-capsorubin synthase) are specifically triggered during the normal period of development, at the ripening stage. This pattern of expression can be mimicked and precociously induced by a simple wounding stress. Concerning the cytosol-located enzymes, we observed that the expression of the gene encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is constitutive, whereas that of farnesyl pyrophosphate cyclase (5-epi-aristolochene synthase) is undetectable during the normal development of the fruit. The expression of these later genes are, however, only selectively triggered after elicitor treatment. The results provide evidence for developmental control of isoprenoid biosynthesis occurring in plastids and that cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis is regulated, in part, by environmental signals. PMID:8787029

  19. Inhibition of IspH, a [4Fe-4S]2+ enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids via the methylerythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Janthawornpong, Karnjapan; Krasutsky, Sergiy; Chaignon, Philippe; Rohmer, Michel; Poulter, C Dale; Seemann, Myriam

    2013-02-01

    The MEP pathway, which is absent in animals but present in most pathogenic bacteria, in the parasite responsible for malaria and in plant plastids, is a target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. IspH, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] enzyme, catalyzes the last step of this pathway and converts (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate (HMBPP) into the two isoprenoid precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). A crucial step in the mechanism of this enzyme is the binding of the C4 hydroxyl of HMBPP to the unique fourth iron site in the [4Fe-4S](2+) moiety. Here, we report the synthesis and the kinetic investigations of two new extremely potent inhibitors of E. coli IspH where the OH group of HMBPP is replaced by an amino and a thiol group. (E)-4-Mercapto-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate is a reversible tight-binding inhibitor of IspH with K(i) = 20 ± 2 nM. A detailed kinetic analysis revealed that (E)-4-amino-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate is a reversible slow-binding inhibitor of IspH with K(i) = 54 ± 19 nM. The slow binding behavior of this inhibitor is best described by a one-step mechanism with the slow step consisting of the formation of the enzyme-inhibitor (EI) complex. PMID:23316732

  20. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  1. Deuterium-labelled isotopomers of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol as tools for the elucidation of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Charon, L; Hoeffler, J F; Pale-Grosdemange, C; Lois, L M; Campos, N; Boronat, A; Rohmer, M

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli synthesizes its isoprenoids via the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The MC4100dxs::CAT strain, defective in deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate synthase, which is the first enzyme in this metabolic route, exclusively synthesizes its isoprenoids from exogenous 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (ME) added to the culture medium. The fate of the hydrogen atoms in the MEP pathway was followed by the incorporation of [1,1-(2)H(2)]ME and [3,5,5,5-(2)H(4)]ME. The two C-1 hydrogen atoms of ME were found without any loss in the prenyl chain of menaquinone and/or ubiquinone on the carbon atoms derived from C-4 of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and on the E-methyl group of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the C-5 hydrogen atoms on the methyl groups derived from IPP C-5 methyl group and the Z-methyl group of DMAPP. This showed that no changes in the oxidation state of these carbon atoms occurred in the reaction sequence between MEP and IPP. Furthermore, no deuterium scrambling was observed between the carbon atoms derived from C-4 and C-5 of IPP or DMAPP, suggesting a completely stereoselective IPP isomerase or no significant activity of this enzyme. The C-3 deuterium atom of [3,5,5,5-(2)H(4)]ME was preserved only in the DMAPP starter unit and was completely missing from all those derived from IPP. This finding, aided by the non-essential role of the IPP isomerase gene, suggests the presence in E. coli of two different routes towards IPP and DMAPP, starting from a common intermediate derived from MEP. PMID:10698701

  2. LC-MS method for screening unknown microbial carotenoids and isoprenoid quinones.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Geyer, Roland; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The structure of secondary metabolites from microorganisms provides a useful tool for microbial characterization and chemotaxonomic classification. Microbial isoprenoid quinones, for example, are well described and used to distinguish among photosynthetic microorganism groups. In addition, isoprenoid quinones can also be found, together with carotenoids, in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method which can analyze and identify these microbial isoprenoids. Positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) together with collisionally induced dissociation was applied for generation of informative fragment spectra by mass spectrometry. Enhanced product ion (EPI) scan in a linear ion trap with information dependent data acquisition (IDA) enabled generation of MS fragment data even from minor isoprenoids. The developed liquid chromatography method enabled separation of isoprenoid patterns from their ester derivatives. Discovery and structural characterization of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were carried out by comparing characteristics of fragment spectra from unknown compounds with fragment spectra of a range of isoprenoid standard compounds and using published data. Throughout the study 17 microorganisms (e.g., Acremonium butyri, Arthrobacter spp., Brevibacterium linens, Bullera variabilis, Exophiala dermatitidis, Lecythophora hoffmannii, Panthoea agglomerans, Rhodotorula spp., Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) were screened and probable structures of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were suggested. The method lays some foundations on the analysis of yet unknown isoprenoids in microorganisms by using LCMS/MS techniques. PMID:22036764

  3. Prediction of function for the polyprenyl transferase subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Wallrapp, Frank H.; Pan, Jian-Jung; Ramamoorthy, Gurusankar; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Hillerich, Brandan S.; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Poulter, C. Dale

    2013-01-01

    The number of available protein sequences has increased exponentially with the advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing, creating a significant challenge for functional annotation. Here, we describe a large-scale study on assigning function to unknown members of the trans-polyprenyl transferase (E-PTS) subgroup in the isoprenoid synthase superfamily, which provides substrates for the biosynthesis of the more than 55,000 isoprenoid metabolites. Although the mechanism for determining the product chain length for these enzymes is known, there is no simple relationship between function and primary sequence, so that assigning function is challenging. We addressed this challenge through large-scale bioinformatics analysis of >5,000 putative polyprenyl transferases; experimental characterization of the chain-length specificity of 79 diverse members of this group; determination of 27 structures of 19 of these enzymes, including seven cocrystallized with substrate analogs or products; and the development and successful application of a computational approach to predict function that leverages available structural data through homology modeling and docking of possible products into the active site. The crystallographic structures and computational structural models of the enzyme–ligand complexes elucidate the structural basis of specificity. As a result of this study, the percentage of E-PTS sequences similar to functionally annotated ones (BLAST e-value ≤ 1e−70) increased from 40.6 to 68.8%, and the percentage of sequences similar to available crystal structures increased from 28.9 to 47.4%. The high accuracy of our blind prediction of newly characterized enzymes indicates the potential to predict function to the complete polyprenyl transferase subgroup of the isoprenoid synthase superfamily computationally. PMID:23493556

  4. MRI study of the cuprizone-induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis: demyelination is not found after co-treatment with polyprenols (long-chain isoprenoid alcohols)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M.; Glazacheva, V.; Pan, E.; Akulov, A.; Krutenkova, E.; Trusov, V.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a neurological disorder with poorly understood pathogenic mechanisms and a lack of effective therapies. Therefore, the search for new MS treatments remains very important. This study was performed on a commonly used cuprizone animal model of multiple sclerosis. It evaluated the effect of a plant-derived substance called Ropren® (containing approximately 95% polyprenols or long-chain isoprenoid alcohols) on cuprizone- induced demyelination. The study was performed on 27 eight-week old male CD-1 mice. To induce demyelination mice were fed 0.5% cuprizone in the standard diet for 10 weeks. Ropren® was administered in one daily intraperitoneal injection (12mg/kg), beginning on the 6th week of the experiment. On the 11th week, the corpus callosum in the brain was evaluated in all animals using magnetic resonance imaging with an 11.7 T animal scanner using T2- weighted sequence. Cuprizone treatment successfully induced the model of demyelination with a significant decrease in the size of the corpus callosum compared with the control group (p<0.01). Mice treated with both cuprizone and Ropren® did not exhibit demyelination in the corpus callosum (p<0.01). This shows the positive effect of polyprenols on cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice.

  5. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M.; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J.; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents. PMID:26595805

  6. Metabolic engineering of volatile isoprenoids in plants and microbes.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Claudia E; Bongers, Mareike; Liu, Qing; Delatte, Thierry; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2014-08-01

    The chemical properties and diversity of volatile isoprenoids lends them to a broad variety of biological roles. It also lends them to a host of biotechnological applications, both by taking advantage of their natural functions and by using them as industrial chemicals/chemical feedstocks. Natural functions include roles as insect attractants and repellents, abiotic stress protectants in pathogen defense, etc. Industrial applications include use as pharmaceuticals, flavours, fragrances, fuels, fuel additives, etc. Here we will examine the ways in which researchers have so far found to exploit volatile isoprenoids using biotechnology. Production and/or modification of volatiles using metabolic engineering in both plants and microorganisms are reviewed, including engineering through both mevalonate and methylerythritol diphosphate pathways. Recent advances are illustrated using several case studies (herbivores and bodyguards, isoprene, and monoterpene production in microbes). Systems and synthetic biology tools with particular utility for metabolic engineering are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the practical realities of various applications in modern biotechnology, explore possible future applications, and examine the challenges of moving these technologies forward so that they can deliver tangible benefits. While this review focuses on volatile isoprenoids, many of the engineering approaches described here are also applicable to non-isoprenoid volatiles and to non-volatile isoprenoids. PMID:24588680

  7. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcia F; Saito, Alexandre Y; Peres, Valnice J; Oliveira, Antonio C; Katzin, Alejandro M

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  8. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcia F.; Saito, Alexandre Y.; Peres, Valnice J.; Oliveira, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  9. The YTA7 gene is involved in the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuranda, Klaudia; Grabinska, Kariona; Berges, Thierry; Karst, Francis; Leberre, Veronique; Sokol, Serguei; François, Jean; Palamarczyk, Grazyna

    2009-05-01

    The isoprenoid pathway in yeasts is important not only for sterol biosynthesis but also for the production of nonsterol molecules, deriving from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), implicated in N-glycosylation and biosynthesis of heme and ubiquinones. FPP formed from mevalonate in a reaction catalyzed by FPP synthase (Erg20p). In order to investigate the regulation of Erg20p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we searched for its protein partners using a two-hybrid screen, and identified five interacting proteins, among them Yta7p. Subsequently, we showed that Yta7p was a membrane-associated protein localized both to the nucleus and to the endoplasmic reticulum. Deletion of YTA7 affected the enzymatic activity of cis-prenyltransferase (the enzyme that utilizes FPP for dolichol biosynthesis) and the cellular levels of isoprenoid compounds. Additionally, it rendered cells hypersensitive to lovastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) that acts upstream of FPP synthase in the isoprenoid pathway. While HMGR is encoded by two genes, HMG1 and HMG2, only HMG2 overexpression was able to restore growth of the yta7Delta cells in the presence of lovastatin. Moreover, the expression level of the S. cerevisiae YTA7 gene was altered upon impairment of the isoprenoid pathway not only by lovastatin but also by zaragozic acid, an inhibitor of squalene synthase. Altogether, these results provide substantial evidence of Yta7p involvement in the regulation of isoprenoid biosynthesis. PMID:19416104

  10. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  11. Pleiotropic Effects of a Schweinfurthin on Isoprenoid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Kuder, Craig H.; Tong, Huaxiang

    2013-01-01

    The schweinfurthins, a family of natural products derived from the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP), have marked growth inhibitory activity. However, the biochemical basis for the schweinfurthins cellular effects has remained ill-defined. Here, the effects of the synthetic schweinfurthin, 3-deoxyschweinfurthin (3dSB) on multiple aspects of isoprenoid homeostasis are explored. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrate a synergistic interaction between 3dSB and the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin but not with other IBP inhibitors in a variety of human cancer cell lines. The cytotoxic effects of 3dSB were enhanced in cells incubated in lipid-depleted serum. 3dSB was found to enhance the lovastatin-induced decrease in protein prenylation. In addition, 3dSB decreases intracellular farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate levels in both established cell lines and primary cells. To determine whether 3dSB alters the regulation of expression of genes involved in isoprenoid homeostasis, real-time PCR studies were performed in human cell lines cultured in either lipid-replete or -deplete conditions. These studies demonstrate that 3dSB abrogates lovastatin-induced upregulation of sterol regulatory element-containing genes and lovastatin-induced downregulation of ABCA1. In aggregate, these studies are the first to demonstrate that a schweinfurthin exerts pleiotropic effects on isoprenoid homeostasis. PMID:21633866

  12. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Pathogenic Bacteria: Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Insight into the Unusual [4Fe-4S] Cluster of the E. coli LytB/IspH Protein.

    PubMed

    Faus, Isabelle; Reinhard, Annegret; Rackwitz, Sergej; Wolny, Juliusz A; Schlage, Kai; Wille, Hans-Christian; Chumakov, Aleksandr; Krasutsky, Sergiy; Chaignon, Philippe; Poulter, C Dale; Seemann, Myriam; Schünemann, Volker

    2015-10-19

    The LytB/IspH protein catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway which is used for the biosynthesis of essential terpenoids in most pathogenic bacteria. Therefore, the MEP pathway is a target for the development of new antimicrobial agents as it is essential for microorganisms, yet absent in humans. Substrate-free LytB has a special [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster with a yet unsolved structure. This motivated us to use synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) in combination with quantum chemical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to gain more insight into the structure of substrate-free LytB. The apical iron atom of the [4Fe-4S](2+) is clearly linked to three water molecules. We additionally present NRVS data of LytB bound to its natural substrate, (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate (HMBPP) and to the inhibitors (E)-4-amino-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate and (E)-4-mercapto-3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl diphosphate. PMID:26118554

  13. Isoprenoid generating systems in plants - A handy toolbox how to assess contribution of the mevalonate and methylerythritol phosphate pathways to the biosynthetic process.

    PubMed

    Lipko, Agata; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Isoprenoids comprise an astonishingly diverse group of metabolites with numerous potential and actual applications in medicine, agriculture and the chemical industry. Generation of efficient platforms producing isoprenoids is a target of numerous laboratories. Such efforts are generally enhanced if the native biosynthetic routes can be identified, and if the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the biosynthesis of the compound(s) of interest can be determined. In this review a critical summary of the techniques applied to establish the contribution of the two alternative routes of isoprenoid production operating in plant cells, the mevalonate and methylerythritol pathways, with a focus on their co-operation (cross-talk) is presented. Special attention has been paid to methodological aspects of the referred studies, in order to give the reader a deeper understanding for the nuances of these powerful techniques. This review has been designed as an organized toolbox, which might offer the researchers comments useful both for project design and for interpretation of results obtained. PMID:27133788

  14. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C.; Herron, Blake K.; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants. PMID:26282236

  15. Isoprenoids, Small GTPases and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooff, Gero P.; Wood, W. Gibson; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    The mevalonate-pathway is a crucial metabolic pathway for most eukaryotic cells. Cholesterol is a highly recognized product of this pathway but growing interest is being given to the synthesis and functions of isoprenoids. Isoprenoids are a complex class of biologically active lipids including for example, dolichol, ubiquinone, farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). Early work had shown that the long-chain isoprenoid dolichol is decreased, but that dolichyl-phosphate and ubiquinone are elevated in brains of Alzheimer´s diseased (AD) patients. Until recently, levels of their biological active precursors FPP and GGPP were unknown. These short-chain isoprenoids are critical in the post translational modification of certain proteins which function as molecular switches in numerous, signaling pathways. The major protein families belong to the superfamily of small GTPases, consisting of roughly 150 members. Recent experimental evidence indicated that members of the small GTPases are involved in AD pathogenesis and stimulated interest in the role of FPP and GGPP in protein prenylation and cell function. A straightforward prediction derived from those studies was that FPP and GGPP levels would be elevated in AD brains as compared with normal neurological controls. For the first time, recent evidence shows significantly elevated levels of FPP and GGPP in human AD brain tissue. Cholesterol levels did not differ between AD and control samples. One obvious conclusion is that homeostasis of FPP and GGPP but not of cholesterol is specifically targeted in AD. Since prenylation of small GTPases by FPP or GGPP is indispensable for their proper function we are proposing that these two isoprenoids are up-regulated in AD resulting in an over abundance of certain prenylated proteins which contributes to neuronal dysfunction. PMID:20382260

  16. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  17. High isoprenoid flux Escherichia coli as a host for carotenoids production.

    PubMed

    Suh, Wonchul

    2012-01-01

    A noncarotenogenic microbe E. coli was engineered for high production of carotenoids. To increase the isoprenoid flux, the chromosomal native promoters of the rate-controlling steps (dxs, idi and ispDispF) in the isoprenoid pathway were replaced with a strong bacteriophage T5 promoter (P(T5)) by using the λ-Red recombinase system in combination with the Flp/FRT site-specific recombination system for marker excision and P1 transduction for gene trait stacking. The resulting high isoprenoid flux E. coli can be used as a starting strain to produce various carotenoids by introducing heterologous carotenoid genes. In this study, the high isoprenoid flux E. coli was transformed with a plasmid carrying the β-carotene biosynthetic genes from Pantoea stewartii for β-carotene production. PMID:22144352

  18. Biodegradation of acyclic isoprenoids by Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, S G; Lau, E P; Watt, D S; Fall, R R

    1978-01-01

    The ability of various pseudomonads to utilize acyclic isoprenoids as a sole carbon source was investigated. Tests for utilization of acyclic isoprenols such as citronellol and geraniol were complicated by toxic effects of these alcohols, and most species tested were killed by exposure to citronellol or geraniol (0.1%, vol/vol) in liquid culture. In the case of Pseudomonas citronellolis, sensitivity to isoprenols is reduced by prior induction of the isoprenoid degradative pathway via either growth on succinate in the presence of citronellol or growth on citronellic acid. For this species, citronellic acid proved to be the best isoprenoid growth substrate tested. Geraniol utilization as a taxonomic indicator for different subgroups of pseudomonads is discussed. Only a few of the species tested were able to utilize acyclic isoprenoids. Two species which utilize C10 acyclic isoprenoids, P. aeruginosa and P. mendocina, were shown to contain the inducible enzyme geranyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, one of the unique enzymes in the isoprenol degradative pathway known to occur in P. citronellolis. Of the species which utilized geranitol, none showed definite growth on the homologous C15 and C20 isoprenols. PMID:681275

  19. Mutation of Archaeal Isopentenyl Phosphate Kinase Highlights Mechanism and Guides Phosphorylation of Additional Isoprenoid Monophosphates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) from either the mevalonate (MVA) or the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway provides the key metabolite for primary and secondary isoprenoid biosynthesis. Isoprenoid metabolism plays crucial roles in membrane stability, steroid biosynthesis, vitamin production, protein localization, defense and communication, photoprotection, sugar transport, and glycoprotein biosynthesis. Recently, an alternative branch of the MVA pathway was discovered in the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii involving a small molecule kinase, isopentenyl phosphate kinase (IPK). IPK belongs to the amino acid kinase (AAK) superfamily. In vitro, IPK phosphorylates isopentenyl monophosphate (IP) in an ATP and Mg2+-dependent reaction producing IPP. Here, we describe crystal structures of IPK from M. jannaschii refined to nominal resolutions of 2.0−2.8 Å. Notably, an active site histidine residue (His60) forms a hydrogen bond with the terminal phosphate of both substrate and product. This His residue serves as a marker for a subset of the AAK family that catalyzes phosphorylation of phosphate or phosphonate functional groups; the larger family includes carboxyl-directed kinases, which lack this active site residue. Using steady-state kinetic analysis of H60A, H60N, and H60Q mutants, the protonated form of the Nε2 nitrogen of His60 was shown to be essential for catalysis, most likely through hydrogen bond stabilization of the transition state accompanying transphosphorylation. Moreover, the structures served as the starting point for the engineering of IPK mutants capable of the chemoenzymatic synthesis of longer chain isoprenoid diphosphates from monophosphate precursors. PMID:20392112

  20. Localization of the pre-squalene segment of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in mammalian peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Werner J; Tape, Khanichi N; Shackelford, Janis E; Duan, Xueying; Kasumov, Takhar; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri; Krisans, Skaidrite K

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the early steps in the isoprenoid/cholesterol biosynthetic pathway occur in peroxisomes. However, the role of peroxisomes in cholesterol biosynthesis has recently been questioned in several reports concluding that three of the peroxisomal cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes, namely mevalonate kinase, phosphomevalonate kinase, and mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, do not localize to peroxisomes in human cells even though they contain consensus peroxisomal targeting signals. We re-investigated the subcellular localization of the cholesterol biosynthetic enzymes of the pre-squalene segment in human cells by using new stable isotopic techniques and data computations with isotopomer spectral analysis, in combination with immunofluorescence and cell permeabilization techniques. Our present findings clearly show and confirm previous studies that the pre-squalene segment of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is localized to peroxisomes. In addition, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that acetyl-CoA derived from peroxisomal beta-oxidation of very long-chain fatty acids and medium-chain dicarboxylic acids is preferentially channeled to cholesterol synthesis inside the peroxisomes without mixing with the cytosolic acetyl-CoA pool. PMID:17180682

  1. The isoprenoid pathway in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad.: cloning and characterisation of the tbhmgr, tbfpps and tbsqs genes.

