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Sample records for isotope profiles shed

  1. Anomalous vortex shedding and wake profiles in quasi-two-dimensional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Paul W.; Dams, Dominic A.

    2014-11-01

    Vortex shedding by circular cylinders in a vertical soap film channel exhibits anomalously low shedding frequencies compared with observations in conventional systems. Furthermore, the Strouhal number (St = fD /U∞ , where f is the shedding frequency, D the cylinder diameter, and U∞ the upstream flow speed) is not uniquely determined by the Reynolds number (Re = DU∞ / ν , where ν is the kinematic viscosity). We have previously argued that Ekman friction is a likely cause [Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 57(17), R10.7]. Other possibilities include gravity, which in this system acts as a forcing mechanism not typically present during vortex shedding measurements, surface tension effects, or variable-viscosity effects due to variations in film thickness. Theory to predict the shedding frequency is lacking and so it is unclear if or how each of these mechanisms should affect it, but understanding the anomaly may elucidate the shedding process. We present two-dimensional profiles of velocity, viscosity, and surface friction measured in the wake of the cylinder under several sets of flow parameters and discuss their implications for the various candidates. The results do not support variable viscosity as a cause.

  2. Lead isotope profiling in dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, John; McClure-Brinton, Kimberly; Zyskowski, Justin; Stensen, Lauren; Lehner, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Lead (Pb) is a common cause of heavy metal poisonings in cattle. Sources of Pb on farms include crankcase oil, machinery grease, batteries, plumbing, and paint chips. Consequently, consumption of Pb from these sources may negatively impact animal health and Pb may be inadvertently introduced into the food supply. Therefore, the scope of poisoning incidents must be clearly assessed and sources of intoxication identified and strategies to mitigate exposure evaluated and implemented to prevent future exposures. Stable isotope analysis by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has proven itself of value in forensic investigations. We report on the extension of Pb stable isotope analysis to bovine tissues and profile comparisons with paint chips and soils collected from an affected dairy farm to elucidate the primary source. Pb occurs naturally as four stable isotopes: (204)Pb, (206)Pb, (207)Pb, and (208)Pb. Herein a case is reported to illustrate the use of (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb ratios to link environmental sources of exposure with tissues from a poisoned animal. Chemical Pb profiling provides a valuable tool for field investigative approaches to Pb poisoning in production agriculture and is applicable to subclinical exposures. PMID:25545316

  3. Transient soil moisture profile of a water-shedding soil cover in north Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Christopher; Baumgartl, Thomas; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    In current agricultural and industrial applications, soil moisture determination is limited to point-wise measurements and remote sensing technologies. The former has limitations on spatial resolution while the latter, although has greater coverage in three dimensions, but may not be representative of real-time hydrologic conditions of the substrate. This conference paper discusses the use of elongated soil moisture probes to describe the transient soil moisture profile of water-shedding soil cover trial plots in north Queensland, Australia. Three-metre long flat ribbon cables were installed at designed depths across a soil cover with substrate materials from mining activities comprising of waste rocks and blended tailings. The soil moisture measurement is analysed using spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR) (Scheuermann et al., 2009) Calibration of the flat ribbon cable's soil moisture measurement in waste rocks is undertaken in a glasshouse setting. Soil moisture retention and outflows are monitored at specific time interval by mass balance and water potential measurements. These data sets together with the soil hydrologic properties derived from laboratory and field measurements are used as input in the numerical code on unsaturated flow, Hydrus2D. The soil moisture calculations of the glasshouse calibration using this numerical method are compared with results from the STDR soil moisture data sets. In context, the purpose of the soil cover is to isolate sulphide-rich mine wastes from atmospheric interaction as oxidation and leaching of these materials may result to acid and metalliferous drainage. The long term performance of a soil cover will be described in terms of the quantities and physico-chemical characteristics of its outflows. With the soil moisture probes set at automated and pre-determined measurement time intervals, it is expected to distinguish between macropore and soil moisture flows during high intensity rainfall events and, also continuously

  4. Transcriptome profiling of petal abscission zone and functional analysis of AUX/IAA family genes reveal that RhIAA16 is involved in petal shedding in rose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone d...

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth (SHEDs) Induce Immune Modulatory Profile in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernando de Sá; Ramos, Rodrigo Nalio; de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Bassi, Enio Jose; Gonzales, Roberto Pereira; Miyagi, Sueli Patricia Harumi; Maranduba, Claudinéia Pereira; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo Augusto Brazil Esteves; Marques, Márcia Martins; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; da Costa Maranduba, Carlos Magno

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells have prominent immune modulatory properties, which may have clinical applications; however their major source, bone marrow, is of limited availability. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) are readily accessible, but their immune regulatory properties have not been completely investigated. This study was designed, therefore, to evaluate the SHEDs influence on DCs differentiation, maturation, ability to activate T cells and to expand CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The experiments were based in cellular co-culture during differentiation and maturation of monocyte derived-DCs (moDCs), with, or not, presence of SHEDs. After co-culture with SHEDs, (moDCs) presented lower expression of BDCA-1 and CD11c, in comparison to DC cultivated without SHEDs. CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 levels were also decreased in mature DCs (mDCs) after co-cultivation with SHEDs. To assess the ability of SHEDs-exposed moDCs to modulate T cell responses, the former were separated from SHEDs, and co-cultured with peripheral blood lymphocytes. After 5 days, the proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was evaluated and found to be lower than that induced by moDCs cultivated without SHEDs. In addition, an increase in the proportion of CD4+Foxp3+IL-10+ T cells was observed among cells stimulated by mature moDCs that were previously cultivated with SHEDs. Soluble factors released during co-cultures also showed a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ), and an increase in the anti-inflammatory molecule IL-10. Conclusion/Significance This study shows that SHEDs induce an immune regulatory phenotype in moDCs cells, evidenced by changes in maturation and differentiation rates, inhibition of lymphocyte stimulation and ability to expand CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Further characterization and validation of this phenomenon could support the use of SHEDs, directly or indirectly

  6. Influences of Phytoncide Supplementation on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, Blood Profiles, Diarrhea Scores and Fecal Microflora Shedding in Weaning Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S.; Jung, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, B. Y.; Kim, I. H.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 140 weaning pigs ((Landrace×Yorkshire)×Duroc, BW = 6.47±0.86 kg) were used in a 5-wk growth trail to determine the effects of phytoncide supplementation on growth performance, nutrient apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), blood profiles, diarrhea scores and fecal microflora shedding. Pigs were assigned randomly by BW into 5 treatments, dietary treatments were: i) NC, basal diet; ii) PC, NC+0.05% tylosin; iii) EO, NC+0.1% essential oil; iv) PP, NC+0.2% PP (phytoncide with 2% citric acid), and v) PA, NC+0.2% PA (phytoncide). Each treatment had 7 replicate pens with 4 pigs per pen. All pigs were housed in pens with a self-feeder and nipple drinker to allow ad libitum access to feed and water throughout the experimental period. During 0 to 2 wks, supplementation with essential oil and PA decreased (p<0.05) G/F compared with the other treatments. During 2 to 5 wks, supplementation with PA led to a higher (p<0.05) G/F than the other treatments. At 2 wk, ATTD of dry matter (DM) and gross energy (GE) in EO treatment were decreased (p<0.05) compared with NC treatment. Dietary PC treatment improved (p<0.05) ATTD of DM and E compared with the CON group, and PA and PP treatments showed a higher (p<0.05) ATTD of E than that in NC treatment. Pigs fed phytoncide (PA and PP) had a greater (p<0.05) ATTD of DM than those of NC and EO treatments at 5 wk. Moreover, supplementation with phytoncide elevated (p<0.05) the concentration of immunoglobulin (IgG) in blood at 2 wk. The inclusion of EO, PP and PA treatments showed a greater (p<0.05) amount of fecal Lactobacillus compared with CON group. However, no difference (p>0.05) was observed in diarrhea scores among treatments. In conclusion, phytoncide can elevate feed efficiency, nutrient digestibility, and improve the fecal Lactobacillus counts in weaning pigs. Our results indicated that the phytoncide could be used as a good antibiotics alternative in weaning pigs. PMID:25049695

  7. Integrating comparative expression profiling data with association of SNPs to Salmonella shedding for improved food safety and porcine disease resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella in swine is a major food safety problem, as a majority of U.S. swine herds are Salmonella-positive. Salmonella can be shed from colonized swine and contaminate a) neighboring pigs; b) slaughter plants and pork products; c) edible crops when swine manure is used as a fertilizer; and d) wat...

  8. Effect of shed type and sunflower supplementation of fatty acid profile and nutritional implications in lamb tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meat from Small Tail Han sheep is an important dietary component of people in western China. Five-mo-old Small Tail Han ewe lambs (n=40) were used to study the effect of sunflower seed (160 g/d) and protected fat (30 and 60 g/d) supplementation and type of shelter (conventional shed vs. greenhouse s...

  9. Metallophore mapping in complex matrices by metal isotope coded profiling of organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Deicke, Michael; Mohr, Jan Frieder; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Wichard, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Metal isotope coded profiling (MICP) introduces a universal discovery platform for metal chelating natural products that act as metallophores, ion buffers or sequestering agents. The detection of cation and oxoanion complexing ligands is facilitated by the identification of unique isotopic signatures created by the application of isotopically pure metals. PMID:25298978

  10. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  11. Isotopic and elemental profiling of ammonium nitrate in forensic explosives investigations.

    PubMed

    Brust, Hanneke; Koeberg, Mattijs; van der Heijden, Antoine; Wiarda, Wim; Mügler, Ines; Schrader, Marianne; Vivo-Truyols, Gabriel; Schoenmakers, Peter; van Asten, Arian

    2015-03-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is frequently encountered in explosives in forensic casework. It is widely available as fertilizer and easy to implement in explosive devices, for example by mixing it with a fuel. Forensic profiling methods to determine whether material found on a crime scene and material retrieved from a suspect arise from the same source are becoming increasingly important. In this work, we have explored the possibility of using isotopic and elemental profiling to discriminate between different batches of AN. Variations within a production batch, between different batches from the same manufacturer, and between batches from different manufacturers were studied using a total of 103 samples from 19 different fertilizer manufacturers. Isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to analyze AN samples for their (15)N and (18)O isotopic composition. The trace-elemental composition of these samples was studied using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). All samples were analyzed for the occurrence of 66 elements. 32 of these elements were useful for the differentiation of AN samples. These include magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe) and strontium (Sr). Samples with a similar elemental profile may be differentiated based on their isotopic composition. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to calculate likelihood ratios and demonstrated the power of combining elemental and isotopic profiling for discrimination between different sources of AN. PMID:25602642

  12. Copper and iron isotope fractionation during weathering and pedogenesis: Insights from saprolite profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-Ao; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shuguang; Wei, Gang-Jian; Ma, Jing-Long; Li, Dandan

    2014-12-01

    Iron and copper isotopes are useful tools to track redox transformation and biogeochemical cycling in natural environment. To study the relationships of stable Fe and Cu isotopic variations with redox regime and biological processes during weathering and pedogenesis, we carried out Fe and Cu isotope analyses for two sets of basalt weathering profiles (South Carolina, USA and Hainan Island, China), which formed under different climatic conditions (subtropical vs. tropical). Unaltered parent rocks from both profiles have uniform δ56Fe and δ65Cu values close to the average of global basalts. In the South Carolina profile, δ56Fe values of saprolites vary from -0.01‰ to 0.92‰ in the lower (reduced) part and positively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.90), whereas δ65Cu values are almost constant. By contrast, δ56Fe values are less variable and negatively correlate with Fe3+/ΣFe (R2 = 0.88) in the upper (oxidized) part, where large (4.85‰) δ65Cu variation is observed with most samples enriched in heavy isotopes. In the Hainan profile formed by extreme weathering under oxidized condition, δ56Fe values vary little (0.05-0.14‰), whereas δ65Cu values successively decrease from 0.32‰ to -0.12‰ with depth below 3 m and increase from -0.17‰ to 0.02‰ with depth above 3 m. Throughout the whole profile, δ65Cu positively correlate with Cu concentration and negatively correlate with the content of total organic carbon (TOC). Overall, the contrasting Fe isotopic patterns under different redox conditions suggest redox states play the key controls on Fe mobility and isotope fractionation. The negative correlation between δ56Fe and Fe3+/ΣFe in the oxidized part of the South Carolina profile may reflect addition of isotopically light Fe. This is demonstrated by leaching experiments, which show that Fe mineral pools extracted by 0.5 N HCl, representing poorly-crystalline Fe (hydr)-oxides, are enriched in light Fe isotopes. The systematic Cu isotopic variation

  13. Isotope Coded Labeling for Accelerated Protein Interaction Profiling using MS

    PubMed Central

    Venable, John D.; Steckler, Caitlin; Ou, Weijia; Grünewald, Jan; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Brock, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction surface mapping using MS is widely applied but comparatively resource intensive. Here a workflow adaptation for use of isotope coded tandem mass tags for the purpose is reported. The key benefit of improved throughput derived from sample acquisition multiplexing and automated analysis is shown to be maintained in the new application. Mapping of the epitopes of two monoclonal antibodies on their respective targets serves to illustrate the novel approach. We conclude that the approach enables mapping of interactions by MS at significantly larger scales than hereto possible. PMID:26151661

  14. Effect of season and variety on the differentiation of geographic growing origin of pistachios by stable isotope profiling.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim A; Smith, Brian W

    2006-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to demonstrate if seasonal or variety differences affected the feasibility of stable isotope profiling methods to differentiate the geographical growing regions of pistachios (Pistachia vera). Bulk carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of approximately 150 pistachios samples were performed. Isotope ratios were determined using a stable isotope mass spectrometer. The pistachio samples analyzed were from the three major pistachio-growing regions: Turkey, Iran, and the United States (California). Geographic regions were well separated on the basis of isotope ratios. Seasonal effects were found to affect some isotopes for some regions. Pistachio varieties within specified geographic regions were not found to affect the discriminating power of stable isotopes, for the varieties tested. This paper reports the development of a simple chemical profiling method using bulk stable isotope ratios that may be widely applied to the determination of the geographic origin of foods. PMID:16506828

  15. Trace element profiles in modern horse molar enamel as tracers of seasonality: Evidence from micro-XRF, LA-ICP-MS and stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winter, Niels; Goderis, Steven; van Malderen, Stijn; Vanhaecke, Frank; Claeys, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    A combination of laboratory micro-X-ray Fluorescence (μXRF) and stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis shows that trace element profiles from modern horse molars reveal a seasonal pattern that co-varies with seasonality in the oxygen isotope records of enamel carbonate from the same teeth. A combination of six cheek teeth (premolars and molars) from the same individual yields a seasonal isotope and trace element record of approximately three years recorded during the growth of the molars. This record shows that reproducible measurements of various trace element ratios (e.g., Sr/Ca, Zn/Ca, Fe/Ca, K/Ca and S/Ca) lag the seasonal pattern in oxygen isotope records by 2-3 months. Laser Ablation-ICP-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis on a cross-section of the first molar of the same individual is compared to the bench-top tube-excitation μXRF results to test the robustness of the measurements and to compare both methods. Furthermore, trace element (e.g. Sr, Zn, Mg & Ba) profiles perpendicular to the growth direction of the same tooth, as well as profiles parallel to the growth direction are measured with LA-ICP-MS and μXRF to study the internal distribution of trace element ratios in two dimensions. Results of this extensive complementary line-scanning procedure shows the robustness of state of the art laboratory micro-XRF scanning for the measurement of trace elements in bioapatite. The comparison highlights the advantages and disadvantages of both methods for trace element analysis and illustrates their complementarity. Results of internal variation within the teeth shed light on the origins of trace elements in mammal teeth and their potential use for paleo-environmental reconstruction.

  16. Hydrogen isotopic profile in the characterization of sugars. Influence of the metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Billault, Isabelle; Li, Xiaobao; Mabon, Françoise; Remaud, Gérald; Martin, Maryvonne L

    2002-03-13

    The site-specific natural hydrogen isotope ratios of plant metabolites determined by 2H nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR method) can provide powerful criteria for inferring mechanistic and environmental effects on biosynthetic pathways. This work examines the potential of isotopic profiles for the main constituents of carbohydrates, glucose and fructose, to distinguish different photosynthetic pathways. An appropriate analytical strategy, involving three suitable isotopic probes, has been elaborated with a view to measuring simultaneously, in conditions devoid of isotopic perturbations, all (or nearly all) of the carbon-bound hydrogen isotope ratios. It is shown that the type of photosynthetic metabolism, either C3 (sugar beet, orange, and grape), C4 (maize and sugar cane), or CAM (pineapple), and the physiological status of the precursor plant exert strong influences on the deuterium distribution in the sugar molecules. Consequently, this isotopic fingerprint may be a rich source of information for the comparison of mechanisms in metabolic pathways. In addition, it can provide complementary criteria to ethanol as a probe for the origin of sugars. PMID:11879039

  17. Molecular and Stable Carbon Isotope Composition of Organic Compounds from Particles Sampled from the Lower Fraser Valley, BC Urban and Regional Air Shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiticar, M. J.; Gray, S. L.

    2001-12-01

    This study examines the character of specific non-volatile organic compounds (N-VOCs) extracted from total suspended particulates. Aerosols are collected on filters by HiVol samplers on monthly intervals, at well-characterized meteorological sites throughout the Lower Fraser Valley. Filters are solvent-extracted , then separated into different compound classes by Silica-gel Chromatography. Selected fractions are analysed for their individual compound molecular compositions by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) and by Continuous Flow-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) for their stable carbon isotope ratio. The purpose is to identify spatial and temporal variations in N-VOCs, with the long-term goal of understanding their sources, transport processes and atmospheric chemistry. This Health Canada, Toxic Substance Research Initiative offers insights into the levels and signatures of N-VOCs exposed to humans in congested urban settings. The program is also part of the Pacific 2001 field study. This paper presents the initial year's results on our N-VOCs, including alkanes, organic acids, in comparison with bulk isotope analyses.

  18. High-resolution profiling of the stable isotopes of water in unsaturated coal waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, S. Lee; Hendry, M. Jim; Carey, Sean K.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of the rate of water migration through unsaturated mine waste rock dumps is an essential element in assessing the chemical loading from these landforms; yet our understanding of how water moves into, through and out of waste rock is incomplete. To further understand the rates and magnitude of percolation through waste rock, deep high-resolution (every 0.1-4.5 m) depth profiles of the stable isotopes of water (δ2H and δ18O) at two coal waste rock dumps and a natural alluvial deposit down-gradient of one of the dumps were collected in the Elk Valley, British Columbia, Canada. The profiles were generated using vapor equilibrium techniques applied to continuous core samples collected using dry sonic drilling methods. Elevated core temperatures (up to 80 °C) were measured during sonic coring. The isotopic values of pore waters measured in the core samples were corrected for water loss to the atmosphere attributed to the elevated core temperatures. The average isotopic composition of the core samples were compared to water collected from rock drains discharging from the base of the dumps. The results indicate that high-resolution profiles of δ2H and δ18O can be measured to depths of 86 m in coal waste rock dumps and, based on the seasonal cycles in the isotopic composition of recharging water, can be used to characterize the migration of recharge water within these dumps. These profiles also suggest that recharge into these dumps occurs from both rain as well as snow melt and may be as high as 400-600 mm/yr (60-75% of annual precipitation). Combined with the relatively low volumetric water contents of these dumps (5-10%) the rates of water migration through the dumps are tens of meters each year.

