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Sample records for isotope dilution thermal

  1. Calibration graphs in isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Enea; Mester, Zoltán; Meija, Juris

    2015-10-01

    Isotope-based quantitation is routinely employed in chemical measurements. Whereas most analysts seek for methods with linear theoretical response functions, a unique feature that distinguishes isotope dilution from many other analytical methods is the inherent possibility for a nonlinear theoretical response curve. Most implementations of isotope dilution calibration today either eliminate the nonlinearity by employing internal standards with markedly different molecular weight or they employ empirical polynomial fits. Here we show that the exact curvature of any isotope dilution curve can be obtained from three-parameter rational function, y = f(q) = (a0 + a1q)/(1 + a2q), known as the Padé[1,1] approximant. The use of this function allows eliminating an unnecessary source of error in isotope dilution analysis when faced with nonlinear calibration curves. In addition, fitting with Padé model can be done using linear least squares. PMID:26481988

  2. An algorithm for U-Pb isotope dilution data reduction and uncertainty propagation

    E-print Network

    McLean, Noah M.; Bowring, J.F.; Bowring, S.A.

    2011-06-01

    High-precision U-Pb geochronology by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry is integral to a variety of Earth science disciplines, but its ultimate resolving power is quantified by the uncertainties of ...

  3. An algorithm for U-Pb isotope dilution data reduction and uncertainty propagation

    E-print Network

    McLean, Noah Morgan

    High-precision U-Pb geochronology by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry is integral to a variety of Earth science disciplines, but its ultimate resolving power is quantified by the uncertainties of ...

  4. Measurement of attogram quantities of 231Pa in dissolved and particulate fractions of seawater by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chuan-Chou; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Moran, S Bradley; Edmonds, Henrietta N; Hoff, John A; Thomas, Rebecca B

    2003-03-01

    A technique has been developed to quantify ultratrace 231Pa (50-2000 ag; 1 ag = 10(-18) g) concentrations in seawater using isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The method is a modification of a process developed by Pickett et al. (Pickett, D. A.; Murrell, M. T.; Williams, R. W. Anal. Chem. 1994, 66, 1044-1049) and extends the technique to very low levels of protactinium. The procedural blank is 16 +/- 15 ag (2sigma), and the ionization efficiency (ions generated/atom loaded) approaches 0.5%. Measurement time is <1 h. The amount of 231Pa needed to produce 231Pa data with an uncertainty of +/-4-12% is 100-1000 ag (approximately 3 x 10(5) to 3 x 10(6) atoms). Replicate measurements made on known standards and seawater samples demonstrate that the analytical precision approximates that expected from counting statistics and that, based on detection limits of 38 and 49 ag, protactinium can be detected in a minimum sample size of surface seawater of approximately 2 L for suspended particulate matter and <0.1 L for filtered (<0.4 microm) seawater, respectively. The concentration of 231Pa (tens of attograms per liter) can be determined with an uncertainty of +/-5-10% (2sigma) for suspended particulate matter filtered from 5 to 10 L of seawater. For the dissolved fraction, 0.5-1 L of seawater yields 231Pa measurements with a precision of 1-10%. Sample size requirements are orders of magnitude less than traditional decay-counting techniques and significantly less than previously reported ICP-MS techniques. Our technique can also be applied to other environmental samples, including cave waters, rivers, and igneous rocks. PMID:12641225

  5. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  6. Determination of lead, cadmium, indium, thallium and silver in ancient ices from Antarctica by isotope dilution-thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsumoto, A.; Hinkley, T.K.

    1997-01-01

    The concentrations of five chalcophile elements (Pb, Cd, In, Tl and Ag) and the lead isotope rarios in ancient ices from the Taylor Dome near coastal Antarctica, have been determined by the isotope dilutionthermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS), with ultra-clean laboratory techniques. The samples were selected from segments of cores, one of which included a visible ash layer. Electric conductivity measurement (ECM) or dielectric properties (DEP) gave distinctive sharp peaks for some of the samples c hosen. Exterior portions of the sample segments were trimmed away by methods described here. Samples w ere evaporated to dryness and later separated into fractions for the five elements using an HBr-HNO3 a nion exchange column method. The concentrations are in the range 2.62-36.7 pg Pb/g of ice, 0.413-2.83 pg Cd/g, 0.081-0.34 pg In/g, 0.096-2.8 pg Tl/g and 0.15-0.84 pg Ag/g. respectively. The dispersions in duplicate analyses are about ??1% for lead and cadmium, ??2% for indium. ??4% for thallium and ??6% for silver, respectively. The concentrations of lead obtained are commonly higher than those in the present-day Antarctic surface snows, but the isotope ratios are distinctively higher than those of the present-day snows and close to those of the other ancient ice collected from a different Antarctic area.

  7. Trace determination of zinc by substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhya, D.; Priya, S.; Subramanian, M.O.S.

    1996-09-01

    A radiometric method based on substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis using 1,10-phenanthroline and a substoichiometric amount of eosin was developed for determining trace amounts of zinc. Evaluation of various metal ion interferences shows that as little as 0.2 {mu}g Zn could be determined in an aqueous-phase volume of 60 mL. The method has been successfully applied to the determination of Zn in city waste incineration ash, cadmium metal, Fourts-B tablets, Boro-plus ointment, and magnesium alloy samples. 12 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Automated spike preparation system for Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Clark, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is a method frequently employed to measure dissolved, irradiated nuclear materials. A known quantity of a unique isotope of the element to be measured (referred to as the ``spike``) is added to the solution containing the analyte. The resulting solution is chemically purified then analyzed by mass spectrometry. By measuring the magnitude of the response for each isotope and the response for the ``unique spike`` then relating this to the known quantity of the ``spike``, the quantity of the nuclear material can be determined. An automated spike preparation system was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to dispense spikes for use in IDMS analytical methods. Prior to this development, technicians weighed each individual spike manually to achieve the accuracy required. This procedure was time-consuming and subjected the master stock solution to evaporation. The new system employs a high precision SMI Model 300 Unipump dispenser interfaced with an electronic balance and a portable Epson HX-20 notebook computer to automate spike preparation.

  9. Nutritional assessment by isotope dilution analysis of body composition

    SciTech Connect

    Szeluga, D.J.; Stuart, R.K.; Utermohlen, V.; Santos, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The three components of body mass, body cell mass (BCM), extracellular fluid (ECF), and fat + extracellular solids (ECS: bone, tendon, etc) can be quantified using established isotope dilution techniques. With these techniques, total body water (TBW) and ECF are measured using 3H/sub 2/O and /sup 82/Bromine, respectively, as tracers. BCM is calculated from intracellular fluid (ICF) where ICF . TBW - ECF. Fat + ECS is estimated as: body weight - (BCM + ECF). TBW and ECF can be determined by either of two calculation methods, one requiring several timed plasma samples (extrapolation method) and one requiring a single plasma sample and a 4-h urine collection (urine-corrected method). The comparability of the two calculation methods was evaluated in 20 studies in 12 bone marrow transplant recipients. We found that for determination of TBW and ECF there was a very strong linear relationship (r2 greater than 0.98) between the calculation methods. Further comparisons (by t test, 2-sided) indicated that for the determination of ECF, the methods were not significantly (p greater than 0.90) different; however, TBW determined by the urine-corrected method was slightly (0.1 to 6%), but significantly (p less than 0.01) greater than that determined by the extrapolation method. Therefore, relative to the extrapolation method, the urine-corrected method ''over-estimates'' BCM and ''under-estimates'' fat + ECS since determination of these compartment sizes depends on measurement of TBW. We currently use serial isotope dilution studies to monitor the body composition changes of patients receiving therapeutic nutritional support.

  10. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in thermal waters at Zunil, Guatemala

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.O.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Urrutia Sole, J.F.

    1982-10-01

    Enthalpy-chloride relations suggest that a deep reservoir exists at Zunil with a temperature near 300/sup 0/C. Water from that reservoir moves to shallower and cooler local reservoirs, where it mixes with diluted water and then attains a new water-rock chemical equilibrium. This mixed water, in turn, generally is further diluted before being discharged from thermal springs. The stable-isotopic composition of the thermal water indicates that recharge for the deep water at Zunil comes mainly from local sources. The presence of measurable tritium, which suggests that the deep water has been underground about 20 to 30 years, also indicates a local source for the recharge.

  11. Application of Uranium Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry in the preparation of New Certified Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasözbek, A.; Mathew, K. J.; Orlowicz, G.; Srinivasan, B.; Narayanan, U.

    2012-04-01

    Proven measurement techniques play a critical role in the preparation of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) - those requiring high accuracy and precision in the measurement results. Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is one such measurement method commonly used in the quantitative analysis of uranium in nuclear safeguards and isotope geology applications. In this project, we evaluated the possibility of using some of the uranium isotopic and assay CRMs made earlier by the New Brunswick laboratory as IDMS spikes to define the uranium mass fraction in future preparations of CRMs. Uranium solutions prepared from CRM 112-A (a highly pure uranium metal assay standard) and CRM 115 (a highly pure uranium oxide isotopic and assay standard) were used as spikes in the determination of uranium. Two different thermal ionization mass spectrometer instruments (MAT 261 and TRITON) were used for the isotopic measurements. Standard IDMS equation was used for data reduction to yield results for uranium mass fraction along with uncertainties, the latter calculated according to GUM. The results show that uranium mass fraction measurements can be made with the required accuracy and precision for defining the uranium concentration in new CRMs as well as in routine samples analyses.

  12. Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry for the Quantification of Sulfane Sulfurs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunrong; Zhang, Faya; Munske, Gerhard; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Sulfane sulfurs are one type of important reactive sulfur species. These molecules have unique reactivity that can attach reversibly to other sulfur atoms and exhibit regulatory effects in diverse biological systems. Recent studies have suggested that sulfane sulfurs are involved in signal transduction processes regulated by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Accurate and reliable measurements of sulfane sulfurs in biological samples are thus needed to reveal their production and mechanisms of actions. Herein we report a convenient and accurate method for the determination of sulfane sulfurs concentrations. The method employs a triphenylphosphine derivative (P2) to capture sulfane sulfurs as a stable phosphine sulphide product PS2. The concentration of PS2 was then determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry, using a 13C3-labelled phosphine sulfide PS1 as the internal standard. The specificity and efficiency of the method were proved by model reactions. It was also applied in the measurement of sulfane sulfurs in mice tissues including brain, kidney, lung, liver, heart, spleen, and blood. PMID:25152234

  13. Quantitation of DNA adducts by stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tretyakova, Natalia; Goggin, Melissa; Janis, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to endogenous and exogenous chemicals can lead to the formation of structurally modified DNA bases (DNA adducts). If not repaired, these nucleobase lesions can cause polymerase errors during DNA replication, leading to heritable mutations potentially contributing to the development of cancer. Due to their critical role in cancer initiation, DNA adducts represent mechanism-based biomarkers of carcinogen exposure, and their quantitation is particularly useful for cancer risk assessment. DNA adducts are also valuable in mechanistic studies linking tumorigenic effects of environmental and industrial carcinogens to specific electrophilic species generated from their metabolism. While multiple experimental methodologies have been developed for DNA adduct analysis in biological samples – including immunoassay, HPLC, and 32P-postlabeling – isotope dilution high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) generally has superior selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility. As typical DNA adducts concentrations in biological samples are between 0.01 – 10 adducts per 108 normal nucleotides, ultrasensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies are required for their analysis. Recent developments in analytical separations and biological mass spectrometry – especially nanoflow HPLC, nanospray ionization MS, chip-MS, and high resolution MS – have pushed the limits of analytical HPLC-ESI-MS/MS methodologies for DNA adducts, allowing researchers to accurately measure their concentrations in biological samples from patients treated with DNA alkylating drugs and in populations exposed to carcinogens from urban air, drinking water, cooked food, alcohol, and cigarette smoke. PMID:22827593

  14. Thermal Conductivity and Sound Attenuation in Dilute Atomic Fermi Gases

    E-print Network

    Braby, Matt; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We compute the thermal conductivity and sound attenuation length of a dilute atomic Fermi gas in the framework of kinetic theory. Above the critical temperature for superfluidity, T_c, the quasi-particles are fermions, whereas below T_c, the dominant excitations are phonons. We calculate the thermal conductivity in both cases. We find that at unitarity the thermal conductivity \\kappa in the normal phase scales as \\kappa ~ T^{3/2}. In the superfluid phase we find \\kappa ~ T^{2}. At high temperature the Prandtl number, the ratio of the momentum and thermal diffusion constants, is 2/3. The ratio increases as the temperature is lowered. As a consequence we expect sound attenuation in the normal phase just above T_c to be dominated by shear viscosity. We comment on the possibility of extracting the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas at unitarity using measurements of the sound absorption length.

  15. Thermal Conductivity and Sound Attenuation in Dilute Atomic Fermi Gases

    E-print Network

    Matt Braby; Jingyi Chao; Thomas Schaefer

    2010-10-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity and sound attenuation length of a dilute atomic Fermi gas in the framework of kinetic theory. Above the critical temperature for superfluidity, T_c, the quasi-particles are fermions, whereas below T_c, the dominant excitations are phonons. We calculate the thermal conductivity in both cases. We find that at unitarity the thermal conductivity \\kappa in the normal phase scales as \\kappa ~ T^{3/2}. In the superfluid phase we find \\kappa ~ T^{2}. At high temperature the Prandtl number, the ratio of the momentum and thermal diffusion constants, is 2/3. The ratio increases as the temperature is lowered. As a consequence we expect sound attenuation in the normal phase just above T_c to be dominated by shear viscosity. We comment on the possibility of extracting the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas at unitarity using measurements of the sound absorption length.

  16. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  17. Measurement of dissolved neon by isotope dilution using a quadrupole mass spectrometer

    E-print Network

    Emerson, Steven R.

    by isotope dilution, with addition of a 22 Ne spike directly to the evacuated sample flask prior to water with a headspace and cryogenically processed to remove interferences. The 22 Ne/20 Ne ratio was then measured

  18. Entropy Production and Thermal Conductivity of A Dilute Gas

    E-print Network

    Yong-Jun Zhang

    2011-02-16

    It is known that the thermal conductivity of a dilute gas can be derived by using kinetic theory. We present here a new derivation by starting with two known entropy production principles: the steepest entropy ascent (SEA) principle and the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle. A remarkable feature of the new derivation is that it does not require the specification of the existence of the temperature gradient. The known result is reproduced in a similar form.

  19. Thermal conductivity and sound attenuation in dilute atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Braby, Matt; Chao Jingyi; Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    We compute the thermal conductivity and sound attenuation length of a dilute atomic Fermi gas in the framework of kinetic theory. Above the critical temperature for superfluidity, T{sub c}, the quasiparticles are fermions, whereas below T{sub c}, the dominant excitations are phonons. We calculate the thermal conductivity in both cases. We find that at unitarity the thermal conductivity {kappa} in the normal phase scales as {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 3/2}. In the superfluid phase we find {kappa}{proportional_to}T{sup 2}. At high temperature the Prandtl number, the ratio of the momentum and thermal diffusion constants, is 2/3. The ratio increases as the temperature is lowered. As a consequence we expect sound attenuation in the normal phase just above T{sub c} to be dominated by shear viscosity. We comment on the possibility of extracting the shear viscosity of the dilute Fermi gas at unitarity using measurements of the sound absorption length.

  20. Dry Blending to Achieve Isotopic Dilution of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Roger Neil; Chipman, Nathan Alan; Rajamani, R. K.

    2001-04-01

    The end of the cold war produced large amounts of excess fissile materials in the United States and Russia. The Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies for disposition of these excess materials. To date, many of these planning strategies have included isotopic dilution of highly enriched uranium as a means of reducing the proliferation and safety risks. Isotopic dilution by dry blending highly enriched uranium with natural and/or depleted uranium has been identified as one non-aqueous method to achieve these risk (proliferation and criticality safety) reductions. This paper reviews the technology of dry blending as applied to free flowing oxide materials.

  1. DETERMINATION OF NIACIN IN FOOD MATERIALS BY ISOTOPE DILUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of deuterium-labeled nicotinic acid makes stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) an attractive option for the determination of the water-soluble B-vitamin, niacin, in food samples. We present a method based on acid digestion, solid ...

  2. Isotopic Dilution Analysis and Secular Equilibrium Study: Two Complementary Radiochemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Lipford, Levin C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a complementary pair of radiochemistry experiments for instruction of isotopic dilution analysis and secular equilibrium. Both experiments use the readily available cesium-137 nuclide and the simple precipitation technique for cesium with the tetraphenylborate anion. Procedures used and typical results obtained are provided and…

  3. Direct determination of halogens in powdered geological and environmental samples using isotope dilution laser ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulyga, Sergei F.; Heumann, Klaus G.

    2005-04-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-IDMS) with a special laser ablation system for bulk analyses (LINA-Spark(TM)-Atomiser) was applied for direct determinations of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in rock and sediment samples. Special attention was focused on possible inter-halogen fractionations and analyte/spike isotope fractionations by using LA-ICP-MS and LA-ICP-IDMS, respectively. A variation of Br/Cl and I/Cl element intensity ratios by a factor of 1.3-3 was observed when changing the nebulizer gas flow rate in the range of 0.84-1.0 L min-1 and the laser power density in the range of 2-10 GW cm-2, respectively. When using an internal standard for halogen quantification in LA-ICP-MS, this inter-element fractionation can cause systematic errors, which can be avoided by applying the isotope dilution technique. However, at high laser power densities (>5.7 GW cm-2 for iodine and >4.0 GW cm-2 for bromine and chlorine) the corresponding measured isotope ratio of the isotope-diluted sample deviates significantly from the target value. Under optimised conditions concentrations in the range of 30 [mu]g g-1-16 × 103 [mu]g g-1 for chlorine, <2-140 [mu]g g-1 for bromine, and <0.1-31 [mu]g g-1 for iodine were determined by LA-ICP-IDMS in two sediment reference materials (SRM 1646, SRM 2704) and three rock reference samples (GS-N, Granite; BX-N, Bauxite; DT-N, Disthene), which have not been certified for these halogens. The sediment results agree well within the given uncertainties with indicative values by different methods and the results of the rock samples with those obtained by negative thermal ionisation isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The detection limits of LA-ICP-IDMS are 8 [mu]g g-1 for chlorine, 1.7 [mu]g g-1 for bromine, and 0.1 [mu]g g-1 for iodine.

  4. Determination of iodine in oyster tissue by isotope dilution laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fassett, J.D.; Murphy, T.J. )

    1990-02-15

    The technique of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been combined with isotope dilution analysis to determine iodine in oyster tissue. The long-lived radioisotope, 129I, was used to spike the samples. Samples were equilibrated with the 129I, wet ashed under controlled conditions, and iodine separated by coprecipitation with silver chloride. The analyte was dried as silver ammonium iodide upon a tantalum filament from which iodine was thermally desorbed in the resonance ionization mass spectrometry instrument. A single-color, two-photon resonant plus one-photon ionization scheme was used to form positive iodine ions. Long-lived iodine signals were achieved from 100 ng of iodine. The precision of 127I/129I measurement has been evaluated by replicate determinations of the spike, the spike calibration samples, and the oyster tissue samples and was 1.0%. Measurement precision among samples was 1.9% for the spike calibration and 1.4% for the oyster tissue. The concentration of iodine determined in SRM 1566a, Oyster Tissue, was 4.44 micrograms/g with an estimate of the overall uncertainty for the analysis of +/- 0.12 microgram/g.

  5. Quantification of ferritin bound iron in human serum using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yao; Walczyk, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Ferritin is a hollow sphere protein composed of 24 subunits that can store up to 4500 iron atoms in its inner cavity. It is mainly found in the liver and spleen but also in serum at trace levels. Serum ferritin is considered as the best single indicator in assessing body iron stores except liver or bone marrow biopsy. However, it is confounded by other disease conditions. Ferritin bound iron (FBI) and ferritin saturation have been suggested as more robust biomarkers. The current techniques for FBI determination are limited by low antibody specificity, low instrument sensitivity and possible analyte losses during sample preparation. The need for a highly sensitive and reliable method is widely recognized. Here we describe a novel technique to detect serum FBI using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SS-IDMS). [(57)Fe]-ferritin was produced by biosynthesis and in vitro labeling with the (57)Fe spike in the form of [(57)Fe]-citrate after cell lysis and heat treatment. [(57)Fe]-ferritin for sample spiking was further purified by fast liquid protein chromatography. Serum ferritin and added [(57)Fe]-ferritin were separated from other iron species by ultrafiltration followed by isotopic analysis of FBI using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Repeatability of our assay is 8% with an absolute detection limit of 18 ng FBI in the sample. As compared to other speciation techniques, SS-IDMS offers maximum control over sample losses and species conversion during analysis. The described technique may therefore serve as a reference technique for clinical applications of FBI as a new biomarker for assessing body iron status. PMID:25008269

  6. Development of stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of Amadori compounds in foods.

    PubMed

    Meitinger, Michael; Hartmann, Sandra; Schieberle, Peter

    2014-06-01

    During thermal processing of foods, reducing carbohydrates and amino acids may form 1-amino-1-desoxyketoses named Amadori rearrangement products after the Italian chemist Mario Amadori. Although these compounds are transient intermediates of the Maillard reaction, they are often used as suitable markers to measure the extent of a thermal food processing, such as for spray-dried milk or dried fruits. Several methods are already available in the literature for their quantitation, but measurements are often done with external calibration without addressing losses during the workup procedure. To cope with this challenge, stable isotope dilution assays in combination with LC-MS/MS were developed for the glucose-derived Amadori products of the seven amino acids valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, methionine, and histidine using the respective synthesized [(13)C6]-labeled isotopologues as internal standards. The quantitation of the analytes added to a model matrix showed a very good sensitivity with the lowest limits of detection for the Amadori compound of phenylalanine of 0.1 ?g/kg starch and 0.2 ?g/kg oil, respectively. Also, the standard deviation measured in, for example, wheat beer was only ±2% for this analyte. Application of the method to several foods showed the highest concentrations of the Amadori product of valine in unroasted cocoa (342 mg/kg) as well as in dried bell pepper (3460 mg/kg). In agreement with literature data, drying of foods led to the formation of Amadori products, whereas they were degraded during roasting of, for example, coffee or cocoa. The study presents for the first time results on concentrations of the Amadori compounds of tyrosine and histidine in foods. PMID:24865106

  7. Total synthesis of isotopically enriched Si-29 silica NPs as potential spikes for isotope dilution quantification of natural silica NPs.

    PubMed

    Pálmai, Marcell; Szalay, Roland; Bartczak, Dorota; Varga, Zoltán; Nagy, Lívia Naszályi; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    A new method was developed for the preparation of highly monodisperse isotopically enriched Si-29 silica nanoparticles ((29)Si-silica NPs) with the purpose of using them as spikes for isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) quantification of silica NPs with natural isotopic distribution. Si-29 tetraethyl orthosilicate ((29)Si-TEOS), the silica precursor was prepared in two steps starting from elementary silicon-29 pellets. In the first step Si-29 silicon tetrachloride ((29)SiCl4) was prepared by heating elementary silicon-29 in chlorine gas stream. By using a multistep cooling system and the dilution of the volatile and moisture-sensitive (29)SiCl4 in carbon tetrachloride as inert medium we managed to reduce product loss caused by evaporation. (29)Si-TEOS was obtained by treating (29)SiCl4 with absolute ethanol. Structural characterisation of (29)Si-TEOS was performed by using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For the NP preparation, a basic amino acid catalysis route was used and the resulting NPs were analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Finally, the feasibility of using enriched NPs for on-line field-flow fractionation coupled with multi-angle light scattering and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FFF/MALS/ICP-MS) has been demonstrated. PMID:25617615

  8. Assessment of vitamin A status in rats by isotope dilution: A simplified model

    SciTech Connect

    Furr, H.C.; Cooper, D.A.; Olson, J.A. )

    1990-02-26

    Isotope-dilution analysis of vitamin A status requires giving a known quantity of labeled vitamin A to the subject and measuring the ratio of labeled to unlabeled retinol in the blood after a period for equilibration. To calculate total body stores from the isotopic ratio of plasma retinol, several assumptions must be made. In considering new ways of better calculating liver vitamin A stores from isotope-dilution data, the authors used the data of Green et al. to estimate loss of vitamin A tracer as a function of time and of vitamin A status. This correction markedly improves the correlation between calculated and analyzed liver vitamin A stores and also quantitively explains the hyperbolic relationship between fraction of tracer dose recovered in liver and mass of liver vitamin A stores. Agreement of this model with experimental data suggests that efficiency of absorption and storage of vitamin A is not affected by vitamin A status. This model can be used to estimate both the amount of tracer needed for a given lower limit of detection and an optimum sampling time.

  9. Use of Isotope Dilution Method To Predict Bioavailability of Organic Pollutants in Historically Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many cases of severe environmental contamination arise from historical episodes, where recalcitrant contaminants have resided in the environment for a prolonged time, leading to potentially decreased bioavailability. Use of bioavailable concentrations over bulk chemical levels improves risk assessment and may play a critical role in determining the need for remediation or assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation operations. In this study, we applied the principle of isotope dilution to quantify bioaccessibility of legacy contaminants DDT and PCBs in marine sediments from a Superfund site. After addition of 13C or deuterated analogues to a sediment sample, the isotope dilution reached a steady state within 24 h of mixing. At the steady state, the accessible fraction (E) derived by the isotope dilution method (IDM) ranged from 0.28 to 0.89 and was substantially smaller than 1 for most compounds, indicating reduced availability of the extensively aged residues. A strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.86) was found between E and the sum of rapid (Fr) and slow (Fs) desorption fractions determined by sequential Tenax desorption. The IDM-derived accessible concentration (Ce) was further shown to correlate closely with tissue residue in the marine benthic polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed in the same sediments. As shown in this study, the IDM approach involves only a few simple steps and may be readily adopted in laboratories equipped with mass spectrometers. This novel method is expected to be especially useful for historically contaminated sediments or soils, for which contaminant bioavailability may have changed significantly due to aging and other sequestration processes. PMID:24946234

  10. Isotopic Dilution GC/MS Method for Methionine Determination in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horj, Elena; Iordache, Andreea; Culea, Monica

    2011-10-01

    The isotopic dilution mass spectrometry technique is the method of choice for sensitive and accurate determination of analytes in biological samples. The aim of this work was to establish a sensitive analytical method for the determination of methionine in different biological media. Quantitation of methionine from the resultant tracer spectrum requires deconvolution of the enrichment of the isotopomers. Deconvolution of the ion abundance ratios to yield tracer-to-tracee ratio for the isotopomer was done using Brauman's least squares approach. Comparison with regression curve calculation method is presented. The method was applied for amino-acids determination in beef, pork and fish meat.

  11. Evidence for dilution of deep, confined ground water by vertical recharge of isotopically heavy Pleistocene water

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I. )

    1991-05-01

    New analyses of the isotopic composition of water, {sup 14}C-dating of dissolved inorganic carbon, and order-of-magnitude Darcy calculations suggest that a dilute body of water, trending north-south in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of Iowa, was emplaced as vertical recharge of Pleistocene-age water from the base of the Des Moines lobe of late Wisconsin time. The recharge occurred through more than 300 m of overlaying Silurian to Mississippian age rocks. The {delta}{sup 18}O values range from {minus}10{per thousand} to {minus}9{per thousand} for the dilute water body and are consistent with a mixture of Des Moines lobe meltwater and precipitation found today in the north-central US. These results suggest that (1) the climate at the end of the last glaciation was mild and (2) a ground-water stable isotope signature similar to that of modern precipitation in an aquifers recharge area is not a priori evidence for relatively recent recharge.

  12. A human in vivo model for the determination of lead bioavailability using stable isotope dilution.

    PubMed

    Graziano, J H; Blum, C B; Lolacono, N J; Slavkovich, V; Manton, W I; Pond, S; Moore, M R

    1996-02-01

    Beverages stored in lead-crystal glass accumulate extraordinary concentrations of lead. We obtained a lead-crystal decanter manufactured with lead from Australia, where the ratio of 206Pb/207Pb is distinctly different from that in the United States. We sought to determine the bioavailability of crystal-derived lead, using the technique of stable isotope dilution in blood. We conducted a single-dose, nonrandomized cross-over study in which participants were admitted to the Clinical Research Center twice, 1 week apart. During the first admission, subjects ingested sherry obtained from the original bottle. During the second admission, they ingested sherry that had been stored in the crystal decanter and that had achieved a lead concentration of 14.2 mu mol/l. After ingesting decanter-stored sherry, mean blood lead rose significantly (p = 0.0003) from 0.10 to 0.18 mu mol/l, while mean 206Pb/207Pb fell from 1.202 to 1.137 (p = 0.0001). On average, 70% of the ingested dose of lead was absorbed. We conclude that lead derived from crystal glass is highly bioavailable; repeated ingestions could cause elevated blood lead concentration. The technique of stable isotope dilution lends itself to the study of the bioavailability of lead in other matrices, including soil. PMID:8820585

  13. Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of Isotope-Doped Silicon Nanowires

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Ultralow Thermal Conductivity of Isotope-Doped Silicon Nanowires Nuo Yang, Gang Zhang,*, and Baowen that the thermal conductivity of SiNWs can be reduced exponentially by isotopic defects at room temperature. The thermal conductivity reaches the minimum, which is about 27% of that of pure 28Si NW, when doped with 50

  14. Metrology and traceability of U-Pb isotope dilution geochronology (EARTHTIME Tracer Calibration Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, D. J.; Schoene, B.; McLean, N. M.; Bowring, S. A.; Parrish, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    Mixed 235U-233U-205Pb(-202Pb) tracers for U-Pb isotope-dilution isotope ratio mass spectrometry have been prepared under the auspices of the EARTHTIME Initiative. The methods and results for the preparation and calibration of the U/Pb ratio and isotopic abundances are given, and the various sources of uncertainty are discussed and quantified. The accuracy of the EARTHTIME U-Pb tracer isotopic composition can be traced back to SI units via a series of assay and isotopic composition reference materials combined with the experiments described herein. The parameters used in calculating U/Pb ratios (and inferentially U-Pb dates) have correlated uncertainties that result in a total uncertainty contribution to 206Pb/238U dates of ± < 0.03% (95% confidence). For suitable terrestrial materials such as zircon, when other sources of uncertainty have been minimised (e.g., open-system behaviour, 238U/235U variation, intermediate daughter product disequilibrium, common Pb, etc.) the U-Pb tracer calibration uncertainty is a limiting factor in the accuracy of U-Pb geochronology - but less so than the uncertainty in the 238U and 235U decay constants (±0.11 and 0.14% 2?). The calibration approach of the mixed EARTHTIME 235U-233U-205Pb(-202Pb) tracers, in addition to updated values for reference materials (e.g., mixed gravimetric reference solutions), and parameters (e.g., Pb reference material assay), can be applied to other laboratory-specific U-Pb tracers and will facilitate the generation of accurate and directly inter-comparable U-Pb data.

  15. Validity of the tritiated thymidine method for estimating bacterial growth rates: measurement of isotope dilution during DNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, P C; Moriarty, D J

    1984-01-01

    The rate of tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA was used to estimate bacterial growth rates in aquatic environments. To be accurate, the calculation of growth rates has to include a factor for the dilution of isotope before incorporation. The validity of an isotope dilution analysis to determine this factor was verified in experiments reported here with cultures of a marine bacterium growing in a chemostat. Growth rates calculated from data on chemostat dilution rates and cell density agreed well with rates calculated by tritiated thymidine incorporation into DNA and isotope dilution analysis. With sufficiently high concentrations of exogenous thymidine, de novo synthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate was inhibited, thereby preventing the endogenous dilution of isotope. The thymidine technique was also shown to be useful for measuring growth rates of mixed suspensions of bacteria growing anaerobically. Thymidine was incorporated into the DNA of a range of marine pseudomonads that were investigated. Three species did not take up thymidine. The common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus species did not incorporate thymidine into DNA. PMID:6517579

  16. Recent developments in stable isotope dilution assays in mycotoxin analysis with special regard to Alternaria toxins.

    PubMed

    Asam, Stefan; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) are becoming ever commoner in mycotoxin analysis, and the number of synthesized or commercially available isotopically labelled compounds has greatly increased in the 7 years since our last review dealing with this topic. Thus, this review is conceived as an update for new applications or improvements of SIDAs for compounds discussed earlier, but the main focus is on newly introduced labelled substances and the development of SIDAs for, for example, fusarin C, moniliformin or the enniatins. Mycotoxin research has concentrated on the emerging group of Alternaria toxins in recent years, and a series of SIDAs have been developed, including ones for tenuazonic acid, alternariol, altertoxins and tentoxin that are discussed in detail in this review. Information about synthetic routes, isotopic purity and mass-spectrometric characterization of labelled compounds is given, as well as about the development and validation of SIDAs and their application to foods, feeds or biological samples. As the number of commercially available labelled standards is increasing continuously, a general tendency for the use of analytical methods based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry capable of identifying a series of mycotoxins simultaneously ("multimethods") and using one or more labelled internal standards can be observed. An overview of these applications is given, thus demonstrating that SIDAs are increasingly being used in routine analysis. PMID:26265031

  17. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate waves in dictyostelium discoideum: a demonstration by isotope dilution-fluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchik, K.J.; Devreotes, P.N.

    1981-04-24

    The distribution of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in fields of aggregating amoebae of Dictyostelium discoidenum was examined by a novel isotope dilution-fluorographic technique. Cellular cyclic AMP was visualized by its competition with exogenous /sup 3/H-labeled cyclic AMP for high-affinity binding sites on protein kinase immobilized on a Millipore filter used to blot the monolayer. The cyclic AMP was distributed in spiral or concentric circular wave patterns which centered on the foci of the aggregations. These patterns were correlated with those of cell shape change that propagate through the monolayers. These observations support the hypothesis that the aggregation process in Dictyostelium is mediated by the periodic relay of cyclic AMP signals and suggest a simple scheme for the dynamics of the aggregation process.

  18. Quantitation of vitamin B6 in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hachey, D.L.; Coburn, S.P.; Brown, L.T.; Erbelding, W.F.; DeMark, B.; Klein, P.D.

    1985-11-15

    Methods have been developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of vitamin B6 forms in biological samples by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using deuterated forms of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine, and pyridoxic acid. The biological fluid or tissue sample was homogenized and then treated with a cocktail containing appropriate amounts of each deuterated vitamer, as well as the deuterated, phosphorylated vitamer forms. The individual vitamers were isolated from the homogenate by a complex high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure that provided separate fractions for each of the six vitamers found in biological samples. Aldehydic B6 vitamers were reduced to the alcohol form prior to acetylation and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The three resulting vitamers were analyzed by electron ionization GC/MS using a silicone capillary column. The methods have been applied to analysis of vitamin B6 in liver, milk, urine, and feces at levels as low as 0.02 nmol/ml.

  19. Determination of Selected B-complex Vitamins in the NIST Multivitamin Reference Standard Material by Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (Experimental Biology, April, 2007, Washington, D.C.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increased interest in accurately assessing the total dietary intake of vitamins from all sources, including foods and dietary supplements. Isotope dilution can be a definitive analytical method for very accurate concentration determinations. Thus, a liquid chromatographic (LC) isotope dilut...

  20. An isotope-dilution standard GC/MS/MS method for steroid hormones in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    An isotope-dilution quantification method was developed for 20 natural and synthetic steroid hormones and additional compounds in filtered and unfiltered water. Deuterium- or carbon-13-labeled isotope-dilution standards (IDSs) are added to the water sample, which is passed through an octadecylsilyl solid-phase extraction (SPE) disk. Following extract cleanup using Florisil SPE, method compounds are converted to trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Validation matrices included reagent water, wastewater-affected surface water, and primary (no biological treatment) and secondary wastewater effluent. Overall method recovery for all analytes in these matrices averaged 100%; with overall relative standard deviation of 28%. Mean recoveries of the 20 individual analytes for spiked reagent-water samples prepared along with field samples analyzed in 2009–2010 ranged from 84–104%, with relative standard deviations of 6–36%. Detection levels estimated using ASTM International’s D6091–07 procedure range from 0.4 to 4 ng/L for 17 analytes. Higher censoring levels of 100 ng/L for bisphenol A and 200 ng/L for cholesterol and 3-beta-coprostanol are used to prevent bias and false positives associated with the presence of these analytes in blanks. Absolute method recoveries of the IDSs provide sample-specific performance information and guide data reporting. Careful selection of labeled compounds for use as IDSs is important because both inexact IDS-analyte matches and deuterium label loss affect an IDS’s ability to emulate analyte performance. Six IDS compounds initially tested and applied in this method exhibited deuterium loss and are not used in the final method.

  1. Determination of technetium-99 in aqueous samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    An isotope dilution/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric method (ID/ICP-MS) for measuring the concentration of technetium-99 in aqueous samples was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The procedure is faster than radiometric techniques, is also less subject to interferences, and has equal or better detection limits. It is currently being used to measure the concentration of {sup 99}Tc in samples of Savannah River water collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site. In this method, one liter samples of water are spiked with {sup 97}Tc. After equilibration, the technetium is extracted from the sample with a chromatographic resin. Interfering elements, molybdenum and ruthenium, are either not retained by the resin or are washed off with dilute nitric acid. The technetium is then eluted with more concentrated nitric acid, and the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio in the eluant is measured with an ICP-MS. The {sup 99}Tc concentration in the original sample is calculated from the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio. The chemical recovery of the extraction procedure is greater than 90%. The detection limit of the instrument, taken as three times the background counts at m/z = 99, is 0.6 part per trillion (ppt). The detection limit of the procedure, taken as three times the standard deviation of several reagent blank analyses, is 0.33 pCi/L.

  2. Determination of technetium-99 in aqueous samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    An isotope dilution/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric method (ID/ICP-MS) for measuring the concentration of technetium-99 in aqueous samples was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The procedure is faster than radiometric techniques, is also less subject to interferences, and has equal or better detection limits. It is currently being used to measure the concentration of {sup 99}Tc in samples of Savannah River water collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site. In this method, one liter samples of water are spiked with {sup 97}Tc. After equilibration, the technetium is extracted from the sample with a chromatographic resin. Interfering elements, molybdenum and ruthenium, are either not retained by the resin or are washed off with dilute nitric acid. The technetium is then eluted with more concentrated nitric acid, and the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio in the eluant is measured with an ICP-MS. The {sup 99}Tc concentration in the original sample is calculated from the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio. The chemical recovery of the extraction procedure is greater than 90%. The detection limit of the instrument, taken as three times the background counts at m/z = 99, is 0.6 part per trillion (ppt). The detection limit of the procedure, taken as three times the standard deviation of several reagent blank analyses, is 0.33 pCi/L.

  3. [Determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongli; Lin, Ying; Xiong, Zhili; Xie, Jianwei

    2014-07-01

    A method for the determination of endogenous agmatine in rat plasma was developed by isotope dilution-gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The plasma samples were analyzed after protein precipitation, evaporation, derivatization by hexafluoroacetone (HFAA), and clean-up on a Florisil SPE column. The GC-MS analysis utilized stable isotope d8-agmatine as internal standard. The samples after treatme were tested by negative chemical ionization with selected ion monitoring (SIM) which was set at m/z 492 (molecular ion of agmatine) and m/z 500 (molecular ion of internal standard). The limit of detection (LOD) of agmatine standard solution was 0.005 7 ng/mL. The calibration curve of the agmatine spiked in rat plasma showed a good linear relationship at the range of 1.14-57.0 ng/mL (r = 0.997). The recoveries of agmatine spiked in rat plasma ranged from 92.3% to 109.8%. Inter-day and intra-day precisions were less than 15%. The average concentration level of agmatine in rat plasma was (22 +/- 9) ng/mL, and there was no significant difference between male and female SD rats (p > 0.05). The method is high sensitive and specific, and can be used for the determination of endogenous agmatine in plasma. It provides a strong support for the subsequent research of agmatine. PMID:25255573

  4. Quantification of monofluoroacetate and monochloroacetate in human urine by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hamelin, Elizabeth I; Mawhinney, Douglas B; Parry, Ritchard; Kobelski, Robert J

    2010-05-01

    The rodenticide monofluoroacetate (MFA) and monochloroacetate (MCA), a chemical intermediate from several chemical syntheses, have been identified as potential agents of chemical terrorism due to their high toxicity. In preparation for response to poisonings and mass exposures, we have developed a quantification method using isotopic dilution to determine MFA and MCA in urine from 50 to 5000 ng/mL. Both analytes were extracted from urine using solid-phase extraction; extraction recoveries were 62% (MFA) and 76% (MCA). The extracts were then separated with isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography and identified using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, with detection limits of 0.9 and 7.0 ng/mL for MFA and MCA, respectively. Selectivity was established for both analytes with unique chromatographic retention times which were correlated with isotopically labeled internal standards and the use of two mass spectral transitions for each compound. The intra-day variability was less than 5% for both analytes and the inter-day variability was 7% for MFA and 6% for MCA. PMID:20356806

  5. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-03-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  6. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  7. Determination of Mercury Content in a Shallow Firn Core from Summit, Greenland by Isotope Dilution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Jacqueline L.; Long, Stephen E.; Shuman, Christopher A.; Kelly, W. Robert

    2003-01-01

    The total mercury Hg content was determined in 6 cm sections of a near-surface 7 m firn core and in surrounding surface snow from Summit, Greenland (elevation: 3238 m, 72.58 N, 38.53 W) in May 2001 by isotope dilution cold-vapor inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-CV-ICP-MS). The focus of this research was to evaluate the capability of the ID-CV-ICPMS technique for measuring trace levels of Hg typical of polar snow and firn. Highly enriched Hg-201 isotopic spike is added to approximately 10 ml melted core and thoroughly mixed. The Hg(+2) in the sample is reduced on line with tin (II) chloride (SnCl2) and the elemental Hg (Hg(0)) vapor pre-concentrated on to gold gauze using a commercial amalgam system. The Hg is then thermally desorbed and introduced into a quadrupole ICP-MS. The blank corrected Hg concentrations determined for all samples ranged from 0.25 ng/L to 1.74 ng/L (ppt) (average 0.59 ng/L plus or minus 0.28 ng/L) and fall within the range of those previously determined by Boutron et al., 1998 (less than or equal to 0.05 ng/L to 2.0 ng/L) for the Summit site. The average blank value was 0.19 ng/L plus or minus 0.045 ng/L (n=6). The Hg values specifically for the firn core range from 0.25 ng/L to 0.87 ng/L (average 0.51 ng/L plus or minus 0.13 ng/L) and show both values declining with time and larger variability in concentration in the top 1.8 m.

  8. Apolipoprotein A-I assayed in human serum by isotope dilution as a potential standard for immunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Weech, P.K.; Jewer, D.; Marcel, Y.L.

    1988-01-01

    We measured the amount of apoA-I in serum by isotope dilution, finding 1.33 mg/ml (standard deviation 0.177) in six normolipidemic, healthy subjects. We developed this method by adapting published techniques to purify apoA-I from 3 ml of serum in two steps: density gradient ultracentrifugation and high performance liquid chromatography gel filtration. The 125I-labeled apoA-I tracer was first screened, by incubation with serum, to select labeled apoA-I which retained the ability to exchange with native apoA-I and bind to HDL. A known amount of 125I-labeled apoA-I-labeled HDL was added to unknown serum samples; apoA-I was reisolated from the serum and its specific radioactivity was used to calculate the dilution of the added, labeled apoA-I by the unlabeled apoA-I in the unknown serum. By not relying on immunochemical techniques, the isotope dilution assay provided results that are independent of the expression of individual apoA-I antigenic sites. Therefore, sera that have been assayed by isotope dilution can serve as standards to evaluate the accuracy of immunoassays for serum apoA-I and provide primary standards for such immunoassays.

  9. Mercury speciation analysis in seafood by species-specific isotope dilution: method validation and occurrence data.

    PubMed

    Clémens, Stéphanie; Monperrus, Mathilde; Donard, Olivier F X; Amouroux, David; Guérin, Thierry

    2011-11-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) in seafood were determined using species-specific isotope dilution analysis and gas chromatography combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Sample preparation methods (extraction and derivation step) were evaluated on certified reference materials using isotopically enriched Hg species. Solid-liquid extraction, derivation by propylation and automated agitation gave excellent accuracy and precision results. Satisfactory figures of merit for the selected method were obtained in terms of limit of quantification (1.2 ?g Hg kg(-1) for MeHg and 1.4 ?g Hg kg(-1) for THg), repeatability (1.3-1.7%), intermediate precision reproducibility (1.5% for MeHg and 2.2% for THg) and trueness (bias error less than 7%). By means of a recent strategy based on accuracy profiles (?-expectation tolerance intervals), the selected method was successfully validated in the range of approximately 0.15-5.1 mg kg(-1) for MeHg and 0.27-5.2 mg kg(-1) for THg. Probability ? was set to 95% and the acceptability limits to ±15%. The method was then applied to 62 seafood samples representative of consumption in the French population. The MeHg concentrations were generally low (1.9-588 ?g kg(-1)), and the percentage of MeHg varied from 28% to 98% in shellfish and from 84% to 97% in fish. For all real samples tested, methylation and demethylation reactions were not significant, except in one oyster sample. The method presented here could be used for monitoring food contamination by MeHg and inorganic Hg in the future to more accurately assess human exposure. PMID:21533797

  10. Daily cortisol production rate in man determined by stable isotope dilution/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Loughlin, T.; Yergey, A.L.; Zawadzki, J.K.; Booth, J.D.; Winterer, J.C.; Loriaux, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Growth retardation as well as the development of Cushingoid features in adrenally insufficient patients treated with the currently accepted replacement dose of cortisol (33-41 mumol/day.m2; 12-15 mg/m2.day) prompted us to reevaluate the cortisol production rate (FPR) in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome, using a recently developed thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The stable isotope (9,12,12-2H3)cortisol was infused continuously for 31 h at about 5% of the anticipated FPR. Blood samples were obtained at 20-min intervals for 24 h, spun, and pooled in 4-h groups. Tracer dilution in plasma was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated with controlled infusions in 6 patients with adrenal insufficiency. Results from 12 normal volunteers revealed a FPR of 27.3 +/- 7.5 mumol/day (9.9 +/- 2.7 mg/day) or 15.7 mumol/day.m2; 5.7 mg/m2. day. A previously unreported circadian variation in FPR was observed. Patients with Cushing's syndrome demonstrated unequivocal elevation of FPR and cortisol concentration correlated during each sample period in normal volunteers, indicating that cortisol secretion, rather than metabolism, is mainly responsible for changes in plasma cortisol. Our data suggest that the FPR in normal subjects may be lower than previously believed.

  11. Development of hemoglobin A1c certified reference material by liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiaming; Wu, Liqing; Yang, Bin; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing

    2012-04-01

    We report the development of a National Institute of Metrology (NIM) hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) certified reference material (CRM). Each CRM unit contains about 10 ?L of hemoglobin. Both hemoglobin and glycated hemoglobin were quantitatively determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) with synthesized VHLTPE and glycated VHLTPE as standards. The mass fraction of synthesized VHLTPE or glycated VHLTPE was also quantitatively determined by HPLC-IDMS with NIM amino acid CRMs as standards. The homogeneity and stability of the CRMs were examined with a commercial HbA(1c) analyzer based on the HPLC principle. Fifteen units were randomly selected for homogeneity examination, and statistical analysis showed there was no inhomogeneity. Examination of the stability showed that the CRM was stable for at least 6 months at -80 °C. Uncertainty components of the balance, amino acid purity, hydrolysis and proteolysis efficiency, method reproducibility, homogeneity, and stability were taken into consideration for uncertainty evaluation. The certified value of NIM HbA(1c) CRM was expressed as the ratio of HbA(1c) to total hemoglobin in moles, and was (9.6 ± 1.9)%. The CRM can be used as a calibration or validation standard for clinical diagnostics. It is expected to improve the comparability for HbA(1c) measurement in China. PMID:22349405

  12. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  13. User`s manual for the ARMLID (Argonne metallic lithium/isotopic dilution) tritium assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Bretscher, M.M.; Bennett, E.F.; DiIorio, G.; Mattas, R.F.; Lewandowski, E.F.

    1992-08-01

    The Argonne Metallic Lithium - Isotopic Dilution (ARMLID) system described in this report, originally developed at ANL for other purposes, was recently redeployed to measure the tritium production rate (TPR) in a series of US/Japanese collaborative fusion blanket integral experiments, involving large assemblies of fusion breeder blanket materials that were irradiated with a fusion neutron source at FNS/JAERI, Japan. Whereas previous uses of the ARMUD scheme involved just a few samples, its application infusion blanket TPR mapping called for large sample numbers per experiment, implying a commensurate scale of sample fabrication and encapsulation, on one hand, and tritium extraction and counting on the other hand. To shorten the time required for these various tasks, yet still yield reliable and accurate results, both the sample fabrication - encapsulation facility and the tritium extraction system had to be extensively revised from original versions that were designed for accuracy, but not necessarily for speed. The present report describes overall revisions in sufficient detail to serve as a User`s Manual for this facility, and/or suggest how a new system might be put together. Either possibility may develop in the near future, in support of ITER design studies. Preliminary and partial descriptions of various aspects and features of the system were presented orally, in the course of annual ANL/JAERI/UCLA ``workshops``, over the last 34 years, as well as elsewhere.

  14. User's manual for the ARMLID (Argonne metallic lithium/isotopic dilution) tritium assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Bretscher, M.M.; Bennett, E.F.; DiIorio, G.; Mattas, R.F.; Lewandowski, E.F.

    1992-08-01

    The Argonne Metallic Lithium - Isotopic Dilution (ARMLID) system described in this report, originally developed at ANL for other purposes, was recently redeployed to measure the tritium production rate (TPR) in a series of US/Japanese collaborative fusion blanket integral experiments, involving large assemblies of fusion breeder blanket materials that were irradiated with a fusion neutron source at FNS/JAERI, Japan. Whereas previous uses of the ARMUD scheme involved just a few samples, its application infusion blanket TPR mapping called for large sample numbers per experiment, implying a commensurate scale of sample fabrication and encapsulation, on one hand, and tritium extraction and counting on the other hand. To shorten the time required for these various tasks, yet still yield reliable and accurate results, both the sample fabrication - encapsulation facility and the tritium extraction system had to be extensively revised from original versions that were designed for accuracy, but not necessarily for speed. The present report describes overall revisions in sufficient detail to serve as a User's Manual for this facility, and/or suggest how a new system might be put together. Either possibility may develop in the near future, in support of ITER design studies. Preliminary and partial descriptions of various aspects and features of the system were presented orally, in the course of annual ANL/JAERI/UCLA workshops'', over the last 34 years, as well as elsewhere.

  15. Determination of total mercury in biological tissue by isotope dilution ICPMS after UV photochemical vapor generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Mo; Shi, Zeming; Zhang, Jiayun; Gao, Ying; Yang, Lu

    2013-12-15

    A method is developed for the determination of trace mercury in biological samples using photo chemical vapor generation (PVG) and isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID ICPMS) detection. Biological tissues were solubilized in formic acid. Subsequently, the sample solutions were exposed to an ultraviolet (UV) source for the reduction of mercury into vapor species prior to ICPMS measurements. The formic acid served not only as a tissue solubilizer in the sample preparation procedure, but also as a photochemical reductant for mercury in the PVG process. The problem arising from the opaque formic acid digested solution was efficiently solved by using ID method. The optimum conditions for sample treatment and PVG were investigated. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 pg g(-1), based on an external calibration, provided 350-fold improvement over that obtained by utilizing conventional pneumatic nebulization sample introduction. Method validation was demonstrated by the determination of total mercury in several biological tissue certified reference materials (CRMs). The results were in good agreement with the certified values. PMID:24209355

  16. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils. PMID:21504212

  17. Measurement of trimethylamine-N-oxide by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S; Hazen, Jennie E; Donahue, Lillian; Li, Xin-Min; Hazen, Stanley L

    2014-06-15

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) levels in blood predict future risk for major adverse cardiac events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Thus, the rapid determination of circulating TMAO concentration is of clinical interest. Here we report a method to measure TMAO in biological matrices by stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with lower and upper limits of quantification of 0.05 and >200?M, respectively. Spike and recovery studies demonstrate an accuracy at low (0.5?M), mid (5?M), and high (100?M) levels of 98.2, 97.3, and 101.6%, respectively. Additional assay performance metrics include intraday and interday coefficients of variance of <6.4 and <9.9%, respectively, across the range of TMAO levels. Stability studies reveal that TMAO in plasma is stable both during storage at -80°C for 5years and to multiple freeze thaw cycles. Fasting plasma normal range studies among apparently healthy subjects (n=349) show a range of 0.73-126?M, median (interquartile range) levels of 3.45 (2.25-5.79)?M, and increasing values with age. The LC/MS/MS-based assay reported should be of value for further studies evaluating TMAO as a risk marker and for examining the effect of dietary, pharmacologic, and environmental factors on TMAO levels. PMID:24704102

  18. Thermal neutron-induced fission cross sections of Cm isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, L.; Heyse, J.; Wagemans, J.; Wagemans, C.

    2009-10-01

    A new measurement program was set up at SCK?CEN to determine the thermal neutron-induced fission cross section of a number of Cm isotopes. These transuranium isotopes are produced in nuclear reactors and are candidates for transmutation. This paper presents preliminary results of our 245Cm(n,f) cross-section measurement.

  19. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determinemore »137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.« less

  20. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Horkley, J. J.; Carney, K. P.; Gantz, E. M.; Davies, J. E.; Lewis, R. R.; Crow, J. P.; Poole, C. A.; Grimes, T. S.; Giglio, J. J.

    2015-03-17

    Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure “spike” solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for “age” determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution, and the encapsulation of the materials will be described.

  1. Production of highly-enriched 134Ba for a reference material for isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. Horkley; K.P E.M. Gantz; J.E. Davis; R.R. Lewis; J.P. Crow; C.A. Poole; T.S. Grimes; J.J. Giglio

    2015-03-01

    t Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is an analytical technique capable of providing accurate and precise quantitation of trace isotope abundance and assay providing measurement uncertainties below 1 %. To achieve these low uncertainties, the IDMS method ideally utilizes chemically pure ‘‘spike’’ solutions that consist of a single highly enriched isotope that is well-characterized relating to the abundance of companion isotopes and concentration in solution. To address a current demand for accurate 137Cs/137Ba ratio measurements for ‘‘age’’ determination of radioactive 137Cs sources, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is producing enriched 134Ba isotopes that are tobe used for IDMS spikes to accurately determine 137Ba accumulation from the decay of 137Cs. The final objective of this work it to provide a homogenous set of reference materials that the National Institute of Standards and Technology can certify as standard reference materials used for IDMS. The process that was developed at INL for the separation and isolation of Ba isotopes, chemical purification of the isotopes in solution,

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Selected B Vitamins in the NIST SRM 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets by Liquid Chromatography Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increased interest in accurately assessing the total dietary intake of vitamins from all sources, including foods and dietary supplements. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) can be a definitive analytical method for very accurate concentration determinations. A liquid chromatographic...

  3. Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal and mineral springs of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1982-02-01

    Waters from the thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged Na-HCO/sub 3/-Cl type waters. St. Martin's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline Na-Cl water, is the notable exception. The dilute Na-HCO/sub 3/ waters are generally associated with granitic intrusions; the warm to hot CO/sub 2/-charged waters issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen-isotopic compositions that indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The CO/sub 2/-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. The carbon-13 in the CO/sub 2/-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 %) than in the cold CO/sub 2/-charged soda springs (-2 to -8%) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold CO/sub 2/-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaCO/sub 3/, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaCO/sub 3/. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur, and Ohanapecosh hot springs seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100/sup 0/C. As these springs occur as individual springs or in small clusters, the respective aquifers are probably of restricted size.

  4. Chemical and isotopic composition of water from thermal springs and mineral springs of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1982-01-01

    Water from thermal springs of Washington range in chemical composition from dilute NaHC03, to moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl waters. St. Martin 's Hot Spring which discharges a slightly saline NaCl water, is the notable exception. Mineral springs generally discharge a moderately saline C02-charged NaHC03-Cl water. The dilute Na-HC03 waters are generally associated with granite. The warm to hot waters charged with C02 issue on or near the large stratovolcanoes and many of the mineral springs also occur near the large volcanoes. The dilute waters have oxygen isotopic compositions which indicate relatively little water-rock exchange. The C02-charged waters are usually more enriched in oxygen-18 due to more extensive water-rock reaction. Carbon-13 in the C02-charged thermal waters is more depleted (-10 to -12 permil) than in the cold C02-charged soda springs (-2 to -8 permil) which are also scattered throughout the Cascades. The hot and cold C02-charged waters are supersaturated with respect to CaC03, but only the hot springs are actively depositing CaC03. Baker, Gamma, Sulphur , and Ohanapecosh seem to be associated with thermal aquifers of more than 100C. (USGS)

  5. Development of melamine certified reference material in milk using two different isotope dilution mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Hon, Phoebe Y T; Chu, Patricia W S; Cheng, Chi-ho; Lee, Terry C L; Chan, Pui-kwan; Cheung, Samuel T C; Wong, Yiu-chung

    2011-09-28

    A new certified reference material (CRM) of melamine in milk GLHK-11-02 was developed aiming to address the great demand from the testing community after the melamine crises. The material was prepared by adding an appropriate quantity of melamine into the skimmed milk samples and the final product was in the form of fine lyophilized powder. Characterization of the material relied on two newly developed gravimetric isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) methods, one using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and another gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Experimental parameters with crucial effects on the performance of the two IDMS methods were thoroughly investigated. These included purity of standard used, equilibration time of isotopes, efficiency of extraction methods as well as possible interferences from the matrix and melamine analogues. Precision was found to be excellent with a coefficient of variation of 2.5% for the LC-IDMS/MS (n=46) and 1.9% for the GC-IDMS (n=30) respectively. Using one-tail Student's t-test at 95% confidence interval, analytical data sets generated from the two methods were found to exhibit no significant difference. Measurement accuracy of the methods was further verified through an Asia Pacific Metrology Program (APMP) pilot study. Analytical results of the present LC-IDMS/MS for the two milk test samples at the concentration level of about 0.45 and 3.5 mg kg(-1) were proven to be very good. There were excellent overlaps between our results and the assigned reference values, and the absolute deviation was less than 3.2%. Both the LC-IDMS/MS and GC-IDMS methods were shown to be sufficiently reliable and accurate for certification of the melamine CRM. Certified value of melamine in dry mass fraction in GLHK-11-02 was 1.14 mg kg(-1). Expanded uncertainty due to sample inhomogeneity, long term and short term stability and variability in the characterization procedure was at 7.1% or 0.08 mg kg(-1). The CRM is primarily used to provide a complete method validation for and to improve the technical competence of melamine analysis to food and chemical testing laboratories. PMID:21872867

  6. Determination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Solid Samples by Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry Using ³?Cl-Labeled Analogues.