    PubMed

    Guidi, C; Zeppa, S; Annibalini, G; Pierleoni, R; Guescini, M; Buffalini, M; Zambonelli, A; Stocchi, V

    2006-12-01

    The isoprenoid pathway of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad is investigated to better understand the molecular mechanisms at work, in particular during the maturation of the complex ascomata (the so-called "truffles"). Three T. borchii genes coding for the most important regulatory enzymes of the isoprenoid biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, farnesyl-diphosphate synthase (FPPS) and squalene synthase (SQS), were cloned and characterised. The analyses of their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences led us to identify the typical domains shown in homologous proteins. By using a quantitative real-time PCR the expression pattern of the three genes was analysed in the vegetative phase and during the complex ascoma maturation process, revealing an over-expression in the mature ascomata. The enzymatic activity of the T. borchii 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaril-CoA reductase (HMGR) was investigated with a HPLC method, confirming that the significant isoprenoid biosynthesis in ripe ascomata proceeds not only via a transcriptional activation, but also via an enzyme activity control. These findings imply that isoprenoids play a fundamental role in Tuber ascomata, particularly in the last phases of their maturation, when they could be involved in antifungal or/and antimicrobial processes and contribute to the famous flavour of the truffle ascomata. PMID:16960710

  2. Biosynthesis of the labdane diterpene marrubiin in Marrubium vulgare via a non-mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Knöss, W; Reuter, B; Zapp, J

    1997-09-01

    The biosynthesis of the furanic labdane diterpene marrubiin has been studied in plantlets and shoot cultures of Marrubium vulgare (Lamiaceae). The use of [2-14C]acetate, [2-14C]pyruvate, [2-14C]mevalonic acid and [U-14C]glucose incorporation experiments showed that the labelling of sterols in etiolated shoot cultures of M. vulgare was in accordance with their biosynthesis via the acetate-mevalonate pathway. In contrast, the incorporation rates of these precursors into the diterpene marrubiin could not be explained by biosynthesis of this compound via the acetate-mevalonate pathway. Cultivation of etiolated shoot cultures of M. vulgare on medium containing [1-13C]glucose and subsequent 13C-NMR spectroscopy of marrubiin led to the conclusion that the biosynthesis of marrubiin follows a non-mevalonate pathway. All isoprenic units of 13C-labelled marrubiin were enriched in those carbons that correspond to positions 1 and 5 of a putative precursor isopentenyl diphosphate. This labelling pattern from [1-13C]glucose is consistent with an alternative pathway via trioses, which has already been shown to occur in Eubacteria and Gymnospermae. The labdane skeleton is a precursor of many other skeletal types of diterpenes. Therefore it becomes obvious that in connection with the few known examples of a non-mevalonate pathway to isoprenoids the formation of some isoprenoids in plants via a non-mevalonate pathway might be quite common. PMID:9291117

  3. Block of the Mevalonate Pathway Triggers Oxidative and Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Modulated by Exogenous Isoprenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines’ release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD. PMID:24758928

  4. Effects of distal cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Carlos; Martín, Miguel; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2005-05-01

    Cholesterol is a major lipid component of the plasma membrane in animal cells. In addition to its structural requirement, cholesterol is essential in cell proliferation and other cell processes. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the stringency of the requirement for cholesterol as a regulator of proliferation and cell cycle progression, compared with other sterols of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were cultured in cholesterol-free medium and treated with different distal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis (zaragozic acid, SKF 104976, SR 31747, BM 15766, and AY 9944), which allow the synthesis of isoprenoid derivatives and different sets of sterol intermediates, but not cholesterol. The results showed that only the inhibition of sterol Delta7-reductase was compatible with cell proliferation. Blocking cholesterol biosynthesis upstream of this enzyme resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest selectively in G2/M phase. PMID:15687348

  5. Genomic and Proteomic Studies on Plesiomonas shigelloides Lipopolysaccharide Core Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aquilini, Eleonora; Merino, Susana; Regué, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We report here the identification of waa clusters with the genes required for the biosynthesis of the core lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of two Plesiomonas shigelloides strains. Both P. shigelloides waa clusters shared all of the genes besides the ones flanking waaL. In both strains, all of the genes were found in the waa gene cluster, although one common core biosynthetic gene (wapG) was found in a different chromosome location outside the cluster. Since P. shigelloides and Klebsiella pneumoniae share a core LPS carbohydrate backbone extending up at least to the second outer-core residue, the functions of the common P. shigelloides genes were elucidated by genetic complementation studies using well-defined K. pneumoniae mutants. The function of strain-specific inner- or outer-core genes was identified by using as a surrogate acceptor LPS from three well-defined K. pneumoniae core LPS mutants. Using this strategy, we were able to assign a proteomic function to all of the P. shigelloides waa genes identified in the two strains encoding six new glycosyltransferases (WapA, -B, -C, -D, -F, and -G). P. shigelloides demonstrated an important variety of core LPS structures, despite being a single species of the genus, as well as high homologous recombination in housekeeping genes. PMID:24244003

  6. Bacterioopsin-triggered retinal biosynthesis is inhibited by bacteriorhodopsin formation in Halobacterium salinarium.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Sonar, S

    1999-08-13

    Factors regulating retinal biosynthesis in halobacteria are not clearly understood. In halobacteria, events leading to the biosynthesis of bacteriorhodopsin have been proposed to participate in stringent regulation of retinal biosynthesis. The present study describes a novel approach of in vivo introductions of mRNA and membrane proteins via liposome fusion to test their role in cellular metabolism. Both the bacterioopsin-encoding mRNA and the liposome-encapsulated bacterioopsin (apoprotein) are independently introduced in spheroplasts of the purple membrane-negative strain Halobacterium salinarium that initially contain neither bacterioopsin nor retinal. Isoprenoid analyses of these cells indicate that the expression/presence of bacterioopsin triggers retinal biosynthesis from lycopene, and its subsequent binding to opsin generates bacteriorhodopsin. When bacteriorhodopsin and excess retinal were independently introduced into spheroplasts of purple membrane-negative cells, the introduction of bacteriorhodopsin resulted in an accumulation of lycopene, indicating an inhibition of retinal biosynthesis. These results provide direct evidence that the formation of bacterioopsin acts as a trigger for lycopene conversion to beta-carotene in retinal biosynthesis. The trigger for this event does not lie with either transcription or translation of the bop gene. It is clearly associated with the folded and the membrane-integrated state of bacterioopsin. On the other hand, the trigger signaling inhibition of retinal biosynthesis does not lie with the presence of excess retinal but with the correctly folded, retinal-bound form, bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:10438533

  7. A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis of Isoprenoid Pathway by LC-MS/MS in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Tomonori; Fang, Yue; Zhou, Xin; Jaiseng, Wurentuya; Ma, Yan; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), ergosterol (a final sterol product), and squalene (an intermediate pathway product), were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level. PMID:23145048

  8. Terpene Biosynthesis: Modularity Rules

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Lin, Fu-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Terpenes are the largest class of small molecule natural products on Earth, and the most abundant by mass. Here, we summarize recent developments in elucidating the structure and function of the proteins involved in their biosynthesis. There are 6 main building blocks or modules (α,β,γ,δ,ε and ζ) that make up the structures of these enzymes: the αα and αδ head-to-tail trans-prenyl transferases that produce trans-isoprenoid diphosphates from C5 precursors; the ε head-to-head prenyl transferases that convert these diphosphates into the tri-and tetra-terpene precursors of sterols, hopanoids and carotenoids; the βγ di- and tri-terpene synthases; the ζ head-to-tail cis-prenyl transferases that produce the cis-isoprenoid diphosphates involved in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and finally the α, αβ and αβγ terpene synthases that produce plant terpenes, with many of these modular enzymes having originated from ancestral α and β domain proteins. We also review progress in determining the structure and function of the two 4Fe-4S reductases involved in formation of the C5 diphosphates in many bacteria, where again, highly modular structures are found. PMID:22105807

  9. Arabidopsis GERANYLGERANYL DIPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sola, M Águila; Coman, Diana; Beck, Gilles; Barja, M Victoria; Colinas, Maite; Graf, Alexander; Welsch, Ralf; Rütimann, Philipp; Bühlmann, Peter; Bigler, Laurent; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Vranová, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Most plastid isoprenoids, including photosynthesis-related metabolites such as carotenoids and the side chain of chlorophylls, tocopherols (vitamin E), phylloquinones (vitamin K), and plastoquinones, derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. Seven out of 10 functional GGPPS isozymes in Arabidopsis thaliana reside in plastids. We aimed to address the function of different GGPPS paralogues for plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis. We constructed a gene co-expression network (GCN) using GGPPS paralogues as guide genes and genes from the upstream and downstream pathways as query genes. Furthermore, knock-out and/or knock-down ggpps mutants were generated and their growth and metabolic phenotypes were analyzed. Also, interacting protein partners of GGPPS11 were searched for. Our data showed that GGPPS11, encoding the only plastid isozyme essential for plant development, functions as a hub gene among GGPPS paralogues and is required for the production of all major groups of plastid isoprenoids. Furthermore, we showed that the GGPPS11 protein physically interacts with enzymes that use GGPP for the production of carotenoids, chlorophylls, tocopherols, phylloquinone, and plastoquinone. GGPPS11 is a hub isozyme required for the production of most photosynthesis-related isoprenoids. Both gene co-expression and protein-protein interaction likely contribute to the channeling of GGPP by GGPPS11. PMID:26224411

  10. Process-based modelling of isoprenoid emissions from evergreen leaves of Quercus ilex (L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, R.; Mayrhofer, S.; Fischbach, R. J.; Steinbrecher, R.; Staudt, M.; Schnitzler, J.-P.

    Monoterpenes play an important role in regulating the trace gas composition of the lower troposphere. Therefore, realistic estimates of the daily as well as seasonal variations of monoterpene emission source strength on the Earth surface are required. Monoterpenes are emitted by Holm oak ( Quercus ilex L.) and other species lacking specific foliar terpene storage structures and their development is dependent on light and temperature. In the present work we describe a process-based emission model taking into account the physiological/phenological state of Holm oak leaves and biochemical processes leading to the formation of monoterpenes. The model 'seasonal isoprenoid synthase model-biochemical isoprenoid biosynthesis model' (SIM-BIM2) is developed based on a previous version which was used to simulate isoprene emissions from deciduous oaks. The current model considers additional enzymatic reactions in Holm oak chloroplasts that lead to the formation of monoterpenes. The comparison of simulated and measured biochemical properties as well as emission rates displayed that the ability of the model to dynamically adjust monoterpene biosynthesis capacity by modulating the amount of monoterpene synthase activities in dependence of the weather pattern led to realistic simulations of light-dependent monoterpene emission rates. Differences to simulation results obtained by a widely used alternative model [Guenther, A.B., Zimmerman, P.R., Harley, P.C., Monson, R.K., Fall, R., 1993. Isoprene and monoterpene emission rate variability—model evaluations and sensitivity analyses. Journal of Geophysical Research 98, 12609-12617] are discussed.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Corvol Ether Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Patrick; Janusko, Aron; Goldfuss, Bernd; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of corvol ethers A and B, two sesquiterpenes from Kitasatospora setae, proceeds with involvement of either one 1,3- or two sequential 1,2-hydride shifts. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the sequence of two 1,2-hydride shifts is energetically favoured. Labelling experiments were in agreement with this finding. In addition, the stereochemical course of a reprotonation step was investigated by incubation of (13)C-labelled isotopomers of farnesyl diphosphate in water and in deuterium oxide. PMID:26635093

  12. Isoprenoid drugs, biofuels, and chemicals--artemisinin, farnesene, and beyond.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids have been identified and used as natural pharmaceuticals, fragrances, solvents, and, more recently, advanced biofuels. Although isoprenoids are most commonly found in plants, researchers have successfully engineered both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways to produce these valuable chemicals in microorganisms at high yields. The microbial synthesis of the precursor to artemisinin--an important antimalarial drug produced from the sweet wormwood Artemisia annua--serves as perhaps the most successful example of this approach. Through advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, microbial-derived semisynthetic artemisinin may soon replace plant-derived artemisinin as the primary source of this valuable pharmaceutical. The richness and diversity of isoprenoid structures also make them ideal candidates for advanced biofuels that may act as "drop-in" replacements for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Indeed, the sesquiterpenes farnesene and bisabolene, monoterpenes pinene and limonene, and hemiterpenes isopentenol and isopentanol have been evaluated as fuels or fuel precursors. As in the artemisinin project, these isoprenoids have been produced microbially through synthetic biology and metabolic engineering efforts. Here, we provide a brief review of the numerous isoprenoid compounds that have found use as pharmaceuticals, flavors, commodity chemicals, and, most importantly, advanced biofuels. In each case, we highlight the metabolic engineering strategies that were used to produce these compounds successfully in microbial hosts. In addition, we present a current outlook on microbial isoprenoid production, with an eye towards the many challenges that must be addressed to achieve higher yields and industrial-scale production. PMID:25577395

  13. Mevalonate-suppressive dietary isoprenoids for bone health.

    PubMed

    Mo, Huanbiao; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Shah, Anureet; Mo, Warren K; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2012-12-01

    Osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, the balancing acts for optimal bone health, are under the regulation of small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (GTPases) including Ras, Rac, Rho and Rab. The activities of GTPases require post-translational modification with mevalonate-derived prenyl pyrophosphates. Mevalonate deprivation induced by competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase (e.g., statins) prevents the activation of GTPases, suppresses the expression of the receptor for activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) ligand (RANKL) and activation of NFκB and, consequently, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and induces osteoclast apoptosis. In contrast, statin-mediated inactivation of GTPases enhances alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, vascular epithelial growth factor, and osteocalcin in osteoblasts and induces osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Animal studies show that statins inhibit bone resorption and increase bone formation. The anabolic effect of statins and other mevalonate pathway-suppressive pharmaceuticals resembles the anti-osteoclastogenic and bone-protective activities conferred by dietary isoprenoids, secondary products of plant mevalonate metabolism. The tocotrienols, vitamin E molecules with HMG CoA reductase-suppressive activity, induce mevalonate deprivation and concomitantly suppress the expression of RANKL and cyclooxygenase-2, the production of prostaglandin E2 and the activation of NFκB. Accordingly, tocotrienols inhibit osteoclast differentiation and induce osteoclast apoptosis, impacts reminiscent of those of statins. In vivo studies confirm the bone protective activity of tocotrienols at nontoxic doses. Blends of tocotrienols, statins and isoprenoids widely found in fruits, vegetables, grains, herbs, spices, and essential oils may synergistically suppress osteoclastogenesis while promoting osteoblastogenesis, offering a novel

  14. Enzymatic modification of proteins with a geranylgeranyl isoprenoid.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, P J; Thissen, J A; Moomaw, J F

    1991-01-01

    The prenylation of several proteins involved in oncogenesis and signal transduction plays an essential role in regulating their biological activities. Two distinct isoprenoids are known to be involved in this modification, the 15-carbon farnesyl and 20-carbon geranylgeranyl groups. Thus far, identified farnesylated proteins contain methionine or serine at the COOH terminus, while those modified by geranylgeranyl end in leucine. This report describes the characterization of an enzyme activity that transfers the geranylgeranyl group to candidate proteins. The enzyme, termed a "protein geranylgeranyltransferase," exhibits a marked preference for substrate proteins that contain leucine at the COOH terminus. In fact, the enzyme will efficiently modify a normally farnesylated protein, Ha-ras, if its COOH-terminal amino acid is switched from serine to leucine. Additional studies characterize this enzyme and suggest that it is responsible for the geranylgeranyl modification of a number of GTP-binding proteins (or their subunits) that contain a consensus prenylation sequence ending in leucine. Images PMID:1924324

  15. Auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  16. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  17. Oxytetracycline Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Pickens, Lauren B.; Tang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic that acts by inhibiting protein synthesis in bacteria. It is an important member of the bacterial aromatic polyketide family, which is a structurally diverse class of natural products. OTC is synthesized by a type II polyketide synthase that generates the poly-β-ketone backbone through successive decarboxylative condensation of malonyl-CoA extender units, followed by modifications by cyclases, oxygenases, transferases, and additional tailoring enzymes. Genetic and biochemical studies have illuminated most of the steps involved in the biosynthesis of OTC, which is detailed here as a representative case study in type II polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:20522541

  18. Metabolic engineering for isoprenoid-based biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Phulara, S C

    2015-09-01

    Sustainable economic and industrial growth is the need of the hour and it requires renewable energy resources having better performance and compatibility with existing fuel infrastructure from biological routes. Isoprenoids (C ≥ 5) can be a potential alternative due to their diverse nature and physiochemical properties similar to that of petroleum based fuels. In the past decade, extensive research has been done to utilize metabolic engineering strategies in micro-organisms primarily, (i) to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and non-natural production and (ii) to develop commercially competent microbial strain for isoprenoid-based biofuel production. This review briefly describes the engineered isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in well-characterized microbial systems for the production of several isoprenoid-based biofuels and fuel precursors. PMID:26095690

  19. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells: a model system for studying biosynthesis of NAAG.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Madhavarao, Chikkathur N; Hershfield, Jeremy R; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, M A Aryan

    2004-05-19

    N-Acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is a neuropeptide that is thought to modulate neurotransmitter release through pre-synaptic mGluR3 receptors. Despite years of research into NAAG biochemistry, almost nothing is known about NAAG biosynthesis. To date, NAAG biosynthesis has only been demonstrated conclusively in explanted animal neural tissues, including frog retina, rat dorsal root ganglia and crayfish nerve cord, but not in human cells or tissues. We show here that a human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, provides a good model system for the study of NAAG biosynthesis. Radiolabled NAAG synthesis occurred using both L-[3H]glutamic acid and L-[3H]glutamine as precursors, with glutamine being the preferred substrate. Differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells with retinoic acid resulted in decreased radiolabel incorporation into NAAG, whereas differentiation with nerve growth factor did not affect radiolabel incorporation. PMID:15129167

  20. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP), an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM) by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA). Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects. Results We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Conclusions AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM), and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM). These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26566274

  1. Engineering the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoprenoid pathway for de novo production of aromatic monoterpenes in wine.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Oscar; Ramón, Daniel; Orejas, Margarita

    2008-03-01

    Grape musts contain a variety of terpenols that significantly affect wine aroma. The amounts of these metabolites depend on the grape variety, and many cultivars are non-aromatic. Yeasts like Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot produce and excrete monoterpenes efficiently, mainly due to their lack of monoterpene synthases. By metabolic engineering we have modified the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway in a wine yeast strain of S. cerevisiae expressing the Clarkia breweri S-linalool synthase gene. Under microvinification conditions, without compromising other desirable and useful fermentative traits, the recombinant yeast efficiently excreted linalool to levels exceeding the threshold of human perception. Bearing in mind the possibility of (co-)expressing other genes that encode enzymes leading to the production of various aroma compounds and the feasibility of controlling the levels of their expression, the potential of this achievement for future genetic manipulation of wine varietal aroma or for use in other alcoholic drinks seems very promising. PMID:18155949

  2. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e., highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C 40 isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an "isoprenoid" algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350°C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C 1 to C 40 pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution of linear chains and their relationships with the C 40 isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the different groups of products then released, nature of the primary cleavages, origin and mode of formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  3. Isoprenoid metabolism is required for stimulation of the respiratory burst oxidase of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bokoch, G M; Prossnitz, V

    1992-01-01

    The formation of oxygen radicals by phagocytic cells occurs through the activation of a multiple-component NADPH oxidase system. An unidentified low molecular weight GTP-binding protein has been proposed to modulate the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins undergo posttranslational processing, including an initial covalent incorporation of an isoprenyl group. To test whether such an isoprenylation reaction might be required for the activity of the oxidase, we utilized compactin and lovastatin as inhibitors of the isoprenylation pathway. Treatment of DMSO-differentiated HL-60 cells with compactin produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of O2- formation in response to FMLP or phorbol myristate acetate. Cell viability was not affected nor was normal differentiation of the HL-60 cells into a neutrophil-like cell. The inhibitory effect of compactin was specifically prevented by addition of exogenous mevalonic acid to the HL-60 cells, indicating that the inhibitory effects of the drug were due to blockade of the pathway leading to isoprenoid synthesis. Addition of cholesterol, ubiquinone, or dolichol, which are also downstream products of the isoprenoid pathway, did not override the inhibitory effects of the drug. Subcellular fractions were prepared from compactin-treated cells, and the location of the compactin-sensitive factor was determined by complementation analysis in a cell-free NADPH oxidase system. The inhibited factor was localized to the HL-60 cytosol. These data suggest that an isoprenoid pathway intermediate is necessary for activation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This is likely to represent the requirement for an isoprenoid moiety in the posttranslational modification of a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein. Our studies provide support for the involvement of such a low molecular weight GTP-binding protein in NADPH oxidase activation. Images PMID:1310693

  4. An E. coli-based bioengineering strategy to study Streptolysin S biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Markley, Andrew L.; Jensen, Emily R.; Lee, Shaun W.

    2011-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) is a leading human pathogen that produces a powerful cytolytic bacteriocin known as Streptolysin S (SLS). We have developed a bioengineering strategy to successfully reconstitute SLS activity using heterologous expression in lab strains of E. coli. Our E. coli-based heterologous expression system will allow more detailed studies into the biosynthesis of other bacteriocin compounds, and the production of these natural products in much greater yield. PMID:22001374

  5. Revealing Nature’s Synthetic Potential Through the Study of Ribosomal Natural Product Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Kyle L.; Mitchell, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a rapidly growing class of natural products with diverse structures and activities. In recent years, a great deal of progress has been made in elucidating the biosynthesis of various RiPP family members. As with the study of nonribosomal peptide and polyketide biosynthetic enzymes, these investigations have led to the discovery of entirely new biological chemistry. With each unique enzyme investigated, a more complex picture of Nature’s synthetic potential is revealed. This review focuses on recent reports (since 2008) that have changed the way that we think about ribosomal natural product biosynthesis and the enzymology of complex bond-forming reactions. PMID:23286465

  6. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from the highly branched isoprenoid producing diatom Rhizosolenia setigera

    PubMed Central

    Ferriols, Victor Marco Emmanuel N.; Yaginuma, Ryoko; Adachi, Masao; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The diatom Rhizosolenia setigera Brightwell produces highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbons that are ubiquitously present in marine environments. The hydrocarbon composition of R. setigera varies between C25 and C30 HBIs depending on the life cycle stage with regard to auxosporulation. To better understand how these hydrocarbons are biosynthesized, we characterized the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (FPPS) enzyme of R. setigera. An isolated 1465-bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame spanning 1299-bp encoding a protein with 432 amino acid residues. Expression of the RsFPPS cDNA coding region in Escherichia coli produced a protein that exhibited FPPS activity in vitro. A reduction in HBI content from diatoms treated with an FPPS inhibitor, risedronate, suggested that RsFPPS supplies precursors for HBI biosynthesis. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry also revealed that RsFPPS produced small amounts of the cis-isomers of geranyl pyrophosphate and FPP, candidate precursors for the cis-isomers of HBIs previously characterized. Furthermore, RsFPPS gene expression at various life stages of R. setigera in relation to auxosporulation were also analyzed. Herein, we present data on the possible role of RsFPPS in HBI biosynthesis, and it is to our knowledge the first instance that an FPPS was cloned and characterized from a diatom. PMID:25996801

  7. GENETICAL METABOLOMICS OF FLAVONOID BIOSYNTHESIS IN POPULUS: A CASE STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetical metabolomics (metabolite profiling combined with quantitative trait locus [QTL] analysis) is proposed as a new tool to identify loci that control metabolite abundances. This concept was evaluated in a case study with the model tree Populus. By using HPLC, the peak abundances were analyzed ...

  8. Agrobacterium rhizogenes: Transformed root cultures for the study of polyacetylene metabolism and biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Y.Y.

    1988-02-01

    Biologically active polyacetylenes are produced at low levels by the roots of members of the Coreopsidinae subtribe in the Asteraceae. Ten taxa of Coreopsis and Bidens were tranformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes Strain A/sub 4/ and hairy root cultures established. These cultures grew rapidly and produced the same arrays of polyacetylenes as intact roots. The use of transformed roots for the study of polyacetylene biosynthesis is described in this paper. The engineering of plants with resistance to herbicides is now a practical reality because there are economic, intellectual and environmental incentives for using recombinant DNA technology in crop improvement programs, and because the biochemical and genetic basis for herbicide resistance is a simple trait conferred by a single gene. The transformation of plants with genes conferring resistance to insects or disease is more daunting, however, as biologically active secondary metabolites such as some alkaloids are typically products of multienzyme reactions. Photoactive polyacetylenes are probably plant defense chemicals and they are derived by a sequence of desaturation steps from oleic acid, which occurs ubiquitously in higher plants. Although the acetylene pathway may encompass as many genetic messages as those for morphine biosynthesis, it is likley that the genes controlling the biosynthesis of polyacetylenes may be isolated, identified in the near future and transferred via Agrobacterium to economically important plants susceptible to pathogen attack. 58 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Seasonality of isoprenoid emissions from a primary rainforest in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Jardine, K.; Tota, J.; Jardine, A.; Yáñez-Serrano, A. M.; Karl, T.; Tavares, J.; Nelson, B.; Gu, D.; Stavrakou, T.; Martin, S.; Manzi, A.; Guenther, A.