  19. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-01

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  20. Quantitative metabolomic profiling using dansylation isotope labeling and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruokun; Li, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Differential chemical isotopic labeling (CIL) LC-MS has been used for quantifying a targeted metabolite in biological samples with high precision and accuracy. Herein we describe a high-performance CIL LC-MS method for generating quantitative and comprehensive profiles of the metabolome for metabolomics applications. After mixing two comparative samples separately labeled by light or heavy isotopic tags through chemical reactions, the peak intensity ratio of the labeled analyte pair can provide relative or absolute quantitative information on the metabolites. We describe the use of (12)C2- and (13)C2-dansyl chloride (DnsCl) as the isotope reagents to profile the metabolites containing amine and phenolic hydroxyl functional groups by LC-MS. This method can be used to compare the relative concentration changes of hundreds or thousands of amine- and phenol-containing metabolites among many comparative samples and generate absolute concentration information on metabolites for which the standards are available. Combined with statistical analysis and metabolite identification tools, this method can be used to identify key metabolites involved in differentiating comparative samples such as disease cases vs. healthy controls. PMID:25270927

  1. Uranium isotope composition of a laterite profile during extreme weathering of basalt in Guangdong, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Y.; Lundstrom, C.; Huang, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rock weathering and soil formation in the critical zone are important for material cycle from the solid Earth to superficial system. Laterite is a major type of soil in South China forming at hot-humid climate, which has strong effect on the global uranium cycle. Uranium is closely related to the environmental redox condition because U is stable at U(Ⅳ) in anoxic condition and U(Ⅵ) as soluble uranyl ion (UO22+) under oxic circumstance. In order to understand the behavior of U isotopes during crust weathering, here we report uranium isotopic compositions of soil and base rock samples from a laterite profile originated from extreme weathering of basalt in Guangdong, South China. The uranium isotopic data were measured on a Nu Plasma MC-ICP-MS at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign using the double spike method. The δ238U of BCR-1 is -0.29±0.03‰ (relative to the international standard CRM-112A), corresponding to a 238U/235U ratio of 137.911±0.004. Our result of BCR-1 agrees with previous analyses (e.g., -0.28‰ in Weyer et al. 2008) [1]. U contents of the laterite profile decrease from 1.9 ppm to 0.9 ppm with depth, and peak at 160 - 170 cm (2.3 ppm), much higher than the U content of base rocks (~0.5 ppm). In contrary, U/Th of laterites is lower than that of base rock (0.27) except the peak at the depth of 160-170 cm (0.38), indicating significant U loss during weathering. Notably, U isotope compositions of soils show a small variation from -0.38 to -0.28‰, consistent with the base rock within analytical error (0.05‰ to 0.08‰, 2sd). Such small variation can be explained by a "rind effect" (Wang et al., 2015) [2], by which U(Ⅳ) can be completely oxidized to U(VI) layer by layer during basalt weathering by dissolved oxygen. Therefore, our study indicates that U loss during basalt weathering at the hot-humid climate does not change U isotope composition of superficial water system. [1] Weyer S. et al. (2008) Natural fractionation of 238U/235

  2. Experimental investigation of uranium-series isotope mobility in a basaltic weathering profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, Anthony; Menozzi, Davide; Kinsley, Leslie

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of uranium (U)-series isotopes in regolith can be used to determine the formation rate of weathering profiles. This approach aims at following how the U-series isotope composition of primary minerals (i.e. those derived from the parent material) vary during the development of the weathering profile. Nevertheless, regolith samples are a complex mixture of primary minerals, secondary minerals that are the residue of primary mineral weathering, secondary minerals that precipitate from pore water, minerals derived from atmospheric deposition and organic matter. In this study, firstly we aim at isolating primary minerals and the secondary minerals derived from them, by evaluating a sequential extraction procedure designed to eliminate carbonates, Fe-Mn oxides and organic matter. Secondly, we investigate the behaviour of U-series isotopes during primary mineral dissolution by applying a mild HF/HCl etching solution to the residues of the sequential extraction. These experiments were performed on bedrock, saprolite and soil derived from a basaltic weathering profile in south-eastern Australia. Results show that up to 50% of U is removed during sequential extraction, suggesting that (i) there is a large pool of labile U in the bedrock and (ii) secondary phases and organic matter account for a large fraction of the U budget in bulk saprolite and soil. Sequential extraction has little impact on the (234U/238U) activity ratio of bedrock and saprolite, whilst it shows a decrease in soil. This suggests that the pool of U removed from bedrock and saprolite has a (234U/238U) similar to that of primary minerals; but in the soil, the U removed (mostly from organic matter) is enriched in 234U. This is expected as organic matter uptakes U from pore solutions, which are generally enriched in 234U. During HF/HCl etching, the (234U/238U) of bedrock and saprolite is greater than 1. Sheng and Kuroda [1] previously proposed that (234U/238U) >1 in rocks could be explained by

  3. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  4. Uplifting of palsa peatlands by permafrost identified by stable isotope depth profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Jan Paul; Conen, Franz; Leifeld, Jens; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Natural abundances of stable isotopes are a widespread tool to investigate biogeochemical processes in soils. Palsas are peatlands with an ice core and are common in the discontinuous permafrost region. Elevated parts of palsa peatlands, called hummocks, were uplifted by permafrost out of the influence of groundwater. Here we used the combination of δ15N values and C/N ratio along depth profiles to identify perturbation of these soils. In the years 2009 and 2012 we took in total 14 peat cores from hummocks in two palsa peatlands near Abisko, northern Sweden. Peat samples were analysed in 2 to 4 cm layers for stable isotope ratios and concentrations of C and N. The uplifting of the hummocks by permafrost could be detected by stable isotope depth patterns with the highest δ15N value at permafrost onset, a so-called turning point. Regression analyses indicated in 11 of 14 peat cores increasing δ15N values above and decreasing values below the turning point. This is in accordance with the depth patterns of δ13C values and C/N ratios in these palsa peatlands. Onset of permafrost aggradation identified by the highest δ15N value in the profile and calculated from peat accumulation rates show ages ranging from 80 to 545 years and indicate a mean (±SD) peat age at the turning points of 242 (±66) years for Stordalen and 365 (±53) years for Storflaket peatland. The mean peat ages at turning points are within the period of the Little Ice Age. Furthermore, we tested if the disturbance, in this case the uplifting of the peat material, can be displayed in the relation of δ15N and C/N ratio following the concept of Conen et al. (2013). In unperturbed sites soil δ15N values cover a relatively narrow range at any particular C/N ratio. Changes in N cycling, i.e. N loss or gain, results in the loss or gain of 15N depleted forms. This leads to larger or smaller δ15N values than usual at the observed C/N ratio. All, except one, turning point show a perturbation in the depth

  5. Pedogenic Formation of Perylene in a Terrestrial Soil Profile: Evidence From Carbon Isotopic Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gocht, T.; Jochmann, M. A.; Blessing, M.; Barth, J.; Schmidt, T. C.; Grathwohl, P.

    2005-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants (POP), which are introduced into the environment mainly due to combustion of fossil fuel. Perylene is one compound of the PAHs that consists of 5 condensed rings like the well known carcinogenic benzo(a)pyrene. Apart from the pyrogenic formation, there are strong indications that it is produced biologically and/or diagenetically under anaerobic conditions. This conclusion was derived from the presence of perylene in deeper parts of marine and lacustrine sediment profiles, where the combustion-derived PAHs are almost absent ( Lima et al., 2003). 13C/12C compound-specific stable isotopic ratios were successfully applied for the differentiation of probably biologically generated perylene in tropical termite nests and pyrolytic perylene from surface soils of temperate regions ( Wilcke et al., 2002). Our study is the first aiming on the determination of the different processes of perylene formation at one location using carbon isotopic ratios such as 13C/12C. We determined PAHs in natural soils of southern Germany. At one location in the Black Forest we found for the first time evidence for natural perylene production in the subsoil of terrestrial environments. Apart from the combustion derived PAHs that accumulate at the top of all soil profiles, the depth distribution of perylene shows the highest peak in the subsoil about 1 m below the surface. Due to its very low solubility (0.4 μg l-1 at 25 °C) vertical transport of perylene with seepage water is very unlikely. Thus, we suggest atmospheric deposition of pyrogenic perylene at the top of the profile and in-situ generation in the subsoil, probably due to microbial activities. In order to distinguish between the pyrogenic and natural generation we employed 13C/12C compound-specific stable isotope analysis of perylene in soil samples from the top of the profile as well as from the subsoil. Preliminary measurements with soil extracts show strong

  6. Iron isotope composition of the suspended matter along depth and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and its tributaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Pinheiro, Giana Márcia; Poitrasson, Franck; Sondag, Francis; Vieira, Lucieth Cruz; Pimentel, Márcio Martins

    2013-07-01

    Samples of suspended matter were collected at different locations, seasons, depths and lateral profiles in the Amazon River and three of its main tributaries, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Negro rivers. Their iron isotope compositions were studied in order to understand the iron cycle and investigate the level of isotopic homogeneity at the river cross-section scale. Samples from four depth profiles and three lateral profiles analyzed show suspended matter δ57Fe values (relative to IRMM-14) between -0.501 ± 0.075‰ and 0.196 ± 0.083‰ (2SE). Samples from the Negro River, a blackwater river, yield the negative values. Samples from other stations (whitewater rivers, the Madeira, the Solimões and the Amazon) show positive values, which are indistinguishable from the average composition of the continental crust (δ57FeIRMM-14 ˜ 0.1‰). Individual analyses of the depth and lateral profiles show no significant variation in iron isotope signatures, indicating that, in contrast to certain chemical or other isotopic tracers, one individual subsurface sample is representative of river deeper waters. This also suggests that, instead of providing detailed information on the riverine iron cycling, iron isotopes of particulate matter in rivers will rather yield a general picture of the iron sources.

  7. An intercomparison study of isotopic ozone profiles from the ACE-FTS, JEM-SMILES, and Odin-SMR instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A.; Walker, K. A.; Suzuki, M.; Kasai, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Urban, J.; Bernath, P. F.; Manney, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of various atmospheric isotopologue species are a valuable source of information, as they can improve our current understanding of the atmosphere. For example, isotopic signatures in atmospheric profiles can be used to investigate atmospheric dynamical processes, while differences in the isotopic composition of atmospheric trace gases can be traced to effects due to their sources and sinks. This study focuses on the intercomparison of three satellite missions that provide measurements of isotopic species. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003) was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature, pressure, and vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species, including isotopologue profiles for; O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, CO2 and NO. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over one year and with a vertical resolution of typically 3-4 km. ACE-FTS O3 isotopologue volume mixing ratio profiles are firstly compared to data measured by the Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS), and the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) aboard the Swedish Odin satellite. Secondly, we intercompare the isotopic fractionation profiles for each ozone isotopologue product measured by the three instruments to further ascertain a level of confidence in the measurements.

  8. Botanical traceability of commercial tannins using the mineral profile and stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Daniela; Santato, Alessandro; Paolini, Mauro; Barbero, Alice; Camin, Federica; Nicolini, Giorgio; Larcher, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Commercial tannins are natural polyphenolic compounds extracted from different plant tissues such as gall, the wood of different species and fruit. In the food industry they are mainly used as flavourings and food ingredients, whereas in winemaking they are classified as clarification agents for wine protein stabilisation, although colour stabilisation, metal removal, unpleasant thiol removal and rheological correction are also well-known and desired effects. Due to their particular technical properties and very different costs, the possibility of correct identification of the real botanical origin of tannins can be considered a primary target in oenology research and in fulfilling the technical and economic requirements of the wine industry. For some categories of tannins encouraging results have already been achieved by considering sugar or polyphenolic composition. For the first time this work verifies the possibility of determining the botanical origin of tannins on the basis of the mineral element profile and analysis of the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio. One hundred two commercial tannins originating from 10 different botanical sources (grapes, oak, gall, chestnut, fruit trees, quebracho, tea, acacia, officinal plants and tara) were analysed to determine 57 elements and the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, respectively. Forward stepwise discriminant analysis provided good discrimination between the 8 most abundant groups, with 100% correct re-classification. The model was then validated five times on subsets of 10% of the overall samples, randomly extracted, achieving satisfactory results. With a similar approach it was also possible to distinguish toasted and untoasted oak tannins as well as tannins from grape skin and grape seeds. PMID:25230175

  9. High-resolution Oxygen Isotope Profiles in Tree-rings and How to Interpret Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, H.

    2013-12-01

    Workers have long sought to gain environmental information from oxygen isotope measurements in both modern and ancient wood cellulose (δ18Ocellulose). A quantitative mechanistic relationship for interpreting seasonal changes has proven difficult because multiple environmental parameters, such as temperature and precipitation, affect the δ18O value of meteoric water (δ18OMW), which forms the primary source of oxygen for plant tissue construction. Here we present new high-resolution δ18Ocellulose profiles across tree rings from five widely distributed sites, and combine these new data with 26 other similar records from the literature to form a global dataset of intra-annual changes in δ18Ocellulose from 781 tree rings measured at 31 sites. Using the International Atomic Energy Agency Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation month-by-month database we first develop relationships between the seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation amount to seasonal changes in δ18OMW. We then use these relationships based on modern precipitation to relate the seasonal change in δ18Ocellulose measured across tree rings to these seasonal climate parameters. Our analysis results in a unifying relationship explaining the intra-annual δ18Ocellulose patterns observed in tree rings worldwide that can be used to reconstruct seasonal temperature and precipitation amount from modern and fossil wood.

  10. Complex Sedimentary and Tectonic Events Captured in Stable Sulfur Isotope Profiles from the IODP Expedition 344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gott, C.; Riedinger, N.; Torres, M. E.; Solomon, E. A.; Bates, S. M.; Lyons, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    The impact of dynamic sedimentary and tectonic systems on biogeochemical processes, particularly the sulfur cycle, is poorly understood. To better elucidate these relationships, analyses were conducted on sediments collected during Integrated Ocean Drilling Project (IODP) Expedition 344. A primary goal of the CRISP (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project) expedition is to explore diagenetic processes, e.g. fluid flow; relating to the complex sedimentary and tectonic environments along the Costa Rica margin. Samples collected from sites U1381C, U1413B, and U1414A record non-steady state conditions in both the solid phase and the pore water profiles, although it is most pronounced in the latter. The penetration depth of pore water sulfate at these sites varies strongly with depth between 100, 15 and several hundreds of meters, respectively. The corresponding hydrogen sulfide concentrations are >400 μM at Holes U1381C, and U1413B while they are <4 μM at Hole U1414A. The measured concentrations of iron sulfides in the sediments indicate that pyrite is the main sulfur-bearing mineral, with concentrations of 2-3 wt. % at sites U1413B and U1414A. Recorded in the sulfur isotope signal is the likely origin of the heterogeneity between sites. At Site U1414, the 34S isotopically enriched sulfate (δ34S>+60 ‰) is reflected in the δ34S profile of the in situ iron sulfides. We interpret these data as being indicative of fluid flow, potentially along fracture zones, seeps and/or pockmark features seen elsewhere in this region.

  11. Diffusion of lithium-6 isotopes in lithium aluminate ceramics using neutron depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhinney, Hylton G.; James, William D.; Schweikert, Emile A.; Williams, John R.; Hollenberg, Glen; Welsh, John; Sereatan, Washington

    1993-07-01

    Lithium Ceramics offer tremendous potential as a source for the production of tritium ( 3H) for fusion power reactors. Their successful application will depend to a great extent upon the diffusion properties of the 6Li within the matrix. Consequently knowledge od 6Li concentration gradients in the ceramic matrices is an important requirement in the continued development of the technology. In this investigation, the neutron depth profile (NDP) technique has been applied to the study of concentration profiles of 6Li in lithium aluminate ceramics, doped with 1.8%, 50% and 95% 6Li isotopic concentrations. Specimen for analysis were prepared at Battelle (PNL) as pellet discs. Samples for diffusion studies were arranged as diffusion couples in the following manner: 1.8% 6Li discs/85% 6Li powder. Experiments were performed at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center Reactor Building, utilizing 1 MW equivalent thermal neutron fluxes 3 × 10 11n/ m2s. The depth probed by the technique is approximately 15 μ.m. Diffusion coefficients are in the range of 2.1 × 10 -12 to 7.0 × 10 -11m2s-1 for 1.8% 6Li-doped ceramics annealed at 1200 and 1400° C, for 4 to 48-h anneal times.

  12. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  13. Refining Isotopic Parameterization Choices Using Stable Water Isotope Profiles In Surface Layer And Soil To Improve Modeling Of Mid-Latitude Continental Moisture Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, A.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; O'Neill, M.; Noone, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The moisture balance of the continental boundary layer plays an important role in regulating the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and atmosphere. The surface layer moisture balance is controlled by a number of factors including precipitation, infiltration, evaporation and transpiration. Measurements of stable isotope ratios in water can be exploited to better understand the mechanisms controlling atmosphere-land surface water fluxes. We present three years of in situ tower-based measurements of stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δ18O) in vapor, precipitation, vegetation and soil from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, a semi-arid 300 meter tall-tower site in Erie, Colorado. Co-located meteorological and disdrometer measurements at the surface and 300m allow us to explore key aspects of continental moisture cycling in a semi-arid environment such as the important contribution of sub-surface vapor diffusion to the surface water vapor budget and its implications for partitioning in dry ecosystems, and the role of rain evaporation during precipitation events on inter-event and seasonal time scales. We use our observations to constrain a Craig-Gordon evaporation model at the land surface to weight the contributions of rainfall, surface water vapor exchange and sub-surface vapor diffusion to soil water isotope values. A multi-season in situ time series of surface vapor isotope profiles in conjunction with soil and precipitation allows us to field-validate choices for parameters such as the kinetic fractionation factor for each process. This has implications both for modeling short-term gas exchange at the land surface in modern-day climate models as well as for refining paleoclimate interpretations of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope-based proxies. Tall-tower precipitation and vapor isotope profile data can also be analyzed in conjunction with disdrometer data on inter-event and seasonal time scales to quantify the role of rain evaporation

  14. Long-term and high frequency non-destructive monitoring of water stable isotope profiles in an evaporating soil column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Y.; Merz, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Hermes, N.; Weuthen, A.; Pohlmeier, A.; Vereecken, H.; Brüggemann, N.

    2015-04-01

    The stable isotope compositions of soil water (δ2H and δ18O) carry important information about the prevailing soil hydrological conditions and for constraining ecosystem water budgets. However, they are highly dynamic, especially during and after precipitation events. The classical method of determining soil water δ2H and δ18O at different depths, i.e., soil sampling and cryogenic extraction of the soil water, followed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometer analysis is destructive and laborious with limited temporal resolution. In this study, we present a new non-destructive method based on gas-permeable tubing and isotope-specific infrared laser absorption spectroscopy. We conducted a laboratory experiment with an acrylic glass column filled with medium sand equipped with gas-permeable tubing at eight different soil depths. The soil column was initially saturated from the bottom, exposed to evaporation for a period of 290 days, and finally rewatered. Soil water vapor δ2H and δ18O were measured daily, sequentially for each depth. Soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O were inferred from the isotopic values of the vapor assuming thermodynamic equilibrium between liquid and vapor phases in the soil. The experimental setup allowed following the evolution of typical exponential-shaped soil water δ2H and δ18O profiles with unprecedentedly high temporal resolution. As the soil dried out, we could also show for the first time the increasing influence of the isotopically depleted ambient water vapor on the isotopically enriched liquid water close to the soil surface (i.e., atmospheric invasion). Rewatering at the end of the experiment led to instantaneous resetting of the stable isotope profiles, which could be closely followed with the new method.

  15. 13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Relationship of east tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and privy to each other and immediate surroundings, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  16. 12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Relationship of est tool shed, west tool shed, residence, claim house, and chicken house to each other and immediate surroundings, looking southeast - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  17. 11. Relationship of barn, east tool shed, west tool shed, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Relationship of barn, east tool shed, west tool shed, and residence to overall farmstead site, looking southeast - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  18. Lead fluxes, isotopic and concentration profiles in a peat deposit near a lead smelter (Príbram, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Mihaljevic, M; Zuna, M; Ettler, V; Sebek, O; Strnad, L; Goliás, V

    2006-12-15

    The content and the isotopic composition of lead (Pb) were studied in a peat deposit on the ridge of the Brdy Hills, in the vicinity of the Príbram metallurgical works, in the Czech Republic. Quadrupole ICP MS was employed to determine the elemental composition and (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope ratios. The individual layers were dated using alpha spectrometric measurement of the (210)Pb activity. The historical time period covered by the studied cores reached back to the 18th century. The Pb concentration in the studied profiles varied from 10 to 550 mg kg(-1). The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio varied in the range from 1.154 to 1.194 in the individual parts of the profile. The metallurgy of the Pb ores ((206)Pb/(207)Pb approximately 1.16), lithogenic Pb ((206)Pb/(207)Pb approximately 1.2), metallurgical processing of automobile batteries ((206)Pb/(207)Pb approximately 1.17) and the combustion of coal ((206)Pb/(207)Pb approximately 1.17-1.19) yield isotopic signatures that determine the isotope compositions of the individual profiles. Deposition rates between 15 mg m(-2) year(-1) at the beginning of the 19th century and 320 mg m(-2) year(-1) in the 1980s were determined in the dated profiles. The increased deposition rates determined on the dated profiles correspond to the increasing production of Pb ores in the Príbram mining area at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. The maximum for metallurgical production corresponds to the highest deposition rates recorded in 1960s and 1970s. The current deposition rate of 5-89 mg m(-2) year(-1) Pb is related to erosion of contaminated soils and waste dumps. PMID:17081595

  19. Microgamma Scan System for analyzing radial isotopic profiles of irradiated transmutation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A. Hilton; Christopher A. McGrath

    2008-05-01

    The U. S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership / Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (GNEP/AFCI) is developing metallic transmutation alloys as a fuel form to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products. The AFCI program has irradiated and examined eleven metallic alloy transmutation fuel specimens to evaluate the feasibility of actinide transmutation in advanced sodium-cooled fast reactors and thermal reactor implementation. Initial results of postirradiation examinations indicated the irradiation performance of the actinide-bearing compositions is similar to uranium-plutonium-zirconium ternary metallic alloy fuels (U-xPu-10Zr). Further studies to characterize radial burnup profile, constituent migration, and fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) are in progress. A microgamma scan system is being developed to analyze the radial distribution of fission products, such as Cs-137, Cs-134, Ru-106, and Zr-95, in irradiated fuel cross-sections. The microgamma scan system consists of a set of indexed sample collimator blocks and a sample holder, which interfaces with the INL Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Gamma Scan System high purity germanium detector, multichannel analyzer, and removable collimators. The microgamma scan results will be used to evaluate radial burnup profile, cesium migration to the sodium bond and constituent migration within the fuel. These data will further clarify the comparative irradiation performance of actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms and uranium-plutonium-zirconium alloys. Preliminary measurements of the microgamma scan system will be discussed. A simplified model of the microgamma scan system was developed in MCNP and used to investigate the system performance and to interpret data from the scoping studies. Recommendations for improving the MCGS analyses are discussed.

  20. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption. PMID:25162630

  2. Lithium distribution and isotopic fractionation during chemical weathering and soil formation in a loess profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Pei-Hsuan; You, Chen-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Chung, Chuan-Hisung; Sun, You-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Lithium (Li) is a fluid-mobile element and δ7Li in secondary deposits represents an excellent proxy for silicate weathering and authigenic mineral formation. The soil samples from 1205 to 1295 cm in the Weinan profile, one of the best developed loess-paleosol sequences covering the last glacial-interglacial climatic cycle, were collected and chemically separated into detritus and carbonate fractions for subsequent analyses of Li, δ7Li, major and trace elements. Other desert specimens (i.e., Qaidam Desert, Tengger Desert, Badain Juran Desert and Taklimakan Desert) near the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) and various standard clays were analyzed for assisting provenance determination. The Li and δ7Li distributions in the detritus are rather homogeneous, 1.4-2.0 μg/g and +2.5‰ to +4.7‰, respectively, compared with the carbonate fraction. The detrital δ7Li varies systematically with magnetic susceptibility and grain size changes, reflecting significant Li isotopic variation associated with sources and mineralogy of detrital material. On the other hand, Li and δ7Li in carbonates show large changes, 781-963 ng/g and -4.1‰ to +10.2‰, respectively. These carbonate δ7Li correlated well with the estimated index of chemical weathering, as a result of Li mobilization and soil formation during chemical weathering.