    PubMed

    Somoano-Blanco, Lourdes; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo; García Fonseca, Sergio; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2015-08-01

    This work describes the first application of (37)Cl-labeled compounds to isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The synthesis of 12 (37)Cl-labeled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was carried out by the chlorination of biphenyl with isotopically enriched chlorine gas, generated by the direct oxidation of Na(37)Cl with potassium peroxymonosulfate. After an exhaustive purification due to the presence of other congeners, the concentration and the isotopic enrichment of all (37)Cl-labeled PCBs in the mixture was determined. The proposed procedure allows the simultaneous quantification of every isotope diluted PCB congener in a single gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) injection without resorting to a methodological calibration graph. The results obtained here demonstrate that the use of (37)Cl-labeled analogues provides results in agreement with the certified values of three different Certified Reference Materials (marine sediment SRM 1944, fish tissue 1947, and loamy soil CRM 962-50) and analytical figures of merit comparable to those obtained using regular IDMS procedures based on the use of commercially available (13)C-labeled analogues. PMID:26165349

  7. Isotope dilution measurement of copper absorption and excretion in rats fed different carbohydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Bowman, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    An isotope dilution method using /sup 67/Cu was developed to measure true absorption (A) and endogenous excretion (EE) of Cu in rats. Specific activity (SA) of injected /sup 67/Cu was least variable in 7 tissues on days 6-8 after injection. SA of feces compared to tissues was used to calculate EE and A. This method was used to study Cu metabolism in rats fed 5 ppm or 0.4 ppm Cu and diets containing fructose (FR), glucose (GL), sucrose (SU), or cornstarch (CS). In rats fed 5 ppm Cu, the A, EE, and balance (B) were greatest for CS animals. There were no differences in A, B, or EE between FR and SU rats (p > .05). Rats fed GL had B and A lower than other groups (p < .05) but EE was different only from CS rats. Liver and kidney Cu and ceruloplasmin levels were highest in CS rats; other groups did not differ significantly. For rats fed 0.4 ppm Cu, the A, B, and EE did not differ among groups fed different carbohydrates (p > .05). Liver Cu did not differ among groups fed 0.4 ppm Cu. Kidney Cu was higher ( p < .001) in CS rats than GL rats; other groups did not differ. B was significantly lower in rats on the 0.4 ppm Cu diet than on 5 ppm Cu for CS, FR, SU (p < .05). Rats fed the GL-low Cu diet had significantly higher A (p < .01) and unchanged B (p > .05) compared to rats fed GL and 5 ppm Cu. EE was significantly lower in all groups on 0.4 ppm Cu than 5 ppm Cu. EE was 1 ..mu..g Cu/d on the 0.4 ppm Cu diet.

  8. High-Precision Th-Pb Dating by Isotope-Dilution TIMS+MC-ICPMS - Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickert, R. B.; Mundil, R.; Sharp, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Relative to the U-Pb decay series, the Th-Pb decay series has received relatively little attention for geochronology although it offers promising applications in both high-resolution geochronology as well as thermochronology. The limitations are partly because Th measurements by thermal ionization have proven notoriously difficult, and for many geochronological applications, the additional information provided by Th-Pb has not been worth the effort required. However, the current generation of MC-ICPMS instruments provides nearly two orders of magnitude better sensitivity of Th than TIMS, eliminating this barrier to measurement and opening up this chronometer for new use. We have developed a method to measure relative abundances of Th, U and Pb by isotope dilution for high-precision geochronology. This method leverages the strengths of two instruments, the high sensitivity and stable mass fractionation of MC-ICPMS instruments for Th and U, and the low background, lack of isobaric interference, and signal stability of TIMS instruments for Pb. To make these measurements, we have calibrated a new synthetic isotope tracer that comprises a mixture of 229Th-233U-236U-202Pb-205Pb. The analytical strategy developed for accessory minerals is a hybrid of techniques previously developed for U-Pb ID-TIMS and U/230Th ID-MC-ICPMS, with a two-column HCl-HNO3 anion exchange procedure (one to separate U and Pb from matrix+Th, and the other to separate Th from matrix), followed by a recombination of the U and Th fractions for MC-ICPMS analysis while the Pb fraction is measured by TIMS. Th-Pb measurements are complementary to, and potentially as precise as the U-Pb gold standard, and the method will find application in certain geological problems, including (1) precisely determining the relative decay rates of 232Th and 238U, (2) dating materials that are young enough to be substantially affected by 230Th or 231Pa disequilibria, and (3) dating small quantities of high-Th minerals like monazite, allanite, and perovskite. We present here a description of the analytical strategy and preliminary measurements of calibration and reference materials.

  9. Thermal conductivity of nanotubes revisited: Effects of chirality, isotope impurity, tube length, and temperature

    E-print Network

    Li, Baowen

    Thermal conductivity of nanotubes revisited: Effects of chirality, isotope impurity, tube length study the dependence of the thermal conductivity of single-walled nanotubes on chirality, isotope. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive

  10. NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

    2003-08-01

    DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

  11. Modification of a commercial gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometer for on-line carbon isotope dilution: Evaluation of its analytical characteristics for the quantification of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alonso Sobrado, Laura; Robledo Fernández, Mario; Cueto Díaz, Sergio; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    We describe the instrumental modification of a commercial gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS) and its application for on-line carbon isotope dilution. The main modification consisted in the addition of a constant flow of enriched (13)CO2 diluted in helium after the chromatographic column through the splitter holder located inside the chromatographic oven of the instrument. In addition, and in contrast to the conventional mode of operation of GC-IRMS instruments where the signal at m/z 45 is amplified 100-fold with respect to the signal at m/z 44, the same signal amplification was used in both Faraday cups at m/z 44 and 45. Under these conditions isotope ratio precision for the ratio 44/45 was around 0.05% RSD (n=50). The evaluation of the instrument was performed with mixtures of organic compounds including 11 n-alkanes, 16 PAHs, 12 PCBs and 3 benzothiophenes. It was observed that compounds of very different boiling points could be analysed without discrimination in the injector when a Programmable Temperature Vaporizer (PTV) injector was employed. Moreover, the presence of heteroatoms (Cl or S) in the structure of the organic compounds did not affect their combustion efficiency and therefore the trueness of the results. Quantitative results obtained for all the analytes assayed were excellent in terms of precision (<3% RSD) and accuracy (average relative error?4%) and what is more important using a single and simple generic internal standard for quantification. PMID:26435309

  12. Determination of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium in silicate glass standard materials by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.L.; Garner, E.L.; Gramlich, J.W.; Moore, L.J.; Murphy, T.J.; Machlan, L.A.; Shields, W.R.; Tatsumoto, M.; Knight, R.J.

    1973-01-01

    A set of four standard glasses has been prepared which have been doped with 61 different elements at the 500-, 50-, 1-, and 0.02-ppm level. The concentrations of lead, uranium, thorium, and thallium have been determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry at a number of points in each of the glasses. The results obtained from independent determinations in two laboratories demonstrate the homogeneity of the samples and that precision of the order of 0.5% (95% L.E.) may be obtained by the method even at the 20-ppb level for these elements. The chemical and mass spectrometric procedures necessary are presented.

  13. Stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of thymoquinone in black cumin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Ajinwo, Okiemute Rosa; Li, Wen-Wu

    2014-06-18

    Black cumin seed (Nigella sativa L.) is a widely used spice and herb, where thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone) is the major bioactive compound. Here, a stable isotope dilution (SID) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technique was developed for the quantification of thymoquinone. A doubly deuterated thymoquinone ([(2)H2]-thymoquinone) was synthesized for the first time with more than 93% deuteration degree shown by mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). This compound was used as an internal standard for the quantification of thymoquinone using a SID GC-MS method. The validation experiment showed a recovery rate of 99.1 ± 1.1% relative standard deviation (RSD). Standard addition and external calibration methods have also been used to quantify thymoquinone, which cross-validated the developed stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA). In comparison to external calibration and standard addition methods, the SIDA method is robust and accurate. The concentration of thymoquinone in five marketed black cumin seed oils ranged between 3.34 and 10.8 mg/mL by use of SID GC-MS. PMID:24871868

  14. Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks

    E-print Network

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate 2012 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: thermal diffusion hydrogen isotope separation oxygen isotopes lithium isotopes 17-O meteoric hydrothermal systems a b s t r a c t Water plays a fundamental role

  15. A novel quantification strategy of transferrin and albumin in human serum by species-unspecific isotope dilution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Feng, Liuxing; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Jun; Shen, Dairui; Li, Hongmei

    2015-07-16

    Species-specific (SS) isotope dilution analysis with gel electrophoresis (GE)-laser ablation (LA)-ICP-MS is a promising technique for the quantification of particular metal-binding proteins in biological samples. However, unavailable isotopically enriched spike and metal losses in GE separation are main limitations for SS-isotope dilution PAGE-LA-ICP-MS. In this study, we report for the first time the absolute quantification of transferrin (Tf) and albumin (Alb) in human serum by non-denaturing (native) GE combined with species-unspecific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In order to achieve a homogeneous distribution of both protein and isotope-enriched spike (simulated isotope equilibration), immersing the protein strips with (34)S spike solution after gel electrophoresis was demonstrated to be an effective way of spike addition. Furthermore, effects of immersion time and (34)S spike concentration were investigated to obtain optimal conditions of the post-electrophoresis isotope dilution method. The relative mass of spike and ablated sample (m(sp)/m(sam)) in IDMS equation was calculated by standard Tf and Alb proteins, which could be applied to the quantification of Tf and Alb in ERM-DA470k/IFCC for method confirmation. The results were in agreement with the certified value with good precision and small uncertainty (1.5-3%). In this method, species-specific spike protein is not necessary and the integrity of the heteroatom-protein could be maintained in sample preparation process. Moreover, the application of species-unspecific isotope dilution GE-LA-ICP-MS has the potential to offer reliable, direct and simultaneous quantification of proteins after conventional 1D and 2D gel electrophoretic separations. PMID:26073803

  16. Determination of 4(5)-methylimidazole in carbonated beverages by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Geemitha; Halldorson, Thor; Bestvater, Lianna; Tomy, Gregg T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to quantify 4(5)-methylimidazole (4-MEI), a suspected carcinogen, in carbonated beverages by simple sample dilution and isotope-dilution reverse-phase LC-MS/MS. Isotope dilution using hexa-deuterated methylimidazole (d6-4-MEI) was used to quantify native 4-MEI and to assess matrix effects quantitatively. The accuracy of the method was assessed by intentionally fortifying a negative control sample at three doses: low, medium and high (replicates of n = 5 each) with a known amount of 4-MEI. The respective absolute error in each case was 18.7 ± 0.7%, 14.6 ± 2.8% and 21.1 ± 9.7%. Within-day (intra-) and day-to-day (inter-) repeatability, determined as the relative standard deviation by fortifying a negative control sample (n = 5), were 9.5% and 15.4%, respectively. Average ion suppression of d6-4-MEI in beer was 63.9 ± 3.2%, while no suppression or enhancement was seen in non-alcoholic samples. The instrument and method limit of detection were calculated as 0.6 and 5.8 ng ml(-1), respectively. 4(5)-Methylimidazole was quantified in a variety of store-bought consumer beverages and it was found that in many of the samples tested consuming a single can of beer would result in intake levels of 4-MEI that exceed the no significant risk guideline of 29 µg day(-1). Conversely, 4-MEI in the samples was orders of magnitude smaller than the European Food Safety Authority acceptable daily intake threshold value of 100 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1). PMID:25994392

  17. Examining the stability of thermally fissile Th and U isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bharat; Biswal, S. K.; Singh, S. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2015-11-01

    The properties of recently predicted thermally fissile Th and U isotopes are studied within the framework of the relativistic mean-field approach using the axially deformed basis. We calculate the ground, first intrinsic excited state for highly neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes. The possible modes of decay such as ? decay and ? decay are analyzed. We found that neutron-rich isotopes are stable against ? decay, however, they are very unstable against ? decay. The lifetime of these nuclei is predicted to be tens of seconds against ? decay. If these nuclei are utilized before their decay time, a lot of energy can be produced with the help of multifragmentation fission. Also, these nuclei have great implications from the astrophysical point of view. In some cases, we found that the isomeric states with energy range from 2 to 3 MeV and three maxima in the potential energy surface of Th-230228 and U-234228 isotopes.

  18. The longevity of the South Pacific isotopic and thermal anomaly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Park, K.-H.; Pringle, M.; Rubenstone, J.L.; Smith, W.H.F.; Zindler, A.

    1991-01-01

    The South Pacific is anomalous in terms of the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios of its hot spot basalts, a thermally enhanced lithosphere, and possibly a hotter mantle. We have studied the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope characteristics of 12 Cretaceous seamounts in the Magellans, Marshall and Wake seamount groups (western Pacific Ocean) that originated in this South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA). The range and values of isotope ratios of the Cretaceous seamount data are similar to those of the island chains of Samoa, Tahiti, Marquesas and Cook/Austral in the SOPITA. These define two major mantle components suggesting that isotopically extreme lavas have been produced at SOPITA for at least 120 Ma. Shallow bathymetry, and weakened lithosphere beneath some of the seamounts studied suggests that at least some of the thermal effects prevailed during the Cretaceous as well. These data, in the context of published data, suggest: 1. (1)|SOPITA is a long-lived feature, and enhanced heat transfer into the lithosphere and isotopically anomalous mantle appear to be an intrinsic characteristic of the anomaly. 2. (2)|The less pronounced depth anomaly during northwesterly plate motion suggests that some of the expressions of SOPITA may be controlled by the direction of plate motion. Motion parallel to the alignment of SOPITA hot spots focusses the heat (and chemical input into the lithosphere) on a smaller cross section than oblique motion. 3. (3)|The lithosphere in the eastern and central SOPITA appears to have lost its original depleted mantle characteristics, probably due to enhanced plume/lithosphere interaction, and it is dominated by isotopic compositions derived from plume materials. 4. (4)|We speculate (following D.L. Anderson) that the origin of the SOPITA, and possibly the DUPAL anomaly is largely due to focussed subduction through long periods of the geological history of the earth, creating a heterogeneous distribution of recycled components in the lower mantle. ?? 1991.

  19. An Isotopic Dilution Experiment Using Liquid Scintillation: A Simple Two-System, Two-Phase Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moehs, Peter J.; Levine, Samuel

    1982-01-01

    A simple isotonic, dilution analysis whose principles apply to methods of more complex radioanalyses is described. Suitable for clinical and instrumental analysis chemistry students, experimental manipulations are kept to a minimum involving only aqueous extraction before counting. Background information, procedures, and results are discussed.…

  20. Accuracy of some routine method used in clinical chemistry as judged by isotope dilution-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkhem, I.; Bergman, A.; Falk, O.; Kallner, A.; Lantto, O.; Svensson, L.; Akerloef, E.; Blomstrand, R.

    1981-05-01

    Serum from patients was pooled, filtered, dispensed, and frozen. This pooled specimen was used for accuracy control in 64 participating laboratories in Sweden. Mean values (state-of-the-art values) were obtained for creatinine, cholesterol, glucose, urea, uric acid, and cortisol. These values were compared with values obtained with highly accurate reference methods based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. Differences were marked in the case of determination of creatinine and cortisol. Concerning the other components, the differences between the state-of-the-art value and the values obtained with the reference methods were negligible. Moreover, the glucose oxidase and the oxime methods for determination of glucose and urea were found to give significantly lower values than the hexokinase and urease methods, respectively. Researchers conclude that methods with a higher degree of accuracy are required for routine determination of creatinine and cortisol.

  1. The assay of pterostilbene in spiked matrices by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and isotope dilution method.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Di Donna, Leonardo; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Gabriele, Bartolo; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2010-04-01

    Pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxystilbene) is an active component found in several plant species, exhibiting important pharmacological properties. A new and reliable method of assaying this phyto compound in various matrices is presented; the assay is based on (1) the selectivity of liquid chromatography (LC) hyphenated with electrospray ionisation (ESI), (2) the specificity of a two-step mass spectrometric analysis (MS/MS) and (3) the accuracy of the isotope dilution method. The labelled analogue may be conveniently synthesised in a few steps. The sensitivity of the method is confirmed by the very low limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values achieved in the assay of pterostilbene in two distinct fortified matrices, and is further supported by the observed accuracy values. PMID:20198601

  2. In vivo isotope-fractionation factors and the measurement of deuterium- and oxygen-18-dilution spaces from plasma, urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.W.; Cochran, W.J.; Klish, W.J.; Smith, E.O.; Lee, L.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    In vivo isotope-fractionation factors were determined for hydrogen and oxygen between plasma water samples and samples of urine, saliva, respiratory water vapor, and carbon dioxide in 20 normal adults. The isotope-fractionation factors ranged from 0.944 to 1.039 for /sup 2/H in breath water vapor and for /sup 18/O in breath CO/sub 2/, respectively. When corrected for isotope fractionation, the /sup 2/H- and /sup 18/O-dilution spaces determined from urine, saliva, respiratory water, and CO/sub 2/ were within -0.10 +/- 1.09 kg (mean +/- SD, n = 60) and 0.04 +/- 0.68 kg (n = 80), respectively, of the values determined from plasma. In the absence of these corrections, we observed a 6% overestimation of /sup 2/H-dilution space and a 1% overestimation of /sup 18/O-dilution space from the use of respiratory water values. A 4% underestimation of the /sup 18/O-dilution space was observed for breath CO/sub 2/ without correction for isotope fractionation.

  3. Measurement of Niacin in a Variety of Food Samples by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (AOAC Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, Sept. 2006)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of deuterium-labeled nicotinic acid makes stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) an attractive option for the determination of the water-soluble B-vitamin, niacin, in food samples. We have developed a method based on AOAC Peer-Verif...

  4. Measurement of Niacin in a Variety of Food Samples by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Stable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (Experimental Biology, April, 2007, Washington, D.C.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The availability of deuterium-labeled nicotinic acid makes stable isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) an attractive option for the determination of the water-soluble B-vitamin, niacin, in food samples. We have developed a method based on AOAC Peer-Verif...

  5. Examining the stability of thermally fissile Th and U isotopes

    E-print Network

    Bharat Kumar; S. K. Biswal; S. K. Singh; S. K. Patra

    2015-11-02

    The properties of recently predicted thermally fissile Th and U isotopes are studied within the framework of relativistic mean field (RMF) approach using axially deformed basis. We calculated the ground, first intrinsic excited state and matter density for highly neutron-rich thorium and uranium isotopes. The possible modes of decay like $\\alpha$-decay and $\\beta$-decay are analyzed. We found that the neutron-rich isotopes are stable against $\\alpha$-decay, however they are very much unstable against $\\beta$-decay. The life time of these nuclei predicted to be tens of second against $\\beta$-decay. If these nuclei utilize before their decay time, a lots of energy can be produced within the help of multi-fragmentation fission. Also, these nuclei have a great implication in astrophysical point of view. The total nucleonic densities distribution are calculated, from which the clusters inside the parent nuclei are determined. %Most of the thorium isotopes are $\\alpha$ emitters, where as some %of them have short half-lives. In some cases, we found the isomeric states with energy range from 2 to 3 MeV and three minima in the potential energy surface of $^{228-230}$Th and $^{228-234}$U isotopes.

  6. Quantification of Cr(VI) in soil samples from a contaminated area in northern Italy by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Laura; Abad, Silvia Queipo; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Alonso, J Ignacio García; Beone, Gian Maria

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the work were to detect and quantify hexavalent chromium in 14 soil samples from an area in Lombardia (northern Italy) contaminated by two polluted water plumes. Cr(VI) was extracted from the solid samples by applying focused microwaves in an alkaline medium after Cr(III) complexation with EDTA. Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) when previously reported extraction conditions for the analysis of certified reference materials were used, and Cr(VI) could not be reliably quantified in the soil samples. The influence of organic matter and iron contents in the samples on the reduction of Cr(VI) was subsequently studied using a new set of soil samples with different iron and organic matter concentrations. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) measured two different enriched stable isotopes of Cr (54 and 53) to evaluate the reduction extent of hexavalent chromium during the analytical procedure. The extraction conditions were optimized to obtain the lowest amount of Cr(VI) reduction and quantify Cr(VI) in the polluted soil samples from Lombardia. PMID:26141979

  7. Collective and thermal diffusion in dilute, semidilute, and concentrated solutions of polystyrene in toluene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, J.; Köhler, W.

    2003-12-01

    Collective mass diffusion (D), thermal diffusion (DT), and Soret coefficients (ST) have been determined for solutions of polystyrene in toluene ranging from dilute (10-4 g/cm3) to concentrated (0.9 g/cm3) by a transient holographic grating technique and photon correlation spectroscopy (collective diffusion only). The molar mass range of the polymer was between 4.75 and 4060 kg/mol. With a slight exception at intermediate concentrations, DT is molar mass independent over the entire concentration range. Above a polymer concentration of C?0.2 g/cm3 the rising glass transition temperature of the solution leads to a rapid slowing down of both mass and thermal diffusion (Ludwig Soret effect) and the structure relaxation enters the experimental time window. Both D and DT are governed by the same microscopic local viscosity ?eff, which increases dramatically at Tg. It cancels out in ST=DT/D. As a consequence, ST is completely insensitive to the glass transition and shows concentration-dependent scaling as expected for a fictive polymer solution with concentration-independent local friction. Where available, results are compared with literature data.

  8. Unusual isotope effect on thermal transport of single layer molybdenum disulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufei; Yang, Nuo; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-11-01

    Thermal transport in single layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is critical to advancing its applications. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations with first-principles force constants to study the isotope effect on the thermal transport of single layer MoS2. Through phonon modal analysis, we found that isotopes can strongly scatter phonons with intermediate frequencies, and the scattering behavior can be radically different from that predicted by conventional scattering model based on perturbation theory, where Tamura's formula is combined with Matthiessen's rule to include isotope effects. Such a discrepancy becomes smaller for low isotope concentrations. Natural isotopes can lead to a 30% reduction in thermal conductivity for large size samples. However, for small samples where boundary scattering becomes significant, the isotope effect can be greatly suppressed. It was also found that the Mo isotopes, which contribute more to the phonon eigenvectors in the intermediate frequency range, have stronger impact on thermal conductivity than S isotopes.

  9. Characterising the exchangeability of phenanthrene associated with naturally occurring soil colloids using an isotopic dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Juhasz, Albert; Donner, Erica; Lombi, Enzo

    2015-04-01

    The association of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with inorganic and organic colloids is an important factor influencing their bioavailability, mobility and degradation in the environment. Despite this, our understanding of the exchangeability and potential bioavailability of PAHs associated with colloids is limited. The objective of this study was to use phenanthrene as a model PAH compound and develop a technique using (14)C phenanthrene to quantify the isotopically exchangeable and non-exchangeable forms of phenanthrene in filtered soil water or sodium tetraborate extracts. The study was also designed to investigate the exchangeability of colloidal phenanthrene as a function of particle size. Our findings suggest that the exchangeability of phenanthrene in sodium tetraborate is controlled by both inorganic and organic colloids, while in aqueous solutions inorganic colloids play the dominant role (even though coating of these by organic matter cannot be excluded). Filter pore size did not have a significant effect on phenanthrene exchangeability. PMID:25689461

  10. Determination of ultratrace levels of tributyltin in waters by isotope dilution and gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cea, Andrés; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; Font Cardona, Nuria; Aranda Mares, José Luís; Ballester Nebot, Salomé; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2015-12-18

    The current EU legislation lays down the Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) of 45 priority substances in surface water bodies. In particular, the concentration of tributyltin (TBT) must not exceed 0.2ngL(-1) and analytical methodologies with a Limit of Quantification (LOQ) equal or below 0.06ngL(-1) are urged to be developed. This work presents a procedure for the determination of ultratrace levels of TBT in water samples by Isotope Dilution and GC-MS/MS operating in Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) mode which meets current EU requirements. The method requires the monitorization of five consecutive transitions (287>175 to 291>179) for the sensitive and selective detection of TBT. The measured isotopic distribution of TBT fragment ions was in agreement with the theoretical values computed by a polynomial expansion algorithm. The combined use of Tandem Mass Spectrometry, a sample volume of 250mL, the preconcentration of 1mL of organic phase to 30?L and an injection volume of 25?L by Programmed Temperature Vaporization provided a LOQ of 0.0426ngL(-1) for TBT (calculated as ten times the standard deviation of nine independent blanks). The recovery for TBT calculated in Milli-Q water at the EQS level was 106.3±4%. A similar procedure was also developed for the quantification of dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) in water samples showing satisfactory results. The method was finally implemented in a routine testing laboratory to demonstrate its applicability to real samples obtaining quantitative recoveries for TBT at the EQS level in mineral water, river water and seawater. PMID:26614170

  11. Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J.; Pantazopoulos, P.; Scott, P.M.; Moisey, J.; Dabeka, R.W.; Richard, I.D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products ‘as consumed’, pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[13C20]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply. PMID:21623499

  12. Accurate determination of ochratoxin A in Korean fermented soybean paste by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seonghee; Lee, Suyoung; Lee, Joonhee; Kim, Byungjoo

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a naturally occurring mycotoxin, has been frequently detected in doenjang, a traditional fermented soybean paste, when it is fermented under improper conditions. Reliable screening of OTA in traditional fermented soybean paste (doenjang) is a special food-safety issue in Korea. Our laboratory, the National Metrology Institute of Korea, established an isotope dilution-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC/MS/MS) method as a higher-order reference method to be used for SI-traceable value-assignment of OTA in certified reference materials (CRMs). (13)C20-OTA was used as an internal standard. Sample preparation conditions and LC/MS measurement parameters were optimised for this purpose. The analytical method was validated by measuring samples fortified with OTA at various levels. Repeatability and reproducibility studies showed that the ID-LC/MS/MS method is reliable and reproducible within 2% relative standard deviation. The analytical method was applied to determine OTA in various commercial doenjang products and home-made doenjang products. PMID:26212984

  13. Parkinson-dementia complex and development of a new stable isotope dilution assay for BMAA detection in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Laura R.; Cruz-Aguado, Reyniel; Sadilek, Martin; Galasko, Douglas; Shaw, Christopher A.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-10-15

    {beta}-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as a global contributor to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson-dementia complex (PDC) of Guam and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The literature on the effects of BMAA is conflicting with some but not all in vitro data supporting a neurotoxic action, and experimental animal data failing to replicate the pattern of neurodegeneration of these human diseases, even at very high exposures. Recently, BMAA has been reported in human brain from individuals afflicted with PDC or AD. Some of the BMAA in human tissue reportedly is freely extractable (free) while some is protein-associated and liberated by techniques that hydrolyze the peptide bond. The latter is especially intriguing since BMAA is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has no known tRNA. We attempted to replicate these findings with techniques similar to those used by others; despite more than adequate sensitivity, we were unable to detect free BMAA. Recently, using a novel stable isotope dilution assay, we again were unable to detect free or protein-associated BMAA in human cerebrum. Here we review the development of our new assay for tissue detection of BMAA and show that we are able to detect free BMAA in liver but not cerebrum, nor do we detect any protein-associated BMAA in mice fed this amino acid. These studies demonstrate the importance of a sensitive and specific assay for tissue BMAA and seriously challenge the proposal that BMAA is accumulating in human brain.

  14. Quantitative determination of sodium monofluoroacetate "1080" in infant formulas and dairy products by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Thomas; Tarres, Adrienne; Goyon, Alexandre; Mottier, Pascal; Dubois, Mathieu; Tan, Wan Ping; Delatour, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    A fast and easy-to-use confirmatory liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) based-method was developed for the analysis of the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate (MFA, also called "1080") in infant formulas and related dairy products. Extraction of the compound encompassed sample reconstitution and liquid-liquid extraction under acidic conditions. Time-consuming solid-phase extraction steps for clean-up and enrichment and tedious derivatisation were thus avoided. Resulting sample extracts were analysed by electrospray ionisation (ESI) in negative mode. Quantification was performed by the isotopic dilution approach using (13)C-labelled MFA as internal standard. The procedure was validated according to the European document SANCO/12571/2013 and performance parameters such as linearity (r(2) > 0.99), precision (RSD(r) ? 9%, RSD(iR) ? 11%) and recovery (96-117%) fulfilled its requirements. Limit of quantifications (LOQ) was 1 µg kg(-1) for infant formulas and related dairy products except for whey proteins powders with a LOQ of 5 µg kg(-1). Method ruggedness was further assessed in another laboratory devoted to routine testing for quality control. PMID:26366530

  15. Measurement of total body water in human infants using deuterium isotope dilution and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rebouche, C.J.; Pearson, G.A.; Serfass, R.E.; Roth, C.W.; Finley, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Total body water (TBW) provides a useful measure of fat-free body mass. Deuterium (D) oxide isotope dilution is a useful method to determine TBW. Various techniques, including density, infrared absorption, mass spectrometry and gas chromatography have been employed to determine D enrichment in body fluids. Each of these methods requires extensive sample preparation (sublimation or distillation of the body fluid). The authors have employed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to measure D enrichment in saliva and urine of human infants. No sample preparation was necessary. A standard (dg-t-butanol) was added to 0.5 ml of sample and D enrichment was measured using a JEOL FX-900 NMR spectrometer. Signal acquisition time was 4.7 min. Working range of D enrichment was 0.04-0.32 atom % D (corresponding to an oral dose of approximately 0.25-2.0 g D/sub 2/O/kg body weight). Coefficients of variation (c.v.) for saliva samples at 0.20 and 0.06 atom % enrichment were 1.97% and 4.78%, respectively. Mean (+/-SD) of TBW determinations for 6 infants was 58.5 +/- 5.4% of body weight (range 53-66%). Repeat measurements (3) of TBW for each infant at weekly intervals yielded a mean c.v. of 4.1% (n = 6). This method provides precise measurement of TBW without the extensive sample preparation requirements of previously-described methods.

  16. Determining mycotoxins in baby foods and animal feeds using stable isotope dilution and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Trucksess, Mary W

    2014-09-10

    We developed a stable isotope dilution assay with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine multiple mycotoxins in baby foods and animal feeds. Samples were fortified with [(13)C]-uniformly labeled mycotoxins as internal standards ([(13)C]-IS) and prepared by solvent extraction (50% acetonitrile in water) and filtration, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Mycotoxins in each sample were quantitated with the corresponding [(13)C]-IS. In general, recoveries of aflatoxins (2-100 ng/g), deoxynivalenol, fumonisins (50-2000 ng/g), ochratoxin A (20-1000 ng/kg), T-2 toxin, and zearalenone (40-2000 ng/g) in tested matrices (grain/rice/oatmeal-based formula, animal feed, dry cat/dog food) ranged from 70 to 120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) <20%. The method provides sufficient selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy, and reproducibility to screen for aflatoxins at ng/g concentrations and deoxynivalenol and fumonisins at low ?g/g concentrations in baby foods and animal feeds, without using conventional standard addition or matrix-matched calibration standards to correct for matrix effects. PMID:25153173

  17. Application of isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants sorbed to dissolved organic matter (DOM).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Wu, Laosheng; Gan, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Natural waters such as surface water and sediment porewater invariably contain dissolved organic matter (DOM). Association of strongly hydrophobic contaminants (HOCs) with DOM leads to decreased toxicity and bioavailability, but bioavailability of DOM-sorbed HOCs is difficult to measure. Current methods to estimate bioavailability of HOCs in water are based on only the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree). The ignorance of the exchangeable fraction of HOCs sorbed on DOM may result in an underestimation of the toxicity potential of HOCs to aquatic organisms. Here we explore the applicability of an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measuring the desorption fraction of DOM-sorbed pyrene and bifenthrin and determining their exchangeable pool (E) as an approximation of bioavailability. E values, expressed as percentage of the total concentration, ranged between 0.80 and 0.92% for pyrene and 0.74 and 0.85% for bifenthrin, depending primarily on the amount of chemical in the freely dissolved form. However, between 34 and 78% of the DOM-sorbed pyrene was exchangeable. This fraction ranged between 23% and 82% for bifenthrin. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a significant relationship (r(2)>0.72, P<0.0001) between E and bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna. Therefore, IDM may be used to improve the bioavailability measurement and risk assessment of HOCs in aquatic systems. PMID:26037097

  18. Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Sections Of The Palladium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Krtiáka, M.; McNabb, D. P.; Sleaford, B.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Belgya, T.; Révay, Zs.

    2006-03-01

    We have measured precise thermal neutron capture ?-ray cross sections cry for all stable Palladium isotopes with the guided thermal neutron beam from the Budapest Reactor. The data were compared with other data from the literature and have been evaluated into the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF). Total radiative neutron capture cross-sections ?? can be deduced from the sum of transition cross sections feeding the ground state of each isotope if the decay scheme is complete. The Palladium isotope decay schemes are incomplete, although transitions deexciting low-lying levels are known for each isotope. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Palladium thermal neutron capture deexcitation schemes using the computer code DICEBOX. This program generates level schemes where levels below a critical energy Ecrit are taken from experiment, and those above Ecrit are calculated by a random discretization of an a priori known level density formula ?(E,J?). Level de-excitation branching intensities are taken from experiment for levels below Ecrit the capture state, or calculated for levels above Ecrit assuming an a priori photon strength function and applying allowed selection rules and a Porter-Thomas distribution of widths. The advantage of this method is that calculational uncertainties can be investigated systematically. Calculated feeding to levels below Ecrit can be normalized to the measured cross section deexciting those levels to determine the total radiative neutron cross-section ??. In this paper we report the cross section measurements ??[102Pd(n,?)]=0.9±0.3 b, ??[104Pd(n,?)=0.61±0.11 b, ??[105Pd(n,?)]=2.1.1±1.5 b, ??[106Pd(n,?)]=0.36±0.05 b, ??[108Pd(n,?)(0)]=7.6±0.6 b, ??[108Pd(n,?)(189)]=0.185±0.011 b, and ??[110Pd(n,?)]=0.10±0.03 b. We have also determined from our statistical calculations that the neutron capture states in 107Pd are best described as 2+[59(4)%]+3+[41(4)%]. Agreement with literature values was excellent in most cases. We found significant discrepancies between our results for 102Pd and 110Pd and earlier values that could be resolved by re-evaluation of the earlier results.

  19. Isotopic fractionation of the major elements of molten basalt by chemical and thermal diffusion

    E-print Network

    by chemical diffusion between a natural basalt and rhyolite. The thermal isotopic fractionations for isotopes of the same element. The iron isotopic mea- surements of the basalt­rhyolite diffusion couple by chemical diffusion between molten basalt and rhyolite (Richter et al., 2003) and large fractionations

  20. Geochemical behaviour of Radium isotopes and Radon in a coastal thermal system (Balaruc-les-Bains, South of France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condomines, Michel; Gourdin, Elian; Gataniou, Delphine; Seidel, Jean-Luc

    2012-12-01

    The behaviour of the four Ra isotopes (measured by gamma spectrometry) and 222Rn (measured with an AlphaGUARD ionisation chamber) has been investigated in NaCl-rich thermal waters of Balaruc-les-Bains on the Mediterranean coast (South of France). This study allows identification of the deep thermal water signature and reveals the influence of seawater or karst water inflows on Ra isotopes and 222Rn. The deep thermal water has 226Ra and 222Rn activities of 840 and 1900 mBq/l, respectively, a (228Ra/226Ra) activity ratio of 0.59, and low (224Ra/228Ra) and (223Ra/226Ra) ratios of 0.67 and 0.025, respectively. Several arguments suggest a dominant role of radioactive decay for short-lived Ra isotopes and Rn during the relatively rapid ascent of thermal water through wide open fractures and drains. The low (223Ra/226Ra) ratio constrains the maximum ascent velocity of thermal water to 8-10 m/h. Seawater inflow into the hydrothermal system results in an enrichment in short-lived Ra isotopes and 222Rn. The high (223Ra/226Ra) ratio (0.23) suggests that 223Ra, 224Ra and 222Rn produced by alpha-recoil in the upper-Jurassic limestone are entrained by seawater percolation through the coastal basement, due to active pumping in one of the near shore production well. This process would be enhanced by a low water/rock ratio (i.e. in a low-porosity, micro-fractured limestone). Mixing of this enriched seawater with thermal water induces barite precipitation with co-precipitation of a large fraction of Ra. Short-lived Ra isotopes may thus be useful tracers of seawater flux towards the continent. Conversely, the inflow and mixing of karst groundwater result in a general dilution of all dissolved elements, only a small enrichment in 224Ra and 223Ra, but a large enrichment in 222Rn (up to 26 Bq/l). The combination of Ra isotopes and 222Rn data provides a good way to trace the dynamics of different water masses along coastal areas.

  1. Determination of Glyphosate, its Degradation Product Aminomethylphosphonic Acid, and Glufosinate, in Water by Isotope Dilution and Online Solid-Phase Extraction and Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, Michael T.; Loftin, Keith A.; Lee, Edward A.; Hinshaw, Gary H.; Dietze, Julie E.; Scribner, Elisabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey method (0-2141-09) presented is approved for the determination of glyphosate, its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), and glufosinate in water. It was was validated to demonstrate the method detection levels (MDL), compare isotope dilution to standard addition, and evaluate method and compound stability. The original method USGS analytical method 0-2136-01 was developed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and quantitation by standard addition. Lower method detection levels and increased specificity were achieved in the modified method, 0-2141-09, by using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The use of isotope dilution for glyphosate and AMPA and pseudo isotope dilution of glufosinate in place of standard addition was evaluated. Stable-isotope labeled AMPA and glyphosate were used as the isotope dilution standards. In addition, the stability of glyphosate and AMPA was studied in raw filtered and derivatized water samples. The stable-isotope labeled glyphosate and AMPA standards were added to each water sample and the samples then derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethylchloroformate. After derivatization, samples were concentrated using automated online solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by elution in-line with the LC mobile phase; the compounds separated and then were analyzed by LC/MS/MS using electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode with multiple-reaction monitoring. The deprotonated derivatized parent molecule and two daughter-ion transition pairs were identified and optimized for glyphosate, AMPA, glufosinate, and the glyphosate and AMPA stable-isotope labeled internal standards. Quantitative comparison between standard addition and isotope dilution was conducted using 473 samples analyzed between April 2004 and June 2006. The mean percent difference and relative standard deviation between the two quantitation methods was 7.6 plus or minus 6.30 (n = 179), AMPA 9.6 plus or minus 8.35 (n = 206), and glufosinate 9.3 plus or minus 9.16 (n = 16). The analytical variation of the method, comparison of quantitation by isotope dilution and multipoint linear regressed standard curves, and method detection levels were evaluated by analyzing six sets of distilled-water, groundwater, and surface-water samples spiked in duplicate at 0.0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.50 microgram per liter and analyzed on 6 different days during 1 month. The grand means of the normalized concentration percentage recovery for glyphosate, AMPA, and glufosinate among all three matrices and spiked concentrations ranged from 99 to 114 plus or minus 2 to 7 percent of the expected spiked concentration. The grand mean of the percentage difference between concentrations calculated by standard addition and linear regressed multipoint standard curves ranged from 8 to 15 plus or minus 2 to 9 percent for the three compounds. The method reporting levels calculated from all the 0.05- microgram per liter spiked samples were 0.02 microgram per liter for all three compounds. Compound stability experiments were conducted on 10 samples derivatized four times for periods between 136 to 269 days. The glyphosate and AMPA concentrations remained relatively constant in samples held up to 136 days before derivatization. The half life of glyphosate varied from 169 to 223 days in the underivatized samples. Derivatized samples were analyzed the day after derivitization, and again 54 and 64 days after derivatization. The derivatized samples analyzed at days 52 and 64 were within 20 percent of the concentrations of the derivatized samples analyzed the day after derivatization.

  2. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  3. Characterization of candidate reference materials for bone lead via interlaboratory study and double isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Verostek, Mary Frances; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Four candidate ground bone reference materials (NYS RMs 05-01 through 04), were produced from lead-dosed bovine and caprine sources, and characterized by interlaboratory study. The consensus value ( X ) and expanded standard uncertainty (UX ) were determined from the robust average and standard deviation of the participants’ data for each NYS RM 05-01 through 04. The values were 1.08 ±0.04, 15.3 ±0.5, 12.4 ±0.5, and 29.9 ±1.1 ?g g?1 Pb, respectively. Youden plots of z-scores showed a statistically significant correlation between the results for pairs of NYS RM 05-02 through 04, indicating common sources of between-laboratory variation affecting reproducibility. NYS RM 05-01 exhibited more random variability affecting repeatability at low concentration. Some participants using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) exhibited a negative bias compared to the all-method consensus value. Other methods used included inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), isotope dilution (ID-) ICP-MS, and ICP atomic (optical) emission spectroscopy (-OES). The NYS RMs 05-01 through 04 were subsequently re-analyzed in house using double ID-ICP-MS to assign certified reference values (C ) and expanded uncertainty (UC ) of 1.09 ± 0.03, 16.1 ± 0.3, 13.2 ± 0.3 and 31.5 ± 0.7, respectively, indicating a low bias in the interlaboratory data. SRM 1486 Bone Meal was analyzed for measurement quality assessment obtaining results in agreement with the certified values within the stated uncertainty. Analysis using a primary reference method based on ID-ICP-MS with full quantification of uncertainty calculated according to ISO guidelines provided traceability to SI units. PMID:23087531

  4. Sulphur Speciation and Turnover in Soils: Evidence from Sulfur K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy and Isotope Dilution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao,F.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Fox, M.; McGrath, S.

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to quantify S species in humic substance extracts from ten soils from the UK, China and New Zealand, which differ in land use and agricultural management. XANES spectroscopy showed the presence of most reduced (sulphides, disulphides, thiols and thiophenes), intermediate (sulphoxides and sulphonates) and highly oxidised S (ester sulphates) forms, with the three groups representing 14-32%, 33-50% and 22-53% of the organic S in the humic substance extracts, respectively. Land use had a profound influence on the relative proportions of S species. Well-drained arable soils generally had a higher proportion of organic S present in the most oxidised form than the grassland soils collected nearby, whereas paddy soils showed a more reduced profile due to episodic flooding. In the Broadbalk Classical Experiment at Rothamsted, reversion of an arable system to grassland or woodland in the 1880s resulted in an increase of the most reduced and intermediate S species at the expense of the most oxidised S species. Long-term applications of farmyard manure to an arable plot also shifted S species from the most oxidised to the intermediate and the most reduced species. Sulphur immobilisation and gross mineralisation were determined in seven soils using the {sup 35}S isotope dilution method. Gross mineralisation during a 53-day incubation correlated more closely with the amounts of the most reduced and intermediate S species than with the most oxidised S species, suggesting that the former (C-bonded S) were the main source of organic S for mineralisation in the short-term.

  5. Sulphur Speciation and Turnover in Soils: Evidence from Sulphur K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy and Isotope Dilution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao,F.; Lehmann, J.; Solomon, D.; Fox, M.; McGrath, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sulphur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to quantify S species in humic substance extracts from ten soils from the UK, China and New Zealand, which differ in land use and agricultural management. XANES spectroscopy showed the presence of most reduced (sulphides, disulphides, thiols and thiophenes), intermediate (sulphoxides and sulphonates) and highly oxidised S (ester sulphates) forms, with the three groups representing 14-32%, 33-50% and 22-53% of the organic S in the humic substance extracts, respectively. Land use had a profound influence on the relative proportions of S species. Well-drained arable soils generally had a higher proportion of organic S present in the most oxidised form than the grassland soils collected nearby, whereas paddy soils showed a more reduced profile due to episodic flooding. In the Broadbalk Classical Experiment at Rothamsted, reversion of an arable system to grassland or woodland in the 1880s resulted in an increase of the most reduced and intermediate S species at the expense of the most oxidised S species. Long-term applications of farmyard manure to an arable plot also shifted S species from the most oxidised to the intermediate and the most reduced species. Sulphur immobilization and gross mineralization were determined in seven soils using the {sup 35}S isotope dilution method. Gross mineralization during a 53-day incubation correlated more closely with the amounts of the most reduced and intermediate S species than with the most oxidised S species, suggesting that the former (C-bonded S) were the main source of organic S for mineralization in the short-term.

  6. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A; Simas, Rosineide C; Brolio, Marina P; Ferreira, Christina R; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P; Miglino, Maria A; Martins, Daniele S; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  7. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled 17-hydroxyprogesterone suitable as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, K.; Yamaga, N.; Kohara, H.

    1988-03-01

    A synthesis is reported of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, labeled with four atoms of deuterium at ring C and suitable for use as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Base-catalyzed equilibration of methyl 3 alpha-acetoxy-12-oxo-cholanate (III) with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O, followed by reduction of the 12-oxo group by the modified Wolff-Kisher method using (/sup 2/H)diethylene glycol and (/sup 2/H)hydrazine hydrate afforded (11,11,12,12,23,23(-2)H)lithocholic acid (V). The Meystre-Miescher degradation of the side chain of V yielded 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (X). Oxidation of the 3,20-enol-diacetate of X with perbenzoic acid followed by saponification afforded 3 alpha,17-dihydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (XI). Oxidation of XI with N-bromoacetamide yielded 17-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnane-3,20-dione (XII). Bromination of XII followed by dehydrobromination yielded 17-hydroxy-(11,11,12,12(-2)H) progesterone (XIV), consisting of 0.3% /sup 2/H0-, 1.1% /sup 2/H/sub 1/-, 8.6% /sup 2/H/sub 2/-, 37.1% /sup 2/H/sub 3/-, 52.1% /sup 2/H/sub 4/-, and 0.8% /sup 2/H/sub 5/-species.

  8. Folate bioavailability from foods rich in folates assessed in a short term human study using stable isotope dilution assays.

    PubMed

    Mönch, Sabine; Netzel, Michael; Netzel, Gabriele; Ott, Undine; Frank, Thomas; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Different sources of folate may have different bioavailability and hence may impact the standard definition of folate equivalents. In order to examine this, a short term human study was undertaken to evaluate the relative native folate bioavailabilities from spinach, Camembert cheese and wheat germs compared to pteroylmonoglutamic acid as the reference dose. The study had a single-centre, randomised, four-treatment, four-period, four-sequence, cross-over design, i.e. the four (food) items to be tested (referred to as treatments) were administered in sequences according to the Latin square, so that each experimental treatment occurred only once within each sequence and once within each study period. Each of the 24 subjects received the four experimental items separated by a 14-day equilibrium phase and received a pteroylmonoglutamic acid supplement for 14 days before the first testing and between the testings for saturation of body pools. Folates in test foods, plasma and urine samples were determined by stable isotope dilution assays, and in urine and plasma, the concentrations of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate were evaluated. Standard non-compartmental methods were applied to determine the biokinetic parameters C(max), t(max) and AUC from baseline corrected 5-methyltetrahydrofolate concentrations within the interval from 0 to 12 hours. The variability of AUC and C(max) was moderate for spinach and oral solution of pteroylmonoglutamic acid but high for Camembert cheese and very high for wheat germs. The median t(max) was lowest for spinach, though t(max) showed a high variability among all treatments. When comparing the ratio estimates of AUC and C(max) for the different test foods, highest bioavailability was found for spinach followed by that for wheat germs and Camembert cheese. The results underline the dependence of folate bioavailability on the type of food ingested. Therefore, the general assumption of 50% bioavailability as the rationale behind the definition of folate equivalents has to be questioned and requires further investigation. PMID:25407846

  9. Nitrogen Transformations in Wetland Soil Cores Measured by (sup15)N Isotope Pairing and Dilution at Four Infiltration Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stepanauskas, R.; Davidsson, E. T.; Leonardson, L.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water infiltration rate (IR) on nitrogen cycling in a saturated wetland soil was investigated by applying a (sup15)N isotope dilution and pairing method. Water containing [(sup15)N]nitrate was infiltrated through 10-cm-long cores of sieved and homogenized soil at rates of 72, 168, 267, and 638 mm day(sup-1). Then the frequencies of (sup30)N(inf2), (sup29)N(inf2), (sup15)NO(inf3)(sup-), and (sup15)NH(inf4)(sup+) in the outflow water were measured. This method allowed simultaneous determination of nitrification, coupled and uncoupled denitrification, and nitrate assimilation rates. From 3% (at the highest IR) to 95% (at the lowest IR) of nitrate was removed from the water, mainly by denitrification. The nitrate removal was compensated for by the net release of ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen. Lower oxygen concentrations in the soil at lower IRs led to a sharper decrease in the nitrification rate than in the ammonification rate, and, consequently, more ammonium leaked from the soil. The decreasing organic-carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (from 12.8 to 5.1) and the increasing light A(inf250)/A(inf365) ratio (from 4.5 to 5.2) indicated an increasing bioavailability of the outflowing dissolved organic matter with increasing IR. The efflux of nitrous oxide was also very sensitive to IR and increased severalfold when a zone of low oxygen concentration was close to the outlet of the soil cores. N(inf2)O then constituted 8% of the total gaseous N lost from the soil. PMID:16535352

  10. Measurement of Mercury Species in Human Blood using Triple Spike Isotope Dilution with SPME-GC-ICP-DRC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Yuliya L.; Verdon, Carl P.; Fresquez, Mark R.; Ward, Cynthia D.; Wood, Elliott B.; Pan, Yi; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Jones, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of different mercury compounds in human blood can provide valuable information about the type of mercury exposure. To this end, our laboratory developed a biomonitoring method for the quantification of inorganic (iHg), methyl (MeHg) and ethyl (EtHg) mercury in whole blood using a triple spike isotope dilution (TSID) quantification method employing capillary gas chromatography (GC) and inductively coupled dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS). We used a robotic CombiPAL® sample handling station featuring twin fiber-based solid phase microextraction (SPME) injector heads. The use of two SPME fibers significantly reduces sample analysis cycle times making this method very suitable for high sample throughput, which is a requirement for large public health biomonitoring studies. Our sample preparation procedure involved solubilization of blood samples with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) followed by the derivatization with sodium tetra(n-propyl)borate (NaBPr4) to promote volatility of mercury species. We thoroughly investigated mercury species stability in the blood matrix during the course of sample treatment and analysis. The method accuracy for quantifying iHg, MeHg and EtHg was validated using NIST standard reference materials (SRM 955c Level 3) and the Centre de Toxicologie du Québec (CTQ) proficiency testing (PT) samples. The limit of detection (LOD) for iHg, MeHg and EtHg in human blood was determined to be 0.27, 0.12, and 0.16 ?g/L, respectively. PMID:24948088

  11. An Isotope Dilution Method for High-frequency Measurements of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon concentration in the Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Bender, M. L.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Cassar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is one of the most important species in the ocean carbon system. An autonomous system using isotope dilution as its core method has been developed to obtain high-frequency measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the surface ocean. This system accurately mixes a seawater sample and a 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate solution (spike). The mixed solution is then acidified and sent through a gas permeable membrane contactor. CO2 derived from DIC in the mixture is extracted by a CO2-free gas stream, and is sent to a cavity ring-down spectrometer to analyze its 13C/12C ratio. [DIC] of the seawater can then be derived from the measured 13C/12C, the known mixing ratio and the [DI13C] of the spike. The method has been tested under a wide [DIC] range (1800-2800 ?mol/kg) in the laboratory. It has also been deployed on a cruise that surveyed ocean waters to the south of Florida. At a sampling resolution of 4 minutes (15 samples per hour), the relative standard deviation of DIC determined from the laboratory tests and the field deployment is ×0.07% and ×0.09%, respectively. The accuracy of the method is better than 0.1% except where [DIC] varies faster than 5 ?mol/kg per minute. Based on the laboratory and field evaluations, we conclude that this method can provide accurate underway [DIC] measurements at high resolution in most oceanic regions. Schematic illustration of the work flow.

  12. Quantification of N?-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), N?-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), N?-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL) and total lysine through stable isotope dilution assay and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Wiltafsky, Markus; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2015-12-01

    The control of Maillard reaction (MR) is a key point to ensure processed foods quality. Due to the presence of a primary amino group on its side chain, lysine is particularly prone to chemical modifications with the formation of Amadori products (AP), N?-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), N?-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL). A new analytical strategy was proposed which allowed to simultaneously quantify lysine, CML, CEL and the N?-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), the indirect marker of AP. The procedure is based on stable isotope dilution assay followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. It showed high sensitivity and good reproducibility and repeatability in different foods. The limit of detection and the RSD% were lower than 5 ppb and below 8%, respectively. Results obtained with the new procedure not only improved the knowledge about the reliability of thermal treatment markers, but also defined new insights in the relationship between Maillard reaction products and their precursors. PMID:26041204

  13. Improved Isotopic Measurement of Plutonium by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shick, C. Jr.

    2002-02-07

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is accepted widely as the benchmark method for precise and accurate isotopic determination of plutonium. TIMS is one of the few analytical methods capable of determining Pu in bioassay samples at the level required for detecting a 50 yr committed dose of 100 mRem resulting from an inhalation exposure to highly insoluble forms of Pu. Typically, Pu is measured in bioassay samples by radiochemical separation, electrodeposition onto a planchet, and radiometric determination by alpha spectrometry. If, based on the alpha spectrometry results, a sample is deemed to need a more sensitive analysis (i.e. suspected uptake, borderline alpha spectrometry positive for Pu uptake, etc.), then the sample is prepared for analysis by TIMS. Part of the development process for establishing a program to determine Pu in bioassay samples by TIMS at the Savannah River Site involved a careful evaluation of the Pu blank value in the reagents used for sample preparation and in urine blanks. This exercise allowed for the evaluation of the newly developed radiochemical separation procedure, the resin bead loading procedure, and the detection limits of the thermal ionization mass spectrometer.

  14. Automated gravimetric sample pretreatment using an industrial robot for the high-precision determination of plutonium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Surugaya, Naoki; Hiyama, Toshiaki; Watahiki, Masaru

    2008-06-01

    A robotized sample-preparation method for the determination of Pu, which is recovered by extraction reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) is described. The automated system uses a six-axis industrial robot, whose motility is very fast, accurate, and flexible, installed in a glove box. The automation of the weighing and dilution steps enables operator-unattended sample pretreatment for the high-precision analysis of Pu in aqueous solutions. Using the developed system, the Pu concentration in a HNO(3) medium was successfully determined using a set of subsequent mass spectrometric measurements. The relative uncertainty in determining the Pu concentration by IDMS using this system was estimated to be less than 0.1% (k = 2), which is equal to that expected of a talented analyst. The operation time required was the same as that for a skilled operator. PMID:18544862

  15. The Magmatic Structure of Mt. Vesuvius: Isotopic and Thermal Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civetta, L.; D'Antonio, M.; de Lorenzo, S.; Gasparini, P.

    2002-12-01

    Mt. Vesuvius is an active volcano famous for the AD 79 eruption that destroyed Pompeii, Herculaneum and Stabiae. Because of the intense urbanization around and on the volcano, the risk today is very high. Therefore, the knowledge of the structure and behavior of the magmatic system is fundamental both for the interpretation of any change in the dynamics of the volcano and for prediction of eruptions. A review of available and new isotopic data on rocks from Mt. Vesuvius, together with mineralogical and geochemical data and recent geophysical results, allow us to constrain a thermal modeling that describes history and present state of Mt. Vesuvius magmatic system. This system is formed by a "deep", complex magmatic reservoir where mantle-derived magmas arrive, stagnate and differentiate. The reservoir extends discontinuously between 10 and 20 km of depth, is hosted in densely fractured crustal rocks, where magmas and crust can interact, and has been fed more than once since 400 ka. The hypothesis of crustal contamination is favored by the high temperatures reached by crustal rocks as a consequence of repetitive intrusions of magma. From the "deep" reservoir magmas of K-basaltic to K-tephritic to K-phonotephritic composition rise to shallow depths where they stagnate at 3-5 km of depth before plinian eruptions, and through crystallization and mixing processes with the residual portion of the feeding systems, generate isotopically and geochemically layered reservoirs. Alternatively, during "open conduit" conditions deep, volatile-rich magma batches rise from the "deep" reservoir to less than 1 km of depth and mix with the crystal-rich, volatile-poor resident magma, triggering eruptions.

  16. New commercial method for the enzymatic determination of creatinine in serum and urine evaluated: Comparison with a kinetic Jaffe method and isotope dilution-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lindbaeck, B.B.; Bergman, A.

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated a new, simple, enzymatic kinetic method from Wako Chemicals GmbH in comparison with a kinetic Jaffe method by using isotope dilution-mass spectrometry (ID-MS) as a reference method. An ID-MS-calibrated serum standard was used. Both the enzymatic and the Jaffe method correlated well with ID-MS, except for sera with high concentrations of bilirubin. Ethyl acetoacetate, acetone, and glucose in serum interfered somewhat with the Jaffe method but not with the enzymatic method. We conclude that the present enzymatic method has merit as compared with a Jaffe method for routine work, but is more expensive.

  17. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, William M. (Dayton, OH)

    1988-05-24

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtainable in the prior art.

  18. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1985-12-04

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

  19. Determination of 90Sr / 238U ratio by double isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with multiple collection in spent nuclear fuel samples with in situ 90Sr / 90Zr separation in a collision-reaction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Blanchet, P.; Brennetot, R.; Chartier, F.; Geertsen, V.; Manuguerra, F.