    2015-10-01

    Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, profiles were collected of the vertical profile of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia, using a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere were estimated from PTR-MS measurements by using an inverse Lagrangian transport model. Measurements were carried out continuously from September 2010 to January 2011, encompassing the dry and wet seasons. Mixing ratios were higher during the dry (isoprene - 2.68 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.67 ± 0.3 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.09 ± 0.07 ppbv) than the wet season (isoprene - 1.66 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.47 ± 0.2 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.03 ± 0.02 ppbv) for all compounds. Ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) behaved similarly. Daytime isoprene and total monoterpene mixing ratios were highest within the canopy, rather than near the ground or above the canopy. By comparison, daytime total sesquiterpene mixing ratios were highest near the ground. Daytime fluxes varied significantly between seasons for all compounds. The maximums for isoprene (2.53 ± 0.5 μmol m-2 h-1) and total monoterpenes (1.77 ± 0.05 μmol m-2 h-1) were observed in the late dry season, whereas the maximum for total sesquiterpenes was found during the dry-to-wet transition season (0.77 ± 0.1 μmol m-2 h-1). These flux estimates suggest that the canopy is the main source of isoprenoids to the atmosphere for all seasons. However, uncertainties in turbulence parameterization near the ground could affect estimates of fluxes that come from the ground. Leaf phenology seemed to be an important driver of

  10. Seasonality of isoprenoid emissions from a primary rainforest in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Eliane G.; Jardine, Kolby; Tota, Julio; Jardine, Angela; Yãnez-Serrano, Ana Maria; Karl, Thomas; Tavares, Julia; Nelson, Bruce; Gu, Dasa; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Martin, Scot; Artaxo, Paulo; Manzi, Antonio; Guenther, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, vertical profiles of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, were measured within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia, using a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere were estimated from PTR-MS measurements by using an inverse Lagrangian transport model. Measurements were carried out continuously from September 2010 to January 2011, encompassing the dry and wet seasons. Mixing ratios were higher during the dry (isoprene - 2.68 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.67 ± 0.3 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.09 ± 0.07 ppbv) than the wet season (isoprene - 1.66 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.47 ± 0.2 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.03 ± 0.02 ppbv) for all compounds. Ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) behaved similarly. Daytime isoprene and total monoterpene mixing ratios were highest within the canopy, rather than near the ground or above the canopy. By comparison, daytime total sesquiterpene mixing ratios were highest near the ground. Daytime fluxes varied significantly between seasons for all compounds. The maximums for isoprene (2.53 ± 0.5 µmol m-2 h-1) and total monoterpenes (1.77 ± 0.05 µmol m-2 h-1) were observed in the late dry season, whereas the maximum for total sesquiterpenes was found during the dry-to-wet transition season (0.77 ± 0.1 µmol m-2 h-1). These flux estimates suggest that the canopy is the main source of isoprenoids emitted into the atmosphere for all seasons. However, uncertainties in turbulence parameterization near the ground could affect estimates of fluxes that come from the ground. Leaf phenology seemed to be an important driver of seasonal

  11. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation. PMID:25894575

  12. Asparagus Spears as a Model to Study Heteroxylan Biosynthesis during Secondary Wall Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Lili; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Aimin; Picard, Kelsey; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Cheetamun, Roshan; Beahan, Cherie; Cassin, Andrew; Lonsdale, Andrew; Doblin, Monika S; Bacic, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a commercially important crop species utilized for its excellent source of vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber. However, after harvest the tissue hardens and its quality rapidly deteriorates because spear cell walls become rigidified due to lignification and substantial increases in heteroxylan content. This latter observation prompted us to investigate the in vitro xylan xylosyltransferase (XylT) activity in asparagus. The current model system for studying heteroxylan biosynthesis, Arabidopsis, whilst a powerful genetic system, displays relatively low xylan XylT activity in in vitro microsomal preparations compared with garden asparagus therefore hampering our ability to study the molecular mechanism(s) of heteroxylan assembly. Here, we analyzed physiological and biochemical changes of garden asparagus spears stored at 4 °C after harvest and detected a high level of xylan XylT activity that accounts for this increased heteroxylan. The xylan XylT catalytic activity is at least thirteen-fold higher than that reported for previously published species, including Arabidopsis and grasses. A biochemical assay was optimized and up to seven successive Xyl residues were incorporated to extend the xylotetraose (Xyl4) acceptor backbone. To further elucidate the xylan biosynthesis mechanism, we used RNA-seq to generate an Asparagus reference transcriptome and identified five putative xylan biosynthetic genes (AoIRX9, AoIRX9-L, AoIRX10, AoIRX14_A, AoIRX14_B) with AoIRX9 having an expression profile that is distinct from the other genes. We propose that Asparagus provides an ideal biochemical system to investigate the biochemical aspects of heteroxylan biosynthesis and also offers the additional benefit of being able to study the lignification process during plant stem maturation. PMID:25894575

  13. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  14. Identification of long-chain isoprenoid alkylbenzenes in sediments and crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Kock-Van Dalen, A.C.; De Leeuw, J.W. )

    1988-11-01

    A series of novel methylated phytanylbenzenes have been identified in sediment extracts and oils ranging in age from Miocene to Permian. Identifications were based on comparison of mass spectra and chromatographic data of synthetic methylated phytanylbenzenes with those of geologically occurring methylated phytanylbenzenes and by coinjections with the standards. Although methylated phytanylbenzenes are structurally related to the methylated 2-methyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)chromans, components also present in the samples studied, the former do not appear to be the diagenetic derivatives of the latter. The methylated phytanylbenzenes are thought to be derived diagenetically from isoprenoid quinones or may represent a direct biosynthetic origin from specific archaebacteria.

  15. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced by thermal alteration of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Brown, S.; Calvin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of algae and photosynthetic bacteria to serve as precursors of kerogen was studied to determine what factors affect the relative rates of formation of precursor hydrocarbons. Cells of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were subjected to thermal alteration (by heating samples in glass tubes sealed under nitrogen) for two, four, and twelve weeks. Both unextracted and extracted cells in the absence and presence of montmorillonite were investigated, and the isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced in these experiments were determined. Phytane and five isomeric phytenes were the main hydrocarbons observed; their relative rates of formation in the different experimental conditions are described. No phytadienes, pristane, or pristenes were detected.

  16. Isoprenoids suppress the growth of murine B16 melanomas in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, L; Mo, H; Hadisusilo, S; Qureshi, A A; Elson, C E

    1997-05-01

    Sundry mevalonate-derived constituents (isoprenoids) of fruits, vegetables and cereal grains suppress the growth of tumors. This study estimated the concentrations of structurally diverse isoprenoids required to inhibit the increase in a population of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells during a 48-h incubation by 50% (IC50 value). The IC50 values for d-limonene and perillyl alcohol, the monoterpenes in Phase I trials, were 450 and 250 micromol/L, respectively; related cyclic monoterpenes (perillaldehyde, carvacrol and thymol), an acyclic monoterpene (geraniol) and the end ring analog of beta-carotene (beta-ionone) had IC50 values in the range of 120-150 micromol/L. The IC50 value estimated for farnesol, the side-chain analog of the tocotrienols (50 micromol/L) fell midway between that of alpha-tocotrienol (110 micromol/L) and those estimated for gamma- (20 micromol/L) and delta- (10 micromol/L) tocotrienol. A novel tocotrienol lacking methyl groups on the tocol ring proved to be extremely potent (IC50, 0.9 micromol/L). In the first of two diet studies, experimental diets were fed to weanling C57BL female mice for 10 d prior to and 28 d following the implantation of the aggressively growing and highly metastatic B16(F10) melanoma. The isomolar (116 micromol/kg diet) and the Vitamin E-equivalent (928 micromol/kg diet) substitution of d-gamma-tocotrienol for dl-alpha-tocopherol in the AIN-76A diet produced 36 and 50% retardations, respectively, in tumor growth (P < 0.05). In the second study, melanomas were established before mice were fed experimental diets formulated with 2 mmol/kg d-gamma-tocotrienol, beta-ionone individually and in combination. Each treatment increased (P < 0.03) the duration of host survival. Our finding that the effects of individual isoprenoids were additive suggests the possibility that one component of the anticarcinogenic action of plant-based diets is the tumor growth-suppressive action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of fruits

  17. Regulation of Squalene Synthase, a Key Enzyme of Sterol Biosynthesis, in Tobacco1

    PubMed Central

    Devarenne, Timothy P.; Ghosh, Anirban; Chappell, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) represents a putative branch point in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway capable of diverting carbon flow specifically to the biosynthesis of sterols and, hence, is considered a potential regulatory point for sterol metabolism. For example, when plant cells grown in suspension culture are challenged with fungal elicitors, suppression of sterol biosynthesis has been correlated with a reduction in SS enzyme activity. The current study sought to correlate changes in SS enzyme activity with changes in the level of the corresponding protein and mRNA. Using an SS-specific antibody, the initial suppression of SS enzyme activity in elicitor-challenged cells was not reflected by changes in the absolute level of the corresponding polypeptide, implicating a post-translational control mechanism for this enzyme activity. In comparison, the absolute level of the SS mRNA did decrease approximately 5-fold in the elicitor-treated cells, which is suggestive of decreased transcription of the SS gene. Study of SS in intact plants was also initiated by measuring the level of SS enzyme activity, the level of the corresponding protein, and the expression of SS gene promoter-reporter gene constructs in transgenic plants. SS enzyme activity, polypeptide level, and gene expression were all localized predominately to the shoot apical meristem, with much lower levels observed in leaves and roots. These later results suggest that sterol biosynthesis is localized to the apical meristems and that apical meristems may be a source of sterols for other plant tissues. PMID:12114564

  18. Remote sensing of plant emissions of volatile isoprenoids with PRI. Prospects for upscaling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuelas, J.

    2013-12-01

    Josep Peñuelas*1,2, Giovanni Marino1,2,3,4, Joan LLusia1,2, Catherine Morfopoulos1,2,5, Gerard Farre-Armengol1,2, Shawn Kefauver, Alex Guenther6 , Francesca Rapparini7 , Roger Seco1,2,6, Marc Estiarte1,2, Mónica Mejia-Chang1,2, Romà Ogaya1,2, Jordi Sardans1,2 , Andrew Turnipseed6, Peter Harley6, Osvaldo Facini7, Rita Baraldi7, Jim Greenberg6 , Iolanda Filella1,2 1 CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 2 CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 3 Dipartimento di Bioscienze e Territorio, Università degli Studi del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, 86090 Pesche (IS), Italy 4 Institute for Plant Protection, National Research Council, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy 5 Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, UK 6 Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, USA 7 Biometeorology Institute, IBIMET-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna, Italy Abstract Terrestrial plants re-emit around 1-2% of the carbon they fix as isoprene and monoterpenes. These emissions play major roles in the ecological relationships among living organisms and in atmospheric chemistry and climate, and yet their actual quantification at the ecosystem level in different regions is far from being resolved. Phenomenological models are used to estimate the emission rates, but the limited understanding of the function and regulation of these emissions leads to large uncertainties in such estimations. Many measurements have been made at the foliar but few at the ecosystem level, and those that do exist are limited in space and time. We here provide evidence that a simple remote sensing index, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which is indicative of light use efficiency (LUE), is a good indirect estimator of foliar isoprenoid emissions and therefore can be used to sense them remotely. These results open

  19. Cell suspension as a tool to study the biosynthesis of pilocarpine in Jaborandi.

    PubMed

    Abreu, I N; Andreazza, N L; Sawaya, A C H F; Eberlin, M N; Mazzafera, P

    2007-11-01

    Jaborandi (Pilocarpus microphyllus) is a species that naturally occurs in the North and Northeast of Brazil, whose leaves produce pilocarpine (an imidazole alkaloid that has been used to treat glaucoma and xerostomy), the biosynthesis of which is still uncertain. The aim of this work was to establish cell lineages and select them according to an alkaloid profile similar to the one from Jaborandi leaves. The induction of callus was done in different culture media and growth regulators. Calluses from primary cultures or those subcultured several times were used as explants for the obtainment of six cell lineages. Alkaloids content analyses and growth curves showed that lines obtained from primary cultures produced more alkaloids and a better development. Cell lines from 12 subcultures presented a decrease in pilocarpine and pilosine production. After 24 subcultures, the production of alkaloids remained constant. ESI-MS analysis showed that cell culture extracts have the same alkaloid composition as extracts made from leaves. The results indicate that cell suspensions can be used as a model to study the biosynthesis of the imidazole alkaloid in P. microphyllus. PMID:17682964

  20. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    an exceptional model of acquisition and maintenance of redundant gene functions between non-homologous genes as a result of convergent evolution. Subsequently, although old episodic events of HGT could not be excluded, the results supported a prevalent role of gene loss in explaining the distribution of DXR-II in specific pathogenic eubacteria. Our results highlight the importance of the functional characterization of evolutionary shortcuts in isoprenoid biosynthesis for screening specific antibacterial drugs and for regulating the production of isoprenoids of human interest. PMID:24004839

  1. Simvastatin inhibits Staphylococcus aureus host cell invasion through modulation of isoprenoid intermediates.

    PubMed

    Horn, Mary P; Knecht, Sharmon M; Rushing, Frances L; Birdsong, Julie; Siddall, C Parker; Johnson, Charron M; Abraham, Terri N; Brown, Amy; Volk, Catherine B; Gammon, Kelly; Bishop, Derron L; McKillip, John L; McDowell, Susan A

    2008-07-01

    Patients on a statin regimen have a decreased risk of death due to bacterial sepsis. We have found that protection by simvastatin includes the inhibition of host cell invasion by Staphylococcus aureus, the most common etiologic agent of sepsis. Inhibition was due in part to depletion of isoprenoid intermediates within the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway and led to the cytosolic accumulation of the small GTPases CDC42, Rac, and RhoB. Actin stress fiber disassembly required for host invasion was attenuated by simvastatin and by the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. PI3K relies on coupling to prenylated proteins, such as this subset of small GTPases, for access to membrane-bound phosphoinositide to mediate stress fiber disassembly. Therefore, we examined whether simvastatin restricts PI3K cellular localization. In response to simvastatin, the PI3K isoform p85, coupled to these small-GTPases, was sequestered within the cytosol. From these findings, we propose a mechanism whereby simvastatin restricts p85 localization, inhibiting the actin dynamics required for bacterial endocytosis. This approach may provide the basis for protection at the level of the host in invasive infections by S. aureus. PMID:18388257

  2. Studies on the biosynthesis of paraherquamide A. Origin of the {beta}-methylproline ring

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.M.; Sanz-Cervera, J.F.; Williams, R.M.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1996-07-24

    The paraherquamides are potent anthelmintic alkaloids isolated from various Penicillium sp. These substances have attracted considerable attention due to their molecular complexity, intriguing biogenesis, and potential as antiparasitic drugs. The most potent member of this family is paraherquamide A (1), which contains the unusual amino acid, {beta}-methyl-{beta}-hydroxyproline. Recently, a Smith-Kline Beecham group reported the isolation and structural elucidation of the simpler indole alkaloid VM55599 (11), which contains the unusual amino acid {beta}-methylproline. As part of a program directed primarily at elucidating the biosynthetic mechanism of formation of the unique core bicyclo[2.2.2] ring system that is common to all of these alkaloids, we have initiated studies on the biosynthesis of the unusual, functionalized proline derivatives that constitute the paraherquamide family. Herein, we report the biosynthetic incorporation of primary amino acid building blocks that constitute the core framework of this class of alkaloids. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Biosynthesis-driven structure-activity relationship study of premonensin-derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ismail-Ali, A; Fansa, E K; Pryk, N; Yahiaoui, S; Kushnir, S; Pflieger, M; Wittinghofer, A; Schulz, F

    2016-08-10

    The controlled derivatization of natural products is of great importance for their use in drug discovery. The ideally rapid generation of compound libraries for structure-activity relationship studies is of particular concern. We here use modified biosynthesis for the generation of such a library of reduced polyketides to interfere with the oncogenic KRas pathway. The polyketide is derivatized via side chain alteration, and variations in its redox pattern and in its backbone chain length through manipulation in the corresponding polyketide synthase. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed the nature of the interaction between the polyketides and KRas-interacting protein PDE6δ. Non-natural polyketides with low nanomolar affinity to PDE6δ were identified. PMID:27452503

  4. SAR Studies for a New Class of Antibacterial NAD Biosynthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Whitney Beysselance; Yang, Zhengrong; Kane, Tasha A.; Zhou, Qingxian; Harville, Steve; Brouillette, Christie G.; Brouillette, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    A new lead class of antibacterial drug-like NAD synthetase (NADs) inhibitors was previously identified from a virtual screening study. Here a solution-phase synthetic library of 76 compounds, analogs of the urea-sulfonamide 5838, was synthesized in parallel to explore SAR on the sulfonamide aryl group. All library members were tested for enzyme inhibition against NADs and nicotinic acid mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NaMNAT), the last two enzymes in the biosynthesis of NAD, and for growth inhibition in a B. anthracis antibacterial assay. Most compounds that inhibited bacterial growth also showed inhibition against one of the enzymes tested. While only modest enhancements in the enzyme inhibition potency against NADs were observed, of significance was the observation that the antibacterial urea-sulfonamides more consistently inhibited NaMNAT. PMID:19408950

  5. Conversion of isoprenoid oil by catalytic cracking and hydrocracking over nanoporous hybrid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al₂O₃ and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al₂O₃/H-USY and ns Al₂O₃/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al₂O₃]/ns Al₂O₃/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al₂O₃/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products. PMID:22791962

  6. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products. PMID:22791962

  7. Improvement of Pharmaceutical Properties of Isoprenoid Compounds through the Formation of Cyclodextrin Pseudorotaxane-Like Supramolecules.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Taishi; Tanaka, Haruki; Yoshimatsu, Ayumi; Ikeda, Haruna; Arima, Kanako; Honjo, Masatoshi; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Motoyama, Keiichi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design cyclodextrin (CyD)-based pseudorotaxane-like supramolecular complexes with various isoprenoid compounds, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (R-CoQ10), squalene, tocotrienol, and teprenone, and to evaluate their pharmaceutical properties. Squalene, tocotrienol, and teprenone formed precipitates with β-CyD and γ-CyD in aqueous solution, whereas R-CoQ10 formed precipitates with γ-CyD aqueous solution. The results of powder X-ray diffraction and (1)H-NMR analyses indicated that these precipitates are derived from pseudorotaxane-like supramolecular complexes. The photostability of teprenone was markedly improved by complexation with CyDs, especially in the γ-CyD system. In addition, the dispersion rates of teprenone in the γ-CyD system were higher than those in the β-CyD system, compared with the corresponding physical mixtures. In conclusion, pharmaceutical properties such as photostability and dispersion rates of isoprenoid compounds were improved by the formation of pseudorotaxane-like supramolecular complexes with β-CyD and/or γ-CyD. PMID:26852798

  8. Non-Bisphosphonate Inhibitors of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Identified via Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D; Cao, Rong; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Zhu, Wei; Li, Jikun; Sankovsky, Anna; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The relaxed complex scheme, a virtual-screening methodology that accounts for protein receptor flexibility, was used to identify a low-micromolar, non-bisphosphonate inhibitor of farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Serendipitously, we also found that several predicted farnesyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors were low-micromolar inhibitors of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase. These results are of interest because farnesyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors are being pursued as both anti-infective and anticancer agents, and undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors are antibacterial drug leads. PMID:21696546

  9. Global Gene Regulation by Fusarium Transcription Factors Tri6 and Tri10 Reveals Adaptations for Toxin Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are isoprenoid mycotoxins and harmful contaminants of wheat infected with the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. The expression of some fungal genes for trichothecene biosynthesis (Tri genes) are known to be under control of transcription factors encoded by the genes Tri6 and Tr...

  10. Global Gene Regulation by Fusarium Transcription Factors Tri6 and Tri10 Reveals Adaptations for Toxin Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichothecenes are isoprenoid mycotoxins in wheat infected with the filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. Some fungal genes for trichothecene biosynthesis (Tri genes) are known to be under control of transcription factors encoded by Tri6 and Tri10. Tri6 and Tri10 deletion mutants were constructed...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC 23769 Isolate, AY201, Producer of Bacterial Cellulose and Important Model Organism for the Study of Cellulose Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kalpa

    2016-01-01

    The cellulose producer and model organism used for the study of cellulose biosynthesis, Gluconacetobacter hansenii AY201, is a variant of G. hansenii ATCC 23769. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence of G. hansenii AY201, information which may be utilized to further the research into understanding the genes necessary for cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:27516506

  13. Biosynthesis of Protein Amino Acids in Plant Tissue Culture. III. Studies on the Biosynthesis of Arginine 123

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Donald K.; Fulton, Michael M.

    1967-01-01

    Evidence from isotope competition studies and enzymic studies indicates that n-acetyl glutamic semialdehyde, α-n-acetyl-l-ornithine, l-ornithine and l-citrulline are intermediates between glucose and arginine in cells of Paul's Scarlet Rose. Evidence for the presence of α-n-acetyl-ornithine aminotransferase (E. C. 2.6.1.11) in cell-free extracts was obtained. PMID:6045297

  14. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering. PMID:25636485

  15. The potential of the mevalonate pathway for enhanced isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    The cytosol-localised mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway delivers the basic isoprene unit isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). In higher plants, this central metabolic intermediate is also synthesised by the plastid-localised methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Both MVA and MEP pathways conspire through exchange of intermediates and regulatory interactions. Products downstream of IPP such as phytosterols, carotenoids, vitamin E, artemisinin, tanshinone and paclitaxel demonstrate antioxidant, cholesterol-reducing, anti-ageing, anticancer, antimalarial, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. Other isoprenoid precursors including isoprene, isoprenol, geraniol, farnesene and farnesol are economically valuable. An update on the MVA pathway and its interaction with the MEP pathway is presented, including the improvement in the production of phytosterols and other isoprenoid derivatives. Such attempts are for instance based on the bioengineering of microbes such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as plants. The function of relevant genes in the MVA pathway that can be utilised in metabolic engineering is reviewed and future perspectives are presented. PMID:26995109

  16. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 2: Isoprenoids. [Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of isoprenoid compounds were isolated from a heat treated marine sediment (from Tanner Basin) which were not present in the original sediment. Among the compounds identified were: phytol, dihydrophytol, c-18-isoprenoid ketone, phytanic and pristanic acids, c-19 and c-20-monoolefines, and the alkanes pristane and phytane. The significance and possible routes leading to these compounds is discussed.

  17. Gene Profiling for Studying the Mechanism of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic polyketide metabolites produced by certain fungal species, including Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. Because many internal and external factors, such as nutrition and environment affect aflatoxin biosynthesis, we have analyzed the transcriptome of A. fla...

  18. Pulse-chase analysis for studies of MHC class II biosynthesis, maturation, and peptide loading

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tieying; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Busch, Robert; Mellins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Pulse-chase analysis is a commonly used technique for studying the synthesis, processing and transport of proteins. Cultured cells expressing proteins of interest are allowed to take up radioactively labeled amino acids for a brief interval (“pulse”), during which all newly synthesized proteins incorporate the label. The cells are then returned to non-radioactive culture medium for various times (“chase”), during which proteins may undergo conformational changes, trafficking, or degradation. Proteins of interest are isolated (usually by immunoprecipitation) and resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the fate of radiolabeled molecules is examined by autoradiography. This chapter describes a pulse-chase protocol suitable for studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II biosynthesis and maturation. We discuss how results are affected by the recognition by certain anti-class II antibodies of distinct class II conformations associated with particular biosynthetic states. Our protocol can be adapted to follow the fate of many other endogenously synthesized proteins, including viral or transfected gene products, in cultured cells. PMID:23329504

  19. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis. PMID:26065408

  20. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-06-01

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis. PMID:26065408

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza increase artemisinin accumulation in Artemisia annua by higher expression of key biosynthesis genes via enhanced jasmonic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Shantanu; Upadhyay, Shivangi; Wajid, Saima; Ram, Mauji; Jain, Dharam Chand; Singh, Ved Pal; Abdin, Malik Zainul; Kapoor, Rupam

    2015-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that the formation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) enhances secondary metabolite production in shoots. Despite mounting evidence, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms. This study suggests that increase in artemisinin concentration in Artemisia annua colonized by Rhizophagus intraradices is due to altered trichome density as well as transcriptional patterns that are mediated via enhanced jasmonic acid (JA) levels. Mycorrhizal (M) plants had higher JA levels in leaf tissue that may be due to induction of an allene oxidase synthase gene (AOS), encoding one of the key enzymes for JA production. Non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants were exogenously supplied with a range of methyl jasmonic acid concentrations. When leaves of NM and M plants with similar levels of endogenous JA were compared, these matched closely in terms of shoot trichome density, artemisinin concentration, and transcript profile of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Mycorrhization increased artemisinin levels by increasing glandular trichome density and transcriptional activation of artemisinin biosynthesis genes. Transcriptional analysis of some rate-limiting enzymes of mevalonate and methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways revealed that AM increases isoprenoids by induction of the MEP pathway. A decline in artemisinin concentration in shoots of NM and M plants treated with ibuprofen (an inhibitor of JA biosynthesis) further confirmed the implication of JA in the mechanism of artemisinin production. PMID:25366131

  2. Volatile isoprenoids as defense compounds during abiotic stress in tropical plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions of volatile isoprenoids from tropical forests play central roles in atmospheric processes by fueling atmospheric chemistry resulting in modified aerosol and cloud lifecycles and their associated feedbacks with the terrestrial biosphere. However, the identities of tropical isoprenoids, their biological and environmental controls, and functions within plants and ecosystems remain highly uncertain. As part of the DOE ARM program's GoAmazon 2014/15 campaign, extensive field and laboratory observations of volatile isoprenoids are being conducted in the central Amazon. Here we report the results of our completed and ongoing activities at the ZF2 forest reserve in the central Amazon. Among the results of the research are the suprisingly high abundance of light-dependent volatile isoprenoid emissions across abundant tree genera in the Amazon in both primary and secondary forests, the discovery of highly reactive monoterpene emissions from Amazon trees, and evidence for the importance of volatile isoprenoids in protecting photosynthesis during oxidative stress under elevated temperatures including energy consumption and direct antioxidant functions and a tight connection betwen volatile isoprenoid emissions, photorespiration, and CO2 recycling within leaves. The results highlight the need to model allocation of carbon to isoprenoids during elevated temperature stress in the tropics.