  3. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  4. Variability of the CO2 vertical soil profile production and its isotopic composition in a beech forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, E.; Plain, C.; Epron, D.; Longdoz, B.

    2015-12-01

    The use of stable isotopes has become a useful research tool to understand the complexity of processes involved in the variability of the vertical profile of CO2 production (P). In this context, an approach considering diffusion as the only gas transport, the Flux-Gradient Approach (FGA) is used to relate the temporal variation in soil P and its isotopic composition (δ13P). P of the different soil layers ([1] 0 cm - -10 cm / [2] -10 cm - -20 cm / [3] -20 cm - -40 cm) and their isotopic signature can be computed from continuous measurements of the vertical soil CO2 concentration profile and its isotopic signature and combined to simultaneous measurements of the soil efflux, trunk efflux, their respective isotopic signature and eddy flux measurements. The field campaign was conducted at the beech forest of Hesse (France) in 2011 from April to September. The results show significant temporal variations in P and δ13P. For P, large intra and inter day fluctuations are observed and are explained by a dependence on temperature specific to each layer. For δ13P, the horizon 2 show significant daily fluctuations which are related to lag-timed soil moisture and water use efficiency. These fluctuations dependency appears to be consistent with a response of P sources to environment and to the impact of photosynthetic δ13C fluctuations on δ13P. Comparison of isoprod, defined as the product of CO2 production and its isotopic composition, and soil and trunk isofluxes shows that horizon 2, the largest contributor to soil P (50 % to 77 % of total soil P depending on the period) is mainly affected by root respiration. The fluctuations of horizon 1 isoprod are influenced both by autotrophic and heterotrophic sources. Moreover, some fluctuations can be generated by other physical processes inducing P and δ13P variability, highlighting methodological issues that need to be taken into account to improve FGA.

  5. High-resolution δ 13C intratooth profiles in bovine enamel: Implications for mineralization pattern and isotopic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazzo, Antoine; Balasse, Marie; Patterson, William P.

    2005-07-01

    We present the first high-resolution carbon isotope and carbonate content profiles generated through the thickness of enamel from a steer fed C 3- then C 4-dominant food. Carbonate contents decrease by ˜2 wt% from the enamel surface to the innermost enamel layer, and each carbon isotope profile shows a mixture of enamel portions mineralized over several months. Downward and outward increasing contribution of C 4 food to the enamel δ 13C values reveal two components of the mineralization gradient: a vertical component from the tip of the tooth crown to the neck, and a horizontal component from the enamel-dentine junction to the outer enamel. We use our results to infer mineralization parameters for bovines and to calculate expected isotopic attenuations for an array of environmental inputs and microsampling strategies, using the model developed by Passey and Cerling [ Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 66 (2002) 3225-3234]. Although it seems unlikely that any strategy will perfectly isolate discrete time slices, sampling the innermost enamel layer might offer the advantage of significantly reducing the isotope damping that would become independent of the structure of the input signal.

  6. Sulfur Isotopic Inferences of the Controls on Porewater Sulfate Profiles in the Northern Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, T.; Pohlman, J.; Lapham, L.; Riedel, M.; Wing, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The flux of methane from gas hydrate bearing seeps in the marine environment is partially mitigated by the anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled with sulfate reduction. Sedimentary porewater sulfate profiles above gas hydrate deposits are frequently used to estimate the efficacy of this important microbial biofilter. However, to differentiate how other processes (e.g., sulfate reduction coupled to organic matter oxidation, sulfide re-oxidation and sulfur disproportionation) affect sulfate profiles, a complete accounting of the sulfur cycle is necessary. To this end, we have obtained the first ever measurements of minor sulfur isotopic ratios (33S/32S, 36S/32S), in conjunction with the more commonly measured 34S -32S ratio, from porewater sulfate above a gas hydrate-bearing seep. Characteristic minor isotopic fractionations, even when major isotopic fractionations are similar in magnitude, help to quantify the contributions of different microbial processes to the overall sulfur cycling in the system. Down to sediment depths of 1.5 to 4 meters, the δ34S values of porewater sulfate generally increased in association with a decrease in sulfate concentrations as would be expected for active sulfate reduction. Of greater interest, covariance between the δ34S values and measured minor isotopic fractionation suggests sulfide reoxidation and sulfur disproportionation are important components of the local sulfur cycle. We hypothesize that sulfide reoxidation is coupled to redox processes involving Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction and that the reoxidized forms of sulfur are available for additional methane oxidation. Recognizing that sulfate reduction is only one of several microbial processes controlling sulfate profiles challenges current paradigms for interpreting sulfate profiles and may alter our understanding of methane oxidation at gas hydrate-bearing seeps.

  7. 238U, 232Th profiling and U-series isotope analysis of fossil teeth by laser ablation-ICPMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggins, Stephen; Grün, Rainer; Pike, Alistair W. G.; Shelley, Michael; Taylor, Lois

    2003-05-01

    U and Th concentration profiles in fossil hominid and faunal teeth have been measured by laser ablation ICPMS. These profiles record diverse modes of U and Th uptake, particularly within enamel, that can be broadly related to the state of sample preservation. Observed U profiles are in general inconsistent with existing diffusion-adsorption models developed for U-uptake in bone and teeth. Where the models appear applicable, calculated diffusion rates are several orders of magnitude smaller than previous estimates. Laser ablation ICPMS offers a means of rapidly characterizing U and Th distributions in the enamel and dentine components of teeth as a precursor to ESR and U-series dating. In particular, it should allow the identification of teeth (and also bone) samples that have simple U-uptake histories and are amenable to precise dating by time-consuming and expensive Th-U and Pa-U TIMS techniques. We also demonstrated the use of laser ablation ICPMS to measure U-series isotopes in dentine and enamel samples with relatively high U concentrations (>20 ppm). These results, obtained using a quadrupole ICPMS, illustrate significant promise for in situ U-series isotope analysis, particularly when combined with the greater sensitivity and multi-collection capabilities of new sector ICPMS instrumentation. The latter may permit precise isotope ratio measurements on samples containing only a few ppm of U.

  8. Reconstruction of Regional Environments in the Caribbean During the Neogene Using Gastropod Stable Isotope Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, J. A.; Grossman, E. L.; O'Dea, A.; Tao, K.

    2011-12-01

    The closure of the Central American Isthmus (CAI) ca. 3.8-3.6 Ma triggered changes in nearshore environments in the Caribbean, causing changes in marine annual range of temperature (MART), carbonate deposition, and the benthic ecosystem. The associated extinction event began ca. 3-2 Ma, peaking between 2-1 Ma. More than two dozen "faunules", discreet packages of fauna which lived under similar environmental conditions, represent time just prior to, during, and after the uplift of the CAI. Multiple parameters including the amount and types of fauna present in each faunule have been used to estimate factors such as paleodepth, MART, extinction rates, and changes in ecological structure over time. Oxygen and carbon isotope analyses (δ18O and δ13C) of gastropod shells serially-sampled about the spire provide records of seasonal environmental conditions. In the tropics, gastropods that live under conditions of strong seasonal upwelling and freshwater input have a greater range of δ18O values in their profiles compared to those animals that live in non-upwelling waters with little freshwater input. Low δ13C values often represent the isotopically low terrestrial carbon found in river runoff, and may be coupled with low δ18O values during seasonal freshening of marine waters. Preliminary data from Strombus shells representing four faunules ranging in age from before the rise of the isthmus through its completion demonstrate the effectiveness of using these mollusks to study ancient tropical environments. Rio Limoncito (~3 Ma), which is believed to represent water depths of 20-40m based on foraminiferal assemblage, yielded the lowest δ18O values (-0.6±0.4%, representing the warmest temperatures/lowest salinities). The samples from Pueblo Nuevo (~1.6 Ma), with an estimated paleodepth between 50 and 100m, had an average value of 0.4±0.3% and therefore represent cooler waters/higher salinity. A shell from NE Escudo de Veraguas (~3.55 Ma) shows a shift from essentially

  9. Discerning crystal growth from diffusion profiles in zoned olivine by in situ Mg–Fe isotopic analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sio, Corliss Kin I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Chaussidon, Marc; Helz, Rosalind T.; Roskosz, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Mineral zoning is used in diffusion-based geospeedometry to determine magmatic timescales. Progress in this field has been hampered by the challenge to discern mineral zoning produced by diffusion from concentration gradients inherited from crystal growth. A zoned olivine phenocryst from Kilauea Iki lava lake (Hawaii) was selected for this study to evaluate the potential of Mg and Fe isotopes for distinguishing these two processes. Microdrilling of the phenocryst (∼300 μm drill holes) followed by MC-ICPMS analysis of the powders revealed negatively coupled Mg and Fe isotopic fractionations (δ26Mg from +0.1‰ to −0.2‰ and δ56Fe from −1.2‰ to −0.2‰ from core to rim), which can only be explained by Mg–Fe exchange between melt and olivine. The data can be explained with ratios of diffusivities of Mg and Fe isotopes in olivine scaling as D2/D1 = (m1/m2)β with βMg ∼0.16 and βFe ∼0.27. LA-MC-ICPMS and MC-SIMS Fe isotopic measurements are developed and are demonstrated to yield accurate δ56Fe measurements within precisions of ∼0.2‰ (1 SD) at spatial resolutions of ∼50 μm. δ56Fe and δ26Mg stay constant with Fo# in the rim (late-stage overgrowth), whereas in the core (original phenocryst) δ56Fe steeply trends toward lighter compositions and δ26Mg trends toward heavier compositions with higher Fo#. A plot of δ56Fe vs. Fo# immediately distinguishes growth-controlled from diffusion-controlled zoning in these two regions. The results are consistent with the idea that large isotopic fractionation accompanies chemical diffusion in crystals, whereas fractional crystallization induces little or no isotopic fractionation. The cooling timescale inferred from the chemical-isotope zoning profiles is consistent with the documented cooling history of the lava lake. In the absence of geologic context, in situ stable isotopic measurements may now be used to interpret the nature of mineral zoning. Stable isotope measurements by LA-MC-ICPMS and MC

  10. Accurate and precise measurement of oxygen isotopic fractions and diffusion profiles by selective attenuation of secondary ions (SASI).

    PubMed

    Téllez, Helena; Druce, John; Hong, Jong-Eun; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Kilner, John A

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy and precision of isotopic analysis in Time-of-Flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) relies on the appropriate reduction of the dead-time and detector saturation effects, especially when analyzing species with high ion yields or present in high concentrations. Conventional approaches to avoid these problems are based on Poisson dead-time correction and/or an overall decrease of the total secondary ion intensity by reducing the target current. This ultimately leads to poor detection limits for the minor isotopes and high uncertainties of the measured isotopic ratios. An alternative strategy consists of the attenuation of those specific secondary ions that saturate the detector, providing an effective extension of the linear dynamic range. In this work, the selective attenuation of secondary ion signals (SASI) approach is applied to the study of oxygen transport properties in electroceramic materials by isotopic labeling with stable (18)O tracer and ToF-SIMS depth profiling. The better analytical performance in terms of accuracy and precision allowed a more reliable determination of the oxygen surface exchange and diffusion coefficients while maintaining good mass resolution and limits of detection for other minor secondary ion species. This improvement is especially relevant to understand the ionic transport mechanisms and properties of solid materials, such as the parallel diffusion pathways (e.g., oxygen diffusion through bulk, grain boundary, or dislocations) in electroceramic materials with relevant applications in energy storage and conversion devices. PMID:25647357

  11. DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED AT LEFT CENTER, FIRE DISPATCH OFFICES 1 AND 2 AT RIGHT CENTER, UTILITY BUILDING "B" ON RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  12. Long-term Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics at SPRUCE Revealed through Stable Isotopes in Peat Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon and nitrogen turnover in peatlands is of considerable interest because peat is a large reservoir of stored carbon that could emit greenhouse gases in response to climate change. Because peat cores preserve a long-term record of system carbon and nitrogen dynamics, it is possible to use stable isotopes as markers of changes in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics over time. Here, we used δ15N and δ13C patterns throughout the depth profile of peat cores to understand controls over C-N cycling in the Marcell S1 forested bog in northern Minnesota. In multiple regression analyses, δ15N and δ13C correlated strongly with depth, plot location, %C, %N, and each other. Negative correlation of δ15N with %N presumably reflected removal of 15N-depleted N via denitrification, diffusion, or plant N transfer via mycorrhizal fungi. A step increase in the depth coefficient for δ15N of ~3‰ from -25 cm to -35 cm suggested that the N removal process primarily operates at a discrete depth corresponding to the juncture between aerobic and anaerobic layers defined by the water table. Higher δ15N and lower δ13C in plots closer to uplands may reflect distinct hydrology and accompanying shifts in C and N dynamics in the lagg area fringing the bog. The Suess effect (declining δ13CO2 since the Industrial Revoluation) and aerobic decomposition lowered δ13C in recent surficial samples. Small increases in δ13C at -112 cm (4300 calibrated years BP) and -85 cm (3800 calibrated years BP) may reflect C dynamics during a suspected transitional fen stage (based on paleoecology at a nearby bog), when reduced methanotrophy retained less 13C-depleted carbon derived from methane than in later periods. The C/N decreased until about -85 cm and thereafter remained steady, suggesting that the active zone of aerobic processing during drought may extend to this depth. The inflection point in calculated carbon accumulation rates at this depth supports this conclusion.

  13. Soil formation rates determined from Uranium-series isotope disequilibria in soil profiles from the southeastern Australian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, P. O.; Dosseto, A.; Hesse, P. P.; Handley, H. K.

    2013-10-01

    The sustainability of soil resources is determined by the balance between the rates of production and removal of soils. Samples from four weathering profiles at Frogs Hollow in the upper catchment area of the Murrumbidgee River (southeastern Australia) were analyzed for their uranium-series (U-series) isotopic composition to estimate soil production rates. Sequential leaching was conducted on sample aliquots to assess how U-series nuclides are distributed between primary and secondary minerals. Soil is increasingly weathered from bottom to top which is evident from the decrease in (234U/238U) ratios and increase in relative quartz content with decreasing soil depth. One soil profile shows little variation in mineralogy and U-series geochemistry with depth, explained by the occurrence of already extensively weathered saprolite, so that further weathering has minimal effect on mineralogy and geochemistry. Al2O3 is mobilized from these soils, and hence a silicon-based weathering index treating Al2O3 as mobile is introduced, which increases with decreasing soil depth, in all profiles. Leached and unleached aliquots show similar mineralogy with slight variation in relative concentrations, whereas the elemental and isotopic composition of uranium and thorium show notable differences between leached and unleached samples. Unleached samples show systematic variations in uranium-series isotopic compositions with depth compared to leached samples. This is most likely explained by the mobilization of U and Th from the samples during leaching. Soil residence times are calculated by modeling U-series activity ratios for each profile separately. Inferred timescales vary up to 30 kyr for unleached aliquots from profile F1 to up to 12 kyr for both leached and unleached aliquots from profile F2. Muscovite content shows a linear relationship with U-series derived soil residence times. This relationship provides an alternative method to estimate residence timescales for profiles with

  14. Geologic implications of the oxygen isotope profile of the Toa Baja drill hole, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.M. )

    1991-03-01

    The whole-rock O-isotopic compositions of volcanic and volcaniclastic samples from the Toa Baja drill hole demonstrate that low-temperature (< 200C) processes have strongly enriched the island arc materials in {sup 18}O. Subsequent to eruption, processes such as subaerial weathering, alteration during transport and deposition in volcaniclastic aprons, submarine weathering, burial diagenesis, and prograde regional metamorphism through the beginning of the prehnite-pumpellyite facies have raised average whole-rock {delta}{sup 18}O values by {approximately}4% for basalt and andesite lava flows, and by {approximately}8% for volcaniclastic sandstones. These O-isotopic disturbances were probably caused by oxygen exchange with regionally circulating seawater under rather high-water/rock conditions. The processes associated with ageing' of volcanic and volcaniclastic materials in the oceanic environment are probably more important to the global budgets of the oxygen isotopes than has been assumed in the past. Integration of these results into global models for the oxygen isotopes awaits analysis of more varied oceanic terranes, to determine the generality of the O-isotopic conclusions proferred here, and to more carefully evaluate the relative sizes of volcanic, volcaniclastic, and oceanic oxygen reservoirs and their variabilities in time.

  15. Shedding light on prion disease

    PubMed Central

    Glatzel, Markus; Linsenmeier, Luise; Dohler, Frank; Krasemann, Susanne; Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteolytic processing regulates key processes in health and disease. The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is subject to at least 3 cleavage events, α-cleavage, β-cleavage and shedding. In contrast to α- and β-cleavage where there is an ongoing controversy on the identity of relevant proteases, the metalloprotease ADAM10 represents the only relevant PrP sheddase. Here we focus on the roles that ADAM10-mediated shedding of PrPC and its pathogenic isoform (PrPSc) might play in regulating their physiological and pathogenic functions, respectively. As revealed by our recent study using conditional ADAM10 knockout mice (Altmeppen et al., 2015), shedding of PrP seems to be involved in key processes of prion diseases. These aspects and several open questions arising from them are discussed. Increased knowledge on this topic can shed new light on prion diseases and other neurodegenerative conditions as well. PMID:26186508

  16. Stratospheric profiles of heavy water vapor isotopes and CH3D from analysis of the ATMOS Spacelab 3 infrared solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Gunson, M. R.; Foster, J. C.; Toth, R. A.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapor and methane was investigated. Stratospheric profiles of HDO, (H-18)2O, (H-17)2O, and CH3D were derived from solar occultation spectra recorded on April 30 - May 1, 1985 by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy Fourier transform spectrometer aboard Spacelab 3. The profiles of the three water-vapor isotopes showed an increase in the volume mixing ratio with altitude. The measured profiles of D/H in water vapor showed a large depletion in the lower stratosphere (about 63 percent relative to standard mean ocean water, SMOW, at 20 km) and a small increase in D/H with altitude at higher altitudes, up to 34 km. The D/H ratio in stratospheric methane was close to the corresponding isotopic ratio in SMOW.

  17. The use of δ13C isotope ratio mass spectrometry for methamphetamine profiling: comparison of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine-based samples to P2P-based samples.

    PubMed

    Toske, Steven G; Morello, David R; Berger, Jennifer M; Vazquez, Etienne R

    2014-01-01

    Differentiating methamphetamine samples produced from ephedrine and pseudoephedrine from phenyl-2-propanone precursors is critical for assigning synthetic route information for methamphetamine profiling. The use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry data is now a key component for tracking precursor information. Recent carbon (δ(13)C) isotope results from the analysis of numerous methamphetamine samples show clear differentiation for ephedrine and pseudoephedrine-produced samples compared to P2P-produced samples. The carbon isotope differences were confirmed from synthetic route precursor studies. PMID:24378294

  18. Determination of geographic provenance of cotton fibres using multi-isotope profiles and multivariate statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeid, N. Nic; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of cotton fibres can be particularly challenging within a forensic science context where discrimination of one fibre from another is of importance. Normally cotton fibre analysis examines the morphological structure of the recovered material and compares this with that of a known fibre from a particular source of interest. However, the conventional microscopic and chemical analysis of fibres and any associated dyes is generally unsuccessful because of the similar morphology of the fibres. Analysis of the dyes which may have been applied to the cotton fibre can also be undertaken though this can be difficult and unproductive in terms of discriminating one fibre from another. In the study presented here we have explored the potential for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) to be utilised as an additional tool for cotton fibre analysis in an attempt to reveal further discriminatory information. This work has concentrated on un-dyed cotton fibres of known origin in order to expose the potential of the analytical technique. We report the results of a pilot study aimed at testing the hypothesis that multi-element stable isotope analysis of cotton fibres in conjunction with multivariate statistical analysis of the resulting isotopic abundance data using well established chemometric techniques permits sample provenancing based on the determination of where the cotton was grown and as such will facilitate sample discrimination. To date there is no recorded literature of this type of application of IRMS to cotton samples, which may be of forensic science relevance.

  19. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  20. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A; Simas, Rosineide C; Brolio, Marina P; Ferreira, Christina R; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P; Miglino, Maria A; Martins, Daniele S; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  1. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  2. Stable oxygen and carbon isotope profiles in an invasive bivalve ( Corbicula fluminea) in North Carolina watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, John P.; Showers, William J.; Genna, Bernie; Levine, Jay F.

    2009-06-01

    The modern invasive bivalve Corbicula fluminea was collected in 2006 from three sites with different land uses located in a North Carolina River Basin. The primary objective was to describe the δ 18O and δ 13C profiles of C. fluminea shells under various land use conditions. An additional aim was to evaluate whether growth patterns of C. fluminea form seasonally. Annual shell growth patterns were measured from the umbo to the margin and co-varied with estimates of ambient water temperature, corresponding to seasonal variation. The C. fluminea growth patterns as translucent bands (slower growth) appeared to form during winter months and opaque bands (rapid growth) formed during summer. A mixed model analysis (ANOVA) showed a significant site level effect of δ 18O and δ 13C profiles examined among sites ( F = 17.1; p = 0.003). A second model showed a borderline significant site effect among profiles with variability more pronounced at the urban site, Crabtree Creek ( p = 0.085). Previous habitat assessment ratings and water chemistry measurements suggested that the urban site was more impacted by storm water runoff. Understanding δ 18O and δ 13C SHELL profiles and shell growth patterns of the invasive bivalve ( C. fluminea) may help establish a framework for using these animals as biomonitors to record water temperature and nutrient pollution.