    2006-02-01

    Strontium-90 is one of the most important fission products generated in nuclear industry. In the research field concerning nuclear waste disposal in deep geological environment, it is necessary to quantify accurately and precisely its concentration (or the 90Sr / 238U atomic ratio) in irradiated fuels. To obtain accurate analysis of radioactive 90Sr, mass spectrometry associated with isotope dilution is the most appropriated method. But, in nuclear fuel samples the interference with 90Zr must be previously eliminated. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with multiple collection, equipped with an hexapole collision cell, has been used to eliminate the 90Sr / 90Zr interference by addition of oxygen in the collision cell as a reactant gas. Zr + ions are converted into ZrO +, whereas Sr + ions are not reactive. A mixed solution, prepared from a solution of enriched 84Sr and a solution of enriched 235U was then used to quantify the 90Sr / 238U ratio in spent fuel sample solutions using the double isotope dilution method. This paper shows the results, the reproducibility and the uncertainties that can be obtained with this method to quantify the 90Sr / 238U atomic ratio in an UOX (uranium oxide) and a MOX (mixed oxide) spent fuel samples using the collision cell of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with multiple collection to perform the 90Sr / 90Zr separation. A comparison with the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with multiple collection after a chemical separation of strontium from zirconium using a Sr spec resin (Eichrom) has been performed. Finally, to validate the analytical procedure developed, measurements of the same samples have been performed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, used as an independent technique, after chemical separation of Sr.

  20. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of the potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Krti?ka, M.; Révay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Belgya, T.

    2013-02-01

    Precise thermal neutron capture ?-ray cross sections ?? for 39,40,41K were measured on a natural potassium target with the guided neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. The cross sections were internally standardized using a stoichiometric KCl target with well-known 35Cl(n,?) ?-ray cross sections [Révay and Molnár, Radiochimica ActaRAACAP0033-823010.1524/ract.91.6.361.20027 91, 361 (2003); Molnár, Révay, and Belgya, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. BNIMBEU0168-583X10.1016/S0168-583X(03)01529-5 213, 32 (2004)]. These data were combined with ?-ray intensities from von Egidy [von Egidy, Daniel, Hungerford, Schmidt, Lieb, Krusche, Kerr, Barreau, Borner, Brissot , J. Phys. G. Nucl. Phys.JPHGBM0305-461610.1088/0305-4616/10/2/013 10, 221 (1984)] and Krusche [Krusche, Lieb, Ziegler, Daniel, von Egidy, Rascher, Barreau, Borner, and Warner, Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/0375-9474(84)90506-2 417, 231 (1984); Krusche, Winter, Lieb, Hungerford, Schmidt, von Egidy, Scheerer, Kerr, and Borner, Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/0375-9474(85)90429-4 439, 219 (1985)] to generate nearly complete capture ?-ray level schemes. Total radiative neutron cross sections were deduced from the total ?-ray cross section feeding the ground state, ?0=???(GS) after correction for unobserved statistical ?-ray feeding from levels near the neutron capture energy. The corrections were performed with Monte Carlo simulations of the potassium thermal neutron capture decay schemes using the computer code dicebox where the simulated populations of low-lying levels are normalized to the measured cross section depopulating those levels. Comparisons of the simulated and experimental level feeding intensities have led to proposed new spins and parities for selected levels in the potassium isotopes where direct reactions are not a significant contribution. We determined the total radiative neutron cross sections ?0(39K)=2.28±0.04 b, ?0(40K)=90±7 b, and ?0(41K)=1.62±0.03 b from the prompt ?-ray data and the ?-ray transition probability P?(1524.66)=0.164(4) in the ?- decay of 42K in a low-background counting experiment.

  1. Impact of isotopic disorders on thermal transport properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Tao; Kang, Wei; Wang, Jianxiang

    2015-01-21

    We present a one-dimensional lattice model to describe thermal transport in isotopically doped nanotubes and nanowires. The thermal conductivities thus predicted, as a function of isotopic concentration, agree well with recent experiments and other simulations. Our results display that for any given concentration of isotopic atoms in a lattice without sharp atomic interfaces, the maximum thermal conductivity is attained when isotopic atoms are placed regularly with an equal space, whereas the minimum is achieved when they are randomly inserted with a uniform distribution. Non-uniformity of disorder can further tune the thermal conductivity between the two values. Moreover, the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanoscale feature size becomes weak at low temperature when disorder exists. In addition, when self-consistent thermal reservoirs are included to describe diffusive nanomaterials, the thermal conductivities predicted by our model are in line with the results of macroscopic theories with an interfacial effect. Our results suggest that the disorder provides an additional freedom to tune the thermal properties of nanomaterials in many technological applications including nanoelectronics, solid-state lighting, energy conservation, and conversion.

  2. The 2H thermal diffusion isotope effect in benzene and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning-Yuan Richard; Beyerlein, Adolph L.

    1983-06-01

    The 2H thermal diffusion isotope effect is investigated for mixtures benzene-benzeed benzene-o dideuterobenzene, benzene-p didouterobenzen, mathanol d-methanold4, methanol-melhanol d. The thermal diffusion measurements wre made using a cylindrical thermo gravitational diffusion apparatus. (AIP)

  3. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  4. Development and validation of a high-throughput analysis of glutathione in grapes, musts and wines by Stable Isotope Dilution Assay and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi

    2015-06-15

    For the first time, we proposed a high-throughput method to quantify glutathione in grapes, musts and wines for all grape varieties using Stable Isotope Dilution Assay (SIDA). Indeed, the use of SIDA as a quantification method is essential to overcome the chemical instability of glutathione. In practice, glutathione was derivatized in-situ with N-ethylmaleimide to block the cysteine residue and to enhance its lipophilic properties. After quenching with acetic acid, samples were directly analyzed by LC-MS/MS (run of 13 min) in Multiple Reaction Monitoring mode using labeled glutathione as internal standard. The validation according to the International Organization of Vine and Wine recommendations demonstrated the high sensitivity (LOD=45 ?g L(-1)), accuracy (recovery=112%) and intermediate reproducibility (RSD=12%) of the method. This high-throughput method that requires only 1 mL of matrix, allowed us to analyze 70 samples per day for a moderate cost. PMID:25660871

  5. A stable-isotope dilution GC-MS approach for the analysis of DFRC (derivatization followed by reductive cleavage) monomers from low-lignin plant materials.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Judith; Urbat, Felix; Rund, Katharina; Bunzel, Mirko

    2015-03-18

    The derivatization followed by reductive cleavage (DFRC) method is a well-established tool to characterize the lignin composition of plant materials. However, the application of the original procedure, especially the chromatographic determination of the DFRC monomers, is problematic for low-lignin foods. To overcome these problems a modified sample cleanup and a stable-isotope dilution approach were developed and validated. To quantitate the diacetylated DFRC monomers, their corresponding hexadeuterated analogs were synthesized and used as internal standards. By using the selected-ion monitoring mode, matrix-associated interferences can be minimized resulting in higher selectivity and sensitivity. The modified method was applied to four low-lignin samples. Lignin from carrot fibers was classified as guaiacyl-rich whereas the lignins from radish, pear, and asparagus fibers where classified as balanced lignins (guaiacyl/syringyl ratio=1-2). PMID:25727138

  6. Sectional power-law correction for the accurate determination of lutetium by isotope dilution multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hong-Lin; Gao, Shan; Zong, Chun-Lei; Dai, Meng-Ning

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we employ a sectional power-law (SPL) correction that provides accurate and precise measurements of 176Lu/ 175Lu ratios in geological samples using multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Three independent power laws were adopted based on the 176Lu/ 176Yb ratios of samples measured after chemical chromatography. Using isotope dilution (ID) techniques and the SPL correction method, the measured lutetium contents of United States Geological Survey rock standards (BHVO-1, BHVO-2, BCR-2, AGV-1, and G-2) agree well with the recommended values. Results obtained by conventional ICP-MS and INAA are generally higher than those obtained by ID-TIMS and ID-MC-ICP-MS; this discrepancy probably reflects oxide interference and inaccurate corrections.

  7. Determination of low methylmercury concentrations in peat soil samples by isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS using distillation and solvent extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Heidi; Perämäki, Paavo; Piispanen, Juha; Starr, Mike; Nieminen, Tiina; Kantola, Marjatta; Ukonmaanaho, Liisa

    2015-04-01

    Most often, only total mercury concentrations in soil samples are determined in environmental studies. However, the determination of extremely toxic methylmercury (MeHg) in addition to the total mercury is critical to understand the biogeochemistry of mercury in the environment. In this study, N2-assisted distillation and acidic KBr/CuSO4 solvent extraction methods were applied to isolate MeHg from wet peat soil samples collected from boreal forest catchments. Determination of MeHg was performed using a purge and trap GC-ICP-MS technique with a species-specific isotope dilution quantification. Distillation is known to be more prone to artificial MeHg formation compared to solvent extraction which may result in the erroneous MeHg results, especially with samples containing high amounts of inorganic mercury. However, methylation of inorganic mercury during the distillation step had no effect on the reliability of the final MeHg results when natural peat soil samples were distilled. MeHg concentrations determined in peat soil samples after distillation were compared to those determined after the solvent extraction method. MeHg concentrations in peat soil samples varied from 0.8 to 18 ?g kg(-1) (dry weight) and the results obtained with the two different methods did not differ significantly (p=0.05). The distillation method with an isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS was shown to be a reliable method for the determination of low MeHg concentrations in unpolluted soil samples. Furthermore, the distillation method is solvent-free and less time-consuming and labor-intensive when compared to the solvent extraction method. PMID:25434268

  8. Validation of an isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for combined analysis of oxysterols and oxyphytosterols in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Schött, Hans-Frieder; Lütjohann, Dieter

    2015-07-01

    We describe the validation of a method for the analysis of oxysterols, i.e. oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols, in human serum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM). Concentrations of 7?- and 7?-hydroxy-, and 7oxo-cholesterol, -campesterol, and -sitosterol as well as 4?-hydroxycholesterol and side-chain oxygenated 24S-, 25-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol were determined by isotope dilution methodology. After saponification at room temperature the oxysterols were extracted, separated from their substrates, cholesterol, campesterol, and sitosterol, by solid phase extraction, and subsequently derivatised to their corresponding trimethylsilyl-ethers prior to GC-MS-SIM. In order to prevent artificial autoxidation butylated hydroxytoluene and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were added. The validation of the method was performed according to the International Conference on Harmonisation guidance, including limits of detection and quantification, ranges, recovery and precision. Due to improved instrumental settings and work-up procedure, limits of detection and quantification ranged between 8.0-202.0pg/mL and 28.0-674pg/mL, respectively. Recovery data in five calibration points varied between 91.9% and 116.8% and in serum samples between 93.1% and 118.1%. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the recovery of all compounds was <10%. Well satisfying CVs for within-day precision (2.1-10.8%) and for between-day precision (2.3-12.1%) were obtained. More than 20 samples could be processed in a single routine day and test series of about 300 samples can be realised without impairment of the validation parameters during a sequence. Comparison of oxysterol and oxyphytosterol content in serum and plasma revealed no difference. A fully validated isotope dilution methodology for the quantification of oxycholesterols and oxyphytosterols from human serum or plasma is presented. PMID:25701095

  9. Drinking behaviour and water turnover rates of Antarctic fur seal pups: implications for the estimation of milk intake by isotopic dilution.

    PubMed

    Lea, Mary-Anne; Bonadonna, Francesco; Hindell, Mark A; Guinet, Christophe; Goldsworthy, Simon D

    2002-06-01

    The estimation of milk consumption in free-ranging seals using tritium dilution techniques makes the key assumption that the animals drink no pre-formed water during the experimental period. However, frequent observations of unweaned Antarctic fur seal pups drinking water at Iles Kerguelen necessitated the testing of this assumption. We estimated water flux rates of 30 pups (10.7+/-0.3 kg) in four experimental groups by isotopic dilution over 4 days. The groups were: (1) pups held in an open air enclosure without access to water to estimate fasting metabolic water production (MWP); (2) free-ranging pups not administered additional water; (3) pups held in an open air enclosure and given a total of 300 ml of fresh water to verify technique accuracy; and (4) free-ranging pups given 200 ml of fresh water. Pups without access to water exhibited water flux rates (20.5+/-0.8 ml kg(-1)d(-1)), which were significantly lower than those observed for the free-ranging group (33.0+/-1.7 ml kg(-1) d(-1)). Mean estimated pre-formed water intake for the free-ranging experimental groups was 12.6 ml kg(-1) d(-1). Thus, MWP, measured as total water intake during fasting, may be significantly over-estimated in free-ranging Antarctic fur seal pups at Iles Kerguelen and at other sites and subsequently milk intake rates may be underestimated. PMID:12020648

  10. Inoculation of Bacillus sphaericus UPMB-10 to young oil palm and measurement of its uptake of fixed nitrogen using the ¹?N isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Zakry, Fitri Abdul Aziz; Shamsuddin, Zulkifli H; Abdul Rahim, Khairuddin; Zawawi Zakaria, Zin; Abdul Rahim, Anuar

    2012-01-01

    There are increasing applications of diazotrophic rhizobacteria in the sustainable agriculture system. A field experiment on young immature oil palm was conducted to quantify the uptake of N derived from N? fixation by the diazotroph Bacillus sphaericus strain UPMB-10, using the ¹?N isotope dilution method. Eight months after ¹?N application, young immature oil palms that received 67% of standard N fertilizer application together with B. sphaericus inoculation had significantly lower ¹?N enrichment than uninoculated palms that received similar N fertilizers. The dilution of labeled N served as a marker for the occurrence of biological N? fixation. The proportion of N uptake that was derived from the atmosphere was estimated as 63% on the whole plant basis. The inoculation process increased the N and dry matter yields of the palm leaflets and rachis significantly. Field planting of young, immature oil palm in soil inoculated with B. sphaericus UPMB-10 might mitigate inorganic fertilizer-N application through supplementation by biological nitrogen fixation. This could be a new and important source of nitrogen biofertilizer in the early phase of oil palm cultivation in the field. PMID:22446306

  11. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  12. Thermal Conductivity and Large Isotope Effect in GaN from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, L.; Broido, D. A.; Reinecke, T. L.

    2012-08-28

    We present atomistic first principles results for the lattice thermal conductivity of GaN and compare them to those for GaP, GaAs, and GaSb. In GaN we find a large increase to the thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment, ~65% at room temperature. We show that both the high thermal conductivity and its enhancement with isotopic enrichment in GaN arise from the weak coupling of heat-carrying acoustic phonons with optic phonons. This weak scattering results from stiff atomic bonds and the large Ga to N mass ratio, which give phonons high frequencies and also a pronounced energy gap between acoustic and optic phonons compared to other materials. Rigorous understanding of these features in GaN gives important insights into the interplay between intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering and isotopic scattering in a range of materials.

  13. An Ultrahigh Precision, High-Frequency Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Analyzer Based on Dual Isotope Dilution and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan; Cassar, Nicolas; Jonsson, Bror; Cai, Wei-jun; Bender, Michael L

    2015-07-21

    We present a novel method for continuous and automated shipboard measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration ([DIC]) in surface water. The method is based on dual isotope dilution and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (DID-CRDS). In this method, seawater is continuously sampled and mixed with a flow of NaH(13)CO3 solution that is also enriched in deuterated water (the spike). The isotopic composition of CO2 (?(13)C(spiked_sample)) derived from the DIC in the mixture, and the D/H ratio of the mixed water (?D(spiked_sample)), are measured by CRDS analyzers. The D/H of the water in the mixture allows accurate estimates of the mixing ratio of the sample and the spike. [DIC] of the sample is then calculated from the mixing ratio, [DI(13)C] of the spike, and ?(13)C(spiked_sample). In the laboratory, the precision of the method is <0.02% (±0.4 ?mol kg(-1) when [DIC] = 2000 ?mol kg(-1)). A shipboard test was conducted in the Delaware Bay and Estuary. For 2 min average [DIC], a precision of <0.03% was achieved. Measurements from the DID-CRDS showed good agreement with independent measurements of discrete samples using the well-established coulometric method (mean difference = -1.14 ± 1.68 ?mol kg(-1)), and the nondispersive infrared(NDIR)-based methods (mean difference = -0.9 ± 4.73 ?mol kg(-1)). PMID:26119512

  14. Determination of steroid hormones in a human-serum reference material by isotope dilution--mass spectrometry: A candidate definitive method for cortisol

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.G.; Patterson, M.B.; Culbreth, P.H.; Fast, D.M.; Holler, J.S.; Sampson, E.J.; Bayse, D.D.

    1984-05-01

    We report a method, based on isotope dilution--mass spectrometry, for determining cortisol in a pooled specimen of human serum. Isotopically labeled cortisol is added to 5.0 mL of serum so that the molar concentrations of labeled cortisol and unlabeled cortisol are approximately equal. The specimen and two calibration standards are extracted with dichloromethane, and the extracted cortisol is converted to the methoxime-trimethylsilyl ether derivative. Samples and standards are analyzed by gas chromatography--mass spectrometry by monitoring the peak areas for m/z 605 and 608. The cortisol concentration is calculated by linear interpolation between the two bracketing standards. Variances of data collected during six weeks showed that the overall coefficient of variation (CV) was 0.69% (n . 32); the within-vial CV, 0.63%; the among-vial CV, 0.22%; and the among-day CV, 0.15% (means . 3.973 nmol/vial). Method specificity was demonstrated by liquid chromatographic as well as C/sub 8/ mini-column cleanup of samples before derivation, by alternative ion monitoring at m/z 636 and 639, and by negative-ion chemical ionization at m/z 459 and 462. Derivatives of all observed degradation products of cortisol under basic, neutral, and acidic conditions did not interfere.

  15. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2) ?>?0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50?nmol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26033549

  16. Chemical and isotopic data for water from thermal springs and wells of Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Swanson, J.R.; Orris, G.J.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal springs of Oregon range in composition from dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters to moderately saline CO/sub 2/-charged NaCl-NaHCO/sub 3/ waters. Most of the thermal springs are located in southeastern or southcentral Oregon, with a few in northeastern Oregon and near the contact of the Western Cascades with the High Cascades. Thermal springs in the central and northern parts of the Cascades generally issue moderately saline NaCl waters. Farther south in the Cascades, the thermal waters are high in CO/sub 2/ as well as chloride. Most thermal springs in northeastern Oregon issue dilute NaHCO/sub 3/ waters of high pH (>8.5). These waters are similar to the thermal waters which issue from the Idaho batholith, farther east. Most of the remaining thermal waters are Na mixed-anion waters. Based on the chemical geothermometers, Mickey Srpings, Hot Borax Lake, Alvord Hot Springs, Neal Hot Springs, Vale Hot Springs, Crump Well, Hunters (Lakeview) Hot Springs, and perhaps some of the springs in the Cascades are associated with the highest temperature systems (>150/sup 0/C).

  17. Isotope separation by thermal diffusion in liquid metal.

    PubMed

    Ott, A

    1969-04-18

    Isotopic enrichment of several percent has been obtained in liquid lithium metal by applying a temperature gradient over a single-stage separation column. For other metals the method should have the highest eficiency, if these have low melting points and are liquids over a wide temperature range. PMID:17812087

  18. Lead and strontium isotope data for thermal waters of the regional geothermal system in the Twin Falls and Oakley areas, South-Central Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, R.H.; Young, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal fluids obviously related to aquifers in both rhyolite and limestone occur in the Twin Falls-Oakley area of south-central Idaho. Limestone-related waters (high calcium with low silica and fluoride) occur in the middle and upper (southern) parts of the area. Rhyolite-related waters (low calcium but high in silica and fluoride) occur in the lower (northern) part of the area. The relation of thermal fluids in Paleozoic limestone to thermal fluids in Tertiary rhyolite is unknown. Thermal fluids from limestone are dilute, so water-rock reaction in rhyolite could obliterate chemical evidence of fluid residence in a limestone. However, isotopic tracers such as {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb, and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr might preserve evidence of fluid residence in limestone. Systematic relations between these isotopes and dissolved constituents in the water demonstrate the presence of limestone beneath most if not all of the study area and that aquifers in the limestone and rhyolite are hydrologically connected.

  19. Isotopic Fractionation of 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne in a Simulated Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, B.; Dominguez, G.

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulations allow for the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of systems which are difficult or impossible to do experimentally. Isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients is an example of a system which is not fully understood but could provide background for understanding variations in fractionations like those observed for noble gases in terrestrial and extraterrestrial material. Using a recently developed molecular dynamics simulation focused on the accuracy of the simulated physics, the isotopic fractionation of Neon in a thermal gradient was analyzed in order to provide a correlation between the fractionation and the experimental system's properties. Various ratios of isotopes 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne were simulated in a thermal gradient ranging from 218 K to 233 K for a variety of time scales. Data was collected for various configurations including box sizes on the order of 1 nm to 100 ?m. The simulated thermal conductivity was determined and compared with known values. The analysis indicates that the dimensions of the box heavily influence the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation in the thermal gradient.

  20. Thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-01-01

    The mirage-effect/thermal wave technique as a modern technique for thermal property characterization is described. The thermal diffusivity of a material is determined by measuring the time and space varying temperature distribution (thermal wave) in the material generated by an intensity modulated heating laser beam. These thermal waves are detected through the deflection of a probe laser beam due to modulation of gradient of the index of refraction (mirage effect) either in the air above the specimens (the in-air technique) or in the specimen itself (the in-solid technique). Three-dimensional theories, for both in-air and in-solid mirage techniques, are represented. In order to extract the material parameters by comparing the theory with experimental data, an extensive data analysis procedure based on multiparameter-least-squares has been developed. The experimental and data analysis details are discussed. Topics concerns with the quality and reliability of the measurements are addressed. This technique has been successfully applied to the thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotope contents. The results showed a 50% enhancement in the thermal conductivity by removal of C[sup 13] content from 1.1% to 0.1% in diamond at room temperature. The technique has also been adapted to function in cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the temperature range 80-378K for natural IIA specimen and 187-375K for isotopically enriched specimen are obtained, the former results agree with previous works and the latter results demonstrate the isotope effect on the thermal conductivity of single crystal diamond consistently in a large temperature range. The physical source of this enhancement in diffusivity due to the isotope effect in diamond is discussed. The discussion is based on the full Callaway's theory with emphasizing the role of N-processes in the phonon scattering mechanism.

  1. Noninvasive measurement of smoking-associated N(3)-ethyladenine and N(7)-ethylguanine in human salivary DNA by stable isotope dilution nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hauh-Jyun Candy; Lin, Chao-Ray

    2014-02-10

    Evidence showed that ethylating agents are contained in cigarette smoke, which damage DNA producing ethylated DNA adducts, including N(3)-ethyladenine (3-EtAde) and N(7)-ethylguanine (7-EtGua). These two ethylpurines can be depurinated spontaneously and be repaired by enzymes and they have been detected in human urine. In this study, a highly specific and sensitive assay based on stable isotope dilution nanoflow liquid chromatography nanospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-NSI/MS/MS) was used to measure 3-EtAde and 7-EtGua in human salivary DNA. These ethylpurines were released from DNA by neutral thermal hydrolysis and then enriched by a solid-phase extraction column before nanoLC-NSI/MS/MS analysis. The detection limits (S/N?3) of 3-EtA and 7-EtG were 15 fg (92 amol) and 10 fg (56 amol), respectively, injected on-column. The lower quantification limits of 3-EtAde and 7-EtGua were both 100 fg, i.e. 620 and 560 amol, respectively, corresponding to 9.4 and 8.6 adducts in 10(9) normal nucleotides, respectively, starting with as little as 20 ?g of DNA isolated from an average of 3 mL of saliva. The mean (±SD) levels of 3-EtAde in 15 smokers and 15 nonsmokers were 12.6±7.0 and 9.7±5.3 in 10(8) normal nucleotides, respectively, while those of 7-EtGua were 14.1±8.2 and 3.8±2.8 in 10(8) normal nucleotides in smokers and nonsmokers, respectively. Levels of 7-EtGua, but not 3-EtAde, were statistically significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers (p<0.0001). Furthermore, salivary 7-EtGua levels are significantly correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day as well as with the smoking index. This highly specific and sensitive stable isotope dilution nanoLC-NSI/MS/MS assay might be feasible in measuring 7-EtGua in human salivary DNA as a noninvasive biomarker for DNA damage induced by cigarette smoking. PMID:24300169

  2. Accurate determination of selected pesticides in soya beans by liquid chromatography coupled to isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huertas Pérez, J F; Sejerøe-Olsen, B; Fernández Alba, A R; Schimmel, H; Dabrio, M

    2015-05-01

    A sensitive, accurate and simple liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry method for the determination of 10 selected pesticides in soya beans has been developed and validated. The method is intended for use during the characterization of selected pesticides in a reference material. In this process, high accuracy and appropriate uncertainty levels associated to the analytical measurements are of utmost importance. The analytical procedure is based on sample extraction by the use of a modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe) extraction and subsequent clean-up of the extract with C18, PSA and Florisil. Analytes were separated on a C18 column using gradient elution with water-methanol/2.5 mM ammonium acetate mobile phase, and finally identified and quantified by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Reliable and accurate quantification of the analytes was achieved by means of stable isotope-labelled analogues employed as internal standards (IS) and calibration with pure substance solutions containing both, the isotopically labelled and native compounds. Exceptions were made for thiodicarb and malaoxon where the isotopically labelled congeners were not commercially available at the time of analysis. For the quantification of those compounds methomyl-(13)C2(15)N and malathion-D10 were used respectively. The method was validated according to the general principles covered by DG SANCO guidelines. However, validation criteria were set more stringently. Mean recoveries were in the range of 86-103% with RSDs lower than 8.1%. Repeatability and intermediate precision were in the range of 3.9-7.6% and 1.9-8.7% respectively. LODs were theoretically estimated and experimentally confirmed to be in the range 0.001-0.005 mg kg(-1) in the matrix, while LOQs established as the lowest spiking mass fractionation level were in the range 0.01-0.05 mg kg(-1). The method reliably identifies and quantifies the selected pesticides in soya beans at appropriate uncertainty levels, making it suitable for the characterization of candidate reference materials. PMID:25770614

  3. A theoretical model of isotopic fractionation by thermal diffusion and its implementation on silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuefang; Liu, Yun

    2015-04-01

    When a homogeneous system is placed under a temperature gradient for a sufficient time, both its chemical and isotopic compositions will differentiate between the hot and the cold ends. Molecular-level knowledge of this process is of critical importance to understanding concentration and isotopic distributions in many geologic systems. Recently, different theoretical models have been proposed to explain isotopic fractionations observed in laboratory experiments under high temperatures, but there is still a lot of debating. Here we provide a unified theory based on local thermodynamic equilibrium approach to evaluating thermal isotope fractionations under a wide range of temperatures. For high temperature silicate melts, our theory offers a simple equation for calculating isotopic fractionations of all isotope systems: ?XM = -(3/2)ln(m?/m)ln(T/T0). The results from this equation agree with observed data for the most of network modifiers and resolve existing discrepancies among different interpretations. It can also explain O and Si isotope results if consider their diffusing species not as a single ion but a larger unit (e.g., [SiO3] or [SiO4]). The simplicity of the equation support a classical mechanical collision model for high-temperature diffusing particles in silica melts.

  4. Thermal neutron cross sections for the 1991 table of the isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1991-05-01

    It has been a decade since the last publication of the Barn Book,'' BNL-325. In preparing a revision to the Table of the Isotopes, a re-evaluation of all of the thermal neutron cross sections has been performed, utilizing the previous data base of the Barn Book'' and all of the more recently published experiments. 5 refs.

  5. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  6. Thin-layer chromatography/direct analysis in real time time-of-flight mass spectrometry and isotope dilution to analyze organophosphorus insecticides in fatty foods.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Osamu; Oka, Kazuko; Tamada, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Onodera, Jun

    2014-11-28

    To assess food safety emergencies caused by highly hazardous chemical-tainted foods, simultaneous analysis of organophosphorus insecticides in fatty foods such as precooked foods was conducted using thin-layer chromatography/direct analysis in real time time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TLC/DART-TOFMS) and isotope dilution technique. Polar (methamidophos and acephate) and nonpolar organophosphorus insecticides (fenitrothion, diazinon, and EPN) were studied. Experiments to ascertain chromatographic patterns using TLC/DART-TOFMS reveal that it was more useful than GC/MS or GC/MS/MS for the simultaneous analyses of polar and nonpolar pesticides, while obviating the addition of a protective agent for tailing effects of polar pesticides. Lower helium gas temperature (260°C) for DART-TOFMS was suitable for the simultaneous analysis of target pesticides. Linearities were achieved respectively at a lower standard concentration range (0.05-5 ?g) for diazinon and EPN and at a higher standard concentration range (2.5-25 ?g) for methamidophos, acephate, and fenitrothion. Their respective coefficients of determination were ? 0.9989 and ? 0.9959. A few higher repeatabilities (RSDs) for diazinon and EPN were found (>20%), although isotope dilution technique was used. Application to the HPTLC plate without an automatic TLC sampler might be inferred as a cause of their higher RSDs. Detection limits were estimated in the higher picogram range for diazinon and EPN, and in the lower nanogram range for methamidophos, acephate, and fenitrothion. Aside from methamidophos, recovery results (n=3) obtained using a highly insecticide-tainted fatty food (dumpling) and raw food (grapefruit) samples (10mg/kg) using TLC/DART-TOFMS with both complex and simpler cleanups were not as susceptible to matrix effects (95-121%; RSD, 1.3-14%) as those using GC/MS/MS (102-117%; RSD, 0.4-8.5%), although dumpling samples using GC/MS were remarkably susceptible to matrix effects. The coupled method of TLC with simpler cleanup and DART-TOFMS can be regarded as the same analytical tool as GC/MS/MS, which is useful to assess food safety emergencies caused by highly hazardous chemical-tainted foods. PMID:25454149

  7. Body composition in Nepalese children using isotope dilution: the production of ethnic-specific calibration equations and an exploration of methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva-Eternod, Carlos S.; Roberts, Sebastian; Chaube, Shiva Shankar; Saville, Naomi M.; Manandhar, Dharma S.; Costello, Anthony; Osrin, David; Wells, Jonathan C.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Body composition is important as a marker of both current and future health. Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) is a simple and accurate method for estimating body composition, but requires population-specific calibration equations. Objectives. (1) To generate population specific calibration equations to predict lean mass (LM) from BIA in Nepalese children aged 7–9 years. (2) To explore methodological changes that may extend the range and improve accuracy. Methods. BIA measurements were obtained from 102 Nepalese children (52 girls) using the Tanita BC-418. Isotope dilution with deuterium oxide was used to measure total body water and to estimate LM. Prediction equations for estimating LM from BIA data were developed using linear regression, and estimates were compared with those obtained from the Tanita system. We assessed the effects of flexing the arms of children to extend the range of coverage towards lower weights. We also estimated potential error if the number of children included in the study was reduced. Findings. Prediction equations were generated, incorporating height, impedance index, weight and sex as predictors (R2 93%). The Tanita system tended to under-estimate LM, with a mean error of 2.2%, but extending up to 25.8%. Flexing the arms to 90° increased the lower weight range, but produced a small error that was not significant when applied to children <16 kg (p 0.42). Reducing the number of children increased the error at the tails of the weight distribution. Conclusions. Population-specific isotope calibration of BIA for Nepalese children has high accuracy. Arm position is important and can be used to extend the range of low weight covered. Smaller samples reduce resource requirements, but leads to large errors at the tails of the weight distribution. PMID:25780755

  8. An Update on the Non-Mass-Dependent Isotope Fractionation under Thermal Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Mass flow and compositional gradient (elemental and isotope separation) occurs when flu-id(s) or gas(es) in an enclosure is subjected to a thermal gradient, and the phenomenon is named thermal diffusion. Gas phase thermal diffusion has been theoretically and experimentally studied for more than a century, although there has not been a satisfactory theory to date. Nevertheless, for isotopic system, the Chapman-Enskog theory predicts that the mass difference is the only term in the thermal diffusion separation factors that differs one isotope pair to another,with the assumptions that the molecules are spherical and systematic (monoatomic-like structure) and the particle collision is elastic. Our previous report indicates factors may be playing a role because the Non-Mass Dependent (NMD) effect is found for both symmetric and asymmetric, linear and spherical polyatomic molecules over a wide range of temperature (-196C to +237C). The observed NMD phenomenon in the simple thermal-diffusion experiments demands quantitative validation and theoretical explanation. Besides the pressure and temperature dependency illustrated in our previous reports, efforts are made in this study to address issues such as the role of convection or molecular structure and whether it is a transient, non-equilibrium effect only.

  9. Analysis of nitromethane from samples exposed in vitro to chloropicrin by stable isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Halme, Mia; Pesonen, Maija; Grandell, Toni; Kuula, Matti; Pasanen, Markku; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Vanninen, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Chloropicrin (trichloronitromethane) is a widely used soil fumigant and an old chemical warfare agent. The metabolism of chloropicrin is not well known in mammals but nitromethane has been shown to be one of its main metabolites. Here, a fast and simple headspace gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method was applied for the measurement of nitromethane from aqueous samples. The analytical method was validated using stable isotope labeled internal standard and a small sample volume of 260 ?L. No conventional sample preparation steps were needed. The method was accurate (relative standard deviations ?1.5%) and linear (R(2) = 0.9996) within the concentration range of 0.1-6.0 ?g/mL. This method was used to measure nitromethane in in vitro incubations with human and pig liver cell fractions containing enzymes for xenobiotic metabolism, exposed to chloropicrin. The results indicate that the presence of glutathione is necessary for the formation of nitromethane from chloropicrin. Also, nitromethane was formed mostly in liver cytosol fractions, but not in microsomal fractions after the incubation with chloropicrin. Our results suggest that although nitromethane is not the unequivocal biomarker of chloropicrin exposure, this method could be applied for screening the elevated levels in humans after chloropicrin exposure. PMID:26255649

  10. Seasonal changes of total body water and water intake in Shetland ponies measured by an isotope dilution technique.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, L; Gerken, M; Riek, A

    2013-08-01

    Water is an essential nutrient necessary to support life, and adequate water supply is crucial for animal survival and productivity. The present study was designed to determine seasonal changes in the water metabolism of horses under outdoor conditions. Total body water (TBW) and total water intake (TWI) of 10 adult Shetland pony mares were estimated at monthly intervals for 14 mo by using the deuterium dilution technique. During the last 4 mo, 5 ponies were fed restrictively to simulate natural feed shortage in winter, and 5 ponies served as controls. The TBW (kg) was closely related to body mass [TBW (kg) = -2.86 + 0.67 × body mass (kg); P < 0.001; n = 105] explaining 86% of the variation. In contrast to TBW (kg), TBW (%) remained relatively stable across all measurements (57.8 to 71.2%). The TWI showed an increase in summer and a decrease in winter [TWI (mL·kg(-1)·d(-1)) = 15.07 + 23.69 × month - 1.45 × month(2) (R(2) = 0.64, P < 0.01)]. However, TWI measured at ambient temperatures (Ta) < 0°C did not follow the same trend as TWI at Ta > 0°C. Therefore, removing TWI values measured at Ta < 0°C from the analysis resulted in high correlations with locomotor activity (r = 0.87), Ta (r = 0.86), and resting heart rate (r = 0.88). The multiple regression among TWI, Ta, and heart rate explained 84% of the variation in TWI [TWI (mL·kg(-1)·d(-1)) = -13.38 + 1.77 × heart rate (beats/min) + 2.11 × Ta (°C); P < 0.001]. Feed restriction had no effect on TWI and TBW. The TBW content was unaffected by season and physical activity. The established regression equation for TBW and body mass can be used to predict TBW from body mass in ponies under field conditions. The comparison of TWI with published data on drinking water intake revealed that ponies had 1.7 to 5.1 times greater total water intakes when other sources of water such as feed and metabolic water were included. The TWI was highly influenced by environmental conditions and metabolic rate. Contrary to expectation, water supply during the cold seasons might be more critical than under summer conditions when water content of grass is high to allow for the compensation of limited availability of drinking water. PMID:23736044

  11. Measurement of (5'R)- and (5'S)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosines in DNA in vivo by liquid chromatography/isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jaruga, Pawel; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz ; Xiao, Yan; Nelson, Bryant C.; Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2009-09-04

    Oxidatively induced DNA lesions (5'R)- and (5'S)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosines (R-cdA and S-cdA) are detectable and accumulate in vivo due to disease states and defects in DNA repair. They block transcription and inhibit gene expression, and may play a role in disease processes. Accurate measurement of these lesions in DNA in vivo is necessary to understand their biological effects. We report on a methodology using liquid chromatography/isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to measure R-cdA and S-cdA in DNA. This methodology permitted the detection of these compounds at a level of 0.1 fmol on-column. Levels of R-cdA and S-cdA in mouse liver DNA amounted to 0.133 {+-} 0.024 and 0.498 {+-} 0.065 molecules/10{sup 7} DNA 2'-deoxynucleosides, respectively. The successful measurement of R-cdA and S-cdA in DNA in vivo suggests that this methodology will be used for understanding of their repair and biological consequences, and that these compounds may be used as putative biomarkers for disease states.

  12. Effects of processing and of storage on the stability of pantothenic acid in sea buckthorn products (Hippophaë rhamnoides L. ssp. rhamnoides) assessed by stable isotope dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Derek; Klaubert, Bernd; Rychlik, Michael; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2007-05-16

    A stable isotope dilution assay for quantification of pantothenic acid in sea buckthorn berries, juice, and concentrate using a four-fold labeled isotopologue of vitamin B5 as the internal standard was adopted using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. Because of a rapid sample clean up procedure without the necessity of external calibration, this methodology permits the accurate analysis of a high number of samples within a short time. Sea buckthorn juice was stored at 25 and 40 degrees C for up to 7 days to determine the effects of storage temperature on the stability of pantothenic acid. Analysis of kinetic data suggested that the degradation follows a first-order model. The results of the experiments showed that storage of sea buckthorn juice for 7 days at ambient temperature (25 degrees C) already resulted in a significant degradation of pantothenic acid of about 18%. The processing effects of juice production and subsequent concentration revealed a decrease of about 6-7% in the juice and of 23% in the juice concentrate. PMID:17447792

  13. Development of a stable isotope dilution LC-MS assay for the quantitation of multiple polyethylene glycol (PEG) homologues to be used in permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Lichtenegger, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-09-15

    A new quantitation method based on a multiple stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) was developed for polyethylene glycol (PEG) homologues from PEG mixtures with average molecular weights (MW) of 400, 1500, 3000 and 4000Da in urine. Seven [(13)C4(2)H4] and two [(13)C8(2)H8]PEG homologues were synthesized and served as labelled internal standards for SIDA. PEG oligomers were resolved by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) in multiple ion (MI) scan modus. Very low limits of detection (LODs) in a range of 0.4-12ng/mL were achieved for the single homologues. Higher PEG homologues showed increased LODs and LOQs and less effective recovery (77-87%) than PEG with lower molecular masses (95-121%). Precision (relative standard deviation) varied between 3 and 13% and showed no dependence of the chain length. The method was successfully applied to human and mice urine samples. Beside an accurate quantitation of single PEG homologues it was possible to show an alteration in the MW distribution in urine samples compared to the dosed PEG solutions. The highest MW, with which a PEG can pass the intestinal wall (so called "cut off") for humans appeared to be higher than for mice. PMID:26279010

  14. Quantification of DNA damage products resulting from deamination, oxidation and reaction with products of lipid peroxidation by liquid chromatography isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taghizadeh, Koli; McFaline, Jose L.; Pang, Bo; Sullivan, Matthew; Dong, Min; Plummer, Elaine; Dedon, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of damage products as biomarkers of inflammation has been hampered by a poor understanding of the chemical biology of inflammation, the lack of sensitive analytical methods, and a focus on single chemicals as surrogates for inflammation. To overcome these problems, we developed a general and sensitive liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method to quantify, in a single DNA sample, the nucleoside forms of seven DNA lesions reflecting the range of chemistries associated with inflammation: 2?-deoxyuridine, 2?-deoxyxanthosine, and 2?-deoxyinosine from nitrosative deamination; 8-oxo-2?-deoxyguanosine from oxidation; and 1,N2-etheno-2?-deoxyguanosine, 1,N6-etheno-2?-deoxyadenosine, and 3,N4-etheno-2?-deoxycytidine arising from reaction of DNA with lipid peroxidation products. Using DNA purified from cells or tissues under conditions that minimize artifacts, individual nucleosides are purified by HPLC and quantified by isotope-dilution, electrospray ionization LC/MS-MS. The method can be applied to other DNA damage products and requires 4-6 days to complete depending upon the number of samples. PMID:18714297

  15. Proficiency testing for determination of pesticide residues in soybean: comparison of assigned values from participants' results and isotope-dilution mass spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Yarita, Takashi; Otake, Takamitsu; Aoyagi, Yoshie; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency testing (PT) for the determination of pesticide residues in soybean samples was organized by the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ). The candidate certified reference material, NMIJ CRM 7509-a, that was prepared from the raw soybeans containing target pesticides (diazinon, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, and permethrin) was used as the test sample. Forty participants submitted two sets of analytical results along with the details of the analytical method and conditions they applied. Two types of assigned values were established for each target pesticide: one was derived from the analytical results of the participants, and the other was provided from the analytical results by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The latter values were 7.4-16% higher than the former values, plausibly because the analytical values from the IDMS measurements were not affected by the recovery ratio of the target pesticides during the analytical process. Thus, two kinds of z-scores were calculated for individual participants using the corresponding assigned values: one (z1-score) showed the relative performance score for the present PT and the other (z2-score) could be used for evaluation of the trueness of their analytical methods. PMID:25476308

  16. A novel approach for high sensitive determination of sulfur mustard by derivatization and isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zong, Cheng; Nie, Zhiyong; Guo, Lei; Xie, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    A new isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determination of sulfur mustard (SM) has been developed using a direct chemical derivatization method by nucleophile potassium thioacetate (PTA) in aqueous solution. The reaction conditions for derivatization, such as reaction temperature, time, solvent and concentration of PTA, were optimized for high performance. Reversed phase liquid chromatography was suitable for analysis of such a PTA derivatized SM in complex environmental samples. Compared with other conventional gas chromatography or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for direct detection on SM, better sensitivity and selectivity were achieved by this direct derivatization and LC-MS/MS method, where SM can be detected as low as 0.05 ng/mL in acetonitrile. The linear range was from 0.1 to 1000 ng/mL. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the intra-day precision was less than 11.8%, and RSD of the inter-day precision was less than 12.3%. The whole procedure for both derivatization and analysis was quick and simple, and the total time was less than 1h. This established method has been successfully employed for determination of spiking samples both in water and soil. A detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL was achieved for river water, while the SM in soil sample could be detected at 0.1 ng/g. PMID:25476305

  17. Direct determination of fatty acid esters of 3-chloro-1, 2-propanediol in edible vegetable oils by isotope dilution - ultra high performance liquid chromatography - triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Heli; Chen, Dawei; Miao, Hong; Zhao, Yunfeng; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Yongning

    2015-09-01

    A selective and sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography - triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method coupled with matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) extraction was developed for the direct determination of fatty acid esters of 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD esters) in edible vegetable oils. The method integrated the isotope dilution technique, MSPD extraction and UHPLC - MS/MS analysis with multi-reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Matrix-matched calibration curves showed good linearity within the range of 0.01-10mgL(-1) with the correlation coefficient not less than 0.999. Limits of detection (LODs) and limit of quantification (LOQs) of the 3-MCPD esters fell into the range of 0.0001-0.02mgkg(-1) and 0.0004-0.05mgkg(-1), respectively. The recoveries for the spiked extra virgin olive oils ranged from 94.4% to 108.3%, with the relative standard deviations (RSD) ranging from 0.6% to 10.5%. The method was applied for the oil sample (T2642) of the official Food Analysis Performance Assessment Scheme (FAPAS) in 2014 and other real samples from supermarket, and the results showed that the present method was comparative to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method based on the improved German Society for Fat Science (DGF) standard method C-III 18 (09) except for palm oil. PMID:26239698

  18. Studies on the analysis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry using enzyme-assisted derivatisation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Khalik, Jonas; Crick, Peter J.; Carter, Graham D.; Makin, Hugh L.; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The total serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamins D (25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2) is currently used as an indicator of vitamins D status. Vitamins D insufficiency is claimed to be associated with multiple diseases, thus accurate and precise reference methods for the quantification of 25-hydroxyvitamins D are needed. Here we present a novel enzyme-assisted derivatisation method for the analysis of vitamins D metabolites in adult serum utilising 25-[26,26,26,27,27,27-2H6]hydroxyvitamin D3 as the internal standard. Extraction of 25-hydroxyvitamins D from serum is performed with acetonitrile, which is shown to be more efficient than ethanol. Cholesterol oxidase is used to oxidize the 3?-hydroxy group in the vitamins D metabolites followed by derivatisation of the newly formed 3-oxo group with Girard P reagent. 17?-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 is shown to oxidize selectively the 3?-hydroxy group in the 3?-hydroxy epimer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Quantification is achieved by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Recovery experiments for 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 performed on adult human serum give recovery of 102–106%. Furthermore in addition to 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and other uncharacterised dihydroxy metabolites, were detected in adult human serum. PMID:24486315

  19. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of the Non-cytotoxic allo-Tenuazonic Acid in Tomato Products by Stable Isotope Dilution HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hickert, Sebastian; Krug, Isabel; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-12-23

    Tenuazonic acid (1) is a mycotoxin produced mainly by fungi of the genus Alternaria. It occurs in a variety of agricultural products. allo-Tenuazonic acid (2) is an isomer of 1 that is not chromatographically separated from 1 in most analytical methods. Therefore, both isomers are quantitated as a sum parameter. In this study a QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) based stable isotope dilution HPLC-MS/MS method including the chromatographic separation of both isomers was developed and applied to 20 tomato products from the German market. All products showed contamination with both toxins. 1 was found in a range from 5.3 ± 0.1 to 550 ± 15 ?g/kg (average = 120 ?g/kg) and 2 in a range from 1.5 ± 0.4- to 270 ± 0.8 ?g/kg (average = 58 ?g/kg). 2 represents 7.0-44% of the sum of both isomers (average = 29%). This is the first reported occurrence of 2 in food samples. To evaluate and compare the cytotoxicities of 1 and 2, both compounds were isolated from a synthetic racemic mixture. 1 showed moderate cytotoxic effects on HT-29 cells starting at 100 ?M, whereas 2 exhibited no activity. 2 was not produced in liquid cultures of Alternaria alternata in yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium, but could be detected in small amounts in tomato puree inoculated with the fungus. PMID:26633086

  20. Double spike isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS for evaluation of mercury species transformation in real fish samples using ultrasound-assisted extraction.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Mirat, Manuela; de la Hinojosa, M Ignacia Martín; Alonso, J Ignacio García

    2012-08-29

    Sample preparation continues being a key factor to obtain fast and reliable quantification of Hg species. Assisted procedures enhance the efficiency and reduce the extraction time; however, collateral species transformations have been observed. Moreover, differential interconversions have been observed even between similar matrixes, which introduce an important uncertainty for real sample analysis. Trying to minimize Hg species transformations, we have tested a soft ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure. Species quantification and transformations have been evaluated using double spike isotope dilution analysis (IDA) together with gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS) for a CRM material (Tort-2) and shark and swordfish muscle samples. Optimum extraction solution and sonication time led to quantitative extraction and accurate determination of MeHg and IHg in a short time, although different behaviors regarding species preservation were observed depending on the sample. Negligible species transformations were observed in the analysis of the CRM, while a small but significant demethylation factor was observed in the case of real samples. In comparison with other extraction procedures, species transformations became smaller, and fewer differences between fish species were found. Similar results were obtained for fresh and lyophilized samples of both fish samples, which permit one to analyze the fresh sample directly and save time in the sample preparation step. The high grade of species preservation and the affordability of the extraction procedure allow one to obtain accurate determinations even for routine laboratories using quantification techniques, which do not estimate species transformations. PMID:22827829

  1. Measurement of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate in plant leaves by isotope dilution. [Spinacea oleracea; Triticum aestivum; Arabidopsis thaliana; Maize; Phaseolus vulgaris; Petunia hybrida

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.D.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1991-05-01

    The level of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) in leaves of 12 species was determined by an isotope dilution assay. {sup 14}C-labeled standard was synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C)carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate using acid phosphatase, and was added at the initial point of leaf extraction. Leaf CA1P was purified and its specific activity determined. CA1P was found in dark-treated leaves of all species examined, including spinach (Spinacea oleracea), wheat (Triticum aestivum), Arabidopsis thaliana, and maize (Zea mays). The highest amounts were found in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and petunia (Petunia hybrida), which had 1.5 to 1.8 moles CA1P per mole ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase catalytic sites. Most species had intermediate amounts of CA1P (0.2 to 0.8 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). Such intermediate to high levels of CA1P support the hypothesis that CA1P functions in many species as a light-dependent regulator of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and whole leaf photosynthetic CO{sub 2} assimilation. However, CA1P levels in spinach, wheat, and A. thaliana were particularly low (less than 0.09 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). In such species, CA1P does not likely have a significant role in regulating ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but could have a different physiological role.

  2. Simplified method for the determination of Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt in chromitites and other geological materials by isotope dilution ICP-MS and acid digestion.

    PubMed

    Meisel, T; Moser, J; Fellner, N; Wegscheider, W; Schoenberg, R

    2001-03-01

    A method for the determination of low Ru, Pd, Re, Os, Ir and Pt abundances in geological reference materials by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid digestion in a high pressure asher (HPA-S) is presented. The digestion technique is similar to that using Carius tubes but easier to handle and reaches higher temperatures. Osmium can be determined as OsO4 with ICP-MS directly after digestion through a sparging technique. The remaining elements are preconcentrated by means of anion column chromatography. The resin is digested directly without elution leading to high yields but this causes problems if Zr is present at higher levels in the silicate rich materials. The analytical results for international platinum group element (PGE) reference materials, chromitite CHR-Bkg, basalt TDB-1 and gabbro WGB-1, are presented and compared with literature data, demonstrating the validity of the described method. Although higher in concentration, PGEs determined for reference material WGB-1 were worse than for TDB-1 indicating a more inhomogeneous distribution of the platinum group mineral phases. The low PGE abundance chromitite standard, CHR-Bkg, is likely to be homogeneous for Ru, Re, Os and Ir and is recommended as a reference material for the study of chromitites. Detection limits (3s x total procedure blank) range from 0.012 ng (Re and Os) to 0.77 ng (Pt), which could be further improved by applying higher quality acids. PMID:11284333

  3. Determination of Os by isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with the combination of laser ablation to introduce chemically separated geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yali; Ren, Minghao; Xia, Xiaoping; Li, Congying; Sun, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace Os in geological samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with the combination of chemical separation and preconcentration. Samples are digested using aqua regia in Carius tubes, and the Os analyte is converted into volatile OsO4, which is distilled and absorbed with HBr. The HBr solution is concentrated for further Os purification using the microdistillation technique. The purified Os is dissolved in 10 ?l of 0.02% sucrose-0.005% H3PO4 solution and then evaporated on pieces of perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) film, resulting in the formation of a tiny object (< 3 × 104 ?m2 superficial area). Using LA-ICP-MS measurements, the object can give Os signals at least 100 times higher than those provided by routine solution-ICP-MS while successfully avoiding the memory effect. The procedural blank and detection limit in the developed technique are 3.0 pg and 1.8 pg for Os, respectively when 1 g of samples is taken. Reference materials (RM) are analyzed, and their Os concentrations obtained by isotope dilution are comparable to reference or literature values. Based on the individual RM results, the precision is estimated within the range of 0.6 to 9.4% relative standard deviation (RSD), revealing that this method is applicable to the determination of trace Os in geological samples.

  4. Determination of the total and extractable mass fractions of cadmium and lead in mineral feed by using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Emilia; Hoenig, Michel

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the determination of the total and extractable mass fractions of Cd and Pb in mineral feed test sample distributed by the Community Reference Laboratory for Heavy Metals in Feed and Food (CRL-HM), in the frame of the fifth interlaboratory comparison for the European Union National Reference Laboratories (NRL). The developed in this study protocol for the total and extractable mass fractions of Pb and Cd in mineral feed sample is based on isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID ICP-MS). The applied dual spiking approach reduced by 50% the number of analytical steps. The addition of hydrofluoric acid in the digestion step was found necessary to ensure a full decomposition and complete isotope equilibration. Quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer equipped with collision reaction interface (CRI) was employed for the measurements of Cd and Pb. Two methods for the determination of Cd were applied and compared. In the first one the high molybdenum content was reduced by introduction of matrix separation step followed by standard ICP-MS mode measurement, whereas in the second one CRI mode was used for the determination of Cd without preliminary matrix separation. The estimation of the combined uncertainty was performed according to the ISO guidelines. Uncertainty propagation was used as a tool for validation of proposed analytical procedure. Contributions from the correction for moisture content, sample homogeneity, procedural blank, instrumental background and dead time effects were evaluated in both cases. The largest uncertainty contributors for Cd and Pb is due to the within bottle homogeneity of the mineral feed sample - 50.3% and 90% respectively. The IUPAC data for isotope composition are the second major contributor to the combined uncertainty of the result for the total mass fraction of Cd in mineral feed - 43.3%. However, the ID ICP-MS results achieved from the two series of samples (partial and total extraction) were in excellent agreement within uncertainty, irrespective of the method used for extraction. The ID ICP-MS results for the total and extractable mass fractions of Cd and Pb in feed sample were compared with the results obtained with external calibration approach and routinely applied in the daily analytical practice of the Belgium National Reference Laboratory for trace elements in food and feed. PMID:21763806

  5. A Sr-isotopic comparison between thermal waters, rocks, and hydrothermal calcites, Long Valley caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, F.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Brookins, D.C.; Kistler, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr values of thermal waters and hydrothermal calcites of the Long Valley caldera geothermal system are more radiogenic than those of young intracaldera volcanic rocks. Five thermal waters display 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7081-0.7078 but show systematically lighter values from west to east in the direction of lateral flow. We believe the decrease in ratio from west to east signifies increased interaction of deeply circulating thermal water with relatively fresh volcanic rocks filling the caldera depression. All types of pre-, syn-, and post-caldera volcanic rocks in the west and central caldera have (87Sr/86Sr)m between about 0.7060 and 0.7072 and values for Sierra Nevada granodiorites adjacent to the caldera are similar. Sierran pre-intrusive metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks can have considerably higher Sr-isotope ratios (0.7061-0.7246 and 0.7090-0.7250, respectively). Hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks inside the caldera have (87Sr/86Sr)m slightly heavier than their fresh volcanic equivalents and hydrothermal calcites (0.7068-0.7105) occupy a midrange of values between the volcanic/plutonic rocks and the Sierran metamorphic rocks. These data indicate that the Long Valley geothermal reservoir is first equilibrated in a basement complex that contains at least some metasedimentary rocks. Reequilibration of Sr-isotope ratios to lower values occurs in thermal waters as convecting geothermal fluids flow through the isotopically lighter volcanic rocks of the caldera fill. ?? 1991.

  6. Correction of NPL-2013 estimate of the Boltzmann constant for argon isotopic composition and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, Michael; Yang, Inseok; Mark, Darren F.; Underwood, Robin; Sutton, Gavin; Machin, Graham

    2015-10-01

    In 2013, a team from NPL, Cranfield University and SUERC published an estimate of the Boltzmann constant based on precision measurements of the speed of sound in argon. A key component of our results was an estimate of the molar mass of the argon gas used in our measurements. To achieve this we made precision comparison measurements of the isotope ratios found in our experimental argon against the ratios of argon isotopes found in atmospheric air. We then used a previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios to calibrate the relative sensitivity of the mass spectrometer to different argon isotopes. The previous measurement of the atmospheric argon isotope ratios was carried out at KRISS using a mass spectrometer calibrated using argon samples of known isotopic composition, which had been prepared gravimetrically. We report here a new measurement made at KRISS in October 2014, which directly compared a sample of our experimental gas against the same gravimetrically-prepared argon samples. We consider that this direct comparison has to take precedence over our previous more indirect comparison. This measurement implies a molar mass which is 2.73(60) parts in 106 lighter than our 2013 estimate, a shift which is seven times our 2013 estimate of the uncertainty in the molar mass. In this paper we review the procedures used in our 2013 estimate of molar mass; describe the 2014 measurement; highlight some questions raised by the large change in our estimate of molar mass; and describe how we intend to address the inconsistencies between them. We also consider the effect of a new estimate of the low pressure thermal conductivity of argon at 273.16?K. Finally we report our new best estimate of the Boltzmann constant with revised uncertainty, taking account of the new estimates for the molar mass and the thermal conductivity of the argon.

  7. Simultaneous multi-species determination of trimethyllead, monomethylmercury and three butyltin compounds by species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Poperechna, Nataliya; Heumann, Klaus G

    2005-09-01

    An accurate and sensitive multi-species species-specific isotope dilution GC-ICP-MS method was developed for the simultaneous determination of trimethyllead (Me3Pb+), monomethylmercury (MeHg+) and the three butyltin species Bu3Sn+, Bu2Sn2+, and BuSn3+ in biological samples. The method was validated by three biological reference materials (CRM 477, mussel tissue certified for butyltins; CRM 463, tuna fish certified for MeHg+; DORM 2, dogfish muscle certified for MeHg+). Under certain conditions, and with minor modifications of the sample pretreatment procedure, this method could also be transferred to environmental samples such as sediments, as demonstrated by analyzing sediment reference material BCR 646 (freshwater sediment, certified for butyltins). The detection limits of the multi-species GC-ICP-IDMS method for biological samples were 1.4 ng g(-1) for MeHg+, 0.06 ng g(-1) for Me3Pb+, 0.3 ng g(-1) for BuSn3+ and Bu3Sn+, and 1.2 ng g(-1) for Bu2Sn2+. Because of the high relevance of these heavy metal alkyl species to the quality assurance of seafood, the method was also applied to corresponding samples purchased from a supermarket. The methylated lead fraction in these samples, correlated to total lead, varied over a broad range (from 0.01% to 7.6%). On the other hand, the MeHg+ fraction was much higher, normally in the range of 80-100%. Considering that we may expect tighter legislative limitations on MeHg+ levels in seafood in the future, we found the highest methylmercury contents (up to 10.6 microg g(-1)) in two shark samples, an animal which is at the end of the marine food chain, whereas MeHg+ contents of less than 0.2 microg g(-1) were found in most other seafood samples; these results correlate with the idea that MeHg+ is usually of biological origin in the marine environment. The concentration of butyltins and the fraction of the total tin content that is from butyltins strongly depend on possible contamination, due to the exclusively anthropogenic character of these compounds. A broad variation in the butylated tin fraction (in the range of <0.3-49%) was therefore observed in different seafood samples. Corresponding isotope-labeled spike compounds (except for trimethyllead) are commercially available for all of these compounds, and since these can be used in the multi-species species-specific GC-ICP-IDMS method developed here, this technique shows great potential for routine analysis in the future. PMID:16136305

  8. Direct determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in biological materials by solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma-isotope dilution-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gelaude, I; Dams, R; Resano, M; Vanhaecke, F; Moens, L

    2002-08-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SS-EIV-ICPMS) for the direct and simultaneous determination of methylmercury and inorganic mercury in biological materials. The main advantage of this fast and sensitive method is that no sample preparation is required. In this way, the sample throughput can be considerably increased, problems of contamination and analyte losses are kept to a minimum and, even more important, the original chemical form of the different analyte species in the solid samples is preserved. To achieve this goal, a solid sample is inserted into a graphite furnace of the boat-in-tube type and is subsequently submitted to an appropriate temperature program, leading to the separate vaporization of methylmercury and inorganic mercury, which are transported into the ICP by means of an argon carrier gas. The separation was accomplished within 75 s. For the quantification of the two peaks, species-unspecific isotope dilution was used. For this purpose, a stable flow of argon loaded with gaseous Hg isotopically enriched in 200Hg was generated using a permeation tube that was constructed in-house. Its emission rate was determined by collecting the mercury released during a given time interval on a gold-coated silica absorber, after which the amount collected was released by heating of the absorber and determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). A reference material from the Canadian National Research Council (NRC) (TORT-2) was used to assess the accuracy of the method. For the application of the method to samples with diverse mercury contents, the spike/sample ratio can be optimized by varying the emission rate of the permeation tube simply by adapting its temperature. To prove the feasibility of this approach, two reference materials (BCR 463 and DORM-2) with a methylmercury content more than 10 times higher than that of TORT-2 were also analyzed. The detection limits obtained for 1 mg of sample (2 ng g(-1) and 6 ng g(-1) for methylmercury and inorganic mercury, respectively) were found to be sufficiently low for this kind of application and are competitive when compared to other techniques. PMID:12175173

  9. Essentials of iron, chromium, and calcium isotope analysis of natural materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fantle, M.S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of isotopes to understand the behavior of metals in geological, hydrological, and biological systems has rapidly expanded in recent years. One of the mass spectrometric techniques used to analyze metal isotopes is thermal ionization mass spectrometry, or TIMS. While TIMS has been a useful analytical technique for the measurement of isotopic composition for decades and TIMS instruments are widely distributed, there are significant difficulties associated with using TIMS to analyze isotopes of the lighter alkaline earth elements and transition metals. Overcoming these difficulties to produce relatively long-lived and stable ion beams from microgram-sized samples is a non-trivial task. We focus here on TIMS analysis of three geologically and environmentally important elements (Fe, Cr, and Ca) and present an in-depth look at several key aspects that we feel have the greatest potential to trouble new users. Our discussion includes accessible descriptions of different analytical approaches and issues, including filament loading procedures, collector cup configurations, peak shapes and interferences, and the use of isotopic double spikes and related error estimation. Building on previous work, we present quantitative simulations, applied specifically in this study to Fe and Ca, that explore the effects of (1) time-variable evaporation of isotopically homogeneous spots from a filament and (2) interferences on the isotope ratios derived from a double spike subtraction routine. We discuss how and to what extent interferences at spike masses, as well as at other measured masses, affect the double spike-subtracted isotope ratio of interest (44Ca/40Ca in the case presented, though a similar analysis can be used to evaluate 56Fe/54Fe and 53Cr/52Cr). The conclusions of these simulations are neither intuitive nor immediately obvious, making this examination useful for those who are developing new methodologies. While all simulations are carried out in the context of a specific isotope system, it should be noted that the same methods can be used to evaluate any isotope system of interest. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  10. New Measurement of the Thermal-capture Cross Section for the Minor Isotope 180W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Révay, Zs.; Basunia, M. S.; Belgya, T.; Escher, J. E.; Krti?ka, M.; Summers, N. C.; Sleaford, B. W.

    2014-05-01

    Tungsten occurs naturally in five isotopic forms; four of them, 182,183,184,186W, contribute significantly to the overall elemental abundance (with each contribution between 14 and 30 %), whereas 180W only occurs at the 0.12 % level and is a minor isotope. Given its very low abundance, a precise measurement of the thermal neutron-capture cross section is extremely challenging. This work reports a new value of the thermal neutron-capture cross section from a direct 180W(n,?) measurement using a guided-thermal beam at the Budapest Research Reactor, incident upon an 11.35 % enriched sample to induce prompt ?-ray activation within the sample. The thermal-capture cross section was determined as the sum of experimentally observed partial neutron-capture ?-ray cross sections feeding the ground state directly, and, the modeled contribution from the (unobserved) ground-state feeding predicted from statistical-model calculations using the Monte Carlo program DICEBOX. The preliminary value of the 180W(n,?) thermal neutron-capture cross section is 20.5(42) b.

  11. Studies on the analysis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry using enzyme-assisted derivatisation

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Khalik, Jonas; Crick, Peter J.; Carter, Graham D.; Makin, Hugh L.; Wang, Yuqin; Griffiths, William J.

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • New method for the analysis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} exploiting Girard P derivatisation. • Method also applicable to vitamin D{sub 3}, 1?,25- and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. • By modification of the method 3-epi-25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} can also be analysed. - Abstract: The total serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamins D (25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 2}) is currently used as an indicator of vitamins D status. Vitamins D insufficiency is claimed to be associated with multiple diseases, thus accurate and precise reference methods for the quantification of 25-hydroxyvitamins D are needed. Here we present a novel enzyme-assisted derivatisation method for the analysis of vitamins D metabolites in adult serum utilising 25-[26,26,26,27,27,27-{sup 2}H{sub 6}]hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} as the internal standard. Extraction of 25-hydroxyvitamins D from serum is performed with acetonitrile, which is shown to be more efficient than ethanol. Cholesterol oxidase is used to oxidize the 3?-hydroxy group in the vitamins D metabolites followed by derivatisation of the newly formed 3-oxo group with Girard P reagent. 17?-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 10 is shown to oxidize selectively the 3?-hydroxy group in the 3?-hydroxy epimer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}. Quantification is achieved by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Recovery experiments for 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} performed on adult human serum give recovery of 102–106%. Furthermore in addition to 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and other uncharacterised dihydroxy metabolites, were detected in adult human serum.

  12. Selenium speciation and bioavailability in biofortified products using species-unspecific isotope dilution and reverse phase ion pairing-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, J K; Lyons, G H; Karkkainen, M P

    2008-03-12

    In some regions of the world, where the bioavailability of selenium (Se) in soil is low and/or declining (e.g., due to use of high-sulfur fertilizers), there is increased risk of adverse affects on animals and human health. In recent years, increased research attention has focused on understanding the relationships between Se contents in foods and supplements and their nutritional benefits for animal and humans. The objective of this study was to use a species-unspecific isotope dilution and reverse phase ion pairing-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry techniques for the identification and quantification of Se species in biofortified grains (i.e., wheat and triticale), flour, and wheat biscuits. The information on Se species was used to gain an understanding of the bioavailability of Se in biofortified and process-fortified wheat biscuits used in a clinical trail. The major Se species identified in biofortified and process-fortified samples were selenomethionine (76-85%) and selenomethionine selenoxide (51-60%), respectively. Total plasma Se concentrations in the biofortified Se exposure group were found to increase throughout the 6 month trial period (mean=122 microg L(-1) at 0 months to 194 microg L(-1) at 6 months). In contrast, the trial group exposed to process-fortified Se biscuits showed little increase in mean total Se plasma concentrations until 4 months of exposure (mean=122 microg L(-1) at 0 months to 140 microg L(-1) at 4 months) that remained constant until the end of the trial period (mean=140 microg L(-1) at 4 months to 138 microg L(-1) at 6 months). The difference in total Se plasma concentrations may be due to the presence and bioavailability of different Se species in biofortified and process-fortified biscuits. An understanding of Se speciation in foods enables better understanding of pathways and their potential benefits for animals and humans. PMID:18254593

  13. Development and validation of a stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of bisphenols in ready-made meals.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Wenzl, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Due to their growing consumption, ready-made meals are a major dietary component for many people in today's society, representing an important potential route of human exposure to several food contaminants. The recent restrictions in the use of bisphenol A have led the plastic industry to look for alternative chemicals, most of them belonging to the same family of p,p'-bisphenols. The aim of the current work was to develop and validate a method based on stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of bisphenol A and its main analogs - bisphenol S, 4,4'-sulfonylbis(2-methylphenol), bisphenol F, bisphenol E, bisphenol B, bisphenol Z, bisphenol AF, bisphenol AP, tetrabromobisphenol A and bisphenol P - in solid foodstuffs, and particularly in ready-made meals. Extraction was carried out by ultrasound-assisted extraction after sample disruption with sand. A selective solid-phase extraction procedure was then applied to reduce potential matrix interferences. Derivatization of bisphenols with pyridine-3-sulfonyl chloride increased their ionization efficiency by electrospray ionization. Validation of the proposed method was performed in terms of selectivity, matrix effects, linearity, precision, measurement uncertainty, trueness and limits of detection. Satisfactory repeatability and intermediate precision were obtained; the related relative standard deviations were ?7.8% and ?10%, respectively. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) was below 17% for all bisphenol analogs and the trueness of the method was demonstrated by spike recovery experiments. Low limits of detection, in the range from 0.025?gkg(-1) to 0.140?gkg(-1), were obtained for all compounds. To demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method, it was eventually applied to several ready-made meals purchased from different supermarkets in Belgium. PMID:26456223

  14. Simultaneous Measurement of Tabun, Sarin, Soman, Cyclosarin, VR, VX, and VM Adducts to Tyrosine in Blood Products by Isotope Dilution UHPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Brian S.; Pantazides, Brooke G.; Quiñones-González, Jennifer; Garton, Joshua W.; Carter, Melissa D.; Perez, Jonas W.; Watson, Caroline M.; Tomcik, Dennis J.; Crenshaw, Michael D.; Brewer, Bobby N.; Riches, James R.; Stubbs, Sarah J.; Read, Robert W.; Evans, Ronald A.; Thomas, Jerry D.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a new specific, sensitive, and rapid stable isotope dilution method for the simultaneous detection of the organophosphorus nerve agents (OPNAs) tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), cyclosarin (GF), VR, VX, and VM adducts to tyrosine (Tyr). Serum, plasma, and lysed whole blood samples (50 µL) were prepared by protein precipitation followed by digestion with Pronase. Specific Tyr adducts were isolated from the digest by a single solid phase extraction (SPE) step, and the analytes were separated by reversed-phase ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) gradient elution in less than 2 min. Detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer using time-triggered selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in positive electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. The calibration range was characterized from 0.100–50.0 ng/mL for GB– and VR– Tyr and 0.250–50.0 ng/mL for GA–, GD–, GF–, and VX/VM–Tyr (R2 ? 0.995). Inter- and intra-assay precision had coefficients of variation of ?17 and ?10%, respectively, and the measured concentration accuracies of spiked samples were within 15% of the targeted value for multiple spiking levels. The limit of detection was calculated to be 0.097, 0.027, 0.018, 0.074, 0.023, and 0.083 ng/mL for GA–, GB–, GD–, GF–, VR–, and VX/VM–Tyr, respectively. A convenience set of 96 serum samples with no known nerve agent exposure was screened and revealed no baseline values or potential interferences. This method provides a simple and highly specific diagnostic tool that may extend the time postevent that a confirmation of nerve agent exposure can be made with confidence. PMID:25286390

  15. Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Amir; Heidler, Jochen; Halden, Rolf U. . E-mail: rhalden@jhsph.edu

    2007-01-15

    The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (P<0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) than those of samples taken upstream (12+/-15ng/L). Compared to surface water, mean TCC concentrations found in dried, primary sludge obtained from municipal sewage treatment plants in five states were six orders of magnitude greater (19,300+/-7100{mu}g/kg). Several river samples contained a co-contaminant, identified based on its chromatographic retention time, molecular base ion, and MS/MS fragmentation behavior as 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide (DCC; CAS-bar 1219-99-4). In addition to TCC and DCC, municipal sludge contained a second co-contaminant, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorocarbanilide (TetraCC; CAS-bar 4300-43-0). Both newly detected compounds were present as impurities (0.2%{sub w/w} each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC.

  16. Development of three stable isotope dilution assays for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food.

    PubMed

    Granvogl, Michael

    2014-02-12

    Three stable isotope dilution assays (SIDAs) were developed for the quantitation of (E)-2-butenal (crotonaldehyde) in heat-processed edible fats and oils as well as in food using synthesized [¹³C?]-crotonaldehyde as internal standard. First, a direct headspace GC-MS method, followed by two indirect methods on the basis of derivatization with either pentafluorophenylhydrazine (GC-MS) or 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (LC-MS/MS), was developed. All methods are also suitable for the quantitation of acrolein using the standard [¹³C?]-acrolein. Applying these three methods on five different types of fats and oils varying in their fatty acid compositions revealed significantly varying crotonaldehyde concentrations for the different samples, but nearly identical quantitative data for all methods. Formed amounts of crotonaldehyde were dependent not only on the type of oil, e.g., 0.29-0.32 mg/kg of coconut oil or 33.9-34.4 mg/kg of linseed oil after heat-processing for 24 h at 180 °C, but also on the applied temperature and time. The results indicated that the concentration of formed crotonaldehyde seemed to be correlated with the amount of linolenic acid in the oils. Furthermore, the formation of crotonaldehyde was compared to that of its homologue acrolein, demonstrating that acrolein was always present in higher amounts in heat-processed oils, e.g., 12.3 mg of crotonaldehyde/kg of rapeseed oil in comparison to 23.4 mg of acrolein/kg after 24 h at 180 °C. Finally, crotonaldehyde was also quantitated in fried food, revealing concentrations from 12 to 25 ?g/kg for potato chips and from 8 to 19 ?g/kg for donuts, depending on the oil used. PMID:24428123

  17. Development of SI-traceable C-peptide certified reference material NMIJ CRM 6901-a using isotope-dilution mass spectrometry-based amino acid analyses.

    PubMed

    Kinumi, Tomoya; Goto, Mari; Eyama, Sakae; Kato, Megumi; Kasama, Takeshi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2012-07-01

    A certified reference material (CRM) is a higher-order calibration material used to enable a traceable analysis. This paper describes the development of a C-peptide CRM (NMIJ CRM 6901-a) by the National Metrology Institute of Japan using two independent methods for amino acid analysis based on isotope-dilution mass spectrometry. C-peptide is a 31-mer peptide that is utilized for the evaluation of ?-cell function in the pancreas in clinical testing. This CRM is a lyophilized synthetic peptide having the human C-peptide sequence, and contains deamidated and pyroglutamylated forms of C-peptide. By adding water (1.00 ± 0.01) g into the vial containing the CRM, the C-peptide solution in 10 mM phosphate buffer saline (pH 6.6) is reconstituted. We assigned two certified values that represent the concentrations of total C-peptide (mixture of C-peptide, deamidated C-peptide, and pyroglutamylated C-peptide) and C-peptide. The certified concentration of total C-peptide was determined by two amino acid analyses using pre-column derivatization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and hydrophilic chromatography-mass spectrometry following acid hydrolysis. The certified concentration of C-peptide was determined by multiplying the concentration of total C-peptide by the ratio of the relative area of C-peptide to that of the total C-peptide measured by liquid chromatography. The certified value of C-peptide (80.7 ± 5.0) mg/L represents the concentration of the specific entity of C-peptide; on the other hand, the certified value of total C-peptide, (81.7 ± 5.1) mg/L can be used for analyses that does not differentiate deamidated and pyroglutamylated C-peptide from C-peptide itself, such as amino acid analyses and immunochemical assays. PMID:22610603

  18. Determination of agmatine using isotope dilution UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry: application to the characterization of the arginine decarboxylase pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Dalluge, Joseph J; McCurtain, Jennifer L; Gilbertsen, Adam J; Kalstabakken, Kyle A; Williams, Bryan J

    2015-07-01

    A method has been developed for the direct determination of agmatine in bacterial culture supernatants using isotope dilution ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Agmatine determination in bacterial supernatants is comprised of spiking culture or isolate supernatants with a fixed concentration of uniformly labeled (13)C5,(15)N4-agmatine (synthesized by decarboxylation of uniformly labeled (13)C6,(15)N4-arginine using arginine decarboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as an internal standard, followed by derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBDF) to improve the reversed-phase chromatographic retention characteristics of agmatine, as well as the selectivity and sensitivity of UPLC-MS/MS detection of this amine in complex biologically derived mixtures. Intrasample precisions for measurement of agmatine in culture supernatants average 4.1% (relative standard deviation). Calibration curves are linear over the range 5 nM to 10 ?M, and the detection limit is estimated at 1.5 nM. To demonstrate the utility of the method, agmatine levels in supernatants of overnight cultures of wild-type (UCBPP-PA14), as well as arginine decarboxylase and agmatine deiminase mutant strains of P. aeruginosa strain UCBPP-PA14 were measured. This method verified that the mutant strains are lacking the specific metabolic capabilities to produce and metabolize agmatine. In addition, measurement of agmatine in supernatants of a panel of clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis revealed that three of the P. aeruginosa isolates hyper-secreted agmatine into the supernatant, hypothesized to be a result of a mutation in the aguA gene. Because agmatine has potential inflammatory activities in the lung, this phenotype may be a virulence factor for P. aeruginosa in the lung environment of cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:25957842

  19. Validation and uncertainties evaluation of an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS for the quantification of drug residues in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Brieudes, V; Lardy-Fontan, S; Lalere, B; Vaslin-Reimann, S; Budzinski, H

    2016-01-01

    The present work describes the development and validation of a reference method conducted at the French National Institute of Metrology (LNE) for the quantitative determination of psychoactive compounds in the dissolved fraction of surface waters. More specifically an isotope dilution-SPE-LC-MS/MS based method has been implemented for the characterization of a broad range of analytes belonging to different classes of psychotropic drugs such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants, stimulants, opiates and opioids, anticonvulsants, anti-dementia drugs, analgesics as well as the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in the low ngL(-1) range of concentration. Full validation of the method was performed following procedures described by the French standard NF T90-210. Limits of quantification between 0.14 and 3.54ngL(-1) were obtained. Method recoveries from 71 to 123% were observed with standard deviation below 10% in intermediate precision conditions. Accuracy was determined for every compound: measurement errors were between -4 and +1% and standard deviations in intermediate precision conditions were included within a 1-9% interval. Finally, measurement uncertainties were evaluated following the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). Expanded uncertainties (k=2) ranged from 2% for carbamazepine, EDDP (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine) and venlafaxine to 17% for diazepam. The validated method was implemented to Seine river surface waters demonstrating its fitness for purpose. All compounds were detected and 22 out of 25 analytes were quantified. More specifically, measured concentration ranged from 0.39ngL(-1) for MDMA (3,4-methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine) to 182ngL(-1) for gabapentine. PMID:26695245

  20. The effects of liquid immiscibility and thermal diffusion on oxygen isotopes in silicate liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyser, T. K.; Lesher, C. E.; Walker, D.

    Differences between the ?18O values of Si- and Fe-rich immiscible liquids in the system Fe2SiO4-KAlSi2O6-SiO2 (Fa-Lc-Q) in isothermal experiments at 0.1MPa have been determined experimentally to be 0.6 permil. The observed partition of 18O into the Si-rich liquid is consistent with previous experience with the preferential partition of 18O into Si-rich minerals in isothermal equilibrium with minerals of less polymerized structure. Crystallochemical principles affect the distribution of oxygen isotopes in coexisting isothermal liquids in the same way as they apply to isothermally coexisting crystals. The effects of Soret (thermal) diffusion on the distribution of oxygen isotopes in silicate liquids above the solvus in the system Fa-Lc-Q under conditions of an imposed temperature gradient of ca. 250°C over 4mm and at 2GPa have also been investigated experimentally. Both the magnitude and the direction of separation of oxygen isotopes as a result of Soret diffusion are unexpected. For each of the silicate liquids, the cold end of the charge is enriched in 18O by up to 4.7 permil, and the highest ?18O values are associated with the most silica-poor compositions. The distribution of oxygen isotopes appears to be similar in each liquid, regardless of their chemical compositions, which is in contrast to the behaviour of cations whose distributions are compositionally dependent and characterized by strong crystallochemical effects wherein network-forming species such as Si and Al separate to the hot end and Mg, Fe and Ca are segregated preferentially to the cold end. Structural units in the melts are evidently less selective between oxygen isotopes than between cations, because oxygen redistribution over all possible sites in these units proceeds according to mass. Self-diffusion coefficients of oxygen in basaltic liquids estimated from the Soret experiments are in accord with those from other isotope tracer experiments, and comparable to those of Si. The possible effects of Soret diffusion on the oxygen isotopic composition of metasomatic veins in the mantle are examined in light of these data, and indicate that decay of the thermal gradients in the veins exceeds that of the diffusion of oxygen needed to produce variations in the ?18O values of mantle minerals. Variations in oxygen isotope ratios in most natural systems as a result of Soret effects are unlikely.

  1. OXYGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF THE ALLENDE TYPE C CAIs: EVIDENCE FOR ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE DURING NEBULAR MELTING AND ASTEROIDAL THERMAL METAMORPHISM

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, A N; Chaussidon, M; Yurimoto, H; Sakamoto, N; Nagashima, K; Hutcheon, I D; MacPherson, G J

    2008-02-21

    Based on the mineralogy and petrography, coarse-grained, igneous, anorthite-rich (Type C) calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende have been recently divided into three groups: (i) CAIs with melilite and Al,Ti-diopside of massive and lacy textures (coarse grains with numerous rounded inclusions of anorthite) in a fine-grained anorthite groundmass (6-1-72, 100, 160), (ii) CAI CG5 with massive melilite, Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite, and (iii) CAIs associated with chondrule material: either containing chondrule fragments in their peripheries (ABC, TS26) or surrounded by chondrule-like, igneous rims (93) (Krot et al., 2007a,b). Here, we report in situ oxygen isotopic measurements of primary (melilite, spinel, Al,Ti-diopside, anorthite) and secondary (grossular, monticellite, forsterite) minerals in these CAIs. Spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -25{per_thousand} to -20{per_thousand}), massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -20{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}) and fine-grained anorthite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -15{per_thousand} to -2{per_thousand}) in 100, 160 and 6-1-72 are {sup 16}O-enriched relative spinel and coarse-grained Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite in ABC, 93 and TS26 ({Delta}{sup 17}O ranges from -20{per_thousand} to -15{per_thousand}, from -15{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}, and from -5{per_thousand} to 0{per_thousand}, respectively). In 6-1-72, massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside grains are {sup 16}O-depleted ({Delta}{sup 17}O {approx} -13{per_thousand}) relative to spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -23{per_thousand}). Melilite is the most {sup 16}O-depleted mineral in all Allende Type C CAIs. In CAI 100, melilite and secondary grossular, monticellite and forsterite (minerals replacing melilite) are similarly {sup 16}O-depleted, whereas grossular in CAI 160 is {sup 16}O-enriched ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -10{per_thousand} to -6{per_thousand}) relative to melilite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -5{per_thousand} to -3{per_thousand}). We infer that CAIs 100, 160 and CG5 experienced melting in an {sup 16}O-rich ({Delta}{sup 17}O < -20{per_thousand}) nebular gas in the CAI-forming region. The Type C and Type-B-like portions of CAI 6-1-72 experienced melting in an {sup 16}O-depleted ({Delta}{sup 17}O {ge} -13{per_thousand}) nebular gas. CAIs ABC, TS26 and 93 experienced isotopic exchange during re-melting in the presence of an {sup 16}O-poor ({Delta}{sup 17}O {ge} -10{per_thousand}) nebular gas in the chondrule-forming region(s). Subsequently, Allende Type C CAIs experienced post-crystallization isotopic exchange with an {sup 16}O-poor reservoir that affected largely melilite and anorthite. Because pseudomorphic replacement of lacy melilite by grossular, monticellite and forsterite occurred during thermal metamorphism, some oxygen isotopic exchange of melilite and anorthite must have continued after formation of these secondary minerals. We suggest that some or all oxygen isotopic exchange in melilite and anorthite occurred during fluid-assisted thermal metamorphism on the CV parent asteroid. Similar processes may have also affected melilite and anorthite of CAIs in metamorphosed CO chondrites.

  2. ISOTOPES

    E-print Network

    Lederer, C. Michael

    2013-01-01

    nuclear electric power generation involves a number of isotope applications and accounts for most of the separated isotope production.nuclear power industry on a toll basis. According to equations 1.1, 1 .2, and 1.14, the production

  3. Constraints on ocean circulation at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum from neodymium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, A. N.; Haley, B. A.; Tripati, A. K.; Frank, M.

    2015-06-01

    Global warming during the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ~55 million years ago (Ma) coincided with a massive release of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system, as indicated by carbon isotopic data. Previous studies have argued for a role for changing ocean circulation, possibly as a trigger or response to climatic changes. We use neodymium (Nd) isotopic data to reconstruct short high-resolution records of deep-water circulation across the PETM. These records are derived by reductively leaching sediments from seven globally distributed sites and comparing data with published data from fossil fish debris to reconstruct past deep ocean circulation across the PETM. The Nd data for the leachates are interpreted to be consistent with previous studies that have used fish teeth and benthic foraminiferal ?13C to constrain regions of convection. There is some evidence from combining Nd isotope and ?13C records that the three major ocean basins may not have had substantial exchanges of deep waters. If the isotopic data are interpreted within this framework, then the observed pattern may be explained if the strength of overturning in each basin varied distinctly over the PETM, resulting in differences in deep-water aging gradients between basins. Results are consistent with published interpretations from proxy data and model simulations that suggest modulation of overturning circulation had an important role for global recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system after the PETM.

  4. Deuterium isotopic exchangeability of resin and amber at low thermal stress under hydrous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Tappert, R.; Wolfe, A. P.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrous deuterium-exchange experiments have shown that a significant fraction of the original D/H composition of bulk kerogens, bitumens and expelled oils may participate in isotopic exchange reactions during burial diagenesis. However, it is unknown to what extent plant-derived secondary metabolites, namely resins and their fossil counterpart amber, exchange hydrogen isotopes following their biosynthesis. This situation hinders the application of resin D/H measurements in paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Here, we assess explicitly hydrogen exchange in resins and ambers using a series of immersion experiments in deuterated (D-enriched) waters over a period of several months at several temperatures. We are especially interested in assessing whether significant H-isotopic exchange occurs between resins and meteoric waters during early thermal maturation and polymerization. At 90°C, equivalent to ~3km of burial in most diagenetic regimes, modern conifer and angiosperm resins have an average post-metabolic H exchange of 4.6%, compared to only 1.1% for mature, polymerized ambers. At 55°C the degree of exchange is considerably lower: 1.9% for resins and 0.6% for ambers. These results indicate that most D/H isotopic exchange occurs prior to polymerization reactions, thereby confirming that D/H measurements from amber constitute a potentially sensitive proxy for environmental change.

  5. Disturbance of isotope systematics in meteorites during shock and thermal metamorphism and implications for shergottite chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, A M; Borg, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-12-10

    Shock and thermal metamorphism of meteorites from differentiated bodies such as the Moon and Mars have the potential to disturb chronometric information contained in these meteorites. In order to understand the impact-related mechanisms and extent of disturbance to isochrons, we undertook experiments to shock and heat samples of 10017, a 3.6 billion year old lunar basalt. One sub-sample was shocked to 55 GPa, a second subsample was heated to 1000 C for one week, and a third sub-sample was maintained as a control sample. Of the isotope systems analyzed, the Sm-Nd system was the least disturbed by shock or heat, followed by the Rb-Sr system. Ages represented by the {sup 238}U-{sup 206}Pb isotope system were degraded by shock and destroyed with heating. In no case did either shock or heating alone result in rotated or reset isochrons that represent a spurious age. In some cases the true crystallization age of the sample was preserved, and in other cases age information was degraded or destroyed. Although our results show that neither shock nor thermal metamorphism alone can account for the discordant ages represented by different isotope systems in martian meteorites, we postulate that shock metamorphism may render a meteorite more susceptible than unshocked material to subsequent disturbance during impact-related heating or aqueous alteration on Mars or Earth. The combination of these processes may result in the disparate chronometric information preserved in some meteorites.

  6. Selenium and Tellurium concentrations of ultradepleted peridotites determined by isotope dilution ICPMS: implications for Se-Te systematics of the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, S.; Luguet, A.; Lorand, J.-P.; Wombacher, F.; Lissner, M.

    2012-04-01

    As for highly siderophile elements, selenium and tellurium may constitute key tracers for planetary processes such as formation of the Earth's core and the Late Veneer composition, provided that their geochemical behaviour and abundances in the primitive upper mantle (PUM) are constrained. Within this scope, we have developed a high precision analytical method for the simultaneous determination of selenium and tellurium concentrations from a single sample aliquot and various rock matrices, including ultradepleted peridotites. The technique employs isotope dilution, thiol cotton fiber (TCF) separation and hydride generation MC-ICP-MS. A selection of international mafic and ultramafic rock reference materials BIR-1, BE-N, TDB-1, UB-N, FON B 93, BIR-1 and BHVO-2 with a range of 30 to 350 ppb Se and 0.7 to 12 ppb Te show external reproducibilities of 3 to 8% for Se and 0.4 to 11% for Te (2 relative standard deviations (r.s.d.)). We have applied this method to a suite of refractory mantle peridotites (Al2O3 <1.5 wt. %) from Lherz, previously shown to be strongly and uniformly depleted in Se, Te and incompatible elements by high degree of partial melting (20 ± 5%). In contrast to fertile lherzolites which remain at broadly chondritic values (Se/Te = 9), the ultradepleted harzburgites show highly fractionated and up to suprachondritic Se/Te (< 35) that correlate with decreasing Te concentrations. The fractionation is displayed by the depleted peridotites as well as multiple analysis of a single Lherz harzburgite sample (64-3). This shows 1) a strong sample heterogeneity effect for Te and 2) a more incompatible behaviour of Te compared to Se on the whole rock scale, once base metal sulfides are highly depleted and in some cases entirely consumed by partial melting. The marked differences in Se-Te systematics observed between fertile lherzolites and depleted harzburgites can be explained by the combined effect of i) different abundances and proportions of residual and metasomatic base metal sulfides ii) discrete micrometric platinum-group minerals. In addition to re-fertilized lherzolites, harzburgites therefore offer new insights into the behaviour of Se and Te during mantle depletion which is a prerequisite to further constrain the Se and Te abundances of the primitive upper mantle.

  7. Determination of Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in sediments slurries by isotopic dilution calibration ICP-MS after chemical vapor generation using an on-line system or retention in an electrothermal vaporizer treated with iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Mariana Antunes; Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Dias, Lúcia Felicidade; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    A method for the determination of Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in sediments reference materials by slurry sampling chemical vapor generation (CVG) using isotopic dilution (ID) calibration and detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is proposed. Two different systems were used for the investigation: an on-line flow injection system (FI-CVG-ICP-MS) and an off-line system with in situ trapping electrothermal vaporization (CVG-ETV-ICP-MS). About 100 mg of the reference material, ground to a particle size ?50 ?m, was mixed with acid solutions ( aqua regia, HF and HCl) in an ultrasonic bath. The enriched isotopes 111Cd, 198Hg, 206Pb and 77Se were then added to the slurry in an adequate amount in order to produce an altered isotopic ratio close to 1. For the on-line system, a standing time for the slurry of 12 h before measurement was required, while for the batch system, no standing time is needed to obtain accurate results. The conditions for the formation of the analyte vapor were optimized for the evaluated systems. The following altered isotope ratios were measured: 111Cd/ 114Cd, 198Hg/ 199Hg, 206Pb/ 208Pb e 77Se/ 82Se. The obtained detection limits in the on-line system, in ?g g -1, were: Cd: 0.15; Hg: 0.09; Pb: 6.0 and Se: 0.03. Similar detection limits were obtained with the system that uses the ETV: 0.21 for Hg, 6.0 for Pb and 0.06 ?g g -1 for Se. No signal for Cd was obtained in this system. One estuarine, two marine and two river certified sediments were analyzed to check the accuracy. The obtained values by both systems were generally in agreement with the certified concentrations, according to the t-test for a confidence level of 95%, demonstrating that isotope equilibration was attained in the slurries submitted to a chemical vapor generation procedure and detection by ICP-MS. The relative standard deviations were lower than 10%, adequate for slurry analysis. The almost quantitative analytes extractions to the aqueous phase of the slurry must favor equilibration of the added enriched isotope with the isotope in the sample, allowing the use of isotopic dilution calibration for slurry analysis.

  8. Gas and isotope chemistry of thermal features in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Shanks, W.C. Pat, III; Evans, William

    2011-01-01

    This report presents 130 gas analyses and 31 related water analyses on samples collected from thermal features at Yellowstone between 2003 and 2009. An overview of previous studies of gas emissions at Yellowstone is also given. The analytical results from the present study include bulk chemistry of gases and waters and isotope values for water and steam (delta18O, dealtaD), carbon dioxide (delta13C only), methane (delta13C only), helium, neon, and argon. We include appendixes containing photos of sample sites, geographic information system (GIS) files including shape and kml formats, and analytical results in spreadsheets. In addition, we provide a lengthy discussion of previous work on gas chemistry at Yellowstone and a general discussion of the implications of our results. We demonstrate that gases collected from different thermal areas often have distinct chemical signatures, and that differences across the thermal areas are not a simple function of surface temperatures or the type of feature. Instead, gas chemistry and isotopic composition are linked to subsurface lithologies and varying contributions from magmatic, crustal, and meteoric sources.

  9. Nuclear Isotopic Dilution of Highly-Enriched Uranium-235 and Uranium-233 by Dry Blending via the RM-2 Mill Technology

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Chipman; R. N. Henry; R. K. Rajamani; S. Latchireddi; V. Devrani; H. Sethi; J. L. Malhotra

    2004-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy has initiated numerous activities to identify strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. Two such materials are the off-specification highly enriched uranium-235 oxide powder and the uranium-233 contained in unirradiated nuclear fuel both currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the development of a technology that could dilute these materials to levels categorized as low-enriched uranium, or further dilute the materials to a level categorized as waste. This dilution technology opens additional pathways for the disposition of these excess fissile materials as existing processing infrastructure continues to be retired.

  10. Ammonium in thermal waters of Yellowstone National Park: processes affecting speciation and isotope fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Böhlke, J.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Ball, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Dissolved inorganic nitrogen, largely in reduced form (NH4(T)?NH4(aq)++NH3(aq)o), has been documented in thermal waters throughout Yellowstone National Park, with concentrations ranging from a few micromolar along the Firehole River to millimolar concentrations at Washburn Hot Springs. Indirect evidence from rock nitrogen analyses and previous work on organic compounds associated with Washburn Hot Springs and the Mirror Plateau indicate multiple sources for thermal water NH4(T), including Mesozoic marine sedimentary rocks, Eocene lacustrine deposits, and glacial deposits. A positive correlation between NH4(T) concentration and ?18O of thermal water indicates that boiling is an important mechanism for increasing concentrations of NH4(T) and other solutes in some areas. The isotopic composition of dissolved NH4(T) is highly variable (?15N = ?6‰ to +30‰) and is positively correlated with pH values. In comparison to likely ?15N values of nitrogen source materials (+1‰ to +7‰), high ?15N values in hot springs with pH >5 are attributed to isotope fractionation associated with NH3(aq)o loss by volatilization. NH4(T) in springs with low pH typically is relatively unfractionated, except for some acid springs with negative ?15N values that are attributed to NH3(g)o condensation. NH4(T) concentration and isotopic variations were evident spatially (between springs) and temporally (in individual springs). These variations are likely to be reflected in biomass and sediments associated with the hot springs and outflows. Elevated NH4(T) concentrations can persist for 10s to 1000s of meters in surface waters draining hot spring areas before being completely assimilated or oxidized.

  11. Recent Advances in SRS on Hydrogen Isotope Separation Using Thermal Cycling Absorption Process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Xin; Sessions, Henry T.; Heung, L. Kit

    2015-02-01

    The recent Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10th of the current production system’s footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects and medical isotope production.

  12. An experimental and numerical investigation on the influence of external gas recirculation on the HCCI autoignition process in an engine: Thermal, diluting, and chemical effects

    SciTech Connect

    Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon; Guibert, Philippe

    2008-11-15

    In order to contribute to the solution of controlling the autoignition in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, parameters linked to external gas recirculation (EGR) seem to be of particular interest. Experiments performed with EGR present some difficulties in interpreting results using only the diluting and thermal aspect of EGR. Lately, the chemical aspect of EGR is taken more into consideration, because this aspect causes a complex interaction with the dilution and thermal aspects of EGR. This paper studies the influence of EGR on the autoignition process and particularly the chemical aspect of EGR. The diluents present in EGR are simulated by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, with dilution factors going from 0 to 46 vol%. For the chemically active species that could be present in EGR, the species CO, NO, and CH{sub 2}O are used. The initial concentration in the inlet mixture of CO and NO is varied between 0 and 170 ppm, while that of CH{sub 2}O alters between 0 and 1400 ppm. For the investigation of the effect of the chemical species on the autoignition, a fixed dilution factor of 23 vol% and a fixed EGR temperature of 70 C are maintained. The inlet temperature is held at 70 C, the equivalence ratios between 0.29 and 0.41, and the compression ratio at 10.2. The fuels used for the autoignition are n-heptane and PRF40. It appeared that CO, in the investigated domain, did not influence the ignition delays, while NO had two different effects. At concentrations up until 45 ppm, NO advanced the ignition delays for the PRF40 and at higher concentrations, the ignition delayed. The influence of NO on the autoignition of n-heptane seemed to be insignificant, probably due to the higher burn rate of n-heptane. CH{sub 2}O seemed to delay the ignition. The results suggested that especially the formation of OH radicals or their consumption by the chemical additives determines how the reactivity of the autoignition changed. (author)

  13. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada Thermal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

    1982-10-01

    Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO/sub 3//sup -/ and SiO/sub 2/ relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145/sup 0/ and 196/sup 0/C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

  14. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of cold and warm springs from the Tuscarora, Nevada thermal area

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.R.; Cole, D.

    1982-06-01

    Eighteen cold and warm spring water samples from the Tuscarora, Nevada KGRA have been analyzed for hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition and fluid chemistry. Warm springs have deltaD values (-128 to -137 permil) significantly lower than those of cold springs to the north and east of the area, but similar to the deltaD values of cold springs to the west and south (-131 to -135 permil). The recharge area for the warm springs is unlikely to be to the immediate north, which is the local topographic highland in the area. The hydrogen isotope data would permit recharge from areas to the southwest or from high elevations to the southeast (Independence Mountains), a sector consistent with electrical resistivity evidence of fluid flow. Warm springs are HCO/sub 3//sup -/-rich waters, enriched by a factor of 3 to 10 in Na, HCO{sub 3}/{sup -} and SiO{sub 2} relative to local cold springs. Average quartz (no steam loss) and Na/K/Ca geothermometer estimates suggest subsurface temperatures of 145{sup 0} and 196{sup 0}C, respectively. The warm springs exhibit poor correlations between either hydrogen or oxygen isotope composition and water temperature or chemistry. The absence of such correlations suggests that there is no single coherent pattern of cold water mixing or evaporation in the thermal spring system.

  15. Noble gas isotopic signatures in thermal waters of the Dead Sea Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsur, Neta; Kaudse, Tillmann; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    2014-05-01

    Noble gas isotope composition in thermal groundwater provides information about crust-mantle interactions, in form of geotectonic activity, volcanism and advective heat transfer. The knowledge of the geothermal state of the crust is useful for the indication of thermal energy resources, which are of significant environmental and economic importance. In this study, groundwater samples were collected in Israel and Jordan in 2012, along the east and west sides of the central Dead Sea Transform. The helium isotope ratio, 3He/4He, is a well-established marker to discriminate three different geochemical reservoirs: Atmosphere, crust and mantle. The distinct isotope ratios in each reservoir make it possible to separate the total helium concentration in groundwater into mantle, crustal (radiogenic) and atmospheric components. The 3He/4He ratios of all sampled waters exceed the typical crustal ratio, indicating contributions of mantle-derived helium to the total helium concentration. Most of the samples contain less than 3% atmospheric helium, whereas the mantle-derived helium component ranges from 1% to 61%. In Israel, a clear trend is observed. Samples from the northern parts of the sampling area show higher 3He/4He ratios than samples from southern parts. These findings confirm Torfstein et al. [1], who analyzed thermal groundwaters from Israel. In our data from Jordan, however, no north-south trend is seen, but a local anomaly is observed in the area between the Dead Sea and the Sea of Galilee, with a 3He/4He ratio that is 5 times higher than the atmospheric 3He/4He ratio. Moreover, some samples from North Jordan exhibit only minor mantle contributions, compared to the samples from the north of Israel. Our results emphasize the importance of local faulting patterns, which enable a better transfer of mantle derived helium into the shallow crust. In addition to helium, the origin of CO2 in the water was examined. Measurements of ?13C suggest that CO2 originates from metamorphic processes rather than from the mantle. Furthermore, ?18O and ?2H data indicate a water reservoir temperature above 100°C only at one location. References: [1] Torfstein, A. et al. 2013: Helium isotopes in Dead Sea Transform waters. Chemical Geology, 352, 188-201

  16. Comparison between GC-MS and GC-ICPMS using isotope dilution for the simultaneous monitoring of inorganic and methyl mercury, butyl and phenyl tin compounds in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, J; Preud'homme, H; Amouroux, D; Tessier, E; Monperrus, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is to compare simultaneous isotope dilution analysis of organotin and organomercury compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (GC-ICP/MS) on certified bivalve samples. These samples were extracted by microwave with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Derivatization with both NaBEt4 and NaBPr4 was evaluated, and analytical performances were compared. Two CRM materials, BCR-710 and CRM-477, were analyzed by both techniques to verify accuracy. A mixed spike containing (201)Hg-enriched methylmercury (MeHg), (199)Hg-enriched inorganic mercury (iHg), (119)Sn-enriched monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT) as well as homemade (116)Sn-enriched monophenyltin (MPT), diphenyltin (DPT), and triphenyltin (TPT) was used for the isotope dilution analysis of samples. The two techniques studied were compared in terms of classic analytical parameters: linearity, precision or repeatability (i.e., percent relative standard deviation, RSD%), limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantification (LOQ), showing excellent linearity, precision below 12% for all analytes, and LOQs of 0.06-1.45 pg for GC-MS and 0.02-0.27 pg for GC-ICP/MS. PMID:24136249

  17. Isotope Geochemistry of Calcite Coatings and the Thermal History of the Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Marshall; J.F. Whelan

    2000-07-27

    Calcite and opal coatings found on fracture footwalls and lithophysal cavity bottoms in the volcanic section at Yucca Mountain (exposed in a tunnel) contain a record of gradual chemical and isotopic changes that have occurred in the unsaturated zone. The thin (less than 6 cm) coatings are composed primarily of calcite, opal, chalcedony, and quartz. Fluid inclusions in calcite that homogenize at greater than ambient temperatures provide impetus for geochronologic studies in order to determine the thermal history. In the welded Topopah Spring Tuff (12.7 Ma), U-Pb ages of opal and chalcedony layers provide evidence of a long history of deposition throughout the past 10 m.y. However, these ages can constrain the ages of associated calcite layers only in samples with an easily interpretable microstratigraphy. Strontium isotope ratios in calcite increase with microstratigraphic position from the base up to the outermost surface of the coatings. The strontium incorporated in these coatings records the systematic change in pore-water isotopic composition due to water-rock interaction primarily in the overlying nonwelded tuffs. A one-dimensional advection-reaction model simulates strontium isotope ratios measured in pore water extracted from core in three vertical boreholes adjacent to the tunnel. By calculating the strontium isotope compositions of the rocks at various past times, the model predicts a history of the strontium isotope ratios in the water that matches the record in the calcite and therefore provides approximate ages. Oxygen isotope ratios measured in calcite gradually increase with decreasing model strontium age. Assuming that the oxygen isotope ratio of the percolating water was relatively constant, this trend indicates a gradual cooling of the rocks over millions of years, in agreement with thermal modeling of magma beneath the 12-Ma Timber Mountain caldera just north of Yucca Mountain. This model predicts that temperatures significantly exceeding current geotherm values occurred prior to 6 Ma. We find no evidence for Quaternary or recent thermal perturbations to the cooling rocks.

  18. Radium isotope geochemistry of thermal waters, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K.; Markun, F.J. )

    1993-03-01

    Radium isotope activities ([sup 226]Ra, [sup 228]Ra, and [sup 224]Ra), chemical compositions, and sulfur isotope ratios in sulfate were determined for water samples from thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Activities of [sup 226]Ra in these waters range from <0.2 to 37.9 dpm/kg. Activity ratios of [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra range from 0.26 to 14.2, and those of [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra range from 0.73 to 3.1. Radium concentrations are inversely correlated with aquifer equilibration temperatures (estimated from dissolved silica concentrations), while [Ra/Ba][sub aq] and [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra activity ratios depend upon U/Ba and Th/U ratios in aquifer rocks. Major controls on Ra concentration in Yellowstone thermal waters are inferred to be (1) barite saturation (at Norris Geyser Basin, Mammoth Hot Springs, and other northern areas) and (2) zeolite-water ion exchange (at Upper Geyser Basin). The data are consistent with a model in which (1) radium and barium are supplied to water by bulk dissolution of aquifer rock, and (2) chemical equilibration of water with rock is rapid relative to the 1602 year half-life of [sup 226]Ra. The [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra activity ratios of the waters may in some cases reflect surface enrichments of [sup 232]Th and/or may indicate that [alpha]-recoil input of [sup 228]Ra is rapid relative to water-rock chemical equilibration. Activity ratios of [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra indicate a nearly ubiquitous [sup 224]Ra excess that generally increases with decreasing pH. Near-surface ([le]100 m) thermal water flow velocities at Mammoth Hot Springs are estimated from [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra variation to be [ge]1 m h[sup [minus]1]. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  20. Mineralogical and isotopic constraints on chondrule formation from shock wave thermal histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedkin, Alexei V.; Grossman, Lawrence; Ciesla, Fred J.; Simon, Steven B.

    2012-06-01

    When a shock wave passes through a nebular gas, increasing water enrichment leads to higher temperatures and post-shock P, but lower cooling rates. A kinetic evaporation model is developed for tracking the chemical and isotopic changes that would occur in a clump of chondrule precursor dust surrounded by nebular gas in a closed system traversed by a nebular shock wave, taking into account effects of non-equilibrium melting and fractional crystallization on the liquid composition and the temperature difference between the gas and the droplet. A range of shock wave temperature-pressure histories computed for systems enriched relative to solar composition by factors of 550 in water, to achieve the redox state of chondrules, and 600 in dust, to retard evaporation, are employed, and redox changes are assumed to occur on the time-scale of heating and cooling in each. Two different system compositions are assumed, with the mean Fe/Si ratios of Types I and II chondrules. Two different textural outcomes are modeled, PO, in which nuclei are preserved and olivine crystallization begins immediately upon reaching saturation, and BO, in which no nuclei are preserved and olivine crystallization begins only after 300-400 K of supersaturation. In all cases, all iron evaporates, regardless of its oxidation state, as well as alkalis and smaller fractions of Mg and Si. In most cases, recondensation occurs on the time-scale of cooling, resulting in droplets whose bulk compositions have small isotopic anomalies in Mg, Si and Fe, comparable to those seen in bulk chondrules. Because fractional crystallization of olivine occurs before recondensation is complete, however, large isotopic variations, especially for iron, would have been recorded both within olivine crystals and between olivine and glass within these objects. Even after diffusive relaxation during crystal growth and cooling, variations in ?25Mg of several tenths of a ‰ to several ‰, in ?29Si of 0.1‰ to several ‰ and in ?56Fe of several ‰ would be measurable within large grains that grew throughout the olivine crystallization interval in many cases, and olivine-glass differences of ?several tenths of a ‰ in ?29Si, and of several ‰ in ?56Fe would be preserved. Such internal isotopic heterogeneities have not yet been observed in chondrules, suggesting that the latter did not form in these shock wave thermal histories. Suppression of production of internal isotopic variations requires heating times that are shorter by a factor of 100, combined with dust enrichments ? 6 × 104 and/or P?10-2 bar. Together with relatively high f, these constraints suggest that chondrules formed in clouds of liquid and vapor generated by impact on ice-rich planetesimals.

  1. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative ?37Cl values (? - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common ?37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this ?37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well developed hydrothermal systems where magmatic Cl is easily transferred to the surface following its exsolution from shallow magma body, we suggest that ?37Cl has great potential to be a unique proxy to monitor the cessation and revival of infrequent arc volcanoes, particularly at centennial time scales.

  2. Isotopes of deuterium and oxygen-18 in thermal groundwater in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhou; Bin, Fang; Haiyan, Zhou; Juan, Li; Ying, Wang

    2009-06-01

    Compositions of deuterium and 18O isotopes of 90 representative samples indicate that thermal groundwater in most parts of China is meteoric in origin. Latitude, altitude, and continent effects have significant bearing on the values of ?D and ?18O of the hot water samples. Oxygen-18 shift is not significant in most of the thermal groundwater, especially the hot water of low-to-moderate temperature. Slight oxygen-18 shift is only found in some hot springs of high temperature in Tibet and western Yunnan and in thermal groundwater of low-to-moderate temperature in the deep-seated carbonate aquifers in the northern North China Plain (including the Tianjin area). Near-surface boiling may causes the shift of the former and the latter may be attributed to exchange of oxygen-18 between water and carbonates in the geothermal systems of taphrogenic basin-type. Hot springs in Tibet and western Sichuan have very low contents of ?D and ?18O, possibly due to recharge of precipitation and snow-melting water of extremely depleted ?D and ?18O values at high latitudes of several thousands of meters.

  3. Chemical, isotopic, and gas compositions of selected thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-seven thermal springs in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah were sampled for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. The springs issue sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, or sodium mixed-anion waters of near neutral (6.2) to alkaline (9.2) pH. High concentrations of fluoride, more than 8 milligrams per liter, occur in Arizona in waters from Gillard Hot Springs, Castle Hot Springs, and the unnamed spring of Eagle Creek, and in New Mexico from springs along the Gila River. Deuterium compositions of the thermal waters cover the same range as those expected for meteoric waters in the respective areas. The chemical compositions of the thermal waters indicate that Thermo Hot Springs in Utah and Gillard Hot Springs in Arizona represent hydrothermal systems which are at temperatures higher than 125 deg C. Estimates of subsurface temperature based on the quartz and Na-K-Ca geothermometer differ by up to 60 deg C for Monroe, Joseph, Red Hill, and Crater hot springs in Utah. Similar conflicting estimates of aquifer temperature occur for Verde Hot Springs, the springs near Clifton and Coolidge Dam, in Arizona; and the warm springs near San Ysidro, Radium Hot Springs, and San Francisco Hot Springs, in New Mexico. Such disparities could result from mixing, precipitation of calcium carbonate, or perhaps appreciable concentrations of magnesium. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Nitrogen Isotope Composition of Thermally Produced NOx from Various Fossil-Fuel Combustion Sources.

    PubMed

    Walters, Wendell W; Tharp, Bruce D; Fang, Huan; Kozak, Brian J; Michalski, Greg

    2015-10-01

    The nitrogen stable isotope composition of NOx (?(15)N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning, which would help constrain NOx source contributions in nitrogen deposition studies. However, there is large uncertainty in the ?(15)N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources other than on-road vehicles and coal-fired energy generating units. To this end, this study presents a broad analysis of ?(15)N-NOx from several fossil-fuel combustion sources that includes: airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a three-way catalytic converter, lawn equipment, utility vehicles, urban buses, semitrucks, residential gas furnaces, and natural-gas-fired power plants. A relatively large range of ?(15)N-NOx values was measured from -28.1‰ to 8.5‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples that generally tended to be negative due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with thermal NOx production. A negative correlation between NOx concentrations and ?(15)N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with selective catalytic reducers was observed, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx increases ?(15)N-NOx values relative to the NOx produced through fossil-fuel combustion processes. Combining the ?(15)N-NOx measured in this study with previous published values, a ?(15)N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous U.S., which demonstrates seasonal and regional importance of various NOx sources. PMID:26332865

  5. Isotope geochemistry of thermal and nonthermal waters in the Valles caldera, Jemez Mountains, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vuataz, F.D.; Goff, F.

    1986-02-10

    Over 100 stable isotope and 45 tritium analyses from thermal and nonthermal waters of the Jemez Mountains region, New Mexico, have been used to define the hydrodynamics of the Valles caldera (Baca) geothermal system and related geothermal fluids of the region. Evaluation of 36 cold meteoric waters yields an equation for the Jemez Mountains meteoric water line of deltaD = 8delta/sup 18/O+12, while further evaluation of nine cold meteoric waters yields an equation relating recharge elevation to deuterium content of E(meters) = -44.9 (deltaD)-1154. Based on the deuterium content of five Baca well waters (223/sup 0/--294/sup 0/C), the average recharge elevation of the Valles geothermal system ranges from 2530 to 2890 m. This range of elevations falls between the elevations of the lowest point of the caldera floor (2400 m) and the summit of the resurgent dome inside the caldera (3430 m). Thus stable isotopes indicate that the caldera depression probably serves as a recharge basin for the deep geothermal system. Although cold spring waters of the Jemez Mountains region consist of meteoric water, tritium analyses show that most of them contain water between 20 and 75 years old.

  6. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K; Freels, James D

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  7. Isotopically exchangeable organic hydrogen in coal relates to thermal maturity and maceral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic exchangeability (Hex) and ??Dn values of non-exchangeable organic hydrogen were investigated in coal kerogens ranging in rank from lignite to graphite. The relative abundance of Hex is highest in lignite with about 18% of total hydrogen being exchangeable, and decreases to around 2.5% in coals with Ro of 1.7 to ca. 5.7%. At Still higher rank (Ro > 6%), Hex increases slightly, although the abundance of total hydrogen decreases. ??Dn is influenced by original biochemical D/H ratios and by thermal maturation in contact with water. Therefore, ??Dn does not show an overall consistent trend with maturity. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of stable sulphur isotopes to monitor directly the behaviour of sulphur in coal during thermal desulphurization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Chao-Li; Hackley, Keith C.; Coleman, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed using stable sulphur isotope analyses to monitor the behaviour of sulphur forms in a coal during thermal desulphurization. In this method, the natural stable isotopic composition of the pyritic and organic sulphur in coal is used as a tracer to follow their mobility during the desulphurization process. This tracer method is based on the fact that the isotopic compositions of pyritic and organic sulphur are significantly different in some coals. Isotopic results of pyrolysis experiments at temperatures ranging from 350 to 750 ??C indicate that the sulphur released with the volatiles is predominantly organic sulphur. The pyritic sulphur is evolved in significant quantities only when pyrolysis temperatures exceed 500 ??C. The presence of pyrite seems to have no effect on the amount of organic sulphur evolved during pyrolysis. The chemical and isotopic mass balances achieved from three different samples of the Herrin (No. 6) coal of the Illinois Basin demonstrate that this stable isotope tracer method is quantitative. The main disadvantage of this tracing technique is that not all coals contain isotopically distinct organic and pyritic sulphur. ?? 1987.

  9. The thermal neutron capture cross section of the radioactive isotope $^{60}$Fe

    E-print Network

    T. Heftrich; M. Bichler; R. Dressler; K. Eberhardt; A. Endres; J. Glorius; K. Göbel; G. Hampel; M. Heftrich; F. Käppeler; C. Lederer; M. Mikorski; R. Plag; R. Reifarth; C. Stieghorst; S. Schmidt; D. Schumann; Z. Slavkovská; K. Sonnabend; A. Wallner; M. Weigand; N. Wiehl; S. Zauner

    2015-07-11

    50% of the heavy element abundances are produced via slow neutron capture reactions in different stellar scenarios. The underlying nucleosynthesis models need the input of neutron capture cross sections. One of the fundamental signatures for active nucleosynthesis in our galaxy is the observation of long-lived radioactive isotopes, such as $^{60}$Fe with a half-life of $2.60\\times10^6$ yr. To reproduce this $\\gamma$-activity in the universe, the nucleosynthesis of $^{60}$Fe has to be understood reliably. A $^{60}$Fe sample produced at the Paul-Scherrer-Institut was activated with thermal and epithermal neutrons at the research reactor at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universit\\"at Mainz. The thermal neutron capture cross section has been measured for the first time to $\\sigma_{\\text{th}}=0.226 \\ (^{+0.044}_{-0.049})$ b. An upper limit of $\\sigma_{\\text{RI}} 100 keV illustrates that the s-wave part of the direct capture component can be neglected.