  3. Identification of long-chain isoprenoid alkylbenzenes in sediments and crude oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Kock-van Dalen, A. C.; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1988-11-01

    A series of novel methylated phytanylbenzenes (phytanylbenzene, 1-methyl-3-phytanylbenzene, 1,4-dimethyl-2-phytanylbenzene, 1,2-dimethyl-4-phytanylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethyl-5-phytanylbenzene) have been identified in sediment extracts and oils ranging in age from Miocene to Permian. Identifications were based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data of synthetic methylated phytanylbenzenes with those of geologically occurring methylated phytanylbenzenes and by coinjections with the standards. Although methylated phytanylbenzenes are structurally related to the methylated 2-methyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)chromans, components also present in the samples studied, the former do not appear to be the diagenetic derivatives of the latter. The methylated phytanylbenzenes are thought to be derived diagenetically from isoprenoid quinones or may represent a direct biosynthetic origin from specific archaebacteria.

  4. Genome-based analysis and gene dosage studies provide new insight into 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate biosynthesis in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Saika, Azusa; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Mizuno, Shoji; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2015-04-01

    Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strain PHB(-)4 expressing the broad-substrate-specificity polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes a PHA copolymer containing the branched side-chain unit 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), which has a carbon backbone identical to that of leucine. Mutant strain 1F2 was derived from R. eutropha strain PHB(-)4 by chemical mutagenesis and shows higher levels of 3H4MV production than does the parent strain. In this study, to understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced production of 3H4MV, whole-genome sequencing of strain 1F2 was performed, and the draft genome sequence was compared to that of parent strain PHB(-)4. This analysis uncovered four point mutations in the 1F2 genome. One point mutation was found in the ilvH gene at amino acid position 36 (A36T) of IlvH. ilvH encodes a subunit protein that regulates acetohydroxy acid synthase III (AHAS III). AHAS catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to 2-acetolactate, which is the first reaction in the biosynthesis of branched amino acids such as leucine and valine. Thus, the A36T IlvH mutation may show AHAS tolerance to feedback inhibition by branched amino acids, thereby increasing carbon flux toward branched amino acid and 3H4MV biosynthesis. Furthermore, a gene dosage study and an isotope tracer study were conducted to investigate the 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway. Based on the observations in these studies, we propose a 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway in R. eutropha that involves a condensation reaction between isobutyryl coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and acetyl-CoA to form the 3H4MV carbon backbone. PMID:25645560

  5. Genome-Based Analysis and Gene Dosage Studies Provide New Insight into 3-Hydroxy-4-Methylvalerate Biosynthesis in Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Mizuno, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant Ralstonia eutropha strain PHB−4 expressing the broad-substrate-specificity polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase 1 from Pseudomonas sp. strain 61-3 (PhaC1Ps) synthesizes a PHA copolymer containing the branched side-chain unit 3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate (3H4MV), which has a carbon backbone identical to that of leucine. Mutant strain 1F2 was derived from R. eutropha strain PHB−4 by chemical mutagenesis and shows higher levels of 3H4MV production than does the parent strain. In this study, to understand the mechanisms underlying the enhanced production of 3H4MV, whole-genome sequencing of strain 1F2 was performed, and the draft genome sequence was compared to that of parent strain PHB−4. This analysis uncovered four point mutations in the 1F2 genome. One point mutation was found in the ilvH gene at amino acid position 36 (A36T) of IlvH. ilvH encodes a subunit protein that regulates acetohydroxy acid synthase III (AHAS III). AHAS catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to 2-acetolactate, which is the first reaction in the biosynthesis of branched amino acids such as leucine and valine. Thus, the A36T IlvH mutation may show AHAS tolerance to feedback inhibition by branched amino acids, thereby increasing carbon flux toward branched amino acid and 3H4MV biosynthesis. Furthermore, a gene dosage study and an isotope tracer study were conducted to investigate the 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway. Based on the observations in these studies, we propose a 3H4MV biosynthesis pathway in R. eutropha that involves a condensation reaction between isobutyryl coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and acetyl-CoA to form the 3H4MV carbon backbone. PMID:25645560

  6. The isoprenoid pathway and transcriptional response to its inhibitors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuranda, Klaudia; François, Jean; Palamarczyk, Grazyna

    2010-02-01

    This review presents new insights into the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in particular the short-term transcriptional response to two inhibitors, lovastatin and zaragozic acid (ZA). Whereas lovastatin blocks whole isoprenoid pathway, ZA only blocks the sterol branch. Consequently, their effects on the cellular level of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) are different. Lovastatin decreases the FPP level, whereas ZA, by inhibiting the main FPP-consuming enzyme, increases FPP availability in the cell. We discuss the role of genes whose expression is affected by both inhibitors and consider possible association of these genes with the regulation of the isoprenoid pathway. PMID:19744247

  7. Natural abundance deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Study of the biosynthesis of monoterpenes

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    Deuterium NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance (D NMR-na) is a new technique for exploring the biosynthesis of small molecules such as monoterpenes. The analysis of relative site-specific deuterium integration values is an effective means of measuring isotope effects, and examining the regio- and stereochemistry of biosynthetic reactions. The deuterium integration values of linalyl acetate and limonene isolated from the same source were consistent and showed that proton abstraction from the postulated {alpha}-terpinyl cation intermediate to form limonene is regioselective from the methyl derived from the Cs methyl of the precursor, geranyl diphosphate. This regiochemistry was observed in limonene samples from different sources and the measured primary kinetic isotope effect ranged from 0.25 to in excess of 100 (no deuterium was removed within experimental error). Various {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene samples were isolated and D NMR-na analysis showed evidence of isotopically sensitive partitioning of the pinylcation in the formation of these products. This spectral analysis supported published radiolabeling studies but did not require synthesis of substrates or enzyme purification. The formation of 3-carene occurs without isomerization of the double bond which was previously postulated. The olefinic deuterium of the bicyclic compound was traced to the depleted deuterium at C{sub 2} of isopentyl diphosphate by D NMR-na data and this supported unpublished radiolabeling studies. Study of irregular monoterpenes, chrysanthemyl acetate and lyratyl acetate, showed partitioning of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) by chrysanthemyl cyclase. The {alpha}-secondary kinetic isotope effect of 1.06-1.12, obtained from relative deuterium integration values, suggested that S{sub N}1 ionization of one molecule of DMAPP is the first step in the condensation reaction.

  8. Carotenoids in unexpected places: gall midges, lateral gene transfer, and carotenoid biosynthesis in animals.

    PubMed

    Cobbs, Cassidy; Heath, Jeremy; Stireman, John O; Abbot, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Carotenoids are conjugated isoprenoid molecules with many important physiological functions in organisms, including roles in photosynthesis, oxidative stress reduction, vision, diapause, photoperiodism, and immunity. Until recently, it was believed that only plants, microorganisms, and fungi were capable of synthesizing carotenoids and that animals acquired them from their diet, but recent studies have demonstrated that two arthropods (pea aphid and spider mite) possess a pair of genes homologous to those required for the first step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Absent in all other known animal genomes, these genes appear to have been acquired by aphids and spider mites in one or several lateral gene transfer events from a fungal donor. We report the third case of fungal carotenoid biosynthesis gene homologs in an arthropod: flies from the family Cecidomyiidae, commonly known as gall midges. Using phylogenetic analyses we show that it is unlikely that lycopene cyclase/phytoene synthase and phytoene desaturase homologs were transferred singly to an ancient arthropod ancestor; instead we propose that genes were transferred independently from related fungal donors after divergence of the major arthropod lineages. We also examine variation in intron placement and copy number of the carotenoid genes that may underlie function in the midges. This trans-kingdom transfer of carotenoid genes may represent a key innovation, underlying the evolution of phytophagy and plant-galling in gall midges and facilitating their extensive diversification across plant lineages. PMID:23542649

  9. Polyene macrolide biosynthesis in streptomycetes and related bacteria: recent advances from genome sequencing and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Patrick; De Poire, Eimear; Sheehan, James; Sweeney, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The polyene macrolide group includes important antifungal drugs, to which resistance does not arise readily. Chemical and biological methods have been used in attempts to make polyene antibiotics with fewer toxic side effects. Genome sequencing of producer organisms is contributing to this endeavour, by providing access to new compounds and by enabling yield improvement for polyene analogues obtained by engineered biosynthesis. This recent work is also enhancing bioinformatic methods for deducing the structures of cryptic natural products from their biosynthetic enzymes. The stereostructure of candicidin D has recently been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Genes for the corresponding polyketide synthase have been uncovered in several different genomes. Analysis of this new information strengthens the view that protein sequence motifs can be used to predict double bond geometry in many polyketides.Chemical studies have shown that improved polyenes can be obtained by modifying the mycosamine sugar that is common to most of these compounds. Glycoengineered analogues might be produced by biosynthetic methods, but polyene glycosyltransferases show little tolerance for donors other than GDP-α-D-mycosamine. Genome sequencing has revealed extending glycosyltransferases that add a second sugar to the mycosamine of some polyenes. NppY of Pseudonocardia autotrophica uses UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-glucosamine as donor whereas PegA from Actinoplanes caeruleus uses GDP-α-D-mannose. These two enzymes show 51 % sequence identity and are also closely related to mycosaminyltransferases. These findings will assist attempts to construct glycosyltransferases that transfer alternative UDP- or (d)TDP-linked sugars to polyene macrolactones. PMID:27023916

  10. Isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibition disrupts monoclonal protein secretion and induces the unfolded protein response pathway in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloma is characterized by the overproduction and secretion of monoclonal protein. Inhibitors of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) have pleiotropic effects in myeloma cells. To investigate whether IBP inhibition interferes with monoclonal protein secretion, human myeloma cells were treated with specific inhibitors of the IBP or prenyltransferases. These studies demonstrate that agents that inhibit Rab geranylgeranylation disrupt light chain trafficking, lead to accumulation of light chain in the endoplasmic reticulum, activate the unfolded protein response pathway and induce apoptosis. These studies provide a novel mechanism of action for IBP inhibitors and suggest that further exploration of Rab-targeted agents in myeloma is warranted. PMID:20828814

  11. Keratan Sulfate Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Funderburgh, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Keratan sulfate was originally identified as the major glycosaminoglycan of cornea but is now known to modify at least a dozen different proteins in a wide variety of tissues. Despite a large body of research documenting keratan sulfate structure, and an increasing interest in the biological functions of keratan sulfate, until recently little was known of the specific enzymes involved in keratan sulfate biosynthesis or of the molecular mechanisms that control keratan sulfate expression. In the last 2 years, however, marked progress has been achieved in identification of genes involved in keratan sulfate biosynthesis and in development of experimental conditions to study keratan sulfate secretion and control in vitro. This review summarizes current understanding of keratan sulfate structure and recent developments in understanding keratan sulfate biosynthesis. PMID:12512857

  12. Mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Edgard M; Nguyen, Hieu; Hatch, Grant M

    2014-04-01

    Cardiolipin is a major phospholipid in mitochondria and is involved in the generation of cellular energy in the form of ATP. In mammalian and eukaryotic cells it is synthesized via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol phosphate pathway. This brief review will describe some of the more recent studies on mammalian cardiolipin biosynthesis and provide an overview of regulation of cardiolipin biosynthesis. In addition, the important role that this key phospholipid plays in disease processes including heart failure, diabetes, thyroid hormone disease and the genetic disease Barth Syndrome will be discussed. PMID:24144810

  13. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  14. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  15. From flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels: production of isoprenoids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, Stefan; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Isoprenoids denote the largest group of chemicals in the plant kingdom and are employed for a wide range of applications in the food and pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, isoprenoids have additionally been recognized as suitable replacements for petroleum-derived fuels and could thus promote the transition towards a more sustainable society. To realize the biofuel potential of isoprenoids, a very efficient production system is required. While complex chemical structures as well as the low abundance in nature demonstrate the shortcomings of chemical synthesis and plant extraction, isoprenoids can be produced by genetically engineered microorganisms from renewable carbon sources. In this article, we summarize the development of isoprenoid applications from flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels and review the strategies to design microbial cell factories, focusing on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of these compounds. While the high complexity of biosynthetic pathways and the toxicity of certain isoprenoids still denote challenges that need to be addressed, metabolic engineering has enabled large-scale production of several terpenoids and thus, the utilization of these compounds is likely to expand in the future. PMID:24227704

  16. In vitro biosynthesis of diphthamide, studied with mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells resistant to diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Moehring, T J; Danley, D E; Moehring, J M

    1984-01-01

    Diphthamide, a unique amino acid, is a post-translational derivative of histidine that exists in protein synthesis elongation factor 2 at the site of diphtheria toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2. We investigated steps in the biosynthesis of diphthamide with mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells that were altered in different steps of this complex post-translational modification. Biochemical evidence indicates that this modification requires a minimum of three steps, two of which we accomplished in vitro. We identified a methyltransferase activity that transfers methyl groups from S-adenosyl methionine to an unmethylated form of diphthine (the deamidated form of diphthamide), and we tentatively identified an ATP-dependent synthetase activity involved in the biosynthesis of diphthamide from diphthine. Our results are in accord with the proposed structure of diphthamide (B. G. VanNess, et al., J. Biol. Chem. 255:10710-10716, 1980). Images PMID:6717439

  17. Different response of δD values of n-alkanes, isoprenoids, and kerogen during thermal maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Freeman, Katherine H.; Harris, Nicholas B.

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates the extent of post-depositional alteration of δD values of n-alkyl lipids, isoprenoids, and kerogen isolated from a continuous 450 m core that covers the transition from thermally immature to early mature sediments in the lacustrine Kissenda Formation, Lower Cretaceous, Gabon Basin. Large variations in δD values (up to 40‰ for nC 17 and up to 30‰ for nC 29 alkanes as well as up to 10‰ for kerogen) in closely spaced samples are evident throughout the core and remain preserved even at the bottom of the section. δD values of individual n-alkanes show a slight overall D-enrichment with depth, and a general trend of increasing δD values with increasing n-alkane chain length characterizes all samples, particularly in those below 600 m depth. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of kerogen samples overlap with those of n-alkanes throughout the section. δD values of pristane and phytane are more negative than those of nC 17 alkane by as much as 120‰ at shallow depths but increase dramatically and approach δD values of nC 17 alkane in the samples closest to the oil window. Integration of analytical and computational results indicates that: (1) n-alkanes and isoprenoids have the potential to preserve the original biological signal before the onset of oil generation; (2) isomeric and structural rearrangements taking place at the beginning stages of oil generation do not influence significantly the δD values of n-alkanes and kerogen. However, these processes have a major effect on the isotopic composition of isoprenoids, causing isotopic D-enrichment up to 90‰.

  18. Use of heme reporters for studies of cytochrome biosynthesis and heme transport.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B S; Gabbert, K K; Kranz, R G

    1996-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli containing mutations in the cydDC genes are defective for synthesis of the heme proteins cytochrome bd and c-type cytochromes. The cydDC genes encode a putative heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporter that has been proposed to act as an exporter of heme to the periplasm. To more fully understand the role of this transporter (and other factors) in heme protein biosynthesis, we developed plasmids that produce various heme proteins (e.g., cytochrome b5, cytochrome b562, and hemoglobin) in the periplasm of E. coli. By using these reporters, it was shown that the steady-state levels of polypeptides of heme proteins known to be stable without heme (e.g., cytochrome b5 and hemoglobin apoprotein) are significantly reduced in a cydC mutant. Exogenous addition of hemin to the cydC mutant still resulted in < 10% of wild-type steady-state levels of apohemoglobin in the periplasm. Since the results of heme reporter studies are not consistent with lower heme availability (i.e., heme export) in a cydC mutant, we analyzed other properties of the periplasm in cydC mutants and compared them with those of the periplasm in cydAB (encoding cytochrome bd) mutants and wild-type cells. Our results led us to favor a hypothesis whereby cydDC mutants are defective in the reduction environment within the periplasmic space. Such an imbalance could lead to defects in the synthesis of heme-liganded proteins. The heme reporters were also used to analyze strains of E. coli with a defect in genes encoding homologs of a different ABC transporter (helABC). The helABC genes have previously been shown to be required for the assembly of c-type cytochromes in Rhodobacter capsulatus (R. G. Kranz, J. Bacteriol. 171:456-464, 1989; D. L. Beckman, D. R. Trawick, and R. G. Kranz, Genes Dev. 6:268-283, 1992). This locus was shown to be essential in E. coli for endogenous cytochrome c biogenesis but not cytochrome b562 synthesis. Consistent with these and previous results, it

  19. Molecular evolution and functional characterisation of haplotypes of an important rubber biosynthesis gene in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Uthup, T K; Rajamani, A; Ravindran, M; Saha, T

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A synthase (HMGS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway leading to natural rubber production in Hevea brasiliensis (rubber). Analysis of the structural variants of this gene is imperative to understand their functional significance in rubber biosynthesis so that they can be properly utilised for ongoing crop improvement programmes in Hevea. We report here allele richness and diversity of the HMGS gene in selected popular rubber clones. Haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the coding and non-coding regions with a high degree of heterozygosity were identified. Segregation and linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that recombination is the major contributor to the generation of allelic diversity, rather than point mutations. The evolutionarily conserved nature of some SNPs was identified by comparative DNA sequence analysis of HMGS orthologues from diverse taxa, demonstrating the molecular evolution of rubber biosynthesis genes in general. In silico three-dimensional structural studies highlighting the structural positioning of non-synonymous SNPs from different HMGS haplotypes revealed that the ligand-binding site on the enzyme remains impervious to the reported sequence variations. In contrast, gene expression results indicated the possibility of association between specific haplotypes and HMGS expression in Hevea clones, which may have a downstream impact up to the level of rubber production. Moreover, haplotype diversity of the HMGS gene and its putative association with gene expression can be the basis for further genetic association studies in rubber. Furthermore, the data also show the role of SNPs in the evolution of candidate genes coding for functional traits in plants. PMID:26787454

  20. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR-wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  1. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemical scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites. In

  2. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemicalmore » scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites

  3. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-01-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies. PMID:7041819

  4. Biosynthesis of radiolabeled verruculogen by Penicillium simplicissimum.

    PubMed

    Day, J B; Mantle, P G

    1982-03-01

    In surface culture of Penicillium simplicissimum, verruculogen was shown to be biosynthesized from the intact carbon skeletons of tryptophan and proline, isoprenoid derivatives of mevalonic acid, and a methyl group donated by methionine. Selected radiolabeled precursors (1 mCi) pulse-fed at the optimum stage of fermentation yielded verruculogen (specific activity, 5.89 X 10(2) microCi mmol-1) labeled in the prolyl and isoprenyl regions of the molecule and suitable for metabolic studies. PMID:7041819

  5. Metabolic Control of Avocado Fruit Growth (Isoprenoid Growth Regulators and the Reaction Catalyzed by 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase).

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, A. K.; Moore-Gordon, C. S.; Bertling, I.; Wolstenholme, B. N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of isoprenoid growth regulators on avocado (Persea americana Mill. cv Hass) fruit growth and mesocarp 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity was investigated during the course of fruit ontogeny. Both normal and small-fruit phenotypes were used to probe the interaction between the end products of isoprenoid biosynthesis and the activity of HMGR in the metabolic control of avocado fruit growth. Kinetic analysis of the changes in both cell number and size revealed that growth was limited by cell number in phenotypically small fruit. In small fruit a 70% reduction in microsomal HMGR activity was associated with an increased mesocarp abscisic acid (ABA) concentration. Application of mevastatin, a competitive inhibitor of HMGR, reduced the growth of normal fruit and increased mesocarp ABA concentration. These effects were reversed by co-treatment of fruit with mevalonic acid lactone, isopentenyladenine, or N-(2-chloro-4-pyridyl)-N-phenylurea, but were not significantly affected by either gibberellic acid or stigmasterol. However, stigmasterol appeared to partially restore fruit growth when co-injected with mevastatin in either phase II or III of fruit growth. In vivo application of ABA reduced fruit growth and mesocarp HMGR activity and accelerated fruit abscission, effects that were reversed by co-treatment with isopentenyladenine. Together, these observations indicate that ABA accumulation down-regulates mesocarp HMGR activity and fruit growth, and that in situ cytokinin biosynthesis modulates these effects during phase I of fruit ontogeny, whereas both cytokinins and sterols seem to perform this function during the later phases. PMID:12223724

  6. In silico and in vitro Studies on Begomovirus Induced Andrographolide Biosynthesis Pathway in Andrographis Paniculata for Combating Inflammation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifa; Sharma, Pooja; Khan, Feroz; Ajayakumar, P V; Shanker, Karuna; Samad, Abdul

    2016-07-01

    Andrographolide and neoandrographolide are major bioactive molecules of Andrographis paniculata, a well-known medicinal plant. These molecules exhibited varying degrees of anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities in-vitro and in-vivo. Role of begomovirus protein C2/TrAP in biosynthesis of andrographolide was identified through molecular modeling, docking and predicted results were substantiated by in vitro studies. Homology molecular modeling and molecular docking were performed to study the binding conformations and different bonding behaviors, in order to reveal the possible mechanism of action behind higher accumulation of andrographolide. It was concluded that C2/TrAP inhibit the activation of SNF1-Related Protein Kinase-1 (SnRK1) in terpenoid pathway and removes the negative regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) by SnRK1, leading to higher accumulation of andrographolide and neoandrographolide in begomovirus infected plants. The binding site residues of SnRK1 docked with C2/TrAP were found to be associated with ATP binding site, substrate binding site and activation loop. Predicted results were also validated by HPTLC. This study provides important insights into understanding the role of viral protein in altering the regulation of biosynthesis of andrographolide and could be used in future research to develop biomimetic methods for increasing the production of such phytometabolites having anti-cancerous and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:27492239

  7. Studies of the site and mode of biosynthesis of tobacco trichome exudate components.

    PubMed

    Kandra, L; Wagner, G J

    1988-09-01

    Detached glandular trichome head preparations and epidermal strips with and without trichome heads were used to identify glandular trichome heads as the site of sucrose ester biosynthesis in tobacco. Carbon dioxide in solution as well as sucrose, glucose, and acetate were shown to serve as precursors to both sucrose esters and duvatrienediol diterpenes in detached trichome heads or epidermal strips, and gaseous CO2 was also efficiently utilized by epidermal strips. Thus, glandular heads can biosynthesize these principal exudate components from a molecule as simple as CO2. While formation of duvatriendiols from all precursors tested and conversion of sucrose and glucose to sucrose esters was light dependent, utilization of acetate to label the 6-O-acetyl group of the glucose moiety of sucrose esters occurred equally well in light and dark. The data suggest that CO2 and/or monosaccharides produced in trichome head cells and perhaps that supplied by other epidermal cells can act as carbon sources for sucrose ester and duvatrienediol biosynthesis which occurs in the glandular trichome head. PMID:3138948

  8. Farnesylation mediates brassinosteroid biosynthesis to regulate abscisic acid responses.

    PubMed

    Northey, Julian G B; Liang, Siyu; Jamshed, Muhammad; Deb, Srijani; Foo, Eloise; Reid, James B; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A

    2016-01-01

    Protein farnesylation is a post-translational modification involving the addition of a 15-carbon farnesyl isoprenoid to the carboxy terminus of select proteins(1-3). Although the roles of this lipid modification are clear in both fungal and animal signalling, many of the mechanistic functions of farnesylation in plant signalling are still unknown. Here, we show that CYP85A2, the cytochrome P450 enzyme that performs the last step in brassinosteroid biosynthesis (conversion of castasterone to brassinolide)(4), must be farnesylated to function in Arabidopsis. Loss of either CYP85A2 or CYP85A2 farnesylation results in reduced brassinolide accumulation and increased plant responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and overall drought tolerance, explaining previous observations(5). This result not only directly links farnesylation to brassinosteroid biosynthesis but also suggests new strategies to maintain crop yield under challenging climatic conditions. PMID:27455172

  9. Cerivastatin represses atherogenic gene expression through the induction of KLF2 via isoprenoid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiyuan; Natarajan, Selvamuthu K; Chronos, Nicolas; Singh, Jai Pal

    2015-12-01

    Earlier clinical studies have reported that cerivastatin has an anti-atherosclerotic effect that is unique among the statins. In our study, human THP-1 macrophage cells were used to study the effects of various statins on the expressions of the atherosclerotic genes and Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Cerivastatin significantly inhibited the two atherosclerotic genes, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) at both the mRNA and protein levels, while the other statins did not. Accordingly, cerivastatin was also the most potent inducer of KLF2 transcription in the macrophages. An siRNA-induced reduction in KLF2 expression blocked the inhibition of MCP-1 and CCR2 by cerivastatin. When the cells were further treated with mevalonate, farnesylpyrophosphate (FPP) or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), the effects of cerivastatin on KLF2, MCP-1 and CCR2 were obviously reversed. Thus, the results showed that cerivastatin was a potent inhibitor of the inflammation genes MCP-1 and CCR2 through the induction of KLF2. The regulation of MCP-1, CCR2 and KLF2 by cerivastatin was isoprenoid pathway dependent. Our studies suggest that the effect of cerivastatin on atherosclerotic genes and KLF2 expression may contribute to the cardioprotection observed in reported clinical studies. PMID:26556845

  10. Mechanistic studies of a novel C-S lyase in ergothioneine biosynthesis: the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Song, Heng; Hu, Wen; Naowarojna, Nathchar; Her, Ampon Sae; Wang, Shu; Desai, Rushil; Qin, Li; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thio-derivative isolated in 1909. In ergothioneine biosynthesis, the combination of a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzed oxidative C-S bond formation reaction and a PLP-mediated C-S lyase (EgtE) reaction results in a net sulfur transfer from cysteine to histidine side-chain. This demonstrates a new sulfur transfer strategy in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing natural products. Due to difficulties associated with the overexpression of Mycobacterium smegmatis EgtE protein, the proposed EgtE functionality remained to be verified biochemically. In this study, we have successfully overexpressed and purified M. smegmatis EgtE enzyme and evaluated its activities under different in vitro conditions: C-S lyase reaction using either thioether or sulfoxide as a substrate in the presence or absence of reductants. Results from our biochemical characterizations support the assignment of sulfoxide 4 as the native EgtE substrate and the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate in the ergothioneine C-S lyase reaction. PMID:26149121

  11. Mechanistic studies of a novel C-S lyase in ergothioneine biosynthesis: the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate.