  3. Screening halogenated environmental contaminants in biota based on isotopic pattern and mass defect provided by high resolution mass spectrometry profiling.

    PubMed

    Cariou, Ronan; Omer, Elsa; Léon, Alexis; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2016-09-14

    In the present work, we addressed the question of global seeking/screening organohalogenated compounds in a large panel of complex biological matrices, with a particular focus on unknown chemicals that may be considered as potential emerging hazards. A fishing strategy was developed based on untargeted profiling among full scan acquisition datasets provided by high resolution mass spectrometry. Since large datasets arise from such profiling, filtering useful information stands as a central question. In this way, we took advantage of the exact mass differences between Cl and Br isotopes. Indeed, our workflow involved an innovative Visual Basic for Applications script aiming at pairing features according to this mass difference, in order to point out potential organohalogenated clusters, preceded by an automated peak picking step based on the centWave function (xcms package of open access R programming environment). Then, H/Cl-scale mass defect plots were used to visualize the datasets before and after filtering. The filtering script was successfully applied to a dataset generated upon liquid chromatography coupled to ESI(-)-HRMS measurement from one eel muscle extract, allowing for realistic manual investigations of filtered clusters. Starting from 9789 initial obtained features, 1994 features were paired in 589 clusters. Hexabromocyclododecane, chlorinated paraffin series and various other compounds have been identified or tentatively identified, allowing thus broad screening of organohalogenated compounds in this extract. Although realistic, manual review of paired clusters remains time consuming and much effort should be devoted to automation. PMID:27566348

  4. View Shed - Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-09-18

    The View Shed library is a collection of Umbra modules that are used to calculate areas of visual coverage (view sheds). It maps high and low visibility areas and calculates sensor (camera placement for maximum coverage and performance. This assertion includes a managed C++ wrapper code (ViewShedWrapper) to enable C# applications, such as OpShed, to incorporate this library.

  5. Saprolite Formation Rates using U-series Isotopes in a Granodiorite Weathering Profile from Boulder Creek CZO (Colorado, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelt, Eric; Chabaux, Francois; Mills, T. Joseph; Anderson, Suzanne P.; Foster, Melissa A.

    2015-04-01

    Timescales of weathering profile formation and evolution are important kinetic parameters linked to erosion, climatic, and biological processes within the critical zone. In order to understand the complex kinetics of landscape evolution, water and soil resources, along with climate change, these parameters have to be estimated for many different contexts. The Betasso catchment, within the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BC-CZO) in Colorado, is a mountain catchment in Proterozoic granodiorite uplifted in the Laramide Orogeny ca. 50 Ma. In an exposure near the catchment divide, an approximately 1.5 m deep profile through soil and saprolite was sampled and analysed for bulk U-series disequilibria (238U-234U-230Th-226Ra) to estimate the profile weathering rate. The (234U/238U), (230Th/234U) and (226Ra/230Th) disequilibria through the entire profile are small but vary systematically with depth. In the deepest samples, values are close to equilibrium. Above this, values are progressively further from equilibrium with height in the profile, suggesting a continuous leaching of U and Ra compared to Th. The (234U/238U) disequilibria remain < 1 along the profile, suggesting no significant U addition from pore waters. Only the shallowest sample (~20 cm depth) highlights a 226Ra excess, likely resulting from vegetation cycling. In contrast, variations of Th content and (230Th/232Th) - (238U/232Th) activity ratios in the isochron diagram are huge, dividing the profile into distinct zones above and below 80 cm depth. Below 80 cm, the Th content gradually increases upward from 1.5 to 3.5 ppm suggesting a relative accumulation linked to chemical weathering. Above 80 cm, the Th content jumps to ~15 ppm with a similar increase of Th/Ti or Th/Zr ratios that clearly excludes the same process of relative accumulation. This strong shift is also observed in LREE concentrations, such as La, Ce and Nd, and in Sr isotopic composition, which suggests an external input of radiogenic

  6. Sulfur speciation and stable isotope trends of water-soluble sulfates in mine tailings profiles.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Spangenberg, Jorge E

    2005-08-01

    Sulfur speciation and the sources of water-soluble sulfate in three oxidizing sulfidic mine tailings impoundments were investigated by selective dissolution and stable isotopes. The studied tailings impoundments--Piuquenes, Cauquenes, and Salvador No. 1--formed from the exploitation of the Rio Blanco/La Andina, El Teniente, and El Salvador Chilean porphyry copper deposits, which are located in Alpine, Mediterranean, and hyperarid climates, respectively. The water-soluble sulfate may originate from dissolution of primary ore sulfates (e.g., gypsum, anhydrite, jarosite) or from oxidation of sulfide minerals exposed to aerobic conditions during mining activity. With increasing aridity and decreasing pyrite content of the tailings, the sulfur speciation in the unsaturated oxidation zones showed a trend from dominantly Fe(III) oxyhydroxide fixed sulfate (e.g., jarosite and schwertmannite) in Piuquenes toward increasing presence of water-soluble sulfate at Cauquenes and Salvador No. 1. In the saturated primary zones, sulfate is predominantly present in water-soluble form (mainly as anhydrite and/or gypsum). In the unsaturated zone at Piuquenes and Cauquenes, the delta34S(SO4)values ranged from +0.5 per thousand to +2.0 per thousand and from -0.4 per thousand to +1.4 per thousand Vienna Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT), respectively, indicating a major sulfate source from pyrite oxidation (delta34S(pyrite) = -1.1 per thousand and -0.9 per thousand). In the saturated zone at Piuquenes and Cauquenes, the values ranged from -0.8 per thousand to +0.3 per thousand and from +2.2 per thousand to +3.9 per thousand, respectively. At Cauquenes the 34S enrichment in the saturated zone toward depth indicates the increasing contribution of isotopically heavy dissolved sulfate from primary anhydrite (approximately +10.9 per thousand). At El Salvador No. 1, the delta34S(SO4) average value is -0.9 per thousand, suggesting dissolution of supergene sulfate minerals (jarosite, alunite, gypsum

  7. Metabolite Profiling and Stable Isotope Tracing in Sorted Subpopulations of Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Roci, Irena; Gallart-Ayala, Hector; Schmidt, Angelika; Watrous, Jeramie; Jain, Mohit; Wheelock, Craig E; Nilsson, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Biological samples such as tissues, blood, or tumors are often complex and harbor heterogeneous populations of cells. Separating out specific cell types or subpopulations from such complex mixtures to study their metabolic phenotypes is challenging because experimental procedures for separation may disturb the metabolic state of cells. To address this issue, we developed a method for analysis of cell subpopulations using stable isotope tracing and fluorescence-activated cell sorting followed by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. To ensure a faithful representation of cellular metabolism after cell sorting, we benchmarked sorted extraction against direct extraction. While peak areas differed markedly with lower signal for amino acids but higher signal for nucleotides, mass isotopomer distributions from sorted cells were generally in good agreement with those obtained from direct extractions, indicating that they reflect the true metabolic state of cells prior to sorting. In proof-of-principle studies, our method revealed metabolic phenotypes specific to T cell subtypes, and also metabolic features of cells in the committed phase of the cell division cycle. Our approach enables studies of a wide range of adherent and suspension cell subpopulations, which we anticipate will be of broad importance in cell biology and biomedicine. PMID:26855138

  8. Profiling and relative quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine based on acetone stable isotope derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wei, Fang; Xu, Ji-qu; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-yan; Han, Xianlin; Quek, Siew-young; Huang, Feng-hong; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered to be one of the pivotal lipids for normal cellular function as well as disease initiation and progression. In this study, a simple, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive method for the qualitative analysis and relative quantification of PE, based on acetone stable isotope derivatization combined with double neutral loss scan-shotgun electrospray ionization tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS), was developed. The ASID method led to alkylation of the primary amino groups of PE with an isopropyl moiety. The use of acetone (d0-acetone) and deuterium-labeled acetone (d6-acetone) introduced a 6 Da mass shift that was ideally suited for relative quantitative analysis, and enhanced sensitivity for mass analysis. The DNLS model was introduced to simultaneously analyze the differential derivatized PEs by shotgun ESI-MS/MS with high selectivity and accuracy. The reaction specificity, labeling efficiency, and linearity of the ASID method were thoroughly evaluated in this study. Its excellent applicability was validated by qualitative and relative quantitative analysis of PE species presented in liver samples from rats fed different diets. Using the ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS method, 45 PE species from rat livers have been identified and quantified in an efficient manner. The level of total PEs tended to decrease in the livers of rats on high fat diets compared with controls. The levels of PE 32:1, 34:3, 34:2, 36:3, 36:2, 42:10, plasmalogen PE 36:1 and lyso PE 22:6 were significantly reduced, while levels of PE 36:1 and lyso PE 16:0 increased. PMID:26703264

  9. Shed syndecan-2 inhibits angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Giulia; Evans, Alun R.; Kay, Emma; Woodfin, Abigail; McKay, Tristan R.; Nourshargh, Sussan; Whiteford, James R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Angiogenesis is essential for the development of a normal vasculature, tissue repair and reproduction, and also has roles in the progression of diseases such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. The heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-2 is expressed on mesenchymal cells in the vasculature and, like the other members of its family, can be shed from the cell surface resulting in the release of its extracellular core protein. The purpose of this study was to establish whether shed syndecan-2 affects angiogenesis. We demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 regulates angiogenesis by inhibiting endothelial cell migration in human and rodent models and, as a result, reduces tumour growth. Furthermore, our findings show that these effects are mediated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor CD148 (also known as PTPRJ) and this interaction corresponds with a decrease in active β1 integrin. Collectively, these data demonstrate an unexplored pathway for the regulation of new blood vessel formation and identify syndecan-2 as a therapeutic target in pathologies characterised by angiogenesis. PMID:25179601

  10. Stable Isotope Profiling of Internet-Sourced Viagra® and 'generic- Viagra' Tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram

    2013-04-01

    Viagra® manufactured by Pfizer was the first prescription drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), a condition that is estimated to affect 1 in 10 men at some stage in their lives (1). Viagra® contains the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sildenafil, as the citrate salt. Sildenafil, along with Tadalafil and Vardenafil belong to a class of drugs known as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Since its first production in 1998, Viagra® has generated well in excess of 10 billion US dollars in sales (2) and with Pfizers' patent extended to April 2020 (3) it still remains the only sildenafil-based treatment option for sufferers of ED in the US. There are no legal 'generic-Viagra' formulations available in the US. However, formulations containing sildenafil citrate as API are widely available over the internet and often sold as 'generic Viagra'. These cheaper alternatives are often manufactured under less than ideal conditions with little or no QA/QC procedures in place. The World Health Organisation recognised the scale of the problem in its 2010 bulletin "Growing threat from counterfeit medicines" (4) and quotes a Dutch study cited in the International Journal of Clinical Practice in which from a cohort of 370 seized Viagra® samples, only 10 were genuine. We sourced a variety of tablets sold for the treatment of ED which claimed to have sildenafil citrate as API. Viagra®, 'generic-Viagra', Kamagra, Silagra and Filagra tablets were ordered via the internet and supplied from both UK-based pharmacies as well as overseas suppliers (Hong Kong, India, Vanuata). In this small-scale pilot study, we present results from bulk 2H/18O and 13C/15N stable isotope analysis performed on crushed tablets from 23 samples of internet-sourced tablets sold for the treatment of ED and purported to contain sildenafil citrate as API. References 1. www.healthcare.org.uk 2. www.moneynews.com 3. US Patent & trademark office (www.uspto.gov) 4. WHO bulletin 2010; 88:247-248

  11. Variations in [sup 18]O/[sup 16]O ratios of kaolinites within a lateritic profile: Their significance for laterite genesis and isotope paleoclimatology

    SciTech Connect

    Giral, S.; Girard, J.P.; Savin, S.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Nahon, D.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The authors have made an integrated study of the field occurrence, petrology, mineralogy and crystallography, and oxygen isotope geochemistry of an active lateritic profile from about 60 km north of Manaus (Amazonia, Brazil). The parent rock is an arkosic sandstone. The delta O-18 values of kaolinites from the profile are far from uniform. The total range is about 2.4 per mil (18.7 to 21.1 per mil). The calculated delta O-18 value of kaolinite in isotopic equilibrium with local average precipitation and mean annual temperature is 19.6 per mil, within the range of the measured values. Kaolinite of each of several textural occurrences also shows significant isotopic variation both vertically and within a given horizon. Different size fractions of kaolinite of a single textural occurrence within a single horizon also exhibit differences in delta O-18 values. At depths below a few meters, they expect the temperature and the delta O-18 values of the soil water profile to be relatively uniform at any time. If this is so, the variations in delta O-18 values of the kaolinites would suggest that the formation of different populations occurred at different times. They cannot yet distinguish between variations of conditions that were seasonal and variations that occurred on scales of many years. However, it is most important to resolve the causes of these variations before using the delta O-18 values of soil clays for purposes of paleoclimatic reconstruction.

  12. Long-term and high-frequency non-destructive monitoring of water stable isotope profiles in an evaporating soil column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Y.; Merz, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Hermes, N.; Weuthen, A.; Pohlmeier, A.; Vereecken, H.; Brüggemann, N.

    2015-10-01

    The stable isotope compositions of soil water (δ2H and δ18O) carry important information about the prevailing soil hydrological conditions and for constraining ecosystem water budgets. However, they are highly dynamic, especially during and after precipitation events. In this study, we present an application of a method based on gas-permeable tubing and isotope-specific infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for in situ determination of soil water δ2H and δ18O. We conducted a laboratory experiment where a sand column was initially saturated, exposed to evaporation for a period of 290 days, and finally rewatered. Soil water vapor δ2H and δ18O were measured daily at each of eight available depths. Soil liquid water δ2H and δ18O were inferred from those of the vapor considering thermodynamic equilibrium between liquid and vapor phases in the soil. The experimental setup allowed for following the evolution of soil water δ2H and δ18O profiles with a daily temporal resolution. As the soil dried, we could also show for the first time the increasing influence of the isotopically depleted ambient water vapor on the isotopically enriched liquid water close to the soil surface (i.e., atmospheric invasion). Rewatering at the end of the experiment led to instantaneous resetting of the stable isotope profiles, which could be closely followed with the new method. From simple soil δ2H and δ18O gradients calculations, we showed that the gathered data allowed one to determinate the depth of the evaporation front (EF) and how it receded into the soil over time. It was inferred that after 290 days under the prevailing experimental conditions, the EF had moved down to an approximate depth of -0.06 m. Finally, data were used to calculate the slopes of the evaporation lines and test the formulation for kinetic isotope effects. A very good agreement was found between measured and simulated values (Nash and Sutcliffe efficiency, NSE = 0.92) during the first half of the

  13. Effects of melt percolation on highly siderophile elements and Os isotopes in subcontinental lithospheric mantle: A study of the upper mantle profile beneath Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Lukáš; Walker, Richard J.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Pitcher, Lynnette; Jelínek, Emil; Strnad, Ladislav

    2009-04-01

    The effects of melt percolation on highly siderophile element (HSE) concentrations and Re-Os isotopic systematics of subcontinental lithospheric mantle are examined for a suite of spinel peridotite xenoliths from the 4 Ma Kozákov volcano, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic. The xenoliths have previously been estimated to originate from depths ranging from ˜32 to 70 km and represent a layered upper mantle profile. Prior petrographic and lithophile trace element data for the xenoliths indicate that they were variably modified via metasomatism resulting from the percolation of basaltic melt derived from the asthenosphere. Chemical and isotopic data suggest that lower sections of the upper mantle profile interacted with melt characterized by a primitive, S-undersaturated composition at high melt/rock ratios. The middle and upper layers of the profile were modified by more evolved melt at moderate to low melt/rock ratios. This profile permits an unusual opportunity to examine the effects of variable melt percolation on HSE abundances and Os isotopes. Most HSE concentrations in the studied rocks are significantly depleted compared to estimates for the primitive upper mantle. The depletions, which are most pronounced for Os, Ir and Ru in the lower sections of the mantle profile, are coupled with strong HSE fractionations (e.g., Os N/Ir N ratios ranging from 0.3 to 2.4). Platinum appears to have been removed from some rocks, and enriched in others. This enrichment is coupled with lithophile element evidence for the degree of percolating melt fractionation (i.e., Ce/Tb ratio). Osmium isotopic compositions vary considerably from subchondritic to approximately chondritic ( γOs at 5 Ma from -6.9 to +2.1). The absence of correlations between 187Os/ 188Os and indicators of fertility, as is common in many lithospheric mantle suites, may suggest significant perturbation of the Os isotopic compositions of some of these rocks, but more likely reflect the normal range of isotopic

  14. Comprehensive and Quantitative Profiling of the Human Sweat Submetabolome Using High-Performance Chemical Isotope Labeling LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Hooton, Kevin; Han, Wei; Li, Liang

    2016-07-19

    Human sweat can be noninvasively collected and used as a media for diagnosis of certain diseases as well as for drug detection. However, because of very low concentrations of endogenous metabolites present in sweat, metabolomic analysis of sweat with high coverage is difficult, making it less widely used for metabolomics research. In this work, a high-performance method for profiling the human sweat submetabolome based on chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is reported. Sweat was collected using a gauze sponge style patch, extracted from the gauze by centrifugation, and then derivatized using CIL. Differential (12)C- and (13)C-dansylation labeling was used to target the amine/phenol submetabolome. Because of large variations in the total amount of sweat metabolites in individual samples, sample amount normalization was first performed using liquid chromatography with UV detection (LC-UV) after dansylation. The (12)C-labeled individual sample was then mixed with an equal amount of (13)C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was subjected to LC-MS analysis. Over 2707 unique metabolites were detected across 54 sweat samples collected from six individuals with an average of 2002 ± 165 metabolites detected per sample from a total of 108 LC-MS runs. Using a dansyl standard library, we were able to identify 83 metabolites with high confidence; many of them have never been reported to be present in sweat. Using accurate mass search against human metabolome libraries, we putatively identified an additional 2411 metabolites. Uni- and multivariate analyses of these metabolites showed significant differences in the sweat submetabolomes between male and female, as well as between early and late exercise. These results demonstrate that the CIL LC-MS method described can be used to profile the human sweat submetabolome with high metabolomic coverage and high quantification accuracy to reveal metabolic differences in different sweat

  15. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples. PMID:26895346

  16. Vortex shedding and Maxwell's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sebastien; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2006-11-01

    The coupled problem of a flow around a solid body has applications from the fall of objects in a fluid to the computation of forces on wind-exposed structures. A simplified 2D model is proposed here for the interaction between solid bodies and potential flows. Potential flows over sharp edges generate singular velocities at the edges. To satisfy the Kutta condition, vorticity sheets must be shed from the edges to remove these singularities. Here 2D vorticity sheets are represented as discrete point-vortices with monotically varying intensity. From the fluid momentum conservation, an equation of motion for these vortices, the Brown and Michael equation, is derived and mechanical efforts applied by the fluid on the body are computed. The set of dynamical equations obtained for the fluid-body system is closed and is applied to Maxwell's problem of the 2D fall of a plate in an inviscid fluid initially at rest.

  17. High sensitivity vortex shedding flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1989-12-05

    This patent describes an apparatus for measuring fluid flows. It comprises: a flowmeter body including a flow passage; a vortex generator of an elongated cylindrical shape disposed across a cross section of the flow passage, wherein at lest one extremity of the vortex generator is secured to the flowmeter body; a transducer contained in a container vessel secured to the flowmeter body, wherein the transducer is pressed onto a thin wall of the container vessel; and a flexible coupling connecting the thin wall of the container vessel to a deflective portion of the vortex generating, wherein the flexible coupling enhances relative deflection between the vortex generator and the container vessel. Wherein fluctuating fluid dynamic forces resulting from vortices shed from the vortex generator and experienced by vortex generator generate fluctuating electrical signals from the transducer as a measure of fluid flow through the flow passage.

  18. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  19. Delineating resource sheds in aquatic ecosystems (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of spatially-explicit ecological phenomena in aquatic ecosystems is impeded by a lack of knowledge of, and tools to delimit, spatial patterns of material supply to point locations. Here we apply the concept of "resource sheds" to coasts and watersheds. Resource sheds ar...