  10. Analysis of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene-deoxyadenosine adducts in wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 knockout mice using stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Harper, Tod A; Morré, Jeff; Lauer, Fredine T; McQuistan, Tammie J; Hummel, Jessica M; Burchiel, Scott W; Williams, David E

    2015-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC; also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a potent carcinogen in animal models and a class 2A human carcinogen. Recent investigations into DBC-mediated toxicity identified DBC as a potent immunosuppressive agent similar to the well-studied immunotoxicant 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). DBC, like DMBA, is bioactivated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 and forms the reactive metabolite DBC-11,12-diol-13,14-epoxide (DBCDE). DBCDE is largely responsible for the genotoxicity associated with DBC exposure. The immunosuppressive properties of several PAHs are also linked to genotoxic mechanisms. Therefore, this study was designed to identify DBCDE-DNA adduct formation in the spleen and thymus of wild-type and cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1) knockout (KO) mice using a highly sensitive stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS method. Stable-isotope dilution UHPLC-MS/MS identified the major DBC adducts (±)-anti-cis-DBCDE-dA and (±)-anti-trans-DBCDE-dA in the lung, liver, and spleen of both WT and Cyp1b1 KO mice. However, adduct formation in the thymus was below the level of quantitation for our method. Additionally, adduct formation in Cyp1b1 KO mice was significantly reduced compared to wild-type (WT) mice receiving DBC via oral gavage. In conclusion, the current study identifies for the first time DBCDE-dA adducts in the spleen of mice supporting the link between genotoxicity and immunosuppression, in addition to supporting previous studies identifying Cyp1b1 as the primary CYP involved in DBC bioactivation to DBCDE. The high levels of DBC-DNA adducts identified in the spleen, along with the known high levels of Cyp1b1 expression in this organ, supports further investigation into DBC-mediated immunotoxicity. PMID:25868132

  11. Determination of 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole in soils contaminated by rocket fuel using solid-phase microextraction, isotope dilution and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yegemova, Saltanat; Bakaikina, Nadezhda V; Kenessov, Bulat; Koziel, Jacek A; Nauryzbayev, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Environmental monitoring of Central Kazakhstan territories where heavy space booster rockets land requires fast, efficient, and inexpensive analytical methods. The goal of this study was to develop a method for quantitation of the most stable transformation product of rocket fuel, i.e., highly toxic unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine - 1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (MTA) in soils using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Quantitation of organic compounds in soil samples by SPME is complicated by a matrix effect. Thus, an isotope dilution method was chosen using deuterated analyte (1-(trideuteromethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; MTA-d3) for matrix effect control. The work included study of the matrix effect, optimization of a sample equilibration stage (time and temperature) after spiking MTA-d3 and validation of the developed method. Soils of different type and water content showed an order of magnitude difference in SPME effectiveness of the analyte. Isotope dilution minimized matrix effects. However, proper equilibration of MTA-d3 in soil was required. Complete MTA-d3 equilibration at temperatures below 40°C was not observed. Increase of temperature to 60°C and 80°C enhanced equilibration reaching theoretical MTA/MTA-d3 response ratios after 13 and 3h, respectively. Recoveries of MTA depended on concentrations of spiked MTA-d3 during method validation. Lowest spiked MTA-d3 concentration (0.24 mg kg(-1)) provided best MTA recoveries (91-121%). Addition of excess water to soil sample prior to SPME increased equilibration rate, but it also decreased method sensitivity. Method detection limit depended on soil type, water content, and was always below 1 mg kg(-1). The newly developed method is fully automated, and requires much lower time, labor and financial resources compared to known methods. PMID:26078153

  12. DETERMINATION OF 5-METHYLTETRAHYDROFOLIC ACID IN HUMAN SERUM BY STABLE-ISOTOPE DILUTION HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report describes a stable isotope liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method that was developed for the quantitative determination of 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHFA) and folic acid in a variety of citrus juices. Folates were extracted from juices and the polyglutamyl side ch...

  13. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may not be the significant contributor as the energies involved in the hyperfine effect are much smaller than those with molecular collisions, especially under convective conditions.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of ZnO on thermal SiO2 and Si surfaces using N2-diluted diethylzinc and H2O2 precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Ke-Jia; Chen, Sun; Zhu, Bao; Chen, Lin; Ding, Shi-Jin; Lu, Hong-Liang; Sun, Qing-Qing; Zhang, David Wei; Chen, Zhenyi

    2012-03-01

    ZnO nanodots are attracting more and more attention in various photoelectrical applications due to multiple excition generation. In this article, atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth of ZnO nanodots has been realized for the first time on both thermal SiO2 and Si surfaces using N2-diluted gaseous DEZn and H2O2 precursors. The experimental results indicate that the ALD ZnO exhibits a nano-crystalline film with corrugated surfaces in the case of the deposition temperature of 200 °C, likely due to concrescence among ZnO nanodots. When the deposition temperature is increased up to 300 °C, ZnO is grown in the form of well-discrete nanodots. This is due to increased desorption of the reacting molecules and a reduction of nucleation sites on the growing surfaces at 300 °C, thus leading to the reaction between DEZn and sbnd OH groups only on some favorable sites from thermodynamic and energy points of view. In terms of the thermal SiO2 surface, ZnO nanodots with a density of around 5 × 1010 cm-2 are obtained for 100 cycles. As for the Si surface, ZnO nanodots with a density as high as ˜1 × 1011 cm-2 are achieved for 50 cycles. Finally, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the ALD ZnO at 300 °C is dominated by Znsbnd O bonds together with a small quantity of Znsbnd OH bonds, and the deposition temperature of 300 °C can result in preferential growth of ZnO (0 0 2) orientation and a bigger crystallite size.

  15. Isotope and chemical compositions of meteoric and thermal waters and snow from the greater Yellowstone National Park region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Yousif K.; Thordsen, James J.; White, Lloyd D.

    2002-01-01

    An intensive hydrogeologic investigation, mandated by U.S. Congress and centered on the Norris-Mammoth corridor was conducted by USGS and other scientists during 1988-90 to determine the effects of using thermal water from a private well located in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area, Montana, on the thermal springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), especially Mammoth Hot Springs. As part of this investigation, we carried out a detailed study of the isotopic and chemical compositions of meteoric water from cold springs and wells, of thermal water, especially from the Norris-Mammoth corridor and of snow. Additional sampling of meteoric and thermal waters from YNP and surrounding region in northwest Wyoming, southwest Montana and southeast Idaho was carried out in 1991-92 to characterize the distribution of water isotopes in this mountainous region and to determine the origin and possible recharge locations of thermal waters in and adjacent to the Park. The D and 18O values for 40 snow samples range from ?88 to ?178? and ?12.5 to ?23.9?, respectively, and define a well constrained line given by D = 8.2 18O + 14.7 (r2 = 0.99) that is nearly identical to the Global Meteoric Water Line. The D and 18O values of 173 cold water samples range from ?115 to ?153? and ?15.2 to ?20.2?, respectively, and exhibit a similar relationship although with more scatter and with some shift to heavier isotopes, most likely due to evaporation effects. The spatial distribution of cold-water isotopes shows a roughly circular pattern with isotopically lightest waters centered on the mountains and high plateau in the northwest corner of Yellowstone National Park and becoming heavier in all directions. The temperature effect due to altitude is the dominant control on stable water isotopes throughout the region; however, this effect is obscured in narrow 'canyons' and areas of high topographic relief. The effects due to distance (i.e. 'continental') and latitude on water isotopes probably are relatively minor and difficult to resolve from the major controls. The data indicate that the groundwater are derived predominantly from cold, isotopically light winter precipitation, and that the isotope values of groundwater from elevations above about 2.5-3.0 km in the Gallatin and northern Absaroka Ranges are light enough (The D ?149?) to be the presumed recharge water for the hydrothermal system in the Park. However, estimation of the present-day volume of this recharged, isotopically light water indicates that it is not adequate to supply the high (3-4 m3/s) thermal water discharges from YNP, and cooler temperatures at the time of recharge would be required. The volume of meteoric water with D values lighter than ?145? may be adequate for recharging the hydrothermal system, and this may be a more plausible value than the ?149? originally calculated from data that are subject to moderate uncertainties.

  16. A method for determining isotopic composition of elements by thermal ionization source mass spectrometry: Application to strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazzini, Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that in thermal ionization source mass spectrometry, if isotope fractionation of the element in the sample follows a linear law, straight-line distributions in xm versus xm/ym diagrams are observed, where xm and ym are two measured isotope ratios. The slopes and y-intercepts of these linear distributions are functions of the [`]true' (starting) values xt and yt of the element in the sample and of the masses of the isotopes involved in ratios x and y. Since the masses of the nuclides are known, true ratios xt and yt can be calculated. This theoretical result is used to determine the non-radiogenic part of the isotopic composition of strontium in NBS SRM 987, one 84Sr-enriched isotopic tracer prepared at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and two natural samples (rocks from the metamorphic basement of the Italian Eastern Alps) without any assumption about the isotopic composition itself. Strontium was loaded as nitrate on single tungsten filaments, and 88Sr/86Sr and 84Sr/86Sr ratios were measured up to a fractionation of ~1% u-1 in a single-collector VG 54E mass spectrometer. For each run, 86Sr/88Sr, 84Sr/86Sr and 84Sr/88Sr ratios were calculated for all useful xm versus xm/ym distributions. The respective weighted average values are considered the true values of the isotope ratios in the sample. Four runs of isotopic standard NBS SRM 987 and one run of the isotopic tracer gave accurate and reproducible results which are identical, within error limits, to the respective certified values. The four determinations of NBS 987 resulted in the following weighted average values: 86Sr/88Sr = 0.11942 +/- 0.00018; 84Sr/86Sr = 0.056485 +/- 0.000075; 84Sr/88Sr = 0.006746 +/- 0.000017 (error at 2[sigma] level). The values of the natural 86Sr/88Sr ratio (two rocks: 0.11956 +/- 0.00017 and 0.11957 +/- 0.00008; NBS 987: 0.11942 +/- 0.00018) are identical within error limits, and identical or very close to the recommended value of 0.1194, the worldwide assumed [`]true' 86Sr/88Sr value in the commonly used procedure of determining 87Sr/86Sr ratio by normalization. However, due to the accuracy of the above determinations, it is suggested that, in nature, significant differences exist in the non-radiogenic part of the isotopic composition of strontium.

  17. U-Pb dating of Plinian-eruption ashfalls by the isotope dilution method: A reliable and precise tool for time-scale calibration and biostratigraphic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, R.D. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of low analytical blanks, clean Pb-205 enriched tracer-solution, and refined procedures of sample preparation, it is possible to isolate and measure minute quantities of radiogenic Pb in concordant zircon, thereby permitting accurate isotopic age determinations of small multigrain samples of Paleozoic zircon with 7--20 ppm radiogenic Pb. Refinement of these procedures, including reduction of laboratory blank, allows for analysis of single grains of Paleozoic zircon with greater than 25 ppm radiogenic Pb with an age precision of better than 1%. Mass spectrometric measurement of all Pb and U isotopes allows for the calculation of three isotopic ages from a single sample. Concordant multigrain and single-grain U-Pb zircon analyses from 13 biostratigraphically dated K-bentonites in Europe and North America define an internally consistent, absolute chronostratigraphy of Middle ordovician to Upper silurian stratotypes. As a test of trans-Atlantic stratigraphic correlation, a volcanic ash from Middle Ordovician (Rocklandian) strata of North America was found to be in excellent age agreement with Caradocian K-bentonites in Britain and Sweden, demonstrating age equivalence of sedimentary sequences lacking directly comparable fauna. In other case, precise dating of single zircons from three Caradocian K-bentonite in Sweden and Virginia was performed to test a hypothesis that a single ultraplinian volcanic eruption deposited airborne debris on both Larentia and Baltica. The ages of these presumed correlative ashes will be shown to provide quantitative information about the depositional rates of their enclosing strata, as well as tectonic events affecting the margins of Iapetus in Ordovician time.

  18. Influence of longitudinal isotope substitution on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes: Results of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and local density functional calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Frédéric Böhm, Michael C.; Schulte, Joachim; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2014-04-14

    We report reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics calculations of the thermal conductivity of isotope substituted (10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at 300 K. {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C isotopes both at 50% content were arranged either randomly, in bands running parallel to the main axis of the CNTs or in bands perpendicular to this axis. It is found that the systems with randomly distributed isotopes yield significantly reduced thermal conductivity. In contrast, the systems where the isotopes are organized in patterns parallel to the CNTs axis feature no reduction in thermal conductivity when compared with the pure {sup 14}C system. Moreover, a reduction of approximately 30% is observed in the system with the bands of isotopes running perpendicular to the CNT axis. The computation of phonon dispersion curves in the local density approximation and classical densities of vibrational states reveal that the phonon structure of carbon nanotubes is conserved in the isotope substituted systems with the ordered patterns, yielding high thermal conductivities in spite of the mass heterogeneity. In order to complement our conclusions on the {sup 12}C-{sup 14}C mixtures, we computed the thermal conductivity of systems where the {sup 14}C isotope was turned into pseudo-atoms of 20 and 40 atomic mass units.

  19. Lattice thermal conductivity of crystalline and amorphous silicon with and without isotopic effects from the ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regime

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Minkyu; Lee, In-Ho; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-07-28

    Thermal conductivity of a material is an important physical parameter in electronic and thermal devices, and as the device size shrinks down, its length-dependence becomes unable to be neglected. Even in micrometer scale devices, materials having a long mean free path of phonons, such as crystalline silicon (Si), exhibit a strong length dependence of the thermal conductivities that spans from the ballistic to diffusive thermal transport regime. In this work, through non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics (NEMD) simulations up to 17??m in length, the lattice thermal conductivities are explicitly calculated for crystalline Si and up to 2??m for amorphous Si. The Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is solved within a frequency-dependent relaxation time approximation, and the calculated lattice thermal conductivities in the BTE are found to be in good agreement with the values obtained in the NEMD. The isotopic effects on the length-dependent lattice thermal conductivities are also investigated both in the crystalline and amorphous Si.

  20. The Precambrian Biogeochemical Carbon Isotopic Record: Contributions of Thermal Versus Biological Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Superplumes offer a new approach for understanding global C cycles. Isotopes help to discern the impacts of geological, environmental and biological processes ujpun the evolution of these cycles. For example, C-13/C-12 values of coeval sedimentary organics and carbonates give global estimates of the fraction of C buried as organics (Forg), which today lies near 0.2. Before Oxygenic photosynthesis arose, our biosphere obtained reducing power for biosynthesis solely from thermal volatiles and rock alteration. Thus Forg was dominated by the mantle redox state, which has remained remarkably constant for greater than Gy. Recent data confirm that the long-term change in Forg had been small, indicating that the mantle redox buffer remains important even today. Oxygenic photosynthesis enabled life to obtain additional reducing power by splitting the water molecule. Accordingly, biological organic production rose above the level constrained by the mantle-derived flux of reduced species. For example, today, chemoautotrophs harvesting energy from hydrothermal emanations can synthesize at most between 0.2 x 10(exp 12) and 2x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1 of organic C globally. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated at 9000 x 10(exp 12) mol C yr-1. Occasionally photosynthetic productivity did contribute to dramatically -elevated Forg values (to 0.4 or more) as evidenced by very high carbonate C-13/C-12. The interplay between biological, tectonic and other environmental factors is illustrated by the mid-Archean to mid-Proterozoic isotopic record. The relatively constant C-13/C-12 values of Archean carbonates support the view that photosynthetically-driven Forg increases were not yet possible. In contrast, major excursions in C-13/C-12, and thus also in Forg, during the early Proterozoic confirmed the global importance of oxygenic photosynthesis by that time. Remarkably, the superplume event at 1.9 Ga did not trigger another major Forg increase, despite the favorable conditions for organic burial that were evidenced by elevated sea levels and higher black shale abundances. Perhaps those superplume-rated processes that favored enhanced organic burial were offset by the ability of mantle-derived redox buffering, which was enhanced during the superplume event, to limit excursions in Forg.

  1. Simple and sensitive analysis of histamine and tyramine in Japanese soy sauces and their intermediates using the stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Todoroki, Kenichiro; Ishii, Yasuhiro; Miyauchi, Chiemi; Kitagawa, Sachiyo; Min, Jun Zhe; Inoue, Koichi; Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Ohashi, Norio; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2014-07-01

    We established a simple, sensitive, and reproducible method to analyze the histamine and tyramine levels in Japanese soy sauce and its mash (called moromi) using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). Histamine and tyramine quantification was performed using their stable isotopes for electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring mode. The sample pretreatment process was a simple, one-step liquid-liquid extraction. HILIC separation was performed with a gradient elution of aqueous ammonium formate and acetonitrile. Because of validation tests, the linearity, the accuracies, and precisions were sufficient. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification were 0.09 and 0.29 ppm for histamine and 0.13 and 0.42 ppm for tyramine, respectively. We successfully applied this method to histamine and tyramine determination in four kinds of commercial Japanese soy sauces and also in moromi samples during soy sauce production. PMID:24901408

  2. H-isotope retention and thermal/ion-induced release in boronized films

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, D.S. ); Doyle, B.L.; Wampler, W.R.; Hays, A.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, it has been clearly demonstrated that the composition of the very near surface ({approximately}100nm) of plasma-interactive components plays a determinant role in most processes which occur in the plasma-edge of Tokamaks. Two very successful techniques to effect control of the plasma-wall interaction are (1) in-situ deposition of amorphous carbon or boron-carbon films and (2) the use of He/C conditioning discharges or He glow discharge cleaning to modify the near surface of bulk graphite components. We have deposited boronized layers into Si using plasma-assisted CVD and sputter deposition. The PCVD deposition conditions were as close as possible to those used in TFTR, and some films deposited in TFTR have also been studied. Using these two deposition techniques, B{sub x}CH{sub y} films have been produced with x varying from 1/2 -- 4, and y from {approximately}1 (sputtered) to {approximately}3 (PCVD). Most films also contained significant amounts of 0. Thermal and ion-induced release of H-isotopes from BC films is qualitatively similar to that measured for graphite. Implanted H saturates in these films at a H/host atom ratio of 0.7 which is considerably higher than that of graphite({approximately}0.4). As-deposited PCVD films are already saturated with H, while sputtered films are not. Sputtered BC films therefore possess an inherent H-pumping capability which could prove to be extremely beneficial to TFTR. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Measurement of urinary desmosine by isotope dilution and high performance liquid chromatography. Correlation between elastase-induced air-space enlargement in the hamster and elevation of urinary desmosine

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, P.J.; Bryan-Rhadfi, J.; Lucey, E.C.; Ciccolella, D.E.; Crombie, G.; Faris, B.; Snider, G.L.; Franzblau, C. )

    1991-08-01

    The accuracy of methods employed to measure the elastin-specific crosslinks, desmosine (DES) and isodesmosine (IDES), has been called into question because contaminants in the urine may cause elevated values. In the present study urine samples were spiked with a known amount of (14C)DES and refluxed in 6 N HCl. Sephadex G-15 chromatography of the hydrolyzed urine employed to remove contaminants. DES and IDES were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as well as by amino acid analysis. The amount of isotope recovered was used to determine losses during the overall procedure and the isotope dilution to calculate the amounts of endogenous DES and IDES originally present in the urine. Because similar values were obtained by both methods, the more rapid HPLC method was used for all succeeding analyses. In one experiment, the DES amounts in urine collected from hamsters for 3 days after intratracheal treatment with human neutrophil elastase (300 micrograms) or porcine pancreatic elastase (300 micrograms) were 0.212 {plus minus} 0.012 (mean {plus minus} SEM, two measurements on a single pool) and 0.816 {plus minus} 0.005 (two measurements) microgram per hamster per day, respectively. Urine from control hamsters had a mean value of 0.074 {plus minus} 0.008 (eight measurements) microgram per hamster per day. The HNE- and PPE-treated hamsters had mean linear intercept values of 119 and 159% of control values, respectively, giving a positive correlation between increase in airspace size and elevation of urinary DES.

  4. Optimisation of sample preparation protocols for measurement of PGE and Re-Os in organic-rich shales by isotope dilution ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammensee, Philipp; Aulbach, Sonja; Gudelius, Dominik; Brey, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) and Re-Os isotopes, which are variably redox-sensitive and fluid-soluble, have potential as proxies for the oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans (e.g. [1]). However, analysis of these elements in organic rich shales (ORS) is challenging due to abundances of <1 ng/g and the presence of interfering isotopes or molecules of matrix elements. Furthermore, PGE-ReOs systematics in detrital and hydrogenous components may vary, and the choice of digestion parameters (reagents, temperature and pressure) during decomposition of rock powder affects the ratio of digested components [2,3]. Additional treatment to remove the matrix and pre-concentrate PGE-Re by column chromatography is necessary to minimise the effects of interfering elements, but presents its own challenges. We are in the process of conducting variations of acid digestion and column chromatographic protocols on reference sample SDO-1 (Devonian Ohio Shale, USGS). We aim to identify the optimum protocol to investigate PGE-Re-Os systematics of ORS that were sampled as part of the Barberton Drilling Project BARB5 drill core, in order to constrain the changes in detrital and hydrogenous contributions to the sediment with time, to assess the extent of euxinity in the sedimentary basin and to look for evidence of transient "whiffs of oxygen" [1]. The following digestion methods were tested: (1) 4h acid digestion in High Pressure Asher (HPA) apparatus with reverse aqua regia at 300°C and 130 bar (only this digestion allows extraction of volatilised Os in CHCl3 followed by HBr); (2) 3h reverse aqua regia digestion in centrifuge vials on hotplate at 80°C; (3) 48h reverse aqua regia digestion in closed Teflon beakers on hotplate at 140°C followed by a HF/HNO3 digestion step; (4) 48h HF/HNO3 digestion of ashed sample powder in closed Teflon beaker at 140°C on hotplate followed by an aqua regia digestion step. Column chromatographic approaches to decrease the concentrations of interfering elements (Y, Zr, Mo, Cd, Hf, Hg) include the use of cation- and anion resins, and variations of the molarity and composition of the eluent. Preliminary results show that digestion method (1) leaves behind small amounts of presumably PGE-free silica gel; (2) yields consistently higher Re concentrations with an expectedly large amount of solid residue; (3) produces an insoluble sludge; (4) allows complete digestion, but precludes the collection of Os. Column calibrations show the best recovery of PGE-Re in cation resin using 0.2 mol/l HCl as eluent, but intolerably high ratios of interfering over elements of interest, whereas the best matrix separation is achieved using 0.05 mol/l HCl as eluent, but is accompanied by low PGE-Re yields presumably due to the instability of Cl complexes in this medium. They also show that U elutes separately from PGE-Re in 6 mol/l HCl and could be collected with a view to analysing U isotopes as an additional redox proxy. Further tests will be carried out using alternative high-pressure digestion systems. [1] Anbar, et al. (2007) Science 317:1903-1906; [2] Meisel et al. (2003) JAAS 18:720-726; [3] Xu et al. (2012) CG 324:132-147

  5. Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancso, Gabor; Fenby, David V.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses principles and definitions related to the thermodynamics of dilute solutions. Topics considered include dilute solution, Gibbs-Duhem equation, reference systems (pure gases and gaseous mixtures, liquid mixtures, dilute solutions), real dilute solutions (focusing on solute and solvent), terminology, standard states, and reference systems.…

  6. Determination of urinary malondialdehyde by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS with automated solid-phase extraction: a cautionary note on derivatization optimization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Lian; Huang, Yu-Jie; Pan, Chih-Hong; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2011-11-01

    A highly sensitive quantitative LC-MS/MS method was developed for measuring urinary malondialdehyde (MDA). With the use of an isotope internal standard and online solid-phase extraction, urine samples can be directly analyzed within 10 min after 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization. The detection limit was estimated as 0.08 pmol. This method was further applied to assess the optimal addition of DNPH for derivatization and to measure urinary MDA in 80 coke oven emission (COE)-exposed and 67 nonexposed workers. Derivatization optimization revealed that to achieve complete derivatization reaction, an excess of DNPH is required (DNPH/MDA molar ratio: 893-8929) for urine samples that is about 100 times higher than that of MDA standard solutions (molar ratio: 10-80). Meanwhile, the mean urinary concentrations of MDA in COE-exposed workers were significantly higher than those in nonexposed workers (0.23±0.17 vs 0.14±0.05 ?mol/mmol creatinine, P<0.005). Urinary MDA concentrations were also significantly associated with the COE (P<0.005) and smoking exposure (P<0.05). Taken together, this method is capable of routine high-throughput analysis and accurate quantification of MDA and would be useful for assessing the whole-body burden of oxidative stress. Our findings, however, raise the issue that derivatization optimization should be performed before it is put into routine biological analysis. PMID:21906673

  7. Folate content in sea buckthorn berries and related products (Hippophaë rhamnoides L. ssp. rhamnoides): LC-MS/MS determination of folate vitamer stability influenced by processing and storage assessed by stable isotope dilution assay.

    PubMed

    Gutzeit, Derek; Mönch, Sabine; Jerz, Gerold; Winterhalter, Peter; Rychlik, Michael

    2008-05-01

    A stable isotope dilution assay was adopted for quantitation of folate vitamers in sea buckthorn berries, juice, and concentrate using fourfold labeled folate isotopologues of the folate derivatives as the internal standards and reversed-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Processing effects and storage stability were investigated during juice and concentrate production from sea buckthorn berries (Hippophaë rhamnoides). The technological processing of the berries caused a total degradation of tetrahydrofolate and 5-formyltetrahydrofolate in the generated juice. The content of the main folate vitamer 5-methyltetrahydrofolate remained approximately unchanged during the whole processing from the berries to the concentrate. Sea buckthorn juice was stored under two household storage conditions (6 degrees C, 25 degrees C), and also under accelerated aging conditions (40 degrees C) for up to 7 days to determine the effects of storage temperature on the stability of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. The content of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was nearly unchanged during the storage at 6 degrees C after 7 days. The juice showed almost identical degradation of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate of about 17-20% at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C after 7 days of storage. [figure: see text] PMID:18278485

  8. Determination of 2-Methylimidazole, 4-Methylimidazole, and 2-Acetyl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole in Licorice Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Stable-Isotope Dilution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Raters, Marion; Elsinghorst, Paul W; Goetze, Stephanie; Dingel, Anna; Matissek, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    A quick and selective analytical method was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of 2-methylimidazole, 4-methylimidazole, and 2-acetyl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole, which are known to be formed by Maillard reactions. The methodology reported here employs stable-isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) using 4-methylimidazole-d6 and [(13)C6]-2-acetyl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole as internal standards. It was successfully applied in a model assay to show that the addition of ammonium chloride during the manufacture of licorice promotes imidazole formation depending on the added amount of ammonium chloride without the well-known impact of present caramel food colorings. Furthermore, a monitoring assay of 29 caramel coloring-free licorice products showed that both 4-methylimidazole and 2-acetyl-4-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole are endogenously generated in detectable quantities. None of the samples showed 2-methylimidazole levels above the limit of detection, 50 ?g/kg. PMID:26073294

  9. Quantification of Oxidative DNA Lesions in Tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon Rats by Capillary High-performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Stable Isotope-dilution Method

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Yuan, Bifeng; Guerrero, Candace; Bahde, Ralf; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to develop suitable methods to quantify oxidative DNA lesions in the setting of transition metal-related diseases. Transition metal-driven Fenton reactions constitute an important endogenous source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In genetic diseases with accumulation of transition metal ions, excessive ROS production causes pathophysiological changes, including DNA damage. Wilson’s disease is an autosomal recessive disorder with copper toxicosis due to deficiency of ATP7B protein needed for excreting copper into bile. The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat bears a deletion in Atp7b gene and serves as an excellent model for hepatic Wilson’s disease. We used a sensitive capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS/MS method in conjunction with stable-isotope dilution technique to quantify several types of oxidative DNA lesions in liver and brain of LEC rats. These lesions included 5-formyl-2?-deoxyuridine, 5-hydroxymethyl-2?-deoxyuridine, and the 5?R and 5?S diastereomers of 8,5?-cyclo-2?-deoxyguanosine and 8,5?-cyclo-2?-deoxyadenosine. Moreover, the levels of these DNA lesions in the liver and brain increased with age and correlated with age-dependent regulation of the expression of DNA repair genes in LEC rats. These results provide significant new knowledge for better understanding the implications of oxidative DNA lesions in transition metal-induced diseases, such as Wilson’s disease, as well as in ageing and ageing-related pathological conditions. PMID:21323344

  10. Isotopic dilution, self-association, and Raman non-coincidence in the binary system (CH 3) 2C?O+(CD 3) 2C?O reinvestigated by polarized Raman measurement and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil K.; Ojha, Animesh K.; Koster, J.; Shukla, M. K.; Leszczynski, J.; Asthana, B. P.; Kiefer, W.

    2003-12-01

    Raman spectra of the binary system (CH 3) 2C?O (acetone)+(CD 3) 2C?O (acetone-d 6) were reinvestigated employing a more precise and sensitive scanning multichannel detection scheme. The I? and I? components of the Raman scattered radiation were recorded in the C?O stretching region, 1600-1800 cm -1 as well as in the C-D and C-H stretching regions, 2000-2300 and 2800-3100 cm -1, respectively, in different mixtures with the varying mole fractions of the reference system. A careful Raman line shape analysis yielded after fit ? ?nc due to Raman non-coincidence effect (NCE) in acetone and acetone-d 6 as 4.87±0.01 and 4.49±0.01 cm -1, respectively. The optimized geometries and wavenumbers of the neat acetone molecule and its self-associated structure were calculated using ab initio method at the MP2 level using 6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The influence of self-association and NCE together were examined. A systematic study of Raman line shape analysis led to a hitherto unexplored aspect, the wavenumber shift and linewidth variation of the ?1(C-H) stretching mode of acetone upon isotopic dilution. The linewidth variation with the mole fraction of the reference system shows an excellent agreement with the corresponding linewidths derived from the T 2 values obtained by three color fs-CARS study reported earlier.

  11. Preparation, certification and validation of a stable solid spike of uranium and plutonium coated with a cellulose derivative for the measurement of uranium and plutonium content in dissolved nuclear fuel by isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Surugaya, Naoki; Hiyama, Toshiaki; Verbruggen, André; Wellum, Roger

    2008-02-01

    A stable solid spike for the measurement of uranium and plutonium content in nitric acid solutions of spent nuclear fuel by isotope dilution mass spectrometry has been prepared at the European Commission Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements in Belgium. The spike contains about 50 mg of uranium with a 19.838% (235)U enrichment and 2 mg of plutonium with a 97.766% (239)Pu abundance in each individual ampoule. The dried materials were covered with a thin film of cellulose acetate butyrate as a protective organic stabilizer to resist shocks encountered during transportation and to eliminate flaking-off during long-term storage. It was found that the cellulose acetate butyrate has good characteristics, maintaining a thin film for a long time, but readily dissolving on heating with nitric acid solution. The solid spike containing cellulose acetate butyrate was certified as a reference material with certified quantities: (235)U and (239)Pu amounts and uranium and plutonium amount ratios, and was validated by analyzing spent fuel dissolver solutions of the Tokai reprocessing plant in Japan. This paper describes the preparation, certification and validation of the solid spike coated with a cellulose derivative. PMID:18270417

  12. Isotope Variations in Terrestrial Carbonates and Thermal Springs as Biomarkers: Analogs for Martian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Bissada, K. K.

    2006-01-01

    Stable isotope measurements of carbonate minerals contained within ALH84001 [1] suggest that fluids were present at 3.9 Gy on Mars [2, 3, 4, 5]. Both oxygen and carbon isotopes provide independent means of deciphering paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate mineral precipitation. In terrestrial carbonate rocks oxygen isotopes not only indicate the paleotemperature of the precipitating fluid, but also provide clues to environmental conditions that affected the fluid chemistry. Carbon isotopes, on the other hand, can indicate the presence or absence of organic compounds during precipitation (i.e. biogenically vs. thermogenically-generated methane), thus serving as a potential biomarker. We have undertaken a study of micro scale stable isotope variations measured in some terrestrial carbonates and the influence of organic compounds associated with the formation of these carbonates. Preliminary results indicate that isotope variations occur within narrow and discrete intervals, providing clues to paleoenvironmental conditions that include both biological and non-biological activity. These results carry implications for deciphering Martian isotope data and therefore potential biological prospecting on the planet Mars. Recently, Fourier Transform Spectrometer observations have detected methane occurring in the Martian atmosphere [6] that could be attributed to a possible biogenic source. Indeed, Mars Express has detected the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere [7], with evidence indicating that methane abundances are greatest above those basins with high water concentrations.

  13. Chitin: 'Forgotten' Source of Nitrogen: From Modern Chitin to Thermally Mature Kerogen: Lessons from Nitrogen Isotope Ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Wintsch, R.P.; Lewan, M.D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Chitinous biomass represents a major pool of organic nitrogen in living biota and is likely to have contributed some of the fossil organic nitrogen in kerogen. We review the nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry of chitin and present preliminary results suggesting interaction between kerogen and ammonium during thermal maturation. Modern arthropod chitin may shift its nitrogen isotope ratio by a few per mil depending on the chemical method of chitin preparation, mostly because N-containing non-amino-sugar components in chemically complex chitin cannot be removed quantitatively. Acid hydrolysis of chemically complex chitin and subsequent ion-chromatographic purification of the "deacetylated chitin-monomer" D-glucosamine (in hydrochloride form) provides a chemically well-defined, pure amino-sugar substrate for reproducible, high-precision determination of ??15N values in chitin. ??15N values of chitin exhibited a variability of about one per mil within an individual's exoskeleton. The nitrogen isotope ratio differed between old and new exoskeletons by up to 4 per mil. A strong dietary influence on the ??15N value of chitin is indicated by the observation of increasing ??15N values of chitin from marine crustaceans with increasing trophic level. Partial biodegradation of exoskeletons does not significantly influence ??15N values of remaining, chemically preserved amino sugar in chitin. Diagenesis and increasing thermal maturity of sedimentary organic matter, including chitin-derived nitrogen-rich moieties, result in humic compounds much different from chitin and may significantly change bulk ??15N values. Hydrous pyrolysis of immature source rocks at 330??C in contact with 15N-enriched NH4Cl, under conditions of artificial oil generation, demonstrates the abiogenic incorporation of inorganic nitrogen into carbon-bound nitrogen in kerogen. Not all organic nitrogen in natural, thermally mature kerogen is therefore necessarily derived from original organic matter, but may partly result from reaction with ammonium-containing pore waters.

  14. On-line monitoring of benzene air concentrations while driving in traffic by means of isotopic dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Davoli, E; Cappellini, L; Moggi, M; Ferrari, S; Fanelli, R

    1996-01-01

    There is no shortage of information about the average benzene concentrations in urban air, but there is very little about microenvironmental exposure, such as in-vehicle concentrations while driving in various traffic conditions, while refuelling, or while in a parking garage. The main reason for this lack of data is that no analytical instrumentation has been available to measure on-line trace amounts of benzene in such situations. We have recently proposed a highly accurate, high-speed cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system for monitoring benzene concentrations in air. Accuracy of the analytical data is achieved by enrichment of the air sample before trapping, with a stable isotope permeation tube system. The same principles have been applied to a new instrument, specifically designed for operation on an electric vehicle (Ducato Elettra, Fiat). The zero emission vehicle and the fully transportable, battery-operated GC/MS system provide a unique possibility of monitoring benzene exposure in real everyday situations such as while driving, refuelling, or repairing a car. All power consumptions have been reduced so as to achieve a battery-operated GC/MS system. Liquid nitrogen cryofocusing has been replaced by a packed, inductively heated, graphitized charcoal microtrap. The instrument has been mounted on shock absorbers and installed in the van. The whole system has been tested in both fixed and mobile conditions. The maximum monitoring period without external power supply is 6 h. The full analytical cycle is 4 min, allowing close to real-time monitoring, and the minimum detectable level is 1 microgram/m3 for benzene. In-vehicle monitoring showed that, when recirculation was off and ventilation on, i.e., air from outside the vehicle was blown inside, concentrations varied widely in different driving conditions: moving from a parking lot into normal traffic on an urban traffic condition roadway yielded an increase in benzene concentration from 17 to 62.3 micrograms/m3 even if the actual distance was small. A larger increase was observed when a car was left with the engine running at a distance 2 m from the zero emission vehicle: We measured an increment of benzene concentrations from 15.2 to 174.4 micrograms/m3 with a car equipped with a catalytic converter, and from 19.1 to 386.3 micrograms/m3 with a car without such a converter. PMID:8738357

  15. Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, Jr., Henry D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

  16. Separation processes using expulsion from dilute supercritical solutions

    DOEpatents

    Cochran, H.D. Jr.

    1993-04-20

    A process is described for separating isotopes as well as other mixtures by utilizing the behavior of dilute repulsive or weakly attractive elements of the mixtures as the critical point of the solvent is approached.

  17. A comparison of lead-isotope measurements on exploration-type samples using inductively coupled plasma and thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulson, B.L.; Meier, A.L.; Church, S.E.; Mizon, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TI-MS) has long been the method of choice for Pb-isotope determinations. More recently, however, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been used to determine Pb-isotope ratios for mineral exploration. The ICP-MS technique, although not as precise as TI-MS, may promote a wider application of Ph-isotope ratio methods because it allows individual isotopes to be determined more rapidly, generally without need for chemical separation (e.g., Smith et al., 1984; Hinners et al., 1987). To demonstrate the utility of the ICP-MS method, we have conducted a series of Pb-isotope measurements on several suites of samples using both TI-MS and ICP-MS. ?? 1989.

  18. Alternative Methodology for Boron Isotopic Analysis of CaCO3 by Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, G. S.; Vengosh, A.

    2012-12-01

    Negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) has been a common tool for investigating boron isotopes in CaCO3 and other environmental samples, the high sensitivity of BO2- ionization enabling measurements of ng levels of boron. However, B isotope measurement by this technique suffers from a number of problems, including: (1) fractionation induced by selective ionization of B isotopes in the mass spectrometer; (2) CNO- interference on mass 42 ([10BO2]-) that may be present in some filament load solutions (such as B-free seawater processed through ion-exchange resin), and (3) potential matrix effects due to widely differing chemistry of samples and standards. Here we examine a potentially improved NTIMS methodology that incudes removal of sample-related calcium (and other cations) by ion exchange and uses an alternative filament loading solution prepared from high-purity single-element solutions of Ca, Mg, Na, and K. Initial results suggest that this new method may offer significant improvement over the more traditional NTIMS approach in which digested CaCO3 samples are directly loaded onto filaments in B-free seawater. Replicate analyses of standards and samples yield a typical standard deviation of approximately 0.3‰ ?11B and boron isotopic compositions comparable to reported or consensus values. Fractionation during analysis has thus far typically been less than 0.5‰ ?11B. The method delivers boron ionization efficiency similar to directly-loaded seawater, and negligible signal at mass 26 (CN-), a proxy for the possible interfering molecular CNO- ion. Standards and samples behave similarly and predictably during filament heating and analysis, thus allowing for fully automated data acquisition, which in turn may increase sample throughput and reduce potential analytical inconsistencies associated with operator-controlled heating and analysis.

  19. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with isotope dilution time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the measurement of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls in foodstuffs. Comparison with other methods.

    PubMed

    Focant, Jean-François; Eppe, Gauthier; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Massart, Anne-Cécile; Pirard, Catherine; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; De Pauw, Edwin

    2005-09-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOF-MS) experimental setup was tested for the measurement of seven 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ten 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), four non-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), eight mono-ortho-PCBs, and six indicator PCBs (Aroclor 1260) in foodstuff samples. A 40m RTX-500 (0.18mm I.D., 0.10 microm df) was used as the first dimension (1D) and a 1.5 m BPX-50 (0.10mm I.D., 0.10 microm df) as the second dimension (2D). The GC x GC chromatographic separation was completed in 45 min. Quantification was performed using 13C-label isotope dilution (ID). Isotope ratios of the selected quantification ions were checked against theoretical values prior to peak assignment and quantification. The dynamic working range spanned three orders of magnitude. The lowest detectable amount of 2,3,7,8-TCDD was 0.2 pg. Fish, pork, and milk samples were considered. On a congener basis, the GC x GC-ID-TOF-MS method was compared to the reference GC-ID high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) method and to the alternative GC-ID tandem-in-time quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometry (QIST-MS/MS). PCB levels ranged from low picogram (pg) to low nanogram (ng) per gram of sample and data compared very well between the different methods. For all matrices, PCDD/Fs were at a low pg level (0.05-3 pg) on a fresh weight basis. Although congener profiles were accurately described, RSDs of GC x GC-ID-TOF-MS and GC-QIST-MS/MS were much higher than for GC-ID-HRMS, especially for low level pork and milk. On a toxic equivalent (TEQ) basis, all methods, including the dioxin-responsive chemically activated luciferase gene expression (DR-CALUX) assay, produced similar responses. A cost comparison is also presented. PMID:16130655

  20. Dilutions Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Lawrence

    1996-01-01

    Presents problems appropriate for high school and college students that highlight dilution methods. Promotes an understanding of dilution methods in order to prevent the unnecessary waste of chemicals and glassware in biology laboratories. (JRH)

  1. Combining the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe approach and clean-up by immunoaffinity column for the analysis of 15 mycotoxins by isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Tessiot, Sabine; Bessaire, Thomas; Racault, Lucie; Fiorese, Elisa; Urbani, Alessandro; Chan, Wai-Chinn; Cheng, Pearly; Mottier, Pascal

    2014-04-11

    Optimization and validation of a multi-mycotoxin method by LC-MS/MS is presented. The method covers the EU-regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 and HT-2), as well as nivalenol and 3- and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol for analysis of cereals, cocoa, oil, spices, infant formula, coffee and nuts. The proposed procedure combines two clean-up strategies: First, a generic preparation suitable for all mycotoxins based on the QuEChERS (for quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged and safe) protocol. Second, a specific clean-up devoted to aflatoxins and ochratoxin A using immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up. Positive identification of mycotoxins in matrix was conducted according to the confirmation criteria defined in EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EC while quantification was performed by isotopic dilution using (13)C-labeled mycotoxins as internal standards. Limits of quantification were at or below the maximum levels set in the EC/1886/2006 document for all mycotoxin/matrix combinations under regulation. In particular, the inclusion of an IAC step allowed achieving LOQs as low as 0.05 and 0.25?g/kg in cereals for aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, respectively. Other performance parameters like linearity [(r)(2)>0.99], recovery [71-118%], precision [(RSDr and RSDiR)<33%], and trueness [78-117%] were all compliant with the analytical requirements stipulated in the CEN/TR/16059 document. Method ruggedness was proved by a verification process conducted by another laboratory. PMID:24636559

  2. Highly sensitive isotope-dilution liquid-chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem-mass spectrometry approach to study the drug-mediated modulation of dopamine and serotonin levels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fabian; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kleuser, Burkhard; Gulbins, Erich; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Aschner, Michael; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (SRT) are monoamine neurotransmitters that play a key role in regulating the central and peripheral nervous system. Their impaired metabolism has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Consequently, it is imperative to monitor changes in levels of these low-abundant neurotransmitters and their role in mediating disease. For the first time, a rapid, specific and sensitive isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of DA and SRT in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This model organism offers a unique approach for studying the effect of various drugs and environmental conditions on neurotransmitter levels, given by the conserved DA and SRT biology, including synaptic release, trafficking and formation. We introduce a novel sample preparation protocol incorporating the usage of sodium thiosulfate in perchloric acid as extraction medium that assures high recovery of the relatively unstable neurotransmitters monitored. Moreover, the use of both deuterated internal standards and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique allows for unequivocal quantification. Thereby, to the best of our knowledge, we achieve a detection sensitivity that clearly exceeds those of published DA and SRT quantification methods in various matrices. We are the first to show that exposure of C. elegans to the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor selegiline or the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone, in order to block DA and SRT degradation, resulted in accumulation of the respective neurotransmitter. Assessment of a behavioral output of the dopaminergic system (basal slowing response) corroborated the analytical LC-MS/MS data. Thus, utilization of the C. elegans model system in conjunction with our analytical method is well-suited to investigate drug-mediated modulation of the DA and SRT system in order to identify compounds with neuroprotective or regenerative properties. PMID:26452793

  3. S1 certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate certified reference material (organochlorine pesticides in tea) by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della Wai-Mei; Wong, Yee-Lok; Cheng, Eddie Chung-Chin; Lo, Man-Fung; Ho, Clare; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Wong, Siu-Kay

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the certification of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in a candidate tea certified reference material (code: GLHK-11-03) according to the requirements of the ISO Guide 30 series. Certification of GLHK-11-03 was based on an analytical method purposely developed for the accurate measurement of the mass fraction of the target analytes in the material. An isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) method involving determination by (i) gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) and (ii) gas chromatography-electron ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-EI-HRMS) techniques was employed. The performance of the described method was demonstrated through participation in the key comparison CCQM-K95 "Mid-Polarity Analytes in Food Matrix: Mid-Polarity Pesticides in Tea" organized by the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance-Metrology in Chemistry in 2012, where the study material was the same as the certified reference material (CRM). The values reported by using the developed method were in good agreement with the key comparison reference value (KCRV) assigned for beta-endosulfan (727?±?14 ?g kg(-1)) and endosulfan sulfate (505?±?11 ?g kg(-1)), where the degree of equivalence (DoE) values were 0.41 and 0.40, respectively. The certified values of alpha-endosulfan, beta-endosulfan, and endosulfan sulfate in dry mass fraction in GLHK-11-03 were 350, 730, and 502 ?g kg(-1), respectively, and the respective expanded uncertainties, due to sample inhomogeneity, long-term and short-term stability, and variability in the characterization procedure, were 27 ?g kg(-1) (7.8 %), 48 ?g kg(-1) (6.6 %), and 33 ?g kg(-1) (6.6 %). PMID:25619984

  4. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  5. Tracing chlorine sources of thermal and mineral springs along and across the Cascade Range using halogen and chlorine isotope compositions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullen, Jeffrey T.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Leeman, William P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide constraints on the sources of chlorine in spring waters associated with arc volcanism, the major/minor element concentrations and stable isotope compositions of chlorine, oxygen, and hydrogen were measured in 28 thermal and mineral springs along the Cascade Range in northwestern USA. Chloride concentrations in the springs range from 64 to 19,000 mg/L and View the MathML source values range from +0.2‰ to +1.9‰ (average=+1.0±0.4‰), with no systematic variation along or across the arc, nor correlations with their presumed underlying basement lithologies. Additionally, nine geochemically well-characterized lavas from across the Mt. St. Helens/Mt. Adams region of the Cascade Range (Leeman et al., 2004 and Leeman et al., 2005) were analyzed for their halogen concentrations and Cl isotope compositions. In the arc lavas, Cl and Br concentrations from the volcanic front are higher than in lavas from the forearc and backarc. F and I concentrations progressively decrease from forearc to backarc, similar to the trend documented for B in most arcs. View the MathML source values of the lavas range from ?0.1 to +0.8‰ (average = +0.4±0.3‰). Our results suggest that the predominantly positive View the MathML source values observed in the springs are consistent with water interaction with underlying 37Cl-enriched basalt and/or altered oceanic crust, thereby making thermal spring waters a reasonable proxy for the Cl isotope compositions of associated volcanic rocks in the Cascades. However, waters with View the MathML source values >+1.0‰ also suggest additional contributions of chlorine degassed from cooling magmas due to subsurface vapor–liquid HCl fractionation in which Cl is lost to the aqueous fluid phase and 37Cl is concentrated in the ascending magmatic HCl vapor. Future work is necessary to better constrain Cl isotope behavior during volcanic degassing and fluid–rock interaction in order to improve volatile flux estimates through subduction zones.

  6. Thermal, chemical and isotopic homogenization of syn-extensional I-type plutons and mafic microgranular enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar Erkül, Sibel; Erkül, Fuat; Uysal, ?brahim

    2015-04-01

    Magma mixing and mingling processes are common phenomenon in the evolution of granitoid magmas. This study deals with examination of mineral chemical, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of enclaves and enclosing syn-extensional granite bodies in western Turkey to make an attempt to solve problems regarding their origin. Mafic microgranular enclaves have granodiorite, quartz monzonite, monzonite and monzodiorite compositions, are subalkaline/calc-alkaline and high-K in character and display typical mixing/mingling textures. Mafic enclaves have partially overlapping geochemical characteristics onto their host rocks in terms of mobile elements and their isotopes while distinct immobile element patterns occur within host rocks and enclaves. Contrasting geochemistry of enclaves is mainly defined by their low SiO2 and high MgO, Mg# and high Fe2O3 contents. Chondrite-normalized spidergrams of enclaves also reveal two contrasting patterns. One is relatively enriched in rare earth element content and the other is slightly enriched and displays relatively flat pattern. 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd contents of enclaves imply considerable amount of crustal input. Crustally derived felsic magma coeval with mafic magma have been chemically, thermally and mechanically exchanged with each other and resulting homogenization led to compositional and isotopic equilibration of mafic and felsic magmas. Fractional crystallization, mixing and the following crustal contamination were responsible for the final composition of syn-extensional granitoids. Such processes appear to have been widely occurred in continental extensional regime that caused melting and mixing of crustal and mantle sources at MOHO depth.

  7. Variable magnitude of carbon isotope excursions in organic and inorganic terrestrial carbon pools during the Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, J. M.; Sheldon, N. D.; Hren, M. T.; Gallagher, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is the highest magnitude rapid warming event in recent geologic history and is analogous to current climate change, yet the amount and rate of release of carbon is poorly constrained. The size of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) during the PETM has been used to determine source and amount of carbon released during the event, as well as the subsequent rise in atmospheric pCO2. However, the magnitude of this CIE is highly variable in different environments (marine vs. terrestrial) as well as in different terrestrial carbon records (organic vs. inorganic C). Pedogenic carbonates were first used to identify the carbon isotope excursion on land. Pedogenic carbonates are precipitated from CO2 in the soil atmosphere, the majority of which is derived from the degradation of plant material and so the isotopic composition of these carbonates should be representative of the ?13Corg of plants. However, we find that the CIE is larger in carbonates than in organic material preserved in the same paleosols for two difference sites in the western United States. Previously published data from the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming show a CIE that is up to 3‰ larger in the pedogenic carbonates than the preserved organic material. In Axhandle Canyon in Utah, our new data indicates that the CIE is 2‰ greater in the carbonates than in the preserved organic material. This discrepancy in CIE causes a regional ?13C (?13Ccarb - ?13Corg) excursion during the global warming event. Mechanisms for this ?13C excursion will be discussed with regard to the rapid warming during the PETM as well as implications for pedogenic carbonate paleobarometry.

  8. Isotope ratio analysis of actinides, fission products, and geolocators by high-efficiency multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürger, S.; Riciputi, L. R.; Bostick, D. A.; Turgeon, S.; McBay, E. H.; Lavelle, M.

    2009-09-01

    A ThermoFisher "Triton" multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometer (MC-TIMS) was evaluated for trace and ultra-trace level isotope ratio analysis of actinides (uranium, plutonium, and americium), fission products and geolocators (strontium, cesium, and neodymium). Total efficiencies (atoms loaded to ions detected) of up to 0.5-2% for U, Pu, and Am, and 1-30% for Sr, Cs, and Nd can be reported employing resin bead load techniques onto flat ribbon Re filaments or resin beads loaded into a millimeter-sized cavity drilled into a Re rod. This results in detection limits of <0.1 fg (104 atoms to 105 atoms) for 239-242+244Pu, 233+236U, 241-243Am, 89,90Sr, and 134,135,137Cs, and <=1 pg for natural Nd isotopes (limited by the chemical processing blank) using a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) or multiple-ion counters (MICs). Relative standard deviations (RSD) as small as 0.1% and abundance sensitivities of 1 × 106 or better using a SEM are reported here. Precisions of RSD [approximate]0.01-0.001% using a multi-collector Faraday cup array can be achieved at sub-nanogram concentrations for strontium and neodymium and are suitable to gain crucial geolocation information. The analytical protocols reported herein are of particular value for nuclear forensic and nuclear safeguard applications.

  9. Effect of carbon and hydrogen isotopic substitutions on the thermal diffusion of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal diffusion factor of the benzene/carbon 13 substituted benzene pair and of the benzene/deuterated benzene pair are reported. The results show some interesting effects of mass distribution. (AIP)

  10. Chemical and isotopic composition of the Monfortinho thermal water (Portugal): contribution to the aquifer conceptual model and resource evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Rosário Carvalho, Maria; Martins Carvalho, José

    2015-04-01

    Groundwaters from quartzite aquifers are usually cold waters with very low mineralization as consequence of circulation in fractured aquifers and rocks with very low solubility. In the Monfortinho, Beira Baixa region in Portugal, a thermal water occurs associated to a Ordovician quartzite syncline, the Penha Garcia syncline (Sequeira et al., 1999). The thermal water is used for balneology and supplies a thermal Spa trough boreholes discharging about 36 l/s. The syncline of Penha Garcia has NW-SE axis and is fractured by a NE-SW fault, where the valley of Ponsul river is developed. The natural discharge of the thermal aquifer occur at the SE edge of the syncline. The Monfortinho thermal water has temperature around 30 °C, pH of 5.45, very low mineralization, with electric conductivity about 35 uS/cm; the main dissolved specie is the SiO2 that reaches 24 mg/L, corresponding to 53% of the total dissolved solids. The chemical facies is of Na-HCO3 type. The d18O and d2H diagram indicates that Monfortinho water is derived from the local meteoric waters. The ?18O and ?2H content also pointed out a recharge area of the thermal aquifer above 400 m of elevation, with a isotopic gradient value of -0.15‰ d18O/100m. This elevation corresponds to the top of the eastern block of the syncline, suggesting that Ponsul fault is a negative barrier to groundwater flow and the thermal aquifer is developed only in eastern block of the syncline. The groundwater flows at about 600-700 m depth along the syncline base toward SE. The average rainfall in the region is 790 mm/year and the estimated recharge is about 17% (Carvalho, 2001) of the precipitation, corresponding to 134 mm/year and 4x105 m3/ano of hydrothermal resource. References: Carvalho, JM (2001). A Hidrogeologia das águas minerais naturais de Monfortinho. Geonovas, Rev. Assoc. Portg. Geólogos, Lisboa, v15, pp. 61-70 (in portuguese). Sequeira, AF, Cunha, PP, Ribeiro, ML (1999). Notícia Explicativa da Folha 25-B Salvaterra do Extremo. Departamento de Geologia, Instituto Geológico e Mineiro, 47 pp. (in portuguese).

  11. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-l-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-l-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-l-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-l-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of toxicokinetics and daily internal exposure evaluations of acrylamide in vivo. PMID:26423628

  12. Thermal history of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary at Arrow Canyon, NV, USA: Insights from carbonate clumped isotopes and fluid inclusion microthermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenton, B.; Grossman, E. L.; Passey, B. H.; Henkes, G. A.; Becker, S. P.; Pottorf, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining the temperature-time history of sedimentary basins is critical for understanding basin evolution and related problems, such as petroleum systems analysis and genesis of metallic ore deposits. The importance of burial history studies is confirmed by the abundance and diversity of techniques aimed at acquiring thermal history information. Often, multiple techniques are required to fully characterize sediment thermal histories because each tool targets different burial temperatures (e.g., maximum burial temperature, T-t points, or cooling rates) and different indicators may be limited by suitable study material or geologic setting. Therefore it is important to test new techniques, such as clumped isotopes, that may aid in reconstructing basin thermal histories. The potential utility of clumped isotopes as a thermal history tool is suggested by the observation of elevated clumped isotope temperatures in nominally well-preserved fossils, and also from recent laboratory heating experiments showing that C-O bonds can reorder in the solid-state during heating. While this phenomenon conceals primary paleoclimate information, it may record burial temperatures useful for constraining basin thermal histories. Here we present clumped isotope measurements from brachiopods, crinoids, diagenetic cements, and bulk matrix material collected from within ~ 50 m of the global stratotype section and point (GSSP) for the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian boundary along with new fluid inclusion microthermometry data. Preliminary clumped isotope temperatures range from ~100-165 °C and generally cluster based on component type. Secondary fluid inclusion assemblages in blocky calcite cement indicate that strata surrounding the GSSP experienced at least 175-180 °C during burial in the Antler foreland basin. The fact that clumped isotope temperatures in all carbonate components are lower than independently constrained peak temperature estimates from fluid inclusions suggests that clumped isotope compositions either (1) reordered extensively, but not completely, during heating or (2) equilibrated with ambient burial temperature during heating and now reflect ';closure temperatures' achieved during cooling. Our data also suggest that different carbonate components that experience the same T-t history can yield different clumped isotope temperatures.

  13. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  14. Diffusion artifacts in dating by stepwise thermal release of rare gases. [Ar isotope lunar chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the age of an isochron of apparent age plateau can be easily altered during a thermal release experiment, and that constant rare gas compositions can be observed which are artifacts of the experimental technique and are not chronologically meaningful. Examples are selected from 40Ar-39Ar dating of lunar samples in which anomalous variations in apparent ages can be ascribed to such experimental artifacts.

  15. Rhenium-osmium isotope systematics of ordinary chondrites and iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Morgan, J. W.; Horan, M. F.; Grossman, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    Using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry, Re and Os abundances were determined by isotope dilution and Os-187/Os-186 measured in 11 ordinary chondrites, and also in 1 IIB and 3 IIIB irons. In addition, Os-186/Os-188 and Os-189/Os-188 ratios were precisely determined for 3 unspiked ordinary chondrites as a means of constraining the intensity of any neutron irradiation these meteorites may have experienced.

  16. MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

  17. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.H.; Kennedy, B.M. ); Truesdell, A.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Early studies of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium. Kennedy et al, however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations correlate with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO{sub 2} and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface.

  18. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, E. H.; Kennedy, B. M.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1990-11-01

    Early studies of 3He/ 4He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic 3He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic 3He-rich helium. Kennedy et al. (1987), however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect 3He /4He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO 3- concentrations correlate with 3He /4He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO 2 (and therefore HCO 3-) and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface.

  19. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, E.H.; Kennedy, B.M.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    Early studies of 3He/4He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic 3He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic 3He-rich helium. Kennedy et al. (1987), however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect 3He 4He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO3- concentrations correlate with 3He 4He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO2 (and therefore HCO3-) and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface. ?? 1990.

  20. Determination of thermal and cementation histories from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and ion microprobe stable isotope analyses: A San Joaquin Basin example

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, K.I.; Harrison, T.M.; Grove, M.; Lovera, O.M.

    1996-12-31

    Knowledge of the temperature and cementation histories of sedimentary basins is key to appraisal of their liquid hydrocarbon potential. Understanding the thermal history permits assessment of whether source rocks have experienced conditions appropriate for petroleum formation. The mobility of hydrocarbons and their storage capacity in sandstone reservoirs are directly related to porosity changes during diagenesis. Recent advances in {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating (stripping of Cl-correlated Ar{sub xs} Multi-Diffusion Domain model) and development of ion micro-probe techniques for precise ({+-}0.6{per_thousand}) {mu}m-scale oxygen isotopic analysis provide a basis to quantitatively determine thermal and cementation histories. Arkosic sandstones of the Stevens turbidities, San Joaquin basin, are cemented by carbonates with minor amounts of clay and quartz. Detrital K-spars from depths of 4.12 (A4) and 6.61 km (Al) in the Stevens zone at Elk Hills yield thermal histories via the MDD model. These results indicate a broadly linear temperature rise of 9{+-}3{degrees}C/Ma over the past 10 Ma and predict current peak temperatures that are within error ({+-}25{degrees}C) of the measured values of 200{degrees} (Al) and 150{degrees}C (A4). Previous bulk isotopic analyses of cements from Stevens sands at North Coles Levee indicate that diagenetic pore fluids were modified by the introduction of hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} from maturing source horizons. In situ O isotopic analyses of 10 {mu}m spots in these cements confirms this heterogeneity. A model cementation history can then be calculated by linking the oxygen isotopic composition of the cements (and temperature-dependent fractionation factor) with the thermal history independently established from thermochronometry.

  1. A 10-fold improvement in the precision of boron isotopic analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jason Jiun-San; You, Chen-Feng

    2003-05-01

    Boron isotopes are potentially very important to cosmochemistry, geochemistry, and paleoceanography. However, the application has been hampered by the large sample required for positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (PTIMS), and high mass fractionation for negative-TIMS (NTIMS). Running as BO(2)(-), NTIMS is very sensitive and requires only nanogram sized samples, but it has rather poor precision (approximately 0.7-2.0 per thousand) as a result of the larger mass fractionation associated with the relatively light ion. In contrast, running as the much heavier molecule of Cs(2)BO(2)(+), PTIMS usually achieves better precision around 0.1-0.4 per thousand. Moreover, there is a consistent 10 per thousand offset in the (11)B/(10)B ratio for NIST SRM 951 standard boric acid between the NTIMS and the certified value, but the cause of this offset is unclear. In this paper, we have adapted a technique we developed earlier to measure the (138)La/(139)La using LaO(+) (1) to improve the NTIMS technique for BO(2). We were able to correct for instrumental fractionation by measuring BO(2)(-) species not only at masses of 42 and 43, but also at 45, which enabled us to normalize (45)BO(2)/(43)BO(2) to an empirical (18)O/(16)O value. We found that both I(45)/I(42) = ((11)B(16)O(18)O/(10)B(16)O(16)O) and (I(43)/I(42))(C) = ((11)B(16)O(16)O/(10)B(16)O(16)O) vary linearly with (I(45)/I(43))(C) x 0.5 = ((11)B(16)O(18)O/(11)B(16)O(16)O) x 0.5 = (18)O/(16)O. In addition, different activators and different chemical forms of B yield different slopes for the fractionation lines. After normalizing (11)B(16)O(18)O/(11)B(16)O(16)O x 0.5 to a fixed (18)O/(16)O value, we obtained a mean (11)B/(10)B value of NIST SRM 951 that matches the NIST certified value at 4.0430 +/- 0.0015 (+/-0.36 per thousand, n = 11). As a result, our technique can achieve precision and accuracy comparable to that of PTIMS with only 1 per thousand of the sample required. This new NTIMS technique for B isotopes is critical to the studies of early solids in the solar system and individual foraminifera in sediments that require both high sensitivity and precision. PMID:12720329

  2. Sedimentology and Carbon Isotope in Lower Tertiary Sediments of Rajasthan:Implication to Post Paleocene/Eocene Thermal Maximum Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, A.; Sarkar, A.; Bera, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maxima (PETM; ~55 My.), identified as the most abrupt and transient climatic events in Cenozoic era, associated with pronounced warming of ocean and atmosphere, change in ocean chemistry, and perturbation of global carbon cycle. Catastrophic (~5° -6° C) rise in the deep sea temperature and oxygen deficiency might cause 30-50% extinction of benthic foraminifera, increase in sea surface temperature by ~8° C at high latitude (lesser amount towards equator) affected the planktonic biota, and this global warming event led to a pulse of speciation or migration of mammal. PETM is characterized by a prominent drop in carbon isotope values by ~3-4 per mil in both marine and terrestrial sediments in less than 10 ka. The source and triggering mechanism of PETM event are still raging debate. Input of massive amount of greenhouse gas from the dissociation of 13C poor methane hydrate from the continental slop as well as from the terrestrial biosphere is currently the most acceptable explanation for the warming and the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Like other catastrophic events the post-PETM recovery was gradual. Interestingly, ?13C of both carbonate and organic matter shifted towards positive during the recovery period possibly as a combined effect of increased organic burial and silicate weathering. Compared to most studied PETM and post-PETM sections of subtropical to high latitudes, data for equatorial regions and marginal marine are scanty. The marginal marine are important as the effect of silicate weathering or increased burial of shallow marine organic matter will be more pronounced here. The lower Tertiary marginal marine successions of Rajasthan (Akli formation; Giral lignite mine) (paleolatitude ~5° S) shed light on the PETM and post-PETM events and the response of the events on equatorial marginal marine environment. Sedimentological studies suggest that the Akli formation was deposited in a lagoonal environment occasionally inundated by marine incursions. High resolution ?13C Bulk organic matter profile in these lignitic beds and its comparison with the oceanic foraminiferal carbonate ?13C profile reveals that the upper part of the Akli formation was deposited during Early Eocene or recovery phase of PETM. This inference is also supported by the presence of larger benthic foraminifera Nummulites burdigalensis (~52My) in the sand beds. The preliminary data (presence of lignites and C/N Values) suggest that substantial organic carbon burial in shallow seas world over could have been responsible for atmospheric CO2 reduction and enriched ?13C values during the early Eocene period.

  3. Constraining groundwater discharge in a large watershed: Integrated isotopic, hydraulic, and thermal data from the Canadian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Tom; Novakowski, Kent; Cook, Peter G.; Kyser, T. Kurt

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the pattern and rate of groundwater discharge in a large, regulated fractured rock watershed using novel and standard methods that are independent of base flow recession. Understanding the rate and pattern of groundwater discharge to surface water bodies is critical for watershed budgets, as a proxy for recharge rates, and for protecting the ecological integrity of lake and river ecosystems. The Tay River is a low-gradient, warm-water river that flows over exposed and fractured bedrock or a thin veneer of coarse-grained sediments. Natural conservative (?2H, ?18O, Cl, and specific conductance), radioactive (222Rn), and thermal tracers are integrated with streamflow measurements and a steady state advective model to delimit the discharge locations and quantify the discharge fluxes to lakes, wetlands, creeks, and the Tay River. The groundwater discharge rates to most surface water body types are low, indicating that the groundwater and surface water system may be largely decoupled in this watershed compared to watersheds underlain by porous media. Groundwater discharge is distributed across the watershed rather than localized around lineaments or high-density zones of exposed brittle fractures. The results improve our understanding of the rate, localization, and conceptualization of discharge in a large, fractured rock watershed. Applying hydraulic, isotopic, or chemical hydrograph separation techniques would be difficult because the groundwater discharge "signal" is small compared to the "background" surface water inflows or volumes of the surface water bodies. Although this study focuses on a large watershed underlain by fractured bedrock, the methodology developed is transferable to any large regulated or unregulated watershed. The low groundwater discharge rates have significant implications for the ecology, sustainability, and management of large, crystalline watersheds.

  4. Phonon coherence in isotopic silicon superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Frieling, R.; Radek, M.; Eon, S.; Bracht, H.; Wolf, D. E.

    2014-09-29

    Recent experimental and theoretical investigations have confirmed that a reduction in thermal conductivity of silicon is achieved by isotopic silicon superlattices. In the present study, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed to identify the isotope doping and isotope layer ordering with minimum thermal conductivity. Furthermore, the impact of isotopic intermixing at the superlattice interfaces on phonon transport is investigated. Our results reveal that the coherence of phonons in isotopic Si superlattices is prevented if interfacial mixing of isotopes is considered.

  5. Assessment of groundwater pollution from ash ponds using stable and unstable isotopes around the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (Maharashtra, India).

    PubMed

    Voltaggio, M; Spadoni, M; Sacchi, E; Sanam, R; Pujari, P R; Labhasetwar, P K

    2015-06-15

    The impact on local water resources due to fly ash produced in the Koradi and Khaperkheda thermal power plants (district of Nagpur, Maharashtra - India) and disposed in large ponds at the surface was assessed through the study of environmental variation of ratios of stable and unstable isotopes. Analyses of oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest scarce interaction between the water temporarily stored in the ponds and the groundwater in the study area. Data also highlight that the high salinity of groundwater measured in the polluted wells is not due to evaporation, but to subsequent infiltration of stream waters draining from the ponds to the local aquifer. (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, when associated with Sr/Ca ratios, demonstrate the dominant role of waste waters coming from tens of brick kilns surrounding the pond sulfate pollution. Uranium isotopic analyses clearly show evidence of the interaction between groundwater and aquifer rocks, and confirm again the low influence of ash ponds. A new conceptual model based on the study of the isotopes of radium is also proposed and used to estimate residence times of groundwater in the area. This model highlights that high salinity cannot be in any case attributed to a prolonged water-rock interaction, but is due to the influence of untreated waste water of domestic or brick kiln origin on the shallow and vulnerable aquifers. PMID:25783943

  6. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, P.R.; Gray, K.E.

    1988-09-13

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation is disclosed. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains [sup 3]He and [sup 4]He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing [sup 3]He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a [sup 3]He rich liquid phase from a dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the [sup 3]He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He liquid phase. 2 figs.

  7. Helium dilution refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick R. (Darien, IL); Gray, Kenneth E. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A helium dilution refrigeration system operable over a limited time period, and recyclable for a next period of operation. The refrigeration system is compact with a self-contained pumping system and heaters for operation of the system. A mixing chamber contains .sup.3 He and .sup.4 He liquids which are precooled by a coupled container containing .sup.3 He liquid, enabling the phase separation of a .sup.3 He rich liquid phase from a dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase which leads to the final stage of a dilution cooling process for obtaining low temperatures. The mixing chamber and a still are coupled by a fluid line and are maintained at substantially the same level with the still cross sectional area being smaller than that of the mixing chamber. This configuration provides maximum cooling power and efficiency by the cooling period ending when the .sup.3 He liquid is depleted from the mixing chamber with the mixing chamber nearly empty of liquid helium, thus avoiding unnecessary and inefficient cooling of a large amount of the dilute .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He liquid phase.

  8. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation. PMID:25479434

  9. Tracing chlorine sources of thermal and mineral springs along and across the Cascade Range using halogen concentrations and chlorine isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Jeffrey T.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Leeman, William P.

    2015-09-01

    In order to provide constraints on the sources of chlorine in spring waters associated with arc volcanism, the major/minor element concentrations and stable isotope compositions of chlorine, oxygen, and hydrogen were measured in 28 thermal and mineral springs along the Cascade Range in northwestern USA. Chloride concentrations in the springs range from 64 to 19,000 mg/L and ?37Cl values range from + 0.2 ‰ to + 1.9 ‰ (average = + 1.0 ± 0.4 ‰), with no systematic variation along or across the arc, nor correlations with their presumed underlying basement lithologies. Additionally, nine geochemically well-characterized lavas from across the Mt. St. Helens/Mt. Adams region of the Cascade Range (Leeman et al., 2004, 2005) were analyzed for their halogen concentrations and Cl isotope compositions. In the arc lavas, Cl and Br concentrations from the volcanic front are higher than in lavas from the forearc and backarc. F and I concentrations progressively decrease from forearc to backarc, similar to the trend documented for B in most arcs. ?37Cl values of the lavas range from -0.1 to + 0.8 ‰ (average = + 0.4 ± 0.3 ‰). Our results suggest that the predominantly positive ?37Cl values observed in the springs are consistent with water interaction with underlying 37Cl-enriched basalt and/or altered oceanic crust, thereby making thermal spring waters a reasonable proxy for the Cl isotope compositions of associated volcanic rocks in the Cascades. However, waters with ?37Cl values > + 1.0 ‰ also suggest additional contributions of chlorine degassed from cooling magmas due to subsurface vapor-liquid HCl fractionation in which Cl is lost to the aqueous fluid phase and 37Cl is concentrated in the ascending magmatic HCl vapor. Future work is necessary to better constrain Cl isotope behavior during volcanic degassing and fluid-rock interaction in order to improve volatile flux estimates through subduction zones.

  10. The effect of steam-heating processes on the chemical and isotopic composition of the shallow thermal aquifer in Vulcano Island (Aeolian Arc, Sicily).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, G.; Federico, C.; Madonia, P.; Paonita, A.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of major-ion chemistry, dissolved gases, and stable isotopes measured in water wells at Vulcano Island since 1988. Particularly, we focus on chemical and hydrological modifications of groundwaters observed in the last two decades, interpreted according to a quantitative model describing steam condensation and boiling phenomena in shallow water bodies (Federico et al., 2010). According to this model, we infer that (i) strong isotope enrichment observed in some shallow thermal waters can result from an increasing mass rate of condensing deep vapor, even in water being meteoric in origin; (ii) the high pCO2 measured in the coldest and peripheral waters are explained by the progressive CO2 enrichment in the vapor phase during multistep boiling; and (iii) the high Cl- and SO4-- contents in the hottest waters can be attributed to the direct condensation (single-step) of volcanic vapor. The model also takes into account both the mass fluxes and the compositions of the involved endmembers (steam and shallow groundwater), which provides important inferences on the modifications observed during the periods of increasing mass and heat input from depth occurred at Vulcano Island. The volcanic crisis that occurred in 1988-1993 profoundly affected the composition of some thermal wells that were more-directly affected by ascending vapour. In particular, higher Cl-, SO4--, and HCO3- contents, temperature, and pCO2 values were measured. These variations are all explained by a different composition of the vapor entering the aquifer paralleled by a higher mass rate relative to the shallow meteoric endmember. Minor effects on the shallow thermal aquifer are observed during the following periods of increasing heat and mass flux from depth, mostly recorded in the crater area. This implies that the shallow thermal aquifer is affected by magmatic fluids ascending along central conduits only when there is a significant increase in the heat and mass fluxes from depth, which are able to vaporize the deep hydrothermal aquifer and modify the chemical and isotopic compositions of a larger portion of the volcanic edifice. Otherwise, the shallow thermal aquifer is chiefly affected by the vapor separating from the 400°C- hydrothermal system and, therefore, by its P-T conditions. On these grounds, once apportioned the effect of rainwater, we tentatively evaluate the effect of variations of physico-chemical conditions of the hydrothermal aquifer on both the water level and the composition of sampled thermal waters.

  11. Automatic diluter for bacteriological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Bleuze, P; Leroy, G; Moschetto, Y; Leclerc, H

    1983-01-01

    The described apparatus, carrying 190 tubes, allows automatic and aseptic dilution of liquid or suspended-solid samples. Serial 10-fold dilutions are programmable from 10(-1) to 10(-9) and are carried out in glass tubes with screw caps and split silicone septa. Dilution assays performed with strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus permitted efficient conditions for sterilization of the needle to be defined and showed that the automatic dilutions were as accurate and as reproducible as the most rigorous conventional dilutions. Images PMID:6338826

  12. Effects of steam-heating processes on a stratified volcanic aquifer: Stable isotopes and dissolved gases in thermal waters of Vulcano Island (Aeolian archipelago)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, C.; Capasso, G.; Paonita, A.; Favara, R.

    2010-05-01

    We report on a comprehensive study of major-ion chemistry, dissolved gases, and stable isotopes measured in water wells at Vulcano Island since 1988. The work focuses on a quantitative model describing steam condensation and boiling phenomena in shallow water bodies. The model is based on the differences in partition coefficients between liquid water and vapor characterizing oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, as well as volcanic gases (CO 2, S species, and HCl). Based on both physical conditions of aquifers identified during drilling campaigns and the composition of the volcanic vapor, mass and enthalpy balances are applied in a multistep process of steam separation and condensation in shallower aquifers. By comparing the model results with measured data, we infer that (i) strong isotope enrichment observed in some shallow thermal waters can result from an increasing mass rate of condensing deep vapor, even in water meteoric in origin; (ii) the high CO 2 content measured in the fumarolic vapor during 1988-1993 affected the ?18O value of the steam-heated water due to CO 2-H 2O isotope exchange; (iii) the high pCO 2 measured in the coldest and peripheral waters are explained by the progressive enrichment of this gas in the vapor phase during multistep boiling; and (iv) the high Cl - and SO 42-contents in the hottest waters can be attributed to the direct condensation (single-step) of volcanic vapor. The model also takes into account both the mass fluxes and the compositions of the involved endmembers (steam and shallow groundwater), which provides important inferences on the modifications observed or expected during periods of increasing mass and heat input from depth.

  13. Mass-dependent and Mass-independent Sulphur Isotope Fractionation Accompanying Thermal- and Photo-chemical Decomposition of Sulphur Bearing Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Izon, Gareth; Ono, Shuhei

    2014-05-01

    The bimodal S-isotope record, specifically the transition from mass independent (MIF) to mass dependent fractionation (MDF), is perhaps the most widely cited line of evidence for an irreversible rise in atmospheric oxygen at ca. 2.4Ga. The production and preservation of S-MIF, manifested in both ?33S and ?36S, within the geological record are linked to atmospheric O2 via a number of arguments. However, to date, the only mechanism capable of generating S-MIF consistent with the Archaean sedimentary records involves gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of SO21 photolysis. More recently, ?33S S-MIF trends have been reported from en vitro thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) experiments, prompting authors to question the importance of S-MIF as a proxy for Earth oxidation2. Importantly, whilst emerging TSR experiments3,4 affirm the reported ?33S trends2, these experiments fail to identify correlated S-MIF between ?33S and ?36S values3,4. Realization that S-MIF is confined to ?33S during TSR, precludes TSR as a mechanism responsible for the origin of the Archaean S-MIF record but strongly suggests the effect originating from a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with 33S nucleus3,4. Clearly, photochemical and thermochemical processes impart different ?36S/?33S trends with significant variation in ?34S; however, a complete experimental elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the S-MIF and S-MIE signatures is lacking. Interestingly, a complete understanding of the S-isotope chemistry during thermal- and photo-chemical decomposition may reveal wavelength and thermal dependence archived in the sedimentary record. Here we extend the experimental database to explore the magnitude and sign of ?36S/?33S and ?34S produced during both photo- and thermochemical processes. Here the organic sulphur compounds (OSC) utilized in these experiments carries diagnostic ?36S/?33S patterns that differ from those reported from photolysis experiment SO2 and from the Archaean sedimentary record. Further thermal decomposition of several sulphur containing compounds with; 1) an aliphatic-S (e.g., diphenyl disulphide), 2) tri-substituted aromatic-S (trithiane), and S-amino acids (e.g., cysteine, methionine, taurine, and glutathionine) were tested for four S-isotope fractionation under vacuum. Among these, aromatic trithiane produced anomalous 33S up to 1.3‰, indicating thermal decomposition through radical chemistry, producing S-MIE. While taurine with sulphonic acid (R-SO2OH) functional groups yielded S-MDF up to 15‰ (between the AVS and the residual OSC), which is consistent with estimated zero-point energy shifts for thiol (R-SH), and thiyl (R-S-CH3) groups of cysteine and methionine, respectively. These results suggest that OSC might undergo either thermal or photochemical decomposition and the S-MIF, S-MDF, and S-MIE signatures may be archived in the geologic record. The emerging mechanisms responsible for these isotope signals and their implications will be discussed in more detail. Ultimately this work offers a framework where these signals can be used as a diagnostic marker to distinguish between thermo- and photochemical processes. References: 1. Farquhar et al., Science 2000 2. Watanabe et al., Science 2010; 3. Oduro et al., PNAS 2011; 4. Kopf and Ono, GCA 2012.

  14. Diluted magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, XiaoLi; Qi, ShiFei; Jiang, FengXian; Quan, ZhiYong; Xu, XiaoHong

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we review the progress of research on ZnO- and In2O3-based diluted magnetic oxides (DMOs). Firstly, we present the preparation and characterization of DMOs. The former includes the preparation methods and conditions, and the latter includes the characterization techniques for measuring microstructures. Secondly, we introduce the magnetic and transport properties of DMOs, as well as the relationship between them. Thirdly, the origin and mechanism of the ferromagnetism are discussed. Fourthly, we introduce other related work, including computational work and pertinent heterogeneous structures, such as multilayers and magnetic tunnel junctions. Finally, we provide an overview and outlook for DMOs.

  15. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, W.F.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above ca. 140??C and that little re-equilibration occurs during ascent to the surface. The geothermometer is, however, affected by changes in ??18O of water due to subsurface boiling and dilution and by addition of sulfate of nearsurface origin. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures of 360, 240, and 142??C, respectively. ?? 1976.

  16. Determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium in environmental air filters

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1994-08-26

    For many years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has collected monthly air-particulate filter samples from a variety of environmental monitoring stations on and off site. Historically the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium collected on these filters was determined by isotope dilution using a {sup 233}U spike and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). For samples containing as little as 10 nanograms of uranium, ICP-MS is now used to make these measurements to the required level of precision, about 5% in the measured 235/238 and 233/238. Unless particular care is taken to control bias in the mass filter, variable mass bias limits accuracy to a few percent. Measurements of the minor isotopes 236 (if present) and 234 are also possible and provide useful information for identifying the source of the uranium. The advantage of ICP-MS is in rapid analysis, {approximately}12 minutes of instrument time per sample.

  17. Dilute oriented loop models

    E-print Network

    Eric Vernier; Jesper Lykke Jacobsen; Hubert Saleur

    2015-09-25

    We study a model of dilute oriented loops on the square lattice, where each loop is compatible with a fixed, alternating orientation of the lattice edges. This implies that loop strands are not allowed to go straight at vertices, and results in an enhancement of the usual O(n) symmetry to U(n). The corresponding transfer matrix acts on a number of representations (standard modules) that grows exponentially with the system size. We derive their dimension and those of the centraliser by both combinatorial and algebraic techniques. A mapping onto a field theory permits us to identify the conformal field theory governing the critical range, $n \\le 1$. We establish the phase diagram and the critical exponents of low-energy excitations. For generic n, there is a critical line in the universality class of the dilute O(2n) model, terminating in an SU(n+1) point. The case n=1 maps onto the critical line of the six-vertex model, along which exponents vary continuously.

  18. Determination of femtogram quantities of protactinium in geologic samples by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.A.; Murrell, M.T.; Williams, R.W. )

    1994-04-01

    We describe a procedure for measurement of [sup 231]Pa in geologic samples by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, using [sup 233]Pa as a spike isotope, which provides marked improvements in precision and sample size relative to established decay counting techniques. This method allows determination of as little as a few tens of femtograms of [sup 231]Pa (approximately 10[sup 3] atoms) with a conservative estimated uncertainty of [+-]1% (95% confidence level). Applications of [sup 231]Pa-[sup 235]U systematics to uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology should be greatly enhanced by this approach. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Chemical and isotopic compositions of thermal waters in Anatolia, Turkey: A link to fluid-mineral equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Halim; Gülec, Nilgün; Hilton, David R.

    2015-04-01

    The complex magmato-tectonic setting of Turkey has resulted in the occurrence of numerous geothermal fields with distinct chemical and isotopic fluid compositions. We evaluate the data on these fluids in terms of water-rock interaction, mineral equilibrium conditions and reservoir temperatures of each geothermal field. The Ca-HCO3 rich nature of most waters is ascribed to derivation from carbonate-type reservoir rocks. SO4-type waters are found in areas where the reservoir is partly comprised of evaporite units. Na-Cl type waters are characteristic for the coastal areas of west Anatolia. Chemical geothermometer applications estimate average reservoir temperatures of 180 °C for the western Anatolian region, 120 °C for the Bal?kesir region, 130 °C for the eastern Anatolian region, 140 °C for the North Anatolian Fault Zone and 70 °C for the Eski?ehir region. For most of the waters, chalcedony controls the silica solubility and the majority of waters are equilibrated with calcite and chalcedony minerals. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions (-13.5 to -4 permil (VSMOW) and -95.4 to -23 permil (VSMOW), respectively) are generally conformable with Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL); however, stable isotope systematics of geothermal waters close to the coast are consistent with the Mediterranean Meteoric Water Line (MMWL). Carbon and sulfur isotope compositions (?13C (VPDB): -17.7 to +5.6 permil and ?34S (VCDT): -5.5 to +45.7 permil) suggest marine carbonates and terrestrial evaporite units as the main source of dissolved carbon and sulfate in the waters.

  20. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  1. Uranium-lead Isotope Evidence in the Shelyabinsk LL5 Chondrite Meteorite for Ancient and Recent Thermal Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapen, T. J.; Kring, D. A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Swindle, T. D.; Beard, S. P.; Swindle, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    The impact histories on chondrite parent bodies can be deduced from thermochronologic analyses of materials and isotope systems with distinct apparent closure temperatures. It is especially critical to better understand the geological histories and physical properties of potenally hazardous near-Earth asteroids. Chelyabinsk is an LL5 chondrite meteorite that was dispersed over a wide area tens of kilometers south of the town of Chelyabinsk, Russia by an explosion at an altitude of 27 km at 3:22 UT on 15 Feb 2013 [1,2]. The explosion resulted in significant damage to surrounding areas and over 1500 injuries along with meteorite fragments being spread over a wide area [1].

  2. Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

  3. Method for ultra-trace cesium isotope ratio measurements from environmental samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Mann, Nick R.; White, Byron M.

    2015-05-01

    135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can provide the age, origin and history of environmental Cs contamination. Relatively high precision 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratio measurements from samples containing femtogram quantities of 137Cs are needed to accurately track contamination resuspension and redistribution following environmental 137Cs releases; however, mass spectrometric analyses of environmental samples are limited by the large quantities of ionization inhibitors and isobaric interferences which are present at relatively high concentrations in the environment. We report a new approach for Cs purification from environmental samples. An initial ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) column provides a robust method for extracting Cs under a wide variety of sample matrices and mass loads. Cation exchange separations using a second AMP-PAN column result in more than two orders of magnitude greater Cs/Rb separation factors than commercially available strong cation exchangers. Coupling an AMP-PAN cation exchanging step to a microcation column (AG50W resin) enables consistent 2-4% (2?) measurement errors for samples containing 3-6,000 fg 137Cs, representing the highest precision 135Cs/137Cs ratio measurements currently reported for soil samples at the femtogram level.

  4. Dilute magnetic semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, J. S.; Kazakova, O.; Holmes, J. D.

    2006-11-01

    Semiconductor materials form the basis of modern electronics, communication, data storage and computing technologies. One of today’s challenges for the development of future technologies is the realization of devices that control not only the electron charge, as in present electronics, but also its spin, setting the basis for future spintronics. Spintronics represents the concept of the synergetic and multifunctional use of charge and spin dynamics of electrons, aiming to go beyond the traditional dichotomy of semiconductor electronics and magnetic storage technology. The most direct method to induce spin-polarized electrons into a semiconductor is by introducing appropriate transition-metal or rare-earth dopants producing a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS). At the same time the seamless integration of future spintronic devices into nanodevices would require the fabrication of one-dimensional DMS nanostructures in well-defined architectures. In this review we focus on recent advances in the synthesis of DMS nanowires as well discussing the structural, optical and magnetic properties of these materials.

  5. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  6. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow...

  11. Dilution refrigeration for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    Dilution refrigerators are presently used routinely in ground based applications where temperatures below 0.3 K are required. The operation of a conventional dilution refrigerator depends critically on the presence of gravity. To operate a dilution refrigerator in space many technical difficulties must be overcome. Some of the anticipated difficulties are identified in this paper and possible solutions are described. A single cycle refrigerator is described conceptually that uses forces other than gravity to function and the stringent constraints imposed on the design by requiring the refrigerator to function on the earth without using gravity are elaborated upon.

  12. Extraction Chromatographic Methods in the Sample Preparation Sequence for Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Plutonium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Farawila, Anne F.; Douglas, Matthew; Haney, Morgan M.; Peterson, Steve L.; Maiti, Tapas C.; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2011-10-17

    A sample preparation sequence for actinide isotopic analysis by TIMS is described that includes column-based extraction chromatography as the first separation step, followed by anion exchange column separations. The sequence is designed to include a wet ashing step after the extraction chromatography to prevent any leached extractant or oxalic acid eluent reagents from interfering with subsequent separations, source preparation, or TIMS ionization. TEVA-resin and DGA-resin materials, containing extractants that consist only of C, N, O, and H atoms, were investigated for isolation of plutonium. Radiotracer level studies confirmed expected high yields from column-based separation procedures. Femtogram-level studies were carried out with TIMS detection, using multiple isotopic spikes through the separation sequence. Pu recoveries were 87% and 86% for TEVA- and DGA-resins separations respectively. The Pu recoveries from 400 {mu}L anion-exchange column separations were 89% and 93% for trial sequences incorporating TEVA and DGA-resin. Thus, a prior extraction chromatography step in the sequence did not interfere with the subsequent anion exchange separation when a simple wet ash step was carried out in between these column separations. The average measurement efficiency, for Pu, encompassing the chemical separation recoveries and the TIMS ionization efficiency, was 2.73 {+-} 0.77% (2-sigma) for the DGA-resin trials and 2.67 {+-} 0.54% for the TEVA-resin trials, compared to 3.41% and 2.37% (average 2.89%) for two spikes in the experimental set. These compare with an average measurement efficiency of 2.78 {+-} 1.70%, n = 33 from process benchmark analyses using Pu spikes processed through a sequence of oxalate precipitation, wet ash, iron hydroxide precipitation, and anion exchange column separations. We conclude that extraction chromatography can be a viable separation procedure as part of a multistep sequence for TIMS sample preparation.

  13. Origins of large-volume, compositionally zoned volcanic eruptions: New constraints from U-series isotopes and numerical thermal modeling for the 1912 Katmai-Novarupta eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Simon; Sandiford, Mike; Reagan, Mark; Hawkesworth, Chris; Hildreth, Wes

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a combined U-series isotope and numerical modeling study of the 1912 Katmai-Novarupta eruption in Alaska. A stratigraphically constrained set of samples have compositions that range from basalt through basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. The major and trace element range can be modeled by 80–90% closed-system crystal fractionation over a temperature interval from 1279°C to 719°C at 100 MPa, with an implied volume of parental basalt of ?65 km3. Numerical models suggest, for wall rock temperatures appropriate to this depth, that 90% of this volume of magma would cool and crystallize over this temperature interval within a few tens of kiloyears. However, the range in 87Sr/86Sr, (230Th/238U), and (226Ra/230Th) requires open-system processes. Assimilation of the host sediments can replicate the range of Sr isotopes. The variation of (226Ra/230Th) ratios in the basalt to andesite compositional range requires that these were generated less than several thousand years before eruption. Residence times for dacites are close to 8000 years, whereas the rhyolites appear to be 50–200 kyr old. Thus, the magmas that erupted within only 60 h had a wide range of crustal residence times. Nevertheless, they were emplaced in the same thermal regime and evolved along similar liquid lines of descent from parental magmas with similar compositions. The system was built progressively with multiple inputs providing both mass and heat, some of which led to thawing of older silicic material that provided much of the rhyolite.

  14. Identifying the Source and Generation of Thermal Groundwaters based on Stable Isotopes and Rare Earths - the Case of the Lower Yarmouk Gorge Artesian Wells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Möller, P.; Magri, F.; Kraushaar, S.; Dulski, P.; Guttman, J.; Rödiger, T.

    2014-12-01

    Along the Lower Yarmouk Gorge, thermal groundwaters with varying chemical and isotopic signatures emerge from Cenozoic Limestones. The bordering semiarid Golan and Ajloun Heights host fresh and variable tempered groundwaters in Cretaceous and Cenozoic strata. Sources and mineralisation of these groundwaters are derived from mutual discussion of d2H, d18O and d34S, major elements, rare earth distribution patterns and the (hydro)geological setting. Positive shift of d18O and d2H occur due to evaporation before replenishment and the interaction with basalts. Major infiltration areas for Golan Heights are the limy foothills of the Mt. Hermon and for the Ajloun Heights the Plateau itself. To a less degree, precipitation infiltrates also the basaltic catchments. Groundwaters are mineralised by water/rock (i) variably altered limestones by diagenesis, (ii) evaporates and seawater brines enclosed in limestone matrix and (iii) locally occurring basaltic intrusiva. In the Yarmouk Gorge, a deep-seated brine of the Ha'on type ascends and mixes with the fresh shallow groundwater. REY and isotope fingerprints prove that water from the Syrian Hauran Plateau is recharging springs and wells in the lowermost Yamouk Gorge. Although capping wide areas, the basaltic cover of the Golan Heights is of minor importance for recharge of the underlying A7/B2 aquifer, which becomes recharged at the foothills of Mt. Hermon and gets confined southwards, leading ibid. to ascension of water into the basaltic cover. Anomalous heat flux near the Yarmouk gorge and locally in the western escarpment of the Ajloun may be produced by ascending fluids from greater depth and/or by basaltic intrusions.

  15. Evidence of magnetic isotope effects during thermochemical sulfate reduction

    E-print Network

    Oduro, Harry D.

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction experiments with simple amino acid and dilute concentrations of sulfate reveal significant degrees of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation. Enrichments of up to 13‰ for [superscript ...

  16. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  17. Helium isotopes: Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Smith, S. P.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1987-11-01

    High 3He/4He ratios associated with the Yellowstone caldera reflect the presence of a magmatic helium component. This component is ultimately derived from a mantle plume capped by a cooling batholith underlying the caldera. In surface hot springs, fumaroles, etc., the 3He/4He ratio varies from ˜1 to 16 times the air ratio. The variations are produced by varying degrees of dilution of the magmatic component with radiogenic helium. The radiogenic helium is crustal-derived and is thought to be scavenged from aquifers in which the hydrothermal fluids circulate. We determined the helium isotopic composition in 12 different springs from the Lower Geyser Basin, a large hydrothermal basin within the caldera. The 3He/4He ratio was found to vary from ˜2.7 to 7.7 times the air ratio. The variations correlate with variations in water chemistry. Specifically, the 3He/4He ratio increased with total bicarbonate concentration. The dissolved bicarbonate is from gas-water-rock interactions involving CO2 and Na silicates. The concentration of bicarbonate is a function of the availability of dissolved CO2, which, in turn, is a function of deep boiling with phase separation prior to CO2-bicarbonate conversion. The correlation of high 3He/4He ratios with high bicarbonate is interpreted as the result of deep dilution of a single thermal fluid with cooler water during ascent to the surface. The dilution and cooling deters deep boiling, and therefore both CO2 and 3He are retained in the rising fluid. Fluids that are not diluted will boil to a greater extent, losing a large proportion of 3He, as well as CO2, leaving a helium-poor residual fluid in which the isotopic composition of helium will be strongly affected by the addition of radiogenic helium. The helium isotopic compositions are also affected by the presence or absence of reactive volcanic glass in shallow reservoirs, the extent of these shallow reservoirs, and by the absorption of steam, derived from the early stages of deep boiling, into near-surface cold waters.

  18. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  19. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Aldridge, Frederick T. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  20. Thermal dependency of shell growth, microstructure, and stable isotopes in laboratory-reared Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kozue; Suzuki, Atsushi; Isono, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Irie, Takahiro; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Mori, Chiharu; Sato, Mizuho; Sato, Kei; Sasaki, Takenori

    2015-07-01

    We experimentally examined the growth, microstructure, and chemistry of shells of the bloody clam, Scapharca broughtonii (Mollusca: Bivalvia), reared at five temperatures (13, 17, 21, 25, and 29°C) with a constant pCO2 condition (˜450 ?atm). In this species, the exterior side of the shell is characterized by a composite prismatic structure; on the interior side, it has a crossed lamellar structure on the interior surface. We previously found a negative correlation between temperature and the relative thickness of the composite prismatic structure in field-collected specimens. In the reared specimens, the relationship curve between temperature and the growth increment of the composite prismatic structure was humped shaped, with a maximum at 17°C, which was compatible with the results obtained in the field-collected specimens. In contrast, the thickness of the crossed lamellar structure was constant over the temperature range tested. These results suggest that the composite prismatic structure principally accounts for the thermal dependency of shell growth, and this inference was supported by the finding that shell growth rates were significantly correlated with the thickness of the composite prismatic structure. We also found a negative relationship between the rearing temperature and ?18O of the shell margin, in close quantitative agreement with previous reports. The findings presented here will contribute to the improved age determination of fossil and recent clams based on seasonal microstructural records.

  1. Traces of isotopic reactive species produced from a non-thermal plasma jet in bio-molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. B.; Kwak, H. S.; Choi, E. H.; Hong, T. E.; Yoon, H.; Lee, Y.; Baik, K. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Heavy water (D2O) is introduced into a non-thermal plasma jet (NTPJ) device to generate deuterium monoxide (OD) radicals instead of hydroxyl (OH) radicals. An NTPJ generated from a vapor mixture of N2/H2O and N2/D2O is applied to a cell membrane component and its effects are analyzed by means of 1H NMR, GC-FID and TOF-SIMS spectroscopies. The results show that OH and OD radical species induce similar levels of oxidative breakage of lipid molecules. In addition, the 2H NMR spectra show that deuteriums are incorporated into the lipid oxidative products. In order to trace these effects in vivo, E. coli bacteria are treated with an NTPJ and analyzed using NanoSIMS. Deuterium is observed in both the cytoplasm and membrane, which are colocalized well with nitrogen and phosphorus atoms. The high colocalization of D atoms inside E. coli provides the first direct and visual evidence of the role of OD radicals, which may be utilized to visualize OH radical interactions inside cells.

  2. Diluted equilibrium sterile neutrino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Amol V.; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Kusenko, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We present a model where sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the range ˜keV to ˜MeV can be the dark matter and be consistent with all laboratory, cosmological, and large-scale structure, as well as x-ray constraints. These sterile neutrinos are assumed to freeze out of thermal and chemical equilibrium with matter and radiation in the very early Universe, prior to an epoch of prodigious entropy generation ("dilution") from out-of-equilibrium decay of heavy particles. In this work, we consider heavy, entropy-producing particles in the ˜TeV to ˜EeV rest-mass range, possibly associated with new physics at high-energy scales. The process of dilution can give the sterile neutrinos the appropriate relic densities, but it also alters their energy spectra so that they could act like cold dark matter, despite relatively low rest masses as compared to conventional dark matter candidates. Moreover, since the model does not rely on active-sterile mixing for producing the relic density, the mixing angles can be small enough to evade current x-ray or lifetime constraints. Nevertheless, we discuss how future x-ray observations, future lepton number constraints, and future observations and sophisticated simulations of large-scale structure could, in conjunction, provide evidence for this model and/or constrain and probe its parameters.

  3. Quantification of neptunium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Drake, J.; Roensch, F.R.; Cappis, J.H.; Perrin, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    A surface ionization-diffusion-type ionization source that uses a rhenium filament overplated with platinum has been developed and optimized for 0.1-ng neptunium samples. This source is capable of measuring the neptunium content of nuclear-test-debris samples to 0.15% precision at the 95% confidence level. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Strontium isotope composition of Rotorua geothermal waters

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, I.J. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that strontium isotope compositions of Rotorua geothermal waters, taken in conjunction with chemical and stable isotope data, are broadly consistent with existing hydrogeologic models, and provide new insights into complex water-rock interactions and fluid-fluid mixing processes. Primary alkali chloride water upwelling in the eastern part of the field have {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios higher than their presumed aquifer wall rocks, implying a component of more radiogenic strontium from metasedimentary basement. Secondary waters, in contrast, have relatively low {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios consistent with interaction of primary fluids (variably diluted by deep groundwaters) with rhyolite country rock, followed by shallow dilution by young groundwater. Although complicated by the non-conservative behavior of strontium, the strontium isotope data require significant water-rock interaction in the central and western parts of the Rotorua geothermal field, a feature not made obvious by other chemical or isotope studies.

  5. Calcite Fluid Inclusion, Paragenetic, and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Thermal Event(s) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    B. Peterman; R. Moscati

    2000-08-10

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository situated above the water table in 12.7 Ma tuffs. A wealth of textural and geochemical evidence from low-temperature deposits of calcite and silica, indicates that their genesis is related to unsaturated zone (UZ) percolation and that the level of the potential repository has never been saturated. Nonetheless, some scientists contend that thermal waters have periodically risen to the surface depositing calcite and opal in the tuffs and at the surface. This hypothesis received some support in 1996 when two-phase fluid inclusions (FIs) with homogenization temperatures (Th) between 35 and 75 C were reported from UZ calcite. Calcite deposition likely followed closely on the cooling of the tuffs and continues into the present. The paragenetic sequence of calcite and silica in the UZ is early stage calcite followed by chalcedony and quartz, then calcite with local opal during middle and late stages. Four types of FIs are found in calcite assemblages: (1) all-liquid (L); (2) all-vapor (V); (3) 2-phase with large and variable V:L ratios; and (4) a few 2-phase with small and consistent V:L ratios. Late calcite contains no FI assemblages indicating elevated depositional temperatures. In early calcite, the Th of type 4 FIs ranges from {approx} 40 to {approx} 85 C. Such temperatures (sub-boiling) and the assemblage of FIs are consistent with deposition in the UZ. Some delta 18O values < 10 permil in early calcite support such temperatures. Type 4 FIs, however, seem to be restricted to the early calcite stage, during which either cooling of the tuffs or regional volcanism were possible heat sources. Nonetheless, at present there is no compelling evidence of upwelling water as a source for the calcite/opal deposits.

  6. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  7. Analysis of boron dilution in a four-loop PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal mixing and boron dilution in a pressurized water reactor were analyzed with COMMIX codes. The reactor system was the four loop Zion reactor. Two boron dilution scenarios were analyzed. In the first scenario, the plant is in cold shutdown and the reactor coolant system has just been filled after maintenance on the steam generators. To flush the air out of the steam generator tubes, a reactor coolant pump (RCP) is started, with the water in the pump suction line devoid of boron and at the same temperature as the coolant in the system. In the second scenario, the plant is at hot standby and the reactor coolant system has been heated up to operating temperature after a long outage. It is assumed that an RCP is started, with the pump suction line filled with cold unborated water, forcing a slug of diluted coolant down the downcomer and subsequently through the reactor core. The subsequent transient thermal mixing and boron dilution that would occur in the reactor system is simulated for these two scenarios. The reactivity insertion rate and the total reactivity are evaluated.

  8. Chemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas compositions of the hot springs of the Owyhee Uplands, Malheur County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Young, H.W.; Evans, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Hot springs along the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon between Three Forks and Lake Owyhee could be part of a north flowing regional system or a series of small separate geothermal systems Heat for the waters could be from a very young (Holocene) volcanic activity (basalt flows) of the Owyhee Uplands or the regional heat flow. The springs discharge warm to hot, dilute, slightly alkaline, sodium bicarbonate water. Chemically they are similar to the dilute thermal water at Bruneau Grand View and Twin Falls, Idaho. Maximum aquifer temperatures in the Owyhee Uplands, estimated from chemical geothermometry, are about 100°C. Dissolved helium concentrations, carbon 14 activity, and chemical and isotope data are examined fro systematic trends which would indicate a geothermal system of regional extent.

  9. Fully integrated surface-subsurface flow modelling of groundwater-lake interaction in an esker aquifer: Model verification with stable isotopes and airborne thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Isokangas, Elina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2015-03-01

    Water resources management is moving towards integration, where groundwater (GW), surface water (SW) and related aquatic ecosystems are considered one management unit. Because of this paradigm shift, more information and new tools are needed to understand the ecologically relevant fluxes (water, heat, solutes) at the GW-SW interface. This study estimated the magnitude, temporal variability and spatial distribution of water fluxes at the GW-SW interface using a fully integrated hydrological modelling code (HydroGeoSphere). The model domain comprised a hydrologically complex esker aquifer in Northern Finland with interconnected lakes, streams and wetlands. The model was calibrated in steady state for soil hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy and it reproduced the hydraulic head and stream baseflow distribution throughout the aquifer in both transient and steady state modes. In a novel analysis, model outputs were compared with the locations and magnitude of GW discharge to lakes estimated using field techniques. Spatial occurrence of GW-lake interaction was interpreted from airborne thermal infrared imaging. The observed GW inflow locations coincided well with model nodes showing positive exchange flux between surface and subsurface domains. Order of magnitude of simulated GW inflow to lakes showed good agreement with flux values calculated with a stable water isotope technique. Finally, time series of GW inflow, extracted as model output, showed moderate annual variability and demonstrated different interannual inflow changes in seepage and drainage lakes of the aquifer. Overall, this study demonstrated the ability of a fully integrated numerical model to reproduce observed GW-SW exchange processes in a complex unconfined aquifer system. The model-based estimates obtained for GW influx magnitude and spatial distribution, along with information on GW quality can be used to estimate ecologically relevant fluxes in future water resources management.

  10. Measuring oxygen yields of a thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer for organic and inorganic materials through injection of CO.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xijie; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (TC/EA-IRMS) is widely used to measure the ?(18) O value of various substances. A premise for accurate ?(18) O measurement is that the oxygen in the sample can be converted into carbon monoxide (CO) quantitatively or at least proportionally. Therefore, a precise method to determine the oxygen yield of TC/EA-IRMS measurements is needed. Most studies have used the CO peak area obtained from a known amount of a solid reference material (for example, benzoic acid) to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. Although it was assumed that the oxygen yield of the solid reference material is 100%, no direct evidence has been provided. As CO is the analyte gas for ?(18) O measurement by IRMS, in this study, we use a six-port valve to inject CO gas into the TC/EA. The CO is carried to the IRMS by the He carrier gas and the CO peak area is measured by the IRMS. The CO peak area thus obtained from a known amount of the injected CO is used to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. The oxygen yields of commonly used organic and inorganic reference materials such as benzoic acid (C6 H5 COOH), silver phosphate (Ag3 PO4 ), calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) and silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) are investigated at different reactor temperatures and sample sizes. We obtained excellent linear correlation between the peak area for the injected CO and its oxygen atom amount. C6 H5 COOH has the highest oxygen yield, followed by Ag3 PO4 , CaCO3 and SiO2 . The oxygen yields of TC/EA-IRMS are less than 100% for both organic and inorganic substances, but the yields are relatively stable at the specified reactor temperature and for a given quantity of sample. PMID:25476948

  11. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF TOTAL-BODY STORES OF VITAMIN A IN ADULTS BY A THREE-DAY DEUTERATED-RETINOL-DILUTION (3D-DRD) PROCEDURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The isotope-dilution technique is useful for assessing vitamin A status. Up to now, the conventional deuterated-retinol-dilution (DRD) procedure is the only measure that provides a quantitative estimate of the total-body stores of vitamin A; the procedure has been validated twice in two independent...

  12. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  13. Science Notes: Dilution of a Weak Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Wai, Chooi Khee

    2014-01-01

    This "Science note" arose out of practical work involving the dilution of ethanoic acid, the measurement of the pH of the diluted solutions and calculation of the acid dissociation constant, K[subscript a], for each diluted solution. The students expected the calculated values of K[subscript a] to be constant but they found that the…

  14. 1. Isotope Definitions and terms a) Isotopes and isotope ratios.

    E-print Network

    Saleska, Scott

    3/24/2011 1 Outline 1. Isotope Definitions and terms a) Isotopes and isotope ratios. Isotopes fractionation c) Simple illustration with the water cycle 2. CO2 isotopes in photosynthesis a) Photosynthetic discrimination in C3 plants b) C3 vs C4 photosynthesis and the distinction in isotopes c) Measuring isotopic

  15. Dispersion of Sound in Dilute Suspensions with Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    The theory accounting for nonlinear particle relaxation (viscous and thermal) has been applied to the prediction of dispersion of sound in dilute suspensions. The results suggest that significant deviations exist for sound dispersion between the linear and nonlinear theories at large values of Omega(Tau)(sub d), where Omega is the circular frequency, and Tau(sub d) is the Stokesian particle relaxation time. It is revealed that the nonlinear effect on the dispersion coefficient due to viscous contribution is larger relative to that of thermal conduction

  16. Total body water and lean body mass estimated by ethanol dilution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Myhre, L. G.; Venters, M. D.; Luft, U. C.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating total body water (TBW) using breath analyses of blood ethanol content is described. Regression analysis of ethanol concentration curves permits determination of a theoretical concentration that would have existed if complete equilibration had taken place immediately upon ingestion of the ethanol; the water fraction of normal blood may then be used to calculate TBW. The ethanol dilution method is applied to 35 subjects, and comparison with a tritium dilution method of determining TBW indicates that the correlation between the two procedures is highly significant. Lean body mass and fat fraction were determined by hydrostatic weighing, and these data also prove compatible with results obtained from the ethanol dilution method. In contrast to the radioactive tritium dilution method, the ethanol dilution method can be repeated daily with its applicability ranging from diseased individuals to individuals subjected to thermal stress, strenuous exercise, water immersion, or the weightless conditions of space flights.

  17. Geothermal investigation in Idaho. Part 14. Geochemical and isotopic investigations of thermal water occurrences of the Boise Front Area, Ada County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, A.L.; Muller, A.B.; Mitchell, J.C.

    1984-12-01

    A limited chemical and isotopic investigation was undertaken and geological, geophysical, and hydrological data in the literature were reviewed to evaluate the geothermal potential of the Boise area. 68 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs. (ACR)

  18. Thermal, trophic and metabolic life histories of inaccessible fishes revealed from stable-isotope analyses: a case study using orange roughy Hoplostethus atlanticus.

    PubMed

    Trueman, C N; Rickaby, R E M; Shephard, S

    2013-12-01

    A time-resolved record of inhabited water depth, metabolic rate and trophic behaviour of the orange roughy Hoplostethus atlanticus was recovered from combined stable-isotope analyses of otolith and muscle tissue. The results demonstrate that H. atlanticus from the north-east Atlantic Ocean have a complex life history with three distinct depth-stratified life stages. Early juvenile H. atlanticus occupy relatively shallow habitats, juvenile H. atlanticus show a deep-demersal phase, rising at sexual maturity, and adult H. atlanticus exploit increasingly deep habitats with increasing age. At all sampled sizes, H. atlanticus muscle tissues have an isotopic composition suggesting a benthic rather than benthopelagic or pelagic diet. Isotopic measures of relative metabolic rate provide an insight into energy partitioning throughout ontogeny. Hoplostethus atlanticus have relatively low metabolic rates compared to coexisting deep-water benthic fishes, consistent with their unusually high longevity. Surprisingly, lifetime fastest growth rates are achieved during juvenile stages when otolith isotopes imply deep-water residency and relatively low metabolic rates. Fast growth may be sustained during a period of high efficiency associated with reduced metabolic costs of prey capture or predator evasion. The stable-isotope approach can be applied to any teleost and provides a rapid, cost-effective technique for studying deep-water fish communities. PMID:24298954

  19. A Microgravity Helium Dilution Cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat R.; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a He-3-He-4 dilution cooler to operate in microgravity. It uses charcoal adsorption pumps and heaters for its operation; it has no moving parts. It currently operates cyclically to well below 0.1 K and we have designed a version to operate continuously. We expect that the continuous version will be able to provide the long-duration cooling that many experiments need at temperatures down to 0.040 K. More importantly, such a dilution cooler could provide the precooling that enables the use of adiabatic demagnetization techniques that can reach temperatures below 0.001 K. At temperatures below 0.002 K many fascinating microgravity experiments on superfluid He-3 become possible. Among the possibilities are: research into a superfluid He-3 gyroscope, study of the nucleation of the B-phase of superfluid He-3 when the sample is floating out of contact with walls, study of the anisotropy of the surface tension of the B-phase, and NMR experiments on tiny free-floating clusters of superfluid He-3 atoms that should model the shell structure of nuclei.

  20. Dilution Robustness for Mean Field Ferromagnets

    E-print Network

    Adriano Barra; Federico Camboni; Pierluigi Contucci

    2009-03-26

    In this work we compare two different random dilution of a mean field ferromagnet: the first model is built on a Bernoulli-diluted network while the second lives on a Poisson-diluted network. While it is known that the two models have in the thermodynamic limit the same free energy we investigate on the structural constraints that the two models must fulfill. We rigorously derive for each model the set of identities for the multi-overlaps distribution using different methods for the two dilutions: constraints in the former model are obtained by studying the consequences of the self-averaging of the internal energy density, while in the latter are obtained by a stochastic-stability technique. Finally we prove that the identities emerging in the two models are the same, showing "robustness" of the ferromagnetic properties of diluted networks with respect to the details of dilution.

  1. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

  2. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-04-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show about 61% oil recovery in the case of Alf-38 and 37% in the case of DTAB. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition of the laboratory experiment. Field-scale fracture block simulation shows that as the fracture spacing increases, so does the time of recovery. Plans for the next quarter include simulation studies.

  4. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory imbibition tests show that imbibition rate is not very sensitive to the surfactant concentration (in the range of 0.05-0.2 wt%) and small amounts of trapped gas saturation. It is however very sensitive to oil permeability and water-oil-ratio. Less than 0.5 M Na2CO3 is needed for in situ soap generation and low adsorption; NaCl can be added to reach the necessary total salinity. The simulation result matches the laboratory imbibition experimental data. Small fracture spacing and high permeability would be needed for high rate of recovery.

  5. XAFS in dilute magnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihu; Yan, Wensheng; Yao, Tao; Liu, Qinghua; Xie, Yi; Wei, Shiqiang

    2013-10-14

    X-Ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has experienced a rapid development in the last four decades and has proved to be a powerful structure characterization technique in the study of local environments in condensed matter. In this article, we first introduce the XAFS basic principles including theory, data analysis and experiment in some detail. Then we attempt to make a review on the applications of XAFS to the study of atomic and electronic structure in dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) systems. The power of XAFS in characterizing this interesting material system, such as determining the occupation sites and distribution of the dopants, detecting the presence of metal clusters or secondary phases, as well as identifying the defect types and dopant valence, will be illuminated by selected examples. This review should be of interest both to newcomers in the DMS field and to an interdisciplinary community of researchers working in synthesis, characterization and utilization of DMS materials. PMID:23884341

  6. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  7. Development and Comparison of Two Types of Cryogen-Free Dilution Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Obara, K.; Yano, H.; Ishikawa, O.; Handa, A.; Togitani, S.; Nishitani, T.

    2014-04-01

    Dilution refrigerators are an important tool used in solid state and quantum fluid physics for cooling to temperatures below 0.3 K. Conventional dilution refrigerators consume a lot of liquid helium, which has to be recharged in a helium bath every few days. Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators, however, do not use liquid helium and then automatic operation by electricity can be possible from room temperature to the mK region. In near future, therefore, most conventional dilution refrigerators will be replaced by cryogen-free refrigerators because they are easy to operate, do not require maintenance and do not consume helium. We have developed two types of cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. One is directly cooled by a pulse tube refrigerator in the same cryostat using copper thin wires as a thermal link, and the other is cooled by a separate Gifford McMahon refrigerator using circulating helium gas through a flexible syphon tube. The latter has been developed as a vibration-free cryogen-free dilution refrigerator. These two types of cryogen-free dilution refrigerator are compared considering several key points: base temperature, precooling time, minimum temperature and vibration amplitude.

  8. Electrocoalescence based serial dilution of microfluidic droplets

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-01-01

    Dilution of microfluidic droplets where the concentration of a reagent is incrementally varied is a key operation in drop-based biological analysis. Here, we present an electrocoalescence based dilution scheme for droplets based on merging between moving and parked drops. We study the effects of fluidic and electrical parameters on the dilution process. Highly consistent coalescence and fine resolution in dilution factor are achieved with an AC signal as low as 10?V even though the electrodes are separated from the fluidic channel by insulator. We find that the amount of material exchange between the droplets per coalescence event is high for low capillary number. We also observe different types of coalescence depending on the flow and electrical parameters and discuss their influence on the rate of dilution. Overall, we find the key parameter governing the rate of dilution is the duration of coalescence between the moving and parked drop. The proposed design is simple incorporating the channel electrodes in the same layer as that of the fluidic channels. Our approach allows on-demand and controlled dilution of droplets and is simple enough to be useful for assays that require serial dilutions. The approach can also be useful for applications where there is a need to replace or wash fluid from stored drops. PMID:25379096

  9. Neodymium and strontium isotopic study of Australasian tektites - New constraints on the provenance and age of target materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Koeberl, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of Australasian tectites (including two flanged Australian tectites, two low-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites, and three high-SiO2 Muong Nong-type tectites) and the Nd, Sm, Sr, and Rb concentrations were investigated by isotope-dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry, and the Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope systematics were used to study the characteristics of the parental material. It is shown that the Nd and Sr isotopic data provide evidence that all Australasian tektites were derived from a single sedimentary formation with a narrow range of stratigraphic ages close to 170 Ma. It is suggested that all of the Australasian tektites were derived from a single impact event and that the australites represent the upper part of a melt sheet ejected at high velocity, whereas the indochinites represent melts formed at a lower level in the target material distributed closer to the area of the impact.

  10. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer studies is critically discussed, where special emphasis is set on evaluating different data processing strategies on the example of enriched stable Sr isotopes.1 The analytical key parameters such as blank (Kr, Sr and Rb), variation of the natural Sr isotopic composition in the sample, mass bias, interferences (Rb) and total combined uncertainty are considered. A full metrological protocol for data processing using IPD is presented based on data gained during two transgenerational marking studies of fish, where the transfer of a Sr isotope double spike (84Sr and 86Sr) from female spawners of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) and brown trout (Salmo trutta f.f.)2 to the centre of the otoliths of their offspring was studied by (LA)-MC-ICP-MS. 1J. Irrgeher, A. Zitek, M. Cervicek and T. Prohaska, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2014, 29, 193-200. 2A. Zitek, J. Irrgeher, M. Kletzl, T. Weismann and T. Prohaska, Fish. Manage. Ecol., 2013, 20, 654-361.

  11. Chromium isotopic composition of the implanted solar wind-bearing component in Apollo 16 lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitts, Bunnie Kathleen

    2002-09-01

    Chromium isotopes are scientifically interesting for many reasons. For example, 53Mn decays to 53Cr which has allowed for the development of a fine-scale chronometer, 54Cr is a neutron-rich isotope believed to be generated in Type Ia supernovae which sheds light on local nucleosynthetic processes, and variations in 53Cr may be due to incorporation of differing amounts of live 53Mn. This 53Mn may be linearly, radially heterogeneous (Lugmair and Shukolyukov, 1998). Therefore, to investigate these issues, the isotopic composition of the implanted solar wind-bearing component was measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry of acid etches of plagioclase grains from two Apollo 16 lunar soils. Small aliquots of the etches were spiked with Cr and Ca for isotope dilution. Spiking for Ca allows for the determination of etch depth and the Cr/Ca ratio which acts as a proxy for solar wind content. From these isotope dilution data, three important observations were made. First, the etch depth is in line with the solar wind implantation depths of noble gases (e.g. Eberhardt et al., 1970). Second, the Cr/Ca ratio falls off quickly with depth, peaks in the Etch 1 fraction of 62281 at 0.0006 and 0.0009 for 60601 and returns to the lunar Cr/Ca ratio of 0.00007 by weight by Etch 5. The coronal ratio is 0.224 (Anders and Grevesse, 1989). Third, the absolute abundance of Cr peaks in Etch 1 and falls off with progressive etches. Therefore, it is inferred that the solar wind-bearing component has been successfully isolated from the background lunar signature. The isotopic composition of this component is 3.9 ± 0.4 ?53Cr and 8.5 ± 0.6 ?54Cr for 62281 and 4.5 ± 0.1 and 15.0 ± 0.3, respectively, for 60601. These data are surprising. It will be shown that contributions from contamination, spallation and isobaric interferences are unlikely to be significant. The Cr data presented here are not linearly mass-dependent. Therefore, the linear, mass-dependent processes of volatilization, sputtering and vapor deposition are inadequate to explain these results. Alternative theories and resultant implications are discussed with emphasis on the hypothesis that these Cr results are attributable to spallation in the solar atmosphere.

  12. Isotopic Randomness and Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2005-03-01

    Isotopic disorder in crystals can lead to suppression of thermal conductivity, mobility variations and (weak) Anderson localization on isotopic fluctuations. The latter (AAB, J.ChemPhys.1984) is akin to polaron effect (self-localization due polarization). Possibility of isotopic patterning (IP) increases near melting point (thermally activated isotopic hopping swaps). Crystal near melting threshold become “informationally sensitive” as if its IP is operated by some external Maxwell’s Demon, MD (AAB, URAM J, 2002). At this state short range (e.g. electrostatic inverse square) forces evolve into long-range interactions (due to divergence of order parameter) and information sensitivity can be further amplified by (say) a single fast electron (e.g. beta-particle from decay of 14-C or other radioactive isotope) which may result in cascade of impact ionization events and (short time-scale) enhancement of screening by impact-generated non-equilibrium (non-thermal) electrons. In this state informationally driven (MD-controlled) IP (Eccles effect) can result in decrease of positional entropy signifying emergence of physical complexity out of pure information, similar to peculiar “jinni effect” on closed time loops in relativistic cosmology (R.J.Gott, 2001) or Wheeler’s “it from bit” metaphor. By selecting special IP, MD modifies ergodicity principle in favor of info rich states.

  13. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Direct High-Precision Measurements of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr Isotope Ratio in Natural Water without Chemical Separation Using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Equipped with 10(12) ? Resistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-Feng; Guo, Jing-Hui; Chu, Zhu-Yin; Feng, Lian-Jun; Wang, Xuan-Ce

    2015-07-21

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) allows excellent precision for determining Sr isotope ratios in natural water samples. Traditionally, a chemical separation procedure using cation exchange resin has been employed to obtain a high purity Sr fraction from natural water, which makes sample preparation time-consuming. In this study, we present a rapid and precise method for the direct determination of the Sr isotope ratio of natural water using TIMS equipped with amplifiers with two 10(12) ? resistors. To eliminate the (87)Rb isobaric interference, Re ribbons are used as filaments, providing a significant advantage over W ribbons in the inhibition of Rb(+) emission, based on systematically examining a series of NIST SRM987 standard doping with various amounts of Rb using Re and W ribbons. To validate the applicability of our method, twenty-two natural water samples, including different water types (rain, snow, river, lake and drinking water), that show a large range in Sr content variations (2.54-922.8 ppb), were collected and analyzed from North and South China. Analytical results show good precision (0.003-0.005%, 2 RSE) and the method was further validated by comparative analysis of the same water with and without chemical separation. The method is simple and rapid, eliminates sample preparation time, and prevents potential contamination during complicated sample-preparation procedures. Therefore, a high sample throughput inherent to the TIMS can be fully utilized. PMID:26105121

  15. Chemical characteristics of the major thermal springs of Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, William C.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-one thermal springs in western Montana were sampled for chemical, isotope, and gas compositions. Most of the springs issue dilute to slightly saline sodium-bicarbonate waters of neutral to slightly alkaline pH. A few of the springs issue sodium-mixed anion waters of near neutral pH. Fluoride concentrations are high in most of the thermal waters, up to 18 milligramsper litre, while F/Cl ratios range from 3/1 in the dilute waters to 1/10 in the slightly saline waters. Most of the springs are theoretically in thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to calcite and fluorite. Nitrogen is the major gas escaping from most of the hot springs; however, Hunters Hot Springs issue principally methane. The deuterium content of the hot spring waters is typical of meteoric water in western Montana. Geothermal calculations based on silica concentrations and Na-K-Ca ratios indicate that most of the springs are associated with low temperature aquifers (less than 100?C). Chalcedony may be controlling the silica concentrations in these low temperature aquifers even in 'granitic' terranes.

  16. Ionic liquids behave as dilute electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Matthew A; Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Fox, Eric T; Henderson, Wesley A; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-06-11

    We combine direct surface force measurements with thermodynamic arguments to demonstrate that pure ionic liquids are expected to behave as dilute weak electrolyte solutions, with typical effective dissociated ion concentrations of less than 0.1% at room temperature. We performed equilibrium force-distance measurements across the common ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][NTf2]) using a surface forces apparatus with in situ electrochemical control and quantitatively modeled these measurements using the van der Waals and electrostatic double-layer forces of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory with an additive repulsive steric (entropic) ion-surface binding force. Our results indicate that ionic liquids screen charged surfaces through the formation of both bound (Stern) and diffuse electric double layers, where the diffuse double layer is comprised of effectively dissociated ionic liquid ions. Additionally, we used the energetics of thermally dissociating ions in a dielectric medium to quantitatively predict the equilibrium for the effective dissociation reaction of [C4mim][NTf2] ions, in excellent agreement with the measured Debye length. Our results clearly demonstrate that, outside of the bound double layer, most of the ions in [C4mim][NTf2] are not effectively dissociated and thus do not contribute to electrostatic screening. We also provide a general, molecular-scale framework for designing ionic liquids with significantly increased dissociated charge densities via judiciously balancing ion pair interactions with bulk dielectric properties. Our results clear up several inconsistencies that have hampered scientific progress in this important area and guide the rational design of unique, high-free-ion density ionic liquids and ionic liquid blends. PMID:23716690

  17. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E. E.

    2010-07-15

    This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

  18. Helium isotopes: Lower geyser basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Smith, S.P.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1987-11-10

    High /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios associated with the Yellowstone caldera reflect the presence of a magmatic helium component. This component is ultimately derived from a mantle plume capped by a cooling batholith underlying the caldera. In surface hot springs, fumaroles, etc., the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio varies from approx.1 to 16 tims the air ratio. The variations are produced by varying degrees of dilution of the magmatic component with radiogenic helium. The radiogenic helium is crustal-derived and is thought to be scavenged from aquifers in which the hydrothermal fluids circulate. We determined the helium iosotopic composition in 12 different springs from the Lower Geyser Basin, a large hydrothermal basin with the caldera. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio was found to vary from approx.2.7 to 7.7 times the air ratio. The variations correlate with variations in water chemistry. Specifically, the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio increased with total bicarbonate concentration. The dissolved bicarbonate is from gas-water-rock interactions involving CO/sub 2/ and Na silicates. The concentration of bicarbonate is a function of the availability of dissolved CO/sub 2/, which, in turn, is a function of deep boiling with phase separation prior to CO/sub 2/-bicarbonate conversion. The correlation of high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios with high bicarbonate is interpreted as the result of deep dilution of a single thermal fluid with cooler water during ascent to the surface. The dilution and cooling deters deep boiling, and therefore both CO/sub 2/ and /sup 3/He are retained in the rising fluid. Fluids that are not diluted with boil to a greater extent, losing a large proportion of /sup 3/He, as well as CO/sub 2/, leaving a helium-poor residual fluid in which the isotopic composition of helium will be strongly affected by the addition of radiogenic helium.

  19. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section...Devices § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell diluting apparatus is a fully...

  20. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section...Devices § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell diluting apparatus is a fully...

  1. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section...Devices § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell diluting apparatus is a fully...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section...Devices § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell diluting apparatus is a fully...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section...Devices § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell diluting apparatus is a fully...

  4. Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Pat; Hogan, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium Program Space Technology presents the Helium Dilution Cryocooler for Space Applications. The topics include: 1) Capability; 2) Applications; and 3) Advantages. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  5. Diluted ferromagnetic semiconductors as spintronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkarev, G. V.; Radchenko, M. V.; Karpina, V. A.; Sichkovskyi, V. I.

    2007-02-01

    A brief review of research papers on some diluted magnetic semiconductors is given. Experimental results on the study of the ferromagnetic state in the most promising materials for use in spintronics are presented.

  6. Estimation method for serial dilution experiments.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai; Davidson, Charles E

    2014-12-01

    Titration of microorganisms in infectious or environmental samples is a corner stone of quantitative microbiology. A simple method is presented to estimate the microbial counts obtained with the serial dilution technique for microorganisms that can grow on bacteriological media and develop into a colony. The number (concentration) of viable microbial organisms is estimated from a single dilution plate (assay) without a need for replicate plates. Our method selects the best agar plate with which to estimate the microbial counts, and takes into account the colony size and plate area that both contribute to the likelihood of miscounting the number of colonies on a plate. The estimate of the optimal count given by our method can be used to narrow the search for the best (optimal) dilution plate and saves time. The required inputs are the plate size, the microbial colony size, and the serial dilution factors. The proposed approach shows relative accuracy well within ±0.1log10 from data produced by computer simulations. The method maintains this accuracy even in the presence of dilution errors of up to 10% (for both the aliquot and diluent volumes), microbial counts between 10(4) and 10(12) colony-forming units, dilution ratios from 2 to 100, and plate size to colony size ratios between 6.25 to 200. PMID:25205541

  7. Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi Shibuta

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Isotope Effects on Heat Conduction of Carbon Nanotubes Shigeo Maruyama, Yuki Taniguchi and Yasushi that the inclusion of only 1 % of 13 C natural isotope dramatically reduces the thermal conductivity of diamond. However, isotope effects on heat conduction of SWNTs have not been elucidated. We estimated isotope

  8. Simultaneous in situ determination of U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotopes in monazite by laser ablation ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudie, Dylan J.; Fisher, Christopher M.; Hanchar, John M.; Crowley, James L.; Ayers, John C.

    2014-06-01

    are presented for in situ simultaneous determination of U-Pb and Sm-Nd isotopes in monazite using the Laser Ablation Split-Stream (LASS) method. This method uses a laser ablation system coupled to a magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (HR) (ICP-MS) for measuring U-Pb isotopes and a multicollector (MC) ICP-MS for measuring Sm-Nd isotopes. Ablated material is split using a Y-connector and transported simultaneously to both mass spectrometers. In addition to Sm and Nd isotopes, the MC-ICP-MS is configured to also acquire Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd elemental abundances. This approach provides age, tracer isotope, and trace element data in the same ablation volume, reducing sampling problems associated with fine-scale zoning in accessory minerals and minimizing the material needed for ablation. Precision and accuracy of the U-Pb method (and the precision of the Sm-Nd method) is demonstrated with results from well-characterized monazite reference materials. The LASS results agree within uncertainty with the isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) U-Pb dates. The accuracy of the Sm-Nd method is assessed by comparing the LA-MC-ICP-MS results with ID-TIMS determinations on a well-characterized, in-house monazite reference material. The LASS method is then applied to monazite from the Birch Creek Pluton in the White Mountains of California as a case study to illustrate the utility of this method for solving geologic problems. The U-Pb ages and Sm-Nd isotopic data from the LASS method support the conclusions drawn from previous results that monazite can record timing and information about the source region(s) of hydrothermal fluids.

  9. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    2005-09-30

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300?F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  10. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.M.; Riley, M.F.; Kobayashi, H.

    1997-10-31

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NOx) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NOx through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NOx production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature (~1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O2 vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d+ scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d+ scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW (~0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NOx emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NOx emissions below 5-10-3 g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O2 dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300°F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in-furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, wit6h increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of lower utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, required additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  11. Dilute oxygen combustion. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    A novel burner, in which fuel (natural gas) and oxidant (oxygen or air) are separately injected into a furnace, shows promise for achieving very low nitrogen oxide(s) (NO{sub x}) emissions for commercial furnace applications. The dilute oxygen combustion (DOC) burner achieves very low NO{sub x} through in-furnace dilution of the oxidant stream prior to combustion, resulting in low flame temperatures, thus inhibiting thermal NO{sub x} production. The results of a fundamental and applied research effort on the development of the DOC burner are presented. In addition, the results of a market survey detailing the potential commercial impact of the DOC system are disclosed. The fundamental aspects of the burner development project involved examining the flame characteristics of a natural gas turbulent jet in a high-temperature ({approximately}1366 K) oxidant (7-27% O{sub 2} vol. wet). Specifically, the mass entrainment rate, the flame lift-off height, the velocity field and major species field of the jet were evaluated as a function of surrounding-gas temperature and composition. The measured entrainment rate of the fuel jet decreased with increasing oxygen content in the surrounding high-temperature oxidant, and was well represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation found in the literature. The measured flame lift-off height decreased with increasing oxygen content and increasing temperature of the surrounding gas. An increase in surrounding-gas oxygen content and/or temperature inhibited the velocity decay within the jet periphery as a function of axial distance as compared to isothermal turbulent jets. However, the velocity measurements were only broadly represented by the d{sup +} scaling correlation. Several DOC burner configurations were tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at a nominal firing rate of 185 kW ({approximately}0.63 MMBtu/h). The flue gas composition was recorded as a function of furnace nitrogen content, furnace temperature, burner geometric arrangement, firing rate, and fuel injection velocity. NO{sub x} emissions increased with increasing furnace nitrogen content and furnace temperature, but remained relatively insensitive to variations in fuel injection velocity and firing rate. NO{sub x} emissions below 5{times}10{sup -3} g/MJ (10 ppm-air equivalent at 3% O{sub 2} dry) were obtained for furnace temperatures below 1533 K (2300{degree}F) and furnace nitrogen levels between 1 and 40%. CO emissions were typically low (<35 ppm). Detailed in- furnace species measurements revealed the importance of the interior furnace circulation patterns, as influenced by fuel and oxidant injection schemes, on pollutant emissions. The combustion stability traits of several DOC burner arrangements were ascertained through furnace pressure measurements, with increased stability occurring as furnace temperature increased and as the separation distance between fuel and oxidant inputs decreased. Based on current market conditions, oxy-fuel conversion of batch steel reheat furnaces with a DOC burner is justified on the basis of utility costs alone. However, conversion of continuous steel reheat furnaces, which are responsible for most steel production, requires additional economic incentives, such as further fuel savings, increased furnace productivity, or emission credits.

  12. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 1, Models and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.; Chen, N.C.J.; Ruggles, A.E.; Cook, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine decay heat removal requirements in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) following shutdown from 85 MW. The objective of the study was to determine when forced flow through the core could be terminated without causing the fuel to melt. This question is particularly relevant when a station blackout caused by an external event is considered. Analysis of natural circulation in the core, vessel upper plenum, and reactor pool indicates that 12 h of forced flow will permit a safe shutdown with some margin. However, uncertainties in the analysis preclude conclusive proof that 12 h is sufficient. As a result of the study, two seismically qualified diesel generators were installed in HFIR. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  13. ISOTOP Camera 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Our group has recently described a new form of kinetic isotope effect that arises from dynamic selectivity in the bifurcation of a reaction pathway on the slope of an energy surface. Since the selection between products does not occur at a potential...

  14. Looking at catchments in colors: combining thermal IR imagery with geochemical and isotopic tracers to document spatio-temporal dynamics of water source and flowpaths in the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Wetzel, C.; Ector, L.; Hissler, C.; Hoffmann, L.; Frentress, J. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    At present, our conceptual understanding of catchment-scale water mixing, source apportionment and hydrological connectivity is thwarted by measurement limitations. For instance, the measurement and documentation of HRS connectivity is a major impediment to better process understanding. In recent literature, there have been repeatedly calls for interdisciplinary approaches to expand the frontier of hydrological theory and eventually overcome the well-known limitations that are inherent to conventional techniques used for tracing water source, flowpaths and residence times. The 2010 edition of the EGU Leonardo Topical Conference Series on the hydrological cycle had concluded that a major challenge for hydrology in the near future will be to apply more often multidisciplinary approaches, so to find creative solutions that will eventually allow us to move away from 'monochrome pictures of reality', and 'see the catchments in colors'. Here, we demonstrate the potential for thermal infrared imagery to both determine adequate water sampling sites and validate the identification of water source and connectivity through conventional tracers. Until recently, the use of heat as a ground water tracer had been largely restricted to the hydrogeological literature. Thermal remote sensing of riparian and water surface temperatures has been of interest in aquatic management issues, as well as for the assessment of spatial heterogeneities. Our proof-of-concept study in the Weierbach experimental watershed further extended the potential for infrared thermography via hand-held cameras to hydrological processes studies across various hydrological response units (HRU). Infrared thermography of surface water dynamics stemming either from infiltration excess overland flow or saturation excess overland flow was mapped throughout a complete rainfall-runoff event. In order to grasp the spatial and temporal variability of geochemical and isotopic signatures, during and after a storm event, we have combined thermal IR imagery with grab sampling of water inside the hillslope-riparian zone-stream system. While relying on IR thermography, we also used simultaneous optical image capture to aid in classifying the incoming IR signal and differentiating between substances of different temperature. The distinction between flowing water, saturated zones, soil, wooden branches, pebbles or leaves is extremely difficult when observing the optical image alone. The IR thermography interprets the heat signal from the same source and provides a much better view for identifying both areas where water is flowing and areas where water is either seeping from the soil, flowing as surface runoff or accumulating temporarily in micro-depressions during a rainfall event. This approach has revealed how crucial the location of the grab sampling can be within extremely small geographical zones (a few square meters) due to incomplete mixing, as well as it has helped to map the dynamics of geochemical and isotopic signatures in the area of interest. To date, our investigations have revealed: (a) the potential for infrared thermography to identify, discriminate and observe the spatio-temporal dynamics of hydrological processes, namely infiltration excess overland flow, saturation excess overland flow and subsurface return flow; and (b) the complementarity of information gained from conventional tracers (geochemicals and stable isotopes) and remote sensing (infrared thermography). Our next step will consist in assessing the individual and combined potential of these techniques for reducing uncertainties in hydrological process identification and quantification (especially with respect to hydrograph separation).

  15. Unusual Intramolecular Kinetic Isotope Effects: Selectivity beyond Transition State Theory’s Jurisdiction 

    E-print Network

    Andujar-De Sanctis, Ivonne

    2014-10-16

    isotope effects as the underlying physical phenomena behind the KIEs in the thermal dimerization of methcrolein was studied. The temperature dependence of these novel form of KIEs was investigated by analyzing the isotopic distribution...

  16. Electrical activation and electron spin resonance measurements of implanted bismuth in isotopically enriched silicon-28

    E-print Network

    Electrical activation and electron spin resonance measurements of implanted bismuth in isotopically measurements of implanted bismuth donors in isotopically enriched silicon-28. Donors are electrically activated via thermal annealing with minimal diffusion. Damage from bismuth ion implantation is repaired during

  17. Sulfur isotope analysis of bitumen and pyrite associated with thermal sulfate reduction in reservoir carbonates at the Big Piney-La Barge production complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Hubert E.; Walters, Clifford C.; Horn, William C.; Zimmer, Mindy; Heines, Maureen M.; Lamberti, William A.; Kliewer, Christine; Pottorf, Robert J.; Macleod, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur isotopes of solid bitumen and associated pyrite from the Madison Limestone in the Big Piney-La Barge production complex were measured using a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method. The solid bitumens, a product of thermochemical sulfate reduction, yielded ?34S values of +18.9 ± 3.9 that are consistent with inferred values for native Mississippian sulfate. In contrast, coarse and fine grain pyrite grains were found to be 34S depleted, with values similar to that of the produced H2S (?34S ? +10‰). We interpret these results to indicate that two different sources of sulfate were involved with TSR within the Madison Limestone-autochthonous anhydrite, which is now completely replaced with calcite, and Permian age sulfate dissolved in the aquifer. While checking for inclusions within the bitumen that could lead to erroneous measurement, we found the bitumen possesses a ?5 ?m rim and internal “worm-like” features enriched in organic sulfur. We hypothesize that the rim is the result of back reaction of the late forming H2S with the solid bitumen and that the <1 ?m diameter wormy features may result from liquid-liquid immiscibility occurring at the high temperatures of formation.

  18. Spin dynamics in paramagnetic diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Van-Nham; Tran, Minh-Tien

    2015-10-01

    Microscopic properties of low-energy spin dynamics in diluted magnetic semiconductor are addressed in a framework of the Kondo lattice model including random distribution of magnetic dopants. Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we derive an explicit dependence of the spin diffusion coefficient on the single-particle Green function which is directly evaluated by dynamical mean-field theory. In the paramagnetic state, the magnetic scattering has been manifested to suppress spin diffusion. In agreement with other ferromagnet systems, we also point out that the spin diffusion in diluted magnetic semiconductors at small carrier concentration displays a monotonic 1 /T -like temperature dependence. By investigating the spin diffusion coefficient on a wide range of the model parameters, the obtained results have provided a significant scenario to understand the spin dynamics in the paramagnetic diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  19. Phonon Engineering in Isotopically Disordered Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Givan, U; Senz, S; Bergeron, A; Francoeur, S; de la Mata, M; Arbiol, J; Sekiguchi, T; Itoh, K M; Isheim, D; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2015-06-10

    The introduction of stable isotopes in the fabrication of semiconductor nanowires provides an additional degree of freedom to manipulate their basic properties, design an entirely new class of devices, and highlight subtle but important nanoscale and quantum phenomena. With this perspective, we report on phonon engineering in metal-catalyzed silicon nanowires with tailor-made isotopic compositions grown using isotopically enriched silane precursors (28)SiH4, (29)SiH4, and (30)SiH4 with purity better than 99.9%. More specifically, isotopically mixed nanowires (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) with a composition close to the highest mass disorder (x ? 0.5) were investigated. The effect of mass disorder on the phonon behavior was elucidated and compared to that in isotopically pure (29)Si nanowires having a similar reduced mass. We found that the disorder-induced enhancement in phonon scattering in isotopically mixed nanowires is unexpectedly much more significant than in bulk crystals of close isotopic compositions. This effect is explained by a nonuniform distribution of (28)Si and (30)Si isotopes in the grown isotopically mixed nanowires with local compositions ranging from x = ?0.25 to 0.70. Moreover, we also observed that upon heating, phonons in (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) nanowires behave remarkably differently from those in (29)Si nanowires suggesting a reduced thermal conductivity induced by mass disorder. Using Raman nanothermometry, we found that the thermal conductivity of isotopically mixed (28)Si(x)(30)Si(1-x) nanowires is ?30% lower than that of isotopically pure (29)Si nanowires in agreement with theoretical predictions. PMID:25993500

  20. Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); Choi, Heonjin (Seoul, KR); Lee, Sangkwon (Daejeon, KR); He, Rongrui (Albany, CA); Zhang, Yanfeng (El Cerrito, CA); Kuykendal, Tevye (Berkeley, CA); Pauzauskie, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-08-23

    A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

  1. Automatic dilution gaging of rapidly varying flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duerk, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis showed that the discharges measured by dye-dilution techniques were generally within ± 10 percent of the discharges determined from ratings established by current-meter measurements. Larger differences were noted at the start of and on the rising limb of four hydrographs. Of the 20 storms monitored, dilution measurements on 17 were of acceptable accuracy. Peak discharges from the open-channel site ranged from 0 to 12 percent departures from the existing rating whereas the comparison of peak discharge at the storm sewer site ranged from 0 to 5 percent departures from the existing rating.

  2. Molybdenum Isotopic Composition of Iron Meteorites, Chondrites and Refractory Inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, H.; Walker, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Recent Mo isotopic studies of meteorites reported evidence for differences in isotopic compositions for whole rocks of some primitive and differentiated meteorites relative to terrestrial materials. Enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes of up to 3-4 units (e unit = parts in 10(exp 4) over s-process dominated isotopes are the most prominent features. Certain types of presolar grains show large enrichments in s-process isotopes, however, it was concluded on grounds of mass balance that incomplete digestion of such grains cannot explain the enrichments of r- and p-process isotopes in whole rocks of primitive chondrites. If the reported variability in r- and p-process isotope enrichments reflects the true isotopic characteristics of the whole rocks, the implications are quite profound. It would suggest the presence of large scale Mo isotopic heterogeneity within the solar accretion disk with likely collateral effects for other elements. However, such effects were not found for Ru isotopes, nor for Zr isotopes. Another recent Mo isotopic study by multi collector ICP-MS could not confirm the reported deviations in Allende, Murchison or iron meteorites. Here, we present new results for the Mo isotopic composition of iron meteorites, chondrites and CAIs obtained by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS). We discuss analytical aspects and the homogeneity of Mo isotopic compositions in solar system materials.

  3. Standard test method for analysis of isotopic composition of uranium in nuclear-grade fuel material by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium (U) in nuclear-grade fuel material. The following isotopic weight percentages are determined using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (Q-ICP-MS): 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. The analysis can be performed on various material matrices after acid dissolution and sample dilution into water or dilute nitric (HNO3) acid. These materials include: fuel product, uranium oxide, uranium oxide alloys, uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystals, and solutions. The sample preparation discussed in this test method focuses on fuel product material but may be used for uranium oxide or a uranium oxide alloy. Other preparation techniques may be used and some references are given. Purification of the uranium by anion-exchange extraction is not required for this test method, as it is required by other test methods such as radiochemistry and thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS). This test method is also described i...

  4. Radioisotope dilution analyses of geological samples using 236U and 229Th

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    The use of 236U and 229Th in alpha spectrometric measurements has some advantages over the use of other tracers and measurement techniques in isotope dilution analyses of most geological samples. The advantages are: (1) these isotopes do not occur in terrestrial rocks, (2) they have negligible decay losses because of their long half lives, (3) they cause minimal recoil contamination to surface-barrier detectors, (4) they allow for simultaneous determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium and thorium in a variety of sample types, and (5) they allow for simple and constant corrections for spectral inferences, 0.5% of the 238U activity is subtracted for the contribution of 235U in the 236U peak and 1% of the 229Th activity is subtracted from the 230Th activity. Disadvantages in using 236U and 229Th are: (1) individual separates of uranium and thorium must be prepared as very thin sources for alpha spectrometry, (2) good resolution in the spectrometer system is required for thorium isotopic measurements where measurement times may extend to 300 h, and (3) separate calibrations of the 236U and 229Th spike solution with both uranium and thorium standards are required. The use of these tracers in applications of uranium-series disequilibrium studies has simplified the measurements required for the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium and thorium because of the minimal corrections needed for alpha spectral interferences. ?? 1984.

  5. Resolving the stellar sources of isotopically rare presolar silicate grains through Mg and Fe isotopic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ann N.; Messenger, Scott

    2014-04-01

    We conducted multi-element isotopic analyses of 11 presolar silicate grains from the Acfer 094 meteorite having unusual O isotopic compositions. Eight grains are {sup 18}O-rich, one is {sup 16}O-rich, and two are extremely {sup 17}O-rich. We constrained the grains' stellar sources by measuring their Si and Mg isotopic ratios, and also the {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe and {sup 57}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios for five grains. The Mg and Fe isotopic measurements were conducted after surrounding matrix grains were removed for more accurate ratios. Most of the {sup 18}O-rich silicates had anomalous Mg isotopic ratios, and their combined isotopic constraints are consistent with origins in low-mass Type II supernovae (SNe II) rather than high-metallicity stars. The isotopic ratios of the {sup 16}O-rich silicate are also consistent with an SN origin. Mixing small amounts of interior stellar material with the stellar envelope replicated all measured isotopic ratios except for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si and {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe in some grains. The {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si ratios of all SN-derived grains are matched by doubling the {sup 29}Si yield in the Ne- and Si-burning zones. The {sup 54}Fe/{sup 56}Fe ratios of the grains imply elemental fractionation in the Si/S zone, or introduction of isotopically solar Fe by secondary processing. The two highly {sup 17}O-rich silicates exhibited significant {sup 25}Mg and/or {sup 26}Mg enrichments and their isotopic ratios are best explained by strong dilution of 1.15 M {sub ?} CO nova matter. We estimate that ?12% and 1% of presolar silicates have SN and nova origins, respectively, similar to presolar SiC and oxides. This implies that asymptotic giant branch stars are the dominant dust producers in the galaxy.

  6. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J. (Plainsboro, NJ); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1984-01-01

    A method of enhancing the thermal desorption of a first isotope of a diatomic gas from a metal comprises the steps of (a) establishing a partial pressure of a second isotope of the diatomic gas in vicinity of the metal; heating the metal to a temperature such that the first isotope is desorbed from the metal; and reducing the partial pressure of the desorbed first isotope while maintaining the partial pressure of the second isotope substantially constant. The method is especially useful for enhancing the desorption of tritium from the Zr-Al getter in a plasma confinement device.

  7. Isotopic determinations of rhenium and osmium in meteorites by using fusion, distillation and ion-exchange separations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Walker, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A stable isotope-dilution method using resonance ionization mass spectrometry is suitable for the determination of rhenium and osmium abundances and osmium isotopic composition in carbonaceous chondrites and iron meteorites. The chemical procedure involves sodium peroxide fusion, followed by distillation of osmium from sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide and subsequent anion-exchange separation of rhenium from the same solution. ?? 1989.

  8. Serial dilution microchip for cytotoxicity test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Hyunwoo; Lim, Sun Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Chung, Seok; Chung, Chanil; Han, Dong-Chul; Chang, Jun Keun

    2004-08-01

    Today's pharmaceutical industry is facing challenges resulting from the vast increases in sample numbers produced by high-throughput screening (HTS). In addition, the bottlenecks created by increased demand for cytotoxicity testing (required to assess compound safety) are becoming a serious problem. We have developed a polymer PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) based microfluidic device that can perform a cytotoxicity test in a rapid and reproducible manner. The concept that the device includes is well adjustable to automated robots in huge HTS systems, so we can think of it as a potential dilution and delivery module. Cytotoxicity testing is all about the dilution and dispensing of a drug sample. Previously, we made a PDMS based microfluidic device which automatically and precisely diluted drugs with a buffer solution with serially increasing concentrations. This time, the serially diluted drug solution was directly delivered to 96 well plates for cytotoxicity testing. Cytotoxic paclitaxel solution with 2% RPMI 1640 has been used while carrying out cancerous cell based cytotoxicity tests. We believe that this rapid and robust use of the PDMS microchip will overcome the growing problem in cytotoxicity testing for HTS.

  9. LAKE RESTORATION BY DILUTION: MOSES LAKE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dilution water, low in macronutrients, was added to Moses Lake on three occasions in 1977 and once in 1978 during the spring-summer period. The addition resulted in reducing the annual average inflow concentration of phosphorus from about 130-140 micrograms/l to 100 micrograms/l....

  10. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  11. THE MOST DILUTE LAKE IN THE WORLD?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Notasha, near the crest of the Oregon Cascade mountain range, is the most dilute lake known. he measured conductivity during two visits was 1.3 and 1.6 uS cm-1, with a sum of base cations of 9 and 18 ueq L-1; bicarbonate was the dominant anion. ost of the cations in the lake...

  12. Osteoinductive porous titanium implants: effect of sodium removal by dilute HCl treatment.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Neo, Masashi; Suzuki, Jun; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-05-01

    In a previous study, we observed that chemically and thermally treated plasma-sprayed porous titanium possesses intrinsic osteoinductivity and that bone formation occurs after 12 months in the muscles of beagle dogs. The aim of this study was to optimize the surface treatment and to accelerate the osteoinductivity. Previous studies have reported that sodium removal converts the sodium titanate layer on the surface of an alkali-treated titanium plate into a more bioactive titania layer. In this study, we developed a dilute hydrochloric acid (HCl) treatment for porous titanium, which removed sodium from the complexly shaped porous structure more effectively than conventional hot water treatment. Three types of surface treatments were applied: (a) alkali and heat treatment (AH treatment); (b) alkali, hot water, and heat treatment (Water-AH treatment); and (c) alkali, dilute HCl, hot water, and heat treatment (HCl-AH treatment). The osteoinductivity of the materials implanted in the back muscles of adult beagle dogs was examined at 3, 6, and 12 months. The HCl-AH-treated porous bioactive titanium implant had the highest osteoinductivity, with induction of a large amount of bone formation within 3 months. The dilute HCl treatment was considered to give both chemical (titania formation and sodium removal) and topographic (etching) effects on the titanium surface, although we cannot determine which is the predominant factor. Nevertheless, adding the dilute HCl treatment to the conventional chemical and thermal treatments is a promising candidate for advanced surface treatment of porous titanium implants. PMID:16413052

  13. A simple deep monitoring well dilution technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogiers, Bart; Labat, Serge; Gedeon, Matej; Vandersteen, Katrijn

    2015-04-01

    Well dilution techniques are well known and studied as one of the basic techniques to quantify groundwater fluxes. A typical well dilution test consists of the injection of a tracer, a mixing mechanism (e.g. water circulation with a pump) to achieve a homogeneous concentration distribution within the well, and monitoring of the evolution of tracer concentration with time. An apparent specific discharge can be obtained from such a test, and when details on the well construction are known, it can be converted into a specific discharge representative of the undisturbed aquifer. For deep wells however, the injection of tracer becomes less practical and the use of pumps for circulating and mixing the water becomes problematic. This is due to the limited pressure that common pumps can endure at the outlet, as well as the large volume of water that makes it difficult to achieve a homogeneous concentration, and the impracticalities of getting a lot of equipment to large depths in very small monitoring wells. Injection and monitoring of tracer at a specific depth omits several of the problems with deep wells. We present a very simple device that can be used to perform a dilution test at a specific depth in deep wells. The injection device consists of a PVC tube with a detachable rubber seal at its bottom. To minimize disturbance of the water column in the well, we integrated an EC sensor in this injection device, which enables us to use demineralized water or dissolved salts as a tracer. Once at the target depth, the PVC tube is retracted and the EC sensor and tracer become subject to groundwater flow. The device was tested on a shallow well, on which different types of dilution tests were performed. The results of the other tests agree well with the injection tube results. Finally, the device was used to perform a dilution test in a deep well in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

  14. MG Isotopic Measurement of FIB-Isolated Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, A.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of presolar oxide and silicate grains are ascribed to origins in low-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars based on their O isotopic ratios. However, a minor population of these grains (< 10%) has O isotopic ratios incompatible with these sources. Two principle alternative sources are higher-than-solar metallicity (Z) stars or, more likely, supernovae (SN) [1-3]. These rare (Group 4) grains [3] are characterized by enrichments in O-18, and typically also enrichments in O-17. An even rarer subset of grains with extremely large enrichments in O-17 and smaller depletions in O-18 were suggested to come from binary star systems [2]. To establish the origins of these isotopically unusual grains, it is necessary to examine isotopic systems in addition to O. Presolar silicates offer several elements diagnostic of their stellar sources and nuclear processes, including O, Si, Mg, Fe and Ca. However, the database for minor element isotopic compositions in silicates is seriously lacking. To date only two silicate grains have been analyzed for Mg [4] or Fe [5]. One major complicating factor is their small size (average 230 nm), which greatly limits the number of measurements that can be performed on any one grain and makes it more difficult to obtain statistically relevant data. This problem is compounded because the grains are identified among isotopically solar silicates, which contribute a diluting signal in isotopic measurements [1]. Thus, relatively small isotopic anomalies are missed due to this dilution effect. By applying focused ion beam (FIB) milling, we obtain undiluted Mg isotopic ratios of isolated rare presolar silicate grains to investigate their sources.

  15. Pyroxene Homogenization and the Isotopic Systematics of Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.

    1996-01-01

    The original Mg-Fe zoning of eucritic pyroxenes has in nearly all cases been partly homogenized, an observation that has been combined with other petrographic and compositional criteria to establish a scale of thermal "metamorphism" for eucrites. To evaluate hypotheses explaining development of conditions on the HED parent body (Vesta?) leading to pyroxene homogenization against their chronological implications, it is necessary to know whether pyroxene metamorphism was recorded in the isotopic systems. However, identifying the effects of the thermal metamorphism with specific effects in the isotopic systems has been difficult, due in part to a lack of correlated isotopic and mineralogical studies of the same eucrites. Furthermore, isotopic studies often place high demands on analytical capabilities, resulting in slow growth of the isotopic database. Additionally, some isotopic systems would not respond in a direct and sensitive way to pyroxene homogenization. Nevertheless, sufficient data exist to generalize some observations, and to identify directions of potentially fruitful investigations.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission...

  17. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Dilution air background correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Dilution air background correction. 1066.610...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Calculations § 1066.610 Dilution air background correction....

  18. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission...

  1. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Dilution air background emission correction...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES...Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission...

  2. Suppression of Pauling's residual entropy in the dilute spin ice (Dy1-xYx) 2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharffe, S.; Breunig, O.; Cho, V.; Laschitzky, P.; Valldor, M.; Welter, J. F.; Lorenz, T.

    2015-11-01

    Around 0.5 K, the entropy of the spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 has a plateau like feature close to Pauling's residual entropy derived originally for water ice, but an unambiguous quantification towards lower temperature is prevented by ultraslow thermal equilibration. Based on the specific-heat data of (Dy1-xYx)2Ti2O7 we analyze the influence of nonmagnetic dilution on the low-temperature entropy. With increasing x , the ultraslow thermal equilibration rapidly vanishes, the low-temperature entropy systematically decreases, and its temperature dependence strongly increases. These data suggest that a nondegenerate ground state is realized in (Dy1-xYx)2Ti2O7 for intermediate dilution. This contradicts the expected zero-temperature residual entropy obtained from a generalization of Pauling's theory for dilute spin ice, but is supported by Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Origin of nucleosynthetic isotope heterogeneity in the solar protoplanetary disk.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Elliott, Tim; Ulfbeck, David; Coath, Christopher; Krot, Alexander N; Bizzarro, Martin

    2009-04-17

    Stable-isotope variations exist among inner solar system solids, planets, and asteroids, but their importance is not understood. We report correlated, mass-independent variations of titanium-46 and titanium-50 in bulk analyses of these materials. Because titanium-46 and titanium-50 have different nucleosynthetic origins, this correlation suggests that the presolar dust inherited from the protosolar molecular cloud was well mixed when the oldest solar system solids formed, but requires a subsequent process imparting isotopic variability at the planetary scale. We infer that thermal processing of molecular cloud material, probably associated with volatile-element depletions in the inner solar system, resulted in selective destruction of thermally unstable, isotopically anomalous presolar components, producing residual isotopic heterogeneity. This implies that terrestrial planets accreted from thermally processed solids with nonsolar isotopic compositions. PMID:19372428

  4. Helium 3/Helium 4 dilution cryocooler for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, John B.; Dingus, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Prototype dilution cryocoolers based on dilution refrigeration and adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration (ADR) cycles were designed, constructed, and tested. Although devices the devices did not operate as fully functional dilution cryocoolers, important information was gathered. The porous metal phase separator was demonstrated to operate in the -1-g configuration; this phase separation is the critical element in the He-3 circulation dilution cryocooler. Improvements in instrumentation needed for additional tests and development were identified.

  5. Development and validation of an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the reliable quantification of 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 14 other explosives and their degradation products in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Sébastien; Léonço, Daniel; Hubert, Cécile; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Bridoux, Maxime

    2015-10-01

    A comprehensive method for the determination and characterization of 15 common explosive compounds in water samples by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) is presented. The method allows the determination of 10 nitroaromatics, two nitroamines and three nitrate ester compounds. Among these, 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) was quantified and detected for the first time in our knowledge at trace levels (0.2 µg/L). Furthermore, the collision induced dissociation (CID) mass spectrum of TATB is discussed and a fragmentation mechanism is proposed. The signal for each explosive was normalized by isotopically-enriched congeners used as internal standards. The limits of detection (LOD) reached 20 ng/L, depending on the type of energetic molecule, which are adequate for water samples and the linearity was verified from 1.4 to 2 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of the UHPLC-APCI-MS/MS approach allows direct injection of aqueous samples without preceding extraction for concentration. Besides, the method displays a good reliability with low signal suppression in various matrices such as spring water, mineral water, acidified water or ground water. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by the analysis of underground water samples containing traces of explosives from test fields in France. PMID:26078159

  6. Murphy's law of limiting dilution cloning.

    PubMed

    Staszewski, R

    1990-04-01

    Conventional practice and literature on limiting dilution cloning address the irrelevant problem of selection of a single progenitor from a uniform population, and provide optimistic estimates of monoclonality for interesting cultures and subcultures. Any cell line established via these estimates is suspect and may be polyclonally metastable. Cultures derived by limiting dilution of the progenitors of independently Poisson distributed populations obey a counterintuitive relation with the characteristics of a Murphy's law: the probability that an interesting culture is monotypic or monoclonal is less than that of a random non-sterile culture, decreases for increasingly rare interesting cultures, and is bounded below by the probability of sterility. A priori and empiric a posteriori estimates of the probability that interesting subcultures are monotypic or monoclonal are derived consistent with this principle. PMID:2362981

  7. Unstable blast shocks in dilute granular flows.

    PubMed

    Boudet, J F; Kellay, H

    2013-05-01

    Shocks and blasts can be readily obtained in granular flows be they dense or dilute. Here, by examining the propagation of a blast shock in a dilute granular flow, we show that such a front is unstable with respect to transverse variations of the density of grains. This instability has a well-defined wavelength which depends on the density of the medium and has an amplitude which grows as an exponential of the distance traveled. These features can be understood using a simple model for the shock front, including dissipation which is inherent to granular flows. While this instability bears much resemblance to that anticipated in gases, it is distinct and has special features we discuss here. PMID:23767525

  8. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants and related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower...

  9. 21 CFR 172.710 - Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2009-04-01 true Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. 172.710 Section...Additives § 172.710 Adjuvants for pesticide use dilutions. The following surfactants...related adjuvants may be safely added to pesticide use dilutions by a grower or...

  10. The ADMX Site and Dilution Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, James; ADMX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The ADMX experiment searches for axions by looking for their resonant conversion to detectable photons with a frequency that directly corresponds to the axion mass (a currently unknown value). Fundamentally, the RF photon detection is relatively straightforward; the exceptional technical challenge of ADMX is achieving the sensitivity required to discern the extremely weak (~ 10-22 W) photon signal above the system noise. Greater sensitivity is achieved by either lowering the physical and amplifier noise or by integrating for longer time over a given frequency range. Noise temperatures approaching the quantum limit are achieved by operating quantum electronics, SQUIDs and JPAs, at very low physical temperatures. In the past ADMX has achieved ~1.5K physical temperatures by operating with pumped 4 He. The addition of a 3 He/4 He dilution refrigerator into ADMX will lower the physical temperatures to ~100mK, dramatically increasing the scan rate and sensitivity. I will discuss the site and hardware modifications to ADMX to accommodate the dilution refrigerator and will report on the commissioning operations of the dilution refrigerator. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant 1067242, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 046409 (2012) Particle chains in a dilute dusty plasma with subsonic ion flow

    E-print Network

    Goree, John

    2012-01-01

    from the main plasma and toward the electrodes on the chamber's boundaries. The ion thermal speed v of capacitively coupled rf plasmas [6­9] and in the periphery of an inductively coupled rf plasma [10PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 046409 (2012) Particle chains in a dilute dusty plasma with subsonic ion flow

  12. Efficient removal of UDMH from dilute nitride MOCVD exhaust streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahle, Jörg; Czerniak, Mike; Seeley, Andy; Baker, Derek

    2004-12-01

    Unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (UDMH) (CH 3) 2N 2H 2 is often used in the deposition of dilute nitride semiconductors because it provides a source of nitrogen with a low thermal decomposition temperature (Temperature-dependent carrier lifetime in GaNAs using resonant-coupled photoconductive decay, NCPV Program Review Meeting, Lakewood, Colorado, 14-17 October, 2001). The problems with using this material, however, are its significant toxicity (0.01 ppm compared to ammonia's 25 ppm) and also the fact that it blocks the action of conventional dosed wet scrubbers sometimes used on nitride applications, resulting in diminished efficiency in removing arsine (the source of arsenic), and arsine being similarly toxic (TLV of 0.05 ppm). Efficient removal of UDMH, AsH 3 and hydrogen (which, though not toxic poses a potential safety hazard) by means of a combined thermal oxidation reaction and wet scrubber in series is described at input gas flow rates exceeding those typically encountered in practice. The detection technique employed was Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), and the calibration and resolution techniques will be described. For input UDMH flows of up to 445 sccm (i.e. 1.85×10 -2 mol/min), destructive reaction efficiencies (DREs) of >99.9% were demonstrated, corresponding to the background detection resolution of 0.4 ppm.

  13. Number-conserving master equation theory for a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Schelle, Alexej; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas; Delande, Dominique

    2011-01-15

    We describe the transition of N weakly interacting atoms into a Bose-Einstein condensate within a number-conserving quantum master equation theory. Based on the separation of time scales for condensate formation and noncondensate thermalization, we derive a master equation for the condensate subsystem in the presence of the noncondensate environment under the inclusion of all two-body interaction processes. We numerically monitor the condensate particle number distribution during condensate formation, and derive a condition under which the unique equilibrium steady state of a dilute, weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate is given by a Gibbs-Boltzmann thermal state of N noninteracting atoms.

  14. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  15. Global NOx Measurements in Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-03-01

    Turbulent hydrogen diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen are currently being studied to assess their ability to achieve the DOE Turbine Program’s aggressive emissions goal of 2 ppm NOx in a hydrogen-fueled IGCC gas turbine combustor. Since the unstrained adiabatic flame temperatures of these diluted flames are not low enough to eliminate thermal NOx formation the focus of the current work is to study how the effects of flame residence time and global flame strain can be used to help achieve the stated NOx emissions goal. Dry NOx measurements are presented as a function of jet diameter nitrogen dilution and jet velocity for a turbulent hydrogen/nitrogen jet issuing from a thin-lipped tube in an atmospheric pressure combustor. The NOx emission indices from these experiments are normalized by the flame residence time to ascertain the effects of global flame strain and fuel Lewis Number on the NOx emissions. In addition dilute hydrogen diffusion flame experiments were performed in a high-pressure combustor at 2 4 and 8 atm. The NOx emission data from these experiments are discussed as well as the results from a Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling effort currently underway to help explain the experimental data.

  16. The Osmium Isotopic Composition of Tagish Lake and Other Chondrites, Implications for Late Terrestrial Planetary Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, A. D.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this investigation are twofold. First, obtain high-precision Os isotope measurements of Tagish Lake and other chondrites by TIMS. Second, measure Re, Os, Pt, and other HSE concentrations by isotope dilution using TIMS and ICPMS. These measurements will determine whether this meteorite does in fact represent C-chondrite material with timeintegrated elevated Re/Os and Pt/Os with the implications to late accretion material characteristics.

  17. Microbroth Dilution Susceptibility Testing of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, Randal J; Lockhart, Shawn R

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal susceptibility testing for Candida species is now widely accepted as a methodology to predict the success or failure of antifungal therapy for some antifungal/Candida species combinations. There are many different ways to perform susceptibility testing of antifungal agents, but broth microdilution has become the most popular over the last 10 years. This chapter describes in detail two methods for antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida species using the commercially available microbroth dilution tray (YeastOne(®)) and a commercially available gradient agar diffusion technique (Etest(®)) for isolates that appear resistant. PMID:26519073

  18. Magnetopolaron effect in diluted semimagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Georgiy G.; Mazur, Yuri I.; Rakitin, Andrey S.; Lavoric, S. R.; Tomm, Jens W.; Hoerstel, W.

    1997-08-01

    Phonon-assisted self-trapping of free carrier is considered in diluted semimagnetics. It is shown that the binding energy of free magnetic polaron can be substantially larger when the 'spin-phonon' coupling is taken into account. For the particular case of 'soft' lattice dynamics the region of stability for hole-induced polaron can be promoted to the temperature of tenths of degrees and magnetic field of a few Tesla. The possible hybridized excitations with the partition of free magnetic polaron are discussed in semimagnetic semiconductors.

  19. Dilution jet mixing program, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Myers, G.; White, C.

    1985-01-01

    The main objectives for the NASA Jet Mixing Phase 3 program were: extension of the data base on the mixing of single sided rows of jets in a confined cross flow to discrete slots, including streamlined, bluff, and angled injections; quantification of the effects of geometrical and flow parameters on penetration and mixing of multiple rows of jets into a confined flow; investigation of in-line, staggered, and dissimilar hole configurations; and development of empirical correlations for predicting temperature distributions for discrete slots and multiple rows of dilution holes.

  20. Impact of Atmosphere-sea Exchange on the Isotopic Expression of Carbon Excursions: Observations and Modeling of OAE-1a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, D. B.; Pratt, L. M.; Brassell, S. C.; Montañez, I. P.

    2005-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope excursions are a recurring phenomenon in earth history (e.g., Permo-Triassic boundary, Jurassic and Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) variously attributed to destabilization of methane clathrates, a decrease in primary productivity, intensified volcanism, and more recently to widespread peat fires. Each forcing mechanism invoked accounts for both the magnitude of the negative isotopic shift and the reservoir required to drive the shift as observed at one to several locales. Studies rarely consider the effect of latitudinal temperature changes on the excursion. Here, we explore the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event as an example of a negative isotopic shift whose magnitude varies with paleolatitude in terrestrial settings. It increases (from -2.0 to -8.2 ‰) with paleolatitude (5° to 33°N) and is greater than that expected for changes in plant C isotope discrimination driven by environmental stresses (~3 ‰). Conceptually, an isotopic shift of terrestrial vegetation across paleolatitudes represents a response to its forcing mechanism and temperature. A closed system carbon cycle model constructed of five reservoirs (atmosphere, vegetation, soil, and shallow and deep oceans), and five fluxes (productivity, respiration, litter fall, atmosphere-ocean exchange, and surface-deep ocean exchange) was employed is assessment of a negative isotopic shift at 2x pre-industrial atmospheric levels (P.A.L.) for pCO2 keeping all variables constant with the exception of temperature. The model was run at 5°C increments from 5° to 40°C to simulate the effect of temperature gradients on isotopic shifts at variable latitudes, with the appropriate temperature dependent fractionations for atmosphere - sea exchange. The magnitude of the negative isotopic shift at each temperature was calculated for both terrestrial and marine organic matter. In terrestrial vegetation it changed from -4 to -5.8 ‰ with decreasing temperature (from 40° to 5°C), and from -2.3 to -3.0 ‰ for marine organic matter. Increasing pCO2 to 4x P.A.L. offered a better fit of the modeled data and published terrestrial values. Literature values for ?13C of organic matter from marine settings record a narrower range for the negative isotopic shift (-1.6 to -3.8 ‰) versus paleolatitude because most studies have focused on the Tethyan region where proximal basin sites may record mixtures of both terrestrial and marine organic matter thereby diluting the signature of marine organic matter. The magnitude of the negative isotopic shift, recorded in terrestrial organic matter is enhanced at lower temperatures and buffered by higher carbonate solubility in seawater. Thus, caution should be exercised in the use of the magnitude of the negative isotope shift for limited range in paleolatitudes in mass balance equations and evidence of a global forcing mechanism. These results are broadly applicable for all negative carbon isotope shifts, and their ascribed forcing mechanisms whether in terrestrial and marine records, and across geological time.

  1. Three-dimensional structure of dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Unconfined experimental density currents dynamically similar to pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) suggest that cross-stream motions of the currents and air entrainment through currents' lateral margins strongly affects PDC behavior. Experiments are conducted within an air-filled tank 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents are generated by feeding heated powders down a chute into the tank at controlled rates to form dilute, particle-laden, turbulent gravity currents that are fed for 30 to 600 seconds. Powders include 5 ?m aluminum oxide, 25 ?m talc, 27 ?m walnut, 76 ?m glass beads and mixtures thereof. Experiments are scaled such that Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, particle Stokes and Settling numbers, and thermal to kinetic energy densities are all in agreement with dilute PDCs; experiments have lower Reynolds numbers that natural currents, but the experiments are fully turbulent, thus the large scale structures should be similar. The experiments are illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps); this system provides synchronous observation of a vertical streamwise and cross-stream planes, and a horizontal plane. Ambient temperature currents tend to spread out radially from the source and have long run out distances, whereas warmer currents tend to focus along narrow sectors and have shorter run outs. In addition, when warm currents lift off to form buoyant plumes, lateral spreading ceases. The behavior of short duration currents are dominated by the current head; as eruption duration increases, current transport direction tends to oscillate back and forth (this is particularly true for ambient temperature currents). Turbulent structures in the horizontal plane show air entrainment and advection downstream. Eddies illuminated by the vertical cross-stream laser sheet often show vigorous mixing along the current margins, particularly after the current head has passed. In some currents, the head can persist as a large, vertically oriented vortex long after the bulk of the current has lifted off to form a coignimbrite plume. These unconfined experiments show that three-dimensional structures can affect PDC behavior and suggest that our typical cross-sectional or 'cartoon' understanding of PDCs misses what may be very important parts of PDC dynamics.

  2. Hydrologic Cycle Response to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum at Austral, High-Latitude Site 690 as Revealed by In Situ Measurements of Foraminiferal Oxygen Isotope and Mg/Ca Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdon, R.; Kelly, D.; Fournelle, J.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Earth surface temperatures warmed by ~5°C during an ancient (~55.5 Ma) global warming event termed the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). This transient (~200 ka) "hyperthermal" climate state had profound consequences for the planet's surficial processes and biosphere, and is widely touted as being an ancient analog for climate change driven by human activities. Hallmarks of the PETM are pervasive carbonate dissolution in the ocean basins and a negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) recorded in variety of substrates including soil and marine carbonates. Together these lines of evidence signal the rapid (?30 ka) release of massive quantities (?2000 Gt) of 13C-depleted carbon into the exogenic carbon cycle. Paleoenvironmental reconstructions based on pedogenic features in paleosols, clay mineralogy and sedimentology of coastal and continental deposits, and land-plant communities indicate that PETM warmth was accompanied by a major perturbation to the hydrologic cycle. Micropaleontological evidence and n-alkane hydrogen isotope records indicate that increased poleward moisture transport reduced sea-surface salinities (SSSs) in the central Arctic Ocean during the PETM. Such findings are broadly consistent with predictions of climate model simulations. Here we reassess a well-studied PETM record from the Southern Ocean (ODP Site 690) in light of new ?18O and Mg/Ca data obtained from planktic foraminiferal shells by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), respectively. The unparalleled spatial resolution of these in situ techniques permits extraction of more reliable ?18O and Mg/Ca data by targeting of minute (?10 ?m spots), biogenic domains within individual planktic foraminifera that retain the original shell chemistry (Kozdon et al. 2011, Paleocean.). In general, the stratigraphic profile and magnitude of the ?18O decrease (~2.2‰) delimiting PETM warming in our SIMS-generated record are similar to those of published whole-shell ?18O records for this site; however, the mean baseline of the SIMS ?18O record is consistently ~1-2‰ lower than that of the published records. We attribute this ?18O offset to post-depositional diagenesis, which added 18O-enriched secondary calcite to planktic shells biasing conventional measurements. In the SIMS ?18O record, a minimum value of -4.4‰ is attained ~43 ka after the CIE onset. This ?18O minimum coincides with both the minimum ?13C value of the CIE and an abundance peak in warm-water immigrant taxa (morozovellids) of planktic foraminifera. Congruence of these two datasets reflects warming of sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), but the magnitude of the SST anomaly captured by complementary Mg/Ca data (~5°C) cannot account for the full magnitude of the ?18O decrease. This discrepancy is reconciled by lowering seawater ?18O to a value (-2‰) well below that computed for an ice-free world (-1.2‰). We therefore conclude that, much like in the Arctic, increased poleward moisture transport enhanced Antarctic continental runoff and reduced SSSs in the Weddell Sea region during the PETM.