    PubMed

    Song, Heng; Hu, Wen; Naowarojna, Nathchar; Her, Ampon Sae; Wang, Shu; Desai, Rushil; Qin, Li; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Pinghua

    2015-01-01

    Ergothioneine is a histidine thio-derivative isolated in 1909. In ergothioneine biosynthesis, the combination of a mononuclear non-heme iron enzyme catalyzed oxidative C-S bond formation reaction and a PLP-mediated C-S lyase (EgtE) reaction results in a net sulfur transfer from cysteine to histidine side-chain. This demonstrates a new sulfur transfer strategy in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing natural products. Due to difficulties associated with the overexpression of Mycobacterium smegmatis EgtE protein, the proposed EgtE functionality remained to be verified biochemically. In this study, we have successfully overexpressed and purified M. smegmatis EgtE enzyme and evaluated its activities under different in vitro conditions: C-S lyase reaction using either thioether or sulfoxide as a substrate in the presence or absence of reductants. Results from our biochemical characterizations support the assignment of sulfoxide 4 as the native EgtE substrate and the involvement of a sulfenic acid intermediate in the ergothioneine C-S lyase reaction. PMID:26149121

  12. Influence of Manganese Deficiency and Toxicity on Isoprenoid Syntheses 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Robert E.; Ohki, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-eight day old wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Stacy) response to varying Mn concentration (10.1-10,000 micromolar) in nutrient solution was measured. Manganese concentrations in the most recently matured leaves (blade 1) were 0.21 to 19.03 mmol Mn per kilogram dry weight, respectively. Fresh and dry weights increased to a maximum at the 5 micromolar Mn nutritional level (0.37 millimole Mn per kilogram dry weight) and were decreased at Mn above and below this concentration. Blade 1 chloroplast pigment concentrations increased up to the 20 micromolar Mn nutritional level (1.98 millimole Mn per kilogram dry weight) and decreased at higher Mn concentrations. Thylakoid Mn content was above 1 mole Mn/100 mole chloroplast at Mn nutrition levels which resulted in greatly decreased plant growth. Total phytoene biosynthesis was decreased by Mn deficiency and toxicity. In vitro ent- kaurene synthesis was greatly influenced by Mn concentration with a maximal biosynthesis at 1 micromolar Mn and decreases at Mn levels above and below this concentration. In vivo blade 1 gibberellic acid equivalent concentrations were maximal at 20 parts per million Mn nutrition solution levels (1.98 millimole Mn per kilogram dry weight) and decreased at Mn tissue concentrations above and below this value; additionally, gibberellic acid concentrations were reciprocal to extracted C20 alcohol concentrations. Mn influence on gibberellin and chloroplast pigment biosyntheses exactly matched the measured changes in growth. PMID:16666235

  13. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  14. Function of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols during oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jerzy; Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Dłużewska, Jolanta

    2016-09-25

    Isoprenoid quinones and chromanols in plants fulfill both signaling and antioxidant functions under oxidative stress. The redox state of the plastoquinol pool (PQ-pool), which is modulated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxidative stress, has a major regulatory function in both short- and long-term acclimatory responses. By contrast, the scavenging of ROS by prenyllipids affects signaling pathways where ROS play a role as signaling molecules. As the primary antioxidants, isoprenoid quinones and chromanols are synthesized under high-light stress in response to any increased production of ROS. During photo-oxidative stress, these prenyllipids are continuously synthesized and oxidized to other compounds. In turn, their oxidation products (hydroxy-plastochromanol, plastoquinol-C, plastoquinone-B) can still have an antioxidant function. The oxidation products of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols formed specifically in the face of singlet oxygen, can be indicators of singlet oxygen stress. PMID:26970272

  15. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  16. δ-Deuterium Isotope Effects as Probes for Transition-State Structures of Isoprenoid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathways to isoprenoid compounds involve transfer of the prenyl moiety in allylic diphosphates to electron-rich (nucleophilic) acceptors. The acceptors can be many types of nucleophiles, while the allylic diphosphates only differ in the number of isoprene units and stereochemistry of the double bonds in the hydrocarbon moieties. Because of the wide range of nucleophilicities of naturally occurring acceptors, the mechanism for prenyltransfer reactions may be dissociative or associative with early to late transition states. We have measured δ-secondary kinetic isotope effects operating through four bonds for substitution reactions with dimethylallyl derivatives bearing deuterated methyl groups at the distal (C3) carbon atom in the double bond under dissociative and associative conditions. Computational studies with density functional theory indicate that the magnitudes of the isotope effects correlate with the extent of bond formation between the allylic moiety and the electron-rich acceptor in the transition state for alkylation and provide insights into the structures of the transition states for associative and dissociative alkylation reactions. PMID:24665882

  17. Calcium, calcification, and melatonin biosynthesis in the human pineal gland: a postmortem study into age-related factors.

    PubMed

    Schmid, H A; Requintina, P J; Oxenkrug, G F; Sturner, W

    1994-05-01

    It is believed that pineal calcification may be age-associated and that the well-demonstrated age-related decline in melatonin biosynthesis may be an expression of an alteration in calcium homeostasis in the pinealocyte. Prior correlations of melatonin to calcium deposition and age were made on the basis of radiological or semiquantitative analysis. In this postmortem study of 33 subjects (age range 3 months to 65 years) calcium deposits measured by atomic absorption spectrometry correlated positively with age in day and night samples (day: r = 0.56, P < 0.05; night: r = 0.818, P < 0.001). Nighttime (2200 h to 0800 h) pineal melatonin content (HPLC fluorometry) was higher than daytime melatonin levels (nighttime 3.80 +/- 0.3 vs. daytime 0.85 +/- 0.4 ng/mg protein). Nighttime calcium levels in the supernatant correlated negatively with melatonin content (r = -0.59, P < 0.05). PMID:7807371

  18. Synthesis, biological activity, and conformational study of N-methylated allatostatin analogues inhibiting juvenile hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yong; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Chuanliang; Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Xile; Yang, Xinling; Tobe, Stephen S

    2015-03-25

    An allatostatin (AST) neuropeptide mimic (H17) is a potential insect growth regulator, which inhibits the production of juvenile hormone (JH) by the corpora allata. To determine the effect of conformation of novel AST analogues and their ability to inhibit JH biosynthesis, eight insect AST analogues were synthesized using H17 as the lead compound by N-methylation scanning, which is a common strategy for improving the biological properties of peptides. A bioassay using JH production by corpora allata of the cockroach Diploptera punctata indicated that single N-methylation mimics (analogues 1-4) showed more activity than double N-methylation mimics (analogues 5-8). Especially, analogues 1 and 4 showed roughly equivalent activity to that of H17, with IC50 values of 5.17 × 10(-8) and 6.44 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Molecular modeling based on nuclear magnetic resonance data showed that the conformation of analogues 1 and 4 seems to be flexible, whereas analogues 2 and 3 showed a type IV β-turn. This flexible linear conformation was hypothesized to be a new important and indispensable structural element beneficial to the activity of AST mimics. PMID:25751662

  19. Composition and content of normal and isoprenoid hydrocarbons in the Pavel meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Kh. P.; Stoianova, R. Zh.; Stoev, G.

    The composition and content of alkanes in extracts from the Pavel meteorite are examined and the content of individual hydrocarbons in the entire meteorite is determined. Preliminary evidence is found for the existence of isoprenoids, steranes, and triterpanes in the meteorite, substances that have not previously been found in meteorites.

  20. Cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of Streptomyces rubellomurinus genes required for biosynthesis of antimalarial compound FR900098.

    PubMed

    Eliot, Andrew C; Griffin, Benjamin M; Thomas, Paul M; Johannes, Tyler W; Kelleher, Neil L; Zhao, Huimin; Metcalf, William W

    2008-08-25

    The antibiotics fosmidomycin and FR900098 are members of a unique class of phosphonic acid natural products that inhibit the nonmevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. Both are potent antibacterial and antimalarial compounds, but despite their efficacy, little is known regarding their biosynthesis. Here we report the identification of the Streptomyces rubellomurinus genes required for the biosynthesis of FR900098. Expression of these genes in Streptomyces lividans results in production of FR900098, demonstrating their role in synthesis of the antibiotic. Analysis of the putative gene products suggests that FR900098 is synthesized by metabolic reactions analogous to portions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These data greatly expand our knowledge of phosphonate biosynthesis and enable efforts to overproduce this highly useful therapeutic agent. PMID:18721747

  1. Engineering an isoprenoid pathway in Escherichia coli for production of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol: a potential biofuel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dinesh; Summers, Michael L; Basu, Chhandak

    2014-06-01

    2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) is a natural volatile 5-carbon alcohol produced by several pine species that have the potential to be used as biofuel. MBO has a high energy content making it superior to ethanol in terms of energy output, and due to its volatility and lower solubility in water, MBO is easier to recover than ethanol. Pine's MBO synthase enzyme utilizes the intermediate dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) produced by the methyl-erythritol-4-phosphate isoprenoid pathway for the production of MBO. In this study, we performed metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to express an alternate mevalonate dependent pathway for production of DMAPP, along with a codon optimized Pinus sabiniana MBO synthase gene. This heterologous expressed pathway carried out the conversion of an acetyl CoA precursor to DMAPP leading to production of MBO. PMID:24271564

  2. Identification of potential inhibitors for AIRS from de novo purine biosynthesis pathway through molecular modeling studies - a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Guru Raj; Biswal, Jayashree; Dhamodharan, Prabhu; Kanagarajan, Surekha; Jeyaraman, Jeyakanthan

    2016-10-01

    In cancer, de novo pathway plays an important role in cell proliferation by supplying huge demand of purine nucleotides. Aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (AIRS) catalyzes the fifth step of de novo purine biosynthesis facilitating in the conversion of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide to aminoimidazole ribonucleotide. Hence, inhibiting AIRS is crucial due to its involvement in the regulation of uncontrollable cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of AIRS from P. horikoshii OT3 was constructed based on the crystal structure from E. coli and the modeled protein is verified for stability using molecular dynamics for a time frame of 100 ns. Virtual screening and induced fit docking were performed to identify the best antagonists based on their binding mode and affinity. Through mutational studies, the residues necessary for catalytic activity of AIRS were identified and among which the following residues Lys35, Asp103, Glu137, and Thr138 are important in determination of AIRS function. The mutational studies help to understand the structural and energetic characteristics of the specified residues. In addition to Molecular Dynamics, ADME properties, binding free-energy, and density functional theory calculations of the compounds were carried out to find the best lead molecule. Based on these analyses, the compound from the NCI database, NCI_121957 was adjudged as the best molecule and could be suggested as the suitable inhibitor of AIRS. In future studies, experimental validation of these ligands as AIRS inhibitors will be carried out. PMID:26524231

  3. Homology modeling and dynamics study of aureusidin synthase--an important enzyme in aurone biosynthesis of snapdragon flower.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Pavadai; Liu, Hsuan-Liang

    2011-08-01

    Aurones, a class of plant flavonoids, provide bright yellow color on some important ornamental flowers, such as cosmos, coreopsis, and snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus). Recently, it has been elucidated that aureusidin synthase (AUS), a homolog of plant polyphenol oxidase (PPO), plays a key role in the yellow coloration of snapdragon flowers. In addition, it has been shown that AUS is a chalcone-specific PPO specialized for aurone biosynthesis. AUS gene has been successfully demonstrated as an attractive tool to engineer yellow flowers in blue flowers. Despite these biological studies, the structural basis for the specificity of substrate interactions of AUS remains elusive. In this study, we performed homology modeling of AUS using Grenache PPO and Sweet potato catechol oxidase (CO). An AUS-inhibitor was then developed from the initial homology model based on the CO and subsequently validated. We performed a thorough study between AUS and PTU inhibitor by means of interaction energy, which indicated the most important residues in the active site that are highly conserved. Analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations of the apo enzyme and ligand-bound complex showed that complex is relatively stable than apo and the active sites of both systems are flexible. The results from this study provide very helpful information to understand the structure-function relationships of AUS. PMID:21470561

  4. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  5. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  6. Current aspects of auxin biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is an important plant hormone essential for many aspects of plant growth and development. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most studied auxin in plants, and its biosynthesis pathway has been investigated for over 70 years. Although the complete picture of auxin biosynthesis remains to be elucidated, remarkable progress has been made recently in understanding the mechanism of IAA biosynthesis. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that IAA is mainly synthesized from l-tryptophan (Trp) via indole-3-pyruvate by two-step reactions in Arabidopsis. While IAA is also produced from Trp via indole-3-acetaldoxime in Arabidopsis, this pathway likely plays an auxiliary role in plants of the family Brassicaceae. Recent studies suggest that the Trp-independent pathway is not a major route for IAA biosynthesis, but they reveal an important role for a cytosolic indole synthase in this pathway. In this review, I summarize current views and future prospects of IAA biosynthesis research in plants. PMID:26364770

  7. Isoprenoid modification permits 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase to bind to membranes.

    PubMed

    Braun, P E; De Angelis, D; Shtybel, W W; Bernier, L

    1991-11-01

    The myelination-related enzyme 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP), a relatively abundant protein in the CNS possesses the C-terminal isoprenylation consensus domain found in a small family that includes the ras oncoproteins and their relatives, some G-proteins, and nuclear lamins. We found that CNP, like these other proteins, is modified posttranslationally by an isoprenoid derived from mevalonic acid. It appears that only the smaller of the two CNP isoforms (CNP1) is isoprenylated, but similar modification of CNP2 cannot be excluded. Inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis by Lovastatin blocks the binding of newly synthesized CNP to cell membranes; binding is restored upon addition of mevalonate to the culture medium. This shows that isoprenylation is permissive for the well-known avid association of CNP with membranes. PMID:1666129

  8. Bioactive Isoprenoid-Derived Natural Products from a Dongsha Atoll Soft Coral Sinularia erecta.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Yao; Tseng, Yen-Ju; Chokkalingam, Uvarani; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Dai, Chang-Feng; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Sheu, Jyh-Horng

    2016-05-27

    Four new isoprenoids, including two norcembranoids sinulerectols A and B (1 and 2), a cembranoid sinulerectol C (3), and a degraded cembranoid sinulerectadione (4), along with three known isoprenoids, an unnamed norcembrene (5), sinularectin (6), and ineleganolide (7), and a known nitrogen-containing compound (Z)-N-[2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-methyldodec-2-enamide (8), were isolated from an extract of the marine soft coral Sinularia erecta. The structure of sinularectin (6) was revised, too. Compounds 3, 4, and 8 exhibited inhibitory activity against the proliferation of a limited panel of cancer cell lines, whereas 1, 2, and 8 displayed potent anti-inflammatory activity in fMLP/CB-stimulated human neutrophils. PMID:27142697

  9. Retardation of peripheral nerve myelination in mice treated with inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. A quantitative electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, F A; Uzman, B G

    1970-09-01

    The effect of two inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis, triparanol and AY 9944, on peripheral nerve myelination, was studied. Suckling mice were intraperitoneally injected with both drugs on 3 consecutive days and were sacrificed 6 hr after the last injection; others were suckled by an injected mother and sacrificed at 2(1/2) days of age. A single mouse which had been injected with both drugs at 1, 2, and 3 days of age was sacrificed 2 wk after the last injection. Membranous and crystalline intracytoplasmic inclusions were observed in the Schwann cells of the sciatic nerves of all the experimental animals. Both the number of unmyelinated single axons and the number of myelin lamellae around each myelinating axon in the sciatic nerves were recorded for treated mice and of mice suckled by treated mothers. The sciatic nerve of the experimental mice contained a larger proportion of unmyelinated single axons and smaller numbers of myelin lamellae around the myelinating axons, when compared with age-matched controls. The results suggest that a decrease of endogenous cholesterol in suckling mice may affect peripheral nerve myelination in two ways: by retarding the "triggering" of myelination in unmyelinated axons and by decreasing the rate of myelination already in progress. PMID:4349129

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Samuel K; Didelot, Xavier; Meric, Guillaume; Torralbo, Alicia; Jolley, Keith A; Kelly, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Maiden, Martin C J; Parkhill, Julian; Falush, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminated meat and poultry. We applied our association mapping method to identify the factors responsible for adaptation to cattle and chickens among 192 Campylobacter isolates from these and other host sources. Phylogenetic analysis implied frequent host switching but also showed that some lineages were strongly associated with particular hosts. A seven-gene region with a host association signal was found. Genes in this region were almost universally present in cattle but were frequently absent in isolates from chickens and wild birds. Three of the seven genes encoded vitamin B5 biosynthesis. We found that isolates from cattle were better able to grow in vitamin B5-depleted media and propose that this difference may be an adaptation to host diet. PMID:23818615

  11. Diversity of ABBA Prenyltransferases in Marine Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509: Promiscuous Enzymes for the Biosynthesis of Mixed Terpenoid Compounds.

    PubMed

    Leipoldt, Franziska; Zeyhle, Philipp; Kulik, Andreas; Kalinowski, Jörn; Heide, Lutz; Kaysser, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids are arguably the largest and most diverse family of natural products, featuring prominently in e.g. signalling, self-defence, UV-protection and electron transfer. Prenyltransferases are essential players in terpenoid and hybrid isoprenoid biosynthesis that install isoprene units on target molecules and thereby often modulate their bioactivity. In our search for new prenyltransferase biocatalysts we focused on the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509, a particularly rich source of meroterpenoid chemistry. Sequencing and analysis of the genome of Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509 revealed seven putative phenol/phenazine-specific ABBA prenyltransferases, and one putative indole-specific ABBA prenyltransferase. To elucidate the substrate specificity of the ABBA prenyltransferases and to learn about their role in secondary metabolism, CnqP1 -CnqP8 were produced in Escherichia coli and incubated with various aromatic and isoprenoid substrates. Five of the eight prenyltransferases displayed enzymatic activity. The efficient conversion of dihydroxynaphthalene derivatives by CnqP3 (encoded by AA958_24325) and the co-location of AA958_24325 with genes characteristic for the biosynthesis of THN (tetrahydroxynaphthalene)-derived natural products indicates that the enzyme is involved in the formation of debromomarinone or other naphthoquinone-derived meroterpenoids. Moreover, CnqP3 showed high flexibility towards a range of aromatic and isoprenoid substrates and thus represents an interesting new tool for biocatalytic applications. PMID:26659564

  12. Diversity of ABBA Prenyltransferases in Marine Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509: Promiscuous Enzymes for the Biosynthesis of Mixed Terpenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Leipoldt, Franziska; Zeyhle, Philipp; Kulik, Andreas; Kalinowski, Jörn; Heide, Lutz; Kaysser, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids are arguably the largest and most diverse family of natural products, featuring prominently in e.g. signalling, self-defence, UV-protection and electron transfer. Prenyltransferases are essential players in terpenoid and hybrid isoprenoid biosynthesis that install isoprene units on target molecules and thereby often modulate their bioactivity. In our search for new prenyltransferase biocatalysts we focused on the marine-derived Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509, a particularly rich source of meroterpenoid chemistry. Sequencing and analysis of the genome of Streptomyces sp. CNQ-509 revealed seven putative phenol/phenazine-specific ABBA prenyltransferases, and one putative indole-specific ABBA prenyltransferase. To elucidate the substrate specificity of the ABBA prenyltransferases and to learn about their role in secondary metabolism, CnqP1 –CnqP8 were produced in Escherichia coli and incubated with various aromatic and isoprenoid substrates. Five of the eight prenyltransferases displayed enzymatic activity. The efficient conversion of dihydroxynaphthalene derivatives by CnqP3 (encoded by AA958_24325) and the co-location of AA958_24325 with genes characteristic for the biosynthesis of THN (tetrahydroxynaphthalene)-derived natural products indicates that the enzyme is involved in the formation of debromomarinone or other naphthoquinone-derived meroterpenoids. Moreover, CnqP3 showed high flexibility towards a range of aromatic and isoprenoid substrates and thus represents an interesting new tool for biocatalytic applications. PMID:26659564

  13. Structural basis for cyclic terpene biosynthesis by tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Starks, C.M.; Noel, J.P. |; Back, K.; Chappell, J.

    1997-09-19

    Terpene cyclases catalyze the synthesis of cyclic terpenes with 10-, 15-, and 20-carbon acyclic isoprenoid diphosphates as substrates. Plants have been a source of there natural products by providing a homologous set of terpene synthases. The crystal structures of 5-epi-aristolochene synthase, a sesquiterpene cyclase from tobacco, alone and complexed separately with two farnesyl diposphate analogs were analyzed. These structures reveal an unexpected enzymatic mechanism for the synthesis of the bicyclic product, 5-epi-aristolochene, and provide a basis for understanding the stereochemical selectivity displayed by other cyclases in the biosynthesis of pharmacologically important cyclic terpenes. As such, these structures provide templates for the engineering of novel terpene cyclases.

  14. "One-pot" reductive lactone alkylation provides a concise asymmetric synthesis of chiral isoprenoid targets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jia; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    An efficient method, based on nucleophilic addition to lactones followed by modified in situ Clemmensen reduction, provides a short synthetic route to chiral isoprenoid targets. The efficacy of this method has been exemplified through the synthesis of several targets including the commercial fragrance Rosaphen, the side chain of Zaragozic acid C, the cotton leaf sex pheromone, and the side chains of vitamin E. PMID:23957629

  15. Production of wax esters during aerobic growth of marine bacteria on isoprenoid compounds

    PubMed

    Rontani; Bonin; Volkman

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the production of isoprenoid wax esters during the aerobic degradation of 6,10,14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one and phytol by four bacteria (Acinetobacter sp. strain PHY9, Pseudomonas nautica [IP85/617], Marinobacter sp. strain CAB [DSMZ 11874], and Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus [ATCC 49840]) isolated from the marine environment. Different pathways are proposed to explain the formation of these compounds. In the case of 6,10, 14-trimethylpentadecan-2-one, these esters result from the condensation of some acidic and alcoholic metabolites produced during the biodegradation, while phytol constitutes the alcohol moiety of most of the esters produced during growth on this isoprenoid alcohol. The amount of these esters formed increased considerably in N-limited cultures, in which the ammonium concentration corresponds to conditions often found in marine sediments. This suggests that the bacterial formation of isoprenoid wax esters might be favored in such environments. Although conflicting evidence exists regarding the stability of these esters in sediments, it seems likely that, under some conditions, bacterial esterification can enhance the preservation potential of labile compounds such as phytol. PMID:9872783

  16. Hepatic Isoprenoid Metabolism in a Rat Model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. Kennedy; Mitchell, David A.; Goulah, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated (4 to 7-fold) levels of urinary dolichol and coenzyme Q and substantially longer chain lengths for urinary dolichols have been reported in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) patients, compared to normal subjects. We investigated the possibility of similar alterations in hepatic, nonsterol isoprenoids in a well-established rat model of SLOS. In this model, the ratio of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (Chol) in serum approached 15:1; however, total sterol mass in serum decreased by >80 %. Livers from treated rats had 7DHC/Chol ratios of ~32:1, but the steady-state levels of total sterols were >40 % those of livers from age-matched (3-month-old) control animals. No significant differences in the levels of LDL receptor or HMG-CoA reductase were observed. The levels of dolichol and coenzyme Q were elevated only modestly (by 64 and 31 %, respectively; p < 0.05, N = 6) in the livers of the SLOS rat model compared to controls; moreover, the chain lengths of these isoprenoids were not different in the two groups. We conclude that hepatic isoprenoid synthesis is marginally elevated in this animal model of SLOS, but without preferential shunting to the nonsterol branches (dolichol and coenzyme Q) of the pathway and without alteration of normal dolichol chain lengths. PMID:23361583

  17. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic 'archaebacteria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Langworthy, T. A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids from nine species of methanogenic bacteria (five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum and a methanosarcina) and two thermoacidophilic bacteria (Thermo-plasma and Sulfolobus) have been analyzed. The neutral lipids were found to comprise a wide range (C14 to C30) of polyisoprenyl hydrocarbons with varying degrees of saturation. The principal components represented the three major isoprenoid series (C20 phytanyl, C25 pentaisoprenyl, and C30 squalenyl), in contrast with the neutral lipids of extreme halophiles, which consist predominantly of C2O (phytanyl, geranylgeraniol), C30 (squalenes), C40 (carotenes) and C50 (bacterioruberins compounds), as reported by Kates (1978). These results, which indicate strong general similarities between genetically diverse organisms, support the classification of these organisms in a separate phylogenetic group. The occurrence of similar isoprenoid compounds in petroleum and ancient sediments and the fact that the methanogens, halophiles and thermoacidophiles live in conditions presumed to have prevailed in archaen times suggest that the isoprenoid compounds in petroleum compounds and sediment may have been directly synthesized by organisms of this type

  18. Biosynthesis of Carotenoids in Plants: Enzymes and Color.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Saavedra, Carolina; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are the most important biocolor isoprenoids responsible for yellow, orange and red colors found in nature. In plants, they are synthesized in plastids of photosynthetic and sink organs and are essential molecules for photosynthesis, photo-oxidative damage protection and phytohormone synthesis. Carotenoids also play important roles in human health and nutrition acting as vitamin A precursors and antioxidants. Biochemical and biophysical approaches in different plants models have provided significant advances in understanding the structural and functional roles of carotenoids in plants as well as the key points of regulation in their biosynthesis. To date, different plant models have been used to characterize the key genes and their regulation, which has increased the knowledge of the carotenoid metabolic pathway in plants. In this chapter a description of each step in the carotenoid synthesis pathway is presented and discussed. PMID:27485218

  19. Strategies for transgenic manipulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Soheil S; Croteau, Rodney B

    2002-08-01

    Monoterpenes, the C(10) isoprenoids, are a large family of natural products that are best known as constituents of the essential oils and defensive oleoresins of aromatic plants. In addition to ecological roles in pollinator attraction, allelopathy and plant defense, monoterpenes are used extensively in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The importance of these plant products has prompted the definition of many monoterpene biosynthetic pathways, the cloning of the relevant genes and the development of genetic transformation techniques for agronomically significant monoterpene-producing plants. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in the model plant peppermint has resulted in yield increase and compositional improvement of the essential oil, and also provided strategies for manipulating flavor and fragrance production, and plant defense. PMID:12167332

  20. Overexpression of a bacterial 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase gene in potato tubers perturbs the isoprenoid metabolic network: implications for the control of the tuber life cycle.

    PubMed

    Morris, Wayne L; Ducreux, Laurence J M; Hedden, Peter; Millam, Steve; Taylor, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Potato tubers were engineered to express a bacterial gene encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in order to investigate the effects of perturbation of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Twenty-four independent transgenic lines out of 38 generated produced tubers with significantly elongated shape that also exhibited an early tuber sprouting phenotype. Expression analysis of nine transgenic lines (four exhibiting the phenotype and five showing a wild-type phenotype) demonstrated that the phenotype was strongly associated with dxs expression. At harvest, apical bud growth had already commenced in dxs-expressing tubers whereas in control lines no bud growth was evident until dormancy was released after 56-70 d of storage. The initial phase of bud growth in dxs tubers was followed by a lag period of approximately 56 d, before further elongation of the developing sprouts could be detected. Thus dxs expression results in the separation of distinct phases in the dormancy and sprouting processes. In order to account for the sprouting phenotype, the levels of plastid-derived isoprenoid growth regulators were measured in transgenic and control tubers. The major difference measured was an increase in the level of trans-zeatin riboside in tubers at harvest expressing dxs. Additionally, compared with controls, in some dxs-expressing lines, tuber carotenoid content increased approximately 2-fold, with most of the increase accounted for by a 6-7-fold increase in phytoene. PMID:16873449

  1. Regulation of cardiolipin biosynthesis in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hatch, G M

    1996-06-21

    Cardiolipin is one of the principle phospholipids in the mammalian heart comprising as much as 15-20% of the entire phospholipid phosphorus mass of that organ. Cardiolipin is localized primarily in the mitochondria and appears to be essential for the function of several enzymes of oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, cardiolipin is essential for production of energy for the heart to beat. Cardiac cardiolipin is synthesized via the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol pathway. The properties of the four enzymes of the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol pathway have been characterized in the heart. The rate-limiting step of this pathway is catalyzed by the phosphatidic acid: cytidine-5'-triphosphate cytidylyltransferase. Several regulatory mechanisms that govern cardiolipin biosynthesis in the heart have been uncovered. Current evidence suggests that cardiolipin biosynthesis is regulated by the energy status (adenosine-5'-triphosphate and cytidine-5'-triphosphate level) of the heart. Thyroid hormone and unsaturated fatty acids may regulate cardiolipin biosynthesis at the level of three key enzymes of the cytidine-5'-diphosphate-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol pathway, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate synthase, phosphatidyl-glycerolphosphate phosphatase and cardiolipin synthase. Newly synthesized phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylglycerol may be preferentially utilized for cardiolipin biosynthesis in the heart. In addition, separate pools of phosphatidylglycerol, including an exogenous (extra-mitochondrial) pool not derived from de novo phosphatidylglycerol biosynthesis, may be utilized for cardiac cardiolipin biosynthesis. In several mammalian tissues a significant number of studies on polyglycerophospholipid biosynthesis have been documented, including detailed studies in the lung and liver. However, in spite of the important role of cardiolipin in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and membrane integrity, studies on the control of cardiolipin

  2. Lipid Flippases for Bacterial Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cellular polysaccharides and glycoconjugates often involves lipid-linked intermediates that need to be translocated across membranes. Essential pathways such as N-glycosylation in eukaryotes and biogenesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall in bacteria share a common strategy where nucleotide-sugars are used to build a membrane-bound oligosaccharide precursor that is linked to a phosphorylated isoprenoid lipid. Once made, these lipid-linked intermediates must be translocated across a membrane so that they can serve as substrates in a different cellular compartment. How translocation occurs is poorly understood, although it clearly requires a transporter or flippase. Identification of these transporters is notoriously difficult, and, in particular, the identity of the flippase of lipid II, an intermediate required for PG biogenesis, has been the subject of much debate. Here, I will review the body of work that has recently fueled this controversy, centered on proposed flippase candidates FtsW, MurJ, and AmJ. PMID:26792999

  3. Taxol biosynthesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Hezari, M; Croteau, R

    1997-08-01

    The novel diterpenoid taxol (paclitaxel) is now well-established as a potent chemotherapeutic agent. Total synthesis of the drug is not commercially feasible and, in the foreseeable future, the supply of taxol and its synthetically useful progenitors must rely on biological methods of production. The first three steps of taxol biosynthesis have been defined and the responsible enzymes described. These are the cyclization of the universal diterpenoid precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate to taxa-4(5),11(12)-diene, the cytochrome P450-catalyzed hydroxylation of this olefin to taxa-4(20), 11(12)-dien-5 alpha-ol, and the acetyl CoA-dependent conversion of the alcohol to the corresponding acetate ester. Demonstration of these early steps of taxol biosynthesis suggests that the complete pathway can be defined by a systematic, stepwise approach at the cell-free enzyme level. When combined with in vivo studies to determine contribution to pathway flux, slow steps can be targeted for gene isolation and subsequent overexpression in Taxus to improve the yield of taxol and related compounds. PMID:9270370

  4. Precursor feeding studies and molecular characterization of geraniol synthase establish the limiting role of geraniol in monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus leaves.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishna; Kumar, Sarma Rajeev; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Shukla, Ashutosh K; Shanker, Karuna; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-10-01

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are generally derived from strictosidine, which is formed by condensation of the terpene moiety secologanin and the indole moiety tryptamine. There are conflicting reports on the limitation of either terpene or indole moiety in the production of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus cell cultures. Formation of geraniol by geraniol synthase (GES) is the first step in secologanin biosynthesis. In this study, feeding of C. roseus leaves with geraniol, but not tryptophan (precursor for tryptamine), increased the accumulation of the MIAs catharanthine and vindoline, indicating the limitation of geraniol in MIA biosynthesis. This was further validated by molecular and in planta characterization of C. roseus GES (CrGES). CrGES transcripts exhibited leaf and shoot specific expression and were induced by methyl jasmonate. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CrGES significantly reduced the MIA content, which was restored to near-WT levels upon geraniol feeding. Moreover, over-expression of CrGES in C. roseus leaves increased MIA content. Further, CrGES exhibited correlation with MIA levels in leaves of different C. roseus cultivars and has significantly lower expression relative to other pathway genes. These results demonstrated that the transcriptional regulation of CrGES and thus, the in planta geraniol availability plays crucial role in MIA biosynthesis. PMID:26398791

  5. Physiological and molecular responses of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus exposed to water deficit.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Falara, Vasiliki; Pateraki, Irene; López-Carbonell, Marta; Cela, Jana; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2009-01-30

    The goal of the present research was to obtain new insights into the mechanisms underlying drought stress resistance in plants. Specifically, we evaluated changes in the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis, together with the levels of the corresponding metabolites (chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols and abscisic acid), in a drought-resistant Mediterranean shrub, Cistus creticus grown under Mediterranean field conditions. Summer drought led to reductions in the relative leaf water content (RWC) by 25%, but did not alter the maximum efficiency of PSII, indicating the absence of damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. While the expression of genes encoding C. creticus chlorophyll a oxygenase/chlorophyll b synthase (CAO) and phytoene synthase (PSY) were not affected by water deficit, the genes encoding homogentisate phytyl-transferase (HPT) and 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) were induced in water-stressed (WS) plants. Drought-induced changes in gene expression were observed at early stages of drought and were strongly correlated with levels of the corresponding metabolites, with simultaneous increases in abscisic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels of up to 4-fold and 62%, respectively. Furthermore, alpha-tocopherol levels were strongly positively correlated with abscisic acid contents, but not with the levels of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. We conclude that the abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthetic pathway may be regulated at the transcript level in WS C. creticus plants, and that the genes encoding HPT and NCED may play a key role in the drought stress resistance of this Mediterranean shrub by modulating abscisic acid and tocopherol biosynthesis. PMID:18455260

  6. D-Amino acid metabolism in mammals: biosynthesis, degradation and analytical aspects of the metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Ohide, Hiroko; Miyoshi, Yurika; Maruyama, Rindo; Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi

    2011-11-01

    It was believed for long time that d-amino acids are not present in mammals. However, current technological advances and improvements in analytical instruments have enabled studies that now indicate that significant amounts of D-amino acids are present in mammals. The most abundant D-amino acids are D-serine and D-aspartate. D-Serine, which is synthesized by serine racemase and is degraded by D-amino-acid oxidase, is present in the brain and modulates neurotransmission. D-Aspartate, which is synthesized by aspartate racemase and degraded by D-aspartate oxidase, is present in the neuroendocrine and endocrine tissues and testis. It regulates the synthesis and secretion of hormones and spermatogenesis. D-Serine and D-aspartate bind to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors and function as a coagonist and agonist, respectively. The enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these D-amino acids are associated with neural diseases where the NMDA receptors are involved. Knockout mice for serine racemase and D-aspartate oxidase have been generated, and natural mutations in the d-amino-acid oxidase gene are present in mice and rats. These mutant animals display altered behaviors caused by enhanced or decreased NMDA receptor activity. In this article, we review currently available studies on D-amino acid metabolism in mammals and discuss analytical methods used to assay activity of amino acid racemases and D-amino-acid oxidases. PMID:21757409

  7. NMR studies of conformational states of proteins involved in biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ziqi

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are the most ancient and ubiquitous cofactors that exist throughout evolution. The most important biosynthetic system of the cluster in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes is the ISC system. Defects in this system can be lethal and have been associated with a number of human diseases. Previous works show that a number of proteins are involved in the [Fe-S] biosynthetic processes and the structural flexibility may play an important role. For example, it was shown that apo-IscU, the scaffold protein, from Escherichia coli populates two functionally important conformational states, one dynamically disordered (D-state) and the other more structured (S-state) (Kim et al., 2009; Kim et al., 2012c). To further investigate the characteristics and transition of the conformational states of proteins involved in this system, I performed extensive NMR studies. Here, I present the findings based on my studies of two important players of the ISC system, IscU and HscB. In this research, I find that a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization might account for the slow step in the S-D interconversion of IscU. More specifically, P14 and P101 are trans in the S-state, but become cis in the D-state. In addition, I discover that IscU is very responsive to pH changes, and I postulate that this response is correlated to conserved histidine residues, H10 and H105. Moreover, my thermodynamic analyses reveal that the S-D equilibrium of IscU is also very sensitive to change in temperature, pressure, and amino acid sequence compared to other proteins. In the study, I also discovered a novel state of IscU, the unfolded U-state. I suspect that this state may serve as an intermediate of interconversion between IscU S-/D-states. Finally, I extended the effort to HscB, and find that it may possess more conformational flexibility than expected earlier. I postulate that this flexibility may be the cause of the line-broadening observed during interaction of HscB with Isc

  8. Biosynthesis, characterization and antibacterial studies of silver nanoparticles using pods extract of Acacia auriculiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalawade, Pradnya; Mukherjee, Poulomi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2014-08-01

    The present study reports an environmental friendly method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using an aqueous extract of Acacia auriculiformis that acts as reducing agent as well as capping agent. The obtained NPs were characterized by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and showed a sharp surface plasmon absorption band at ∼400 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed nanoparticles were capped with plant compounds. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the particles were spherical in nature with diameter ranging from 20 to 150 nm depending on the pH of the solution. The as-synthesized Ag NPs showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria with more efficacy against Gram negative bacteria.

  9. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27031227

  10. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Šink, Roman; Kotnik, Miha; Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27031227

  11. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Rachael C.; Batten, Laura E.; Wells, Neil J.; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Roach, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the ‘alarmones’ (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5′,3′-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia. PMID:26450927

  12. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Rachael C; Batten, Laura E; Wells, Neil J; Oyston, Petra C F; Roach, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the 'alarmones' (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5',3'-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia. PMID:26450927

  13. Biosynthesis of cylindrospermopsin.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, D L; Hemscheidt, T K; Moore, R E; Runnegar, M T

    2000-01-14

    Studies on the biosynthesis of cylindrospermopsin (1), a potent hepatotoxin associated with the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, indicate that 1 is an acetogenin with guanidinoacetic acid serving as the starter unit of the polyketide chain. Feeding experiments show that C14 and C15 of 1 are derived from C1 and C2 of glycine, respectively, and C4 through C13 arise from five contiguous acetate units attached head to tail. The methyl carbon on C13 originates from the C(1) pool. The starter unit, established by the incorporation of [guanidino-(13)C,alpha-(15)N]-guanidinoacetic acid into N16 and C17 of 1, does not appear to be formed from glycine by known amidination pathways. The origin of the NH-CO-NH segment in the uracil ring is also unknown. PMID:10813909

  14. Light Remodels Lipid Biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana by Modulating Carbon Partitioning between Organelles.

    PubMed

    Alboresi, Alessandro; Perin, Giorgio; Vitulo, Nicola; Diretto, Gianfranco; Block, Maryse; Jouhet, Juliette; Meneghesso, Andrea; Valle, Giorgio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Maréchal, Eric; Morosinotto, Tomas

    2016-08-01

    The seawater microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana is capable of accumulating a large fraction of reduced carbon as lipids. To clarify the molecular bases of this metabolic feature, we investigated light-driven lipid biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures combining the analysis of photosynthetic functionality with transcriptomic, lipidomic and metabolomic approaches. Light-dependent alterations are observed in amino acid, isoprenoid, nucleic acid, and vitamin biosynthesis, suggesting a deep remodeling in the microalgal metabolism triggered by photoadaptation. In particular, high light intensity is shown to affect lipid biosynthesis, inducing the accumulation of diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomo-Ser and triacylglycerols, together with the up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Chloroplast polar lipids are instead decreased. This situation correlates with the induction of genes coding for a putative cytosolic fatty acid synthase of type 1 (FAS1) and polyketide synthase (PKS) and the down-regulation of the chloroplast fatty acid synthase of type 2 (FAS2). Lipid accumulation is accompanied by the regulation of triose phosphate/inorganic phosphate transport across the chloroplast membranes, tuning the carbon metabolic allocation between cell compartments, favoring the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum at the expense of the chloroplast. These results highlight the high flexibility of lipid biosynthesis in N. gaditana and lay the foundations for a hypothetical mechanism of regulation of primary carbon partitioning by controlling metabolite allocation at the subcellular level. PMID:27325666

  15. Light Remodels Lipid Biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana by Modulating Carbon Partitioning between Organelles1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vitulo, Nicola; Diretto, Gianfranco; Block, Maryse; Jouhet, Juliette; Meneghesso, Andrea; Valle, Giorgio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The seawater microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana is capable of accumulating a large fraction of reduced carbon as lipids. To clarify the molecular bases of this metabolic feature, we investigated light-driven lipid biosynthesis in Nannochloropsis gaditana cultures combining the analysis of photosynthetic functionality with transcriptomic, lipidomic and metabolomic approaches. Light-dependent alterations are observed in amino acid, isoprenoid, nucleic acid, and vitamin biosynthesis, suggesting a deep remodeling in the microalgal metabolism triggered by photoadaptation. In particular, high light intensity is shown to affect lipid biosynthesis, inducing the accumulation of diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomo-Ser and triacylglycerols, together with the up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Chloroplast polar lipids are instead decreased. This situation correlates with the induction of genes coding for a putative cytosolic fatty acid synthase of type 1 (FAS1) and polyketide synthase (PKS) and the down-regulation of the chloroplast fatty acid synthase of type 2 (FAS2). Lipid accumulation is accompanied by the regulation of triose phosphate/inorganic phosphate transport across the chloroplast membranes, tuning the carbon metabolic allocation between cell compartments, favoring the cytoplasm, mitochondrion, and endoplasmic reticulum at the expense of the chloroplast. These results highlight the high flexibility of lipid biosynthesis in N. gaditana and lay the foundations for a hypothetical mechanism of regulation of primary carbon partitioning by controlling metabolite allocation at the subcellular level. PMID:27325666

  16. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; Wildung, Mark R

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general "allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction" scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1R, 3R, 4S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil. PMID:16292524

  17. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  18. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, Andrea; Bruno, Mark; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. PMID:25057464

  19. Isoprenoid emissions of trees in a tropical rainforest in Xishuangbanna, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilske, B.; Cao, K.-F.; Schebeske, G.; Chen, J.-W.; Wang, A.; Kesselmeier, J.

    Isoprenoid emissions of eight tropical tree species of SE Asia were investigated using dynamic Teflon bag branch enclosures. Emission potentials of four species were considerably deviating from a previous report. Two species, Garcinia cowa and Celtis philippensis, emitted isoprene with standard emission factors, given as carbon on dry weight basis of 20.7 and 0.2μgg-1h-1, respectively, before the peak of the rainy season. After the peak of the rainy reason the standard emission changed to 17.5 and 0.7μgg-1h-1, respectively. The other six species emitted monoterpenes with low standard emission factors between <0.1 and 0.5μgg-1h-1. Four out of five species investigated at two different times of the year showed seasonal differences in emission rates and composition. Total isoprenoid emissions were generally higher with new leaf flush than with aged leaves. Overall, the results suggest that better understanding of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission from tropical species of SE Asia requires investigations that cover different seasons.

  20. Voltammetric detection and profiling of isoprenoid quinones hydrophobically transferred from bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Quynh; Morishita, Aya; Tokonami, Shiho; Nishino, Tomoaki; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Masami; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2015-08-18

    We have developed a novel bacterial detection technique by desiccating a bacterial suspension deposited on an electrode. It was also found that the use of an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode dramatically improved the resolution of the voltammogram, allowing us to observe two pairs of redox peaks, each assigned to the adsorption of isoprenoid ubiquinone (UQn) and menaquinone (MKn), which were present in the bacterial cell envelopes, giving midpeak potentials of -0.015 and -0.25 V versus Ag|AgCl|saturated KCl| at pH 7.0, respectively. Most of the microorganisms classified in both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria gave well-defined redox peaks, demonstrating that this procedure made the detection of the quinones possible without solvent extraction. It has been demonstrated that the present technique can be used not only for the detection of bacteria, but also for profiling of the isoprenoid quinones, which play important roles in electron and proton transfer in microorganisms. In this respect, the present technique provides a much more straightforward way than the solvent extraction in that one sample can be prepared in 1 min by heat evaporation of a suspension containing the targeted bacteria, which has been applied on the ITO electrode. PMID:26218886

  1. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogues for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed Click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and DFT calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of PFTase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogues are employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogues for chemical proteomic applications. PMID:21040496

  2. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  3. Benzodiazepine biosynthesis in Streptomyces refuineus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Phelan, Vanessa; Ntai, Ioanna; Farnet, Chris M; Zazopoulos, Emmanuel; Bachmann, Brian O

    2007-06-01

    Anthramycin is a benzodiazepine alkaloid with potent antitumor and antibiotic activity produced by the thermophilic actinomycete Streptomyces refuineus sbsp. thermotolerans. In this study, the complete 32.5 kb gene cluster for the biosynthesis of anthramycin was identified by using a genome-scanning approach, and cluster boundaries were estimated via comparative genomics. A lambda-RED-mediated gene-replacement system was developed to provide supporting evidence for critical biosynthetic genes and to validate the boundaries of the proposed anthramycin gene cluster. Sequence analysis reveals that the 25 open reading frame anthramycin cluster contains genes consistent with the biosynthesis of the two halves of anthramycin: 4 methyl-3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and a "dehydroproline acrylamide" moiety. These nonproteinogenic amino acid precursors are condensed by a two-module nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) terminated by a reductase domain, consistent with the final hemiaminal oxidation state of anthramycin. PMID:17584616

  4. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  5. Globulixanthones A and B, two new cytotoxic xanthones with isoprenoid groups from the root bark of Symphonia globulifera.

    PubMed

    Nkengfack, Augustin E; Mkounga, Pierre; Fomum, Zacharias T; Meyer, Michele; Bodo, Bernard

    2002-05-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root bark extract of Symphonia globulifera has yielded, in addition to stigmasterol, two new xanthones with isoprenoid units, named globulixanthones A (1) and B (2). The structures of these compounds have been elucidated by spectroscopic means. They possess significant cytotoxicity in vitro against the KB cell line. PMID:12027753

  6. Isolation and Synthesis of Laxaphycin B-Type Peptides: A Case Study and Clues to Their Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bornancin, Louis; Boyaud, France; Mahiout, Zahia; Bonnard, Isabelle; Mills, Suzanne C.; Banaigs, Bernard; Inguimbert, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The laxaphyci’s B family constitutes a group of five related cyclic lipopeptides isolated from diverse cyanobacteria from all around the world. This group shares a typical structure of 12 amino acids from the l and d series, some of them hydroxylated at the beta position, and all containing a rare beta-amino decanoic acid. Nevertheless, they can be differentiated due to slight variations in the composition of their amino acids, but the configuration of their alpha carbon remains conserved. Here, we provide the synthesis and characterization of new laxaphycin B-type peptides. In doing so we discuss how the synthesis of laxaphycin B and analogues was developed. We also isolate minor acyclic laxaphycins B, which are considered clues to their biosynthesis. PMID:26690181

  7. Biosynthesis of Dolichyl Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, H. Esteban; Daleo, Gustavo R.; Romero, Pedro A.; Lezica, Rafael Pont

    1978-01-01

    This is the first report not only on the presence of polyprenyl phosphates and their site of synthesis in algae, but also on the formation of their sugar derivatives in this system. A glucose acceptor lipid was isolated from the nonphotosynthetic alga Prototheca zopfii. The lipid was acidic and resistant to mild acid and alkaline treatments. The glucosylated lipid was labile to mild acid hydrolysis and resistant to phenol treatment and catalytic hydrogenation, as dolichyl phosphate glucose is. These results are consistent with the properties of an α-saturated polyprenyl phosphate. The polyprenylic nature of the lipid was confirmed by biosynthesis from radioactive mevalonate. The [14C]lipid had the same chromatographic properties as dolichyl phosphate in DEAE-cellulose and Sephadex LH-20. Strong alkaline treatment and enzymic hydrolysis liberated free alcohols with chain lengths ranging from C90 to C105, C95 and C100 being the most abundant molecular forms. The glucose acceptor activity of the biosynthesized polyprenyl phosphate was confirmed. The ability of different subcellular fractions to synthesize dolichyl phosphate was studied. Mitochondria and the Golgi apparatus were the sites of dolichyl phosphate synthesis from mevalonate. PMID:16660269

  8. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  9. CDC group IIc: phenotypic characteristics, fatty acid composition, and isoprenoid quinone content.

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, D G; Moss, C W; Daneshvar, M I; Wallace-Shewmaker, P L

    1996-01-01

    Twenty strains of glucose-utilizing, small gram-negative slightly pleomorphic rods that grew well aerobically and that were isolated from clinical specimens formed a phenotypically similar group that was designated CDC group IIc. The phenotypic characteristics of CDC group IIc were most similar to those of CDC groups IIe and IIh, the major differences being that CDC group IIc produced acid from sucrose, hydrolyzed esculin, and usually reduced nitrate. The CDC group IIc strains were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography for their cellular fatty acid compositions, and all contained relatively large amounts of isobranched hydroxy and nonhydroxy acids. High-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis of the quinone extract showed menaquinone-6 as the major component. Both the cellular fatty acid and isoprenoid quinone compositions were consistent with the profiles of CDC groups IIe and IIh. Thirty percent of the isolates were from human blood. PMID:8862612

  10. Enhancement of β-carotene production by over-expression of HMG-CoA reductase coupled with addition of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guo-liang; Wen, Ke-rui; Duan, Chang-qing

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the synergistic effect of overexpressing the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase gene and adding ergosterol synthesis inhibitor, ketoconazole, on β-carotene production in the recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. The results showed that the over-expression of HMG-CoA reductase gene and adding 100 mg/l ketoconazole alone can result in 135.1 and 15.6% increment of β-carotene concentration compared with that of the control (2.05 mg/g dry weight of cells), respectively. However, the combination of overexpressing HMG-CoA reductase gene and adding ketoconazole can achieve a 206.8% increment of pigment content (6.29 mg/g dry weight of cells) compared with that of the control. Due to the fact that over-expression of the HMG-CoA reductase gene can simultaneously improve the flux of the sterol and carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, it can be concluded that under the circumstances of blocking sterol biosynthesis, increasing the activity of HMG-CoA reductase can result in more precursors FPP fluxing into carotenoid branch and obtain a high increment of β-carotene production. The results of this study collectively suggest that the combination of overexpressing HMG-CoA reductase gene and supplying ergosterol synthesis inhibitor is an effective strategy to improve the production of desirable isoprenoid compounds such as carotenoids. PMID:22086347

  11. Methylerythritol phosphate pathway to isoprenoids: kinetic modeling and in silico enzyme inhibitions in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek Kumar; Ghosh, Indira

    2013-09-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) has become an attractive target for anti-malarial drug discovery. This study describes a kinetic model of this pathway, its use in validating 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) as drug target from the systemic perspective, and additional target identification, using metabolic control analysis and in silico inhibition studies. In addition to DXR, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) can be targeted because it is the first enzyme of the pathway and has the highest flux control coefficient followed by that of DXR. In silico inhibition of both enzymes caused large decrement in the pathway flux. An added advantage of targeting DXS is its influence on vitamin B1 and B6 biosynthesis. Two more potential targets, 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate synthase and 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase, were also identified. Their inhibition caused large accumulation of their substrates causing instability of the system. This study demonstrates that both types of enzyme targets, one acting via flux reduction and the other by metabolite accumulation, exist in P. falciparum MEP pathway. These groups of targets can be exploited for independent anti-malarial drugs. PMID:23816706

  12. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  13. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-01-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol. PMID:26052683

  14. The hedgehog Pathway Gene shifted Functions together with the hmgcr-Dependent Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway to Orchestrate Germ Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Girish; Zhou, Keren; Wan, Joy Y.; Friedrich, Jana; Jourjine, Nicholas; Smith, Daniel; Schedl, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila embryonic gonad is assembled from two distinct cell types, the Primordial Germ Cells (PGCs) and the Somatic Gonadal Precursor cells (SGPs). The PGCs form at the posterior of blastoderm stage embryos and are subsequently carried inside the embryo during gastrulation. To reach the SGPs, the PGCs must traverse the midgut wall and then migrate through the mesoderm. A combination of local repulsive cues and attractive signals emanating from the SGPs guide migration. We have investigated the role of the hedgehog (hh) pathway gene shifted (shf) in directing PGC migration. shf encodes a secreted protein that facilitates the long distance transmission of Hh through the proteoglycan matrix after it is released from basolateral membranes of Hh expressing cells in the wing imaginal disc. shf is expressed in the gonadal mesoderm, and loss- and gain-of-function experiments demonstrate that it is required for PGC migration. Previous studies have established that the hmgcr-dependent isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway plays a pivotal role in generating the PGC attractant both by the SGPs and by other tissues when hmgcr is ectopically expressed. We show that production of this PGC attractant depends upon shf as well as a second hh pathway gene gγ1. Further linking the PGC attractant to Hh, we present evidence indicating that ectopic expression of hmgcr in the nervous system promotes the release/transmission of the Hh ligand from these cells into and through the underlying mesodermal cell layer, where Hh can contact migrating PGCs. Finally, potentiation of Hh by hmgcr appears to depend upon cholesterol modification. PMID:24068944

  15. Bakuchiol Is a Phenolic Isoprenoid with Novel Enantiomer-selective Anti-influenza A Virus Activity Involving Nrf2 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Masaki; Arakaki, Yumie; Esumi, Tomoyuki; Kohnomi, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Konishi, Shiro; Kido, Hiroshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza represents a substantial threat to human health and requires novel therapeutic approaches. Bakuchiol is a phenolic isoprenoid compound present in Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia L.) seeds. We examined the anti-influenza viral activity of synthetic bakuchiol using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. We found that the naturally occurring form, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol, and its enantiomer, (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, inhibited influenza A viral infection and growth and reduced the expression of viral mRNAs and proteins in these cells. Furthermore, these compounds markedly reduced the mRNA expression of the host cell influenza A virus-induced immune response genes, interferon-β and myxovirus-resistant protein 1. Interestingly, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol had greater efficacy than (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, indicating that chirality influenced anti-influenza virus activity. In vitro studies indicated that bakuchiol did not strongly inhibit the activities of influenza surface proteins or the M2 ion channel, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Analysis of luciferase reporter assay data unexpectedly indicated that bakuchiol may induce some host cell factor(s) that inhibited firefly and Renilla luciferases. Next generation sequencing and KeyMolnet analysis of influenza A virus-infected and non-infected cells exposed to bakuchiol revealed activation of transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf), and an Nrf2 reporter assay showed that (+)-(S)-bakuchiol activated Nrf2. Additionally, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol up-regulated the mRNA levels of two Nrf2-induced genes, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 and glutathione S-transferase A3. These findings demonstrated that bakuchiol had enantiomer-selective anti-influenza viral activity involving a novel effect on the host cell oxidative stress response. PMID:26446794

  16. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  17. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-08

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulationmore » by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Lastly, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.« less

  18. Application of CRISPRi for prokaryotic metabolic engineering involving multiple genes, a case study: Controllable P(3HB-co-4HB) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Li; Ren, Yi-Lin; Chen, Jin-Chun; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is used to edit eukaryotic genomes. Here, we show that CRISPRi can also be used for fine-tuning prokaryotic gene expression while simultaneously regulating multiple essential gene expression with less labor and time consumption. As a case study, CRISPRi was used to control polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis pathway flux and to adjust PHA composition. A pathway was constructed in Escherichia coli for the production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB-co-4HB)] from glucose. The native gene sad encoding E. coli succinate semi-aldehyde dehydrogenase was expressed under the control of CRISPRi using five specially designed single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for regulating carbon flux to 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB) biosynthesis. The system allowed formation of P(3HB-co-4HB) consisting of 1-9mol% 4HB. Additionally, succinate, generated by succinyl-coA synthetase and succinate dehydrogenase (respectively encoded by genes sucC, sucD and sdhA, sdhB) was channeled preferentially to the 4HB precursor by using selected sgRNAs such as sucC2, sucD2, sdhB2 and sdhA1 via CRISPRi. The resulting 4HB content in P(3HB-co-4HB) was found to range from 1.4 to 18.4mol% depending on the expression levels of down-regulated genes. The results show that CRISPRi is a feasible method to simultaneously manipulate multiple genes in E. coli. PMID:25838211

  19. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, regeneration and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Thöny, B; Auerbach, G; Blau, N

    2000-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor is essential for various processes, and is present in probably every cell or tissue of higher organisms. BH(4) is required for various enzyme activities, and for less defined functions at the cellular level. The pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of BH(4) from GTP involves GTP cyclohydrolase I, 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase. Cofactor regeneration requires pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase and dihydropteridine reductase. Based on gene cloning, recombinant expression, mutagenesis studies, structural analysis of crystals and NMR studies, reaction mechanisms for the biosynthetic and recycling enzymes were proposed. With regard to the regulation of cofactor biosynthesis, the major controlling point is GTP cyclohydrolase I, the expression of which may be under the control of cytokine induction. In the liver at least, activity is inhibited by BH(4), but stimulated by phenylalanine through the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein. The enzymes that depend on BH(4) are the phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylases, the latter two being the rate-limiting enzymes for catecholamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) biosynthesis, all NO synthase isoforms and the glyceryl-ether mono-oxygenase. On a cellular level, BH(4) has been found to be a growth or proliferation factor for Crithidia fasciculata, haemopoietic cells and various mammalian cell lines. In the nervous system, BH(4) is a self-protecting factor for NO, or a general neuroprotecting factor via the NO synthase pathway, and has neurotransmitter-releasing function. With regard to human disease, BH(4) deficiency due to autosomal recessive mutations in all enzymes (except sepiapterin reductase) have been described as a cause of hyperphenylalaninaemia. Furthermore, several neurological diseases, including Dopa-responsive dystonia, but also Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, autism and depression, have been suggested to be

  20. Biosynthetic studies of marine lipids. 42. Biosynthesis of steroid and triterpenoid metabolites in the sea cucumber Eupentacta fraudatrix.

    PubMed

    Makarieva, T N; Stonik, V A; Kapustina, I I; Boguslavsky, V M; Dmitrenoik, A S; Kalinin, V I; Cordeiro, M L; Djerassi, C

    1993-11-01

    The saponins, conjugated sterols, and free sterols of the sea cucumber Eupentacta fraudatrix were examined. A total of 85 steroids, twelve of them new, were identified in the free sterol, sulfated sterol, and sterol-xyloside fractions. The free sterol fraction contained 4 alpha,14 alpha-dimethylcholest-9(11)-en-3 beta-ol(6) and 14 alpha-methylcholest-9(11)-en-3 beta-ol(7) together with 18 minor sterols. Examination of the aglycone moieties of the sterol-beta-xyloside fraction afforded 31 different sterols. Cholestan-3 beta-ol (15) and 24-methylcholesta-7,22-dien-3 beta-ol (20) were the major sterols in this group. Cholestanol sulfate (74) and cholesterol sulfate (64) were identified as the major components among the 34 different sterol sulfates present. Finally, cucumariosides G1 (1), C1 (2), C2 (3), H (4), and G2 (5) were isolated from the saponin fraction. Radiolabeling experiments indicated that there are two pathways of sterol biosynthesis in E. fraudratix. The first involves transformation of squalene to produce lanosta-9(11),24-dien-3 beta-ol(parkeol) which is subsequently demethylated to form 4 alpha,14 alpha-dimethylcholest-9(11)-en-3 beta-ol (6) and 14 alpha-methylcholest-9(11)-en-3 beta-ol (7). The second proceeds through squalene to lanosterol which is further metabolized to produce the triterpene saponins, 5 alpha-cholest-7-en-3 beta-ol (19) and its xyloside (49). PMID:8273112

  1. Genomics-Based Discovery of Plant Genes for Synthetic Biology of Terpenoid Fragrances: A Case Study in Sandalwood oil Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Celedon, J M; Bohlmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoid fragrances are powerful mediators of ecological interactions in nature and have a long history of traditional and modern industrial applications. Plants produce a great diversity of fragrant terpenoid metabolites, which make them a superb source of biosynthetic genes and enzymes. Advances in fragrance gene discovery have enabled new approaches in synthetic biology of high-value speciality molecules toward applications in the fragrance and flavor, food and beverage, cosmetics, and other industries. Rapid developments in transcriptome and genome sequencing of nonmodel plant species have accelerated the discovery of fragrance biosynthetic pathways. In parallel, advances in metabolic engineering of microbial and plant systems have established platforms for synthetic biology applications of some of the thousands of plant genes that underlie fragrance diversity. While many fragrance molecules (eg, simple monoterpenes) are abundant in readily renewable plant materials, some highly valuable fragrant terpenoids (eg, santalols, ambroxides) are rare in nature and interesting targets for synthetic biology. As a representative example for genomics/transcriptomics enabled gene and enzyme discovery, we describe a strategy used successfully for elucidation of a complete fragrance biosynthetic pathway in sandalwood (Santalum album) and its reconstruction in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). We address questions related to the discovery of specific genes within large gene families and recovery of rare gene transcripts that are selectively expressed in recalcitrant tissues. To substantiate the validity of the approaches, we describe the combination of methods used in the gene and enzyme discovery of a cytochrome P450 in the fragrant heartwood of tropical sandalwood, responsible for the fragrance defining, final step in the biosynthesis of (Z)-santalols. PMID:27480682

  2. Seasonality of Isoprenoid Vertical Gradient Within a Primary Rainforest in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. G.; Jardine, K.; Tota, J.; Jardine, A. B.; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Karl, T.; Guenther, A. B.; Tavares, J. V.; Nelson, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical mixing ratio gradients of isoprene, total monoterpenes (TMt) and total sesquiterpenes (TSt) were quantified, within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia , using a Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). We also estimated the fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere. Measurements were carried out from the dry season (Sept/2010) to the wet season (Jan/2011), continuously. All compound mixing ratios were higher during the dry season than during the wet season; the same behavior was observed for ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Isoprene and TMt mixing ratios were higher within the canopy as compared to near the ground and above the canopy. Daytime TSt mixing ratios were higher near the ground than within and above the canopy. Isoprene and TMt had a diurnal cycle similar to diurnal cycles of air temperature and PAR suggesting that the emission of these compounds are light dependent and stimulated by increasing temperature. However, this same behavior was not observed for TSt. This is probably due to the fact that sesquiterpene emissions are not strongly light dependent; the ozonolysis of sesquiterpenes during daytime could reduce ambient sesquiterpene concentrations; and a less turbulent atmospheric boundary layer during nighttime could make the mixing ratio of sesquiterpenes higher near the surface at nighttime. Daytime flux estimations also presented seasonal variation for the fluxes of all compounds, such that fluxes of: isoprene ranged from 0.4 to 1.5 mg m-2 h-1, TMt ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 mg m-2 h-1, and TSt ranged from 0.1 to 0.25 mg m-2 h-1, being the highest end during the dry season. These flux estimations suggested that the canopy could be the main source of those compounds for the atmosphere for all seasons. Our results provide the first in situ observations of seasonal mixing ratio gradients of isoprenoids in central Amazonia, and suggest that some

  3. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  4. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters. PMID:27396184

  5. Isoprenoid phenol and quinone precursors of ubiquinones and dihydroubiquinones [ubiquinones(H2)] in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ah; Threlfall, D. R.; Whistance, G. R.

    1971-01-01

    1. Ten moulds and two yeasts were analysed for the presence of 2-polyprenylphenols, 2-polyprenyl(H2)phenols, 6-methoxy-2-polyprenylphenols, 6-methoxy-2-polyprenyl(H2)phenols, 6-methoxy-2-polyprenyl-1,4-benzoquinones, 6-methoxy-2-polyprenyl(H2)-1,4-benzoquinones, 5-demethoxyubiquinones, 5-demethoxyubiquinones(H2), ubiquinones and ubiquinones(H2). 2. The organisms were found to be of three types: (a) those that contained only ubiquinones (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium brevi-compactum) or ubiquinones(H2) (Alternaria solani, Claviceps purpurae and Penicillium stipitatum); (b) those that contained 5-demethoxyubiquinones and ubiquinones (Agaricus campestris, Aspergillus niger, Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhodotorula glutinis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or 5-demethoxyubiquinones(H2) and ubiquinones(H2) (Aspergillus quadrilineatus and Neurospora crassa); (c) one that contained 2-decaprenyl(H2)phenol, 6-methoxy-2-decaprenyl(H2)phenol, 6-methoxy-2-decaprenyl(X-H2)-1,4-benzoquinone, 5-demethoxyubiquinone-10(X-H2) and ubiquinones(H2) (Aspergillus flavus). 3. Studies were made on the biosynthesis of ubiquinones and ubiquinones(H2) by Asp. flavus, Phyc. blakesleeanus and S. cerevisiae. These provided evidence that in Phyc. blakesleeanus 5-demethoxyubiquinone-9 is a precursor of ubiquinone-9 and that in S. cerevisiae 5-demethoxyubiquinone-6 is a precursor of ubiquinone-6. In addition they yielded results that may be interpreted as providing evidence that in Asp. flavus 6-methoxy-2-decaprenyl(X-H2)-1,4-benzoquinone and 5-demethoxyubiquinone-10(X-H2) are precursors of ubiquinone-10(X-H2). PMID:5166547

  6. Nonionic diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains: thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    The thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour of a series of diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains (geranoyl, H-farnesoyl, and phytanoyl) has been investigated. When neat, both H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form a smectic liquid crystalline structure at sub-zero temperatures. In addition, all three diethanolamides exhibit a glass transition temperature at around -73 C. Geranoyl diethanolamide forms a lamellar crystalline phase with a lattice parameter of 17.4 {angstrom} following long term storage accompanied by the loss of the glass transition. In the presence of water, H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, whilst geranoyl diethanolamide forms an L{sub 2} phase. H-farnesoyl diethanolamide forms a fluid lamellar phase (L{sub {alpha}}) at room temperature and up to {approx} 40 C. Phytanoyl diethanolamide displays a rich mesomorphism forming the inverse diamond (Q{sub II}{sup D}) and gyroid (Q{sub II}{sup G}) bicontinuous cubic phases in addition to an L{sub {alpha}} phase.

  7. Mevalonate Analogues as Substrates of Enzymes in the Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Takashi; Park, Chan Sun; Lefurgy, Scott T.; Sun, Meihao; Michels, Theodore; Leyh, Thomas S.; Silverman, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Survival of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae requires a functional mevalonate pathway, which produces isopentenyl diphosphate, the essential building block of isoprenoids. Flux through this pathway appears to be regulated at the mevalonate kinase (MK) step, which is strongly feedback-inhibited by diphosphomevalonate (DPM), the penultimate compound in the pathway. The human mevalonate pathway is not regulated by DPM, making the bacterial pathway an attractive antibiotic target. Since DPM has poor drug characteristics, being highly charged, we propose to use unphosphorylated, cell-permeable prodrugs based on mevalonate that will be phosphorylated in turn by MK and phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) to generate the active compound in situ. To test the limits of this approach, we synthesized a series of C3-substituted mevalonate analogues to probe the steric and electronic requirements of the MK and PMK active sites. MK and PMK accepted substrates with up to two additional carbons, showing a preference for small substitutents. This result establishes the feasibility of using a prodrug strategy for DPM-based antibiotics in S. pneumoniae and identified several analogues to be tested as inhibitors of MK. Among the substrates accepted by both enzymes were cyclopropyl, vinyl, and ethynyl mevalonate analogues that, when diphosphorylated, might be mechanism-based inactivators of the next enzyme in the pathway, diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase. PMID:20056424

  8. Apicoplast isoprenoid precursor synthesis and the molecular basis of fosmidomycin resistance in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sethu C.; Brooks, Carrie F.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Strurm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Anglin, Justin L.; Song, Yongcheng; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexa are important pathogens that include the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Apicomplexan parasites contain a relict chloroplast, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is indispensable and an attractive drug target. The apicoplast is home to a 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DOXP) pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors. This pathway is believed to be the most conserved function of the apicoplast, and fosmidomycin, a specific inhibitor of the pathway, is an effective antimalarial. Surprisingly, fosmidomycin has no effect on most other apicomplexans. Using Toxoplasma gondii, we establish that the pathway is essential in parasites that are highly fosmidomycin resistant. We define the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility, experimentally testing various host and parasite contributions in T. gondii and Plasmodium. We demonstrate that in T. gondii the parasite plasma membrane is a critical barrier to drug uptake. In strong support of this hypothesis, we engineer de novo drug-sensitive T. gondii parasites by heterologous expression of a bacterial transporter protein. Mice infected with these transgenic parasites can now be cured from a lethal challenge with fosmidomycin. We propose that the varied extent of metabolite exchange between host and parasite is a crucial determinator of drug susceptibility and a predictor of future resistance. PMID:21690250

  9. Isoprenoid addition to Ras protein is the critical modification for its membrane association and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Cox, A D; Hisaka, M M; Graham, S M; Buss, J E; Der, C J

    1992-01-01

    We have introduced a variety of amino acid substitutions into carboxyl-terminal CA1A2X sequence (C = cysteine; A = aliphatic; X = any amino acid) of the oncogenic [Val12]Ki-Ras4B protein to identify the amino acids that permit Ras processing (isoprenylation, proteolysis, and carboxyl methylation), membrane association, and transformation in cultured mammalian cells. While all substitutions were tolerated at the A1 position, substitutions at A2 and X reduced transforming activity. The A2 residue was important for both isoprenylation and AAX proteolysis, whereas the X residue dictated the extent and specificity of isoprenoid modification only. Differences were observed between Ras processing in living cells and farnesylation efficiency in a cell-free system. Finally, one farnesylated mutant did not undergo either proteolysis or carboxyl methylation but still displayed efficient membrane association (approximately 50%) and transforming activity, indicating that farnesylation alone can support Ras transforming activity. Since both farnesylation and carboxyl methylation are critical for yeast a-factor biological activity, the three CAAX-signaled modifications may have different contributions to the function of different CAAX-containing proteins. Images PMID:1631135

  10. Down-regulation of tomato PHYTOL KINASE strongly impairs tocopherol biosynthesis and affects prenyllipid metabolism in an organ-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Juliana; Azevedo, Mariana da Silva; Spicher, Livia; Glauser, Gaétan; vom Dorp, Katharina; Guyer, Luzia; del Valle Carranza, Andrea; Asis, Ramón; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos; Demarco, Diego; Bres, Cécile; Rothan, Christophe; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Kessler, Félix; Dörmann, Peter; Carrari, Fernando; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Tocopherol, a compound with vitamin E (VTE) activity, is a conserved constituent of the plastidial antioxidant network in photosynthetic organisms. The synthesis of tocopherol involves the condensation of an aromatic head group with an isoprenoid prenyl side chain. The latter, phytyl diphosphate, can be derived from chlorophyll phytol tail recycling, which depends on phytol kinase (VTE5) activity. How plants co-ordinate isoprenoid precursor distribution for supplying biosynthesis of tocopherol and other prenyllipids in different organs is poorly understood. Here, Solanum lycopersicum plants impaired in the expression of two VTE5-like genes identified by phylogenetic analyses, named SlVTE5 and SlFOLK, were characterized. Our data show that while SlFOLK does not affect tocopherol content, the production of this metabolite is >80% dependent on SlVTE5 in tomato, in both leaves and fruits. VTE5 deficiency greatly impacted lipid metabolism, including prenylquinones, carotenoids, and fatty acid phytyl esters. However, the prenyllipid profile greatly differed between source and sink organs, revealing organ-specific metabolic adjustments in tomato. Additionally, VTE5-deficient plants displayed starch accumulation and lower CO2 assimilation in leaves associated with mild yield penalty. Taken together, our results provide valuable insights into the distinct regulation of isoprenoid metabolism in leaves and fruits and also expose the interaction between lipid and carbon metabolism, which results in carbohydrate export blockage in the VTE5-deficient plants, affecting tomato fruit quality. PMID:26596763

  11. Down-regulation of tomato PHYTOL KINASE strongly impairs tocopherol biosynthesis and affects prenyllipid metabolism in an organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Juliana; Azevedo, Mariana da Silva; Spicher, Livia; Glauser, Gaétan; vom Dorp, Katharina; Guyer, Luzia; del Valle Carranza, Andrea; Asis, Ramón; de Souza, Amanda Pereira; Buckeridge, Marcos; Demarco, Diego; Bres, Cécile; Rothan, Christophe; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Kessler, Félix; Dörmann, Peter; Carrari, Fernando; Rossi, Magdalena

    2016-02-01

    Tocopherol, a compound with vitamin E (VTE) activity, is a conserved constituent of the plastidial antioxidant network in photosynthetic organisms. The synthesis of tocopherol involves the condensation of an aromatic head group with an isoprenoid prenyl side chain. The latter, phytyl diphosphate, can be derived from chlorophyll phytol tail recycling, which depends on phytol kinase (VTE5) activity. How plants co-ordinate isoprenoid precursor distribution for supplying biosynthesis of tocopherol and other prenyllipids in different organs is poorly understood. Here, Solanum lycopersicum plants impaired in the expression of two VTE5-like genes identified by phylogenetic analyses, named SlVTE5 and SlFOLK, were characterized. Our data show that while SlFOLK does not affect tocopherol content, the production of this metabolite is >80% dependent on SlVTE5 in tomato, in both leaves and fruits. VTE5 deficiency greatly impacted lipid metabolism, including prenylquinones, carotenoids, and fatty acid phytyl esters. However, the prenyllipid profile greatly differed between source and sink organs, revealing organ-specific metabolic adjustments in tomato. Additionally, VTE5-deficient plants displayed starch accumulation and lower CO2 assimilation in leaves associated with mild yield penalty. Taken together, our results provide valuable insights into the distinct regulation of isoprenoid metabolism in leaves and fruits and also expose the interaction between lipid and carbon metabolism, which results in carbohydrate export blockage in the VTE5-deficient plants, affecting tomato fruit quality. PMID:26596763

  12. Oleic acid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    VanDusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids in cyanobacteria is very similar to the well characterized system found in green plants. However, the initial desaturation of stearic acid in cyanobacteria appears to represent a significant departure from plant systems in which stearoyl-ACP is the exclusive substrate for desaturation. In Anabaena variabilis, the substrate appears to be monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a lipid not found in plants. The authors examined five different cyanobacteria to determine if the pathway in A. variabilis was generally present in other cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria studied were A. variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis marina, and Anacystis nidulans. Each were grown in liquid culture, harvested, and examined for stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity or incubated with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. None of the cyanobacteria contained any stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity in whole homogenates or 105,000g supernatants. All were capable of incorporating /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and results from incubations of 20 min, 1 hr, 1 hr + 10 hr chase were consistent with monoglucosyldiacylglycerol serving as precursor for monogalctosyldiacylglycerol. Thus, initial evidence is consistent with oleic acid biosynthesis occurring by desaturation of stearoyl-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol in all cyanobacteria.

  13. Taxadiene Synthase Structure and Evolution of Modular Architecture in Terpene Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Jin, Yinghua; Coates, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney; Christianson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    With more than 55,000 members identified to date in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A particularly eminent member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization1 and exhibits remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy2. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia)3 is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene4, which is catalyzed by taxadiene synthase5. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862-residues, but an ~80-residue N-terminal transit sequence is cleaved upon maturation in plastids6. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N-terminus, henceforth designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (ACP, 1.82 Å resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (FGP, 2.25 Å resolution). The TXS structure is the first of a diterpene cyclase and reveals a modular assembly of three α-helical domains. The C-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. Surprisingly, the N-terminal domain and a third "insertion" domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:21160477

  14. Taxadiene Synthase Structure and Evolution of Modular Architecture in Terpene Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    M Köksal; Y Jin; R Coates; R Croteau; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    With more than 55,000 members identified so far in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A well-known and important member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization and shows remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene, which is catalysed by taxadiene synthase. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862 residues, but a roughly 80-residue amino-terminal transit sequence is cleaved on maturation in plastids. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N terminus, hereafter designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (1.82 {angstrom} resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (2.25 {angstrom} resolution). The TXS structure reveals a modular assembly of three {alpha}-helical domains. The carboxy-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. The N-terminal domain and a third 'insertion' domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis.

  15. A Decade of Molecular Understanding of Withanolide Biosynthesis and In vitro Studies in Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal: Prospects and Perspectives for Pathway Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid W.; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K.

    2015-01-01

    Withania somnifera, a multipurpose medicinal plant is a rich reservoir of pharmaceutically active triterpenoids that are steroidal lactones known as withanolides. Though the plant has been well-characterized in terms of phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. This scenario limits biotechnological interventions for enhanced production of bioactive compounds. Nevertheless, recent emergent trends vis-à-vis, the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics, and in vitro studies have opened new vistas regarding pathway engineering of withanolide production. During recent years, various strategic pathway genes have been characterized with significant amount of regulatory studies which allude toward development of molecular circuitries for production of key intermediates or end products in heterologous hosts. Another pivotal aspect covering redirection of metabolic flux for channelizing the precursor pool toward enhanced withanolide production has also been attained by deciphering decisive branch point(s) as robust targets for pathway modulation. With these perspectives, the current review provides a detailed overview of various studies undertaken by the authors and collated literature related to molecular and in vitro approaches employed in W. somnifera for understanding various molecular network interactions in entirety. PMID:26640469

  16. Biosynthesis, characterization and antimicrobial studies of green synthesized silver nanoparticles from fruit extract of Syzygium alternifolium (Wt.) Walp. an endemic, endangered medicinal tree taxon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugandhar, P.; Savithramma, N.

    2016-02-01

    In nanotechnology, the plant mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has terrific application in biomedicine due to its novel properties and its eco-friendly nature. The present study deals with the biosynthesis of stable silver nanoparticles (SNPs) from aqueous fruit extract of S. alternifolium an endemic medicinal plant to Eastern Ghats. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized by UV-VIS spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, AFM, SEM with EDAX and TEM. Colour change from brown to grey indicates the formation of nanoparticles and UV-VIS surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy observed at 442 nm further confirms the synthesized nanoparticles are SNPs. FTIR studies reveal that the phenols and primary amines of proteins are main responsible for reduction, stabilization and capping agents towards these SNPs. The XRD data show crystalline nature of nanoparticles and EDAX measurements reveal the (12.74 %) percentage presence of Ag metal. AFM, SEM and TEM microscopic analyses revealed that the size of synthesized SNPs ranging from 5 to 68 nm has spherical shape and they are in polydispersed condition. Further, the antimicrobial studies of synthesized SNPs show high toxicity towards different bacterial and fungal isolates. This is the first report on fruit mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles from S. alternifolium.

  17. First step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis cross-talks with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhawna; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Jain, Priyanka; Pratyusha, Vavilala A; Kumar, Pravin; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide. It has several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored virulence factors. Inhibiting GPI biosynthesis attenuates its virulence. Building on our previous work, we explore the interaction of GPI biosynthesis in C. albicans with ergosterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphogenesis. This study is also the first report of transcriptional co-regulation existing between two subunits of the multisubunit enzyme complex, GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GnT), involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Using mutational analysis, we show that the accessory subunits, GPI2 and GPI19, of GPI-GnT exhibit opposite effects on ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling (which determines hyphal morphogenesis). This is because the two subunits negatively regulate one another; GPI19 mutants show up-regulation of GPI2, whereas GPI2 mutants show up-regulation of GPI19. Two different models were examined as follows. First, the two GPI-GnT subunits independently interact with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling. Second, the two subunits mutually regulate one another and thereby regulate sterol levels and Ras signaling. Analysis of double mutants of these subunits indicates that GPI19 controls ergosterol biosynthesis through ERG11 levels, whereas GPI2 determines the filamentation by cross-talk with Ras1 signaling. Taken together, this suggests that the first step of GPI biosynthesis talks to and regulates two very important pathways in C. albicans. This could have implications for designing new antifungal strategies. PMID:24356967

  18. Carnitine biosynthesis in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Frédéric M; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2002-01-01

    Carnitine is indispensable for energy metabolism, since it enables activated fatty acids to enter the mitochondria, where they are broken down via beta-oxidation. Carnitine is probably present in all animal species, and in numerous micro-organisms and plants. In mammals, carnitine homoeostasis is maintained by endogenous synthesis, absorption from dietary sources and efficient tubular reabsorption by the kidney. This review aims to cover the current knowledge of the enzymological, molecular, metabolic and regulatory aspects of mammalian carnitine biosynthesis, with an emphasis on the human and rat. PMID:11802770

  19. Biological source and provenance of deep-water derived isoprenoid tetraether lipids along the Portuguese continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Villanueva, Laura; Zell, Claudia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that nitrifying Thaumarchaeota in the deep ocean waters may contribute to the sedimentary composition of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (isoGDGTs), impacting TEX86 paleothermometry. We investigated the potential effect of deep-water dwelling Thaumarchaeota in the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) on the distribution of isoGDGTs by analysing suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediments collected along five land-ocean transects along the southern Portuguese continental margin. To this end, we directly compared for the first time the composition of intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived isoGDGTs of SPM with the diversity, abundance, and activity of Thaumarchaeota based on the genetic analysis of the genes coding for the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase involved in the isoGDGT biosynthetic pathway. Our results revealed a strong positive relationship between water depth and TEX86H values for both SPM and surface sediments. The increasing TEX86H trends for both core lipid (CL) and IPL-derived fractions were accompanied by increasing fractional abundances of GDGT-2 and crenarchaeol regio-isomer and decreasing fractional abundances of GDGT-1 and GDGT-3 with increasing water depth. Phylogenetic analyses based on the archaeal amoA and the GGGP synthase proteins showed that Thaumarchaeota populations detected at 1 m and 50 m water depth were different from those detected in 200 m and 1000 m water depth, which had an increased contribution of so-called 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. The differences in the fractional abundances of isoGDGTs with water depth were compatible with the increasing contribution of 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota harboring a different GGGP synthase enzyme which has been suggested to relate to changes in the relative proportion of synthesized isoGDGTs. Accordingly, it appears that the sedimentary distribution of CL isoGDGTs used

  20. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the biosynthesis by Microbacterium ammoniaphilum of L-glutamate selectively enriched with carbon-13

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, T.E.; Han, C.H.; Kollman, V.H.; London, R.E.; Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1982-02-10

    /sup 13/C NMR of isotopically enriched metabolites has been used to study the metabolism of Microbacterium ammoniaphilum, a bacterium which excretes large quantities of L-glutamic acid into the medium. Biosynthesis from 90% (1-/sup 13/C) glucose results in relatively high specificity of the label, with (2,4-/sup 13/C/sub 2/) glutamate as the major product. The predominant biosynthetic pathway for synthesis of glutamate from glucose was determined to be the Embden Meyerhof glycolytic pathway followed by P-enolpyruvate carboxylase and the first third of the Krebs cycle. Different metabolic pathways are associated with different correlations in the enrichment of the carbons, reflected in the spectrum as different /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C scalar multiplet intensities. Hence, intensity and /sup 13/C-/sup 13/C multiplet analysis allows quantitation of the pathways involved. Although blockage of the Krebs cycle at the ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase step is the basis for the accumulation of glutamate, significant Krebs cycle activity was found in glucose grown cells, and extensive Krebs cycle activity in cells metabolizing (1-/sup 13/C) acetate. In addition to the observation of the expected metabolites, the disaccharide ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..-trehalose and ..cap alpha..,..beta..-glucosylamine were identified from the /sup 13/C NMR spectra.

  1. X-Ray Scattering and Electron Cryomicroscopy Study on the Effect of Carotenoid Biosynthesis to the Structure of Chlorobium tepidum Chlorosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, T. P.; Li, H.; Pšenčík, J.; Laurinmäki, P. A.; Butcher, S. J.; Frigaard, N.-U.; Serimaa, R. E.; Bryant, D. A.; Tuma, R.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorosomes, the main antenna complexes of green photosynthetic bacteria, were isolated from null mutants of Chlorobium tepidum, each of which lacked one enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of carotenoids. The effects of the altered carotenoid composition on the structure of the chlorosomes were studied by means of x-ray scattering and electron cryomicroscopy. The chlorosomes from each mutant strain exhibited a lamellar arrangement of the bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, which are the major constituents of the chlorosome interior. However, the carotenoid content and composition had a pronounced effect on chlorosome biogenesis and structure. The results indicate that carotenoids with a sufficiently long conjugated system are important for the biogenesis of the chlorosome baseplate. Defects in the baseplate structure affected the shape of the chlorosomes and were correlated with differences in the arrangement of lamellae and spacing between the lamellar planes of bacteriochlorophyll aggregates. In addition, comparisons among the various mutants enabled refinement of the assignments of the x-ray scattering peaks. While the main scattering peaks come from the lamellar structure of bacteriochlorophyll c aggregates, some minor peaks may originate from the paracrystalline arrangement of CsmA in the baseplate. PMID:17468163

  2. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  3. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  4. Hydrogen sulfide mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Ruijing; Jia, Yujie; Ef, Abd Allah; Jia, Aiqun; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a signal to induce many physiological processes in plants, but its role in controlling the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is not well established. In this study, we found that high temperature (HT) treatment induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and promoted the rapid accumulation of H2S. Furthermore, HT triggered the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone that promotes nicotine biosynthesis. Suppression of the H2S signal using chemical inhibitors or via RNAi suppression of l-cysteine desulphydrase (L-CD) in transgenic plants, compromised JA production and nicotine biosynthesis under HT treatments, and these inhibitory effects could be reversed by applying exogenous H2S. Based on these data, we propose that H2S is an important trigger of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under HT conditions, and that H2S acts upstream of JA signaling by modulating the transcription of genes associated with JA biosynthesis. PMID:27035256

  5. Biosynthesis of plant sulfolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Kleppinger-Sparace, K.; Mudd, J.B.; Sparace, S. )

    1989-04-01

    The complete biosynthesis of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) remains undetermined although dark synthesis of SQDG by chloroplasts supplied with AP{sup 35}S, PAP{sup 35}S or {sup 35}SO{sub 4} plus ATP suggests the sulfur moiety arises from either APS or sulfite (1). Sulfate incorporation into sulfolipids in isolated chloroplasts and in intact roots is reported here and compared to lipids labelled by {sup 14}C-acetate or {sup 14}C-glycerol. Several unknown {sup 35}S-labelled chloroform-soluble compounds were isolated from sterile roots. These {sup 35}S-labelled compounds differ from those of the chloroplast, identified as elemental sulfur forms. Identification of the unknown root compounds is in progress. Unlike chloroplast, isolated root plastids do not synthesis SQDG from sulfate plus ATP suggesting a requirement for an activated form of sulfate, such as APS or PAPS.

  6. Designer microbes for biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have long been adapted for the biosynthetic production of useful compounds. There is increasing demand for the rapid and cheap microbial production of diverse molecules in an industrial setting. Microbes can now be designed and engineered for a particular biosynthetic purpose, thanks to recent developments in genome sequencing, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology. Advanced tools exist for the genetic manipulation of microbes to create novel metabolic circuits, making new products accessible. Metabolic processes can be optimized to increase yield and balance pathway flux. Progress is being made towards the design and creation of fully synthetic microbes for biosynthetic purposes. Together, these emerging technologies will facilitate the production of designer microbes for biosynthesis. PMID:24646570

  7. Organometallic mechanism of action and inhibition of the 4Fe-4S isoprenoid biosynthesis protein GcpE (IspG)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weixue; Li, Jikun; Wang, Ke; Huang, Cancan; Zhang, Yong; Oldfield, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a series of chemical, EPR, ENDOR, and HYSCORE spectroscopic investigations of the mechanism of action (and inhibition) of GcpE, E-1-hydroxy-2-methyl-but-2-enyl-4-diphosphate (HMBPP) synthase, also known as IspG, an Fe4S4 cluster-containing protein. We find that the epoxide of HMBPP when reduced by GcpE generates the same transient EPR species as observed on addition of the substrate, 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2, 4-cyclo-diphosphate. ENDOR and HYSCORE spectra of these transient species (using 2H, 13C and 17O labeled samples) indicate formation of an Fe-C-H containing organometallic intermediate, most likely a ferraoxetane. This is then rapidly reduced to a ferracyclopropane in which the HMBPP product forms an η2-alkenyl π- (or π/σ) complex with the 4th Fe in the Fe4S4 cluster, and a similar “metallacycle” also forms between isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and GcpE. Based on this metallacycle concept, we show that an alkyne (propargyl) diphosphate is a good (Ki ∼ 300 nM) GcpE inhibitor, and supported again by EPR and ENDOR results (a 13C hyperfine coupling of ∼7 MHz), as well as literature precedent, we propose that the alkyne forms another π/σ metallacycle, an η2-alkynyl, or ferracyclopropene. Overall, the results are of broad general interest because they provide new mechanistic insights into GcpE catalysis and inhibition, with organometallic bond formation playing, in both cases, a key role. PMID:20534554

  8. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Lipid Biosynthesis of Piezophilic Bacteria - Implications for Studying Microbial Metabolism and Carbon Cycle in Deep Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Dasgupta, S.; Zhang, L.; Li, J.; Kato, C.; Bartlett, D.

    2012-12-01

    Piezophiles are pressure-loving microorganisms, which reproduce preferentially or exclusively at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. In this study, we examined stable carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in fatty acid biosynthesis of a piezophilic bacterium Moritella japonica DSK1. The bacterium was grown to stationary phase at hydrstatic pressures of 0.1, 10, 20, and 50 MPa (mega-passcal) in media prepared using sterilized natural seawater supplied with glucose as the sole carbon source. Bacterial cell biomass and individual fatty acids exhibited consistent pressure-dependent carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations relative to substrates. Average carbon isotope fractionation (delta(FA-glucose)) at high pressures was much higher than that for surface bacteria: -15.7, -15.3, and -18.3‰ at 10, 20, and 50 MPa, respectively. For deltaD, fatty acids are more depleted in D relative to glucose than to water. Monounsaturated fatty acids are more depleted in D than corresponding saturated fatty acids by as much as 36‰. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are most depleted in D. For example, DHA (22:6omega3) has the most negative hydrogen isotope ratio (-170.91‰) (delta(FA-glucose) = -199, delta(FA-water) = -176). The observed isotope effects can be ascribed to the kinetics of enzymatic reactions that are affected by hydrostatic pressure and to operating of two independent lipid biosynthetic pathways of the piezophilic bacteria. Given that most of the biosphere lives under high pressures, our results have important important implications for studying microbial metabolism and carbon cycle in the deep biosphere.

  9. Biosynthesis of Camptothecin. In Silico and in Vivo Tracer Study from [1-13C]Glucose1

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yasuyo; Kitajima, Mariko; Arita, Masanori; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Sudo, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Mami; Aimi, Norio; Saito, Kazuki

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin derivatives are clinically used antitumor alkaloids that belong to monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. In this study, we investigated the biosynthetic pathway of camptothecin from [1-13C]glucose (Glc) by in silico and in vivo studies. The in silico study measured the incorporation of Glc into alkaloids using the Atomic Reconstruction of Metabolism software and predicted the labeling patterns of successive metabolites from [1-13C]Glc. The in vivo study followed incorporation of [1-13C]Glc into camptothecin with hairy roots of Ophiorrhiza pumila by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The 13C-labeling pattern of camptothecin isolated from the hairy roots clearly showed that the monoterpene-secologanin moiety was synthesized via the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway, not via the mevalonate pathway. This conclusion was supported by differential inhibition of camptothecin accumulation by the pathway-specific inhibitors (fosmidomycin and lovastatin). The quinoline moiety from tryptophan was also labeled as predicted by the Atomic Reconstruction of Metabolism program via the shikimate pathway. These results indicate that camptothecin is formed by the combination of the 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway and the shikimate pathway. This study provides the innovative example for how a computer-aided comprehensive metabolic analysis will refine the experimental design to obtain more precise biological information. PMID:14657405

  10. Genome-wide association study dissects the genetic architecture of oil biosynthesis and accumulation in maize kernel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) on a population of 368 maize inbreds with 1.06 million SNPs was performed and identified 74 highly significantly associated genes influencing maize kernel oil content and fatty acid composition. To validate these findings, three biparental linkage mapping popul...