  20. 24. 'HANGAR SHEDS ELEVATIONS DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. 'HANGAR SHEDS - ELEVATIONS - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Partial elevations, and details of sliding doors and ventilator flaps, as built. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/81, revision B, dated April 6, 1943. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  1. Influence of relative abundance of isotopes on depth resolution for depth profiling of metal coatings by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Coedo, Aurora G; Dorado, Teresa

    2010-04-15

    A systematic study on the influence of relative abundance of isotopes of elements in the coating (A(c)) and in the substrate (A(s)) on both shape of time-resolved signals and depth resolution (Delta z) was performed for depth profile analysis of metal coatings on metal substrates by ultraviolet (266 nm) nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry. Five coated samples with coating thicknesses of the same order of magnitude (20-30 microm) were tested: nickel coating on aluminium, chromium and copper, and steel coated with copper and zinc. A laser repetition rate of 1 Hz and a laser fluence of 21 J cm(-2) were used. Five different depth profile types were established, which showed a clear dependence on A(c)/A(s) ratio. In general, depth profiles obtained for ratios above 1-10 could not be used to determine Delta z. We found that Delta z increased non-linearly with A(c)/A(s) ratio. The best depth profile types, leading to highest depth resolution and reproducibility, were attained in all cases by using the isotopes with low/medium A(c) values and with the highest A(s) values. In these conditions, an improvement of up to 4 times in Delta z values was achieved. The average ablation rates were in the range from 0.55 microm pulse(-1) for copper coating on steel to 0.83 microm pulse(-1) for zinc coating on steel, and the Delta z values were between 2.74 microm for nickel coating on chromium and 5.91 microm for nickel coating on copper, with RSD values about 5-8%. PMID:20188923

  2. Lead isotopic compositions of soil and near-surface till profiles from a watershed containing arsenic-enriched groundwater in coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy; Colvin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of soils and near-surface tills from an area of coastal Maine known to have groundwater with anomalously high arsenic contents were measured in order to determine the source of the lead and, by inference, possible sources of arsenic. Five soil and till sites were selected for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. To construct profiles of the soil and till horizons, five samples were collected at 10-cm intervals from the surface to the base of each horizon. Total lead and arsenic concentrations and lead isotopic compositions were measured for 48 leaches and bulk residues. The soils and tills are underlain by sulfidic schists of the Penobscot Formation. Several generations of minerals containing arsenic and lead exist in the regional bedrock, including rock-forming silicates (feldspar and micas), sulfide minerals formed during diagenesis (for example, arsenic-rich pyrite), and sulfide and oxide minerals that formed as a result of Silurian metamorphic and igneous events (for example, arsenopyrite, galena, iron-oxides, and arsenic-sulfides). A young group of secondary minerals (for example, iron-hydroxides, arsenic-hydroxides, lead-sulfate, and arsenic-jarosite) formed from recent weathering and pedogenic processes.

  3. Influence of chemical weathering on the composition of the continental crust: Insights from Li and Nd isotopes in bauxite profiles developed on Columbia River Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.; Cummings, Michael L.

    2013-08-01

    Mineralogical, chemical, and Li and Nd isotopic compositions of two drill cores (8-9 m deep) through bauxites developed on the Miocene Columbia River Basalts document the changes associated with basalt weathering, provide insights into the processes involved, and allow us to examine the overall influence of chemical weathering on juvenile (basaltic) crust. Gibbsite, hematite, ±kaolinite, halloysite, goethite, and maghemite are the weathering products in the bauxites. Quartz is observed near the tops of the cores and its abundance decreases progressively with depth; no quartz is observed below five meters depth in either core. Most major and trace elements, including "mobile" and some "immobile" elements are severely depleted in the bauxites. Niobium is less mobile relative to the rare earth elements, thus chemical weathering attenuates the negative Nb anomaly in the continental crust. Li and Nd are strongly depleted relative to fresh basalt, and both increase systematically towards the surface in the quartz-bearing samples while δ7Li and ɛNd values decrease systematically towards the surface in these same samples. Both Li and Nd were likely lost from the bauxites through leaching. The systematic enrichment of Li, Nd, and quartz, as well as the less radiogenic Nd isotopic composition at the tops of both profiles reflects 20-60 wt.% addition of an eolian component to the soils. The eolian dust is unlikely to have experienced significant post-depositional weathering due to the relatively high Li contents near the tops of the profiles, and, therefore, the low δ7Li and ɛNd values suggest that the dust came from an old, weathered region of the continent. Our results demonstrate that lithium isotopes are sensitive tracers of chemical weathering, particularly in extreme weathering settings, and support the hypothesis that chemical weathering influences the mass and composition of the continental crust.

  4. 15N-Cholamine – A Smart Isotope Tag for Combining NMR- and MS-Based Metabolite Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tayyari, Fariba; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Gu, Haiwei; Raftery, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the enhanced resolution and sensitivity offered by chemoselective isotope tags have enabled new and enhanced methods for detecting hundreds of quantifiable metabolites in biofluids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or mass spectrometry. However, the inability to effectively detect the same metabolites using both complementary analytical techniques has hindered the correlation of data derived from the two powerful platforms and thereby the maximization of their combined strengths for applications such as biomarker discovery of the identification of unknown metabolites. With the goal of alleviating this bottleneck, we describe a smart isotope tag, 15N-cholamine, which possesses two important properties: an NMR sensitive isotope, and a permanent charge for MS sensitivity. Using this tag, we demonstrate the detection of carboxyl group containing metabolites in both human serum and urine. By combining the individual strengths of the 15N label and permanent charge, the smart isotope tag facilitates effective detection of the carboxyl-containing metabolome by both analytical methods. This study demonstrates a unique approach to exploit the combined strength of MS and NMR in the field of metabolomics. PMID:23930664

  5. Vortex shedding flowmeter with fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, D. J.; Skuratovsky, E.

    Vortex shedding flow meters have proved over the last decade to be suitable for a wide variety of applications. They provide good accuracy, reliable flow measurement in a wide range of flow rates, and low pressure drop. Past performance was limited to operating pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 600 and process temperatures below 400 C. This paper presents a new design of vortex shedding flow meter with a fiber optic sensor capable of operating at pressures equivalent to ANSI Class 2500 and temperatures from -200 to 600 C. This device opens new horizons for vortex shedding flow meters in flow measurements and process control applications.

  6. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  7. Equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors and their implications on Si isotope distributions in the Earth's surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among minerals, organic molecules and the H4SiO4 solution are complemented to facilitate explanation of distributions of Si isotope in the Earth's surface environments. The results reveal that heavy Si isotopes will be significantly enriched in the secondary silicate minerals in comparison to aqueous H4SiO4. On the contrary, quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes are enriched in light silicon isotope relative to the solution. The extent of 28Si-enrichment in hyper-coordinated organosilicon complexes is found the largest. In addition, the large kinetic isotope effect associated with the polymerization of monosilicic acid and dimer is calculated and the result supports previous statement that highly 28Si-enrichment in the formation of amorphous quartz precursor contributes to the discrepancy between theoretical calculations and field observations. With equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in many surface systems of the Earth can be explained. For example, the change of bulk soil δ30Si can be predicted as a concave pattern with respect to weathering degree, with the minimum value where allophane completely dissolves and the total amount of sesqui-oxides and poorly crystalline minerals reaches its maximum. When well-crystallized clays start to precipitate from pore solutions under equilibrium conditions, the bulk soil δ30Si will increase again and reach a constant value. Similarly, the precipitation of crystalline smectite and the dissolution of poorly crystalline kaolinite may explain δ30Si variations in the ground water profile. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionations among quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes and the H4SiO4 solution may also shed the light on the Si isotope distributions in Si-accumulating plants.

  8. High-Performance Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Profiling the Metabolomic Reprogramming Elicited by Ammonium Limitation in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xian; Zhao, Shuang; Huan, Tao; Sun, Difei; Friis, R Magnus N; Schultz, Michael C; Li, Liang

    2016-05-01

    Information about how yeast metabolism is rewired in response to internal and external cues can inform the development of metabolic engineering strategies for food, fuel, and chemical production in this organism. We report a new metabolomics workflow for the characterization of such metabolic rewiring. The workflow combines efficient cell lysis without using chemicals that may interfere with downstream sample analysis and differential chemical isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CIL LC-MS) for in-depth yeast metabolome profiling. Using (12)C- and (13)C-dansylation (Dns) labeling to analyze the amine/phenol submetabolome, we detected and quantified a total of 5719 peak pairs or metabolites. Among them, 120 metabolites were positively identified using a library of 275 Dns-metabolite standards, and 2980 metabolites were putatively identified based on accurate mass matches to metabolome databases. We also applied (12)C- and (13)C-dimethylaminophenacyl (DmPA) labeling to profile the carboxylic acid submetabolome and detected over 2286 peak pairs, from which 33 metabolites were positively identified using a library of 188 DmPA-metabolite standards, and 1595 metabolites were putatively identified. Using this workflow for metabolomic profiling of cells challenged by ammonium limitation revealed unexpected links between ammonium assimilation and pantothenate accumulation that might be amenable to engineering for better acetyl-CoA production in yeast. We anticipate that efforts to improve other schemes of metabolic engineering will benefit from application of this workflow to multiple cell types. PMID:26947805

  9. Profile distribution and accumulation characteristics of organic carbon in a karst hillslope based on particle-size fractionation and stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoze; Zhao, Zhiqi; Lang, Yunchao; Ding, Hu

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have highlighted tight coupling between soil aggregate fractions and soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover. However, large uncertainties remain and a mechanistic understanding of geomorphic and land use change effects on carbon storage in soil is still lacking. Taking typical slope of vegetation recovery in karst area as object, the present study analyzed organic carbon content and stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C value) of soil organic matter in bulk and particle size separates of soil on profiles at different topographic positions. The results showed that SOC content decreased gradually in downhill direction. Organic carbon content of sandy soil (50-2000 μm) accounted above 50% in the upper slope positions but in the middle and lower slope soil profiles, organic carbon was mainly stored in silts (2-50 μm) and clays (< 2 μm) which belonged to stable and highly humified SOC. The composition difference of δ13C values in soil profiles reflected the input of plant residues and accumulation characteristics. Organic matter was deposited in different soil particle sizes owing to different degrees of decomposition. Hence, δ13C value can help in identifying the storage and decomposition rates of soil organic matter. PMID:26387345

  10. CO2 and CH4 Surface Flux, Soil Profile Concentrations, and Stable Isotope Composition, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Curtis, J.B.; Vaughn, L.S.; Torn, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Chafe, O.; Bill, M.

    2015-12-31

    In August-October 2012 and June-October 2013, co-located measurements were made of surface CH4 and CO2 flux, soil pore space concentrations and stable isotope compositions of CH4 and CO2, and subsurface temperature and soil moisture. Measurements were made in intensive study site 1 areas A, B, and C, and from the site 0 and AB transects, from high-centered, flat-centered, and low-centered polygons, from the center, edge, and trough of each polygon.

  11. Ion microscopy with resonant ionization mass spectrometry : time-of-flight depth profiling with improved isotopic precision.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Levine, J.; Zinovev, A.; Davis, A. M.; Stephan, T.; Tripa, C. E.; King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are four generally mutually exclusive requirements that plague many mass spectrometric measurements of trace constituents: (1) the small size (limited by the depth probed) of many interesting materials requires high useful yields to simply detect some trace elements, (2) the low concentrations of interesting elements require efficient discrimination from isobaric interferences, (3) it is often necessary to measure the depth distribution of elements with high surface and low bulk contributions, and (4) many applications require precise isotopic analysis. Resonant ionization mass spectrometry has made dramatic progress in addressing these difficulties over the past five years.

  12. 1. View south, metal shed (at left) and tool room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View south, metal shed (at left) and tool room shed (WV-268-C)) (at right), in front of wash house (WV-268-D) - 3240 Cyrus Road, Tool Room Shed, About 25 feet directly behind house, Cyrus, Wayne County, WV

  13. Inverse Ubbelohde effect in the short hydrogen bond of photosystem II: Relation between H/D isotope effect and symmetry in potential energy profile.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Takano, Yu

    2016-09-01

    The short hydrogen bond between tyrosine Yz and D1-His190 of photosystem II (PSII) was investigated using multicomponent quantum mechanics, where the quantum fluctuation of a hydrogen nucleus was incorporated into electronic structure calculation. Our computation demonstrated that the deuteration for hydrogen in the short hydrogen bond of PSII led to the reduction of the O…N distance. It indicated an inverse Ubbelohde effect typically recognized in strong and symmetric hydrogen-bonding clusters such as FHF(-) and H3O2-. We confirmed that the relation between the geometric isotope effect and the symmetry of the potential energy profile of FHF(-) was reasonably agreed with that of PSII. According to this agreement, the short hydrogen bond in PSII can be regarded as a short strong hydrogen bond. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349328

  14. An Analysis of Diet Quality, How It Controls Fatty Acid Profiles, Isotope Signatures and Stoichiometry in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles arabiensis

    PubMed Central

    Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca; Schwarzinger, Bettina; Schwarzinger, Clemens; Soliban, Sharon; Madakacherry, Odessa; Aigner, Martina; Watzka, Margarete; Gilles, Jeremie

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowing the underlying mechanisms of mosquito ecology will ensure effective vector management and contribute to the overall goal of malaria control. Mosquito populations show a high degree of population plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, the principle factors controlling population size and fecundity are for the most part unknown. Larval habitat and diet play a crucial role in subsequent mosquito fitness. Developing the most competitive insects for sterile insect technique programmes requires a “production” orientated perspective, to deduce the most effective larval diet formulation; the information gained from this process offers us some insight into the mechanisms and processes taking place in natural native mosquito habitats. Methodology/Principal Findings Fatty acid profiles and de-novo or direct assimilation pathways, of whole-individual mosquitoes reared on a range of larval diets were determined using pyrolysis gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. We used elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure individual-whole-body carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous values and to assess the impact of dietary quality on subsequent population stoichiometry, size, quality and isotopic signature. Diet had the greatest impact on fatty acid (FA) profiles of the mosquitoes, which exhibited a high degree of dietary routing, characteristic of generalist feeders. De-novo synthesis of a number of important FAs was observed. Mosquito C:N stoichiometry was fixed in the teneral stage. Dietary N content had significant influence on mosquito size, and P was shown to be a flexible pool which limited overall population size. Conclusions/Significance Direct routing of FAs was evident but there was ubiquitous de-novo synthesis suggesting mosquito larvae are competent generalist feeders capable of survival on diet with varying characteristics. It was concluded that nitrogen availability in the larval diet controlled teneral

  15. Effects of self-heating and phase change on the thermal profile of hydrogen isotopes in confined geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, S. Field, J.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; Suratwala, T.; Sater, J.

    2014-03-28

    Growth of high-quality single-crystal hydrogen in confined geometries relies on the in situ formation of seed crystals. Generation of deuterium-tritium seed crystals in a confined geometry is governed by three effects: self-heating due to tritium decay, external thermal environment, and latent heat of phase change at the boundary between hydrogen liquid and vapor. A detailed computation of the temperature profile for liquid hydrogen inside a hollow shell, as is found in inertial confinement fusion research, shows that seeds are likely to form at the equatorial plane of the shell. Radioactive decay of tritium to helium slowly alters the composition of the hydrogen vapor, resulting in a modified temperature profile that encourages seed formation at the top of the shell. We show that the computed temperature profile is consistent with a variety of experimental observations.

  16. Untargeted Profiling of Tracer-Derived Metabolites Using Stable Isotopic Labeling and Fast Polarity-Switching LC–ESI-HRMS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An untargeted metabolomics workflow for the detection of metabolites derived from endogenous or exogenous tracer substances is presented. To this end, a recently developed stable isotope-assisted LC–HRMS-based metabolomics workflow for the global annotation of biological samples has been further developed and extended. For untargeted detection of metabolites arising from labeled tracer substances, isotope pattern recognition has been adjusted to account for nonlabeled moieties conjugated to the native and labeled tracer molecules. Furthermore, the workflow has been extended by (i) an optional ion intensity ratio check, (ii) the automated combination of positive and negative ionization mode mass spectra derived from fast polarity switching, and (iii) metabolic feature annotation. These extensions enable the automated, unbiased, and global detection of tracer-derived metabolites in complex biological samples. The workflow is demonstrated with the metabolism of 13C9-phenylalanine in wheat cell suspension cultures in the presence of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). In total, 341 metabolic features (150 in positive and 191 in negative ionization mode) corresponding to 139 metabolites were detected. The benefit of fast polarity switching was evident, with 32 and 58 of these metabolites having exclusively been detected in the positive and negative modes, respectively. Moreover, for 19 of the remaining 49 phenylalanine-derived metabolites, the assignment of ion species and, thus, molecular weight was possible only by the use of complementary features of the two ion polarity modes. Statistical evaluation showed that treatment with DON increased or decreased the abundances of many detected metabolites. PMID:25372979

  17. Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution recorded by five Swiss peat profiles: Enrichment factors, fluxes, isotopic composition, and sources

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.; Shotyk, W.; Kramers, J.D.; Appleby, P.G.; Cheburkin, A.K.

    1999-05-01

    Atmospheric Pb deposition since the Industrial Revolution was studied in western, central, and southern Switzerland using five rural peat bogs. Similar temporal patterns were found in western and central Switzerland, with two distinct periods of Pb enrichment relative to the natural background: between 1880 and 1920 with enrichments ranging from 40 to 80 times, and between 1960 and 1980 with enrichments ranging from 80 to 100 times. The fluxes also were generally elevated in those time periods: in western Switzerland between 1.16 and 1.55 {micro}g cm{sup {minus}2} y{sup {minus}1} during the second period. Between the Industrial Revolution and 1985, nonradiogenic Pb became increasingly important in all five cores because of the replacement of coal by oil after ca. 1920, the use of Australian Pb in industry, and the extensive combustion of leaded gasoline after 1950. The introduction of unleaded gasoline in 1985 had a pronounced effect on the Pb deposition in all five cores. Enrichments dropped sharply, and the isotopic ratios reverted back toward natural values. The cores from western and central Switzerland showed very similar isotopic trends throughout the time period studied, implying that these sites were influenced contemporaneously by similar pollution sources and atmospheric pathways. Southern Switzerland revealed a different record with respect to the Pb pollution: it was dominated by a single massive Pb enrichment dated between 1930 and 1950.

  18. Vortex-induced vibrations under oblique shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourguet, Remi; Karniadakis, George; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2014-11-01

    A slender flexible body with bluff cross-section placed at normal incidence within a current may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). In practical applications, the structures (e.g. marine risers, towing cables) are often inclined with respect to the direction of the oncoming flow, sometimes at large angles. The vibrations that may appear in such configurations are investigated in the present work on the basis of direct numerical simulation results. We find that a flexible cylinder inclined at 80 degrees exhibits regular large-amplitude vibrations and that the structural responses are excited under the lock-in condition, i.e. synchronization between body oscillation and vortex formation, which is the central mechanism of VIV. We show that the lock-in condition may involve parallel vortex shedding, where the vortex rows are aligned with the body axis, but also oblique vortex shedding patterns. The excited structural wavenumber and the spanwise wavenumber of the obliquely shed vortices coincide; therefore, the flexible structure and the wake are locked both temporally and spatially. In addition, we find that the VIV occurring under oblique shedding may reach very high frequencies compared to the vibrations observed under parallel shedding.

  19. Vortex Shedding Inside a Baffled Air Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Philip; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Common in the operation of both segmented and un-segmented large solid rocket motors is the occurrence of vortex shedding within the motor chamber. A portion of the energy within a shed vortex is converted to acoustic energy, potentially driving the longitudinal acoustic modes of the motor in a quasi-discrete fashion. This vortex shedding-acoustic mode excitation event occurs for every Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) operation, giving rise to subsequent axial thrust oscillations. In order to better understand this vortex shedding/acoustic mode excitation phenomena, unsteady CFD simulations were run for both a test geometry and the full scale RSRM geometry. This paper covers the results from the subscale geometry runs, which were based on work focusing on the RSRM hydrodynamics. Unsteady CFD simulation parameters, including boundary conditions and post-processing returns, are reviewed. The results were further post-processed to identify active acoustic modes and vortex shedding characteristics. Probable locations for acoustic energy generation, and subsequent acoustic mode excitation, are discussed.