  3. FE and MG Isotopic Analyses of Isotopically Unusual Presolar Silicate Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Messenger, S.; Ito, M.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Interstellar and circumstellar silicate grains are thought to be Mg-rich and Fe-poor, based on astronomical observations and equilibrium condensation models of silicate dust formation in stellar outflows. On the other hand, presolar silicates isolated from meteorites have surprisingly high Fe contents and few Mg-rich grains are observed. The high Fe contents in meteoritic presolar silicates may indicate they formed by a non-equilibrium condensation process. Alternatively, the Fe in the stardust grains could have been acquired during parent body alteration. The origin of Fe in presolar silicates may be deduced from its isotopic composition. Thus far, Fe isotopic measurements of presolar silicates are limited to the Fe-54/Fe-56 ratios of 14 grains. Only two slight anomalies (albeit solar within error) were observed. However, these measurements suffered from contamination of Fe from the adjacent meteorite matrix, which diluted any isotopic anomalies. We have isolated four presolar silicates having unusual O isotopic compositions by focused ion beam (FIB) milling and obtained their undiluted Mg and Fe isotopic compositions. These compositions help to identify the grains stellar sources and to determine the source of Fe in the grains.

  4. Chemical and isotopic properties of kukersites from Iowa and Estonia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Hower, J.C.; Lis, G.; Hatch, J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Kukersite samples from Estonia and Iowa were analyzed for elemental composition, functional group distribution, and carbon and hydrogen stable isotope ratios. The elemental and hydrogen isotope values, together with other analytical data, suggest a higher thermal maturity for the Iowa kukersite. The wide carbon isotopic range of 9.3??? among kukersites, with unusually negative ??13C values reaching -33.2???, indicates isotopically variable carbon sources for production of biomass, and thus major paleoceanographic differences between the environments supporting biosynthesis. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Geochemistry and hydrology of thermal springs in the Idaho Batholith and adjacent areas, central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence of nature of thermal springs in the Idaho batholith and adjacent areas suggest a relation between structural controls and deeply circulating hot-water systems. Springs issuing from granitic rocks are associated mostly with major regional fault structures. Springs issuing from other rocks probably are related to local faulting. Individual spring flows and water temperatures are variable and range from less than 1 gallon per minute to 2,710 gallons per minute and from 20.5 degrees to 94.0 degrees Celsius. Annual spring discharge is at least 27,000 acre-feet; heat discharges convectively is estimated to be 5.0 x 107 calories per second. Thermal springs discharge relatively dilute water; dissolved solids range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. The chemical quality of the water suggests deep circulation of meteoric water. Estimated reservoir temperatures are generally less than 100 degrees Celsius, but temperatures for several springs exceed 150 degrees Celsius. Stable-isotope data suggest that most of the thermal water is not derived from current precipitation. Carbon-14 values indicate that thermal waters are old; apparent residence times range from 9,000 to more than 40,000 years.

  6. Geometric Exponents of Dilute Loop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencher, Guillaume; Saint-Aubin, Yvan; Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    The fractal dimensions of the hull, the external perimeter and of the red bonds are measured through Monte Carlo simulations for dilute minimal models, and compared with predictions from conformal field theory and SLE methods. The dilute models used are those first introduced by Nienhuis. Their loop fugacity is ?=-2 \\cos(?/bar{kappa}) where the parameter bar{kappa} is linked to their description through conformal loop ensembles. It is also linked to conformal field theories through their central charges c(bar{kappa})=13-6(bar{kappa}+bar{kappa}^{-1}) and, for the minimal models of interest here, bar{kappa}=p/p' where p and p' are two coprime integers. The geometric exponents of the hull and external perimeter are studied for the pairs ( p, p')=(1,1),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5),(5,6),(5,7), and that of the red bonds for ( p, p')=(3,4). Monte Carlo upgrades are proposed for these models as well as several techniques to improve their speeds. The measured fractal dimensions are obtained by extrapolation on the lattice size H, V??. The extrapolating curves have large slopes; despite these, the measured dimensions coincide with theoretical predictions up to three or four digits. In some cases, the theoretical values lie slightly outside the confidence intervals; explanations of these small discrepancies are proposed.

  7. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements...-displacement pump (PDP), a subsonic venturi (SSV), or an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Combined with an upstream... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi,...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements...-displacement pump (PDP), a subsonic venturi (SSV), or an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Combined with an upstream... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi,...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements...-displacement pump (PDP), a subsonic venturi (SSV), or an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Combined with an upstream... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi,...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements...-displacement pump (PDP), a subsonic venturi (SSV), or an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Combined with an upstream... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi,...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements...-displacement pump (PDP), a subsonic venturi (SSV), or an ultrasonic flow meter (UFM). Combined with an upstream... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi,...

  12. Motor-mediated microtubule self-organization in dilute and semi-dilute filament solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, S.; Ziebert, F.; Aranson, I. S.; Karpeev, D.

    2011-01-01

    We study molecular motor-induced microtubule self-organization in dilute and semi-dilute filament solutions. In the dilute case, we use a probabilistic model of microtubule interaction via molecular motors to investigate microtubule bundle dynamics. Microtubules are modeled as polar rods interacting through fully inelastic, binary collisions. Our model indicates that initially disordered systems of interacting rods exhibit an orientational instability resulting in spontaneous ordering. We study the existence and dynamic interaction of microtubule bundles analytically and numerically. Our results reveal a long term attraction and coalescing of bundles indicating a clear coarsening in the system; microtubule bundles concentrate into fewer orientations on a slow logarithmic time scale. In semi-dilute filament solutions, multiple motors can bind a filament to several others and, for a critical motor density, induce a transition to an ordered phase with a nonzero mean orientation. Motors attach to a pair of filaments and walk along the pair bringing them into closer alignment. We develop a spatially homogenous, mean-field theory that explicitly accounts for a force-dependent detachment rate of motors, which in turn affects the mean and the fluctuations of the net force acting on a filament. We show that the transition to the oriented state can be both continuous and discontinuous when the force-dependent detachment of motors is important.

  13. How dilute are dilute solutions in extensional flows? C. Clasen,a)

    E-print Network

    the boundary separating the physical and rheological definition of dilute and semidilute polymer solutions c, and L. E. Scriven Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, University of Minnesota and their molar mass. Graessley 1980 provides a simple definition of c* that is widely accepted for de- marking

  14. Thermal Ionization Jurg Frohlich and Marco Merkli yz

    E-print Network

    Thermal Ionization Jurg Frohlich #3; and Marco Merkli yz Theoretical Physics ETH- Honggerberg CH is in a thermal state corresponding to a suÃ?ciently high positive temperature, and under suitable conditions is called thermal ionization. Thus, a very dilute gas of atoms or molecules in intergalactic space

  15. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  16. Characterization of the Dilute Ising Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, T.

    2000-09-12

    A spin glass is a magnetic ground state in which ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions compete, thereby creating frustration and a multidegenerate state with no long range order. An Ising system is a system where the spins are constrained to lie parallel or antiparallel to a primary axis. There has been much theoretical interest in the past ten years in the effects of applying a magnetic field transverse to the primary axis in an Ising spin glass at low temperatures and thus study phase transitions at the T=0 limit. The focus of this study is to search for and characterize a new Ising spin glass system. This is accomplished by site diluting yttrium for terbium in the crystalline material TbNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}. The first part of this work gives a brief overview of the physics of rare earth magnetism and an overview of experimental characteristics of spin glasses. This is followed by the methodology used to manufacture the large single crystals used in this study, as well as the measurement techniques used. Next, a summary of the results of magnetic measurements on across the dilution series from pure terbium to pure yttrium is presented. This is followed by detailed measurements on particular dilutions which demonstrate spin glass behavior. Pure TbNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} is an Ising antiferromagnet with a several distinct metamagnetic states below 17 K. As the terbium is alloyed with yttrium, these magnetic states are weakened in a consistent manner, as is seen in measurements of the transition temperatures and analysis of Curie-Weiss behavior at high temperature. At low concentrations of terbium, below 35%, long range order is no longer present and a spin-glass-like state emerges. This state is studied through various measurements, dc and ac susceptibility, resistivity, and specific heat. This magnetic behavior was then compared to that of other well characterized spin glasses. It is concluded that there is a region of concentration s for which a spin glass state is formed with the best spin glasses existing between the concentration of 25% and 30%.

  17. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the Cl-37/Cl-35 ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For example, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. A significantly large mass fractionation between two stable chlorine isotopes is expected during planetary processes In addition, in view of the isotopic heterogeneity of other light elements, the chlorine isotopes can potentially be used as a tracer for the origins and evolutionary processes of early solar system materials. Due to analytical difficulties, however, current chlorine isotope studies on planetary materials are quite controversial among IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and/or TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1-3]. Although a cross-calibration of IRMS and TIMS indicates that both techniques are sufficiently consistent with each other [4], some authors have claimed that the 37Cl/35Cl ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For eample, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. In order to clarify the stable chlorine isotope features of early solar system materials, we have initiated development of the TIMS technique at NASA JSC applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We report here the current status of chlorine isotope analysis at NASA JSC.

  18. Magnetization and Hysteresis of Dilute Magnetic-Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, Ralph; Balamurugan, B.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Real-structure imperfections in dilute magnetic oxides tend to create small concentrations of local magnetic moments that are coupled by fairly long-range exchange interactions, mediated by p-electrons. The robustness of these interactions is caused by the strong overlap of the p orbitals, as contrasted to the much weaker interatomic exchange involving iron-series 3d electrons. The net exchange between defect moments can be positive or negative, which gives rise to spin structures with very small net moments. Similarly, the moments exhibit magnetocrystalline anisotropy, reinforced by electron hopping to and from 3d states and generally undergoing some random-anuisotropy averaging. Since the coercivity scales as 2K1/M and M is small, this creates pronounced and -- in thin films -- strongly anisotropic hysteresis loops. In finite systems with N moments, both K1 and M are reduced by a factor of order N1/2 due to random anisotropy and moment compensation, respectively, so that that typical coercivities are comparable to bulk magnets. Thermal activation readily randomizes the net moment of small oxide particles, so that the moment is easier to measure in compacted or aggregated particle ensembles. This research is supported by DOE (BES).

  19. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500 Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. (a) Identification....

  20. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500 Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. (a) Identification....

  1. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500 Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. (a) Identification....

  2. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500 Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 866.2500 - Microtiter diluting and dispensing device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2500 Microtiter diluting and dispensing device. (a) Identification....

  4. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Golden, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  5. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C., III; Callender, E.

    1992-01-01

    The ??18O values of pore wqters range from -15.2??? to -16.7???, and ??D values range from -119??? to -126??? (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water [SMOW]). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a ??18O value of -5.6??? and a ??D value of -120???. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest ??D and ??18O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites. -from Authors

  6. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  7. Cadmium measurements in coral skeleton using isotope dilutioninductively coupled plasmamass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Cadmium measurements in coral skeleton using isotope dilution­inductively coupled plasma for the precise analysis of Cd/Ca in coral skeleton using inductively coupled plasma­ mass spectrometry (ICP of a coral standard yielded a precision of ±2.2% (one standard deviation as a fraction of signal). Analyses

  8. Computational modeling of dilute biomass slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Michael; Stickel, Jonathan; Fischer, Paul; Lischeske, James

    2012-11-01

    The biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid transportation fuels involves a multitude of physical and chemical transformations that occur in several distinct processing steps (e.g., pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation). In this work we focus on development of a computational fluid dynamics model of a dilute biomass slurry, which is a highly viscous particle-laden fluid that can exhibit yield-stress behavior. Here, we model the biomass slurry as a generalized Newtonian fluid that accommodates biomass transport due to settling and biomass-concentration-dependent viscosity. Within a typical mixing vessel, viscosity can vary over several orders of magnitude. We solve the model with the Nek5000 spectral-finite-element solver in a simple vane mixer, and validate against experimental results. This work is directed towards our goal of a fully coupled computational model of fluid dynamics and reaction kinetics for the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  9. Negative magnetophoresis in diluted ferrofluid flow.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2015-07-21

    We report magnetic manipulation of non-magnetic particles suspended in diluted ferrofluid. Diamagnetic particles were introduced into a circular chamber to study the extent of their deflection under the effect of a non-uniform magnetic field of a permanent magnet. Since ferrofluid is a paramagnetic medium, it also experiences a bulk magnetic force that in turn induces a secondary flow opposing the main hydrodynamic flow. Sheath flow rate, particle size, and magnetic field strength were varied to examine this complex behaviour. The combined effect of negative magnetophoresis and magnetically induced secondary flow leads to various operation regimes, which can potentially find applications in separation, trapping and mixing of diamagnetic particles such as cells in a microfluidic system. PMID:26054840

  10. Are Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Dilute Electrolytes?

    E-print Network

    Alpha A Lee; Dominic Vella; Susan Perkin; Alain Goriely

    2014-12-26

    An important question in understanding the structure of ionic liquids is whether ions are truly "free" and mobile which would correspond to a concentrated ionic melt, or are rather "bound" in ion pairs, that is a liquid of ion pairs with a small concentration of free ions. Recent surface force balance experiments from different groups have given conflicting answers to this question. We propose a simple model for the thermodynamics and kinetics of ion pairing in ionic liquids. Our model takes into account screened ion-ion, dipole-dipole and dipole-ion interactions in the mean field limit. The results of this model suggest that almost two thirds of the ions are free at any instant, and ion pairs have a short lifetime comparable to the characteristic timescale for diffusion. These results suggest that there is no particular thermodynamic or kinetic preference for ions residing in pairs. We therefore conclude that ionic liquids are concentrated, rather than dilute, electrolytes.

  11. Dynamical Threshold of Diluteness of Soft Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Egami, T; Falus, Peter; Li, Xin; Liu, Dazhi; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of soft colloids in solutions is characterized by internal collective motion as well as center-of-mass diffusion. Using neutron scattering we demonstrate that the competition between the relaxation processes associated with these two degrees of freedom results in strong dependence of dynamics and structure on colloid concentration, c, well below the overlap concentration c*. Triggered by the increasing inter-particle collisions, substantial structural dehydration and slowing-down of internal dynamics occurs before geometrically defined colloidal overlap develops. This observation is surprising since it is generally believed that the internal dynamics and conformation of soft colloidal particles essentially remain invariant below c*. The competition between these two relaxation processes gives rise to a new dynamically-defined dilute threshold concentration well below c*.

  12. Shock waves in a dilute granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Ansumali, Santosh; Alam, Meheboob

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of shock waves in a dilute granular gas which is modelled using three variants of hydrodynamic equations: Euler, 10-moment and 14-moment models. The one-dimensional shock-wave problem is formulated and the resulting equations are solved numerically using a relaxation-type scheme. Focusing on the specific case of blast waves, the results on the density, the granular temperature, the skew temperature, the heat flux and the fourth moment are compared among three models. We find that the shock profiles are smoother for the 14-moment model compared to those predicted by the standard Euler equations. A shock-splitting phenomenon is observed in the skew granular temperature profiles for a blast wave.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Dilute magnetic semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Heo, W. H.; Ivill, M.; Norton, D. P.; Steiner, T.

    2004-10-01

    A review of recent results on transition metal doping of electronic oxides such as ZnO, TiO2, SnO2, BaTiO3, Cu2O, SrTiO3 and KTaO3 is presented. There is interest in achieving ferromagnetism with Curie temperatures above room temperature in such materials for applications in the field of spintronic devices, in which the spin of the carriers is exploited. The incorporation of several atomic per cent of the transition metals without creation of second phases appears possible under optimized synthesis conditions, leading to ferromagnetism. Pulsed laser deposition, reactive sputtering, molecular beam epitaxy and ion implantation have all been used to produce the oxide-based dilute magnetic materials. The mechanism is still under debate, with carrier-induced, double-exchange and bound magnetic polaron formation all potentially playing a role depending on the conductivity type and level in the material.

  14. Photophoresis in a Dilute, Optically Thick Medium and Dust Motion in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We derive expressions for the photophoretic force on opaque spherical particles in a dilute gas in the optically thick regime where the radiation field is in local thermal equilibrium. Under those conditions, the radiation field has a simple form, leading to well defined analytical approximations for the photophoretic force that also consider both the internal thermal conduction within the particle, and the effects of heat conduction and radiation to the surrounding gas. We derive these results for homogeneous spherical particles; and for the double layered spheres appropriate for modeling solid grains with porous aggregate mantles. Then, as a specific astrophysical application of these general physical results, we explore the parameter space relevant to the photophoresis driven drift of dust in protoplanetary disks. We show that highly porous silicate grains have sufficiently low thermal conductivities that photophoretic effects, such as significant relative velocities between particles with differing porosity or levitation above the midplane, are expected to occur.

  15. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase 3 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.F.; Ryan, H.M.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel?s standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion of furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  16. Dilute Oxygen Combustion - Phase 3 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Michael F.

    2000-05-31

    Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) burners have been successfully installed and operated in the reheat furnace at Auburn Steel Co., Inc., Auburn, NY, under Phase 3 of the Dilute Oxygen Combustion project. Two new preheat zones were created employing a total of eight 6.5 MMBtu/hr capacity burners. The preheat zones provide a 30 percent increase in maximum furnace production rate, from 75 tph to 100 tph. The fuel rate is essentially unchanged, with the fuel savings expected from oxy-fuel combustion being offset by higher flue gas temperatures. When allowance is made for the high nitrogen level and high gas phase temperature in the furnace, measured NOx emissions are in line with laboratory data on DOC burners developed in Phase 1 of the project. Burner performance has been good, and there have been no operating or maintenance problems. The DOC system continues to be used as part of Auburn Steel's standard reheat furnace practice. High gas phase temperature is a result of the high firing density needed to achieve high production rates, and little opportunity exists for improvement in that area. However, fuel and NOx performance can be improved by further conversion on furnace zones to DOC burners, which will lower furnace nitrogen levels. Major obstacles are cost and concern about increased formation of oxide scale on the steel. Oxide scale formation may be enhanced by exposure of the steel to higher concentrations of oxidizing gas components (primarily products of combustion) in the higher temperature zones of the furnace. Phase 4 of the DOC project will examine the rate of oxide scale formation in these higher temperature zones and develop countermeasures that will allow DOC burners to be used successfully in these furnace zones.

  17. Irreversible Adsorption from Dilute Polymer Solutions

    E-print Network

    Ben O'Shaughnessy; Dimitrios Vavylonis

    2003-06-06

    We study irreversible polymer adsorption from dilute solutions theoretically. Universal features of the resultant non-equilibrium layers are predicted. Two cases are considered, distinguished by the value of the local monomer-surface sticking rate Q: chemisorption (very small Q) and physisorption (large Q). Early stages of layer formation entail single chain adsorption. While single chain physisorption times tau_ads are typically microsecs, for chemisorbing chains of N units we find experimentally accessible times tau_ads = Q^{-1} N^{3/5}, ranging from secs to hrs. We establish 3 chemisorption universality classes, determined by a critical contact exponent: zipping, accelerated zipping and homogeneous collapse. For dilute solutions, the mechanism is accelerated zipping: zipping propagates outwards from the first attachment, accelerated by occasional formation of large loops which nucleate further zipping. This leads to a transient distribution omega(s) \\sim s^{-7/5} of loop lengths s up to a size s_max \\approx (Q t)^{5/3} after time t. By tau_ads the entire chain is adsorbed. The outcome of the single chain adsorption episode is a monolayer of fully collapsed chains. Having only a few vacant sites to adsorb onto, late arriving chains form a diffuse outer layer. In a simple picture we find for both chemisorption and physisorption a final loop distribution Omega(s) \\sim s^{-11/5} and density profile c(z) \\sim z^{-4/3} whose forms are the same as for equilibrium layers. In contrast to equilibrium layers, however, the statistical properties of a given chain depend on its adsorption time; the outer layer contains many classes of chain, each characterized by different fraction of adsorbed monomers f. Consistent with strong physisorption experiments, we find the f values follow a distribution P(f) \\sim f^{-4/5}.

  18. Transport and sedimentation in unconfined experimental dilute pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, G.; Andrews, B. J.; Dennen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from experiments conducted in a new facility that permits the study of large, unconfined particle laden density currents that are dynamically similar to natural dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Experiments were run in a sealed, air-filled tank measuring 8.5 m long by 6.1 m wide by 2.6 m tall. Currents were generated by feeding mixture of heated particles (5 ?m aluminum oxide, 25 ?m talc, 27 ?m walnut shell, 76 ?m glass beads) down a chute at controlled rates to produce dilute, turbulent gravity currents. Comparison of experimental currents with natural PDCs shows good agreement between Froude, densimetric and thermal Richardson, and particle Stokes and settling numbers; experimental currents have lower Reynolds numbers than natural PDCs, but are fully turbulent. Currents were illuminated with 3 orthogonal laser sheets (650, 532, and 450 nm wavelengths) and recorded with an array of HD video cameras and a high speed camera (up to 3000 fps). Deposits were mapped using a grid of sedimentation traps. We observe distinct differences between ambient temperature and warm currents: * warm currents have shorter run out distances, narrow map view distributions of currents and deposits, thicken with distance from the source, and lift off to form coignimbrite plumes; * ambient temperature currents typically travel farther, spread out radially, do not thicken greatly with transport distance, and do not form coignimbrite plumes. Long duration currents (600 s compared to 30-100 s) oscillate laterally with time (e.g. transport to the right, then the left, and back); this oscillation happens prior to any interaction with the tank walls. Isopach maps of the deposits show predictable trends in sedimentation versus distance in response to eruption parameters (eruption rate, duration, temperature, and initial current mass), but all sedimentation curves can be fit with 2nd order polynomials (R2>.9). Proximal sedimentation is similar in comparable warm and ambient temperature currents, but distal sedimentation (beyond the current runout) increases in warm currents reflecting deposition from coignimbrite plumes. We are currently developing analytical models to link the observed transport and sedimentation results.

  19. Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Hooker, Jacob Matthew (Port Jefferson, NY); Schonberger, Matthias (Mains, DE); Schieferstein, Hanno (Aabergen, DE); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY)

    2011-10-04

    Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

  20. Direct observation of polymer dynamics in semi-dilute solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Kai-Wen; Brockman, Christopher; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we use single molecule techniques to study polymer dynamics in semi-dilute solutions. Here, we study the steady state extension and relaxation time dynamics of polymer molecules in semi-dilute DNA solutions in extensional flow. Polymer chain dynamics are complicated in semi-dilute solutions due to chain overlap, hydrodynamic interactions, and excluded volume interactions. We use single molecule fluorescence microscopy and a microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap to directly observe the dynamics of polymers in non-dilute solutions. We report the scaling of polymer relaxation time as a function of polymer concentration, and we observe a crossover in chain behavior from the dilute to semi-dilute regime. Interestingly, we observe a pronounced center-of-mass drift of single polymer chains in directions orthogonal to flow in semi-dilute solutions, which is characterized as a function of concentration and flow rate. By using the automated hydrodynamic trap coupled with a piezoelectric stage, we are able to track the 3-D position of single polymer molecules and deduce the relationship between strain rate and polymer extension. Overall, our work reports on a key advance in the field of polymer dynamics via direct observation of dynamics in semi-dilute solutions in strong flows

  1. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  2. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5240 - Automated blood cell diluting apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. 864.5240 Section 864.5240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 864.5240 Automated blood cell diluting apparatus. (a) Identification. An automated blood cell...

  6. UNCORRECTED 2 Effects of dilution on the extinction characteristics

    E-print Network

    Im, Hong G.

    UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Effects of dilution on the extinction characteristics 3 of strained lean relevant to micro-combustor application, the effects of mixture dilution on the 10 lean extinction by consideration of charac- 16 teristic time scales calculated from the fuel consumption rate. The extinction

  7. A PRESSURIZED PROPORTIONAL DILUTER FOR AQUATIC TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A half-liter proportional diluter using positive pressure was designed and tested. Its primary siphons are activated by a pulse of pressure instead of by a partial vacuum as in conventional diluters. This method eliminated the need for venturi tubes, vacuum manifolds, and individ...

  8. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Dilution air background correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.610 Dilution air background correction. (a... ratio of the test fuel. You may measure a or use default values from Table 1 of 40 CFR 1065.655. b... 40 CFR 1065.655. ER28AP14.101 (c) Determine the dilution factor, DF, over the test interval...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.667 - Dilution air background emission correction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.667 Dilution air background emission correction. (a) To determine the mass of background emissions to subtract... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dilution air background...

  14. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope values in hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Barnette, Janet E; Lott, Michael J; Howa, John D; Podlesak, David W; Ehleringer, James R

    2011-05-30

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is a widely used oxidizer with many commercial applications; unfortunately, it also has terrorist-related uses. We analyzed 97 hydrogen peroxide solutions representing four grades purchased across the United States and in Mexico. As expected, the range of hydrogen (?(2)H, 230‰) and oxygen (?(18)O, 24‰) isotope values of the H(2)O(2) solutions was large, reflecting the broad isotopic range of dilution waters. This resulted in predictable linear relationships of ?(2)H and ?(18)O values of H(2)O(2) solutions that were near parallel to the Meteoric Water Line (MWL), offset by the concentration of H(2)O(2) in the solution. By grade, dilute (3 to 35%) H(2)O(2) solutions were not statistically different in slope. Although the ?(2)H values of manufactured H(2)O(2) could be different from those of water, rapid H(2)O(2)-H(2)O exchange of H atoms eliminated any distinct isotope signal. We developed a method to measure the ?(18)O value of H(2)O(2) independent of dilution water by directly measuring O(2) gas generated from a catalase-induced disproportionation reaction. We predicted that the ?(18)O values of H(2)O(2) would be similar to that of atmospheric oxygen (+23.5‰), the predominant source of oxygen in the most common H(2)O(2) manufacturing process (median disproportionated ?(18)O=23.8‰). The predictable H-O relationships in H(2)O(2) solutions make it possible to distinguish commercial dilutions from clandestine concentration practices. Future applications of this work include synthesis studies that investigate the chemical link between H(2)O(2) reagents and peroxide-based explosive products, which may assist law enforcement in criminal investigations. PMID:21504008

  15. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces, and this reduction can be scaled by the gravitational dimensionless time. Mechanistic simulation of core-scale surfactant brine imbibition matches the experimentally observed imbibition data. In-situ distributions observed through simulation indicate that surfactant diffusion (which depends on temperature and molecular weight) is the rate limiting step. Most of the oil is recovered through gravitational forces. Oil left behind at the end of this process is at its residual oil saturation. The capillary and Bond numbers are not large enough to affect the residual oil saturation. At the field-scale, 50% of the recoverable oil is produced in about 3 years if the fracture spacing is 1 m and 25% if 10 m, in the example simulated. Decreasing fracture spacing and height, increasing permeability, and increasing the extent of wettability alteration increase the rate of oil recovery from surfactant-aided gravity drainage. This dilute surfactant aided gravity-drainage process is relatively cheap. The chemical cost for a barrel of oil produced is expected to be less than $1.

  16. THE MAGNETOVISCOUS-THERMAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Tanim

    2012-02-10

    Accretion flows onto underluminous black holes, such as Sagittarius A* at the center of our galaxy, are dilute (mildly collisional to highly collisionless), optically thin, and radiatively inefficient. Therefore, the accretion properties of such dilute flows are expected to be modified by their large viscosities and thermal conductivities. Second, turbulence within these systems needs to transport angular momentum as well as thermal energy generated through gravitational infall outward in order to allow accretion to occur. This is in contrast to classical accretion flows, in which the energy generated through accretion down a gravitational well is locally radiated. In this paper, using an incompressible fluid treatment of an ionized gas, we expand on previous research by considering the stability properties of a magnetized rotating plasma wherein the thermal conductivity and viscosity are not negligible and may be dynamically important. We find a class of MHD instabilities that can transport angular momentum and thermal energy outward. They are plausible candidates to describe accretion in radiatively inefficient accretion flows. We finish by discussing the implications for analytic models and numerical MHD simulations of mildly dilute or collisionless astrophysical plasmas, and immediate directions for further research.

  17. Isotope evidence of hexavalent chromium stability in ground water samples.

    PubMed

    ?adková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    Chromium stable isotopes are of interest in many geochemical studies as a tool to identify Cr(VI) reduction and/or dilution in groundwater aquifers. For such studies the short term stability of Cr(VI) in water samples is required before the laboratory analyses can be carried out. Here the short term stability of Cr(VI) in groundwater samples was studied using an isotope approach. Based on commonly available methods for Cr(VI) stabilization, water samples were filtered and the pH value was adjusted to be equal to or greater than 8 before Cr isotope analysis. Based on our Cr isotope data (expressed as ?(53)CrNIST979), Cr(VI) was found to be unstable over short time periods in anthropogenically contaminated groundwater samples regardless of water treatment (e.g., pH adjustment, different storage temperatures). Based on our laboratory experiments, ?(53)CrNIST979 of the Cr(VI) pool was found to be unstable in the presence of dissolved Fe(II), Mn(IV) and/or SO2. Threshold concentrations of Fe(II) causing Cr(VI) reduction range between 10mgL(-1) and 100mgL(-1)and less than 1mgL(-1) for Mn. Hence our isotope data show that water samples containing Cr(VI) should be processed on-site through anion column chemistry to avoid any isotope shifts. PMID:26037819

  18. Addressing the current bottlenecks of metabolomics: Isotopic Ratio Outlier Analysis™, an isotopic-labeling technique for accurate biochemical profiling

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Felice A; Beecher, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics or biochemical profiling is a fast emerging science; however, there are still many associated bottlenecks to overcome before measurements will be considered robust. Advances in MS resolution and sensitivity, ultra pressure LC MS, ESI, and isotopic approaches such as flux analysis and stable-isotope dilution, have made it easier to quantitate biochemicals. The digitization of mass spectrometers has simplified informatic aspects. However, issues of analytical variability, ion suppression and metabolite identification still plague metabolomics investigators. These hurdles need to be overcome for accurate metabolite quantitation not only for in vitro systems, but for complex matrices such as biofluids and tissues, before it is possible to routinely identify biomarkers that are associated with the early prediction and diagnosis of diseases. In this report, we describe a novel isotopic-labeling method that uses the creation of distinct biochemical signatures to eliminate current bottlenecks and enable accurate metabolic profiling. PMID:23046270

  19. Zinc oxide based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Shivaraman

    During my graduate research I have synthesized materials known as diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) as epitaxial thin film structures using the process of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). These materials are envisioned to be of importance in the emerging field of spintronics where the charge as well as the spin of the charge carriers can be combined to yield unique functionalities to yield novel devices including, on-chip memories, ultra-low power devices etc. The material of interest in this dissertation was zinc oxide, a wide bandgap optoelectronic semiconductor. ZnO has a bandgap of 3.3 eV. It is an ideal candidate for spintronics applications, because Zn is the last of the first row transition metals, which leads to pretty high solubility of transition metals such as Co, Mn and V in ZnO. In a diluted magnetic semiconductor a fraction of the host atoms is substituted by the transition metal dopant ion. We have found that we can synthesize very high quality, single phase and single crystalline Zn(TM)O thin films on basal plane sapphire single crystals (alpha-Al 2O3). We have analyzed the magnetic properties of the three systems of ZnVO, ZnCoO and ZnMnO and found that ZnCoO and ZnMnO exhibit ferromagnetic ordering up to room temperature, when synthesized under high vacuum. In these conditions, the samples have a reasonable concentration of point defects which drive ZnO to n-type conductivity. By a combination of in-situ and ex-situ variation of parameters we have been able to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of these systems. From these studies we conclude that the main mechanism of magnetic ordering in these DMS materials is through a combination of defect related carrier induced exchange and bound magnetic polaron exchange. Device structures were fabricated using the as deposited samples to study the possibility of spin injection through semiconductors. We have observed that at low temperatures we see a considerable effect from this phenomenon in a magnetic tunnel junction kind of configuration. Hence, this study opens up new avenues and possibilities for a variety of spintronics applications.

  20. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is important for quite different application fields (e.g. for isotope ratio measurements of stable isotopes in nature, especially for the investigation of isotope variation in nature or age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, quality assurance of fuel material, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control, for tracer experiments using stable isotopes or long-lived radionuclides in biological or medical studies). Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which used to be the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements, is being increasingly replaced for isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS due to its excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy. Instrumental progress in ICP-MS was achieved by the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate many disturbing argon-based molecular ions, thermalize the ions and neutralize the disturbing argon ions of plasma gas (Ar+). The application of the collision cell in ICP-QMS results in a higher ion transmission, improved sensitivity and better precision of isotope ratio measurements compared to quadrupole ICP-MS without the collision cell [e.g., for 235U/238U approximately 1 (10 microg x L(-1) uranium) 0.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) vs. 0.2% RSD in short-term measurements (n = 5)]. A significant instrumental improvement for ICP-MS is the multicollector device (MC-ICP-MS) in order to obtain a better precision of isotope ratio measurements (with a precision of up to 0.002%, RSD). CE- and HPLC-ICP-MS are used for the separation of isobaric interferences of long-lived radionuclides and stable isotopes by determination of spallation nuclide abundances in an irradiated tantalum target. PMID:11220826

  1. NMR investigations of Co(III) coordination compounds oriented in a dilute lyotropic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Pellizer, Giorgio; Asaro, Fioretta; Pergolese, Barbara

    2004-09-01

    A swollen lamellar phase, based on sodium dodecyl sulfate, pentanol and NaBr brine, was examined by means of NMR spectroscopy of isotopes with quadrupolar characteristics, namely 2H, 17O, 23Na and 81Br, present at natural abundance. Such a dilute lyotropic liquid crystal was capable of inducing a preferential orientation of the cobalt coordination compounds [Co(en)3]3+ and Co(acac)3, the 59Co NMR signals of which displayed quadrupolar splittings. Moreover, it imparted alignment in the magnetic field to the organocobaloxime [ClCD2Co(Hdmg)2H2O], as shown by the quadrupolar splitting of the deuterium of the axial ligand. PMID:15307057

  2. Melanin bleaching with dilute hydrogen peroxide: a simple and rapid method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Hsing; Lin, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Min-Jan; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chai, Chee-Yin; Huang, Ya-Chun; Tsai, Kun-Bow

    2013-05-01

    Melanins are naturally occurring pigments in both normal and pathologic tissues. Two common bleaching processes are potassium permanganate followed by oxalic acid treatment and dilute hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) process. The potassium permanganate/oxalic acid method is faster and more easily incorporated in conventional daily immunostaining protocols, whereas the dilute H2O2 method requires 24 hours. This study aimed to reduce melanin bleaching time by using a 10% H2O2 dilution. First, reaction time was reduced to 30 minutes by raising the temperature to 65°C. Second, containers with high thermal conductivity were used to improve bleaching effectiveness. Experimental comparisons of melanin treatments with H2O2 contained in an iron jar, a glass coplin jar, and a plastic steel jar obtained bleaching time of 20, 30, and 40 minutes, respectively. These modifications of the conventional bleaching method significantly improve the speed and efficiency of the procedure and are recommended when performing immunohistochemical studies. PMID:23060296

  3. Magnetostrictive composites in the dilute limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. P.; James, R. D.; Leo, P. H.

    2006-05-01

    We calculate the effective properties of a magnetostrictive composite in the dilute limit. The composite consists of well separated identical ellipsoidal particles of magnetostrictive material, surrounded by an elastic matrix. The free energy of the magnetostrictive particles is computed using the constrained theory of DeSimone and James [2002. A constrained theory of magnetoelasticity with applications to magnetic shape memory materials. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 50, 283-320], where application of an external field causes rearrangement of variants rather than rotation of the magnetization or elastic strain in a variant. The free energy of the composite has an elastic energy term associated with the deformation of the surrounding matrix and demagnetization terms. By using results from the constrained theory and from the Eshelby inclusion problem in linear elasticity, we show that the energy minimization problem for the composite can be cast as a quadratic programming problem. The solution of the quadratic programming problem yields the effective properties of Ni2MnGa and Terfenol-D composite systems. Numerical results show that the average strain of the composite depends strongly on the particle shape, the applied stress, and the elastic modulus of the matrix.

  4. Rheological characterization of dilute acid pretreated softwood.

    PubMed

    Wiman, Magnus; Palmqvist, Benny; Tornberg, Eva; Lidén, Gunnar

    2011-05-01

    Large-scale bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass will require high solids loading in the enzymatic hydrolysis step. However, slurries of pretreated lignocelluloses are complex fluids due to the fibrous nature, especially at high concentrations of water insoluble solids (WIS). A prerequisite for dealing with transport issues and for developing efficient full-scale processes is a fundamental understanding of the flow properties of pretreated lignocellulose. A comprehensive rheological characterization of dilute acid pretreated spruce has been carried out in this study, accounting for the effects of WIS concentration, particle size distribution (PSD), and the degree of enzymatic hydrolysis. The rheology of pretreated spruce slurries was found to be strongly dependent on the WIS concentration. The storage modulus (G'(LVR)) and yield stress showed typical power-law dependencies on volume fraction and WIS content. Milling of the pretreated material resulted in significantly higher yield stress and viscosity, likely due to narrower PSD, which suggests that the strength of the network of the coarsest fibers determines the rheology of these materials to a large extent. During enzymatic hydrolysis, yield stress and viscosity decreased dramatically, partly due to decreasing WIS content, but possibly also due to changes in fiber properties such as the chemical composition. PMID:21449021

  5. Chain Dynamics in a Dilute Magnetorheological Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jing; Hagenbuchle, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The structure, formation, and dynamics of dilute, mono-dispersive ferrofluid emulsions in an external magnetic field have been investigated using dynamic light scattering techniques. In the absence of the magnetic field, the emulsion particles are randomly distributed and behave like hard spheres in Brownian motion. An applied magnetic field induces a magnetic dipole moment in each particle. Dipolar interactions between particles align them into chains where correlation functions show two decay processes. The short-time decay shows the motion of straight chains as a whole where the apparent chain length increases with the applied magnetic field and the particle volume fraction. Good scaling results are obtained showing that the apparent chain length grows with time following a power law with exponent of 0.6 and depends on the applied field, particle volume fraction, and diffusion constant of the particles. The long-time decay in the correlation function shows oscillation when the chains reach a certain length with time and stiffness with threshold field This result shows that chains not only fluctuate, but move in a periodic motion with a frequency of 364 Hz at lambda = 15. It may suggest the existence of phonons. This work is the first step in the understanding of the structure formation, especially chain coarsening mechanism, of magnetorheological (MR) fluids at higher volume fractions.

  6. Dilute ferromagnetic semiconductors: Physics and spintronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietl, Tomasz; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    This review compiles results of experimental and theoretical studies on thin films and quantum structures of semiconductors with randomly distributed Mn ions, which exhibit spintronic functionalities associated with collective ferromagnetic spin ordering. Properties of p-type Mn-containing III-V as well as II-VI, IV-VI, V2-VI3, I-II-V, and elemental group IV semiconductors are described, paying particular attention to the most thoroughly investigated system (Ga,Mn)As that supports the hole-mediated ferromagnetic order up to 190 K for the net concentration of Mn spins below 10%. Multilayer structures showing efficient spin injection and spin-related magnetotransport properties as well as enabling magnetization manipulation by strain, light, electric fields, and spin currents are presented together with their impact on metal spintronics. The challenging interplay between magnetic and electronic properties in topologically trivial and nontrivial systems is described, emphasizing the entangled roles of disorder and correlation at the carrier localization boundary. Finally, the case of dilute magnetic insulators is considered, such as (Ga,Mn)N, where low-temperature spin ordering is driven by short-ranged superexchange that is ferromagnetic for certain charge states of magnetic impurities.

  7. Sieving hydrogen isotopes through two dimensional crystals

    E-print Network

    Lozada-Hidalgo, M; Marshall, O; Mishchenko, A; Grigorenko, A N; Dryfe, R A W; Radha, B; Grigorieva, I V; Geim, A K

    2015-01-01

    One-atom-thick crystals are impermeable to atoms and molecules, but hydrogen ions (thermal protons) penetrate through them. We show that monolayers of graphene and boron nitride can be used to separate hydrogen ion isotopes. Employing electrical measurements and mass spectrometry, we find that deuterons permeate through these crystals much slower than protons, resulting in a separation factor of 10 at room temperature. The isotope effect is attributed to a difference of about 60 meV between zero-point energies of incident protons and deuterons, which translates into the equivalent difference in the activation barriers posed by two dimensional crystals. In addition to providing insight into the proton transport mechanism, the demonstrated approach offers a competitive and scalable way for hydrogen isotope enrichment.

  8. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by substoichiometric isotope dilution analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Greenland L.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1972-01-01

    A rapid procedure suitable for the routine determination of 1-10 ng of bismuth in a silicate rock matrix is described. Results for the U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks are presented. Rocks and minerals are dissolved in hydrofluoric-perchloric acid in the presence of 207Bi tracer and the silica is removed by evaporation. The perchloric acid residue is taken up in water and bismuth iodide is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone. After three acid-iodide washes, the bismuth is stripped into water and reacted with a substoichiometric amount of EDTA. Excess of bismuth is extracted as the iodide and the specific activity of the bismuth-EDTA complex is determined. ?? 1972.

  9. Determination of niobium in rocks by an isotope dilution spectrophotometric method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks and minerals are fused with sodium peroxide in the presence of carrierfree 95Nb. The fusion cake is leached with water and the precipitate dissolved in hydrofluoric-sulfuric acid mixture. Niobium is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone and further purified by ion exchange. The amount of niobium is determined spectrophotometrically with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol, and the chemical yield of the separations determined by counting 95Nb. This procedure is faster and less sensitive to interferences than previously proposed methods for determining niobium in rocks.The high purity of the separated niobium makes the method applicable to nearly all matrices. ?? 1970.

  10. Global simulation of the carbon isotope exchange of terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Terao, Y.; Mukai, H.

    2009-12-01

    There remain large uncertainties in our quantification of global carbon cycle, which has close interactions with the climate system and is subject to human-induced global environmental change. Information on carbon isotopes is expected to reduce the uncertainty by providing additional constraints on net atmosphere-ecosystem exchange. This study attempted to simulate the dynamics of carbon isotopes at the global scale, using a process-based terrestrial ecosystem model: Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace gases (VISIT). The base-model of carbon cycle (Sim-CYCLE, Ito 2003) has already considered stable carbon isotope composition (13C/12C), and here radioactive carbon isotope (14C) was included. The isotope ratios characterize various aspects of terrestrial carbon cycle, which is difficult to be constrained by sole mass balance. For example, isotopic discrimination by photosynthetic assimilation is closely related with leaf stomatal conductance and composition of C3 and C4 plant in grasslands. Isotopic disequilibrium represents mean residence time of terrestrial carbon pools. In this study, global simulations (spatial resolution 0.5-deg, time-step 1-month) were conducted during the period 1901 to 2100 on the basis of observed and projected atmospheric CO2, climate, and land-use conditions. As anthropogenic CO2 accumulates in the atmosphere, heavier stable carbon isotope (13C) was diluted, while radioactive carbon isotope (14C) is strongly affected by atomic bomb experiments mainly in the 1950s and 1960s. The model simulated the decadal change in carbon isotope compositions. Leaf carbon with shorter mean residence time responded rapidly to the atmospheric change, while plant stems and soil humus showed substantial time-lag, leading to large isotopic disequilibrium. In the future, the isotopic disequilibrium was estimated to augment, due to accelerated rate of anthropogenic CO2 accumulation. Spatial distribution of stable isotope composition (12C/13C, or d13C) was primarily dominated by C3/C4 plant composition and then ancillary environmental conditions. Along latitude, plant and litter carbon pools in northern ecosystems have slower turnover rates (i.e., higher 14C/12C) than those in tropical ecosystems. However, humus carbon in northern ecosystems with very long mean residence times has lower 14C/12C ratio, most of bomb-derived radioactive carbon lingered still in plant biomass. Now, we are attempting to examine the model estimations by comparing with atmospheric measurements.

  11. Mg Isotopes of USGS Igneous Rock Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Glessner, J. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium has three stable isotopes, 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg with abundances of 78.99%, 10.00%, and 11.01%, respectively. It is one of the most abundant elements in the crust and mantle. As advancements of analytical techniques using MC-ICP-MS have dramatically advanced our ability to measure isotope ratios of Mg with greater precision, Mg isotopes can now be applied to study a variety of fundamental geological processes, such as continental crust weathering, chemical diffusion, and chondrule formation. Therefore the need for well characterized Mg isotope ratios for geological materials is increasingly important. Routine measurement of readily-available USGS rock standards is a viable way for inter-lab comparison to show the quality of data. However, the Mg isotope data for USGS standards reported in the literature are limited and inconsistent. USGS standards reported by different MC-ICP-MS labs have a range of Mg isotopic data outside of the normal external error of 0.1‰ (2?). Mg isotopes of USGS igneous rock standards (dunite, DTS-1; basalts, BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1; and andesite, AGV-1) were measured by a sample-standard bracketing method using a low resolution MC-ICP- MS (Nu-Plasma HR). The method has a large tolerance of matrix bias with Na/Mg and Al/Mg > 100% only changing the ?26Mg by less than 0.1‰. Dilution effects do not cause significant error (< 0.1‰) until the concentration difference between standard and sample is greater than 25%. The isobaric interference of CN+ on 26Mg was avoided by measuring Mg signal on the low mass shoulder. Only purified samples with excellent yields (>99.5%) and acceptable concentrations of matrix (mainly Na, Al, Ca, and Fe) are included in these results. Duplicate analyses of independently processed standards yielded the following results (?26MgDSM-3 (‰)): BCR-2 (-0.306±0.144, - 0.290±0.116, -0.283±0.048, -0.288±0.057), BCR-1 (-0.399±0.079, -0.346±0.046), AGV-1 (-0.295±0.110, -0.307±0.086, -0.339±0.068), BHVO-1 (-0.308±0.076, - 0.299±0.103), and DTS-1 (-0.299±0.163, -0.368±0.059). ?26MgDSM-3 of measured USGS standards are consistent within error (2?).

  12. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry in continental tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Katharine W.; Lechler, Alex R.

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructing the thermal history of minerals and fluids in continental environments is a cornerstone of tectonics research. Paleotemperature constraints from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry have provided important tests of geodynamic, structural, topographic and basin evolution models. The thermometer is based on the 13C-18O bond ordering in carbonates (mass-47 anomaly, ?47) and provides estimates of the carbonate formation temperature independent of the ?18O value of the water from which the carbonate grew; ?47 is measured simultaneously with conventional measurements of carbonate ?13C and ?18O values, which together constrain the isotopic composition of the parent water. Depending on the geologic setting of carbonate growth, this information can help constrain paleoenvironmental conditions or basin temperatures and fluid sources. This review examines how clumped isotope thermometry can shed new light on problems in continental tectonics, focusing on paleoaltimetry, basin evolution and structural diagenesis applications. Paleoaltimetry is inherently difficult, and the precision in carbonate growth temperature estimates is at the limit of what is useful for quantitative paleoelevation reconstruction. Nevertheless, clumped isotope analyses have enabled workers to address previously intractable problems and in many settings offer the best chance of understanding topographic change from the geologic record. The portion of the shallow crust residing at temperatures up to ca. 200 °C is important as host to economic resources and records of tectonics and climate, and clumped isotope thermometry is one of the few proxies that can access this critical range with sensitivity to temperature alone. Only a handful of studies to date have used clumped isotopes to investigate diagenesis and other sub-surface processes using carbonate crystallization temperatures or the sensitivity of ?47 values to a sample's thermal history. However, the thermometer is sufficiently precise to answer many important questions in this area, making the investigation of sub-surface processes an excellent target for future investigations.

  13. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  14. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  15. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, W.C. III; Callender, E. )

    1992-06-01

    Pore waters extracted from sediment cores were analyzed for their oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions and major ion chemistry to determine the source of water from a vent area for diffuse lake-bottom thermal springs or seeps in Frolikha Bay, northeastern Lake Baikal. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of pore waters range from {minus}15.2{per thousand} to {minus}16.7{per thousand}, and {delta}D values range from {minus}119{per thousand} to {minus}126{per thousand} (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water (SMOW)). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a {delta}{sup 18}O value of {minus}5.6{per thousand} and a {delta}D values of {minus}120{per thousand}. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites.

  16. Fluid Origins, Thermal Regimes, and Fluid and Solute Fluxes in the Forearc of Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, M.; Solomon, E. A.; Harris, R. N.; Torres, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    An in-depth analysis and synthesis of published and newly acquired data on the chemical and isotopic composition of forearc fluids, fluid fluxes, and the associated thermal regimes in five well-studied, representative erosional and accretionary subduction zone (SZ) forearcs will be presented. Evidence of large-scale fluid flow, primarily focused along faults, is manifested by widespread seafloor venting, associated biological communities, authigenic carbonate formation, chemical and isotopic anomalies in pore-fluid depth-profiles, and thermal anomalies. The nature of fluid venting seems to differ at the two types of SZs. At both, fluid and gas venting sites are primarily associated with faults. At accretionary SZs, the décollement and underthrust coarser-grained stratigraphic horizons are the main fluid conduits, whereas at non-accreting and erosive margins, the fluids from compaction and dehydration reactions are to a great extent partitioned between the décollement and focused conduits through the prism. The measured fluid output fluxes at seeps are high, ~15-40 times the amount that can be produced through local steady-state compaction, suggesting additional fluid sources or non-steady-state fluid flow must be involved. Recirculation of seawater must be an important component of the overall forearc output fluid flux. The most significant chemical and isotopic characteristics of the expelled fluids relative to seawater are: Cl dilution, sulfate, Ca and Mg depletions, and enrichments in Li, B, Si, Sr, alkalinity, and hydrocarbon concentrations; they often have distinctive ?18O, ?D, ?7Li, ?11B, and ?37Cl values, and variable Sr isotope ratios. These characteristics provide key insights on the source of the fluid and the temperature at the source. Using our best fluid output flux estimate and considering an ocean volume of 1340 × 106 km3, the global ocean residence time in SZs is ~100 Myr. This value is five times faster than previous estimates for SZs and is more similar to the estimates of the residence time in the global ridge crest that range from 20-90 Myr. Based on this extrapolated fluid reflux to the global ocean, SZs are an important source and sink for several elements and isotopic ratios, in particular an important sink for seawater sulfate, Ca, Mg, and sulfate, and an important source of B and Li.

  17. Effect of dilution on carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase assays

    SciTech Connect

    Cauchon, N.; LeDuy, A.

    1984-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that the dilution of samples prior to the carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase assays causes serious discrepancies in the numerical values obtained for the enzyme activities. Even when the sample is assayed with the identical procedure, one could obtain different numerical values of the enzyme activity U depending on how much this sample has been diluted before the enzyme assay. Two crude commercial cellulase samples of Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma viride as well as the culture filtrate of our newly isolated acidophilic fungus have been used for the demonstration. An empirical method for reporting the cellulolytic activity by taking into account this dilution effect is proposed.

  18. Special dilution refrigerator systems of Milli-Kelvin detector experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Batey, G.; Balshaw, N. )

    1993-11-01

    Several hundred ultra low temperature systems have been designed and built for a variety of applications. One common application is the refrigeration of low temperature detectors. Although many of the requirements are satisfied by standard designs, Oxford Instruments has often built special refrigerators to suit specific detector requirements. A few of the most interesting of these systems will be discussed. (1) dilution refrigerators to cool gravitational wave antennae to 65 mK; (2) rotating dilution refrigerator for cosmic ray detector experiments; (3) compact dilution refrigerator to cool large bolometer arrays within the SCUBA telescope; (4) side access systems for beam line experiments

  19. Hopping Conductivity in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Robin; Stampe, Patricia; von Molnar, Stephan; Xiong, Peng; Hu, Erhong; Xin, Yan

    2004-11-01

    A principal difficulty in the development of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) has been determining whether the magnetic dopant material is entering the semiconductor lattice or forming clusters forming. Resolving this concern involves time-consuming microstructural examination using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheng et al[1] have shown that the presence of metallic clusters within a semiconducting matrix leads to a hopping-type conductivity and characteristic behaviors of both the temperature and electric field dependence of the conductivity. The resistivity of such a multiphase system is predicted to follow a log(?)-1/2 dependence, the slope of which gives information on the cluster size and distribution in the material. TiO_2:Co and SnO2 films have been grown under varying conditions. The presence of cobalt clusters in TiO_2:Co films grown at low pressures has been found by TEM analysis. The resistivity of these films is found to follow a log(?)-1/2 dependence over a wide temperature range, however this behavior is not seen in TiO_2:Co in which there are no clusters. Thus, transport measurements are shown to be sensitive to the appearance of metallic clusters in these systems. [ 1]P. Sheng, B. Abeles, and Y. Arie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 31, 44 (1973) We acknowledge the support of DARPA through grant numbers MDA972-02-1-0002 and N-00014-99-1-1094. The TEM work was carried out at the NHMFL supported by NSF under DMR-0084173 and the State of Florida.

  20. Band Anticrossing Effects in Dilute Nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walukiewicz, Wladek

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in nonequilibrium epitaxial growth techniques have led to successful synthesis of alloys of distinctly different semiconductors. An important class of such materials are Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). These are compound semiconductors formed when metallic (electronegative) anions are partially replaced by isoelectronic, more electronegative (metallic) atoms. Dilute nitrides in which highly electronegative N atoms partially replace standard group V elements are the most prominent and extensively studied class of HMAs. Using Ga1-yInyNxAs1-x as a prototypical HMA, experimental and theoretical studies will be presented that show how all the unusual properties of these alloys can be explained by considering the interaction between highly localized states of substitutional N atoms and the extended states of Ga1-yInyAs matrix in the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic bands resulting in large changes in the electrical and optical properties of these materials. The BAC model provides a consistent and quantitative description of experimentally observed data including the large band gap bowing, splitting of the conduction band, and increase enhancement of the electron effective mass. Also, it explains the mutual passivation effect in which group IV donors form nearest neighbor pairs with substitutional N atoms, which eliminates the activity of both species. Most recently we have found that the electronic properties of N-rich GaN1-xAsx (x<0.06) HMAs are determined by an anticrossing interaction between localized donor-like As states and the valence band states of the GaN matrix. The finding provides a basis for a description of the electronic structure of these alloys in the whole composition range.

  1. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for Melt and Dilute DOE-Owned Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    H. Radulescu

    2001-07-31

    There are more than 250 forms of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment (DOE 2000b, Section 6.6.8). The Melt and Dilute (MD) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the high-enriched U-Al fuel group. The MD SNF consists of homogeneous cylindrical ingots with 16.5 in. (419.1 mm) maximum diameter. Two general ingot compositions are considered in the criticality and geochemistry analyses. The first composition consists of 8.2 to 18.2 wt% uranium, enriched at less than 20 wt% U-235 and 0.5 wt% gadolinium, with the balance of the ingot being aluminum. The second composition is identical to the first for uranium and gadolinium, but in this case 2.5 wt% of the ingot is hafnium, with the balance of the ingot being aluminum. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance of fuel from the high-enriched U-Al fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the high-enriched U-Al fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report. The analyses have been performed by following the disposal criticality analysis methodology, which was documented in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000) submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The methodology includes analyzing the geochemical and physical processes that can breach the waste package and degrade the waste forms and other internal components, as well as the structural, thermal, and shielding analyses, and intact and degraded component criticality analyses. One or more addenda (validation reports) to the topical report will be required to establish the critical limit for DOE SNF form once sufficient critical benchmarks are identified and verified. The waste package design for MD ingots holds one 18-in.-outer diameter DOE standardized SNF canister containing the MD ingots, and five defense high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass canisters. The 5-DHLW/DOE SNF-short waste package is based on the Site Recommendation design of waste packages (Appendix A). The waste package design consists of two concentric cylindrical shells in which the waste forms will be placed. The outer shell is made of a corrosion resistant nickel-based alloy (Alloy 22). The inner shell is composed of stainless steel 316 NG (nuclear grade). The waste package design incorporates three lids at the one end of the waste package (one for the inner shell and two for the outer shell) and two lids at the other end of the waste package (one for each shell). The DOE SNF canister containing three to six MD ingots is placed in a carbon steel support tube that becomes the center of the waste package. The DOE SNF canister is surrounded by five 3-meter-long Savannah River Site DHLW glass canisters. The five DHLW glass canisters are evenly spaced around the DOE SNF canister. This report presents the results of analyzing the 5-DHLWDOE SNF-short waste package against various design criteria. Section 2.2 provides the criteria, and Section 2.3 provides the key assumptions for the various analyses.

  2. Discovery of the Calcium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    J. L. Gross; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Twenty four calcium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  3. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Discovery of the Vanadium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Shore; A. Fritsch; M. Heim; A. Schuh; M. Thoennessen

    2009-07-11

    Twenty-four vanadium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Discovery of the Einsteinium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Bury, A; Ginepro, J Q; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Shore, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Seventeen einsteinium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Discovery of the Scandium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Meierfrankenfeld, D

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-three scandium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  7. Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes

    E-print Network

    D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  8. Discovery of the Einsteinium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Bury; A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Schuh; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Seventeen einsteinium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  9. Discovery of the Titanium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Twentyfive titanium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Shore; A. Fritsch; M. Heim; A. Schuh; M. Thoennessen

    2009-02-25

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  12. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    E-print Network

    T. Szymanski; M. Thoennessen

    2009-09-04

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  13. Discovery of the Barium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Shore; A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Schuh; M. Thoennessen

    2009-08-13

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Discovery of the barium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, A.; Fritsch, A.; Ginepro, J.Q.; Heim, M.; Schuh, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-11-15

    Thirty-eight barium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery of the Platinum Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Gross, J L

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-nine platinum isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Discovery of the Krypton Isotopes

    E-print Network

    M. Heim; A. Fritsch; A. Schuh; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

    2009-04-15

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. Discovery of the krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Heim, M.; Fritsch, A.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-07-15

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Discovery of the Gold Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Schuh; A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

    2009-03-10

    Thirty-six gold isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Discovery of the Indium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    S. Amos; M. Thoennessen

    2010-09-08

    Thirty-eight indium isotopes (A = 98-135) have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  20. Discovery of the Silver Isotopes

    E-print Network

    A. Schuh; A. Fritsch; J. Q. Ginepro; M. Heim; A. Shore; M. Thoennessen

    2009-07-09

    Thirty-eight silver isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.