  20. Epithelial Cell Shedding and Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. M.; Duckworth, C. A.; Burkitt, M. D.; Watson, A. J. M.; Campbell, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical component of the gut barrier. Composed of a single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) held together by tight junctions, this delicate structure prevents the transfer of harmful microorganisms, antigens, and toxins from the gut lumen into the circulation. The equilibrium between the rate of apoptosis and shedding of senescent epithelial cells at the villus tip, and the generation of new cells in the crypt, is key to maintaining tissue homeostasis. However, in both localized and systemic inflammation, this balance may be disturbed as a result of pathological IEC shedding. Shedding of IECs from the epithelial monolayer may cause transient gaps or microerosions in the epithelial barrier, resulting in increased intestinal permeability. Although pathological IEC shedding has been observed in mouse models of inflammation and human intestinal conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited. This process may also be an important contributor to systemic and intestinal inflammatory diseases and gut barrier dysfunction in domestic animal species. This review aims to summarize current knowledge about intestinal epithelial cell shedding, its significance in gut barrier dysfunction and host-microbial interactions, and where research in this field is directed. PMID:25428410

  1. Determining Paleoredox Conditions Across the Cretaceous-Paleogene Mass Extinction at Blake Nose: Evaluation of Carbon and Nitrogen Isotopes and Trace Metal Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. M.; Nelson, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary (~65 Mya) is marked by a major mass extinction for a wide range of terrestrial and marine organisms. In addition, there is significant evidence for disruptions in the carbon and nutrient cycles, productivity, paleoclimate, and bottom water oxygen levels, but the exact temporal and spatial extent of the disruptions are still unknown. In order to assess changes in nitrogen cycling and post-extinction anoxia, we have been measuring sedimentary nitrogen isotopes (δ15N), carbon isotopes (δ13C), and redox-sensitive trace metal concentrations in several cores across the K-Pg boundary. Since the sedimentary δ15N record can provide information on bottom water oxygen levels as well as nitrogen cycling, we can also investigate the use of bulk sedimentary δ15N as a proxy for paleoredox conditions by comparing the isotope record with that of the redox-sensitive trace metals. We obtained samples from Blake Nose in the North Atlantic (ODP 171B), a site that is proximal to the Chicxulub impact location. The cores at this site have an excellent record through the K-Pg boundary and contain clear evidence of both the impact and subsequent mass extinction. We measured δ15Nbulk, δ13Corg, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) and trace metal concentrations in samples dating from the Late Maastrichtian (R. fructicosa foraminiferal zone) through to the Early Paleogene (foraminiferal zone P1c). Unlike our previous findings at the more distal Bass River (ODP 174AX) and Demerara Rise (ODP 207) sites, there is no obvious increase in δ15N values through the mass extinction, although there is a slight enrichment in redox-sensitive trace metals after the boundary. As a result, there appears to be no evidence for increased denitrification/anammox activity (and therefore no significant change in deep water redox state) immediately after the K-Pg boundary at Blake Nose based on the δ15N profiles; however, the trace metal profiles suggest

  2. A Proteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Shedding

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Wunschel, David S.; Springer, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Shedding (i.e., proteolysis of ectodomains of membrane proteins) plays an important pathophysiological role. In order to study the feasibility of identifying shed proteins, we analyzed serum-free media of human mammary epithelial cells by mass spectrometry following induction of shedding by the phorbol ester, 4β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Different means of sample preparation, including biotinylation of cell surface proteins, isolation of glycosylated proteins, and preparation of crude protein fraction, were carried out to develop the optimal method of sample processing. The collected proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography interfaced to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The resulting peptide spectra were interpreted using the program SEQUEST. Analyzing the sample containing the crude protein mixture without chemical modification or separation resulted in the greatest number of identifications, including putatively shed proteins. Overall, 93 membrane-associated proteins were identified including 57 that contain at least one transmembrane domain and 36 that indirectly associate with the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane. Of the 57 transmembrane proteins, 43 were identified by extracellular peptides providing strong evidence for them originating from regulated proteolysis or shedding processes. We combined results from the different experiments and used a peptide count method to estimate changes in protein abundance. Using this approach, we identified 2 proteins, syndecan-4 and hepatoma-derived growth factor, whose abundances increased in media of cells treated with PMA. We also detected proteins whose abundances decreased after PMA treatment such as 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein and calreticulin. Further analysis using immunoblotting validated the abundance changes for syndecan-4 and 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein as a result of PMA treatment. These results demonstrate that mass

  3. A proteomic approach to characterize protein shedding.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Adkins, Joshua N; Auberry, Deanna L; Wunschel, David S; Springer, David L

    2005-01-01

    Shedding (i.e. proteolysis of ectodomains of membrane proteins) plays an important pathophysiological role. In order to study the feasibility of identifying shed proteins, we analyzed serum-free media of human mammary epithelial cells by mass spectrometry following induction of shedding by the phorbol ester, 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Different means of sample preparation, including biotinylation of cell surface proteins, isolation of glycosylated proteins, and preparation of crude protein fractions, were carried out to develop the optimal method of sample processing. The collected proteins were digested with trypsin and analyzed by reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography interfaced to an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The resulting peptide spectra were interpreted using the program SEQUEST. Analyzing the sample containing the crude protein mixture without chemical modification or separation resulted in the greatest number of identifications, including putatively shed proteins. Overall, 45 membrane-associated proteins were identified including 22 that contain at least one transmembrane domain and 23 that indirectly associate with the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane. Of the 22 transmembrane proteins, 18 were identified by extracellular peptides providing strong evidence they originate from regulated proteolysis or shedding processes. We combined results from the different experiments and used a peptide count method to estimate changes in protein abundance. Using this approach, we identified two proteins, syndecan-4 and hepatoma-derived growth factor, whose abundances increased in media of cells treated with PMA. We also detected proteins whose abundances decreased after PMA treatment such as 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein and lactate dehydrogenase A. Further analysis using immunoblotting validated the abundance changes for syndecan-4 and 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein as a result of PMA treatment. These results demonstrate

  4. 77 FR 27574 - Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding and Load Shedding Plans Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ...Under section 215 of the Federal Power Act (FPA), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) approves Reliability Standards PRC-006-1 (Automatic Underfrequency Load Shedding) and EOP- 003-2 (Load Shedding Plans), developed and submitted to the Commission for approval by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), the Electric Reliability Organization certified by the......

  5. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. Analytical approach for the determination of steroid profile of humans by gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry aimed at distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Gorczyca, Damian; Zalewska, Izabela; Pokrywka, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2015-03-15

    The contamination of commonly used supplements by unknown steroids as well as their metabolites (parent compounds) become a challenge for the analytical laboratories. Although the determination of steroids profile is not trivial because of the complex matrix and low concentration of single compound, one of the most difficult current problem is to distinguish, during analytical procedure, endogenous androgens such as testosterone, dehydrotestosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone from their synthetic equivalents. The aim of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of the steroid profile in human urine by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) toward distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous steroids. Beside the optimization of the experimental parameters for gas chromatography separation and mass spectrometry, attention was focused on urine sample preparation. Using an optimized sample preparation protocol it was possible to achieve better chromatographic resolutions and better sensitivity enabling the determination of 5 steroids, androsterone, etiocholanolone, testosterone, 5-androstandiol, 11-hydroxyandrdostane, pregnandiol, with the expanded uncertainty (k=2) below 1‰. This enable to evaluate the significant shift of the δ(13)C/(12)C [‰] values for each of examined steroids (excluding ERC). The analytical protocol described in this work was successfully used for the confirmation of positive founding urine by evaluation T/E ratio after GC/C/IRMS analysis. PMID:25498150

  7. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluianov, S. V.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radioisotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na, and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air mass dynamics using cosmogenic radioisotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the 10Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 A.D. and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice cores.

  8. Characterization of CD200 Ectodomain Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Khatri, Ismat; Huo, Qiang; Spaner, David E.; Gorczynski, Reginald M.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the existence of a soluble form of CD200 (sCD200) in human plasma, and found sCD200 to be elevated in the plasma of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) patients. CLL cells release CD200 at a constitutive level, which could be attenuated partially by ADAM28 silencing. In this study, we further explored mechanisms of CD200 shedding beyond that of ADAM28, and performed biochemical analysis of sCD200 using materials derived from purified CLL cells and Hek293 cells stably transfected with CD200, and antibodies generated specifically against either the extracellular or cytoplasmic regions of CD200. CD200 shedding was enhanced by PMA stimulation, and the loss of cell surface CD200 could be monitored as a reduction in CD200 cell surface expression by flow cytometry, in parallel with an increase in the detection of sCD200 in the supernatant. Western blot analyses and functional studies using CD200R1 expressing Hek293 cells showed that the shed CD200 detected in CLL and Hek293-hCD200 supernatants lacked the cytoplasmic domain of CD200 but retained the functional extracellular domain required for binding to, and phosphorylation of, CD200R. These data confirms that a functionally active CD200 extracellular moiety can be cleaved from the surface of CD200 expressing cells following ectodomain shedding. PMID:27111430

  9. 2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) SHOWING SIGN HOLDER ON LEFT AND ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL. METEOROLOGICAL TOWER AND METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) IN BACKGROUND ON LEFT; SOUTHEAST CORNER OF GPS AZIMUTH STATION (BLDG. 775) IN BACKGROUND BEHIND AND RIGHT OF PYROTECHNIC SHED. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. A test of the nitrogen-limitation hypothesis for retarded eukaryote radiation: Nitrogen isotopes across a Mesoproterozoic basinal profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüeken, Eva E.

    2013-11-01

    Nitrogen limitation caused by trace metal scarcity under euxinic ocean conditions has been proposed as an explanation for the delayed radiation of eukaryotes until at least the late Mesoproterozoic. However, evidence for how the nitrogen cycle was operating during the middle Precambrian is, so far, rare. More specifically, it is unknown which steps in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, e.g. nitrogen fixation, nitrification or ammonification, were rate-limiting and thus controlling microbial community structures. The Mesoproterozoic Belt Supergroup in western Montana hosts a variety of facies ranging from shallow to deep water and thus offers the opportunity to address this issue. Bulk δ15N values show a clear trend from -1‰ in the deepest part of the basin to +5‰ along basin margins, which suggests that coastal areas were sufficiently oxygenated for aerobic nitrogen cycling. The total fractionation of carbon isotopes between carbonate and organic carbon (Δ13C) increases from 20‰ to 32‰ in the same direction, possibly indicating an ecological response to redox stratification and nitrogen speciation. Evidence from the Belt Supergroup is thus consistent with the idea that nutrient availability may have restricted early eukaryotic organisms to a narrow range of habitats, which thus prevented a global rise to ecological dominance until concentrations of fixed nitrogen increased in the global open ocean.

  11. Contribution of NAD 2D-NMR in liquid crystals to the determination of hydrogen isotope profile of methyl groups in miliacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdagué, Philippe; Lesot, Philippe; Jacob, Jérémy; Terwilliger, Valery J.; Le Milbeau, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD or (D/H) value) of molecular biomarkers preserved in sedimentary archives is increasingly used to provide clues about the evolution of past climatic conditions. The rationale is that intact biomarkers retain isotopic information related to the climatic conditions that prevailed at the time of their synthesis. Some of these biomarkers may be degraded during diagenesis, however. The extent to which these degradations alter the original δD value of the source biomarker is presently debated and the capacity to resolve this question by determination of compound-specific δD values alone is limited. The "bulk" or "global" δD value of any molecule is in fact a composite of δD values at each site within this molecule (δDi or (D/H)i with i = number of hydrogen/deuterium atoms in the considered molecule). Determination of this site-specific δDi value in biomarkers could not only yield outstanding paleoenvironmental information but also help forecast the impacts of diagenesis and define essential steps in biosynthetic pathways. This task is analytically challenging. Here, we examined the capabilities of natural abundance deuterium 2D-NMR (NAD 2D-NMR) using homopolypeptide liquid crystals as an NMR solvent to: (i) analyze the NAD spectra of biomakers; (ii) determine the site-specific distribution of hydrogen in the nine methyl groups (δDMei with i = 23-31) of miliacin, a pentacyclic triterpene of the amyrin family and key biomarker for broomcorn millet in sedimentary archives. Relative (D/H)Mei values were established by anisotropic NAD 2D-NMR. Then absolute δDMei values were obtained by determining δDMei value of the methoxy group of miliacin using two independent approaches: isotropic NAD NMR (SNIF-NMR™) and GC-irMS. The resulting isotope profile for miliacin shows, for the first time, large variations in δDMei values that can directly be explained by biosynthetic processes. This approach has also the potential to permit

  12. Patterns of vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Keun-Shik; Sa, Jong-Youb

    1990-01-01

    Vortex shedding from an oscillating circular cylinder was numerically investigated at Re = 100 with the Navier-Stokes equations and the new boundary conditions. The detailed shedding patterns are characterized by means of streakline plotting and lift-coefficient curves. A parameter map is presented which distinguishes the synchronized shedding from the asynchronous and the double vortices shedding from the single vortex shedding. The computational result is in good agreement with earlier experimental results.

  13. Organochlorine contaminant and stable isotope profiles in Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) from the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, P F; Braune, B M; O'Hara, T M; Elkin, B; Solomon, K R; Muir, D C G

    2003-01-01

    Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) is a circumpolar species distributed across northern Canada and Alaska. Arctic fox muscle and liver were collected at Barrow, AK, USA (n=18), Holman, NT, Canada (n=20), and Arviat, NU, Canada (n=20) to elucidate the feeding ecology of this species and relate these findings to body residue patterns of organochlorine contaminants (OCs). Stable carbon (delta 13C) and nitrogen (delta 15N) isotope analyses of Arctic fox muscle indicated that trophic position (estimated by delta 15N) is positively correlated with increasing delta 13C values, suggesting that Arctic fox with a predominantly marine-based foraging strategy occupy a higher trophic level than individuals mostly feeding from a terrestrial-based carbon source. At all sites, the rank order for OC groups in muscle was polychlorinated biphenyls (Sigma PCB) > chlordane-related compounds (Sigma CHLOR) > hexachlorocyclohexane (Sigma HCH) > total toxaphene (TOX) > or = chlorobenzenes (Sigma ClBz) > DDT-related isomers (Sigma DDT). In liver, Sigma CHLOR was the most abundant OC group, followed by Sigma PCB > TOX > Sigma HCH > Sigma ClBz > Sigma DDT. The most abundant OC analytes detected from Arctic fox muscle and liver were oxychlordane, PCB-153, and PCB-180. The comparison of delta 15N with OC concentrations indicated that relative trophic position might not accurately predict OC bioaccumulation in Arctic fox. The bioaccumulation pattern of OCs in the Arctic fox is similar to the polar bear. While Sigma PCB concentrations were highly variable, concentrations in the Arctic fox were generally below those associated with the toxicological endpoints for adverse effects on mammalian reproduction. Further research is required to properly elucidate the potential health impacts to this species from exposure to OCs. PMID:12547532

  14. New untargeted metabolic profiling combining mass spectrometry and isotopic labeling: application on Aspergillus fumigatus grown on wheat.

    PubMed

    Cano, Patricia M; Jamin, Emilien L; Tadrist, Souria; Bourdaud'hui, Pascal; Péan, Michel; Debrauwer, Laurent; Oswald, Isabelle P; Delaforge, Marcel; Puel, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of fungal secondary metabolomes has become a challenge due to the industrial applications of many of these molecules, and also due to the emergence of fungal threats to public health and natural ecosystems. Given that, the aim of the present study was to develop an untargeted method to analyze fungal secondary metabolomes by combining high-accuracy mass spectrometry and double isotopic labeling of fungal metabolomes. The strain NRRL 35693 of Aspergillus fumigatus , an important fungal pathogen, was grown on three wheat grain substrates: (1) naturally enriched grains (99% (12)C), (2) grains enriched 96.8% with (13)C, (3) grains enriched with 53.4% with (13)C and 96.8% with (15)N. Twenty-one secondary metabolites were unambiguously identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) analysis. AntiBase 2012 was used to confirm the identity of these metabolites. Additionally, on the basis of tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments, it was possible to identify for the first time the formula and the structure of fumigaclavine D, a new member of the fumigaclavines family. Post biosynthesis degradation of tryptoquivaline F by methanol was also identified during HPLC-HRMS analysis by the detection of a carbon atom of nonfungal origin. The interest of this method lies not only on the unambiguous determination of the exact chemical formulas of fungal secondary metabolites but also on the easy discrimination of nonfungal products. Validation of the method was thus successfully achieved in this study, and it can now be applied to other fungal metabolomes, offering great possibilities for the discovery of new drugs or toxins. PMID:23901908

  15. TLR4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Salmonella shedding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a key factor in the innate immune recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria. Previous studies from our group identified differences in the expression profile of TLR4 and genes affected by the TLR4 signaling pathway among pigs that shed varying...

  16. Molecular and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids within one sedimentary profile in the Shenhu, northern South China Sea: Source implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Mao, Shengyi; Wu, Nengyou; Sun, Yongge; Guan, Hongxiang

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions of saturated fatty acids (SaFAs) in one 300 cm long sedimentary profile, which was named as Site4B in Shenhu, northern South China Sea. The concentrations of total SaFAs in sediments ranged from 1.80 to 10.16 μg/g (μg FA/g dry sediment) and showed an even-over-odd predominance in the carbon chain of C12 to C32, mostly with n-C16 and n-C18 being the two major components. The short-chain fatty acids (ScFAs; n-C12 to n-C18) mainly from marine microorganisms had average δ13C values of -26.7‰ to -28.2‰, whereas some terrigenous-sourced long-chain fatty acids (LcFAs; n-C21 to n-C32) had average δ13C values of -29.6‰ to -34.1‰. The other LcFAs (n-C24 & n-C26 ∼ n-C28; average δ13C values are -26.1‰ to -28.0‰) as well as n-C19 and n-C20 SaFAs (average δ13C values are -29.1‰ and -29.3‰, respectively) showed a mixed signal of carbon isotope compositions. The relative bioproductivity calculation (marine vs. terrigenous) demonstrated that most of organic carbon accumulation throughout the sedimentary profile was contributed by marine organism. The high marine productivity in Shenhu, South China Sea may be related to the hydrocarbon seepage which evidenced by diapiric structures. Interestingly, there is a sever fluctuation of terrigenous inputs around the depth of 97 cm below the seafloor (bsf), probably resulting from the influence of the Dansgaard-Oeschger events and the Younger Dryas event as revealed by 14C age measurements.

  17. Shed king cobra and cobra skins as model membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Prakongpan, Sompol; Panomsuk, Suwannee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Priprem, Aroonsri

    2002-10-01

    Shed king cobra skin (SKCS) and shed cobra skin (SCS) were investigated for use as barrier membranes, including some pre-hydration factors, for in-vitro nicotine permeation. Inter-specimen variations in nicotine fluxes using shed snake skin were compared with those using human epidermis. Nicotine in the form of 1% w/v aqueous buffer solution at pH 5 and transdermal patches (dose 14 mg day(-1)) were used. The nicotine fluxes across the shed snake skin were not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by temperature and duration of hydration pre-treatment. Scanning electron micrographs of SKCS and SCS revealed a remarkable difference in surface morphology, but the nicotine fluxes using both shed skins were not significantly different (P > 0.05). When compared with the results obtained using human epidermis, there were similarities in fluxes and permeation profiles of nicotine. Using nicotine solution, the nicotine permeation profiles of all membranes followed zero order kinetics. The amount of nicotine permeated provided good linearity with the square root of time over 24 h (R(2) > 0.98) when using nicotine patches. The nicotine fluxes using SKCS and SCS had less inter-specimen variation than those using human epidermis. The results suggest a potential use for SKCS or SCS as barrier membranes for in-vitro nicotine permeation studies. PMID:12396295

  18. Vortex shedding from obstacles: theoretical frequency prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Benoît

    2001-11-01

    The existence of self-sustained oscillations in spatially developing systems is closely related to the presence of a locally absolutely unstable region. A recent investigation of a ``synthetic wake'' (a wake with no solid obstacle and no reverse flow region) has proved [Pier and Huerre, J. Fluid Mech. 435, 145 (2001)] that the observed Kármán vortex street is a nonlinear elephant global mode. The same criterion is now shown to hold for real obstacles. Local properties are derived from the unperturbed basic flow computed by enforcing a symmetry condition on the central line. Application of the theoretical criterion then yields the expected Strouhal vortex shedding frequency. The thus predicted frequency is in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations of the complete flow. The use of the frequency selection mechanism to control the vortex shedding will also be discussed.

  19. Differentiation potential of SHEDs using biomimetic periosteum containing dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-Ta; Chiou, Wei-Ling; Yu, Ho-Hsu; Huang, Te-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the architecture of the natural environment in vivo is an effective strategy for tissue engineering. The periosteum has an important function in bone regeneration. However, the harvesting of autogenous periosteum has the disadvantages of donor site morbidity and limited donor sources. This study uses an innovative artificial periosteum that forms dexamethasone (DEX)-containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofiber obtained from skin fibrous scaffold. The aim was to evaluate the effect on bone healing of osteogenic differentiation in stems originating from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in vitro. The microstructure of fabricated periosteum was observed through SEM, and results showed the apparent homogenous distribution of porous structures. DEX was also found to be continuously released into the culture medium from the periosteum for 28 days. MTT results further revealed that fabricated periosteum was cytocompatible and non-toxic to SHEDs. After 21 days of induced culture, the expression of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization notably increased. Osteogenic results showed high early and late osteoblast gene expression by RT-PCR analysis, such as collagen type I, Runx2, OPN, and OCN. The osteoblastic protein expression of BMP-2 and OCN was clearly observed as well under fluorescence microscopy. The results, which could be applied to bone regeneration, demonstrated that skin fibrous scaffold provided an osteoinductive environment for stem cells to differentiate and that PVA nanofiber was a suitable reservoir for osteogenic factors with controlled release profile. PMID:26478401

  20. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  1. Periodic cavitation shedding in a cylindrical orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, C.; Barber, T.; Milton, B.; Rosengarten, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation structures in a large-scale ( D = 8.25 mm), plain orifice style nozzle within a unique experimental rig are investigated using high-speed visualisation and digital image processing techniques. Refractive index matching with an acrylic nozzle is achieved using aqueous sodium iodide for the test fluid. Cavitation collapse length, unsteady shedding frequency and spray angles are measured for cavitation conditions from incipient to supercavitation for a range of Reynolds numbers, for a fixed L/ D ratio of 4.85. Periodic cavitation shedding was shown to occur with frequencies between 500 and 2,000 Hz for conditions in which cavitation occupied less than 30% of the nozzle length. A discontinuity in collapse length was shown to occur once the cavitation exceeded this length, coinciding with a loss of periodic shedding. A mechanism for this behaviour is discussed. Peak spray angles of approximately θ ≈ 14° were recorded for supercavitation conditions indicating the positive influence of cavitation bubble collapse on the jet atomisation process.

  2. Using elemental profiles and stable isotopes to trace the origin of green coffee beans on the global market.

    PubMed

    Santato, Alessandro; Bertoldi, Daniela; Perini, Matteo; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    A broad elemental profile incorporating 54 elements (Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Re, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi and U) in combination with δ(2) H, δ(13) C, δ(15) N and δ(18) O was used to characterise the composition of 62 green arabica (Coffea arabica) and robusta (Coffea canephora) coffee beans grown in South and Central America, Africa and Asia, the four most internationally renowned areas of production. The δ(2) H, Mg, Fe, Co and Ni content made it possible to correctly assign 95% of green coffee beans to the appropriate variety. Canonical discriminant analysis, performed using δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(18) O, Li, Mg, P, K, Mn, Co, Cu, Se, Y, Mo, Cd, La and Ce correctly traced the origin of 98% of coffee beans. PMID:22972781

  3. Experience from insulators with RTV silicon rubber sheds and shed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastos, A.E.; Sherif, E. )

    1990-10-01

    Long-rod composite insulators, with weather sheds made of room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber compounds (RTV), were exposed for many years to HVAC and HVDC under realistic conditions and natural pollution. This paper reports that it was found that the shed material, quite in contrary to the experience gained from insulators with sheds of other organic materials e.g., EPDM rubber, undergoes a slow degradation which improves the already superior water repelling properties of the silicon rubber compounds. The improvement seems to be due to a low molecular layer which is produced on the surface of the insulator sheds. This layer improves the hydrophobicity of the surface, while protecting the surface from further degradation. Weather sheds of porcelain housing coated with a thin layer of RTV give similar results to those obtained with long-rod silicon rubber insulators. The RTV coating, although it led to increased salt deposit density, reduces the leak currents and the withstand of the insulator under the same pollution conditions.

  4. Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cherry picker at end of Train Shed with arm fully extended and photographer in bucket - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  5. VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW WEST, SOUTH PENN POWERHOUSE, (FROM LEFT) BLEEDER SHED, ENGINE HOUSE, BELT SHED, ECCENTRIC HOUSE. - South Penn Oil Company, G. M. Mead Lot 492 Lease, Morrison Run Field, Clarendon, Warren County, PA

  6. 2. SOUTH FACE OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) WITH METEOROLOGICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTH FACE OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) WITH METEOROLOGICAL DATA ACQUISITION TERMINAL (MDAT) INSIDE BUILDING - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Meteorological Shed & Tower, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. 1. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) SOUTH FACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHWEST CORNER OF METEOROLOGICAL SHED (BLDG. 756) SOUTH FACE OF SLC-3W MOBILE SERVICE TOWER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Meteorological Shed & Tower, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 2. DETAIL OF THEODOLITE PYLON NORTH OF AZIMUTH ALIGNMENT SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF THEODOLITE PYLON NORTH OF AZIMUTH ALIGNMENT SHED (BLDG. 775). - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Azimuth Alignment Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  9. 1. SOUTH FACE AND WEST SIDE OF STORAGE SHED (BLDG. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH FACE AND WEST SIDE OF STORAGE SHED (BLDG. 773) LOCATED ON SLC-3W IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Storage Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. 23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  11. East elevation of bunkhouse and agriculture storage sheds, looking west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    East elevation of bunkhouse and agriculture storage sheds, looking west. The shower house is adjacent to the storage sheds and just south of the bunkhouse. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  12. 13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor window sill - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  13. 15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing second floor support beams. - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  14. 12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of Sterling Creek lettuce shed showing floor joist and support beams - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  15. 1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking south, with road in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  16. 5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Sterling Creek lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  17. 9. Relationship of residence, claim house, west tool shed, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Relationship of residence, claim house, west tool shed, and east tool shed to each other and immediate surroundings, looking west - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  18. 2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Light tower, keeper's house and shed, view south southwest, northwest and northeast sides of tower, east and north sides of keeper's house and shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  19. 7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Fog signal house and shed, view south, north and west sides of fog signal house, northeast and northwest sides of shed - Whitehead Light Station, Whitehead Island, East northeast of Tenants Harbor, Spruce Head, Knox County, ME

  20. 19. ROYAL WALNUT. STORAGE SHED PART OF HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. ROYAL WALNUT. STORAGE SHED PART OF HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. WEST PROPERTY LINE ADJACENT TO TREE AND RUNS ALONG SIDE OF SHED. LOOKING NORTH AND SLIGHTLY EAST FROM ADJOINING PROPERTY. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  1. 15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed showing posts looking towards the chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  2. 14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking towards chute building - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  3. 9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking north, with chute building on the left - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  4. 3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking southeast; parking lot in foreground - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  5. 12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Partial view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northwest showing office - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  6. 2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking south; chute building is in background - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  7. 6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Oblique view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking northeast, with chute building to the right - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  8. 16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior view of Cherry Hill lettuce shed looking up at the trusses of the second floor - Richmond Hill Plantation, Cherry Hill Lettuce Shed, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  9. 1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING NORTHEAST END (FRONT) OF TRANSIT SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING NORTHEAST END (FRONT) OF TRANSIT SHED, IN CONTEXT WITH LOADING YARD AND DERRICK, LOOKING WEST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  10. 10. WIDE GENERAL VIEW OF SHED SHOWING SOUTHWEST FACADE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. WIDE GENERAL VIEW OF SHED SHOWING SOUTHWEST FACADE AND TRUCK PLATFORM/STAGING AREA AT SOUTHWEST END OF BUILDING, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  11. 32. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 161 TYPICAL SECTION & DETAILS. Sheet 5 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  12. 31. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 STAIR & TOILET ROOM DETAILS. Sheet 3 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  13. 33. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 STAIR & TOILET ROOM DETAILS. Sheet 6 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  14. 14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST CORNER OF SHED, OBSTRUCTED BY LATE METAL BUILDING, LOOKING EAST - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  15. 34. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 70'0' TRUSS. Sheet 7 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. 7. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF SHED, SHOWING ALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GENERAL VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF SHED, SHOWING ALL EIGHTEEN LOADING BAYS, LOOKING WEST FROM ACROSS TURNING BASIN - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. 3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OBLIQUE GENERAL VIEW SHOWING EAST CORNER OF SHED, WITH RAILROAD TRACKS PASSING UNDER DERRICK ALONG WHARF - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  18. 35. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 127 END WALL FRAMING. Sheet 9 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. 9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. GENERAL OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH DERRICK AND RAILWAY PASS-TROUGH ON WHARF, LOOKING NORTH - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  20. 30. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Oakland Port and General Depot. Transit Shed No. 7, 936 feet, Building 161 PLOT PLAN & TRANSVERSE SECTION. Sheet 1 of 16 - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  1. 2. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTH. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, North end of base, northwest of Mess Hall & south of Basketball Court, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  2. 1. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PAINT AND OIL STORAGE SHED, FRONT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, North end of base, northwest of Mess Hall & south of Basketball Court, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  3. NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 January 2013 (historical) NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus Discovery Is ... the University of Oxford, U.K., have shed light on a long-standing enigma about the structure ...

  4. 2. SHED, SOUTH END OF SHORTER BARRACKS, FRONT AND RIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SHED, SOUTH END OF SHORTER BARRACKS, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Paint & Oil Storage Shed, South of Launch Area Entrance Drive, near security fence, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  5. 3. EAST FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757); DOORS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST FACE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757); DOORS FOR STORAGE ROOMS. SECURITY FENCE ON RIGHT SIDE OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. 1. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF CONDUCTOR'S SHED (CENTER) CA. 1893, LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF CONDUCTOR'S SHED (CENTER) CA. 1893, LOCATED NORTH OF THE CAR BARNS ALONG CENTRAL AVENUE - Johnstown Passenger Railway Company, Conductor's Shed, Central Avenue, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  7. 2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ACID STORAGE SHED, FRONT AND RIGHT SIDES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - NIKE Missile Base C-84, Acid Storage Shed, North of launch area, northwest of earthen berm of Acid Fueling Station, Barrington, Cook County, IL

  8. View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of EPA Farm storage shed, facing north. Greenhouse is in background - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Storage Shed, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  9. 5. PERSONNEL ROOM ON WEST SIDE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PERSONNEL ROOM ON WEST SIDE OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757) STORAGE LOCKER ON EAST WALL; PADDED TABLE ON SOUTH WALL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. 4. MACHINERY SHED AND STORAGE ROOM ADDITION, SOUTH AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. MACHINERY SHED AND STORAGE ROOM ADDITION, SOUTH AND WEST WALL LOOKING NORTHEAST SEED STORAGE BUILDING (1963) BEHIND - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  11. Developmental and spatial variations in the diet signatures of hyperbenthic shrimp Nauticaris marionis at the Prince Edward Islands based on stable isotope ratios and fatty acid profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richoux, Nicole B.; Allan, E. Louise; Froneman, P. William

    2016-04-01

    The caridean shrimp Nauticaris marionis is an ecologically important species in the benthic community around the sub-Antarctic Prince Edward Islands (PEI) as it represents a key prey item for a variety of top predators breeding on the islands. We hypothesized that the diet of N. marionis shifts during its development, and that spatial variability in food availability results in differentiation in the diet signatures of specimens collected from various locations of the shelf waters around the PEI. Specimens were collected from nine stations (depth range 70 to 240 m) around the PEI at inter-island shelf (from west to east: upstream, between and downstream) and nearshore regions during austral autumn 2009. Stable isotope and fatty acid data both revealed spatial and developmental variations in the shrimp diet. Nearshore shrimp were more 13C-enriched than those from the inter-island region, suggesting increased kelp detritus entered the food web in the nearshore regions. The shrimp showed increases in δ13C and δ15N signatures (and trophic position) with an increase in body size, resulting in distinctions between size classes that reflected shifts in their trophic niche through development. The fatty acid profiles similarly indicated distinctions in diet with increased shrimp size (in the deep regions), and spatial variability was evident in relation to region and depth. All shrimp contained large proportions of polyunsaturated and essential fatty acids, indicating that the quality of food consumed was similar between regions despite the diet variability. Our results provide new dietary information about a key species operating near the base of the food web at the highly productive PEI, and show that there were no areas of enhanced nutrition available to the shrimp. As such, there was no nutritional advantage to shrimp inhabiting any specific region around the PEI.

  12. Shedding patterns of endemic Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) pathogens.

    PubMed

    González-Barrio, David; Martín-Hernando, María Paz; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    The Eurasianwild boar has experienced aworldwide demographic explosion that increases awareness on shared pathogens. However, shedding routes of relevant wild boar pathogens are unknown. Previous observations on sex- and age-related differences in Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) exposure led us to hypothesize that shedding patterns of endemicwild boar pathogens may be influenced by individual traits.We investigated shedding routes of ADV, porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Coxiella burnetii and analysed the effect of host sex and age on pathogen shedding patterns. The presence of pathogen antibodies in serumand of pathogen DNA in oral, nasal, genital and rectal swabswas analysed by ELISA and PCR, respectively. The influence of sex and age in pathogen shedding prevalencewas tested statistically.Main routes of ADV, PPV, PCV2 and C. burnetii shedding were identified but the hypothesis of sex- and/or age-related shedding patterns couldn't be confirmed. PMID:26412545

  13. On vortex shedding from a hexagonal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi, Hatef A.; Andersson, Helge I.

    2011-10-01

    The unsteady wake behind a hexagonal cylinder in cross-flow is investigated numerically. The time-dependent three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved for three different Reynolds numbers Re and for two different cylinder orientations. The topology of the vortex shedding depends on the orientation and the Strouhal frequency is generally higher in the wake of a face-oriented cylinder than behind a corner-oriented cylinder. For both orientations a higher Strouhal number St is observed when Re is increased from 100 to 500 whereas St is unaffected by a further increase up to Re=1000. The distinct variation of St with the orientation of the hexagonal cylinder relative to the oncoming flow is opposite of earlier findings for square cylinder wakes which exhibited a higher St with corner orientation than with face orientation.

  14. Supercomputing Sheds Light on the Dark Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Salman Habib

    2012-11-15

    At Argonne National Laboratory, scientists are using supercomputers to shed light on one of the great mysteries in science today, the Dark Universe. With Mira, a petascale supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a team led by physicists Salman Habib and Katrin Heitmann will run the largest, most complex simulation of the universe ever attempted. By contrasting the results from Mira with state-of-the-art telescope surveys, the scientists hope to gain new insights into the distribution of matter in the universe, advancing future investigations of dark energy and dark matter into a new realm. The team's research was named a finalist for the 2012 Gordon Bell Prize, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in high-performance computing.

  15. Increased In Vitro Osteopotential in SHED Associated with Higher IGF2 Expression When Compared with hASCs.

    PubMed

    Fanganiello, Roberto Dalto; Ishiy, Felipe Augusto Andre; Kobayashi, Gerson Shigeru; Alvizi, Lucas; Sunaga, Daniele Yumi; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2015-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation potential varies according to factors such as tissue source and cell population heterogeneity. Pre-selection of cell subpopulations harboring higher osteopotential is a promising strategy to achieve a thorough translation of MSC-based therapies to the clinic. Here, we searched for novel molecular markers predictive of osteopotential by comparing MSC populations from two sources harboring different osteogenic potentials. We show that MSCs from human deciduous teeth (SHED) have an intrinsically higher osteogenic potential when compared with MSCs from human adipose tissue (hASCs) under the same in vitro controlled induction system. Transcriptome profiling revealed IGF2 to be one of the top upregulated transcripts before and during early in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Further, exogenous IGF2 supplementation enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization, and inhibition of IGF2 lessened these parameters in SHED and hASCs, validating IGF2 as an osteogenic factor in these MSCs. Further, we found IGF2 to be biallelically expressed in SHED, but not in hASCs. We observed a 4 % methylation increase in the imprinting control region within the IGF2-H19 locus in SHED, and this is mainly due to 2 specific CpG sites. Thus, we suggest that IGF2 upregulation in SHED is due to loss of imprinting. This study unravels osteogenic properties in SHED, implying IGF2 as a potential biomarker of MSCs with higher osteopotential, and unveils IGF2 loss-of-imprinting in SHED. PMID:25931278

  16. A Lagrangian analysis of a two-dimensional airfoil with vortex shedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Doug; Cardwell, Blake; Mohseni, Kamran

    2008-08-01

    Using invariant material manifolds and flow topology, the flow behavior and structure of flow around a two-dimensional Eppler 387 airfoil is examined with an emphasis on vortex shedding and the time-dependent reattachment profile. The examination focuses on low Reynolds number (Re = 60 000) flow at several angles of attack. Using specialized software, we identify invariant manifolds in the flow and use these structures to illuminate the process of vortex formation and the periodic behavior of the reattachment profile. Our analysis concludes with a topological view of the flow, including fixed points and a discussion of phase plots and the frequency spectrum of several key points in the flow. The behavior of invariant manifolds directly relates to the flow topology and illuminates some aspects seen in phase space during vortex shedding. Furthermore, it highlights the reattachment behavior in ways not seen before.

  17. Oxygen isotope studies and compilation of isotopic dates from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Quaternary Isotope Laboratory, alone or in collaboration with other investigators, is currently involved in a number of oxygen-isotope studies mainly in Antarctica. Studies of a drill core from the South Pole, seasonal oxygen-18 signals preserved in the Dominion Range, isotope dating of the Ross Ice Shelf, oxygen-18 profiles of the Siple Coast, McMurdo Ice Shelf sampling, and a data compilation of radiometric dates from Antarctica are discussed.

  18. Quantitation of Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolic Profiles in Human Bronchoalveolar H358) Cells by Stable Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ding; Harvey, Ronald G.; Blair, Ian A.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and are carcinogenic in multiple organs and species. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a representative PAH and has been studied extensively for its carcinogenicity and toxicity. B[a]P itself is chemically inert and requires metabolic activation to exhibit its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Three major metabolic pathways have been well documented. The signature metabolites generated from the radical cation (peroxidase or monooxygenase mediated) pathway are B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione, the signature metabolite generated from the diol-epoxide (P450 mediated) pathway is B[a]P-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydrotetrol (B[a]P-tetrol-1) and the signature metabolite generated from the o-quinone (aldo-keto reductase mediated) pathway is B[a]P-7,8-dione. The contributions of these different metabolic pathways to cancer initiation and the exploitation of this information for cancer prevention are still under debate. With the availability of a library of [13C4]-labeled B[a]P metabolite internal standards, we developed a sensitive stable isotope dilution atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method to address this issue by quantitating B[a]P metabolites from each metabolic pathway in human lung cells. This analytical method represents a 500 fold increased sensitivity compared with a method using HPLC-radiometric detection. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 6 fmol on column for 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OH-B[a]P), the generally accepted biomarker for B[a]P exposure. This high level of sensitivity and robustness of the method was demonstrated in a study of B[a]P metabolic profiles in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells induced or uninduced with the AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD). All the signature metabolites were detected and successfully quantitated. Our results suggest that all three metabolic pathways contribute equally in the overall

  19. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  20. Three-in-one vortex shedding flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.

    1989-02-28

    An apparatus is described for measuring fluid flow comprising: a body including a flow passage; a vortex generator of an elongated cylindrical shape disposed across a first cross section of the flow passage; and a planar member disposed generally parallel to the vortex generator across a second cross section of the flow passage on a plane generally parallel to the central axis of the flow passage, wherein at least one extremity of the planar member is secured to the wall of the flow passage in an isolated arrangement from the vortex generator; and a transducer means secured to the body including a force transmitter member extending from the transducer means in an isolated arrangement from the vortex generator, wherein the force transmitter member is connected to the other extremity of the planar member opposite to the one extremity by a mechanical coupling; wherein the transducer means provides signals related to alternating lift forces on the planar member exerted by vortices shed from two sides of the vortex generator in an alternating pattern as a measure of fluid flow through the flow passage.

  1. New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, and roof structure. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  2. 19. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, AND HYDRAULIC PUMPHOUSE, INCLUDING HYDRAULIC OIL TANK - Folsom Powerhouse, Adjacent to American River, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  3. ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTERNATE VIEW OF PENSTOCK SHED, NORTH ELEVATION OF POWERHOUSE, TRANSFORMERS, AND HYDRAULIC PUMPHOUSE, INCLUDING HYDRAULIC OIL TANK - Folsom Powerhouse, Adjacent to American River, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  4. SHED repair critical-size calvarial defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Seo, BM; Sonoyama, W; Yamaza, T; Coppe, C; Kikuiri, T; Akiyama, K; Lee, JS; Shi, S

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are a population of highly proliferative postnatal stem cells capable of differentiating into odontoblasts, adipocytes, neural cells, and osteo-inductive cells. To examine whether SHED-mediated bone regeneration can be utilized for therapeutic purposes, we used SHED to repair critical-size calvarial defects in immuno-compromised mice. MATERIALS AND METHODS We generated calvarial defects and transplanted SHED with hydroxyapatite/ tricalcium phosphate as a carrier into the defect areas. RESULTS SHED were able to repair the defects with substantial bone formation. Interestingly, SHED-mediated osteogenesis failed to recruit hematopoietic marrow elements that are commonly seen in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-generated bone. Furthermore, SHED were found to co-express mesenchymal stem cell marker, CC9/MUC18/CD146, with an array of growth factor receptors such as transforming growth factor β receptor I and II, fibroblast growth factor receptor I and III, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor I, implying their comprehensive differentiation potential. CONCLUSIONS Our data indicate that SHED, derived from neural crest cells, may select unique mechanisms to exert osteogenesis. SHED might be a suitable resource for orofacial bone regeneration. PMID:18938268

  5. 2. Photocopy of photograph Photographer unknown, ca. 1893 Train shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of photograph Photographer unknown, ca. 1893 Train shed under construction - Pennsylvania Railroad Station, Broad Street Station, Broad & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Microvesicles shed by oligodendroglioma cells and rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts contain aggrecanase activity.

    PubMed

    Lo Cicero, Alessandra; Majkowska, Iwona; Nagase, Hideaki; Di Liegro, Italia; Troeberg, Linda

    2012-05-01

    Membrane microvesicle shedding is an active process and occurs in viable cells with no signs of apoptosis or necrosis. We report here that microvesicles shed by oligodendroglioma cells contain an 'aggrecanase' activity, cleaving aggrecan at sites previously identified as targets for adamalysin metalloproteinases with disintegrin and thrombospondin domains (ADAMTSs). Degradation was inhibited by EDTA, the metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 and by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-3, but not by TIMP-1 or TIMP-2. This inhibitor profile indicates that the shed microvesicles contain aggrecanolytic ADAMTS(s) or related TIMP-3-sensitive metalloproteinase(s). The oligodendroglioma cells were shown to express the three most active aggrecanases, namely Adamts1, Adamts4 and Adamts5, suggesting that one or more of these enzymes may be responsible for the microvesicle activity. Microvesicles shed by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts similarly degraded aggrecan in a TIMP-3-sensitive manner. Our findings raise the novel possibility that microvesicles may assist oligodendroglioma and rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts to invade through aggrecan-rich extracellular matrices. PMID:22406378

  7. Multi-element, multi-compound isotope profiling as a means to distinguish the geographical and varietal origin of fermented cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) beans.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier; Antheaume, Ingrid; Leroux, Maël; Lalande, Julie; Balayssac, Stéphane; Remaud, Gérald S; Tea, Illa

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element stable isotope ratios have been assessed as a means to distinguish between fermented cocoa beans from different geographical and varietal origins. Isotope ratios and percentage composition for C and N were measured in different tissues (cotyledons, shells) and extracts (pure theobromine, defatted cocoa solids, protein, lipids) obtained from fermented cocoa bean samples. Sixty-one samples from 24 different geographical origins covering all four continental areas producing cocoa were analyzed. Treatment of the data with unsupervised (Principal Component Analysis) and supervised (Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis) multiparametric statistical methods allowed the cocoa beans from different origins to be distinguished. The most discriminant variables identified as responsible for geographical and varietal differences were the δ(15)N and δ(13)C values of cocoa beans and some extracts and tissues. It can be shown that the isotope ratios are correlated with the altitude and precipitation conditions found in the different cocoa-growing regions. PMID:26041233

  8. Multi-isotope (C - O - S - H - B - Mg - Ca - Ba) and trace element variations along a vertical pore water profile across a brackish-fresh water transition, Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Michael E.; Lapham, Laura; Gussone, Nikolaus; Struck, Ulrich; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Moeller, Kirsten; Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dellwig, Olaf; Schnetger, Bernhard; Huckriede, Hermann; Halas, Stan; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    downcore increase in pore water concentrations of earth alkaline ions and the formation of authigenic barites. Coupled S-34 and O-18 isotope signals in authigenic barites suggest that they were formed in pre-Yoldia sediments from pore waters strongly depleted in O-18 (as low as -20 per mil vs. VSMOW). In the present communication, we will discuss possible impacts of diagenetic processes on multi-isotope signals in pore waters and authigenic phases. A combination of mixing between brackish and fresh water, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, and transport reactions is considered to explain most of the observed isotope variations along the vertical pore water profile. This work was supported by the Leibniz IOW, BONUS+ program, the Universities of Bern, Geneva, Bochum, Münster, and Oldenburg, and the Natural Museum of History, Berlin.

  9. The effect of vaccination on Marek's disease virus shedding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current Marek’s Disease vaccines are efficient at preventing disease. However, vaccination can reduce but not completely eliminate virus shedding. Our hypothesis is that an efficient vaccine will result in fewer viruses being shed. To test this hypothesis, we developed a real-time PCR to measure Mar...

  10. 1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF WEST AND SOUTH FACES OF PYROTECHNIC SHED (BLDG. 757). ENTRANCE TO TEST CELL ON SOUTH SIDE; ENTRANCE TO PERSONNEL ROOM ON WEST SIDE. SECURITY FENCE BETWEEN SLC-3E AND SLC-3W IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Pyrotechnic Shed, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts. Note rock foundations of wood tanks once located under the rain shed on the ground at center of photograph. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  12. Estimating heritability of wool shedding in a crossbred ewe population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low wool prices and high production costs in sheep systems have resulted in the introduction of hair sheep genetics into flocks to reduce shearing costs. Wool shedding occurs naturally in a few breeds, and can be incorporated by crossbreeding. The opportunity to enhance shedding through selection de...

  13. 17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied from a photograph by Thomas S. Bronson, 'Group at Whitney Factory, 5 November 1906,' NHCHSL. The most reliable view of the fuel storage sheds and foundry, together with a view of the forge building. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  14. 126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. EXTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING CAST SHED NO. 2, FURNACE NO. 2, STOVES, POWER HOUSE, STACKS, FURNACE NO. 1 CAST SHED. FURNACE NO. 2 IS IN PROCESS OF RESTORATION. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. 15. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF SHED, WITH AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. GENERAL VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF SHED, WITH AN OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE STEP-DOWN ROOF AND TWO BANKS OF CLEARSTORY LIGHTS - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  16. 27. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. GENERAL INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING SOUTH CORNER OF SHED WITH ONE-STORY OFFICES, SHOWING TYPICAL COLUMN BASE WITH TIMBER BOLTED TO STEEL 'L' SHOE - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  17. 1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Shed, railroad, keeper's house, light tower and boathouse, view southwest, northeast side of shed, keeper's house and tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  18. 2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Shed, railroad, light tower and boathouse, view south southwest, northeast and northwest sides of shed, northeast side of tower, east and north sides of boathouse - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  19. 3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Railroad viaduct, keeper's house, light tower and shed, view west, southeast side of viaduct, southeast and northeast sides of keeper's house, tower and shed - Seguin Island Light Station, Summit of Seguin Island, south of mouth of Kennebec River, Popham Beach, Sagadahoc County, ME

  20. NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ELEVATION. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE AT THE FAR RIGHT. DOCKSIDE STORAGE SHED IS VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. LAKE WORTH INLET AND THE TOWN OF PALM BEACH ARE IN THE BACKGROUND. - U.S. Coast Guard Lake Worth Inlet Station, Boathouse, Peanut Island, Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, FL

  1. 11. FREIGHT YARDS AT KEYSER. TRAIN SHED AND B & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. FREIGHT YARDS AT KEYSER. TRAIN SHED AND B & O STORAGE FACILITY ARE VISIBLE AT LEFT. TURNTABLE LIES OUT OF VIEW BEHIND TRAIN SHED. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Keyser Machine Shop, State Route 46 Northwest of Spring Street, Keyser, Mineral County, WV

  2. Specific inhibition of ectodomain shedding of glycoprotein Ibα by targeting its juxtamembrane shedding cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xin; Russell, Susan R.; Estelle, Sandra; Jones, Limei H.; Cho, Sungyun; Kahn, Mark L.; Berndt, Michael C.; Bunting, Silvia T.; Ware, Jerry; Li, Renhao

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Ectodomain shedding of GPIbα, a proteolytic event in which metalloprotease ADAM17 cleaves the Gly464-Val465 bond and releases glycocalicin to the plasma, is considered a critical step in mediating clearance of stored platelets. Supporting evidence has largely come from studies using ADAM17 inhibitors. However, the definitive proof is lacking due to the broad substrate specificity of ADAM17. Objectives To achieve substrate-specific inhibition of GPIbα shedding. Methods Development of monoclonal antibodies that directly bind the sequence around the GPIbα shedding cleavage site and inhibit GPIbα shedding by blocking ADAM17 access to the cleavage site. Results Six anti-GPIbα monoclonal antibodies with varying binding affinities were obtained. The prototypic clone, designated 5G6, and its monomeric Fab fragment, bind specifically purified GPIb-IX complex, human platelets, and transgenic murine platelets expressing human GPIbα. 5G6 showed similar inhibitory potency as a widely used shedding inhibitor GM6001 in both constitutive and induced GPIbα shedding in human platelets. It does not recognize mouse GPIbα. Nor does it inhibit shedding of other platelet receptors. Finally, 5G6 binding displays no detectable effect on platelet activation and aggregation. Conclusion 5G6 specifically inhibits GPIbα shedding with no detectable effect on platelet functions. The method of substrate-specific shedding inhibition by macromolecular binding of the shedding cleavage site can be applicable to many other transmembrane receptors undergoing ectodomain shedding. PMID:24119228

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid treatment improves differentiation and immunomodulation of SHED.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, C; Liu, S; Liu, D; Xu, X; Chen, X; Shi, S

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) possess multipotent differentiation and immunomodulatory properties. They have been used for orofacial bone regeneration and autoimmune disease treatment. In this study, we show that acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) treatment is able to significantly improve SHED-mediated osteogenic differentiation and immunomodulation. Mechanistically, ASA treatment upregulates the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)/Wnt/β-catenin cascade, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated bone regeneration, and also upregulates TERT/FASL signaling, leading to improvement of SHED-mediated T-cell apoptosis and ameliorating disease phenotypes in dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis mice. These data indicate that ASA treatment is a practical approach to improving SHED-based cell therapy. PMID:25394850

  4. DEM Simulation of Rock Shed Failure due to Rockfall Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-An; Lin, Ming-Lang; Wang, Ching-Ping; Lo, Chia-Ming

    2013-04-01

    The rock shed is a more costly but effective traffic facility used to keep out falling rocks in Taiwan. The main function of rock shed is to let the falling rock passing through via the top slab without hitting the road users. The failure mode of the rock shed due to rockfall impact generally includes punching of top slab, flexural cracks of beam, buckling of column, and damage of foundation, etc. Even so, the failure behavior of the rock shed is still complicated and difficult to predict. Accordingly, this study adopts the discrete element program (PFC2D) to simulate the failure behavior of rock shed. A comparison with uniaxial compression test was carried out firstly to determine the micro parameters of structure elements. The model was utilized to simulate the behavior of rock shed with impact load or hitting of falling block separately. Then, a case study of present rock shed of highway NO.18 in middle Taiwan was analyzed. The result indicates that: the primary causes of rock shed failure mode include block size, falling height, impact position, and structure system. The failure mode of punching shear failure or flexural cracks is dominated by block size and falling height. The occurrence of differential settlement is related to impact position and absence of combined footing. Considering the connection of beam and column, the structure is more likely to break at the joints rather than punching of the top slab. As a result, combined footing and beam-to-column joint should be to take into account to obtain safer protection of rock shed. Keywords: rockfall disaster, PFC, rock shed, discrete element method

  5. August 2007 FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel Recommendations for SHEDS-Dietary and SHEDS-Residential Modules (Summarized) and EPA Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past ten years, the Agency has requested the Panel to review several probabilistic dietary exposure software models. These have included DEEM-FCID™, Calendex-FCID, CARES™, LifeLine™, and an earlier (specialized) version of SHEDS (SHEDS-Wood) designed to assess exposure...

  6. ORAL SHEDDING OF MARBURG VIRUS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED EGYPTIAN FRUIT BATS (ROUSETTUS AEGYPTIACUS)

    PubMed Central

    Amman, Brian R.; Jones, Megan E. B.; Sealy, Tara K.; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Schuh, Amy J.; Bird, Brian H.; Coleman-McCray, JoAnn D.; Martin, Brock E.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Towner, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (Marburg marburgvirus; MARV) causes sporadic outbreaks of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) in Africa. The Egyptian fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) has been identified as a natural reservoir based most-recently on the repeated isolation of MARV directly from bats caught at two locations in southwestern Uganda where miners and tourists separately contracted MHF from 2007–08. Despite learning much about the ecology of MARV through extensive field investigations, there remained unanswered questions such as determining the primary routes of virus shedding and the severity of disease, if any, caused by MARV in infected bats. To answer these questions and others, we experimentally infected captive-bred R. aegyptiacus with MARV under high (biosafety level 4) containment. These experiments have shown infection profiles consistent with R. aegyptiacus being a bona fide natural reservoir host for MARV and demonstrated routes of viral shedding capable of infecting humans and other animals. PMID:25375951

  7. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  8. On oblique and parallel shedding behind an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dan; Pettersen, Bjørnar; Andersson, Helge I.; Narasimhamurthy, Vagesh D.

    2013-05-01

    Three-dimensional wake instabilities in the form of oblique shedding and vortex dislocations in the flow past an inclined flat plate of angle of attack 20° and Reynolds number 1000 have been reported earlier [D. Yang, B. Pettersen, H. I. Andersson, and V. D. Narasimhamurthy, Phys. Fluids 24, 084103 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4744982. In the current study, direct numerical simulations were performed to further explore this bifurcation. At lower Reynolds numbers, i.e., well below 525, the three-dimensional wake was found to be stable and in a parallel shedding mode. However, as the Reynolds number increases, it was observed that both parallel and oblique vortex sheddings arose naturally. Vortex dislocations appeared at the juxtaposition of oblique and parallel shedding modes. The velocity signals were analyzed by a wavelet transformation, from which the instantaneous characteristics of three-dimensional vortex shedding were obtained and examined. Results show that the phase difference of shed vortex rollers in the spanwise direction gave a symmetric probability density function. This indicates that both positive and negative shedding angles (relative to the axis of the plate) occur with equal likelihood.

  9. 19. RW Meyer Sugar: 18761889. Cooling Shed Interior, 1881. View: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. RW Meyer Sugar: 1876-1889. Cooling Shed Interior, 1881. View: Looking toward west end of cooling shed. After the concentrated syrup flowed out of the sorghum pan it cooled and crystallized in large sugar coolers. The humidity and vapors caused by the sorghum pan would have retarded the crystallizing and cooling of the sugar in the boiling house. In 1881 this shed was constructed to house the coolers and the sugar before it was dried in the centrifugals. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  10. Numerical Simulations of Vortex Shedding in Hydraulic Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel; Marcu, Bogdan

    2004-01-01

    Turbomachines for rocket propulsion applications operate with many different working fluids and flow conditions. Oxidizer boost turbines often operate in liquid oxygen, resulting in an incompressible flow field. Vortex shedding from airfoils in this flow environment can have adverse effects on both turbine performance and durability. In this study the effects of vortex shedding in a low-pressure oxidizer turbine are investigated. Benchmark results are also presented for vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder. The predicted results are compared with available experimental data.

  11. Quantitative profiling of O-glycans by electrospray ionization- and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry after in-gel derivatization with isotope-coded 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone.

    PubMed

    Sić, Siniša; Maier, Norbert M; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    The potential and benefits of isotope-coded labeling in the context of MS-based glycan profiling are evaluated focusing on the analysis of O-glycans. For this purpose, a derivatization strategy using d0/d5-1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) is employed, allowing O-glycan release and derivatization to be achieved in one single step. The paper demonstrates that this release and derivatization reaction can be carried out also in-gel with only marginal loss in sensitivity compared to in-solution derivatization. Such an effective in-gel reaction allows one to extend this release/labeling method also to glycoprotein/glycoform samples pre-separated by gel-electrophoresis without the need of extracting the proteins/digested peptides from the gel. With highly O-glycosylated proteins (e.g. mucins) LODs in the range of 0.4 μg glycoprotein (100 fmol) loaded onto the electrophoresis gel can be attained, with minor glycosylated proteins (like IgAs, FVII, FIX) the LODs were in the range of 80-100 μg (250 pmol-1.5 nmol) glycoprotein loaded onto the gel. As second aspect, the potential of isotope coded labeling as internal standardization strategy for the reliable determination of quantitative glycan profiles via MALDI-MS is investigated. Towards this goal, a number of established and emerging MALDI matrices were tested for PMP-glycan quantitation, and their performance is compared with that of ESI-based measurements. The crystalline matrix 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP) and the ionic liquid matrix N,N-diisopropyl-ethyl-ammonium 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (DIEA-THAP) showed potential for MALDI-based quantitation of PMP-labeled O-glycans. We also provide a comprehensive overview on the performance of MS-based glycan quantitation approaches by comparing sensitivity, LOD, accuracy and repeatability data obtained with RP-HPLC-ESI-MS, stand-alone nano-ESI-MS with a spray-nozzle chip, and MALDI-MS. Finally, the suitability of the isotope-coded PMP labeling strategy for O

  12. 16. INTERIOR OF SHED ADDITION AND FREESTANDING CABINETS AGAINST NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR OF SHED ADDITION AND FREE-STANDING CABINETS AGAINST NORTH WALL. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Control Station, Hydrographer's Office, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  13. 8. Detail of underside of viaduct, hog shed to left. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail of underside of viaduct, hog shed to left. View to west. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, "O" Street Viaduct, "O" Street Spanning Hog Pens; South Omaha Terminal Railway Company Tracks & Union Pacific Railroad Tracks, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  14. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  15. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE EXPLOSIVE STORAGE SHED, BUILDING 306, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE EXPLOSIVE STORAGE SHED, BUILDING 306, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Explosive Storage, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  16. HISTORIC SHED (NOW WAREHOUSE) AT TRANSFORMER YARD ABOVE GLINES POWERHOUSE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC SHED (NOW WAREHOUSE) AT TRANSFORMER YARD ABOVE GLINES POWERHOUSE. PHOTO BY JET LOWE, HAER, 1995. - Elwha River Hydroelectric System, Glines Hydroelectric Dam & Plant, Port Angeles, Clallam County, WA

  17. 29. View of oil storage shed, looking northeast. Photo by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of oil storage shed, looking northeast. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  18. 16. STORAGE SHED DOOR DETAIL, SOUTH FRONT. Hondius Water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. STORAGE SHED DOOR DETAIL, SOUTH FRONT. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  19. 3. Keeper's house, shed, light tower and bell, view east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Keeper's house, shed, light tower and bell, view east, northwest and southwest sides - Monhegan Island Light Station, Monhegan Island, ten miles south by ferry from Port Clyde, Monhegan, Lincoln County, ME

  20. 1. Keeper's house, shed, covered passageway and light tower, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Keeper's house, shed, covered passageway and light tower, view northwest, southwest and southeast sides - Monhegan Island Light Station, Monhegan Island, ten miles south by ferry from Port Clyde, Monhegan, Lincoln County, ME

  1. 7. Outhouse and shed, view west northwest, south and east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Outhouse and shed, view west northwest, south and east sides - Ram Island Light Station, Ram Island, south of Ocean Point & just north of Fisherman Island, marking south side of Fisherman Island Passage, Ocean Point, Lincoln County, ME

  2. Tracking Kids' Eye Movements Might Shed New Light on Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids' Eye Movements Might Shed New Light on Autism When conversations turn emotional, children with ASD change ... HealthDay News) -- New findings about where children with autism look during conversations could lead to changes in ...

  3. New rain shed (Building No. 241) on right with Tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) on right with Tanks T5, T4 and T2 on left from front to back. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  4. New rain shed (Building No. 241), overhead pipeline and raw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241), overhead pipeline and raw water tank T4. Distribution pump house can be seen at the center of building. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  5. Detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241). Note pipeline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241). Note pipeline connection from collection trough. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  6. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with collection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with collection downspouts from gutter to reservoir. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  7. Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing truss type A in foreground and truss type B behind that. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  8. Redwood tanks in foreground with old rain shed (Building No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Redwood tanks in foreground with old rain shed (Building No. 43) and steel tanks in background. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  9. Rooftop view of old rain shed (Building No. 43), pipeline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop view of old rain shed (Building No. 43), pipeline on trestle, and water tanks. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  10. Rooftop view of new rain shed (Building No. 241) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop view of new rain shed (Building No. 241) showing collection gutter and overhead pipeline. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  11. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing vertical posts on concrete footing with diagonal timber bracing and wire bracing. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  12. Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with gutter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of old rain shed (Building No. 43) with gutter box on northwest side. Maintenance staff in foreground. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  13. Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of old rain shed (Building No. 43) showing redwood dry storage building located inside. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  14. Rooftop detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241) with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rooftop detail of new rain shed (Building No. 241) with flume and overhead pipeline. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  15. 33. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH ON SECOND LEVEL OF FERRY SHEDS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. VIEW, LOOKING NORTH ON SECOND LEVEL OF FERRY SHEDS, STEEL PASSENGER BRIDGES - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Jersey City Ferry Terminal, Johnson Avenue at Hudson River, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 2. Relationship of claim house, residence, east tool shed, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Relationship of claim house, residence, east tool shed, and garage to overall farmstead site, looking north - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  17. 6. RElationship of residence, claim house, east tool shed, barn, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. RElationship of residence, claim house, east tool shed, barn, garage, and pole building to overall farmstead site, looking northwest - George Spangerberger Farmstead, 2012 West Illinois Avenue, South Hutchinson, Reno County, KS

  18. 7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, showing shaft and pulley system, 210mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  19. 64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS SHOWING CALCIUM CARBIDE IN COOLING CARS ON THE FLOOR. DECEMBER 26, 1918. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  20. PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CYANAMIDE (LN) COOLING SHED, MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW LOOKING NORTHWEST AT CYANAMIDE (L-N) COOLING SHED, MILL BUILDING AND CONVEYOR BRIDGE. NOTE CORNERSTONE ON THE MILL BUILDING. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  1. 43. PROCESS WELDING SHEDS (FABRICATION SHOPS) ON RIGHT, AND TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. PROCESS WELDING SHEDS (FABRICATION SHOPS) ON RIGHT, AND TANK BARGE, CRANES, PAINT SHOP AND PIPE/MACHINE SHOP IN BACKGROUND, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Hillman Barge & Construction Company, Paul Thomas Boulevard, Brownsville, Fayette County, PA

  2. GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF DEHYDRATER (STRUCTURE 12), SHED (STRUCTURE 18), FRUIT TRAY STORAGE ROOM (STRUCTURE 11), WITH FRUIT DRYING AREA AND TRAM TRACKS IN FOREGROUND, FROM NORTHWEST - Stevens Ranch Complex, State Route 101, Coyote, Santa Clara County, CA

  3. 15. Elevator no. 2: Scale floor above track shed, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Elevator no. 2: Scale floor above track shed, showing interlocking levers and beams, facing southeast - Washburn Crosby Company Elevators No. 2 & 3, 900 & 1000 Second Avenue, South, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  4. Vortex shedding from struts in an annular exhaust diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Fric, T.F.; Villarreal, R.; Auer, R.O.; James, M.L.; Ozgur, D.; Staley, T.K.

    1998-01-01

    Results from scale-model experiments and industrial gas turbine tests show that strut vortex shedding in an annular exhaust diffuser can effectively be modified by adding tapered chord to the struts. The struts are bluff bodies at full-speed, no-load conditions, when inlet swirl is close to 60 deg. Data from wind tunnel tests show that wake Strouhal number is 0.47, larger than that expected for an isolated cylinder wake. This value of Strouhal number agrees with those measured in full-scale exhaust diffusers. Wind tunnel tests showed that a strut with tapered chord most effectively reduced wake amplitudes and shifted shedding frequency. The tapered strut was also effective in reducing shedding amplitude in a scale-model diffuser. Finally, gas turbine tests employing a tapered strut showed significant reductions in unsteady pressure and noise. A major benefit of strut taper is a reduction of noise by uncoupling of vortex shedding from acoustic resonant response.

  5. 12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of disassembled steam engine sitting in open shed showing base, columns and entablature. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Steam Engine & Mill, 2.65 Mi. N of PR Rt. 2 Bridge over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  6. 29. Umbrella sheds behind South Station. Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Umbrella sheds behind South Station. Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 229.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. 103. CABLES ENTERING CABLE TRAY SHED AT EAST OF LSB; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. CABLES ENTERING CABLE TRAY SHED AT EAST OF LSB; OXIDIZER APRON AND LAUNCH PAD IN BACKGROUND - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 1. GUNNARSON FARMSTEAD. OVERVIEW SHOWING HOUSE, IMPLEMENT SHED, AND GRANARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GUNNARSON FARMSTEAD. OVERVIEW SHOWING HOUSE, IMPLEMENT SHED, AND GRANARY (NEW HOUSE IN BACKGROUND). VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Gunnarson Farmstead, U.S. Highway 20 at New Sweden, Idaho Falls, Bonneville County, ID

  9. 2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST ELEVATION, SHOWING TAILRACE AND SLIDING DOOR UNDER SHED ROOF. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE IS IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT. VIEW TO EAST-NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-3 Powerhouse, San Bernardino National Forest, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. VIEW OF NORTHEAST TOWARD MAINTENANCE SHED AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHEAST TOWARD MAINTENANCE SHED AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF PARK - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA