Science.gov

Sample records for isotope snapshot application

  1. Light-guide snapshot spectrometer for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-04-01

    We present a proof-of-principle prototype of a fiber-based snapshot spectrometer to provide high spatial and spectral sampling for biomedical application such as cell signaling or diagnostics. An image is collected by a custom fiber bundle and then divided into spatial groups with spaces in between for dispersion. The image is later scaled down by an image taper (to scale down the image size and allow smaller optical components), dispersed with a prism and captured by a CCD camera. An interpolation algorithm is used to locate each wavelength and reconstruct the image for each spectral channel. The fiber bundle is fabricated by aligning multi-mode bare fiber ribbons as matrix, gluing together in Teflon molds, laser cutting and polishing. We present preliminary finger occlusion results obtained with the spectrometer where the oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin spectrum could be differentiated.

  2. SNAP/SHOT Your Ability to Support That Next Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ernest L.

    SNAP/SHOT (System Network Analysis Program-Simulated Host Overview Technique) is a discrete simulation of a network and/or host model available through IBM at the Raleigh System Center. The simulator provides an analysis of a total IBM Communications System. Input data must be obtained from RMF, SMF, and the CICS Analyzer to determine the existing…

  3. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400–1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future. PMID:27044607

  4. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400-1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future. PMID:27044607

  5. A four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has proven significance in bio-imaging applications and it has the ability to capture up to several hundred images of different wavelengths offering relevant spectral signatures. To use hyperspectral imaging for in vivo monitoring and diagnosis of the internal body cavities, a snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope is required. However, such reported systems provide only about 50 wavelengths. We have developed a four-dimensional snapshot hyperspectral video-endoscope with a spectral range of 400–1000 nm, which can detect 756 wavelengths for imaging, significantly more than such systems. Capturing the three-dimensional datacube sequentially gives the fourth dimension. All these are achieved through a flexible two-dimensional to one-dimensional fiber bundle. The potential of this custom designed and fabricated compact biomedical probe is demonstrated by imaging phantom tissue samples in reflectance and fluorescence imaging modalities. It is envisaged that this novel concept and developed probe will contribute significantly towards diagnostic in vivo biomedical imaging in the near future.

  6. Nationwide Snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, Terry S.; Iverson, Megan M.; Fassbender, Linda L.; Britt, Michelle L.

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this effort was to create a nationwide snapshot of the current residential building practices in the United States, and to identify trends in building practices as they relate to building energy efficiency. Information on typical insulation levels, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) efficiencies, window profiles, and other residential building components and assemblies provided a foundation for (1) identifying trends in residential building practices over time, (2) assessing energy-efficiency improvements in single-family homes over time and correlating them with the applicable building energy codes if possible, and (3) identifying building energy code adoption and compliance needs. This report seeks to identify trends in the residential building practice from 1996 to 2009.

  7. Photonics engineering: snapshot applications in healthcare, homeland security, agriculture, and industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2015-01-01

    Throughout my experience in photonics engineering, this article shows that photonics is indeed a key technology enabler for enhancing our competitiveness. In particular, I snapshot the achievements of NECTEC research teams in implementing devices and systems suitable for healthcare, homeland security, agriculture, and industry.

  8. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  9. Special Application Thermoelectric Micro Isotope Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmatpour, Ben; Lieberman, Al; Khayat, Mo; Leanna, Andrew; Dobry, Ted

    2008-01-21

    Promising design concepts for milliwatt (mW) size micro isotope power sources (MIPS) are being sought for use in various space and terrestrial applications, including a multitude of future NASA scientific missions and a range of military applications. To date, the radioisotope power sources (RPS) used on various space and terrestrial programs have provided power levels ranging from one-half to several hundred watts. In recent years, the increased use of smaller spacecraft and planned new scientific space missions by NASA, special terrestrial and military applications suggest the need for lower power, including mW level, radioisotope power sources. These power sources have the potential to enable such applications as long-lived meteorological or seismological stations distributed across planetary surfaces, surface probes, deep space micro-spacecraft and sub-satellites, terrestrial sensors, transmitters, and micro-electromechanical systems. The power requirements are in the range of 1 mW to several hundred mW. The primary technical requirements for space applications are long life, high reliability, high specific power, and high power density, and those for some special military uses are very high power density, specific power, reliability, low radiological induced degradation, and very low radiation leakage. Thermoelectric conversion is of particular interest because of its technological maturity and proven reliability. This paper summarizes the thermoelectric, thermal, and radioisotope heat source designs and presents the corresponding performance for a number of mW size thermoelectric micro isotope power sources.

  10. Short course on St-02 applications of isotope dilutions and isotopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.

    1998-01-05

    This short course includes information on these topics and subtopics: (I) Nuclear Properties: (A) Historic roots; (B) Nomenclature; (C) Nuclear Stability and abundance; (D) Uses of isotopic techniques; (II) Instrumentation: (A) Sources; (B) Mass resolving elements; (C) Detectors; (III) Making Isotopic Measurements by ICP-MS: (A) Deadtime Correction; (B) Mass Discrimination; (C) Signal /Noise considerations; (IV) Applications and examples: (A) Isotope dilution; (B) Double Spike; (C) Biological Application; (D) Environmental Application; (E) Geological.

  11. Snapshots of Applications in Mathematics: Thermal Systems and the Solar Oven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callas, Dennis, Ed.; Hildreth, David J., Ed.; Bickford, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Showcases applications of mathematics designed to demonstrate to students how the topics under study are used in the real world or to solve problems. Presents an activity on thermal systems using spreadsheets or graphing calculators. (ASK)

  12. Triple Oxygen Isotopes: Fundamental Relationships and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Huiming; Cao, Xiaobin; Hayles, Justin A.

    2016-06-01

    The element oxygen has three stable isotopes: 16O, 17O, and 18O. For a defined process, a change in 18O/16O scales with the corresponding change in 17O/16O, or the fractionation factors 18α and 17α have a relationship of θ = ln17α/ln18α, in which the triple oxygen isotope exponent θ is relatively fixed but does vary with reaction path, temperature, and species involved. When the small variation is of interest, the distinction of three concepts—θ, S (a slope through data points in δ17O–δ18O space), and C (an arbitrary referencing number for the degree of 17O deviation)—becomes important. Triple oxygen isotope variations can be measured by modern instruments and thus offer an additional line of information on the underlying reaction processes and conditions. Analytical methods and Earth science applications have recently been developed for air oxygen, carbon dioxide, water, silicates, oxides, sulfates, carbonates, and phosphates.

  13. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  14. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-04-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens.

  15. Snapshot Hyperspectral Volumetric Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiamin; Xiong, Bo; Lin, Xing; He, Jijun; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive analysis of biological specimens brings about the demand for capturing the spatial, temporal and spectral dimensions of visual information together. However, such high-dimensional video acquisition faces major challenges in developing large data throughput and effective multiplexing techniques. Here, we report the snapshot hyperspectral volumetric microscopy that computationally reconstructs hyperspectral profiles for high-resolution volumes of ~1000 μm × 1000 μm × 500 μm at video rate by a novel four-dimensional (4D) deconvolution algorithm. We validated the proposed approach with both numerical simulations for quantitative evaluation and various real experimental results on the prototype system. Different applications such as biological component analysis in bright field and spectral unmixing of multiple fluorescence are demonstrated. The experiments on moving fluorescent beads and GFP labelled drosophila larvae indicate the great potential of our method for observing multiple fluorescent markers in dynamic specimens. PMID:27103155

  16. Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond

    2006-07-01

    Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation

  17. APPLICATIONS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR WATERSHED INVESTIGATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental isotopes include naturally-occurring nuclides that can be applied as tracers within watersheds (Sidle, 1998). Recent advances in mass spectroscopy may supplant many traditional and costly hydrometric techniques. It is now possible, for example, to utilize isotopes a...

  18. Stable Isotope Applications in Hydrologic Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, C.; Doctor, D. H.

    2003-12-01

    The topic of stream flow generation has received considerable attention over the last two decades, first in response to concern about "acid rain" and more recently in response to the increasingly serious contamination of surface and shallow groundwaters by anthropogenic contaminants. Many sensitive, low-alkalinity streams in North America and Europe are already acidified (see Chapter 9.10). Still more streams that are not yet chronically acidic may undergo acidic episodes in response to large rainstorms and/or spring snowmelt. These acidic events can seriously damage local ecosystems. Future climate changes may exacerbate the situation by affecting biogeochemical controls on the transport of water, nutrients, and other materials from land to freshwater ecosystems.New awareness of the potential danger to water supplies posed by the use of agricultural chemicals and urban industrial development has also focused attention on the nature of rainfall-runoff and recharge processes and the mobility of various solutes, especially nitrate and pesticides, in shallow systems. Dumping and spills of other potentially toxic materials are also of concern because these chemicals may eventually reach streams and other public water supplies. A better understanding of hydrologic flow paths and solute sources is required to determine the potential impact of contaminants on water supplies, develop management practices to preserve water quality, and devise remediation plans for sites that are already polluted.Isotope tracers have been extremely useful in providing new insights into hydrologic processes, because they integrate small-scale variability to give an effective indication of catchment-scale processes. The main purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of recent research into the use of naturally occurring stable isotopes to track the movement of water and solutes in hydrological systems where the waters are relatively fresh: soils, surface waters, and shallow

  19. Analytical techniques in biomedical stable isotope applications: (isotope ratio) mass spectrometry or infrared spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Stellaard, Frans; Elzinga, Henk

    2005-12-01

    An overview is presented of biomedical applications of stable isotopes in general, but mainly focused on the activities of the Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases of the University Medical Center Groningen. The aims of metabolic studies in the areas of glucose, fat, cholesterol and protein metabolism are briefly explained, as well as the principle of breath testing and the techniques to study body composition and energy expenditure. Much attention is paid to the analytical considerations based upon metabolite concentrations, sample size restrictions, the availability of stable isotope labelled substrates and dose requirements in relation to compound-specific isotope analysis. The instrumental advantages and limitations of the generally used techniques gas chromatography/reaction/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are described as well as the novelties of the recently commercialised liquid chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The present use and future perspective of infrared (IR) spectrometry for clinical and biomedical stable isotope applications are reviewed. In this respect, the analytical demands on IR spectrometry are discussed to enable replacement of isotope ratio mass spectrometry by IR spectrometry, in particular, for the purpose of compound-specific isotope ratio analysis in biological matrices. PMID:16543190

  20. Stable Chlorine Isotope Study: Application to Early Solar System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mala,ira. M/; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2010-01-01

    other [4], some authors have claimed that the 37Cl/35Cl ratio of geological samples obtained by TIMS technique are, in general, misleadingly too high and variable compared to those of IRMS [3]. For eample, almost no differences of Cl isotope composition were observed among mantle materials and carbonaceous meteorites by [3]. On the other hand, according to more recent IRMS work [2], significant Cl isotope variations are confirmed for mantle materials. Therefore, additional careful investigation of Cl isotope analyses are now required to confirm real chlorine isotope variations for planetary materials including carbonaceous chondrites [5]. In order to clarify the stable chlorine isotope features of early solar system materials, we have initiated development of the TIMS technique at NASA JSC applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We report here the current status of chlorine isotope analysis at NASA JSC.

  1. Possible application of laser isotope separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The laser isotope separation process is described and its special economic features discussed. These features are its low cost electric power operation, capital investment costs, and the costs of process materials.

  2. Robust snapshot interferometric spectropolarimetry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesuk; Seo, Yoonho; Yoon, Yonghee; Dembele, Vamara; Yoon, Jae Woong; Lee, Kyu Jin; Magnusson, Robert

    2016-05-15

    This Letter describes a Stokes vector measurement method based on a snapshot interferometric common-path spectropolarimeter. The proposed scheme, which employs an interferometric polarization-modulation module, can extract the spectral polarimetric parameters Ψ(k) and Δ(k) of a transmissive anisotropic object by which an accurate Stokes vector can be calculated in the spectral domain. It is inherently strongly robust to the object 3D pose variation, since it is designed distinctly so that the measured object can be placed outside of the interferometric module. Experiments are conducted to verify the feasibility of the proposed system. The proposed snapshot scheme enables us to extract the spectral Stokes vector of a transmissive anisotropic object within tens of msec with high accuracy. PMID:27176992

  3. Heavy element stable isotope ratios: analytical approaches and applications.

    PubMed

    Tanimizu, Masaharu; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2013-03-01

    Continuous developments in inorganic mass spectrometry techniques, including a combination of an inductively coupled plasma ion source and a magnetic sector-based mass spectrometer equipped with a multiple-collector array, have revolutionized the precision of isotope ratio measurements, and applications of inorganic mass spectrometry for biochemistry, geochemistry, and marine chemistry are beginning to appear on the horizon. Series of pioneering studies have revealed that natural stable isotope fractionations of many elements heavier than S (e.g., Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ce, Nd, Mo, Cd, W, Tl, and U) are common on Earth, and it had been widely recognized that most physicochemical reactions or biochemical processes induce mass-dependent isotope fractionation. The variations in isotope ratios of the heavy elements can provide new insights into past and present biochemical and geochemical processes. To achieve this, the analytical community is actively solving problems such as spectral interference, mass discrimination drift, chemical separation and purification, and reduction of the contamination of analytes. This article describes data calibration and standardization protocols to allow interlaboratory comparisons or to maintain traceability of data, and basic principles of isotope fractionation in nature, together with high-selectivity and high-yield chemical separation and purification techniques for stable isotope studies. PMID:23397089

  4. Mediterranean Outflow and surface water variability off southern Portugal during the early Pleistocene: A snapshot at Marine Isotope Stages 29 to 34 (1020-1135 ka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelker, Antje H. L.; Salgueiro, Emilia; Rodrigues, Teresa; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Bahr, André; Alberto, Ana; Loureiro, Isabel; Padilha, Maria; Rebotim, Andreia; Röhl, Ursula

    2015-10-01

    Centennial-to-millennial scale records from IODP Site U1387, drilled during IODP Expedition 339 into the Faro Drift at 558 m water depth, now allow evaluating the climatic history of the upper core of the Mediterranean Outflow (MOW) and of the surface waters in the northern Gulf of Cadiz during the early Pleistocene. This study focuses on the period from Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 29 to 34, i.e. the interval surrounding extreme interglacial MIS 31. Conditions in the upper MOW reflect obliquity, precession and millennial-scale variations. The benthic δ18O signal follows obliquity with the exception of an additional, smaller δ18O peak that marks the MIS 32/31 transition. Insolation maxima (precession minima) led to poor ventilation and a sluggish upper MOW core, whereas insolation minima were associated with enhanced ventilation and often also increased bottom current velocity. Millennial-scale periods of colder sea-surface temperatures (SST) were associated with short-term maxima in flow velocity and better ventilation, reminiscent of conditions known from MIS 3. A prominent contourite layer, coinciding with insolation cycle 100, was formed during MIS 31 and represents one of the few contourites developing within an interglacial period. MIS 31 surface water conditions were characterized by an extended period (1065-1091 ka) of warm SST, but SST were not much warmer than during MIS 33. Interglacial to glacial transitions experienced 2 to 3 stadial/interstadial cycles, just like their mid-to-late Pleistocene counterparts. Glacial MIS 30 and 32 recorded periods of extremely cold (< 12 °C) SST that in their climatic impact were comparable with the Heinrich events of the mid and late Pleistocene. Glacial MIS 34, on the other hand, was a relative warm glacial period off southern Portugal. Overall, surface water and MOW conditions at Site U1387 show a strong congruence with Mediterranean climate, whereas millennial-scale variations are closely linked to North Atlantic

  5. APPLICATION OF STABLE ISOTOPE TECHNIQUES TO AIR POLLUTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope techniques provide a robust, yet under-utilized tool for examining pollutant effects on plant growth and ecosystem function. Here, we survey a range of mixing model, physiological and system level applications for documenting pollutant effects. Mixing model examp...

  6. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab... 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  7. 77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab... 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  8. Biomedical research applications of electromagnetically separated enriched stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, R. M.

    The current and projected annual requirements through 1985 for stable isotopes enriched by electromagnetic separation methods were reviewed for applications in various types of biomedical research: (1) medical radiosiotope production, labeled compounds, and potential radio-pharmaceuticals; (2) nutrition, food science, and pharmacology: (3) metallobiochemistry and environmental toxicology; (4) nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and moessbauer spectroscopy in biochemical, biophysical, and biomedical research; and (5) miscellaneous advances in radioactive and nonradioactive tracer technology. Radioisotopes available from commercial sources or routinely used in clinical nuclear medicine were excluded. Current requirements for enriched stable isotopes in biomedical research are not being satisfied. Severe shortages exist for Mg 26, Ca 43, Zn 70, Se 76, Se 77, Se 78, Pd 102, Cd 111, Cd 113, and Os 190. Many interesting and potentially important investigations in biomedical research require small quantities of specific elements at high isotopic enrichments.

  9. Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingey, Garth L.; Sorensen, Gerald C.; Ross, Brad A.

    1995-01-01

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  10. Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C.; Ross, B.A.

    1995-01-20

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  11. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C.; Ross, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  12. An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage unit for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Rose, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage Unit (ITSU), that would store and utilize heat energy in a 'pulsed' fashion in space operations, is described. Properties of various radioisotopes are considered in conjunction with characteristics of thermal energy storage materials, to evaluate possible implementation of such a device. The utility of the unit is discussed in light of various space applications, including rocket propulsion, power generation, and spacecraft thermal management.

  13. 60-watt isotopic heat source for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, W.M.

    1995-01-20

    A sealed isotopic heat source (IHS) with a nominal thermal inventory of 60 watts is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for use in remote terrestrial applications that require isotopic power for electrical power generation. Emphasis is on use in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and dynamic cycle power units. The selected IHS design incorporates technologies developed for prior space and terrestrial IHSs to minimize development cost and span time. A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Fueled Clad (FC), comprised of a plutonium-238 enriched pressed-plutonia pellet contained within a vented iridium clad, is the source for thermal energy. The GPHS FC technology was developed by DOE for use in space RTGs. The GPHS FC is, in turn, enclosed within a three-layer cladding system similar to that developed by DOE for earlier terrestrial heat sources. The cladding system provides for retention of the helium gas generated by the decay of the isotopic fuel and containment of the isotopic fuel under normal operating and accident conditions. Test hardware is currently being fabricated and safety demonstration testing is scheduled to be completed in early 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  14. Snapshots of Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Tesar, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    Pluripotency is a unique developmental state that lays the foundation upon which the entire embryo is built. Pluripotent cells possess the unique capacity to generate, in an exquisitely defined sequence, all the distinct cell types comprising the fetal and adult organism. The discovery of pluripotent stem cells and now the ability to generate them from differentiated cells has had a profound impact on a vast array of scientific disciplines. In addition to their clinical potential as a source of therapeutic cell types, pluripotent stem cells provide scalable access to otherwise experimentally inaccessible development- and disease-associated biology. Here I provide my perspective on the continuum of pluripotency in the early mammalian embryo. I also discuss how novel genomic technologies are now enabling the capture of molecular "snapshots" of the several distinct pluripotent states that stem cells undergo during this pivotal developmental period. PMID:26833092

  15. Fiber optic snapshot hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Vaillancourt, Robert

    2012-06-01

    OPTRA is developing a snapshot hyperspectral imager (HSI) employing a fiber optic bundle and dispersive spectrometer. The fiber optic bundle converts a broadband spatial image to an array of fiber columns which serve as multiple entrance slits to a prism spectrometer. The dispersed spatially resolved spectra are then sampled by a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) at a greater than 30 Hz update rate, thereby qualifying the system as snapshot. Unlike snapshot HSI systems based on computed tomography or coded apertures, our approach requires only the remapping of the FPA frame into hyperspectral cubes rather than a complex reconstruction. Our system has high radiometric efficiency and throughput supporting sufficient signal to noise for hyperspectral imaging measurements made over very short integration times (< 33 ms). The overall approach is compact, low cost, and contains no moving parts, making it ideal for unmanned airborne surveillance. In this paper we present a preliminary design for the fiber optic snapshot HSI system.

  16. Applications of nuclear and isotopic techniques in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmy, N.; Hendranto, K.

    1994-12-31

    Applications of Nuclear and Isotopic Techniques have been developed by the National Atomic Energy Agency (BATAN) since early 1970 in Indonesia. The scope of these applications covers various fields such as agriculture, hydrology, sedimentology and industry. Some applications of tracer techniques in industry which have been done such as measurement of homogeneity of mixing process in fertiliser and paper factory, residence time distribution in gold processing plant, mercury inventory in caustic soda plant, enhanced oil recovery in oil production wells, leakage investigation in dust chamber of fertiliser plant and blockage of pipeline, are presented in this paper. In the field of NDT by radiographic technique, BATAN regularly conducts training courses and also issues licences for Level I and II. Some applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture such as mutation breeding, animal production and animal health have shown the potential of radiation in creating variability as a basis for varietal improvements in several food crop species, the potential of using isotopes as tracers in the studies on metabolism, particularly in relation to the efficiency of rumen fermentative digestion and biological evaluation of locally available feedstuffs from agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts. So far, four varieties of nice, two varieties of soybean, and one variety of mungbean have been officially approved for release, and one formulation of feed supplement utilizing locally available agricultural and agro-industrial byproducts has been established and used for cattle and goats. In animal health, a radiovaccine against coccidiosis in poultry has been produced and used routinely.

  17. SNAPSHOT: A MODERN, SUSTAINABLE HOLDUP MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Smith, Steven E; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Dunn, Michael E; Stewart, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    SNAPSHOT is a software platform designed to eventually replace Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS 4), which is the current state-of-the-art for acquisition and analysis of nondestructive assay measurement data for in situ nuclear materials, holdup, in support of criticality safety and material control and accounting. HMS 4 is over 10 years old and is currently unsustainable due to hardware and software incompatibilities that have arisen from advances in detector electronics, primarily updates to multi-channel analyzers (MCAs), and both computer and handheld operating systems. SNAPSHOT is a complete redesign of HMS 4 that addresses the issue of compatibility with modern MCAs and operating systems and that is designed with a flexible architecture to support long-term sustainability. It also provides an updated and more user friendly interface and is being developed under an NQA 1 software quality assurance (SQA) program to facilitate site acceptance for safety-related applications. This paper provides an overview of the SNAPSHOT project including details of the software development process, the SQA program, and the architecture designed to support sustainability.

  18. Stable isotopes and elasmobranchs: tissue types, methods, applications and assumptions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, N E; MacNeil, M A; Olin, J A; McMeans, B C; Kinney, M J; Chapman, D D; Fisk, A T

    2012-04-01

    Stable-isotope analysis (SIA) can act as a powerful ecological tracer with which to examine diet, trophic position and movement, as well as more complex questions pertaining to community dynamics and feeding strategies or behaviour among aquatic organisms. With major advances in the understanding of the methodological approaches and assumptions of SIA through dedicated experimental work in the broader literature coupled with the inherent difficulty of studying typically large, highly mobile marine predators, SIA is increasingly being used to investigate the ecology of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays). Here, the current state of SIA in elasmobranchs is reviewed, focusing on available tissues for analysis, methodological issues relating to the effects of lipid extraction and urea, the experimental dynamics of isotopic incorporation, diet-tissue discrimination factors, estimating trophic position, diet and mixing models and individual specialization and niche-width analyses. These areas are discussed in terms of assumptions made when applying SIA to the study of elasmobranch ecology and the requirement that investigators standardize analytical approaches. Recommendations are made for future SIA experimental work that would improve understanding of stable-isotope dynamics and advance their application in the study of sharks, skates and rays. PMID:22497393

  19. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomics and applications for drug development

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Teresa W-M.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Sellers, Katherine; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Higashi, Richard M.; Lane, Andrew N.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in analytical methodologies, principally nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), during the last decade have made large-scale analysis of the human metabolome a reality. This is leading to the reawakening of the importance of metabolism in human diseases, particularly cancer. The metabolome is the functional readout of the genome, functional genome, and proteome; it is also an integral partner in molecular regulations for homeostasis. The interrogation of the metabolome, or metabolomics, is now being applied to numerous diseases, largely by metabolite profiling for biomarker discovery, but also in pharmacology and therapeutics. Recent advances in stable isotope tracer-based metabolomic approaches enable unambiguous tracking of individual atoms through compartmentalized metabolic networks directly in human subjects, which promises to decipher the complexity of the human metabolome at an unprecedented pace. This knowledge will revolutionize our understanding of complex human diseases, clinical diagnostics, as well as individualized therapeutics and drug response. In this review, we focus on the use of stable isotope tracers with metabolomics technologies for understanding metabolic network dynamics in both model systems and in clinical applications. Atom-resolved isotope tracing via the two major analytical platforms, NMR and MS, has the power to determine novel metabolic reprogramming in diseases, discover new drug targets, and facilitates ADME studies. We also illustrate new metabolic tracer-based imaging technologies, which enable direct visualization of metabolic processes in vivo. We further outline current practices and future requirements for biochemoinformatics development, which is an integral part of translating stable isotope-resolved metabolomics into clinical reality. PMID:22212615

  20. Saturn's Infrared Temperature Snapshot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    Scientists have discovered a wave pattern, or oscillation, in Saturn's atmosphere only visible from Earth every 15 years. The pattern ripples back and forth like a wave within Saturn's upper atmosphere. In this region, temperatures switch from one altitude to the next in a candy cane-like, striped, hot-cold pattern.

    The temperature 'snapshot' shown in these two images captures two different phases of this wave oscillation: the temperature at Saturn's equator switches from hot to cold, and temperatures on either side of the equator switch from cold to hot every Saturn half-year.

    The image on the left was taken in 1997 and shows the temperature at the equator is colder than the temperature at 13 degrees south latitude. Conversely, the image on the right taken in 2006 shows the temperature at the equator is warmer.

    These images were taken with NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Mauna Kea, Hawaii.

  1. Applications of C and N stable isotopes to ecological and environmental studies in seagrass ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Lepoint, Gilles; Dauby, Patrick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2004-12-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen are increasingly used in marine ecosystems, for ecological and environmental studies. Here, we examine some applications of stable isotopes as ecological integrators or tracers in seagrass ecosystem studies. We focus on both the use of natural isotope abundance as food web integrators or environmental tracers and on the use of stable isotopes as experimental tools. As ecosystem integrators, stable isotopes have helped to elucidate the general structure of trophic webs in temperate, Mediterranean and tropical seagrass ecosystems. As environmental tracers, stable isotopes have proven their utility in sewage impact measuring and mapping. However, to make such environmental studies more comprehensible, future works on understanding of basic reasons for variations of N and C stable isotopes in seagrasses should be encouraged. At least, as experimental tracers, stable isotopes allow the study of many aspects of N and C cycles at the scale of a plant or at the scale of the seagrass ecosystem. PMID:15556172

  2. Mobility. Snapshot Report, Spring 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This snapshot report presents information on student mobility for 2012. It offers data on the following: (1) Percentage of Students Completing Degrees at Four-Year Institutions Who Previously Enrolled at Two-Year Institutions; (2) Number of Years Between Degree Completion at Four-Year Institutions and Most Recent Enrollment at Two-Year…

  3. American Youth: A Statistical Snapshot.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, James R.

    This document presents a statistics snapshot of young people, aged 15 to 24 years. It provides a broad overview of trends documenting the direction of changes in social behavior and economic circumstances. The projected decline in the total number of youth from 43 million in 1980 to 35 million in 1995 will affect marriage and childbearing…

  4. Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature

    PubMed Central

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  5. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    PubMed

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  6. Isotopically Modified Molybdenum: Production for Application in Nuclear Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. Yu.; Bonarev, A. K.; Sulaberidze, G. A.; Borisevich, V. D.; Kulikov, G. G.; Shmelev, A. N.

    The possibility to use the isotopically modified molybdenum as a constructive material for the fuel rods of light water and fast reactors is discussed. The calculations demonstrate that the isotopically modified molybdenum with an average neutron absorption cross-section comparable to that of zirconium can be obtained with the reasonable for practice cost by a cascade of gas centrifuges, specially designed for separation of non-uranium isotopes.

  7. SnapShot: Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Braggio, Esteban; Kortüm, K Martin; Stewart, A Keith

    2015-11-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Genetic abnormalities are not only key events in the origin and progression of the disease but are also useful tools for prognosis, risk stratification, and therapeutic decision making. Although still incurable, a revolution in the treatment of MM is currently ongoing, leading to a significant improvement of clinical outcome and survival. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26555176

  8. The potential for application of ink stable isotope analysis in questioned document examination.

    PubMed

    Chesson, Lesley A; Tipple, Brett J; Barnette, Janet E; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a novel application of stable isotope abundance analysis of nitrogen (15N), carbon (13C), hydrogen (2H), and oxygen (18O) to characterize pen ink. We focused on both ballpoint and gel pen inks. We found that the isotope ratios of ink from pens purchased together in a package were similar and within-package stable isotope ratio variability was not significantly larger than the variability of isotope reference materials used during analysis. In contrast, the isotope ratios of ink from pens of the same brand purchased in three states of the continental USA were significantly different from each other and there was isotope ratio variation among pens of the same brand but different, unknown production periods. The stable isotope ratios of inked paper were statistically distinguishable using measured δ15N values. Paper inked with different gel pens was statistically distinguishable using measured δ2H values. The capacity of stable isotope ratios to differentiate among ballpoint inks as well as gel inks shows that stable isotope analysis may be a useful and quantifiable investigative technique for questioned document examination, although current sample size requirements limit its utility. Application of the technique in casework will require the development of micro-scale sampling and analysis methods. PMID:25577004

  9. Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

    2009-01-01

    etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

  10. Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Smith, R.L.; Miller, D.N.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) is a major constituent of many contaminated groundwaters, but its movement through aquifers is complex and poorly documented. In this study, processes affecting NH4+ movement in a treated wastewater plume were studied by a combination of techniques including large-scale monitoring of NH4+ distribution; isotopic analyses of coexisting aqueous NH4+, NO3-, N2, and sorbed NH 4+; and in situ natural gradient 15NH 4+ tracer tests with numerical simulations of 15NH4+, 15NO3-, and 15N2 breakthrough data. Combined results indicate that the main mass of NH4+ was moving downgradient at a rate about 0.25 times the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4+ in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3- and excess N2 gas, which were related to each other by denitrification near the plume source, were moving downgradient more rapidly and were largely unrelated to coexisting NH 4+. The ??15N data indicate areas of the plume affected by nitrification (substantial isotope fractionation) and sorption (no isotope fractionation). There was no conclusive evidence for NH 4+-consuming reactions (nitrification or anammox) in the anoxic core of the plume. Nitrification occurred along the upper boundary of the plume but was limited by a low rate of transverse dispersive mixing of wastewater NH4+ and O2 from overlying uncontaminated groundwater. Without induced vertical mixing or displacement of plume water with oxic groundwater from upgradient sources, the main mass of NH4+ could reach a discharge area without substantial reaction long after the more mobile wastewater constituents are gone. Multiple approaches including in situ isotopic tracers and fractionation studies provided critical information about processes affecting NH4+ movement and N speciation.

  11. Snapshot advantage: a review of the light collection improvement for parallel high-dimensional measurement systems

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan; Kester, Robert T.; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2012-01-01

    The snapshot advantage is a large increase in light collection efficiency available to high-dimensional measurement systems that avoid filtering and scanning. After discussing this advantage in the context of imaging spectrometry, where the greatest effort towards developing snapshot systems has been made, we describe the types of measurements where it is applicable. We then generalize it to the larger context of high-dimensional measurements, where the advantage increases geometrically with measurement dimensionality. PMID:22791926

  12. Curriculum Snapshots: Picture Technology in Your Classroom!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Lori S., Ed.

    This booklet provides glimpses into the classrooms of real teachers at various stages of technology integration. The "Snapshots" offered in this document illustrate appropriate and creative uses of technology at many grade levels and within different subject areas. The Curriculum Snapshots are organized by grade level (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12). Each…

  13. SnapShot: Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Turajlic, Samra; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2015-12-01

    This SnapShot summarizes current knowledge about the key features in mutational landscape, major pathways, and tumor evolution and heterogeneity in renal cell carcinoma, as well as the most recent advances in therapeutic development. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26638079

  14. Snapshot colored compressive spectral imager.

    PubMed

    Correa, Claudia V; Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-10-01

    Traditional spectral imaging approaches require sensing all the voxels of a scene. Colored mosaic FPA detector-based architectures can acquire sets of the scene's spectral components, but the number of spectral planes depends directly on the number of available filters used on the FPA, which leads to reduced spatiospectral resolutions. Instead of sensing all the voxels of the scene, compressive spectral imaging (CSI) captures coded and dispersed projections of the spatiospectral source. This approach mitigates the resolution issues by exploiting optical phenomena in lenses and other elements, which, in turn, compromise the portability of the devices. This paper presents a compact snapshot colored compressive spectral imager (SCCSI) that exploits the benefits of the colored mosaic FPA detectors and the compression capabilities of CSI sensing techniques. The proposed optical architecture has no moving parts and can capture the spatiospectral information of a scene in a single snapshot by using a dispersive element and a color-patterned detector. The optical and the mathematical models of SCCSI are presented along with a testbed implementation of the system. Simulations and real experiments show the accuracy of SCCSI and compare the reconstructions with those of similar CSI optical architectures, such as the CASSI and SSCSI systems, resulting in improvements of up to 6 dB and 1 dB of PSNR, respectively. PMID:26479928

  15. Longwave infrared snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumiller, Riley

    The goal of this dissertation research is to develop and demonstrate a functioning snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter for the long wavelength infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths from 8-12 microns). Such an optical system will be able to simultaneously measure both the spectral and polarimetric signatures of all the spatial locations/targets in a scene with just a single integration period of a camera. This will be accomplished by combining the use of computed tomographic imaging spectrometry (CTIS) and channeled spectropolarimetry. The proposed system will be the first instrument of this type specifically designed to operate in the long wavelength infrared region, as well as being the first demonstration of such a system using an uncooled infrared focal plane array. In addition to the design and construction of the proof-of-concept snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter LWIR system, the dissertation research will also focus on a variety of methods on improving CTIS system performance. These enhancements will include some newly proposed methods of system design, calibration, and reconstruction aimed at improving the speed of reconstructions allowing for the first demonstration of a CTIS system capable of computing reconstructions in real time.

  16. Unique Features and Spacecraft Applications of Dynamic Isotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, B.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic isotope power system represents the most recent attempt to develop a heat-engine generator for space electric power. A major objective in this most recent effort was to increase the power and to reduce the cost of nuclear space power systems to the point where the unique features of this power source could be brought to bear for Earth-orbit missions which could benefit therefrom. This objective was largely achieved; both weight and cost of the dynamic isotope systems are comparable to solar power systems. The dynamic isotope power system, designed for spacecraft requiring prime power in the 500-2000 W range, has been successfully built and ground tested. A number of studies, summarized herein, have demonstrated the advantages of using such a power system instead of the conventional solar system for a variety of Earth-orbit missions. These advantages stem from the unique nature of the dynamic isotope system, different in kind from solar power systems. As a result, in many cases, the spacecraft design can be significantly simplified and more closely harmonized with mission requirements. This overall advantage can be crucial in missions which have stringent pointing, stability, viewing, and/or positioning requirements.

  17. Application of the laser ion source for isotope shift and hyperfine structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Chubukov, I. Ya.; Fedorov, D. V.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    1998-12-01

    A high-efficient method for measuring isotope shifts and hyperfine structures in optical transitions of radioactive atoms is presented. The method is based on application of laser resonance ionization in the mass-separator ion source. The sensitivity of the method is determined by a high efficiency of the laser ion source and low background of the detection system, making use of counting α-particles following the decay of the isotope under investigation. The possibilities of this method are shown in the experiment with 155Yb and 154Tm (I=9). The isotope shifts and electromagnetic moments have been measured.

  18. THE SNAPSHOT HUBBLE U-BAND CLUSTER SURVEY (SHUCS). I. SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND FIRST APPLICATION TO THE MIXED STAR CLUSTER POPULATION OF NGC 4041

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Smith, L. J.; Adamo, A.; Silva-Villa, E.; Gallagher, J. S.; Ryon, J. E.; Bastian, N.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Zackrisson, E.; Larsen, S. S.; Charlton, J. C.

    2013-05-15

    We present the Snapshot Hubble U-band Cluster Survey (SHUCS), a project aimed at characterizing the star cluster populations of 10 nearby galaxies (d < 23 Mpc, half within Almost-Equal-To 12 Mpc) through new F336W (U-band equivalent) imaging from Wide Field Camera 3, and archival BVI-equivalent data with the Hubble Space Telescope. Completing the UBVI baseline reduces the age-extinction degeneracy of optical colors, thus enabling the measurement of reliable ages and masses for the thousands of clusters covered by our survey. The sample consists chiefly of face-on spiral galaxies at low inclination, in various degrees of isolation (isolated, in group, merging), and includes two active galactic nucleus hosts. This first paper outlines the survey itself, the observational datasets, the analysis methods, and presents a proof-of-concept study of the large-scale properties and star cluster population of NGC 4041, a massive SAbc galaxy at a distance of Almost-Equal-To 23 Mpc, and part of a small grouping of six giant members. We resolve two structural components with distinct stellar populations, a morphology more akin to merging and interacting systems. We also find strong evidence of a truncated, Schechter-type mass function, and a similarly segmented luminosity function. These results indicate that binning must erase much of the substructure present in the mass and luminosity functions, and might account for the conflicting reports on the intrinsic shape of these functions in the literature. We also note a tidal feature in the outskirts of the galaxy in Galaxy Evolution Explorer UV imaging, and follow it up with a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of NGC 4041 and its parent group. We deduce a minor merger as a likely cause of its segmented structure and the observed pattern of a radially decreasing star formation rate. We propose that combining the study of star cluster populations with broadband metrics is not only advantageous, but often easily achievable thorough

  19. Reactor Fuel Isotopics and Code Validation for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Matthew W.; Weber, Charles F.; Pigni, Marco T.; Gauld, Ian C.

    2015-02-01

    Experimentally measured isotopic concentrations of well characterized spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples have been collected and analyzed by previous researchers. These sets of experimental data have been used extensively to validate the accuracy of depletion code predictions for given sets of burnups, initial enrichments, and varying power histories for different reactor types. The purpose of this report is to present the diversity of data in a concise manner and summarize the current accuracy of depletion modeling. All calculations performed for this report were done using the Oak Ridge Isotope GENeration (ORIGEN) code, an internationally used irradiation and decay code solver within the SCALE comprehensive modeling and simulation code. The diversity of data given in this report includes key actinides, stable fission products, and radioactive fission products. In general, when using the current ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries in SCALE, the major actinides are predicted to within 5% of the measured values. Large improvements were seen for several of the curium isotopes when using improved cross section data found in evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-VII.0 as compared to ENDF/B-V-based results. The impact of the flux spectrum on the plutonium isotope concentrations as a function of burnup was also shown. The general accuracy noted for the actinide samples for reactor types with burnups greater than 5,000 MWd/MTU was not observed for the low-burnup Hanford B samples. More work is needed in understanding these large discrepancies. The stable neodymium and samarium isotopes were predicted to within a few percent of the measured values. Large improvements were seen in prediction for a few of the samarium isotopes when using the ENDF/B-VII.0 libraries compared to results obtained with ENDF/B-V libraries. Very accurate predictions were obtained for 133Cs and 153Eu. However, the predicted values for the stable ruthenium and rhodium isotopes varied

  20. Non-standard isotope production and applications at Washington University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Timothy J.; McCarthy, Deborah W.; Laforest, Richard; Bigott, Heather M.; Wüst, Frank; Reichert, David E.; Lewis, Michael R.; Welch, Michael J.

    2001-07-01

    The positron emitting radionuclides, oxygen-15, nitrogen-13, carbon-11, and fluorine-18 have been produced at Washington University for many years utilizing two biomedical cyclotrons; a Cyclotron Corporation CS15 and a Japan Steel Works 16/8 cyclotron. In recent years we have become interested in the production of non-standard PET isotopes. We were initially interested in copper-64 production using the 64Ni(p,n)64Cu nuclear reaction, but now apply this technique to other positron emitting copper isotopes, copper-60 and copper-61. Copper-64 is being produced routinely and made available to other institutions. In 1999 over ten Curies of copper-64 were produced, making copper available to thirteen institutions, as well as research groups at Washington University. We are currently developing methods for the routine productions of other PET radioisotopes of interest, these include; bromine-76, bromine-77, iodine-124, gallium-66, and technetium-94m.

  1. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  3. Snapshot hyperspectral retinal camera with the Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Smith, R. Theodore; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a snapshot hyperspectral retinal camera with the Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) for eye imaging applications. The resulting system is capable of simultaneously acquiring 48 spectral channel images in the range 470 nm–650 nm with frame rate at 5.2 fps. The spatial sampling of each measured spectral scene is 350 × 350 pixels. The advantages of this snapshot device are elimination of the eye motion artifacts and pixel misregistration problems in traditional scanning-based hyperspectral retinal cameras, and real-time imaging of oxygen saturation dynamics with sub-second temporal resolution. The spectral imaging performance is demonstrated in a human retinal imaging experiment in vivo. The absorption spectral signatures of oxy-hemoglobin and macular pigments were successfully acquired by using this device. PMID:22254167

  4. Application of Stable Isotope-Assisted Metabolomics for Cell Metabolism Studies

    PubMed Central

    You, Le; Zhang, Baichen; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2014-01-01

    The applications of stable isotopes in metabolomics have facilitated the study of cell metabolisms. Stable isotope-assisted metabolomics requires: (1) properly designed tracer experiments; (2) stringent sampling and quenching protocols to minimize isotopic alternations; (3) efficient metabolite separations; (4) high resolution mass spectrometry to resolve overlapping peaks and background noises; and (5) data analysis methods and databases to decipher isotopic clusters over a broad m/z range (mass-to-charge ratio). This paper overviews mass spectrometry based techniques for precise determination of metabolites and their isotopologues. It also discusses applications of isotopic approaches to track substrate utilization, identify unknown metabolites and their chemical formulas, measure metabolite concentrations, determine putative metabolic pathways, and investigate microbial community populations and their carbon assimilation patterns. In addition, 13C-metabolite fingerprinting and metabolic models can be integrated to quantify carbon fluxes (enzyme reaction rates). The fluxome, in combination with other “omics” analyses, may give systems-level insights into regulatory mechanisms underlying gene functions. More importantly, 13C-tracer experiments significantly improve the potential of low-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for broad-scope metabolism studies. We foresee the isotope-assisted metabolomics to be an indispensable tool in industrial biotechnology, environmental microbiology, and medical research. PMID:24957020

  5. Application of the laser ion source for isotope shift and hyperfine structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliverstov, M. D.; Barzakh, A. E.; Chubukov, I. Ya.; Fedorov, D. V.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2000-08-01

    The study of nuclei far from stability requires high sensitivity of the experimental technique. The method of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy in a Laser Ion Source (RIS/LIS) allows one to carry out measurements of the isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings for isotopes at the production rate about 102 atoms per second. The sensitivity of this method is determined by the high efficiency of the laser ion source and the low background of the detection system afforded by characteristic α particle registration. The isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of 155Yb, 154Tm (I=9 and I=2) and 153Tm (I=11/2) have been measured and the isotopic changes in mean square charge radii and nuclear electromagnetic moments have been determined. The further development of this experimental method - enhanced Target Ion Source system aimed to suppress thermionic background - enables direct detection of the photoions and widens the range of the applicability of the RIS/LIS method.

  6. High Precision Isotope Analyses Using Multi-Collector SIMS: Applications to Earth and Planetary Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, N. T.; Ushikubo, T.; Valley, J. W.

    2008-05-01

    The CAMECA IMS-1280 large radius, multicollector ion microprobe at the Wisc-SIMS National Facility is capable of high accuracy and precision for in situ analysis of isotope ratios. With improved hardware stability and software capability, high precision isotope analyses are routinely performed, typically 5 min per spot. We have developed analytical protocols for stable isotope analyses of oxygen, carbon, Mg, Si and Sulfur using multi-collector Faraday Cups (MCFC) and achieved precision of 0.1-0.2 ‰ (1SD) from a typically 10μm spot analyses. A number of isotopically homogeneous mineral standards have been prepared and calibrated in order to certify the accuracy of analyses in the same level. When spatial resolution is critical, spot size is reduced down to sub- μm for δ 18O to obtain better than 0.5‰ (1SD) precision by using electron multiplier (EM) on multi-collection system. Multi-collection EM analysis is also applied at 10 ppm level to Li isotope ratios in zircon with precision better than 2‰ (1SD). A few applications will be presented. (1) Oxygen three isotope analyses of chondrules in ordinary chondrites revealed both mass dependent and mass independent oxygen isotope fractionations among chondrules as well as within individual chondrules. The results give constraints on the process of chondrule formation and origin of isotope reservoirs in the early solar system. (2) High precision 26Al-26Mg (half life of 0.73 Ma) chronology is applied to zoned melilite and anorthite from Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAI) in Leoville meteorite, and a well-defined internal isochron is obtained. The results indicate the Al- Mg system was remained closed within 40ky of the crystallization of melilite and anorthite in this CAI. (3) Sub- μm spot analyses of δ18O in isotopically zoned zircon from high-grade metamorphism reveals a diffusion profile of ~6‰ over 2μm, indicating slow diffusion of oxygen in zircon. This result also implies that old Archean detrital zircons (> 4

  7. Electric Vehicles--A Historical Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraft, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Most people don't realize that the history of electric vehicles (EVs) predates the Civil War. This article provides a historical snapshot of EVs to spark the interest of both teachers and students in this important transportation technology.

  8. Demonstration of snapshot imaging polarimeter using modified Savart polariscopes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jing; DeHoog, Edward; Zhang, Chunmin

    2016-02-10

    In an earlier publication, [Appl. Opt.51, 5791 (2012)] we demonstrated by theoretical analysis that a snapshot imaging polarimeter using modified Savart polariscopes (MSP-SIP) is comparable in carrier frequency, signal-to-noise ratio, and spatial resolution to a snapshot imaging polarimeter using conventional Savart polariscopes. In this investigation, numerical simulation is used to demonstrate the feasibility of MSP-SIP and investigate the limitation of the filtration and the Fourier analysis decoupling the polarization information encoded through the spatial modulation. In addition, a laboratory experiment is conducted to demonstrate the validity of MSP-SIP. The MSP-SIP operates on the principle of encoding polarization information within the spatial modulation of the image. This unique technology allows all Stokes parameters to be simultaneously recorded from every spatial position in an image with a single integration period of the imaging system. The device contains no moving parts and requires no scanning, allowing it to acquire data without the motion artifacts normally associated with a scanning polarimeter. In addition to snapshot imaging and static (no moving parts) capabilities, image processing is simple, and the device is compact and miniature. Therefore, we believe that MSP-SIP will be useful in many applications, such as remote sensing and bioscience. PMID:26906358

  9. Limited-memory adaptive snapshot selection for proper orthogonal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Oxberry, Geoffrey M.; Kostova-Vassilevska, Tanya; Arrighi, Bill; Chand, Kyle

    2015-04-02

    Reduced order models are useful for accelerating simulations in many-query contexts, such as optimization, uncertainty quantification, and sensitivity analysis. However, offline training of reduced order models can have prohibitively expensive memory and floating-point operation costs in high-performance computing applications, where memory per core is limited. To overcome this limitation for proper orthogonal decomposition, we propose a novel adaptive selection method for snapshots in time that limits offline training costs by selecting snapshots according an error control mechanism similar to that found in adaptive time-stepping ordinary differential equation solvers. The error estimator used in this work is related to theory bounding the approximation error in time of proper orthogonal decomposition-based reduced order models, and memory usage is minimized by computing the singular value decomposition using a single-pass incremental algorithm. Results for a viscous Burgers’ test problem demonstrate convergence in the limit as the algorithm error tolerances go to zero; in this limit, the full order model is recovered to within discretization error. The resulting method can be used on supercomputers to generate proper orthogonal decomposition-based reduced order models, or as a subroutine within hyperreduction algorithms that require taking snapshots in time, or within greedy algorithms for sampling parameter space.

  10. Strategies for Application of Isotopic Uncertainties in Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, I.C.

    2002-12-23

    Uncertainties in the predicted isotopic concentrations in spent nuclear fuel represent one of the largest sources of overall uncertainty in criticality calculations that use burnup credit. The methods used to propagate the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations to the uncertainty in the predicted neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of the system can have a significant effect on the uncertainty in the safety margin in criticality calculations and ultimately affect the potential capacity of spent fuel transport and storage casks employing burnup credit. Methods that can provide a more accurate and realistic estimate of the uncertainty may enable increased spent fuel cask capacity and fewer casks needing to be transported, thereby reducing regulatory burden on licensee while maintaining safety for transporting spent fuel. This report surveys several different best-estimate strategies for considering the effects of nuclide uncertainties in burnup-credit analyses. The potential benefits of these strategies are illustrated for a prototypical burnup-credit cask design. The subcritical margin estimated using best-estimate methods is discussed in comparison to the margin estimated using conventional bounding methods of uncertainty propagation. To quantify the comparison, each of the strategies for estimating uncertainty has been performed using a common database of spent fuel isotopic assay measurements for pressurized-light-water reactor fuels and predicted nuclide concentrations obtained using the current version of the SCALE code system. The experimental database applied in this study has been significantly expanded to include new high-enrichment and high-burnup spent fuel assay data recently published for a wide range of important burnup-credit actinides and fission products. Expanded rare earth fission-product measurements performed at the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia that contain the only known publicly-available measurement for {sup 103

  11. Application of non-traditional stable isotopes in analytical ecogeochemistry assessed by MC ICP-MS--A critical review.

    PubMed

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ecogeochemistry is an evolving scientific field dedicated to the development of analytical methods and tools and their application to ecological questions. Traditional stable isotopic systems have been widely explored and have undergone continuous development during the last century. The variations of the isotopic composition of light elements (H, O, N, C, and S) have provided the foundation of stable isotope analysis followed by the analysis of traditional geochemical isotope tracers (e.g., Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf). Questions in a considerable diversity of scientific fields have been addressed, many of which can be assigned to the field of ecogeochemistry. Over the past 15 years, other stable isotopes (e.g., Li, Zn, Cu, Cl) have emerged gradually as novel tools for the investigation of scientific topics that arise in ecosystem research and have enabled novel discoveries and explorations. These systems are often referred to as non-traditional isotopes. The small isotopic differences of interest that are increasingly being addressed for a growing number of isotopic systems represent a challenge to the analytical scientist and push the limits of today's instruments constantly. This underlines the importance of a metrologically sound concept of analytical protocols and procedures and a solid foundation of data processing strategies and uncertainty considerations before these small isotopic variations can be interpreted in the context of applied ecosystem research. This review focuses on the development of isotope research in ecogeochemistry, the requirements for successful detection of small isotopic shifts, and highlights the most recent and innovative applications in the field. PMID:26446900

  12. 78 FR 63501 - Request To Submit a Two-Part Application-Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Rules of Practice and Procedure,'' on April 24, 1974 (39 FR 14506). The intent of this final rule was to... licenses under 10 CFR part 52, ``Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants'' (72 FR... COMMISSION Request To Submit a Two-Part Application--Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC AGENCY:...

  13. An open source Bayesian Monte Carlo isotope mixing model with applications in Earth surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Carli A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Hetland, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    The implementation of isotopic tracers as constraints on source contributions has become increasingly relevant to understanding Earth surface processes. Interpretation of these isotopic tracers has become more accessible with the development of Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) mixing models, which allow uncertainty in mixing end-members and provide methodology for systems with multicomponent mixing. This study presents an open source multiple isotope BMC mixing model that is applicable to Earth surface environments with sources exhibiting distinct end-member isotopic signatures. Our model is first applied to new δ18O and δD measurements from the Athabasca Glacier, which showed expected seasonal melt evolution trends and vigorously assessed the statistical relevance of the resulting fraction estimations. To highlight the broad applicability of our model to a variety of Earth surface environments and relevant isotopic systems, we expand our model to two additional case studies: deriving melt sources from δ18O, δD, and 222Rn measurements of Greenland Ice Sheet bulk water samples and assessing nutrient sources from ɛNd and 87Sr/86Sr measurements of Hawaiian soil cores. The model produces results for the Greenland Ice Sheet and Hawaiian soil data sets that are consistent with the originally published fractional contribution estimates. The advantage of this method is that it quantifies the error induced by variability in the end-member compositions, unrealized by the models previously applied to the above case studies. Results from all three case studies demonstrate the broad applicability of this statistical BMC isotopic mixing model for estimating source contribution fractions in a variety of Earth surface systems.

  14. Snapshot imaging polarimeters using spatial modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haitao

    The recent demonstration of a novel snapshot imaging polarimeter using the fringe modulation technique shows a promise in building a compact and moving-parts-free device. As just demonstrated in principle, this technique has not been adequately studied. In the effort of advancing this technique, we build a complete theory framework that can address the key issues regarding the polarization aberrations caused by using the functional elements. With this model, we can have the necessary knowledge in designing, analyzing and optimizing the systems. Also, we propose a broader technique that uses arbitrary modulation instead of sinusoidal fringes, which can give us more engineering freedom and can be the solution of achromatizing the system. In the hardware aspect, several important progresses are made. We extend the polarimeter technique from visible to middle wavelength infrared by using the yttrium vanadate crystals. Also, we incorporate a Savart Plate polarimter into a fundus camera to measure the human eye's retinal retardance, useful information for glaucoma diagnosis. Thirdly, a world-smallest imaging polarimeter is proposed and demonstrated, which may open many applications in security, remote sensing and bioscience.

  15. Geochemistry of beryllium isotopes: Applications in geochronometry. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The cosmogenic radioisotope beryllium-10 (half-life= 1.5 Myr) has been determined in suites of samples from tropical river systems and from areas of the oceans influenced by input from the continents, and also within the mineral lattices of quartz grains from Antarctic moraines. These data have been used to investigate the geochemistry of 10Be and apply that knowledge to development of geochronometric techniques. Beryllium-10 is primarily produced by neutron-induced spallation of 14N and 16O in the atmosphere; its flux to the Earth's surface at low latitude was examined through measurements in tropical rainfall. Distributions of 10Be and 9Be (the stable isotope) in dissolved and particulate phases in tropical rivers were used, in conjunction with major ion data, to delineate the geochemical cycle of Be in these river systems. The present work applies in situ cosmogenic production to the examination of the deposition history of moraines of varying ages in Antarctica. It also yields estimates of 10Be and 26Al production rates: 6.4(+5.9-1.5) at/g yr and 42(+20-6) at/g yr at sea level and high geomagnetic latitude.

  16. Application of Uranium Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry in the preparation of New Certified Reference Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasözbek, A.; Mathew, K. J.; Orlowicz, G.; Srinivasan, B.; Narayanan, U.

    2012-04-01

    Proven measurement techniques play a critical role in the preparation of Certified Reference Materials (CRMs) - those requiring high accuracy and precision in the measurement results. Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) is one such measurement method commonly used in the quantitative analysis of uranium in nuclear safeguards and isotope geology applications. In this project, we evaluated the possibility of using some of the uranium isotopic and assay CRMs made earlier by the New Brunswick laboratory as IDMS spikes to define the uranium mass fraction in future preparations of CRMs. Uranium solutions prepared from CRM 112-A (a highly pure uranium metal assay standard) and CRM 115 (a highly pure uranium oxide isotopic and assay standard) were used as spikes in the determination of uranium. Two different thermal ionization mass spectrometer instruments (MAT 261 and TRITON) were used for the isotopic measurements. Standard IDMS equation was used for data reduction to yield results for uranium mass fraction along with uncertainties, the latter calculated according to GUM. The results show that uranium mass fraction measurements can be made with the required accuracy and precision for defining the uranium concentration in new CRMs as well as in routine samples analyses.

  17. Automated isotopic measurements of micron-sized dust: application to meteoritic presolar silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, Larry R.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.

    2003-12-01

    We report the development of a new analytical system allowing the fully automated measurement of isotopic ratios in micrometer-sized particles by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a Cameca ims-6f ion microprobe. Scanning ion images and image processing algorithms are used to locate individual particles dispersed on sample substrates. The primary ion beam is electrostatically deflected to and focused onto each particle in turn, followed by a peak-jumping isotopic measurement. Automatic measurements of terrestrial standards indicate similar analytical uncertainties to traditional manual particle analyses (e.g., ˜3‰/amu for Si isotopic ratios). We also present an initial application of the measurement system to obtain Si and C isotopic ratios for ˜3300 presolar SiC grains from the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite. Three rare presolar Si 3N 4 grains were also identified and analyzed. Most of the analyzed grains were extracted from the host meteorite using a new chemical dissolution procedure. The isotopic data are broadly consistent with previous observations of presolar SiC in the same size range (˜0.5-4 μm). Members of the previously identified SiC AB, X, Y, and Z subgroups were identified, as was a highly unusual grain with an extreme 30Si enrichment, a modest 29Si enrichment, and isotopically light C. The stellar source responsible for this grain is likely to have been a supernova. Minor differences in isotopic distributions between the present work and prior data can be partially explained by terrestrial contamination and grain aggregation on sample mounts, though some of the differences are probably intrinsic to the samples. We use the large new SiC database to explore the relationships between three previously identified isotopic subgroups—mainstream, Y, and Z grains—all believed to originate in asymptotic giant branch stars. The isotopic data for Z grains suggest that their parent stars experienced strong CNO-cycle nucleosynthesis during

  18. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  19. Snapshot retinal imaging Mueller matrix polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yifan; Kudenov, Michael; Kashani, Amir; Schwiegerling, Jim; Escuti, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Early diagnosis of glaucoma, which is a leading cause for visual impairment, is critical for successful treatment. It has been shown that Imaging polarimetry has advantages in early detection of structural changes in the retina. Here, we theoretically and experimentally present a snapshot Mueller Matrix Polarimeter fundus camera, which has the potential to record the polarization-altering characteristics of retina with a single snapshot. It is made by incorporating polarization gratings into a fundus camera design. Complete Mueller Matrix data sets can be obtained by analyzing the polarization fringes projected onto the image plane. In this paper, we describe the experimental implementation of the snapshot retinal imaging Mueller matrix polarimeter (SRIMMP), highlight issues related to calibration, and provide preliminary images acquired from the camera.

  20. SnapShot: Expanding the Ubiquitin Code.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-02-25

    The Ubiquitin (Ub) system coordinates vital cellular processes by controlling lifetime, signaling, and binding properties of proteins. Ub serves as a multivalent protein tag that is further diversified by post-translational modifications. Specialized Ub receptors then convert the encoded signals into cellular responses. This SnapShot highlights the importance of the rapidly expanding Ub code in biology as well as novel pharmacological approaches to target the Ub system in multiple diseases. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26919436

  1. A review of snapshot multidimensional optical imaging: Measuring photon tags in parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-02-01

    Multidimensional optical imaging has seen remarkable growth in the past decade. Rather than measuring only the two-dimensional spatial distribution of light, as in conventional photography, multidimensional optical imaging captures light in up to nine dimensions, providing unprecedented information about incident photons' spatial coordinates, emittance angles, wavelength, time, and polarization. Multidimensional optical imaging can be accomplished either by scanning or parallel acquisition. Compared with scanning-based imagers, parallel acquisition-also dubbed snapshot imaging-has a prominent advantage in maximizing optical throughput, particularly when measuring a datacube of high dimensions. Here, we first categorize snapshot multidimensional imagers based on their acquisition and image reconstruction strategies, then highlight the snapshot advantage in the context of optical throughput, and finally we discuss their state-of-the-art implementations and applications.

  2. An adaptive model order reduction by proper snapshot selection for nonlinear dynamical problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigro, P. S. B.; Anndif, M.; Teixeira, Y.; Pimenta, P. M.; Wriggers, P.

    2016-04-01

    Model Order Reduction (MOR) methods are employed in many fields of Engineering in order to reduce the processing time of complex computational simulations. A usual approach to achieve this is the application of Galerkin projection to generate representative subspaces (reduced spaces). However, when strong nonlinearities in a dynamical system are present and this technique is employed several times along the simulation, it can be very inefficient. This work proposes a new adaptive strategy, which ensures low computational cost and small error to deal with this problem. This work also presents a new method to select snapshots named Proper Snapshot Selection (PSS). The objective of the PSS is to obtain a good balance between accuracy and computational cost by improving the adaptive strategy through a better snapshot selection in real time (online analysis). With this method, it is possible a substantial reduction of the subspace, keeping the quality of the model without the use of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD).

  3. Stirling Isotope Power Systems for Stationary and Mobile Lunar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Penswick, L. Barry; Shaltens, Richard K.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) places a significant emphasis on the development of a wide range of capabilities on the lunar surface as a stepping-stone to further space exploration. An important aspect of developing these capabilities will be the availability of reliable, efficient, and low-mass power systems to support both stationary and mobile applications. One candidate system to provide electrical power is made by coupling the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) with a high-performance Stirling convertor. In this paper we explore the practical power range of GPHS/Stirling convertor systems all with conductively coupled hot-end designs for use on the lunar surface. Design and off-design operations during the life of the convertor are studied in addition to considering these varying conditions on system. Unique issues concerning Stirling convertor configurations, integration of the GPHS with the Stirling convertor, controller operation, waste heat rejection, and thermal protection are explored. Of particular importance in the evaluation process is a thorough understanding of the interactions between the wide range of unique lunar environments and the selection of key systems operating characteristics and the power systems design. Additionally, as power levels rise the interface between the GPHS and Stirling and the Stirling and the radiator begins to dominate system mass and material selection becomes more important.

  4. Examining Social Acceptance & Rejection. FPG Snapshot #44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This FPG Snapshot summarizes the findings of a study, published in the November 2006 issue of the "Journal of Educational Psychology," that examined whether children with disabilities are accepted or rejected by their classmates in inclusive classrooms. Specifically, the study examined two sets of related questions: (1) Are individual children…

  5. Gender Equity in Education: A Data Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This data snapshot highlights several differences in educational opportunities between males and females from prekindergarten through higher education. The information herein, gathered from a variety of education data sources, shows that--despite the enormous progress made in ensuring equal educational opportunities since the passage of Title IX…

  6. SnapShot: The Bacterial Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Fink, Gero; Szewczak-Harris, Andrzej; Löwe, Jan

    2016-07-14

    Most bacteria and archaea contain filamentous proteins and filament systems that are collectively known as the bacterial cytoskeleton, though not all of them are cytoskeletal, affect cell shape, or maintain intracellular organization. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:27419875

  7. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Light Bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  8. Symptoms: Personal Snapshots of Anxiety Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these conditions: Panic Disorder: "For me, a panic attack is almost a violent experience. I feel disconnected from reality. I feel like I'm losing control in a very extreme way. My heart ... / Studying Anxiety Disorders / Symptoms: Personal snapshots of anxiety ...

  9. Snapshot: Diabetes in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    A SNAPSHOT DIABETES IN THE UNITED STATES DIABETES 29.1 MILLION 29.1 million people have diabetes That's about 1 out of every 11 people 1 4 ... estimates of diabetes and its burden in the United States, 2014. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health ...

  10. Micropolarizer arrays in the MWIR for snapshot polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemme, S. A.; Cruz-Cabrera, A. A.; Nandy, R.; Boye, R. R.; Wendt, J. R.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2007-04-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and simulation of a four-state pixelated subwavelength optical device that enables mid-wave infrared (MWIR) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) snapshot polarimetric imaging. The polarization information can help to classify imaged materials and identify objects of interest for remote sensing and military applications. The fabricated pixelated polarizers have measured extinction ratios larger than 100:1 for pixel sizes greater than 9 microns by 9 microns, with transmitted signals greater than 50%. That exceeds, by 7 times, previously reported device extinction ratios for 15 micron by 15 micron pixels. Traditionally, sequential polarimetric imaging sensors produce scenes with polarization information through a series of assembled images. Snapshot polarimetric imaging collects the spatial distribution of all four Stokes' parameters simultaneously. In this way any noise due to scene movement from one frame to the next is eliminated. In this paper, we will quantify near-field and diffractive effects of the finite pixel apertures upon detection. We have designed and built an experimental setup that models a pixel within a focal plane array (FPA) to measure crosstalk from adjacent gold wiregrid micropolarizers. This configuration simulates a snapshot polarization imaging device where the two substrates are stacked; micropolarizer array substrate on top of an FPA. Modeling and measured data indicate crosstalk between the adjacent pixels up to a few microns behind the polarizer plane. Crosstalk between adjacent pixels increases uncertainty in the measured polarization states in a scene of interest. Measured and simulated data confirm that the extinction ratio of a micropolarizer pixel in a super-cell will be reduced by 17% when moving the FPA from 0.5 microns to 1.0 microns away from the polarizer. These changes in extinction ratio are significant since typical glue separation is on the order of 10 microns.

  11. Forensic applications of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in tracing nitrate sources in urban environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Ging, P.B.; Lee, R.W.; Ebbert, J.C.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Inkpen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground and surface waters in urban areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination from septic systems, leaking sewer lines, and fertilizer applications. Source identification is a primary step toward a successful remediation plan in affected areas. In this respect, nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate, in conjunction with hydrologic data and water chemistry, have proven valuable in urban studies from Austin, Texas, and Tacoma, Washington. In Austin, stream water was sampled during stremflow and baseflow conditions to assess surface and subsurface sources of nitrate, respectively. In Tacoma, well waters were sampled in adjacent sewered and un-sewered areas to determine if locally high nitrate concentrations were caused by septic systems in the un-sewered areas. In both studies, sewage was identified as a nitrate source and mixing between sewage and other sources of nitrate was apparent. In addition to source identification, combined nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were important in determining the significance of denitrification, which can complicate source assessment by reducing nitrate concentrations and increasing ??15N values. The two studies illustrate the value of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate for forensic applications in urban areas. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  12. Application of nitrogen stable isotope analysis in size-based marine food web and macroecological research.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Simon; Barnes, Carolyn; Sweeting, Christopher J; Polunin, Nicholas V C

    2008-06-01

    Interacting human and environmental pressures influence the structure and dynamics of marine food webs. To describe and predict the effects of these pressures, theoretical advances need to be supported by a capacity to validate the underlying models and assumptions. Here, we review recent applications of nitrogen stable isotope analysis in marine food web and macroecological research, with a focus on work that has paralleled a resurgence of interest in the development and application of size-based models. Nitrogen stable isotope data have been used to estimate intra- and inter-specific variation in trophic level, predator-prey size ratios, transfer efficiency, food chain length, relationships between predator and prey species diversity and the dynamics of energy use. Many of these estimates have contributed to the development, testing and parameterisation of food web and ecosystem models, some of which have been used to establish baselines for assessing the scale of human impacts. The interpretation of results depends on assumed fractionation but, when supported by sensitivity analyses and experimental validation, nitrogen stable isotope data provide valuable insights into the structuring of marine communities and ecosystems. PMID:18438766

  13. Improving carbonate clumped isotope thermometry for application to foraminifera-based paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meckler, A. N.; Ziegler, M.; Millán, I.; Breitenbach, S. F. M.; Kele, S.; Benning, L. G.; Rodriguez-Blanco, J. D.; Bernasconi, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry has great potential for solving long-standing questions in paleoceanography as it provides temperature estimates that are independent from assumptions regarding the isotopic or elemental composition of seawater. However, the application to foraminifera, which would allow reconstructing surface and deep-sea temperatures through the Cenozoic and beyond, is currently hampered by the relatively large sample amount requirements. Normally, several aliquots of 3-10 mg carbonate are needed to arrive at a precision of around 2 °C. At ETH we have worked towards decreasing the sample requirements by employing the Kiel carbonate preparation device. The Kiel system improves the gas use efficiency and allows balancing sample amount and precision for each sample due to the fact that multiple small aliquots are analyzed. Per measurement we normally use 8-10 aliquots of 150-200 μg carbonate each. With three such measurements (i.e., 4.5-6 mg carbonate) we typically arrive at a precision of around 2 °C (Meckler et al., RCM, 2014), and better precision can be achieved with an increased number of replicates. We are currently testing ways to reduce sample size and/or increase gas use efficiency further. Recent tests have shown that the size of individual aliquots can be reduced to 100 μg, suggesting that useful temperature estimates (± 2 °C) can be derived with as little as 2.5 mg carbonate. Uncertainties still exist in the temperature calibration of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer, which seem at least in part to be associated with differences in the methodology applied by different laboratories. We have therefore derived calibrations for the Kiel method based on synthetic and natural calcites. Current and planned applications of the improved Kiel clumped isotope method to paleoceanography focus on long-term trends and major events during the Cenozoic.

  14. The Modern Marine Ca-isotope Budget and its Application to the Phanerozoic Ca-isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattler, C. L.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Henderson, G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Variations in the calcium-isotope ratio (δ44/40Ca) of ancient seawater have been recorded in several studies using marine carbonate, barite, or apatite, but the causes of these variations have not been explored quantitatively. Seawater Ca-isotope ratios are affected by the average fractionation factor between seawater and the carbonate that precipitates from it, which is defined by the composition of the marine carbonate sink. To investigate possible changes in the fractionation factor of marine carbonate over the Phanerozoic, a Ca-isotope budget has been constructed for the modern oceans. Over 250 Ca-isotope measurements have been compiled from a wide variety of carbonate sources to describe the modern marine Ca-isotope budget. This dataset includes over 50 new measurements to characterize several components of the carbonate system, such as coral reefs, which are quantitatively important but have been undersampled, for example, relative to planktic foraminifera. δ44/40Ca values have been temperature-normalized using the relationship of +0.02% per °C, which permits observations and comparisons based on mineralogy, taxonomy, and locus of carbonate precipitation. A general offset of ~0.25%, increasing up to ~0.8% for certain taxa, is observed between subsets of aragonite and calcite samples; no statistical difference is observed between high-Mg calcite and low-Mg calcite. Additionally, within the data for calcite skeletons, two broad groups appear based on taxonomic patterns. Taxa with generally weak control over their biomineralization, such as sclerosponges, brachiopods, and calcareous red algae, are 0.4-0.5% heavier than organisms with more controlled calcification mechanisms, such as coccolithophores and planktic foraminifera. The patterns that emerge from this dataset for different clades demonstrate the usefulness of fossil carbonate for reconstructing the Ca-isotope ratio of ancient seawater. The composition of the modern Ca-isotope budget provides a basis

  15. Generation of stoichiometric ethylene and isotopic derivatives and application in transition-metal-catalyzed vinylation and enyne metathesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Geanna K; Bjerglund, Klaus; Kramer, Søren; Gøgsig, Thomas M; Lindhardt, Anders T; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-12-16

    Ethylene is one of the most important building blocks in industry for the production of polymers and commodity chemicals. (13)C- and D-isotope-labeled ethylenes are also valuable reagents with applications ranging from polymer-structure determination, reaction-mechanism elucidation to the preparation of more complex isotopically labeled compounds. However, these isotopic derivatives are expensive, and are flammable gases, which are difficult to handle. We have developed a method for the controlled generation of ethylene and its isotopic variants including, for the first time, fully isotopically labeled ethylene, from simple alkene precursors by using Ru catalysis. Applying a two-chamber reactor allows both the synthesis of ethylene and its immediate consumption in a chemical transformation permitting reactions to be performed with only stoichiometric amounts of this two carbon olefin. This was demonstrated in the Ni-catalyzed Heck reaction with aryl triflates and benzyl chlorides, as well as Ru-mediated enyne metathesis. PMID:24243666

  16. Sr - an element shows the way - Applications of Sr isotopes for provenance, tracing and migration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prohaska, T.; Irrgeher, J.; Zitek, A.; Teschler Nicola, M.

    2010-12-01

    Strontium - named after the small Scottish town Strontian - as such is an element with little popularity. Firstly described by Martin Heinrich Klaproth in 1798, the metal is used in metallurgy to some extent whereas its compounds are interesting in glass industries, electronics and pyrotechnics. The element has chemical similarity to Ca and makes up 1/60 of the earth’s amount of the latter. Nonetheless, it is its isotopic composition which makes Sr so interesting for a large number of scientists. The natural composition of the four naturally occurring isotopes (84Sr, 86Sr 87Sr and 88Sr) varies in nature due to the radioactive decay of 87Rb to 87Sr. Thus, it was early recognized as geochronometer especially in Ca rich matrices. With increasing precision of applied methodology, the natural variation of the 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio (analyzed at first mainly by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS)) became more and more popular in provenance studies. The natural variation of the ratio is mainly determined by the geological age and the original composition of the rock and can be used therefore as fingerprint of the local geology. The ratio is transferred with no significant fractionation via the water into plants and finally via the food chain into animal and human tissues (especially bones and teeth). As the element is chemically similar to Ca, it appears in most matrices. The use for provenance studies is supported by the fact that the long half life (4.8 x 1010 years) does not lead to an alteration during the time scales which are investigated (from recent samples to human or animal skeletal remains which date back up to 30.000 BC). The uniqueness of the system besides the natural variation is defined by the ubiquity in nature and the relatively high (and thus measurable) elemental concentration in most tissues. It was finally the advent of multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) which augmented the number of applications

  17. Ion microprobe measurement of strontium isotopes in calcium carbonate with application to salmon otoliths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, P.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Ingram, B.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ion microprobe has the capability to generate high resolution, high precision isotopic measurements, but analysis of the isotopic composition of strontium, as measured by the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, has been hindered by isobaric interferences. Here we report the first high precision measurements of 87Sr/ 86Sr by ion microprobe in calcium carbonate samples with moderate Sr concentrations. We use the high mass resolving power (7000 to 9000 M.R.P.) of the SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe in combination with its high transmission to reduce the number of interfering species while maintaining sufficiently high count rates for precise isotopic measurements. The isobaric interferences are characterized by peak modeling and repeated analyses of standards. We demonstrate that by sample-standard bracketing, 87Sr/86Sr ratios can be measured in inorganic and biogenic carbonates with Sr concentrations between 400 and 1500 ppm with ???2??? external precision (2??) for a single analysis, and subpermil external precision with repeated analyses. Explicit correction for isobaric interferences (peak-stripping) is found to be less accurate and precise than sample-standard bracketing. Spatial resolution is ???25 ??m laterally and 2 ??m deep for a single analysis, consuming on the order of 2 ng of material. The method is tested on otoliths from salmon to demonstrate its accuracy and utility. In these growth-banded aragonitic structures, one-week temporal resolution can be achieved. The analytical method should be applicable to other calcium carbonate samples with similar Sr concentrations. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. RFNC-VNIIEF Capabilities to Production High Pure Isotopes for Scientific and Medical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vesnovskii, S. P.

    2002-02-26

    In the technical paper there is presented the information on the basic equipment and more than thirty-year experience of RFNC-VNIIEF activities in the sphere of producing highly enriched isotopes of actinide elements--thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium--for scientific researches and practical applications. Electromagnetic separator and radiochemical methods provide obtaining of superpure isotope samples for nuclear-physical radiometric and mass-spectrometric equipment, and also as tracers when analyzing environmental contamination. There are presented the structure of the laboratory occupied with these isotopes electromagnetic separation as well as the nomenclature and characteristics of the specimens supplied. There are stated science and engineering elaborations of technologies aimed at producing alpha-ray radiating radionuclides--thorium-229, thorium-228, actinium-225, radium-224--for the purpose of anti-cancer therapy using bismuth-212 and bismuth-213 produced by the specially developed generators. There are presented the basic directions of cooperation with other Russian Institutes in developing this promising line of conversion.

  19. Ultraspectral imaging and the snapshot advantage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenov, Michael W.; Gupta Roy, Subharup; Pantalone, Brett; Maione, Bryan

    2015-05-01

    Ultraspectral sensing has been investigated as a way to resolve terrestrial chemical fluorescence within solar Fraunhofer lines. Referred to as Fraunhofer Line Discriminators (FLDs), these sensors attempt to measure "band filling" of terrestrial fluorescence within these naturally dark regions of the spectrum. However, the method has challenging signal to noise ratio limitations due to the low fluorescence emission signal of the target, which is exacerbated by the high spectral resolution required by the sensor (<0.1 nm). To now, many Fraunhofer line discriminators have been scanning sensors; either pushbroom or whiskbroom, which require temporal and/or spatial scanning to acquire an image. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the snapshot throughput advantage in ultraspectral imaging for FLD. This is followed by preliminary results of our snapshot FLD sensor. The system has a spatial resolution of 280x280 pixels and a spectral resolving power of approximately 10,000 at a 658 nm operating wavelength.

  20. Managing Spatial Selections With Contextual Snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Mindek, P; Gröller, M E; Bruckner, S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial selections are a ubiquitous concept in visualization. By localizing particular features, they can be analysed and compared in different views. However, the semantics of such selections often depend on specific parameter settings and it can be difficult to reconstruct them without additional information. In this paper, we present the concept of contextual snapshots as an effective means for managing spatial selections in visualized data. The selections are automatically associated with the context in which they have been created. Contextual snapshots can also be used as the basis for interactive integrated and linked views, which enable in-place investigation and comparison of multiple visual representations of data. Our approach is implemented as a flexible toolkit with well-defined interfaces for integration into existing systems. We demonstrate the power and generality of our techniques by applying them to several distinct scenarios such as the visualization of simulation data, the analysis of historical documents and the display of anatomical data. PMID:25821284

  1. "Application of Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometry to Isotopic Studies for Exobiology"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauke, Todd B.

    1999-01-01

    Computer-controlled electrically-activated valves for rapid gas-handling have been incorporated into the Stable Isotope Laser Spectrometer (SILS) which now permits rapid filling and evacuating of the sample and reference gas cells, Experimental protocols have been developed to take advantage of the fast gas handling capabilities of the instrument and to achieve increased accuracy which results from reduced instrumental drift during rapid isotopic ratio measurements. Using these protocols' accuracies of 0.5 del (0.05%) have been achieved in measurements of 13C/12C in carbon dioxide. Using the small stable isotope laser spectrometer developed in a related PIDDP project of the Co-I, protocols for acquisition of rapid sequential calibration spectra were developed which resulted in 0.5 del accuracy also being achieved in this less complex instrument. An initial version of software for automatic characterization of tunable diode lasers has been developed and diodes have been characterized in order to establish their spectral output properties. A new state-of-the-art high operating temperature (200 K) mid infrared diode laser was purchased (through NASA procurement) and characterized. A thermo-electrically cooled mid infrared tunable diode laser system for use with high temperature operation lasers was developed. In addition to isotopic ratio measurements of carbon and oxygen, measurements of a third biologically important element (15N/14N in N2O gas) have been achieved to a preliminary accuracy of about 0.2%. Transfer of the basic SILS technology to the commercial sector is proceeding under an unfunded Space Act Agreement between NASA and SpiraMed, a medical diagnostic instrument company. Two patents have been issued. Foreign patents based on these two US patents have been applied for and are expected to be issued. A preliminary design was developed for a thermo-electrically cooled SILS instruments for application to planetary space flight exploration missions.

  2. SnapShot: Stress and Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Archana S; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Dorniak, Piotr L; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K

    2016-02-01

    Perturbation of an organism's homeostasis by stress can trigger biological or behavioral adaptation and accelerate onset and course of several diseases. Signaling triggered by norepinephrine or epinephrine (via adrenergic receptors) and cortisol (through glucocorticoid receptors) has profound effects on dampening immune responses, accelerating cancer progression and increasing the risk of cardiovascular, metabolic, and colonic diseases. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26863488

  3. SnapShot: Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Christopher J; Crooks, Daniel R; Sourbier, Carole; Schmidt, Laura S; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Linehan, W Marston

    2016-04-11

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous disease made up of a number of different cancer types, with distinct histologies, clinical courses, therapeutic responses, and genetic drivers. Germline mutations in 14 genes have been associated with increased risk of RCC and can result in HIF pathway activation, chromatin dysregulation, and altered metabolism. Knowledge of these pathway alterations can inform the development of targeted therapeutic approaches. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:27070709

  4. SnapShot: Neuronal Regulation of Aging.

    PubMed

    Weir, Heather J; Mair, William B

    2016-07-28

    Aging is characterized by loss of homeostasis across multiple tissues. The nervous system governs whole-body homeostasis by communicating external and internal signals to peripheral tissues. Here, we highlight neuronal mechanisms and downstream outputs that regulate aging and longevity. Targeting these neuronal pathways may be a novel strategy to promote healthy aging. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:27471972

  5. Learning Flow Regimes from Snapshot Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemati, Maziar

    2015-11-01

    Fluid flow regimes are often categorized based on the qualitative patterns observed by visual inspection of the flow field. For example, bluff body wakes are traditionally classified based on the number and groupings of vortices shed per cycle (e.g., 2S, 2P, P+S), as seen in snapshots of the vorticity field. Subsequently, the existence and nature of these identified flow regimes can be explained through dynamical analyses of the fluid mechanics. Unfortunately, due to the need for manual inspection, the approach described above can be impractical for studies that seek to learn flow regimes from large volumes of numerical and/or experimental snapshot data. Here, we appeal to established techniques from machine learning and data-driven dynamical systems analysis to automate the task of learning flow regimes from snapshot data. Moreover, by appealing to the dynamical structure of the fluid flow, this approach also offers the potential to reveal flow regimes that may be overlooked by visual inspection alone. Here, we will introduce the methodology and demonstrate its capabilities and limitations in the context of several model flows.

  6. Multiple and single snapshot compressive beamforming.

    PubMed

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph F

    2015-10-01

    For a sound field observed on a sensor array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the direction of arrival (DOA) of multiple sources using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem by expressing the acoustic pressure at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition of source amplitudes at all hypothetical DOAs. Regularizing with an ℓ1-norm constraint renders the problem solvable with convex optimization, and promoting sparsity gives high-resolution DOA maps. Here the sparse source distribution is derived using maximum a posteriori estimates for both single and multiple snapshots. CS does not require inversion of the data covariance matrix and thus works well even for a single snapshot where it gives higher resolution than conventional beamforming. For multiple snapshots, CS outperforms conventional high-resolution methods even with coherent arrivals and at low signal-to-noise ratio. The superior resolution of CS is demonstrated with vertical array data from the SWellEx96 experiment for coherent multi-paths. PMID:26520284

  7. Snapshots from deep magma chambers: decoding field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.

    2014-05-01

    During the post-orogenic stage of a Neoproterozoic orogen (Araçuaí-West Congo), inversely zoned calc-alkaline to alkaline plutonic structures intruded previous geologic units. Structural measurements, mapping of flow patterns and additional geochemical and isotopic data point towards different compositional domains which have been generated during a time span between 20 to 30 Ma. The result from decades of mapping revealed the architecture of ca. 10 large plutons in more détail. This work will focus on the dynamics of magmatic interaction for six different plutons ranging from c.20 to 200 km2 in outcropping area. Conclusions are based on already published and new unpublished data aiming the state of the art. In the silica-richer structures concentric fragmented and folded layers of granite in a K-basaltic matrix contrast with predominant more homogeneous K-basaltic to gabbroic regions. These may be separated by stretched filament regions (magmatic shear zones) where mixing has been enhanced resulting in hybrid compositions. Locally sharp and pillow-like contacts between granitic and K-basaltic rocks depict a frozen-in situation of different intrusive episodes. In the silica-poorer plutonic bodies gradational contacts are more frequent and may be the result of convection enhanced diffusion. For all plutons, however, mostly sub-vertical internal contacts between most- and least-differentiated rocks suggest generation from predominat large magma bodies of variable composition which crystallized while crossing the middle to lower crust (< 25 km depth). They have been catch in the act on their way up. Accordingly mushroom- to funnel-like magma-chambers and/or conduits could register snapshots of the interaction dynamics between granitic and noritic/dioritic or syeno-monzonitic and gabbroic magmas. Different compositional domains within different plutons suggest distinct kinematics. Nevertheless all studied plutons provide outstanding evidence for mixing, not only

  8. Applications with Near-Barrier Photo-Fission Reactions in Uranium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Hall, J. M.; McNabb, D. P.; Tuffley, M. J.; Ahmed, M. W.; Stave, S.; Weller, H. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Tompkins, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    Homeland security programs are developing compact, linearly polarized, quasi-monoenergetic photon sources to probe containers for special nuclear material (SNM). These sources are important in national security applications within the commerce system because of the low dose compared to current bremsstrahlung-based sources used for radiography, and important safety concern. Basic radiography only offers density distributions in cargo containers and does not distinguish fissionable materials from non-fissionable, high-Z materials. One possible usage of quasi-monoenergetic sources is to look for photo-neutrons, which may be subject to lower backgrounds, especially near the barrier where photo-fission neutrons have a high energy tail relative to (g,n). For this presentation, we discuss the results of recent near-barrier photo-fission resonance measurements in uranium isotopes. We will present our study of the neutron data and discuss its viability as a signature for SNM detection applications.

  9. Radiogenic Isotopes As Paleoceanographic Tracers in Deep-Sea Corals: Advances in TIMS Measurements of Pb Isotopes and Application to Southern Ocean Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. J.; van de Flierdt, T.; Bridgestock, L. J.; Paul, M.; Rehkamper, M.; Robinson, L. F.; Adkins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Deep-sea corals have emerged as a valuable archive of deep ocean paleoceanographic change, with uranium-series dating providing absolute ages and the potential for centennial resolution. In combination with measurements of radiocarbon, neodymium isotopes and clumped isotopes, this archive has recently been exploited to reconstruct changes in ventilation, water mass sourcing and temperature in relation to millennial climate change. Lead (Pb) isotopes in both corals and seawater have also been used to track anthropogenic inputs through space and time and to trace transport pathways within the oceans. Better understanding of the oceanic Pb cycle is emerging from the GEOTRACES programme. However, while Pb isotopes have been widely used in environmental studies, their full potential as a (pre-anthropogenic) paleoceanographic tracer remains to be exploited. In deep-sea corals, challenges exist from low Pb concentrations in aragonite in comparison to secondary coatings, the potential for contamination, and the efficient elemental separation required for measurement by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). Here we discuss progress in measuring Pb isotopes in coral aragonite using a 207Pb-204Pb double spike on a ThermoFinnigan Triton TIMS. For a 2 ng NIST-981 Pb standard, the long term reproducibility (using 1011 Ω resistors) is ~1000 ppm (2 s.d.) on 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb ratios. We now show that using a new 1012 Ω resistor to measure the small 204Pb beam improves the internal precision on these ratios from ~500 ppm (2 s.e.) to ~250 ppm (2 s.e.) and we envisage a potential improvement in the long term reproducibility as a consequence. We further assess the internal precision and external reproducibility of our method using a BCR-2 rock standard and an in-house coral standard. Preliminary evidence on the application of this method to natural samples is derived from cleaning experiments and replication tests on deep-sea corals from the Southern

  10. Ion microprobe measurement of strontium isotopes in calcium carbonate with application to salmon otoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Peter K.; Bacon, Charles R.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Ingram, B. Lynn; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2005-03-01

    The ion microprobe has the capability to generate high resolution, high precision isotopic measurements, but analysis of the isotopic composition of strontium, as measured by the 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio, has been hindered by isobaric interferences. Here we report the first high precision measurements of 87Sr/ 86Sr by ion microprobe in calcium carbonate samples with moderate Sr concentrations. We use the high mass resolving power (7000 to 9000 M.R.P.) of the SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe in combination with its high transmission to reduce the number of interfering species while maintaining sufficiently high count rates for precise isotopic measurements. The isobaric interferences are characterized by peak modeling and repeated analyses of standards. We demonstrate that by sample-standard bracketing, 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios can be measured in inorganic and biogenic carbonates with Sr concentrations between 400 and 1500 ppm with ˜2‰ external precision (2σ) for a single analysis, and subpermil external precision with repeated analyses. Explicit correction for isobaric interferences (peak-stripping) is found to be less accurate and precise than sample-standard bracketing. Spatial resolution is ˜25 μm laterally and 2 μm deep for a single analysis, consuming on the order of 2 ng of material. The method is tested on otoliths from salmon to demonstrate its accuracy and utility. In these growth-banded aragonitic structures, one-week temporal resolution can be achieved. The analytical method should be applicable to other calcium carbonate samples with similar Sr concentrations.

  11. Single snapshot imaging of optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Vervandier, Jean; Gioux, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    A novel acquisition and processing method that enables single snapshot wide field imaging of optical properties in the Spatial Frequency Domain (SFD) is described. This method makes use of a Fourier transform performed on a single image and processing in the frequency space to extract two spatial frequency images at once. The performance of the method is compared to the standard six image SFD acquisition method, assessed on tissue mimicking phantoms and in vivo. Overall both methods perform similarly in extracting optical properties. PMID:24409392

  12. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  13. Capon-based single-snapshot DOA estimation in monostatic MIMO radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, Aboulnasr; Amin, Moeness G.; Zhang, Yimin D.; Ahmad, Fauzia

    2015-05-01

    We consider the problem of single snapshot direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation of multiple targets in monostatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. When only a single snapshot is used, the sample covariance matrix of the data becomes non-invertible and, therefore, does not permit application of Capon-based DOA estimation techniques. On the other hand, low-resolution techniques, such as the conventional beamformer, suffer from biased estimation and fail to resolve closely spaced sources. In this paper, we propose a new Capon-based method for DOA estimation in MIMO radar using a single radar pulse. Assuming that the angular locations of the sources are known a priori to be located within a certain spatial sector, we employ multiple transmit beams to focus the transmit energy of multiple orthogonal waveforms within the desired sector. The transmit weight vectors are carefully designed such that they have the same transmit power distribution pattern. As compared to the standard MIMO radar, the proposed approach enables transmitting an arbitrary number of orthogonal waveforms. By using matched-filtering at the receiver, the data associated with each beam is extracted yielding a virtual data snapshot. The total number of virtual snapshots is equal to the number of transmit beams. By choosing the number of transmit beams to be larger than the number of receive elements, it becomes possible to form a full-rank sample covariance matrix. The Capon beamformer is then applied to estimate the DOAs of the targets of interest. The proposed method is shown to have improved DOA estimation performance as compared to conventional single-snapshot DOA estimation methods.

  14. Family Snapshots: A Descriptive Classroom Exercise in Memory and Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladding, Samuel T.; Cox, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    "Family Snapshots" are 100-words-or-less descriptive memories of times in the lives of families that highlight poignant moments. They complement other exercises within a family counseling course, including the use of genograms. Modeled after the "Washington Post Magazine"'s series "Life Is Short: Autobiography as Haiku," these snapshots give…

  15. SnapShot: Olfactory Classical Conditioning of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ronald L

    2015-10-01

    This SnapShot summarizes current knowledge about the molecules and circuitry that mediate olfactory memory formation in Drosophila, with emphasis on neural circuits carrying the learned sensory information; the molecular mechanisms for acquisition, memory storage, and forgetting; and the output pathways for memory expression. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26451491

  16. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part I.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-01-14

    This first of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts the composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators. Their roles at different stages of the cell cycle will appear in Part II. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26771499

  17. [Application of stable carbon isotope technique in the research of carbon cycling in soil-plant system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lü, Hao-Hao; Chen, Ying-Xu; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2008-03-01

    As a main life element, carbon plays important role in the matter cycling in soil-plant system. Stable carbon isotope 13C has been widely used in the study of carbon cycling in soil-plant system, due to its safe, no pollution, and easy to be handled. Through the analysis of both natural and labeled 13C organic matter in soil-plant system, a better understanding of the mechanisms of photosynthesis, the distribution of photosynthates in plant-soil system, the fate of plant litter, and the source of new carbon in soil could be achieved. In this paper, the applications of stable carbon isotope technique in the researches of photosynthesis, reconstruction of paleoclimate, turnover of soil organic matter, and interactions between plants and rhizosphere microorganisms were briefly summarized, and the perspectives of the application of stable carbon isotope technique were also discussed, based on the issues existed in current researches. PMID:18533543

  18. Abstracts of the 24th international isotope society (UK group) symposium: synthesis and applications of labelled compounds 2015.

    PubMed

    Aigbirhio, F I; Allwein, S; Anwar, A; Atzrodt, J; Audisio, D; Badman, G; Bakale, R; Berthon, F; Bragg, R; Brindle, K M; Bushby, N; Campos, S; Cant, A A; Chan, M Y T; Colbon, P; Cornelissen, B; Czarny, B; Derdau, V; Dive, V; Dunscombe, M; Eggleston, I; Ellis-Sawyer, K; Elmore, C S; Engstrom, P; Ericsson, C; Fairlamb, I J S; Georgin, D; Godfrey, S P; He, L; Hickey, M J; Huscroft, I T; Kerr, W J; Lashford, A; Lenz, E; Lewinton, S; L'Hermite, M M; Lindelöf, Å; Little, G; Lockley, W J S; Loreau, O; Maddocks, S; Marguerit, M; Mirabello, V; Mudd, R J; Nilsson, G N; Owens, P K; Pascu, S I; Patriarche, G; Pimlott, S L; Pinault, M; Plastow, G; Racys, D T; Reif, J; Rossi, J; Ruan, J; Sarpaki, S; Sephton, S M; Simonsson, R; Speed, D J; Sumal, K; Sutherland, A; Taran, F; Thuleau, A; Wang, Y; Waring, M; Watters, W H; Wu, J; Xiao, J

    2016-04-01

    The 24th annual symposium of the International Isotope Society's United Kingdom Group took place at the Møller Centre, Churchill College, Cambridge, UK on Friday 6th November 2015. The meeting was attended by 77 delegates from academia and industry, the life sciences, chemical, radiochemical and scientific instrument suppliers. Delegates were welcomed by Dr Ken Lawrie (GlaxoSmithKline, UK, chair of the IIS UK group). The subsequent scientific programme consisted of oral presentations, short 'flash' presentations in association with particular posters and poster presentations. The scientific areas covered included isotopic synthesis, regulatory issues, applications of labelled compounds in imaging, isotopic separation and novel chemistry with potential implications for isotopic synthesis. Both short-lived and long-lived isotopes were represented, as were stable isotopes. The symposium was divided into a morning session chaired by Dr Rebekka Hueting (University of Oxford, UK) and afternoon sessions chaired by Dr Sofia Pascu (University of Bath, UK) and by Dr Alan Dowling (Syngenta, UK). The UK meeting concluded with remarks from Dr Ken Lawrie (GlaxoSmithKline, UK). PMID:26991121

  19. Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model 

    SciTech Connect

    L.B. Wimmer

    2003-11-10

    The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO{sub 2} fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of {sup 235}U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2.

  20. Snapshot hyperspectral fovea vision system (HyperVideo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriesel, Jason; Scriven, Gordon; Gat, Nahum; Nagaraj, Sheela; Willson, Paul; Swaminathan, V.

    2012-06-01

    The development and demonstration of a new snapshot hyperspectral sensor is described. The system is a significant extension of the four dimensional imaging spectrometer (4DIS) concept, which resolves all four dimensions of hyperspectral imaging data (2D spatial, spectral, and temporal) in real-time. The new sensor, dubbed "4×4DIS" uses a single fiber optic reformatter that feeds into four separate, miniature visible to near-infrared (VNIR) imaging spectrometers, providing significantly better spatial resolution than previous systems. Full data cubes are captured in each frame period without scanning, i.e., "HyperVideo". The current system operates up to 30 Hz (i.e., 30 cubes/s), has 300 spectral bands from 400 to 1100 nm (~2.4 nm resolution), and a spatial resolution of 44×40 pixels. An additional 1.4 Megapixel video camera provides scene context and effectively sharpens the spatial resolution of the hyperspectral data. Essentially, the 4×4DIS provides a 2D spatially resolved grid of 44×40 = 1760 separate spectral measurements every 33 ms, which is overlaid on the detailed spatial information provided by the context camera. The system can use a wide range of off-the-shelf lenses and can either be operated so that the fields of view match, or in a "spectral fovea" mode, in which the 4×4DIS system uses narrow field of view optics, and is cued by a wider field of view context camera. Unlike other hyperspectral snapshot schemes, which require intensive computations to deconvolve the data (e.g., Computed Tomographic Imaging Spectrometer), the 4×4DIS requires only a linear remapping, enabling real-time display and analysis. The system concept has a range of applications including biomedical imaging, missile defense, infrared counter measure (IRCM) threat characterization, and ground based remote sensing.

  1. Isotopic chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Floss, H.G.

    1994-12-01

    This paper deals with compounds that are chiral-at least in part, due to isotope substitution-and their use in tracing the steric course of enzyme reaction in vitro and in vivo. There are other applications of isotopically chiral compounds (for example, in analyzing the steric course of nonenzymatic reactions and in probing the conformation of biomolecules) that are important but they will not be discussed in this context.

  2. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  3. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  4. Internet snapshot survey: A novel methodology to monitor novel psychotropic substances and its need in Asia.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sharma, Pawan

    2016-06-01

    Recently there has been upsurge in the use of novel psychoactive substances, commonly known as legal highs. There is limited data available on the use and availability of these substances. Internet snapshot methodology has been successfully used in Europe and America to understand rapidly adapting internet based drug market but no data is available from Asian region. Hence there is need of application of similar methodology in Asia to explore and gauge the problem statement about these substances. PMID:27208446

  5. Snapshot of cooling and drying before onset of Antarctic Glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Warny, Sophie; DeConto, Robert M.

    2014-10-01

    The late Eocene to Oligocene transition (EOT) witnessed a major ice advance on Antarctica. Because of the paucity of accessible outcrops and difficult drilling logistics, little is known about hydrological conditions in the Antarctic Peninsula during the late Eocene prior to the major ice advance. Here we study hydrological conditions with proxy evidence from marine sediment core NBP0602A-3C, adjacent to the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, with sediments dated to 35.9±1.1 Ma providing a snapshot of conditions prior to the EOT. We reconstruct conditions during the latest Eocene based on plant leaf wax hydrogen isotopic evidence (δDwax) paired with previously-published evidence from pollen assemblages, and compared to climate model experiments simulating conditions before, during and after the transition. The pollen from late Eocene sediments of NBP0602A-3C indicate a Nothofagidites (southern beech) dominated landscape. In the same sediments, δDwax values average -202±7‰ (1σ, n=22) for the C28n-alkanoic acid. Uncertainty around the appropriate net fractionation between water and wax (ɛwax/w) provides the largest degree of uncertainty in paleoprecipitation δD reconstructions and we therefore use two reasonable fractionations -100 and -60‰ to constrain the likely range of average precipitation δD values to between -113 and -151‰. Model experiments confirm that isotopic compositions show low sensitivity to temperature changes at the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, in comparison to much larger changes in the continental interior. Across the interval sampled, a decline in pollen abundance from 105 to 103 gdw represents cooling and drying towards more tundra-like conditions. The 30‰ trend in δDwax values towards more positive values can best be explained by smaller fractionations as the vegetation shifted from forest to tundra, with greater water stress. Model results are broadly consistent with the data and quantify the cooling and drying across the full

  6. Biomedical applications of accelerator mass spectrometry-isotope measurements at the level of the atom.

    PubMed

    Barker, J; Garner, R C

    1999-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a nuclear physics technique developed about twenty years ago, that uses the high energy (several MeV) of a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator to measure very small quantities of rare and long-lived isotopes. Elements that are of interest in biomedicine and environmental sciences can be measured, often to parts per quadrillion sensitivity, i.e. zeptomole to attomole levels (10(-21)-10(-18) mole) from milligram samples. This is several orders of magnitude lower than that achievable by conventional decay counting techniques, such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC). AMS was first applied to geochemical, climatological and archaeological areas, such as for radiocarbon dating (Shroud of Turin), but more recently this technology has been used for bioanalytical applications. In this sphere, most work has been conducted using aluminium, calcium and carbon isotopes. The latter is of special interest in drug metabolism studies, where a Phase 1 adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) study can be conducted using only 10 nanoCurie (37 Bq or ca. 0.9 microSv) amounts or less of 14C-labelled drugs. In the UK, these amounts of radioactivity are below those necessary to request specific regulatory approval from the Department of Health's Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee (ARSAC), thus saving on valuable development time and resources. In addition, the disposal of these amounts is much less an environmental issue than that associated with microCurie quantities, which are currently used. Also, AMS should bring an opportunity to conduct "first into man" studies without the need for widespread use of animals. Centre for Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CBAMS) Ltd. is the first fully commercial company in the world to offer analytical services using AMS. With its high throughput and relatively low costs per sample analysis, AMS should be of great benefit to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology

  7. Oxygen Isotope of Phytoliths in Modern Wetland Plants and the Application to Paleoclimate Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Webb, E. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2009-05-01

    Because the oxygen-isotope composition of phytoliths in modern plants is controlled primarily by the oxygen- isotope composition of source water, temperature and relative humidity, isotope analyses of ancient phytoliths extracted from soils have the potential to reveal paleoclimate information. A controlled-temperature, growth- chamber experiment was conducted to determine the relationships among temperature, relative humidity, soil water evaporation, plant-water isotope composition and oxygen-isotope composition of phytoliths in cattails and horsetails. Typha, a cattail species that grows in wetland conditions, and Equisetum, a horsetail species that prefers dry soils, were each grown in four separate chambers at 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees Celsius. The oxygen- and hydrogen-isotope compositions of watering water, soil water, vapour in the growth chambers and plant water from the leaves and stems were analyzed throughout the eight-month long artificial growing season. The oxygen-isotope compositions of phytoliths extracted from the transpiring tissues of the plants at the end of the growing season were also analyzed.The results show that the oxygen-isotope composition of phytoliths is strongly correlated with oxygen isotope composition of average plant water from late growing season, rather than plant water extracted earlier in the season or from the stem, leaf-base or leaf- apex alone. As the temperature increases, the oxygen-isotope fractionation between phytoliths and plant water decreases. This trend is comparable to the oxygen-isotope thermometer equation developed by Shahack- Gross et al. (1996: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 3949-3953), but the separation in oxygen-isotope values between silica and water at a given temperature is about 4 ‰ lower. This discrepancy is likely from uncertainties in the oxygen-isotope value of leaf water at the site of phytolith precipitation, which varied over the growing season as a result of fluctuations in relative humidity and

  8. IRAC Snapshot Imaging of Red Herschel Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Wardlow, Julie; Ivison, Rob; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Riechers, Dominik; Clements, David; Oliver, Seb; Oteo, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Wide-field submillimeter surveys with Herschel have produced large samples of rare populations, which provide some of the most stringent constraints on galaxy formation theories. In this proposal we request IRAC observations of 'red' Herschel sources, which are the most extreme DSFGs at z>4. The proposed snapshot IRAC 3.6 and 4.5um data will probe the stellar emission from these systems - complementary data to the far-infrared dust emission that led to their identification. We will use these data to extend the SEDs into the near-IR regime and measure more reliable stellar masses than otherwise available. They will be combined with existing survey data and dedicated follow-up programs to map the evolution of DSFGs as a function of redshift, stellar mass and far-IR luminosity.

  9. A stable isotope approach and its application for identifying nitrate source and transformation process in water.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shiguo; Kang, Pingping; Sun, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of water is a worldwide environmental problem. Recent studies have demonstrated that the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotopes of nitrate (NO3(-)) can be used to trace nitrogen dynamics including identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes. This paper analyzes the current state of identifying nitrate sources and nitrogen transformation processes using N and O isotopes of nitrate. With regard to nitrate sources, δ(15)N-NO3(-) and δ(18)O-NO3(-) values typically vary between sources, allowing the sources to be isotopically fingerprinted. δ(15)N-NO3(-) is often effective at tracing NO(-)3 sources from areas with different land use. δ(18)O-NO3(-) is more useful to identify NO3(-) from atmospheric sources. Isotopic data can be combined with statistical mixing models to quantify the relative contributions of NO3(-) from multiple delineated sources. With regard to N transformation processes, N and O isotopes of nitrate can be used to decipher the degree of nitrogen transformation by such processes as nitrification, assimilation, and denitrification. In some cases, however, isotopic fractionation may alter the isotopic fingerprint associated with the delineated NO3(-) source(s). This problem may be addressed by combining the N and O isotopic data with other types of, including the concentration of selected conservative elements, e.g., chloride (Cl(-)), boron isotope (δ(11)B), and sulfur isotope (δ(35)S) data. Future studies should focus on improving stable isotope mixing models and furthering our understanding of isotopic fractionation by conducting laboratory and field experiments in different environments. PMID:26541149

  10. Development and Applications of Thallium isotopes: a new proxy tracking the extent of manganese oxide burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.; Ostrander, C.; Peterson, L. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are a new and potential powerful paleoredox proxy with the possibility to track bottom water oxygen conditions based on the burial flux of manganese oxides. Thallium has a residence time of ~20 thousand years, which is long enough to render modern oxic seawater conservative with respect to concentration and isotopes. The isotopic signature of Tl in the global ocean is driven mainly by two outputs (1) adsorption onto manganese oxides and (2) low temperature oceanic crust alteration. Importantly, the isotopic inputs of Tl are all nearly the same value; thus, the isotopic composition and flux of the outputs almost exclusively set the seawater signature. For relatively short term redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominant isotope fractionation process is associated with manganese oxide precipitation because low temperature alteration is controlled by long-term average ocean crust production rates. We present a broad range of modern samples that span several open ocean profiles combined with water column and sediment profiles from the permanently anoxic basins of the Black Sea and Cariaco Basins. The open ocean shows no variation in depth profiles that encompass most of the major water masses in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. The anoxic basins, however, reveal Tl isotope signatures closer to their inputs, which is likely due to basinal restriction. The authigenic fraction of organic-rich sediments from the Black Sea and Cariaco Basin capture the Tl isotope value of the overlying water column, which shows that Tl isotopes could be applied as a faithful deep time redox proxy. For the first time, we will present new data showing that Tl isotopes is tracking bottom water ocean oxygenation. We are applying this isotope system to ancient samples, testing the spatial and temporal variability of ocean oxygenation coinciding with major biogeochemical events.

  11. Heterogeneous distribution of Zn stable isotopes in mice and applications to medical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Fujii, T.; Shaw, A.; Le Borgne, M.

    2013-12-01

    Zinc is required for the function of more than 300 enzymes involved in many metabolic pathways, and is a vital micronutrient for living organisms. To investigate if Zn isotopes could be used to better understand metal homeostasis, as well as a biomarker for diseases, we assessed the distribution of natural Zn isotopes in various mouse tissues. We found that, with respect to Zn isotopes, most mouse organs are isotopically distinct and that the total range of variation within one mouse encompasses the variations observed in the Earth's crust. Therefore, biological activity must have a major impact on the distribution of Zn isotopes in inorganic materials. The most striking aspect of the data is that red blood cells and bones are enriched by ~0.5 per mil in 66Zn relative to 64Zn when compared to serum, and up to ~1 per mil when compared to the brain and liver. This fractionation is well explained by the equilibrium distribution of isotopes between different bonding environments of Zn in different organs. Differences in gender and genetic background did not appear to affect the isotopic distribution of Zn. Together, these results suggest that potential use of Zn isotopes as a tracer for dietary Zn, and for detecting disturbances in Zn metabolism due to pathological conditions.

  12. 47. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern Railroad correspondence files, October, 1957) SHEAR FENCE DAMAGE FROM M/V KORSHOLMA - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 49. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern Railroad correspondence files, 1957) PIER III DAMAGE FROM M/V KORSHOLMA COLLISION - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  14. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Grenada (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Grenada - a small island nation consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea - three of which are inhabited: Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique.

  15. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  16. Application Of Stable Isotope Analysis To Study Temporal Changes In Foraging Ecology In A Highly Endangered Amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, J. Hayley

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding dietary trends for endangered species may be essential to assessing the effects of ecological disturbances such as habitat modification, species introductions or global climate change. Documenting temporal variation in prey selection may also be crucial for understanding population dynamics. However, the rarity, secretive behaviours and obscure microhabitats of some endangered species can make direct foraging observations difficult or impossible. Furthermore, the lethality or invasiveness of some traditional methods of dietary analysis (e.g. gut contents analysis, gastric lavage) makes them inappropriate for such species. Stable isotope analysis facilitates non-lethal, indirect analysis of animal diet that has unrealized potential in the conservation of endangered organisms, particularly amphibians. Methodology/findings I determined proportional contributions of aquatic macroinvertebrate prey to the diet of an endangered aquatic salamander Eurycea sosorum over a two-year period using stable isotope analysis of 13/12C and 15/14N and the Bayesian stable isotope mixing model SIAR. I calculated Strauss’ dietary electivity indices by comparing these proportions with changing relative abundance of potential prey species through time. Stable isotope analyses revealed that a previously unknown prey item (soft-bodied planarian flatworms in the genus Dugesia) made up the majority of E. sosorum diet. Results also demonstrate that E. sosorum is an opportunistic forager capable of diet switching to include a greater proportion of alternative prey when Dugesia populations decline. There is also evidence of intra-population dietary variation. Conclusions/significance Effective application of stable isotope analysis can help circumvent two key limitations commonly experienced by researchers of endangered species: the inability to directly observe these species in nature and the invasiveness or lethality of traditional methods of dietary analysis. This

  17. Calcium isotopes in caves as a proxy for aridity: Modern calibration and application to the 8.2 kyr event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, R. A.; Day, C. C.; Hu, C.-Y.; Liu, Y.-H.; Pointing, M. D.; Blättler, C. L.; Henderson, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first study of Ca isotope cycling in a natural cave system, with measurements of bedrock, dripwater and recently formed carbonate, coupled to a first stalagmite time-series spanning the 8.2 kyr event. Dripwaters at Heshang Cave (Central China; 30°27‧N, 110°25‧E) are isotopically heavy relative to the dolomite bedrock, the result of prior calcite precipitation (PCP) occurring earlier in the drip flow path. A simple Rayleigh fractionation model quantifies the extent of PCP in the modern environment at 36% Ca removal. The observed in situ calcium isotope fractionation factor between dripwater and carbonate is Δ 44 / 42 Ca = - 0.63 ± 0.03 ‰ and does not vary during the annual cycle. Measurements of speleothem carbonate spanning the 8.2 kyr event show the response of Ca isotopes to changing climate. δ44/42Ca increases by 0.35‰ at the onset of the event, coeval with changes in δ18O and Mg/Ca, and remains high for 80 yr. This change is explained by decreased rainfall leading to increased PCP; an interpretation supported by established PCP proxies (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca). Ca isotopes indicate that PCP increased to 60% Ca removal during the event, which, from application of a simple box model, suggests mean annual rainfall decreased by approximately a third in Central China during the 8.2 kyr event. The response of Ca isotopes across this event demonstrates their potential for the assessment of past conditions, including past dripwater flow rates and rainfall.

  18. Oxygen isotopic transport and exchange during fluid flow: One-dimensional models and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.R. ); Willett, S.D. ); Cook, S.J. Environ Corp., Houston, TX )

    1994-01-01

    In this work the authors investigate the consequences of fluid flow and fluid-rock interaction to the isotopic evolution of fluids and rock with one-dimensional transport models of fluid flow and oxygen isotope exchange. Transport models dealing with stable isotopes are well established in recent geochemical literature. The authors extend previous treatments by presenting the derivation of both analytical and numerical solutions to the transport equations incorporating simultaneously advection, diffusion and hydrodynamic dispersion, and kinetics of isotopic exchange. The increased generality of numerical solutions allows the incorporation of other effects which control the spatial patterns of [delta][sup 18]O values developed in rocks and fluids including multiple reactive species and temperature gradients. The authors discuss the effects of flow parameters, conditions of isotopic exchange, and temperature gradients on the spatial patterns of isotopic shifts produced in rock sequences subjected to fluid flow, and on conventionally calculated W/R ratios for these rock sequences. Finally, the authors examine the implications of oxygen isotope transport for two natural systems where isotopic shifts or gradients could be interpreted in terms of unidirectional fluid infiltration. Solutions of one-dimensional transport equations including the mechanisms of advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, and non-equilibrium exchange between water and rock indicate that the time-space evolution of oxygen isotopic compositions of rock and infiltrating fluid is dependent on (1) the rate of fluid infiltration, (2) the diffusive and dispersive properties of the rock matrix, (3) the rate of isotopic exchange, and (4) the rock-water mass oxygen ratio in a unit volume of water-saturated, porous rock. 56 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. HIBAL: A hydrologic-isotopic-balance model for application to paleolake systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Paillet, F.

    2002-01-01

    A simple hydrologic-isotopic-balance (HIBAL) model for application to paleolake ??18O records is presented. Inputs to the model include discharge, on-lake precipitation, evaporation, and the ??18O values of these fluid fluxes. Monthly values of climatic parameters that govern the fractionation of 18O and 16O during evaporation have been extracted from historical data sets and held constant in the model. The ability of the model to simulate changes in the hydrologic balance and the ??18O evolution of the mixed layer has been demonstrated using measured data from Pyramid Lake, Nevada. Simulations of the response in ??18O to step- and periodic-function changes in fluid inputs indicate that the hydrologic balance and ??18O values lag climate change. Input of reconstructed river discharges and their ??18O values to Pyramid and Walker lakes indicates that minima and maxima in simulated ??18O records correspond to minima and maxima in the reconstructed volume records and that the overall shape of the volume and ??18O records is similar. The model was also used in a simulation of abrupt oscillations in the ??18O values of paleo-Owens Lake, California.

  20. SnapShot: SMC Protein Complexes Part II.

    PubMed

    Haering, Christian H; Gruber, Stephan

    2016-02-11

    This second of two SnapShots on SMC proteins depicts their roles at different stages of the eukaryotic cell cycle. The composition and architecture of SMC protein complexes and their regulators appear in SMC Protein Complexes Part I (available at http://www.cell.com/cell/pdf/S0092-8674%2815%2901690-6.pdf). To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26871638

  1. Application of a Stable Isotope Approach to Evaluate Impact of Changes in Manufacturing Parameters for an Immediate-Release Tablet.

    PubMed

    Parr, Alan; Badman, Geoff; Bowen, Chester L; Coffin, Mark; Gupta, Manish; Jones, Lori; Kurtinecz, Milena; Naderer, Odin; Travis, Eric; Zhu, John; Patel, Parul

    2016-07-01

    There is continued emphasis from the various worldwide regulatory agencies to ensure that the pharmaceutical industry fully understands the products they are developing. This emphasis is seen via development of quality-by-design (QbD) publications and guidelines generated by the International Committee on Harmonization. The challenge to meet these expectations is primarily associated with the generation of in vivo data (eg, pharmacokinetic data) that is resource intensive. A technique reducing the resources needed to generate this in vivo data permits a more extensive application of QbD principles. This paper presents the application of stable isotopes in pharmacokinetic studies. The data show that the use of stable isotopes can significantly reduce the number of subjects required for a study. This reduction in subjects thus translates into a significant reduction in resources and time needed to generate the required in vivo data to support QbD. PMID:26479497

  2. Application of isotopes to estimate water ages in variable time scales in surface and groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Water-Isotopes (2H, 3H, 18O) are ideal tracers not only to determine the origin of waters in precipitation, surface water (river + lakes) as well as in groundwater close to the surface and in deep groundwater but also the mean residence time (MRT) in many applied projects as drinking water supply, hydroelectric power plants, road tunnels etc. . Their application has a long history, but must be always evaluated by a feasible hydrogeological concept and/or other isotope and geochemical tracers. In Alpine areas the retention of precipitation in form of snow and ice in the winter half year is indicated by the lowest 18O-values. The snow melt of the highest part of the recharge area is marked by the lowest 18O-values in the river water, but may not coincide with the maximum flow. Time-series of precipitation station in the mountain and on river station indicate the arrival of the peak snow-melt water in the river and in Low-land areas 4-7 month later. Tritium series indicate that MRTs of several Austrian rivers are in the range of 4 - 6 years. The seasonal input variation of in 18O in precipitation and/or river waters can be used to calculate by lumped parameter models MRT of groundwater at a certain well and compare it with lysimeter measurements and transient model simulations. The MRT of the dispersion model is in good agreement with the estimated time calculated by the numerical transport model and the vertical lysimeter measurements. The MRT of spring water was studied by several methods (3H/3He, SF6 and 85Kr) and a long time series of 3H-measurements. The gas tracers are in good agreement in the range of 6-10 year whereas the 3H-series model (dispersion model) indicate ages in the range of 18-23 years. The hydrogeological concept indicate that the precipitation infiltrates in a mountainous karst area, but the transfer into the porous aquifer in the Vienna Basin occurs either through rivers draining away in the basin or through the lateral transport from the karst

  3. Coupled sulfur isotopic and chemical mass transfer modeling: Approach and application to dynamic hydrothermal processes

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1988-09-21

    A computational modeling code (EQPSreverse arrowS) has been developed to examine sulfur isotopic distribution pathways coupled with calculations of chemical mass transfer pathways. A post processor approach to EQ6 calculations was chosen so that a variety of isotopic pathways could be examined for each reaction pathway. Two types of major bounding conditions were implemented: (1) equilibrium isotopic exchange between sulfate and sulfide species or exchange only accompanying chemical reduction and oxidation events, and (2) existence or lack of isotopic exchange between solution species and precipitated minerals, parallel to the open and closed chemical system formulations of chemical mass transfer modeling codes. All of the chemical data necessary to explicitly calculate isotopic distribution pathways is generated by most mass transfer modeling codes and can be input to the EQPS code. Routines are built in to directly handle EQ6 tabular files. Chemical reaction models of seafloor hydrothermal vent processes and accompanying sulfur isotopic distribution pathways illustrate the capabilities of coupling EQPSreverse arrowS with EQ6 calculations, including the extent of differences that can exist due to the isotopic bounding condition assumptions described above. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Successful application of lead isotopes in source apportionment, legal proceedings, remediation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian; Korsch, Michael; Winchester, Wayne; Devenish, Matthew; Hobbs, Thad; Main, Cleve; Smith, Gerard; Rosman, Kevin; Howearth, Lynette; Burn-Nunes, Laurie; Seow, Jimmy; Oxford, Cameron; Yun, Gracie; Gillam, Lindsay; Crisp, Michelle

    2012-01-15

    In late 2006, the seaside community in Esperance Western Australia was alerted to thousands of native bird species dying. The source of the lead (Pb) was determined by Pb isotopes to derive from the handling of Pb carbonate concentrate through the Port, which began in July 2005. Concern was expressed for the impact of this on the community. Our objectives were to employ Pb isotope ratios to evaluate the source of Pb in environmental samples for use in legal proceedings, and for use in remediation and monitoring. Isotope measurements were undertaken of bird livers, plants, drinking water, soil, harbour sediments, air, bulk ceiling dust, gutter sludge, surface swabs and blood. The unique lead isotopic signature of the contaminating Pb carbonate enabled diagnostic apportionment of lead in samples. Apart from some soil and water samples, the proportion of contaminating Pb was >95% in the environmental samples. Lead isotopes were critical in resolving legal proceedings, are being used in the remediation of premises, were used in monitoring of workers involved in the decontamination of the storage facility, and monitoring transport of the concentrate through another port facility. Air samples show the continued presence of contaminant Pb, more than one year after shipping of concentrate ceased, probably arising from dust resuspension. Brief details of the comprehensive testing and cleanup of the Esperance community are provided along with the role of the Community. Lead isotopic analyses can provide significant benefits to regulatory agencies, interested parties, and the community where the signature is able to be characterised with a high degree of certainty. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Lead carbonate concentrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Successful use of Pb isotopes in identifying sources of Pb arising from transport and shipping. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Use of Pb isotopes in legal proceedings and their use in cleanup of residences. Black

  5. Infrared vibrational predissociation of van der Waals clusters: applications to isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Philippoz, J.M.; Zellweger, J.M.; van den Bergh, H.; Monot, R.

    1984-08-30

    Isotope separation is demonstrated following the selective infrared laser-induced photodissociation of van der Waals clusters in a free jet. Irradiation of a natural abundance mixture of SF/sub 6/ isotopomers diluted in argon with a 20-W cw CO/sub 2/ laser gives overall enrichment factors in excess of 1.1. By adjusting the wavelength one can either enrich or deplete the center of the free jet in any one of the sulfur isotopes. Furthermore, unselective photodissociation of clusters can be used to enhance the separation of isotopes in a recently reported selective condensation method. 8 references, 3 figures.

  6. Architectures of Planetary System - Snapshots in Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Michele; Goel, Amit

    2015-08-01

    Architectures of planetary systems are observable snapshots in time, a study of which can aide in our understanding of how planetary systems form and evolve dynamically. For example, if we compare architectures of exoplanetary systems having various stellar host ages with laws that apply to our own Solar System architecture, population, and age, we gain insights into when these laws hold with stellar age and which systems are outliers at various stellar ages. In this work, we study Keplerian motion in confirmed planetary systems as a function of stellar age. Systems eliminated from the study are those with unknown planetary orbital periods, unknown planetary semi-major axis, and/or unknown stellar ages, the latter of which eliminates several Kepler multi-planet systems. As expected, we find Keplerian motion holds for systems that are the age of the Solar System or older, but this result does not seem to hold true for younger systems. In this work we discuss these findings, we identify the outlier systems at various stellar ages from our statistical analysis, and we provide explanations as to why these exo-systems are outliers.

  7. Application of NMR Spectroscopy to the Determination of Low Concentrations of Nonradioactive Isotopes in Liquid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhimak, S. S.; Basov, A. A.; Kopytov, G. F.; Kashaev, D. V.; Sokolov, M. E.; Artsybasheva, O. M.; Sharapov, K. S.; Baryshev, M. G.

    2015-11-01

    A method is developed for measuring the content of hydrogen (2H) and oxygen (17O) isotopes in liquid media based on quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance. It has been established that the shifting europium trifluoromethanesulfonate (III) reagent is the most appropriate chemical compound for a reference sample to study the isotopic composition of aqueous solutions. A dependence of the paramagnetic chemical shift of 2H and 17O nuclei on the concentration of Eu3+ ions in a solution is studied.

  8. A Snapshot View of High Temperature Superconductivity 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Bansil, Arun; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2002-04-05

    This report outlines the conclusions of a workshop on High Temperature Superconductivity held April 5-8, 2002 in San Diego. The purpose of this report is to outline and highlight some outstanding and interesting issues in the field of High Temperature Superconductivity. The range of activities and new ideas that arose within the context of High Temperature Superconductors is so vast and extensive that it is impossible to summarize it in a brief document. Thus this report does not pretend to be all-inclusive and cover all areas of activity. It is a restricted snapshot and it only presents a few viewpoints. The complexity and difficulties with high temperature superconductivity is well illustrated by the Buddhist parable of the blind men trying to describe “experimentally” an elephant. These very same facts clearly illustrate that this is an extremely active field, with many unanswered questions, and with a great future potential for discoveries and progress in many (sometimes unpredictable) directions. It is very important to stress that independently of any current or future applications, this is a very important area of basic research.

  9. The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for discrimination and comparison of adhesive tapes.

    PubMed

    Horacek, Micha; Min, Ji-Sook; Heo, Sangcheol; Park, Jongseo; Papesch, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    Forensic scientists are frequently requested to differentiate between, or compare, adhesive tapes from a suspect or a crime scene. The most common polymers used to back packaging tape are polypropylene and polyvinyl chloride. Much of the oriented polypropylene (OPP) needed to produce packaging tapes, regardless of the tape brand, is supplied by just a few polymer manufacturers. Consequently, the composition of the backing material varies little. Therefore, the discriminating power of classical methods (physical fit, tape dimensions, colour, morphology, FTIR, PyGC/MS, etc.) is limited. Analysis of stable isotopes using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) has been applied in the broad area of forensics and it has been reported that isotope analysis is a valuable tool for the identification of adhesive tapes. We have tested the usefulness of this method by distinguishing different South Korean adhesive tapes produced by just a few manufacturers in the small South Korean market. Korean adhesive tapes were collected and analysed for their isotope signatures. The glue of the tapes was separated from the backing material and these sub-samples were analysed for their H- and C-isotope composition. The result shows the possibility for discriminating most tape samples, even from the same brand. Variations within single rolls have also been investigated, where no variations in H- and C-isotope composition significantly exceeding the standard deviation were found. PMID:18438979

  10. Application Prospect of Environmental Isotopes and Tracing Techniques for Earthquake Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Yaowei; REN, Hongwei; WANG, Bo

    In recent years, with the progress of new observation techniques and related theories, the tracing technique of environmental isotopes has been widely applied to investigate the groundwater dynamic process. It's expected that the tracing technique of environmental isotopes will contribute to identifying the dynamic information of groundwater, which is associated with the earthquake gestation and occurrence. In this study, along with the characteristics of stable isotopes including 2H and 18O, as well as radioactive isotopes such as 3H and 14C, the tracing techniques are investigated. Especially, with the environmental isotopes, the activity rules of groundwater including the groundwater recharge, circulation depth of geothermal water, water-rock interaction, and groundwater age are deeply discussed. The study was carried out to analyze effects of the groundwater on its response to the stress-strain changes and to the tectonic activities. It's worthy to mention that the tracing technique of environmental isotopes can be applied to identify the information of seismic subsurface fluid, determine the intensity of seismicity, discuss the role of fluid in earthquake gestation, and estimate the earthquake-reflecting effectiveness of borehole.

  11. Headspace analysis: A new application for isotopic characterization of dissolved organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, G.F.; Dempster, H.S.; Lollar, B.S.; Ahad, J.

    1999-01-01

    Petroleum products and industrial solvents are among the most ubiquitous contaminants of soil and groundwater and the source of several common and hazardous volatile organic chemicals (VOCs). Volatilization is a key determinant of the fate of VOCs in the subsurface environment, impacting contaminant partitioning between the aqueous, gaseous, and nonaqueous liquid phases. This study uses stable carbon isotope analysis to investigate the isotopic effects involved in volatilization of trichloroethylene (TCE) and toluene from both free product (or pure phase) and aqueous solutions. Results indicate that, during volatilization from the aqueous phase and from free product, the isotopic composition of TCE and toluene remains unchanged within reproducibility limits. These results have two important implications for contaminant hydrogeology. First, they suggest that carbon isotopic signatures may be useful in tracing contaminant transport between the vapor, aqueous, and NAPL phases since they remain conservative during phase changes. Second, they demonstrate the utility of headspace extraction (sampling of the vapor phase or headspace above an aqueous solution) as a preparatory technique for isotopic analysis of dissolved VOCs. Headspace isotopic analysis provides a straightforward and rapid technique for {delta}{sup 13}C analysis of dissolved organic contaminants at concentrations as low as hundreds of ppb.

  12. Application of Ca stable isotopes to long-term changes in the Ca cycle of a Northern Hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, A. C.; Takagi, K.; Bailey, S. W.; Bullen, T. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (New Hampshire, USA) presents an unusual opportunity for the application of innovative isotope methods in forest biogeochemistry. Changes in biogeochemical cycling resulting from decades of acid deposition, subsequent reductions in acid deposition, and a series of experimental treatments (harvesting, Ca amendment) have been studied continuously for 60 years at this site. Importantly, researchers have archived soil, water, and vegetation samples for much of the site's history. Our work seeks to complement earlier mass balance studies of Ca cycling by measuring Ca isotope ratios on archived samples. In the first component of our study, we examined the Ca isotopic response to an experimental clearcut in the early 1980's. Earlier work showed that the clearcut promoted dramatic loss of Ca from the watershed, indicated by a 5-fold increase in streamwater Ca concentrations. The mechanism for this loss was unclear as no resolvable changes in soil Ca pools were observed. Our work shows that streamwater dissolved Ca becomes isotopically lighter as Ca concentrations increase. These data are best accounted for by an increase in Ca loss from the soil cation exchange complex. Soil exchangeable δ44Ca itself evolves towards lighter values in the years following the experimental harvest. We interpret this as replenishment of the soil exchange complex by release of isotopically light Ca from root biomass. In the second component of our study, we examine decadal-scale changes in streamwater and soil Ca in an un-manipulated biogeochemical reference watershed. Historical data from Hubbard Brook show that streamwater Ca concentrations began decreasing sharply in the early 1970's, attributed to decreased deposition of both acidity and Ca with the passage of the Clean Air Act. Preliminary data indicate no resolvable change in the average δ44Ca of streamwater, with variability mostly attributable to discharge (flowpath control). Preliminary data

  13. Preliminary Study: Application of Off-Axis ICOS to Determine Stable Carbon Isotope in Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. T.; Lee, J. M.; Hwang, J. H.; Piao, J.; Woo, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is one of the major causes for global climate change. Because stable carbon isotope ratio is used to trace carbon source, several analytical techniques likes IRMS (Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) and LAS (Laser Absorption Spectrometry) were extensively used. Off-axis ICOS, a kind of LAS, has merits on long-term stability and field application, therefore it is widely being used in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) field. The aim of this study is to extend the application scope of OA-ICOS to determine dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Because OA-ICOS showed dependence of δ13C on CO2 concentration, data processing is required. We tested CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyzer (CCIA-36-EP, Los Gatos Research) with both reference gas (δ13C= -28.28‰) and aqueous solutions prepared by dissolving sodium bicarbonate standards (δ13C= -12.26‰ and +3.96‰). The differences of δ13C between reference and measurement values are plotted by CO2 concentrations, then compared. At first, we checked the similarity between our curve pattern for reference gas and Guillon's research (δ13C= -43.99‰) by other Analyzer. To analyze aqueous samples, more errors can be caused than gas analysis. The carbon isotope fractionation occurs during dissolving standard reagents and extracting DIC as CO2 gas form. This effect is mixed with CO2 concentration dependence effect, therefore the curve patterns are different with that for reference gas. Our experiments are done for various δ13C values. It could be an important point to use OA-ICOS to analyze DIC, too.

  14. Spinel-olivine-pyroxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, François L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-01

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fetot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (β-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fetot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fetot on the β-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite-fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fetot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  15. Recent developments in application of stable isotope analysis on agro-product authenticity and traceability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Gang; Chen, Ailiang; Yang, Shuming; Ye, Zhihua

    2014-02-15

    With the globalisation of agro-product markets and convenient transportation of food across countries and continents, the potential for distribution of mis-labelled products increases accordingly, highlighting the need for measures to identify the origin of food. High quality food with identified geographic origin is a concern not only for consumers, but also for agriculture farmers, retailers and administrative authorities. Currently, stable isotope ratio analysis in combination with other chemical methods gradually becomes a promising approach for agro-product authenticity and traceability. In the last five years, a growing number of research papers have been published on tracing agro-products by stable isotope ratio analysis and techniques combining with other instruments. In these reports, the global variety of stable isotope compositions has been investigated, including light elements such as C, N, H, O and S, and heavy isotopes variation such as Sr and B. Several factors also have been considered, including the latitude, altitude, evaporation and climate conditions. In the present paper, an overview is provided on the authenticity and traceability of the agro-products from both animal and plant sources by stable isotope ratio analysis. PMID:24128481

  16. Spinel-olivine-pryoxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    SciTech Connect

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, Francois L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-15

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (beta-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fe-tot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fe-tot on the beta-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite- fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  17. Compact snapshot real-time imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudenov, Michael W.; Dereniak, Eustace L.

    2011-11-01

    The described spectral imaging system, referred to as a Snapshot Hyperspectral Imaging Fourier Transform (SHIFT) spectrometer, is capable of acquiring spectral image data of a scene in a single integration of a camera, is ultra-compact, inexpensive (commercial off-the-shelf), has no moving parts, and can produce datacubes (x, y, λ) in real time. Based on the multiple-image FTS originally developed by A. Hirai [1], the presented device offers significant advantages over his original implementation. Namely, its birefringent nature results in a common-path interferometer which makes the spectrometer insensitive to vibration. Furthermore, it enables the potential of making the instrument ultra-compact, thereby improving the portability of the sensor. By combining a birefringent interferometer with a lenslet array, the entire spectrometer consumes approximately 15×15×20 mm3, excluding the imaging camera. The theory of the birefringent FTS is provided, followed by details of its specific embodiment and a laboratory proof of concept of the sensor. Post-processing is currently accomplished in Matlab, but progress is underway in developing real-time reconstruction capabilities with software programmed on a graphics processing unit (GPU). It is anticipated that processing of >30 datacubes per second can be achieved with modest GPU hardware, with spatial/spectral data of or exceeding 256×256 spatial resolution elements and 60 spectral bands over the visible (400-800 nm) spectrum. Data were collected outdoors, demonstrating the sensor's ability to resolve spectral signatures in standard outdoor lighting and environmental conditions as well as retinal imaging.

  18. Application of Fe Isotopes to the Search for Life and Habitable Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Clark M.; Beard, Brian L.; Nealson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    The relatively new field of Fe isotope geochemistry can make important contributions to tracing the geochemical cycling of Fe, which bears on issues such as metabolic processing of Fe, surface redox conditions, and development of planetary atmospheres and biospheres. It appears that Fe isotope fractionation in nature and the lab spans about 4 per mil (%) in Fe-56/Fe-54, and although this range is small, our new analytical methods produce a precision of +/- 0.05% on sample sizes as small as 100 ng (10(exp -7) g); this now provides us with a sufficient "signal-to-noise" ratio to make this isotope system useful. We review our work in three areas: 1) the terrestrial and lunar rock record, 2) experiments on inorganic fractionation, and 3) experiments involving biological processing of Fe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Applications of isotopes to tracing sources of solutes and water in shallow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kendall, Carol; Krabbenhoft, David P.

    1995-01-01

    New awareness of the potential danger to water supplies posed by the use of agricultural chemicals has focused attention on the nature of groundwater recharge and the mobility of various solutes, especially nitrate and pesticides, in shallow systems. A better understanding of hydrologic flowpaths and solute sources is required to determine the potential impact of sources of contamination on water supplies, to develop management practices for preserving water quality, and to develop remediation plans for sites that are already contaminated. In many cases, environmental isotopes can be employed as 'surgical tools' for answering very specific questions about water and solute sources. Isotopic data can often provide more accurate information about the system than hydrologic measurements or complicated hydrologic models. This note focuses on practical and cost-effective examples of how naturally-occurring isotopes can be used to track water and solutes as they move through shallow systems.

  20. Successful application of lead isotopes in source apportionment, legal proceedings, remediation and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Gulson, Brian; Korsch, Michael; Winchester, Wayne; Devenish, Matthew; Hobbs, Thad; Main, Cleve; Smith, Gerard; Rosman, Kevin; Howearth, Lynette; Burn-Nunes, Laurie; Seow, Jimmy; Oxford, Cameron; Yun, Gracie; Gillam, Lindsay; Crisp, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In late 2006, the seaside community in Esperance Western Australia was alerted to thousands of native bird species dying. The source of the lead (Pb) was determined by Pb isotopes to derive from the handling of Pb carbonate concentrate through the Port, which began in July 2005. Concern was expressed for the impact of this on the community. Our objectives were to employ Pb isotope ratios to evaluate the source of Pb in environmental samples for use in legal proceedings, and for use in remediation and monitoring. Isotope measurements were undertaken of bird livers, plants, drinking water, soil, harbour sediments, air, bulk ceiling dust, gutter sludge, surface swabs and blood. The unique lead isotopic signature of the contaminating Pb carbonate enabled diagnostic apportionment of lead in samples. Apart from some soil and water samples, the proportion of contaminating Pb was >95% in the environmental samples. Lead isotopes were critical in resolving legal proceedings, are being used in the remediation of premises, were used in monitoring of workers involved in the decontamination of the storage facility, and monitoring transport of the concentrate through another port facility. Air samples show the continued presence of contaminant Pb, more than one year after shipping of concentrate ceased, probably arising from dust resuspension. Brief details of the comprehensive testing and cleanup of the Esperance community are provided along with the role of the Community. Lead isotopic analyses can provide significant benefits to regulatory agencies, interested parties, and the community where the signature is able to be characterised with a high degree of certainty. PMID:21925655

  1. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  2. Advancement and application of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry techniques for atmospheric trace gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giebel, Brian M.

    2011-12-01

    The use of gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) for compound specific stable isotope analysis is an underutilized technique because of the complexity of the instrumentation and high analytical costs. However stable isotopic data, when coupled with concentration measurements, can provide additional information on a compounds production, transformation, loss, and cycling within the biosphere and atmosphere. A GC-IRMS system was developed to accurately and precisely measure delta13C values for numerous oxygenated volatile organic compounds having natural and anthropogenic sources. The OVOCs include methanol, ethanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, 2-pentanone, and 3-pentanone. Guided by the requirements for analysis of trace components in air, the GC-IRMS system was developed with the goals of increasing sensitivity, reducing dead-volume and peak band broadening, optimizing combustion and water removal, and decreasing the split ratio to the IRMS. The technique relied on a two-stage preconcentration system, a low-volume capillary reactor and water trap, and a balanced reference gas delivery system. Measurements were performed on samples collected from two distinct sources (i.e. biogenic and vehicle emissions) and ambient air collected from downtown Miami and Everglades National Park. However, the instrumentation and the method have the capability to analyze a variety of source and ambient samples. The measured isotopic signatures that were obtained from source and ambient samples provide a new isotopic constraint for atmospheric chemists and can serve as a new way to evaluate their models and budgets for many OVOCs. In almost all cases, OVOCs emitted from fuel combustion were enriched in 13C when compared to the natural emissions of plants. This was particularly true for ethanol gas emitted in vehicle exhaust, which was observed to have a uniquely enriched isotopic signature that was attributed to ethanol's corn origin and use as an alternative

  3. Barium Isotope Heterogeneities in Planetary Materials: Applications to Incomplete Mixing of the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranen, M. C.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2006-05-01

    A persistent view among geochemists is that the Solar System formed as a hot, well mixed disk of dust and gas that had the same initial isotopic composition of heavy elements throughout. Thus, all meteorite parent bodies and terrestrial planets would have identical stable isotopic ratios of refractory, heavy elements. In order to explain the initial isotope ratios of various extinct nuclides, both injection of supernova and AGB star material to the proto-solar molecular cloud or disk within a few million years of formation has been proposed. A common view is that these r-process and s-process contributions were homogenized throughout the disk. The existence of pre-solar grains in meteorites shows that grains with extremely large isotopic differences have been preserved. Some rare, refractory inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites have relatively large r-process excesses while a large portion of pre-solar grains found in chondrites are almost pure s-process material. The survival of these grains means that the nebula could not be as homogenized as previously thought. Thus, it is plausible for various planets and planetesimals to have slightly different inventories of r- and s-process nuclides. Small isotopic differences between bulk meteorites and the Earth have been measured for both Mo and Zr (Yin et al. 2002). Boyet and Carlson (2005) measured a 20 ppm difference in 142Nd between the Earth and chondrites which could either be due to decay of 146Sm or an r-process enrichment in chondritic meteorites compared to the Earth, consistent with the Mo and Zr data. We have measured Ba isotopes in various chondrites to further investigate heavy element isotope heterogeneities in bulk planetary bodies. Barium is an ideal element to study because it has many isotopes, some of which are formed only in the s-process. All chondrites show r-process excesses of up to 40 ppm in 138Ba compared to the Earth. This is likely an r-process excess due to incomplete mixing of r- and s

  4. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  5. Sulfur isotopic analysis of carbonyl sulfide and its application for biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Shohei; Kamezaki, Kazuki; Ogawa, Takahiro; Toyoda, Sakae; Katayama, Yoko; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS or COS) is the most abundant gas containing sulfur in the atmosphere, with an average mixing ratio of 500 p.p.t.v. in the troposphere. OCS is suggested as a sulfur source of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSA) which plays an important role in Earth's radiation budget and ozone depletion. Therefore, OCS budget should be validated for prediction of climate change, but the global OCS budget is imbalance. Recently we developed a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions of OCS using nanomole level samples: the direct isotopic analytical technique of on-line gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions S+ (Hattori et al., 2015). The first measurement of the δ34S value for atmospheric OCS coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere (Hattori et al., 2011; Schmidt et al., 2012; Hattori et al., 2012) explains the reported δ34S value for background stratospheric sulfate, suggesting that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols. This new method measuring δ34S values of OCS can be used to investigate OCS sources and sinks in the troposphere to better understand its cycle. It is known that some microorganisms in soil can degrade OCS, but the mechanism and the contribution to the OCS in the air are still uncertain. In order to determine sulfur isotopic enrichment factor of OCS during degradation via microorganisms, incubation experiments were conducted using strains belonging to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus, isolated from natural soil environments (Kato et al., 2008). As a result, sulfur isotope ratios of OCS were increased during degradation of OCS, indicating that reaction for OC32S is faster than that for OC33S and OC34S. OCS degradation via microorganisms is not mass-independent fractionation (MIF) process, suggesting that this

  6. Maximum bandwidth snapshot channeled imaging polarimeter with polarization gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCasse, Charles F.; Redman, Brian J.; Kudenov, Michael W.; Craven, Julia M.

    2016-05-01

    Compact snapshot imaging polarimeters have been demonstrated in literature to provide Stokes parameter estimations for spatially varying scenes using polarization gratings. However, the demonstrated system does not employ aggressive modulation frequencies to take full advantage of the bandwidth available to the focal plane array. A snapshot imaging Stokes polarimeter is described and demonstrated through results. The simulation studies the challenges of using a maximum bandwidth configuration for a snapshot polarization grating based polarimeter, such as the fringe contrast attenuation that results from higher modulation frequencies. Similar simulation results are generated and compared for a microgrid polarimeter. Microgrid polarimeters are instruments where pixelated polarizers are superimposed onto a focal plan array, and this is another type of spatially modulated polarimeter, and the most common design uses a 2x2 super pixel of polarizers which maximally uses the available bandwidth of the focal plane array.

  7. High-resolution structure of viruses from random diffraction snapshots

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinizadeh, A.; Schwander, P.; Dashti, A.; Fung, R.; D'Souza, R. M.; Ourmazd, A.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record diffraction snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and thence the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing Bayesian approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution typically to 1/10 of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to high resolution, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic level. Our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and nano-crystalline objects. PMID:24914154

  8. Future trends in transport and fate of diffuse contaminants in catchments, with special emphasis on stable isotope applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, J.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Bonell, M.; Duguet, J.-P.; Harris, B.; Meckenstock, R.; McGuire, K.; Moussa, R.; Peters, N.; Richnow, H.H.; Sherwood-Lollar, B.; Uhlenbrook, S.; van, Lanen H.

    2006-01-01

    A summary is provided of the first of a series of proposed Integrated Science Initiative workshops supported by the UNESCO International Hydrological Programme. The workshop brought together hydrologists, environmental chemists, microbiologists, stable isotope specialists and natural resource managers with the purpose of communicating new ideas on ways to assess microbial degradation processes and reactive transport at catchment scales. The focus was on diffuse contamination at catchment scales and the application of compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) in the assessment of biological degradation processes of agrochemicals. Major outcomes were identifying the linkage between water residence time distribution and rates of contaminant degradation, identifying the need for better information on compound specific microbial degradation isotope fractionation factors and the potential of CSIA in identifying key degradative processes. In the natural resource management context, a framework was developed where CSIA techniques were identified as practically unique in their capacity to serve as distributed integrating indicators of process across a range of scales (micro to diffuse) of relevance to the problem of diffuse pollution assessment. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Application of Hydrogen Isotope Geochemistry to Volcanology: Recent Perspective on Eruption Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Kasai, Y.; Sato, N.; Yoshimura, S.

    2008-02-25

    Degassing of magma is central to understand the dynamics of volcanic eruption. Hydrogen isotopic composition of volcanic rocks reflects degassing processes. The natural obsidian samples in some eruptions typically show a gently and then rapidly decreasing {delta}D trends with decreasing water content; this led to the two-stage degassing model, with closed-system volatile exsolution (batch fractionation of hydrogen isotope) during the explosive phase followed by open-system degassing (Rayleigh fractionation) to produce the low {delta}D value of the dome and flow lavas. However, the relationship between pattern of degassing (and fractionation) and mode of eruption is controversial. Based on the CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio of the obsidians, Rust et al. suggested that the analyzed samples with relatively constant {delta}D value and high water content were buffered (re-equilibrated) with vapor of relatively constant isotopic composition, assuming that silicic magma along conduit wall is fragmented and highly permeable. However, the timing and mechanism of the shift to open system degassing (Rayleigh fractionation) has not been clarified. To further constrain the eruption dynamics, experimental study on the hydrogen isotope fractionation during degassing would be helpful, although common noble metals used as sample capsules, including Au, are permeable to hydrogen at magmatic temperature, and even to water molecule in the prolonged run, probably due to the change of grain boundary properties such as thermal grooving.

  10. APPLICATION OF STABLE CARBON AND HYDROGEN ISOTOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE IN THE FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory


    A significant challenge in environmental studies is to determine the onset and extent of MTBE bioremediation at an affected site, which may involve indirect approaches such as microcosm verification of microbial activities at a given site. Stable isotopic fractionation is cha...

  11. Applications of stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in in vivo human metabolic research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Young; Suh, Sang-Hoon; Lee, In-Kyu; Wolfe, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    The human body is in a constant state of turnover, that is, being synthesized, broken down and/or converted to different compounds. The dynamic nature of in vivo kinetics of human metabolism at rest and in stressed conditions such as exercise and pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes and cancer can be quantitatively assessed with stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers in conjunction with gas or liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and modeling. Although measurements of metabolite concentrations have been useful as general indicators of one's health status, critical information on in vivo kinetics of metabolites such as rates of production, appearance or disappearance of metabolites are not provided. Over the past decades, stable, nonradioactive isotope tracers have been used to provide information on dynamics of specific metabolites. Stable isotope tracers can be used in conjunction with molecular and cellular biology tools, thereby providing an in-depth dynamic assessment of metabolic changes, as well as simultaneous investigation of the molecular basis for the observed kinetic responses. In this review, we will introduce basic principles of stable isotope methodology for tracing in vivo kinetics of human or animal metabolism with examples of quantifying certain aspects of in vivo kinetics of carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. PMID:26795236

  12. The Fe-Isotope System and Its Applicability as a Biosignature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.; Skulan, Joseph; Taylor, Lawerence A.; Sun, Henry; Cox, Lea; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gerdenich, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    High precision (0.05) Fe isotope analyses show that igneous rocks and loess are invariant but chemical sediments have variable compositions. The relative roles of abiologic and biologic fractionations that produced this range are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. ISOTOPIC BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC NITROGEN: A NEW TECHNIQUE AND APPLICATION. (R825151)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a new technique for isolating and isotopically characterizing dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) for non-marine waters, 15N values for DON from lacustrine samples and data suggesting that this technique will be a...

  14. Module 5: Applications of Stable Isotope Analyses: Data Interpretation and Data Quality Issues

    EPA Science Inventory

    When organic contaminants such as benzene, TCE or MTBE are degraded, the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon in the organic contaminants will often change in a predictable fashion. In the last ten years, advances in analytical chemistry have made it possible to measure these ...

  15. Rare isotope accelerator project in Korea and its application to high energy density sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, M.; Chung, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, B. J.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    As a national science project, the Korean government has recently established the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) with the goal of conducting world-class research in basic sciences. One of the core facilities for the IBS will be the rare isotope accelerator which can produce high-intensity rare isotope beams to investigate the fundamental properties of nature, and also to support a broad research program in material sciences, medical and biosciences, and future nuclear energy technologies. The construction of the accelerator is scheduled to be completed by approximately 2017. The design of the accelerator complex is optimized to deliver high average beam current on targets, and to maximize the production of rare isotope beams through the simultaneous use of Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) and In-Flight Fragmentation (IFF) methods. The proposed accelerator is, however, not optimal for high energy density science, which usually requires very high peak currents on the target. In this study, we present possible beam-plasma experiments that can be done within the scope of the current accelerator design, and we also investigate possible future extension paths that may enable high energy density science with intense pulsed heavy ion beams.

  16. Application of sulphur isotope ratios to examine weaning patterns and freshwater fish consumption in Roman Oxfordshire, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehlich, Olaf; Fuller, Benjamin T.; Jay, Mandy; Mora, Alice; Nicholson, Rebecca A.; Smith, Colin I.; Richards, Michael P.

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the application of sulphur isotope ratios (δ 34S) in combination with carbon (δ 13C) and nitrogen (δ 15N) ratios to understand the influence of environmental sulphur on the isotopic composition of archaeological human and faunal remains from Roman era sites in Oxfordshire, UK. Humans ( n = 83), terrestrial animals ( n = 11), and freshwater fish ( n = 5) were analysed for their isotope values from four locations in the Thames River Valley, and a broad range of δ 34S values were found. The δ 34S values from the terrestrial animals were highly variable (-13.6‰ to +0.5‰), but the δ 34S values of the fish were clustered and 34S-depleted (-20.9‰ to -17.3‰). The results of the faunal remains suggest that riverine sulphur influenced the terrestrial sulphur isotopic signatures. Terrestrial animals were possibly raised on the floodplains of the River Thames, where highly 34S-depleted sulphur influenced the soil. The humans show the largest range of δ 34S values (-18.8‰ to +9.6‰) from any archaeological context to date. No differences in δ 34S values were found between the males (-7.8 ± 6.0‰) and females (-5.3 ± 6.8‰), but the females had a linear correlation ( R2 = 0.71; p < 0.0001) between their δ 15N and δ 34S compositions. These δ 34S results suggest a greater dietary variability for the inhabitants of Roman Oxfordshire than previously thought, with some individuals eating solely terrestrial protein resources and others showing a diet almost exclusively based on freshwater protein such as fish. Such large dietary variability was not visible by analysing only the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios, and this research represents the largest and most detailed application of δ 34S analysis to examine dietary practices (including breastfeeding and weaning patterns) during the Romano-British Period.

  17. Wide field snapshot imaging polarimeter using modified Savart plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Naooki; Odate, Satoru; Otaki, Katsura; Kubota, Masahiro; Kitahara, Rintaro; Oka, Kazuhiko

    2013-09-01

    Without moving parts, the snapshot imaging polarimeter utilizing Savart plates is capable of stable and fast measurements of spatiallly distributed Stokes parameters. To increase feasibility of the optical design, we propose modi cations that enable a wider eld-of view. By changing the Savar plates' con guration and improving the calibration procedure, the unwanted effects associated with the increase in the eld of view can be reduced. We carried out the veri cation experiments of the wide eld of view snapshot imaging polarimeter.

  18. Microbial activities and phosphorus cycling: An application of oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Lisa M.; Joshi, Sunendra R.; Kana, Todd M.; Jaisi, Deb P.

    2014-08-01

    Microorganisms carry out biochemical transformations of nutrients that make up their cells. Therefore, understanding how these nutrients are transformed or cycled in natural environments requires knowledge of microbial activity. Commonly used indicators for microbial activity typically include determining microbial respiration by O2/CO2 measurements, cell counts, and measurement of enzyme activities. However, coupled studies on nutrient cycling and microbial activity are not given enough emphasis. Here we apply phosphate oxygen isotope ratios (δ18OP) as a tool for measurement of microbial activity and compare the rate of isotope exchange with methods of measuring microbial activities that are more commonly applied in environmental studies including respiration, dehydrogenase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell counts. Our results show that different bacteria may have different strategies for P uptake, storage and release, their respiration and consequently expression of DHA and APase activities, but in general the trend of their enzyme activities are comparable. Phosphate δ18OP values correlated well with these other parameters used to measure microbial activity with the strongest linear relationships between δ18OP and CO2 evolution (r = -0.99). Even though the rate of isotope exchange for each microorganism used in this study is different, the rate per unit CO2 respiration showed one general trend, where δ18OP values move towards equilibrium while CO2 is generated. While this suggests that P cycling among microorganisms used in this study can be generalized, further research is needed to determine whether the microorganism-specific isotope exchange trend may occur in natural environments. In summary, phosphate oxygen isotope measurements may offer an alternative for use as a tracer to measure microbial activity in soils, sediments, and many other natural environments.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ISOTOPES FOR RESOLUTION OF HYDROLOGY PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of environmental isotopes as tracers in the hydrosphere is increasing as analytical instrumentation improves and more applications are discovered. There exists still misconceptions on the role of isotopes in resolving hydrology problems. Naturally occurring isotopes in th...

  20. A new method and application for determining the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Miller, D. J.; Wojtal, P.; O'Connor, M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play key roles in atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and radiative forcing, and contribute to nitric acid deposition. Sources of NOx include both natural and anthropogenic emissions, which vary significantly in space and time. NOx isotopic signatures offer a potentially valuable tool to trace source impacts on atmospheric chemistry and regional acid deposition. Previous work on NOx isotopic signatures suggests large ranges in values, even from the same emission source, as well as overlapping ranges amongst different sources, making it difficult to use the isotopic composition as a quantitative tracer of source influences. These prior measurements have utilized a variety of methods for collecting the NOx as nitrate or nitrite for isotopic analysis, and testing of some of these methods (including active and passive collections) reveal inconsistencies in efficiency of collection, as well as issues related to changes in conditions such as humidity, temperature, and NOx fluxes. A recently developed method allows for accurately measuring the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) after capturing the NOx in a potassium permanganate/sodium hydroxide solution as nitrate (Fibiger et al., Anal. Chem., 2014). The method has been thoroughly tested in the laboratory and field, and efficiently collects NO and NO2 under a variety of conditions. There are several advantages to collecting NOx actively, including the ability to collect over minutes to hourly time scales, and the ability to collect in environments with highly variable NOx sources and concentrations. Challenges include a nitrate background present in potassium permanganate (solid and liquid forms), accurately deriving ambient NOx concentrations based upon flow rate and solution concentrations above this variable background, and potential interferences from other nitrogen species. This method was designed to collect NOx in environments with very different

  1. Recent applications on isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. Sabine; Sela, Hagit; Dobrowolska, Justina; Zoriy, Miroslav; Becker, J. Susanne

    2008-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) have proved themselves to be powerful and sensitive inorganic mass spectrometric techniques for analysing stable and radioactive isotopes in different application fields because of their high sensitivity, low detection limits, good accuracy and precision. New applications of ICP-MS focus on tracer experiments and the development of isotope dilution techniques together with nanoflow injections for the analysis of small volumes of biological samples. Today, LA-ICP-MS is the method of choice for direct determination of metals, e.g., on protein bands in gels after the gel electrophoresis of protein mixtures. Tracer experiments using highly enriched 65Cu were utilized in order to study the formation of metal-binding bovine serum proteins. A challenging task for LA-ICP-MS is its application as an imaging mass spectrometric technique for the production of isotope images (e.gE, from thin sections of brain tissues stained with neodymium). In this paper, we demonstrate the application of imaging mass spectrometry on single particles (zircon and uranium oxide). Single Precambrian zircon crystals from the Baltic Shield were investigated with respect to isotope ratios using LA-ICP-MS for age dating. The U-Pb age was determined from the isochrone with (1.48 ± 0.14) × 109 a. Using isotope ratio measurements on 10 nuclear uranium oxide single particles the 235U/238U isotope ratio was determined to be 0.032 ± 0.004. This paper describes recent developments and applications of isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS and LA-ICP-MS on biological samples and single particles.

  2. Second national topical meeting on tritium technology in fission, fusion and isotopic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; Barlit, J.R.

    1985-09-01

    This conference presented information on the following topics: the development of a tritium dispersion code; global environmental transport models for tritium; HT/HTO conversion in mammals; tritium production, releases and population doses at nuclear power reactors; design of tritium processing facilities and equipment for aqueous and gaseous streams; tritium removal from circulating helium by hydriding of rare earth metals; the determination of deuterium and tritium in effluent wastewater by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; tritium surface contamination: process calculations for a moderator detritiation plant; recent developments in magnetically coupled vane pumps for tritium service; recovery and storage of tritium by Zr-V-Fe getter; gas handling systems using titanium-sponge and uranium bulk getters; isotope effects and helium retention behavior in vanadium tritide; interaction of hydrogen isotopes with stainless steel 316 L; and the interaction of polyethylene and tritium gas as monitored by Raman spectroscopy.

  3. Annual rainfall and nitrogen-isotope correlation in macropod collagen: application as a palaeoprecipitation indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröcke, Darren R.; Bocherens, Hervé; Mariotti, André

    1997-12-01

    Collagen has been extracted and analysed for δ 15N from modern kangaroos, macropods ( Macropus eugenii, M. antilopinus, M. fuliginosus, M. rufus, M. robustus), in Western Australia and South Australia. Comparison of nitrogen-isotope ratios with annual rainfall for the respective areas produced a good negative correlation for macropods, but not for other marsupials. This may be related to metabolic adaptations in macropods to compete against water loss. Hence, the correlation between δ 15N and annual rainfall may be species-specific. Nitrogen-isotope analyses on collagenic material extracted from fossil macropods ( Macropus spp.) have been determined from two Late Pleistocene deposits in South Australia. Corroboration with spore-pollen and sedimentological data confirm that δ 15N of collagenic material can be used as a proxy for palaeoprecipitation levels in Australia. This has great potential for understanding palaeoclimatic changes, especially drought periods, in Australia during the Pleistocene.

  4. Secondary ion mass spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, S.M.; Hoenigman, J.R.; Moddeman, W.E.

    1981-11-20

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is not capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.

  5. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometers (SIMS) for calcium isotope measurements as an application to biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, S. M.; Hoenigman, J. R.; Moddeman, W. E.

    1981-11-01

    The potential use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) to analyze biological samples for calcium isotopes is discussed. Comparison of UTI and Extranuclear based quadrupole systems is made on the basis of the analysis of CaO and calcium metal. The Extranuclear quadrupole based system is superior in resolution and sensitivity to the UTI system and is recommended. For determination of calcium isotopes to within an accuracy of a few percent a high resolution quadrupole, such as the Extranuclear, and signal averaging capability are required. Charge neutralization will be mandated for calcium oxide, calcium nitrate, or calcium oxalate. SIMS is not capable of the high precision and high accuracy results possible by thermal ionization methods, but where faster analysis is desirable with an accuracy of a few percent, SIMS is a viable alternative.

  6. Augmenting real data with synthetic data: an application in assessing radio-isotope identification algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, Tom L; Hamada, Michael; Graves, Todd; Myers, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The performance of Radio-Isotope Identification (RIID) algorithms using gamma spectroscopy is increasingly important. For example, sensors at locations that screen for illicit nuclear material rely on isotope identification to resolve innocent nuisance alarms arising from naturally occurring radioactive material. Recent data collections for RIID testing consist of repeat measurements for each of several scenarios to test RIID algorithms. Efficient allocation of measurement resources requires an appropriate number of repeats for each scenario. To help allocate measurement resources in such data collections for RIID algorithm testing, we consider using only a few real repeats per scenario. In order to reduce uncertainty in the estimated RIID algorithm performance for each scenario, the potential merit of augmenting these real repeats with realistic synthetic repeats is also considered. Our results suggest that for the scenarios and algorithms considered, approximately 10 real repeats augmented with simulated repeats will result in an estimate having comparable uncertainty to the estimate based on using 60 real repeats.

  7. Isotopes and analogs of hydrogen--from fundamental investigations to practical applications.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Roderick M

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has a central role in the story of the universe itself and also in the story of our efforts to understand it. This paper retells the story of the part played by hydrogen and its stable isotope deuterium in the primordial synthesis of the elements, then goes on to describe how the spectrum of atomic hydrogen led to insights into the laws governing matter at the most fundamental level, from the quantum mechanics of Schrödinger and Heisenberg, through quantum electrodynamics, to the most recent work investigating the underlying structure of the proton itself. Atomic hydrogen is unique among the elements in that the concept of isotopy--atoms having the same nuclear charge but different masses--is stretched to its limit in the isotopes of hydrogen, ranging from the well-known isotopes deuterium and tritium to exotic species such as muonium, muonic helium, and positronium. These atoms, or atom-like objects, have much to tell us about fundamental aspects of the universe. In recent years the idea of utilizing hydrogen either as an energy source (through nuclear fusion) or as an energy storage medium (bound in hydrides or other materials) has attracted much attention as a possible avenue to a post-oil energy future. Some of the more interesting recent developments are described here. Dedicated to the memory of Brian C. Webster (1939-2008). PMID:24244971

  8. Stable-isotope-labeled carbohydrates and nucleosides: Synthesis and applications in chemistry and biology

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, A.S.

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrates play important roles in many key biochemical processes in living cells. For example, they are metabolized to produce energy, mediate cell-cell recognition, and play an indirect role (as constituents of DNA and RNA) in DNA replication, RNA transcription, and protein synthesis. These roles, and others of comparable biochemical significance, have been studied to varying extends with the use of stable isotopically labeled molecules, usually in conjunction with NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry. For example, carbohydrate metabolism has been monitored in vitro and in vivo with the use of isotopically labeled compounds. Molecular aspects of cell-cell recognition, mediated by cell-surface glycoproteins and glycolipids, have been probed through NMR studies of isotopically labeled oligosaccharides. More recently, the solution behavior of DNA and RNA has been examined through the use of labeled oligonucleotides. In all of these pursuits, the effort and expense to prepare labeled molecules, both of which can be substantial, are more than offset by the wealth of information derived from these studies. This information often cannot be accessed, or can be accessed only with great difficulty, using natural (unlabeled) compounds.

  9. The application of Mg isotopes in carbonate rocks to reconstruct environmental records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies showed that Mg isotope fractionation between carbonate and solution depends on several parameters including 1) temperature (with a sensitivity of ~0.01‰/oC); 2) precipitation rate; 3) aqueous Mg concentration and pH; 4) mineralogy: All else being equal, the enrichment of 26Mg in carbonate precipitated from solutions with the same δ26Mg values follow the sequence: aragonite > dolomite > magnesite > calcite; and 5) biogenic effect [1]. Despite the complexity, the weak temperature sensitivity and strong mineralogical control offer Mg isotope compositions of carbonate rocks as a paleoproxy to provide constraints on environmental records, and an index for diagenesis and low degree metamorphism. Here, we present four cases describing 1) how Mg isotope varied during the mineralogical transition from aragonite (corals) to calcite; 2) how δ26Mg, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of a Cambrian limestone changed due to the formation of secondary high-Mg calcite; 3) how δ26Mg and trace metal compositions of limestones can be used to reconstruct ocean chemistry, and 4) how δ26Mg, 87Sr/86Sr ratios of dolomite can be used to infer ocean chemistry in the deep time.

  10. A guide through the computational analysis of isotope-labeled mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics data: an application study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has reached a stage where it is possible to comprehensively analyze the whole proteome of a cell in one experiment. Here, the employment of stable isotopes has become a standard technique to yield relative abundance values of proteins. In recent times, more and more experiments are conducted that depict not only a static image of the up- or down-regulated proteins at a distinct time point but instead compare developmental stages of an organism or varying experimental conditions. Results Although the scientific questions behind these experiments are of course manifold, there are, nevertheless, two questions that commonly arise: 1) which proteins are differentially regulated regarding the selected experimental conditions, and 2) are there groups of proteins that show similar abundance ratios, indicating that they have a similar turnover? We give advice on how these two questions can be answered and comprehensively compare a variety of commonly applied computational methods and their outcomes. Conclusions This work provides guidance through the jungle of computational methods to analyze mass spectrometry-based isotope-labeled datasets and recommends an effective and easy-to-use evaluation strategy. We demonstrate our approach with three recently published datasets on Bacillus subtilis [1,2] and Corynebacterium glutamicum [3]. Special focus is placed on the application and validation of cluster analysis methods. All applied methods were implemented within the rich internet application QuPE [4]. Results can be found at http://qupe.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de. PMID:21663690

  11. A Snapshot of Organizational Climate: Perceptions of Extension Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tower, Leslie E.; Bowen, Elaine; Alkadry, Mohamad G.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of the perceptions of workplace climate of Extension faculty at a land-grant, research-high activity university, compared with the perceptions of non-Extension faculty at the same university. An online survey was conducted with a validated instrument. The response rate for university faculty was 44% (968); the…

  12. Drama and Theatre Education in Canada: A Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mindy R.

    2014-01-01

    This "Note from the Field" provides an overview of what is happening in Kindergarten to University drama and theatre education across Canada. In addition to this snapshot I offer some considerations for extending this discipline and its potential impact on curriculum, policy and practice.

  13. A Snapshot of Ten Pre-Service Secondary Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latterell, Carmen M.

    2008-01-01

    Reform in secondary mathematics education has created changes regarding how to educate teachers. It is time to check the result of such changes. This study provides a snapshot look at the commonalities of ten pre-service teachers in regards to their mathematics knowledge and their attitudes about mathematics and mathematics education. Four themes…

  14. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Turks & Caicos (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile presents a snapshot of the electricity generation and reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Turks and Caicos - a British overseas territory consisting of two groups of islands located southeast of the Bahamas. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  15. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - St. Lucia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Saint Lucia, one of six Caribbean countries that make up the Windward Islands - the southern arc of the Lesser Antilles chain - at the eastern end of the Caribbean Sea. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  16. Phase correction algorithms for a snapshot hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Victoria C.; Kudenov, Michael; Dereniak, Eustace

    2015-09-01

    We present image processing algorithms that improve spatial and spectral resolution on the Snapshot Hyperspectral Imaging Fourier Transform (SHIFT) spectrometer. Final measurements are stored in the form of threedimensional datacubes containing the scene's spatial and spectral information. We discuss calibration procedures, review post-processing methods, and present preliminary results from proof-of-concept experiments.

  17. Minority Student Report 2005: A Snapshot of Arizona's Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester, Christine A.; Drake, Tonya M.

    2005-01-01

    This document, from the Arizona Minority Education Policy Analysis Center (AMEPAC), reports the educational achievement of minority students in Arizona, from kindergarten through college. As a snapshot it is simply a description of what is, and the data are, thus, open to interpretation. How the numbers look and what they mean may be two different…

  18. CALiPER Snapshot Report: MR16 Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  19. A Portrait of Pre-kindergarten. FPG Snapshot #28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FPG Child Development Institute, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Multi-State Study of Pre-kindergarten by the National Center for Early Development & Learning (NCEDL) offers a first glance at pre-K children, teachers, and classroom quality in six states. This Snapshot overviews three recent articles co-authored by FPG scientists that summarize findings of the study about children, pre-K teachers, and…

  20. 48. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopy of photograph (from polaroid snapshot in Burlington Northern Railroad correspondence files, October, 1957) SHEAR FENCE DAMAGE FROM M/V/ KORSHOLMA COLLISION - Burlington Northern Railroad Bridge, Spanning Willamette River at River Mile 6.9, Portland, Multnomah County, OR

  1. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Outdoor Area Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-07-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  2. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Indoor LED Luminaires

    SciTech Connect

    2014-04-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  3. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Bahamas (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to the Commonwealth of the Bahamas - a country consisting of more than 700 islands, cays, and islets - of which only 30 are actually inhabited. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  4. Snapshots of mathematics teacher noticing during task design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Ban Heng

    2016-08-01

    Designing a mathematically worthwhile task is critical for promoting students' reasoning. To improve task design skills, teachers often engage in collaborative lesson planning activities such as lesson study. However, to learn from the process of lesson study, it is important for teachers to notice productively the concepts, students' confusion and the design of the task. But what researchers mean by productive noticing varies. In this article, I present the FOCUS Framework which highlights two characteristics of productive noticing: having an explicit focus for noticing and focusing noticing through pedagogical reasoning. Using these two characteristics, I develop snapshots of noticing as a representation of practice to present a fine-grained analysis of teacher noticing. Through vignettes of teachers discussing the design of a task to teach fractions, I illustrate how two teachers' noticing can be analysed and represented using snapshots of noticing. To conclude, I highlight what snapshots of noticing tell us about a teacher's noticing and suggest ways to use these snapshots in future studies of noticing.

  5. Determination and application of the equilibrium oxygen isotope effect between water and sulfite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Eldridge, Daniel L.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The information encoded by the two stable isotope systems in sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4) has been widely applied to aid reconstructions of both modern and ancient environments. Interpretation of δ18OSO4 records has been complicated by rapid oxygen isotope equilibration between sulfoxyanions and water. Specifically, the apparent relationship that develops between δ18OSO4 and δ18Owater during microbial sulfate reduction is thought to result from rapid oxygen isotope equilibrium between intracellular water and aqueous sulfite - a reactive intermediate of the sulfate reduction network that can back-react to produce sulfate. Here, we describe the oxygen equilibrium isotope effect between water and sulfite (referring to all the sum of all S(IV)-oxyanions including sulfite and both isomers and the dimer of bisulfite). Based on experiments conducted over a range of pH (4.5-9.8) and temperature (2-95 °C), where ε = 1000 * (α - 1), we find εSO3-H2O=13.61-0.299∗pH-0.081∗T °C. Thus, at a pH (7.0) and temperature (25 °C) typifying commonly used experimental conditions for sulfate reducing bacterial cultures, sulfite is enriched in 18O by 9.5‰ (±0.8‰) relative to ambient water. We examine the implication of these results in a sulfate reduction network that has been revised to reflect our understanding of the reactions involving oxygen. By evaluating previously published data within this new architecture, our results are consistent with previous suggestions of high reversibility of the sulfate reduction biochemical network. We also demonstrate that intracellular exchange rates between SO32- and water must be on average 1-3 orders of magnitude more rapid than intracellular fluxes of sulfate reduction intermediates and that kinetic isotope effects upstream of SO32- are required to explain previous laboratory and environmental studies of δ18OSO4 resulting as a consequence of sulfate reduction.

  6. Impact of vinasse application in the C and N in the soils cultivaded with sugarcane in South Brasil, using Isotopic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossete, A. M.; Medeiros, G. G.; Adorno, F. C.; Possignolo, N. V.; Moreira, M. Z.; Camargo, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The main anthropogenic sources in the environment are fertilizers, pesticides, biomass burning, vehicle emissions, and disposal of urban and industrial waste. Vinasse is characterized as a residual of sugarcane distillery effluent with high concentrations of potassium and organic matter. The environmental impact caused by its use in the vinasse is modification chemical and physical properties in the soil and water. For this, the isotopic technique can be a powerful tool to understand the biogeochemical cycling of light elements (C and N). Some environmental studies have been conducted involving isotopic characterization of Carbon and Nitrogen in soil. Several soils cultivated with sugarcane of different regions of São Paulo state, Brazil, were analyzed to perform the isotopic characterization. The study area was selected where soil management is by mechanical harvesting of sugarcane and vinasse application. The area was divided into three parts: control (without cultivation); after mechanical harvesting of sugarcane; after mechanical harvesting of sugarcane and vinasse application. Three days after the harvest of sugarcane the vinasse was applied and sampling of soil surface was carried out in two periods of 7 and 30 days after application of vinasse. The isotopic determination in the sample soil and concentration of C and N was by IRMS, Thermo Delta Plus, allowing simultaneous determination of 13C/12C isotope ratios (δ13C) and 15N/14N (δ15N). The results of the C and N concentration in the vinasse applied were average values 2.52% and 0.02% and isotopic values of 13C and 15N were -14.1‰ and 5.2‰. The results for the C concentration of the three areas in two periods showed values around 0.86 to 1.01%. The 13C isotopic values were -16.8 to -15.0‰, demonstrating the predominant cultivation in the region in relation to δ13C values of C4 plant (sugarcane). The results of N analysis were 0.08 to 0.10% and 15N isotope analysis, showing values ranging from 7

  7. Strontium isotopic signatures of oil-field waters: Applications for reservoir characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnaby, R.J.; Oetting, G.C.; Gao, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of formation waters that were collected from 71 wells producing from a Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoir in New Mexico display a well-defined distribution, with radiogenic waters (up to 0.710129) at the updip western part of the reservoir, grading downdip to less radiogenic waters (as low as 0.708903 to the east. Salinity (2800-50,000 mg/L) displays a parallel trend; saline waters to the west pass downdip to brackish waters. Elemental and isotopic data indicate that the waters originated as meteoric precipitation and acquired their salinity and radiogenic 87Sr through dissolution of Upper Permian evaporites. These meteoric-derived waters descended, perhaps along deeply penetrating faults, driven by gravity and density, to depths of more than 7000 ft (2100 m). The 87 Sr/86Sr and salinity trends record influx of these waters along the western field margin and downdip flow across the field, consistent with the strong water drive, potentiometric gradient, and tilted gas-oil-water contacts. The formation water 87Sr/86Sr composition can be useful to evaluate subsurface flow and reservoir behavior, especially in immature fields with scarce pressure and production data. In mature reservoirs, Sr Sr isotopes can be used to differentiate original formation water from injected water for waterflood surveillance. Strontium isotopes thus provide a valuable tool for both static and dynamic reservoir characterization in conjunction with conventional studies using seismic, log, core, engineering, and production data. Copyright ??2004. The American Association of Petroleum Geologist. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of tree-ring isotopic analyses to reconstruct historical water use of riparian trees.

    PubMed

    Alstad, Karrin P; Hart, Stephen C; Horton, Jonathan L; Kolb, Thomas E

    2008-03-01

    Historical patterns of water source use by trees inferred from long-term records of tree-ring stable isotopic content could assist in evaluating the impact of human alterations to natural stream flow regimes (e.g., water impoundments, stream flow diversions, and groundwater extraction). Our objective was to assess the utility of the hydrogen stable isotopic composition (SD) of tree rings as an index of historical water source use by riparian trees. We investigated the influence of site conditions that varied in climate and hydrology on the relationship between deltaD of Populus xylem water (deltaD(xyl)) and tree-ring cellulose (deltaD(cell)). deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(cell) were strongly correlated across sites (r2 = 0.89). However, the slope of this relationship was less than 1, indicating that factors other than deltaD(xyl) influenced deltaD(cell). Inverse modeling with an isotopic fractionation model for tree-ring cellulose suggested that the lack of one-to-one correspondence between deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(cell) was due to the influence of the hydrogen isotopic content of the atmospheric water vapor (deltaD(atm)). Empirically measured values of deltaD(cell) were typically within the seasonal range of deltaD(cell) predicted from the fractionation model. Sensitivity analyses showed that changes in deltaD(xyl) generally had a greater influence at high-elevation montane sites, whereas deltaD(xyl) and deltaD(atm) had about equal influence on deltaD(cell) at low-elevation desert sites. The intrasite relationship between deltaD(cell) and deltaD(xyl) among individual trees was poor, perhaps because of the within-site spatial variation in hydrologic conditions and associated tree physiological responses. Our study suggests that historical variation in deltaD(cell) of Populus provides information on historical variation in both time-integrated water source use and atmospheric conditions; and that the influence of atmospheric conditions is not consistent over sites with large

  9. An air-tolerant approach to the carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling: applications in isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlburg, Andreas; Lindhardt, Anders T; Taaning, Rolf H; Modvig, Amalie E; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-10-18

    Carbonylative Suzuki-Miyaura coupling conditions have been developed that proceed without the exclusion of oxygen and in the presence of nondegassed and nondried solvents. By adapting the method to a two-chamber setup, the direct handling of carbon monoxide, produced from stable CO precursors, is avoided. The protocol afforded the desired benzophenones with excellent functional group tolerance and in good yields. Substituting the CO precursor, in the CO-producing chamber, with its carbon-13 labeled version generated the corresponding carbon-13 labeled benzophenones. Finally, the developed system was applied in the synthesis and isotope labeling of two pharmaceuticals, nordazepam and Tricor. PMID:24004340

  10. Applications of Structural Mass Spectrometry to Metabolomics: Clarifying Bond Specific Spectral Signatures with Isotope Edited Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlova, Olga; Wolke, Conrad T.; Fournier, Joseph; Colvin, Sean; Johnson, Mark; Miller, Scott

    2015-06-01

    Comprehensive FTIR, MS/MS and NMR of pharmaceuticals are generally readily available but characterization of their metabolites has been an obstacle. Atorvastatin is a statin drug responsible for the maintenance of cholesterol in the body. Diovan is an angiostensin receptor antagonist used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. The field of metabolomics, however, is struggling to obtain the identity of their structures. We implement mass spectrometry with cryogenic ion spectroscopy to study gaseous ions of the desired metabolites which, in combination, not only identify the mass of the metabolite but also elucidate their structures through isotope-specific infrared spectroscopy.

  11. Comparison of dynamic isotope power systems for distributed planet surface applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Mckissock, Barbara I.; Hanlon, James C.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Rodriguez, Carlos D.; Withrow, Colleen A.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) alternatives were investigated and characterized for the surface mission elements associated with a lunar base and subsequent manned Mars expedition. System designs based on two convertor types were studied. These systems were characterized parametrically and compared over the steady-state electrical output power range 0.2 to 20 kWe. Three methods of thermally integrating the heat source and the Stirling heater head were considered, depending on unit size. Figures of merit were derived from the characterizations and compared over the parametric range. Design impacts of mission environmental factors are discussed and quantitatively assessed.

  12. Comparison of dynamic isotope power systems for distributed planetary surface applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.; Mckissock, Barbara I.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Hanlon, James C.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic isotope power system (DIPS) alternatives were investigated and characterized for the surface mission elements associated with a lunar base and subsequent manned Mars expedition. System designs based on two convertor types were studied. These systems were characterized parametrically and compared over the steady-state electrical output power range 0.2 to 20 kWe. Three methods of thermally integrating the heat source and the Stirling heater head were considered, depending on unit size. Figures of merit were derived from the characterizations and compared over the parametric range. Design impacts of mission environmental factors are discussed and quantitatively assessed.

  13. Assessing dissolved organic matter dynamics and source strengths in a subtropical estuary: Application of stable carbon isotopes and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya, Chao; Anderson, William; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in subtropical coastal bays are complex. For example, variations in DOM characteristics and sources in Florida Bay are believed to be mainly driven by both hydrology and associated runoff of terrestrial DOM, and by primary productivity mostly from seagrass sources. However, confirmation and quantification of different DOM sources are still incomplete and needed for carbon budget assessments. Optical parameters based on excitation emission matrix fluorescence coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) that had previously been tentatively assigned to both terrestrial and seasgrass sources. These correlated linearly with determined δ13C values, confirming an allochthonous, hydrologically-driven terrestrial source for the humic-like fluorescent components, while autochthonous DOM reflected by the protein-like fluorescence is mainly derived through primary productivity of seagrass communities. This study demonstrated the feasibility of combining optical signatures and stable isotopes in advancing the understanding of DOM dynamics in estuarine systems. Using stable carbon isotopic signatures of DOM, and applying a simple two end-member mixing model, the relative contributions of these two sources to the DOM pool in the bay were estimated. Results indicate that the highest proportion of DOM (ca. 72%) during the dry season was seagrass-derived, but clear variations were observed on both spatial and temporal scales. Limitations to the application of optical properties for the quantitative estimation of DOM sources in such coastal systems are discussed.

  14. Optimized cluster theory of polymer blends: General formulation and application to isotopic polyethylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melenkevitz, J.; Curro, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    A theory for the thermodynamic properties of binary polymer blends was developed and applied to predict the compositional dependence of the effective chi parameter χS in model isotopic polyethylene mixtures. The theory is a generalization of the optimized cluster theory for single component molecular fluids. Starting from exact cluster expansions for the Helmholtz free energy and pair-correlation functions in a molecular mixture developed by Chandler et al., a series of transformations was performed to yield approximate expressions for these quantities. The resulting theory was demonstrated to be equivalent to a set of diagrammatically proper integral equations. For model isotopic polyethylene blends, we calculated the various partial structure factors in the mixture and used them to predict the compositional dependence of χS. The calculated values of χS were found to be in reasonable agreement with recent neutron-scattering measurements but the theory underestimates the compositional dependence relative to the experiment. Deviations from random mixing that extend well beyond monomeric length scales were predicted in this blend system.

  15. Applications of stable isotopes in hydrological studies of Mt. Apo geothermal field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Salonga, N.D.; Aragon, G.M.; Nogara, J.B.; Sambrano, B.G.

    1996-12-31

    The local precipitation in Mt. Apo is depleted of heavy isotopes owing to high elevation and landward location of the field. Rainwaters infiltrate the shallow grounds, circulate in short distances with almost no interaction with the host bed rocks, and effuse in the surface as cold springs. Lakes and rivers are affected by surface evaporation while the acid SO{sub 4} springs are affected by both evaporation and steam-heating. Only the neutral-pH Cl springs have the signature of the deep thermal fluids. The parent fluids of the deep thermal brine contain Cl of 4,800 to 5,000 mg/kg, {delta}{sup 18}O of -4.62 to -4.13 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H of -60.0 to -57.8 {per_thousand}. Inside the Sandawa Collapse, boiling of the parent fluids resulted in a two-phase reservoir with lighter isotope contents. The thermal fluids laterally flow towards the west where they are affected by cooling and mixing of cold waters. Deep water recharge has {delta}{sup 18}O of -10.00 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H = -61.20 {per_thousand} which come from the upper slopes of Sandawa Collapse (1580-1700 mASL).

  16. Application of a Boson Expansion formalism based on the Random Phase Approximation to samarium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Jamaluddin, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    The Boson Expansion Theory of Kishimoto and Tamura has proved to be very successful in describing quadrupole collective motions in even-even nuclei. This theory, however, involves a complicated transformation from the Tamm-Dancoff phonons to the phonons of the random Phase Approximation. In this thesis a Boson Expansion formalism, derived directly from the Random Phase Approximation and set forth by Pedracchi and Tamura, is used to derive the boson forms of the nuclear Hamiltonian and the electromagnetic transition operator. Detailed discussions of the formalism of Pedrocchi and Tamura and its extension needed to perform realistic calculations are presented. The technique used to deriving the boson forms and the formulae used in the calculations are also given a thorough treatment to demonstrate the simplicity of this approach. Finally, the theory is tested by applying it to calculate the energy levels and some electromagnetic properties of the Samarium isotopes. The results show that the present theory is capable of describing the range of behavior from a vibrational to a rotational character of the Samarium isotopes as well as the previous theory.

  17. The DOE Isotopes Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillo, Jehannes

    2015-10-01

    The DOE Isotope Program is a small federal program with a great deal of impact and is managed by the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The Isotope Program has been managed by the Office of Nuclear Physics since 2009, and since that time, has been re-defined in terms of mission, scope and operations. The program produces critical isotopes that are in short supply or simply unavailable from elsewhere to facilitate research and applications. Research is also supported to develop or improve production techniques that will increase availability of isotopes in high demand, such as alpha emitters for cancer therapy.

  18. Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus: A comparison of tissue types and sample preservation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andvik, R.T.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.; French, William E.; Bertrand, K.N.; Chipps, S.R.; Klumb, R.A.; Graeb, B.D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional techniques for stable isotope analysis (SIA) generally require sacrificing animals to collect tissue samples; this can be problematic when studying diets of endangered species such as the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus. Our objectives were to (i) determine if pectoral fin tissue (non-lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate the influence of preservation techniques on stable isotope values. In the laboratory, individual juvenile pallid sturgeon were held for up to 186 day and fed chironomids, fish, or a commercially available pellet diet. Significant, positive relationships (r2 ??? 0.8) were observed between fin and muscle tissues for both ??15N and ??13C; in all samples isotopes were enriched in fins compared to muscle tissue. Chironomid and fish based diets of juvenile pallid sturgeon were distinguishable for fast growing fish (0.3 mm day-1) using stable ??15N and ??13C isotopes. Frozen and preserved fin tissue ??15N isotopes were strongly related (r2 = 0.89) but ??13C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended for preservation of fin clips to avoid the confounding effect of enrichment by ethanol. This study demonstrates the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon and should be applicable to other threatened or endangered species. ?? 2010 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  19. Imaging of blood cells based on snapshot Hyper-Spectral Imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robison, Christopher J.; Kolanko, Christopher; Bourlai, Thirimachos; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2015-05-01

    Snapshot Hyper-Spectral imaging systems are capable of capturing several spectral bands simultaneously, offering coregistered images of a target. With appropriate optics, these systems are potentially able to image blood cells in vivo as they flow through a vessel, eliminating the need for a blood draw and sample staining. Our group has evaluated the capability of a commercial Snapshot Hyper-Spectral imaging system, the Arrow system from Rebellion Photonics, in differentiating between white and red blood cells on unstained blood smear slides. We evaluated the imaging capabilities of this hyperspectral camera; attached to a microscope at varying objective powers and illumination intensity. Hyperspectral data consisting of 25, 443x313 hyperspectral bands with ~3nm spacing were captured over the range of 419 to 494nm. Open-source hyper-spectral data cube analysis tools, used primarily in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, indicate that white blood cells features are most prominent in the 428-442nm band for blood samples viewed under 20x and 50x magnification over a varying range of illumination intensities. These images could potentially be used in subsequent automated white blood cell segmentation and counting algorithms for performing in vivo white blood cell counting.

  20. Full-field pressure from snapshot and time-resolved volumetric PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskari, A.; de Kat, R.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with pressure estimation from snapshot and time-resolved three-component (3C) volumetric PIV data using Taylor's hypothesis, an Eulerian and a pseudo-Lagrangian approach. The Taylor's hypothesis approach has been shown to provide accurate results for pressure in the case of 3C planar PIV data with an appropriate choice of convection velocity (de Kat and Ganapathisubramani 2013), and here we extend its use on 3C volumetric velocity snapshots. Application of the techniques to synthetic data shows that the Taylor's hypothesis approach performs best using the streamwise mean as the convection velocity and is affected the least by noise, while the Eulerian approach suffers the most. In terms of resolution, the pseudo-Lagrangian approach is the most sensitive. Its accuracy can be improved by increasing the frame time-separation when computing the material derivative, at the expense of volume loss from fluid parcels leaving the FOV. Comparison of the techniques on turbulent boundary layer data with DNS supports these observations and shows that the Taylor's hypothesis approach is the only way we can get pressure when time information is not present.

  1. Continuous measurements of water vapor isotopic compositions using an integrated cavity output spectrometer: calibrations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Caylor, K.; Dragoni, D.

    2009-04-01

    The 18O and 2H of water vapor can be used to investigate couplings between biological processes (e.g., photosynthesis or transpiration) and hydrologic processes (e.g., evaporation) and therefore serve as powerful tracers in hydrological cycles. A typical method for determining δ18O and δ2H fluxes in landscapes is a "Keeling Plot" approach, which uses field-collected vapor samples coupled with a traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometer to infer the isotopic composition of evapotranspiration. However, fractionation accompanying inefficient vapor trapping can lead to large measurement uncertainty and the intensive laboring involved in cold-trap make it almost impossible for continuous measurements. Over the last 3-4 years a few groups have developed continuous approaches for measuring δ18O and δ2H that use laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) to achieve accuracy levels similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling, constant calibration to a reference gas, and substantial power requirements, which make them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. In this research, we tested out a new LAS-based water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA, Los Gatos Research, Inc, Mountain View, CA) based on Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and coupled this instrument with a flux gradient system. The WVIA was calibrated bi-weekly using a dew point generator and water with known δ18O and δ2H signatures. The field work was performed at Morgan-Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site (central Indiana) between August 8 and August 27, 2008. The combination method was able to produce hourly δ18O and δ2H fluxes data with reproducibility similar to lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Such high temporal resolution data were also able to capture signatures of canopy and bare soil evaporation to individual rainfall events. The use of the ICOS water vapor analyzer within a gradient system has the

  2. Hydrogen-isotope transport in an ELBRODUR G CuCrZr alloy for nuclear applications in heat sinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Byeon, W. J.; Shin, H. W.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, Jaeyong; Lee, S. K.; Kim, Jaewoo

    2016-05-01

    We present the first complete data set of the transport parameters (permeability, diffusivity, and solubility) of hydrogen and deuterium in an ELBRODUR G precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy experimentally measured by using the time-dependent gas-phase technique in an elevated temperature range of 300-600 °C for nuclear applications in heat sinks. Using the measured values for hydrogen and deuterium and a quantum mechanical model based on a harmonic approximation, an extrapolation for tritium is also presented. The isotope effect ratios for the transport parameters were also estimated. Furthermore, our hydrogen results for ELBRODUR G were compared with the results for other copper alloys previously reported by other authors.

  3. An integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring method for identifying seasonal changes and spatial changes in surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chittoor Viswanathan, Vidhya; Jiang, Yongjun; Berg, Michael; Hunkeler, Daniel; Schirmer, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Integrated catchment-scale management approaches in large catchments are often hindered due to the poor understanding of the spatially and seasonally variable pathways of pollutants. High-frequency monitoring of water quality at random locations in a catchment is resource intensive and challenging. A simplified catchment-scale monitoring approach is developed in this study, for the preliminary identification of water quality changes - Integrated spatial snap-shot monitoring (ISSM). This multi-parameter monitoring approach is applied using the isotopes of water (δ18O-H2O and δD) and nitrate (δ15N-NO3- and δ18O-NO3-) together with the fluxes of nitrate and other solutes, which are used as chemical markers. This method involves selection of few sampling stations, which are identified as the hotspots of water quality changes within the catchment. The study was conducted in the peri-alpine Thur catchment in Switzerland, with two snap-shot campaigns (representative of two widely varying hydrological conditions), in summer 2012 (low flow) and spring 2013 (high flow). Significant spatial (varying with elevation) and seasonal changes in the sources of water were observed between the two seasons. A spatial variation of the sources of nitrate and the solute loads was observed, in tandem with the land use changes in the Thur catchment. There is a seasonal shift in the sources of nitrate, it varies from a strong treated waste water signature during the low flow season to a mixture of other sources (like soil nitrogen derived from agriculture), in the high flow season. This demonstrates the influence of other sources that override the influence of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) during high flow in the Thur River and its tributaries. This method is expected to be a cost-effective alternative, providing snap-shots, that can help in the preliminary identification of the pathways of solutes and their seasonal/spatial changes in catchments.

  4. Methods for the separation of rhenium, osmium and molybdenum applicable to isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Golightly, D.W.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Effective methods are described for the chemical separation of rhenium, osmium and molybdenum. The methods are based on distillation and anion-exchange chromatography, and have been the basis for rhenium-osmium isotope studies of ore deposits and meteorites. Successful anion-exchange separation of osmium requires both recognition and careful control of the osmium species in solution; thus, distillation of osmium tetroxide from a mixture of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide is preferred to anion-exchange. Distribution coefficients measured for perrhenate in sulfuric acid media are sufficiently high (Kd > 500) for rhenium to be directly loaded onto an ion-exchange column from a distillation residue and subsequently eluted with nitric acid. Polymerization of molybdenum species during elution is prevented by use of a solution that is 1M in hydrochloric acid and 1M in sodium chloride. ?? 1991.

  5. Determination of the isotopic composition of atmospheric methane and its application in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, David C.; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Tyler, Stanley C.; Dlugkencky, Edward J.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for establishing the C-13/C-12 ratio and the C-14 abundance in the atmospheric methane is discussed. The method involves air sample collection, measurement of the methane mixing ratio by gas chromotography followed by quantitative conversion of the methane in the air samples to CO2 and H2O, and analysis of the resulting CO2 for the C-13/C-12 ratio by stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and measurement of C-14 content by accelerator mass spectrometry. The carbon isotropic composition of methane in air collected at Baring Head, New Zealand, and in air collected on aircraft flights between New Zealand and Antarctica is determined by the method, and no gradient in the composition between Baring Head and the South Pole station is found. As the technique is refined, and more data is gathered, small seasonal and long-term variations in C-13 are expected to be resolved.

  6. A CYCLOTRON CONCEPT TO SUPPORT ISOTOPE PRODUCTION FOR SCIENCE AND MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Egle, Brian; Mirzadeh, Saed; Tatum, B Alan; Varma, Venugopal Koikal; Bradley, Eric Craig; Burgess, Thomas W; Aaron, W Scott; Binder, Jeffrey L; Beene, James R; Saltmarsh, Michael John

    2013-01-01

    In August of 2009, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) recommended a variable-energy, high-current multi-particle accelerator for the production of medical radioisotopes. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a technical concept for a 70 MeV dual-extraction multi-particle cyclotron that will meet the needs identified in the NSAC report. The cyclotron, which will be located at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), will operate on a 24/7 basis and will provide approximately 6000 hours per year of quality beam time for both the production R&D and production of medical and industrial radioisotopes. The proposed cyclotron will be capable of accelerating dual beams of 30 to 70 MeV H at up to 750 A, and up to 50 A of 15-35 MeV D , 35 MeV H2, and 70 MeV -particles. In dual-extraction H mode, a total of 750 A of 70 MeV protons will be provided simultaneously to both HRIBF and Isotope Production Facility. The isotope facility will consist of two target stations: a 2 water-cooled station and a 4 water-cooled high-energy-beam research station. The multi-particle capability and high beam power will enable research into new regimes of accelerator-produced radioisotopes, such as 225Ac, 211At, 68Ge, and 7B. The capabilities of the accelerator will enable the measurement of excitation functions, thick target yield measurements, research in high-power-target design, and will support fundamental research in nuclear and radiochemistry.

  7. Realization of quantitative-grade fieldable snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen; Iannarilli, Frank; Kebabian, Paul

    2004-12-27

    We discuss achievement of a long-standing technology goal: the first practical realization of a quantitative-grade, field-worthy snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter. The instrument employs Polarimetric Spectral Intensity Modulation (PSIM), a technique that enables full Stokes instantaneous "snapshot" spectropolarimetry with perfect channel registration. This is achieved with conventional single beam optics and a single focal plane array (FPA). Simultaneity and perfect registration are obtained by encoding the polarimetry onto the spectrum via a novel optical arrangement which enables sensing from moving platforms against dynamic scenes. PSIM is feasible across the electro-optical sensing range (UV-LWIR). We present measurement results from a prototype sensor that operates in the visible and near infrared regime (450-900 nm). We discuss in some detail the calibration and Stokes spectrum inversion algorithms that are presently achieving 0.5% polarimetric accuracy. PMID:19488307

  8. Mental Snapshots: Creating an Organized Plan for Health Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fosbrook, Susan Curro

    2015-01-01

    Beginning nursing students enter a rapidly moving and changing health care climate. Multiple stimulations can frighten and overwhelm the student's ability to find order of essential patient information. Students need to know how to collect, process, and manage important health data accurately and efficiently in the clinical setting. An integrative method for teaching nursing students to walk into the patient's room and construct a patterned sequence of focused assessments assists students in creating an organized plan for health assessment. The Mental Snapshots Method includes three components for health assessment: (a) sequential assessment steps of the patient; (b) color-coded visual images of the patient representing a bodily condition; and (c) focused assessment questions of primary health complaint(s) with a plan for nursing care. This mental snapshots strategy employs an information processing model of sensory, memory, and motor functioning, which enable students to maintain patient quality and safety. PMID:26428347

  9. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.

  10. Realization of quantitative-grade fieldable snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J.; Kebabian, Paul L.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss achievement of a long-standing technology goal: the first practical realization of a quantitative-grade, field-worthy snapshot imaging spectropolarimeter. The instrument employs Polarimetric Spectral Intensity Modulation (PSIM), a technique that enables full Stokes instantaneous "snapshot" spectropolarimetry with perfect channel registration. This is achieved with conventional single beam optics and a single focal plane array (FPA). Simultaneity and perfect registration are obtained by encoding the polarimetry onto the spectrum via a novel optical arrangement which enables sensing from moving platforms against dynamic scenes. PSIM is feasible across the electro-optical sensing range (UV-LWIR). We present measurement results from a prototype sensor that operates in the visible and near infrared regime (450-900 nm). We discuss in some detail the calibration and Stokes spectrum inversion algorithms that are presently achieving 0.5% polarimetric accuracy.

  11. Multi-spectral compressive snapshot imaging using RGB image sensors.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Hoover; Lau, Daniel; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-05-01

    Compressive sensing is a powerful sensing and reconstruction framework for recovering high dimensional signals with only a handful of observations and for spectral imaging, compressive sensing offers a novel method of multispectral imaging. Specifically, the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI) system has been demonstrated to produce multi-spectral data cubes color images from a single snapshot taken by a monochrome image sensor. In this paper, we expand the theoretical framework of CASSI to include the spectral sensitivity of the image sensor pixels to account for color and then investigate the impact on image quality using either a traditional color image sensor that spatially multiplexes red, green, and blue light filters or a novel Foveon image sensor which stacks red, green, and blue pixels on top of one another. PMID:25969307

  12. Three-phase measurement evaluation using a high-speed processor with snapshot facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, K.P.; Kopainsky, J.; Wittwer, F. )

    1988-07-01

    A homogeneous measurement evaluation system is presented which is able to provide all characteristic, electrical parameters in a HV substation. It can be applied to asymmetric and to distorted power systems. Its application software consists of four parts for each function: preprocessing, frequency shift, filtering, arithmetic functions. Its processor features the snapshot facility i.e. all voltage and current phases of one feeder can be picked up simultaneously thus eliminating interpolation errors. The accuracy of the evaluated parameters is C1.0.2 and C1.0.5 resp. including rms values of harmonics. Analog anti-aliasing filters are not required. Amplitude and phase errors of instrument transformers can be compensated. Since the applied processor is very fast, real-time results are obtained which meet even the stringent requirements of static Var compensators or other power electronics control equipment. An application for an EHV gas-insulated substation is described.

  13. Snapshot RGB mapping of skin melanin and hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spigulis, Janis; Oshina, Ilze

    2015-05-01

    The concept of snapshot red-green-blue (RGB) multispectral imaging was applied for skin chromophore mapping. Three monochromatic spectral images have been extracted from a single RGB image dataset at simultaneous illumination of skin by 473-, 532-, and 659-nm laser lines. The spectral images were further transformed into distribution maps of skin melanin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, related to pigmented and vascular skin malformations. The performance and clinical potential of the proposed technique are discussed.

  14. 12. Photographic copy of historic photograph. Original snapshot print can ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of historic photograph. Original snapshot print can be found in narrative reports of the Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the 1930s, on file at the headquarters of the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Upham, North Dakota. GATES OF DAM 320 ON APRIL 9, 1936 WITH ICE ON WATER 50 INCHES THICK - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 320, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  15. 5. Photographic copy of historic photography. Original snapshot print is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photographic copy of historic photography. Original snapshot print is in narrative reports of the Lower Souris Migratory Waterfowl Refuge for the 1930s, on file at the headquarters of the J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge, Upham, North Dakota. DREDGING CHANNEL FOR THE SOURIS RIVER FOR DRAINAGE PURPOSES IN THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  16. A Snapshot of Photo Editing Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolkan, J.V.

    2004-01-01

    Plenty of digital imaging professionals claim that Adobe's Photoshop CS is the best photo editing application money can buy. This document reviews Adobe's Photoshop CS and its worthy competitors. In addition to Adobe, the following programs are reviewed in this document: (1) Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0; (2) Arcsoft PhotoImpression; (3) Jasc Paint…

  17. Applications of UThPb isotope systematics to the problems of radioactive waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of U, Th and Pb, and the isotopic composition of Pb for whole-rock samples of granitoids show: (1) that open-system behavior is nearly universal in the surface and near-surface environment; and (2) that elemental mobility is possible to depths of several hundred meters. Several identified or at least postulated factors that control U and/or Pb mobility include: (1) the mineralogical sites for U and its daughter products; (2) access of groundwater to these sites; (3) the volume of circulating water; and (4) the chemistry of the groundwater. Studies of granitic samples from peralkaline complexes in the Arabian Shield have shown that most samples lost less than 20% of their U during recent exposure to the near-surface environment. Most of the U in these samples appears to be firmly bound in zircons. In contrast, most surface and shallow drill-core samples of the granite of Lankin Dome (Granite Mountains, Wyoming) have lost ??? 70% of their U. Most of the U in these samples is weakly bound in biotite and epidote-family minerals. The granite recovered during the Illinois Deep Drill Hole Project (Stephenson County, Illinois) is mineralogically similar to the granite of Lankin Dome, but this granite lost radiogenic Pb rather than U, probably as a result of exposure to groundwater that had a markedly different chemistry from that in the Granite Mountains. Studies of the Sherman Granite (Wyoming) and the Go??temar Granite (southeastern Sweden) have shown that U and/or Pb mobility is greatest in and near fractured rock. The greater mobility is interpreted to be the result of both a larger water/rock ratio in the fractured rock and exposure to water over an increased surface area (and consequently a greater number of uranium sites). Several types of geochemical and mineralogic data can be used to identify rock-water interaction in granites; however, if rock samples have favorable radiogenic to common Pb ratios, both the amount and approximate timing of U or Pb

  18. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  19. Triple Oxygen Isotopic Variation in Continental Waters and Potential Applications to Paleoclimate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, N. E.; Li, S.

    2014-12-01

    18O/16O ratios are widely used in paleoclimate studies as proxies for temperature, precipitation amount and hydrologic change, but interpretations of these records are often challenged by the multiple factors that can influence them. Variation in 17O/16O ratios of Earth materials have long been assumed to covary with 18O/16O ratios in predictable and uniform ways such that they were not considered useful in studies of Phanerozoic climate. However, recent advances in the ability to measure small differences in 17O-excess, the deviation from an expected relationship between 18O/16O and 17O/16O ratios, in both waters and low-temperature minerals and rocks (e.g., carbonates, bioapatites, silicates, oxides) present the opportunity to use triple oxygen isotope measurements in hydrological and paleoclimate studies. In particular, the sensitivity of 17O-excess to kinetic fractionation means that it can be used to constrain the influence of kinetic effects on variations in δ18O. Here we review recently generated datasets on the triple oxygen isotope composition of the hydrosphere and show that there is considerably more variation in 17O-excess of continental waters than initially proposed. A compilation of 17O-excess data from precipitation, which includes snow from polar regions, tropical storms and weekly precipitation collections from mid-latitudes, shows that the 17O-excess of precipitation can range from -0.06 to +0.07‰. A continent-wide survey of tap waters from the U.S. mirrors the variation observed in precipitation. Among leaf waters, 17O-excess values range from -0.28 to +0.04‰ and can vary by as much as 0.16‰ in a plant within a single day. The mass-dependent effects associated with kinetic fractionation are likely responsible for the majority of the observed variation in waters, either during re-evaporation of rainfall at warmer temperatures, snow formation at very cold temperatures, or evapotranspiration within leaf waters. In summary, the combination of

  20. In vivo stable isotope measurements of methyl metabolism: applications in pathophysiology and interventions.

    PubMed

    de Meer, Kees; van den Akker, Johana T; Smulders, Yvo; Stam, Frank; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Finglas, Paul

    2002-09-01

    With intravenous infusion of doubly-labeled [2H3C-1(-13)C-] methionine and stable isotope enrichments in plasma free methionine and carbon dioxide in breath air, whole body transmethylation, transsulfuration, and remethylation rates can be calculated. This technique demonstrated impaired recycling as the major disturbance to explain hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with end-stage renal failure, and can be used to optimize interventions with folate, B6, and B12 supplementation in this patient group. Intravenous infusion of [2,3,3-(2)H3] serine has also been applied to demonstrate the appearance of [2H2]- as well as [2H1]-methionine in plasma and protein, suggesting transfer of a one-carbon group from serine via 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate in human hepatocyte cytosol and mitochondria, respectively. In sheep, tissue free methionine enrichments after infusion of universally labeled [U-13C] methionine showed the highest remethylation activity in postmortem investigation of jejunum, liver, and kidney tissue samples, but no such activity in muscle and brain samples. Methods to quantitate one-carbon acceptor metabolism pathways and folate metabolism have recently become available. PMID:12362777

  1. The application of stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the geographical origin of wheat.

    PubMed

    Luo, Donghui; Dong, Hao; Luo, Haiying; Xian, Yanping; Wan, Juan; Guo, Xindong; Wu, Yuluan

    2015-05-01

    In this work, in order to discriminate the geographical origin of wheat, δ(13)C and δ(15)N values of 35 wheat samples originated from different regions were determined, using the method of element analyser-stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results indicated that wheat from Australia, the USA, Canada and China could be potentially discriminated by using analyte δ(13)C and δ(15)N. δ(13)C values of wheat were ranged from -25.647‰ to -22.326‰, the δ(15)N values of 35 wheat samples were calculated between 1.859‰ and 7.712‰. Moreover, the results illustrated regional distributions of δ(15)N values of wheat as Australia>The USA>Jiangsu province of China>Shandong province of China>Canada. So δ(13)C and δ(15)N analysis would be potentially useful for rapid and routine analyses of geographical origin of wheat, even the cereal grains. In order to confirm the discrimination capability of δ(13)C and δ(15)N, a follow-up work will use this method to analyse a larger set of samples. PMID:25529670

  2. Neutron capture cross-section studies of Tellurium isotopes for neutrinoless double beta decay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The CUORE detector at Gran Sasso, aimed at searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, employs an array of TeO2 bolometer modules. To understand and identify the contribution of muon and (α,n) induced neutrons to the CUORE background, fast neutron cature cross-section data of the tellurium isotopes 126Te, 128Te and 130Te have been measured with the activation method at eight different energies in the neutron energy range 0.5-7.5 MeV. Plastic pill boxes of diameter 1.6 cm and width 1 cm containing Te were irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons produced via the 3H(p,n)3He and 2H(d,n)3He reactions. The cross-sections were determined relative to the 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 115In(n,n')115m In standard cross sections. The activities of the products were measured using 60% lead-shielded HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting facility. The present results are compared with the evaluated data from TENDL-2012, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0, as well as with literature data.

  3. Application of (13)C-stable isotope probing to identify RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kun-Ching; Lee, Do Gyun; Roh, Hyungkeun; Fuller, Mark E; Hatzinger, Paul B; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2013-07-01

    We employed stable isotope probing (SIP) with (13)C-labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) to identify active microorganisms responsible for RDX biodegradation in groundwater microcosms. Sixteen different 16S rRNA gene sequences were derived from microcosms receiving (13)C-labeled RDX, suggesting the presence of microorganisms able to incorporate carbon from RDX or its breakdown products. The clones, residing in Bacteroidia, Clostridia, α-, β- and δ-Proteobacteria, and Spirochaetes, were different from previously described RDX degraders. A parallel set of microcosms was amended with cheese whey and RDX to evaluate the influence of this co-substrate on the RDX-degrading microbial community. Cheese whey stimulated RDX biotransformation, altered the types of RDX-degrading bacteria, and decreased microbial community diversity. Results of this study suggest that RDX-degrading microorganisms in groundwater are more phylogenetically diverse than what has been inferred from studies with RDX-degrading isolates. PMID:23603473

  4. Application of isotope dilution mass spectrometry: determination of ochratoxin A in the Canadian Total Diet Study

    PubMed Central

    Tam, J.; Pantazopoulos, P.; Scott, P.M.; Moisey, J.; Dabeka, R.W.; Richard, I.D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods are generally developed and optimized for specific commodities. Total Diet Studies, representing typical food products ‘as consumed’, pose an analytical challenge since every food product is different. In order to address this technical challenge, a selective and sensitive analytical method was developed suitable for the quantitation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in Canadian Total Diet Study composites. The method uses an acidified solvent extraction, an immunoaffinity column (IAC) for clean-up, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for identification and quantification, and a uniformly stable isotope-labelled OTA (U-[13C20]-OTA) as an internal recovery standard. Results are corrected for this standard. The method is accurate (101% average recovery) and precise (5.5% relative standard deviation (RSD)) based on 17 duplicate analysis of various food products over 2 years. A total of 140 diet composites were analysed for OTA as part of the Canadian Total Diet Study. Samples were collected at retail level from two Canadian cities, Quebec City and Calgary, in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The results indicate that 73% (102/140) of the samples had detectable levels of OTA, with some of the highest levels of OTA contamination found in the Canadian bread supply. PMID:21623499

  5. Application of Carbon Isotope Fractionation during the Reduction Process from CO 2 to CH 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Guoyi; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Guifang; Cui, Huiying; Cao, Hongming; Hu, Xülong

    The CO 2 reduced to CH 4 pathway is important for the generation of biogas in the geological history. The Quaternary biogenic gas fields in Qaidam Basin of China belong to the CO 2/H 2 reduction biogenic gas. According to the theory of H 2/CO 2 reduction, we have carried out the biosimulation experiments with different occurrences and different initial carbon isotope values of carbon sources. The experimental results indicate that there is a positive correlation between the δ 13C methane values and the δ 13C values of the substrate in products; In response to the existence of excessive substrate, the occurrence of substrate has its effect on the δ 13C methane values. The δ 13C methane values from free CO 2 reduced to CH 4 is relatively lower than those coming from HCO 3- and CO 32- ions. By applying to the Quaternary biogenic gas filed in the east of Qaidam Basin, the source and occurrences of the main substrate CO 2 are discussed, and these have import reference significance for evaluating the biogas resources and searching for favorable exploration areas.

  6. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-07-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts.

  7. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kevin T; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E

    2013-07-16

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon ((14)C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric (14)C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3-1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. (14)C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. (14)C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve (14)C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  8. Bomb-curve radiocarbon measurement of recent biologic tissues and applications to wildlife forensics and stable isotope (paleo)ecology

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kevin T.; Quade, Jay; Fisher, Daniel C.; Wittemyer, George; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Andanje, Samuel; Omondi, Patrick; Litoroh, Moses; Cerling, Thure E.

    2013-01-01

    Above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing from 1952 through 1962 nearly doubled the concentration of radiocarbon (14C) in the atmosphere. As a result, organic material formed during or after this period may be radiocarbon-dated using the abrupt rise and steady fall of the atmospheric 14C concentration known as the bomb-curve. We test the accuracy of accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating of 29 herbivore and plant tissues collected on known dates between 1905 and 2008 in East Africa. Herbivore samples include teeth, tusks, soft tissue, hair, and horn. Tissues formed after 1955 are dated to within 0.3–1.3 y of formation, depending on the tissue type, whereas tissues older than ca. 1955 have high age uncertainties (>17 y) due to the Suess effect. 14C dating of tissues has applications to stable isotope (paleo)ecology and wildlife forensics. We use data from 41 additional samples to determine growth rates of tusks, molars, and hair, which improve interpretations of serial stable isotope data for (paleo)ecological studies. 14C dating can also be used to calculate the time interval represented in periodic histological structures in dental tissues (i.e., perikymata), which in turn may be used as chronometers in fossil teeth. Bomb-curve 14C dating of confiscated animal tissues (e.g., ivory statues) can be used to determine whether trade of the item is legal, because many Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species restrictions are based on the age of the tissue, and thus can serve as a powerful forensic tool to combat illegal trade in animal parts. PMID:23818577

  9. APPLICATION OF THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING DEUTERIUM ISOTOPE TO TRACING THE CAPILLARY FRINGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Naturally-occurring deuterium is a useful tracer of subsurface hydrologic processes. A possible application includes the identification of capillary fringes in the vadose zone. Multiple and discontinuous water tables persist in many temperate regions, under various hydrogeologi...

  10. Canadian Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (CNIP)and Isotope Climatology and Hydroclimatology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birks, S. J.; Edwards, T. W.; Gibson, J. J.

    2002-12-01

    The distribution of stable isotopes in precipitation provides fundamental information about the partitioning of the global atmospheric water budget, and hence about key aspects of Earth's climate, that cannot be discerned using other means. Although continuing demand exists for monitoring of isotopes in precipitation to define isotopic input functions for local hydrologic studies or for calibration of isotopic indicators of paleoclimate, based on longterm averages and climatological norms, awareness is also growing of the significant value of the monthly snapshots of the precipitation isotope field provided by the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation and its affiliated national networks as benchmark maps of the ongoing and dynamic evolution of the global water cycle. An initiative within the Canadian Network for Isotopes in Precipitation program includes development of a spatial and temporal database incorporating Canadian data to create a gridded isotope overlay compatible with gridded pressure and flux field data from the NCAR/CDAS Re-analysis Project. This database includes interpolated fields of our current best approximations of climatological isotopic means in addition to the original monthly data for the period 1997-2000. Studies are underway to test the sensitivity of the isotope-climate signal in precipitation to changes in these parameters utilizing perturbations in local climate arising from the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Intriguing results have been obtained from preliminary studies incorporating pressure and flux field data for the 1997-98 El Nino with CNIP isotope overlays. The strongest climate anomalies were found during the winter following the 1997 El Nino event, consistent with the expected strengthening of the Pacific North American pattern during this period. Comparisons of the isotopic fields with climate fields illustrate the complexity and dynamic nature of isotope climate not evident in time-series of data from

  11. Sensitive, Efficient Quantitation of 13C-Enriched Nucleic Acids via Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Applications in Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Roland; Szeitz, András; Klassen, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) of nucleic acids is a powerful tool for studying the functional traits of microbial populations within complex communities, but SIP involves a number of technical challenges. Many of the difficulties in DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments can be effectively overcome with an efficient, sensitive method for quantitating the isotopic enrichment of nucleic acids. Here, we present a sensitive method for quantitating 13C enrichment of nucleic acids, requiring a few nanograms of sample, and we demonstrate its utility in typical DNA-SIP and RNA-SIP experiments. All five nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) were separated and detected by using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. We detected all isotopic species in samples with as low as 1.5 atom% 13C above natural abundance, using 1-ng loadings. Quantitation was used to characterize the isotopic enrichment kinetics of cellulose- and lignin-based microcosm experiments and to optimize the recovery of enriched nucleic acids. Application of our method will minimize the quantity of expensive isotopically labeled substrates required and reduce the risk of failed experiments due to insufficient recovery of labeled nucleic acids for sequencing library preparation. PMID:25217022

  12. Applications of the 190Pt-186Os isotope system to geochemistry and cosmochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Beary, E.S.; Smoliar, M.I.; Czamanske, G.K.; Horan, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    Platinum is fractionated from osmium primarily as a consequence of processes involving sulfide and metal crystallization. Consequently, the 190Pt-186Os isotope system (190Pt ??? 186Os + ??) shows promise for dating some types of magmatic sulfide ores and evolved iron meteorites. The first 190Pt-186Os isochrons are presented here for ores from the ca. 251 Ma Noril'sk, Siberia plume, and for group IIAB magmatic iron meteorites. Given the known age of the Noril'sk system, a decay constant for 190Pt is determined to be 1.542 ?? 10-12a-1, with ??1% uncertainty. The isochron generated for the IIAB irons is consistent with this decay constant and the known age of the group. The 186Os/188Os ratios of presumably young, mantle-derived osmiridiums and also the carbonaceous chondrite Allende were measured to high-precision to constrain the composition of the modern upper mantle. These compositions overlap, indicating that the upper mantle is chondritic within the level of resolution now available. Our best estimate for this 186Os/188Os ratio is 0.119834 ?? 2 (2??M). The 190Pt/186Os ratios determined for six enstatite chondrites average 0.001659 ?? 75, which is very similar to published values for carbonaceous chondrites. Using this ratio and the presumed composition of the modern upper mantle and chondrites, a solar system initial 186Os/188Os ratio of 0.119820 is calculated. In comparison to the modern upper mantle composition, the 186Os/188Os ratio of the Noril'sk plume was approximately 0.012% enriched in 186Os. Possible reasons for this heterogeneity include the recycling of Pt-rich crust into the mantle source of the plume and derivation of the osmium from the outer core. Derivation of the osmium from the outer core is our favored model. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. The Application of Methane Clumped Isotope Measurements to Determine the Source of Large Methane Seeps in Alaskan Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Sessions, A. L.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Natural methane emissions from the Arctic present an important potential feedback to global warming. Arctic methane emissions may come from either active microbial sources or from deep fossil reservoirs released by the thawing of permafrost and melting of glaciers. It is often difficult to distinguish between and quantify contributions from these methane sources based on stable isotope data. Analyses of methane clumped isotopes (isotopologues with two or more rare isotopes such as 13CH3D) can complement traditional stable isotope-based classifications of methane sources. This is because clumped isotope abundances (for isotopically equilibrated systems) are a function of temperature and can be used to identify pathways of methane generation. Additionally, distinctive effects of mixing on clumped isotope abundances make this analysis valuable for determining the origins of mixed gasses. We find large variability in clumped isotope compositions of methane from seeps in several lakes, including thermokarst lakes, across Alaska. At Lake Sukok in northern Alaska we observe the emission of dominantly thermogenic methane, with a formation temperature of at least 100° C. At several other lakes we find evidence for mixing between thermogenic methane and biogenic methane that forms in low-temperature isotopic equilibrium. For example, at Eyak Lake in southeastern Alaska, analysis of three methane samples results in a distinctive isotopic mixing line between a high-temperature end-member that formed between 100-170° C, and a biogenic end-member that formed in isotopic equilibrium between 0-20° C. In this respect, biogenic methane in these lakes resembles observations from marine gas seeps, oil degradation, and sub-surface aquifers. Interestingly, at Goldstream Lake in interior Alaska, methane with strongly depleted clumped-isotope abundances, indicative of disequilibrium gas formation, is found, similar to observations from methanogen culture experiments.

  14. Real-time snapshot hyperspectral imaging endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Robert T.; Bedard, Noah; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging has tremendous potential to detect important molecular biomarkers of early cancer based on their unique spectral signatures. Several drawbacks have limited its use for in vivo screening applications: most notably the poor temporal and spatial resolution, high expense, and low optical throughput of existing hyperspectral imagers. We present the development of a new real-time hyperspectral endoscope (called the image mapping spectroscopy endoscope) based on an image mapping technique capable of addressing these challenges. The parallel high throughput nature of this technique enables the device to operate at frame rates of 5.2 frames per second while collecting a (x, y, λ) datacube of 350 × 350 × 48. We have successfully imaged tissue in vivo, resolving a vasculature pattern of the lower lip while simultaneously detecting oxy-hemoglobin. PMID:21639573

  15. Isotopic analysis of methane by Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) Application to the deep-sea Congolobe fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprais, J.; Cathalot, C.; de Prunelé, A.; Ruffine, L.; Cassarino, L.; Le Bruchec, J.; Olu, K.; Rabouille, C.

    2013-12-01

    Channeling all the continental material exported from the Congo River to the terminal lobes, the Congo deep-sea fan constitutes an unrecognized hotspot for biology and biogeochemistry in the Atlantic Ocean. Assemblages of benthic ecosystems in this peculiar environment mimic the ones observed only in active cold-seep regions. Massive organic matter inputs from the Congo canyon likely induce a sedimentary production of reduced fluids bearing sulphide and methane. These reduced compounds may support the development of bacterial mats based on chemo-autotrophy and the presence of biological communities feeding on these mats, as already observed in sediment from the lobe zone. Yet, the processes and driving forces controlling the structure of benthic communities in the lobe of the Congo submarine canyon are still poorly understood. Isotopic fractionations occurring during methanogenesis (depletion), thermic alteration of organic matter (enrichment), and microbial anaerobic oxidation (enrichment) lead to distinct δ13CH4 signatures 1,2. Hence, stable methane isotopes are increasingly being used to determine methane source in the surrounding sediments and infer the gas provenance 3. In the frame of the Congolobe project, this study investigates the functioning of benthic communities in relation with the main environmental conditions. Specifically, it focuses on the applicability of the stable methane isotopes (δ13CH4) in understanding the sediment processes involved and the metabolism of the benthic ecosystems (chemo-autotrophy vs heterotrophy). A total of 5 sites (A, B, C, E, F) were investigated, at a water depth of approximately 5000 m. Three sites (A,F,C) were located along the main axis of the currently active lobe. Site B was located on a lobe which has been disconnected from the active canyon for several decades. Site E corresponds to a fossil lobe, and is taken as a reference station for hemipelagic deposition. At site C, sediment cores of ~20 cm length were

  16. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Starodub, D; Aquila, A; Bajt, S; Barthelmess, M; Barty, A; Bostedt, C; Bozek, J D; Coppola, N; Doak, R B; Epp, S W; Erk, B; Foucar, L; Gumprecht, L; Hampton, C Y; Hartmann, A; Hartmann, R; Holl, P; Kassemeyer, S; Kimmel, N; Laksmono, H; Liang, M; Loh, N D; Lomb, L; Martin, A V; Nass, K; Reich, C; Rolles, D; Rudek, B; Rudenko, A; Schulz, J; Shoeman, R L; Sierra, R G; Soltau, H; Steinbrener, J; Stellato, F; Stern, S; Weidenspointner, G; Frank, M; Ullrich, J; Strüder, L; Schlichting, I; Chapman, H N; Spence, J C H; Bogan, M J

    2012-01-01

    Diffractive imaging with free-electron lasers allows structure determination from ensembles of weakly scattering identical nanoparticles. The ultra-short, ultra-bright X-ray pulses provide snapshots of the randomly oriented particles frozen in time, and terminate before the onset of structural damage. As signal strength diminishes for small particles, the synthesis of a three-dimensional diffraction volume requires simultaneous involvement of all data. Here we report the first application of a three-dimensional spatial frequency correlation analysis to carry out this synthesis from noisy single-particle femtosecond X-ray diffraction patterns of nearly identical samples in random and unknown orientations, collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Our demonstration uses unsupported test particles created via aerosol self-assembly, and composed of two polystyrene spheres of equal diameter. The correlation analysis avoids the need for orientation determination entirely. This method may be applied to the structural determination of biological macromolecules in solution. PMID:23232406

  18. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Boyer, Keith; Greiner, Norman R.

    1988-01-01

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  19. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1987-01-01

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  20. Photochemical isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Greiner, N.R.; Boyer, K.

    1987-04-28

    A process is described for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. 8 figs.

  1. Laser isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Reed, J.J.; Cotter, T.P.; Boyer, K.; Greiner, N.R.

    1975-11-26

    A process and apparatus for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light is described. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photolysis, photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photolysis, photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium.

  2. Requirements for future automotive batteries - a snapshot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karden, Eckhard; Shinn, Paul; Bostock, Paul; Cunningham, James; Schoultz, Evan; Kok, Daniel

    Introduction of new fuel economy, performance, safety, and comfort features in future automobiles will bring up many new, power-hungry electrical systems. As a consequence, demands on automotive batteries will grow substantially, e.g. regarding reliability, energy throughput (shallow-cycle life), charge acceptance, and high-rate partial state-of-charge (HRPSOC) operation. As higher voltage levels are mostly not an economically feasible alternative for the short term, the existing 14 V electrical system will have to fulfil these new demands, utilizing advanced 12 V energy storage devices. The well-established lead-acid battery technology is expected to keep playing a key role in this application. Compared to traditional starting-lighting-ignition (SLI) batteries, significant technological progress has been achieved or can be expected, which improve both performance and service life. System integration of the storage device into the vehicle will become increasingly important. Battery monitoring systems (BMS) are expected to become a commodity, penetrating the automotive volume market from both highly equipped premium cars and dedicated fuel-economy vehicles (e.g. stop/start). Battery monitoring systems will allow for more aggressive battery operating strategies, at the same time improving the reliability of the power supply system. Where a single lead-acid battery cannot fulfil the increasing demands, dual-storage systems may form a cost-efficient extension. They consist either of two lead-acid batteries or of a lead-acid battery plus another storage device.

  3. Design and Application of a Sr-84/Sr-87-Double Spike to Determine Natural Strontium Isotope Fractionation in Carbonates and Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoeft, A.; Eisenhauer, A.; Liebetrau, V.; Fietzke, J.; Boehm, F.

    2008-12-01

    In order to precisely determine 88Sr/86Sr- and 87Sr/86Sr-isotope variations in natural samples using TIMS-technique we developed a mixed 87Sr/84Sr-double spike from two solutions enriched in 84Sr and 87Sr, respectively. After mixing the two solutions the Sr-spike ratios have precisely been determined by calibration to the NBS 987 standard. For the determination of natural 88Sr/86Sr- and 87Sr/86Sr-isotope variations in carbonates and silicates two TIMS measurements are required: an unspiked and a spiked run where the Sr-isotope ratios are arbitrarily normalized to a fixed Sr isotope ratio (e.g. mean of the first block). For denormalization and data reduction we adopted the algorithm for Ca isotope measurements (1) presented earlier by Heuser et al.(2003) modified for Sr-isotope measurements. It was found that best results can be achieved if the 84Srspike/84Srsample ratio is higher than about 12. The algorithm allows the simultaneous calculation of 87Sr/86Sr and 88Sr/86Sr ratios. Standard measurements showed a δ88/86Sr-value (δ88/86Sr=((88Sr/86Sr)Sample/(88Sr/86Sr)NBS 987)-1)*1000) of 0.39 for the IAPSO seawater standard corresponding to an external reproducibility of ±0.02 (n=12). The IAPSO δ88/86Sr-value corresponds to a 87Sr/86Sr-ratio of 0.709285(6). Both values are in accordance with earlier publications (2) and theoretical predictions based on the δ88/86Sr ratio of seawater and assuming mass-dependent isotope fractionation. Preliminary application of the Sr- double spike to carbonate samples of the Phanerocoic indicate unexpected δ88/86Sr variations in the order of about 0.2 to 0.3 ‰ which indicate varying supply of Sr from isotopically distinctively different sources. Furthermore a direct comparison of double spike TIMS, bracketing standard and laser- ablation MC-ICP-MS (3) results are in agreement and can be used to discuss limitation and perspectives of future Sr isotope measurements. References: 1 Heuser A., Eisenhauer A., Gussone N., Bock B

  4. Computer Generated Snapshot of Our Sun's Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    These banana-shaped loops are part of a computer-generated snapshot of our sun's magnetic field. The solar magnetic-field lines loop through the sun's corona, break through the sun's surface, and cornect regions of magnetic activity, such as sunspots. This image --part of a magnetic-field study of the sun by NASA's Allen Gary -- shows the outer portion (skins) of interconnecting systems of hot (2 million degrees Kelvin) coronal loops within and between two active magnetic regions on opposite sides of the sun's equator. The diameter of these coronal loops at their foot points is approximately the same size as the Earth's radius (about 6,000 kilometers).

  5. A snapshot of electrified nanodroplets undergoing Coulomb fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arscott, Steve; Descatoire, Cédric; Buchaillot, Lionel; Ashcroft, Alison E.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the size distribution of electrically charged nanodroplets using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The droplets were generated using nano- and micro-scale silicon tips. A brief voltage pulse results in a "snapshot" of charged nanodroplets on a Cr surface. AFM of the traces left by the nanodroplets revealed that certain droplet diameters are favored suggesting droplet fission due to Rayleigh instability at nanometer length scales. The most occurring droplet diameters are 85.9(4.1) nm and 167.1 nm (9.7 nm) for nano- and micro-scale tips, respectively.

  6. Silicon isotopic abundance toward evolved stars and its application for presolar grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, T.-C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Testi, L.; Baudry, A.; Wittkowski, M.; Rawlings, M. G.; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Vlemmings, W.; Nyman, L.-A.; Gray, M. D.; de Breuck, C.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) is important for understanding the composition of the present-day interstellar medium (ISM) and of our solar system. In this paper, we aim to track the GCE by using the 29Si/30Si ratios in evolved stars and tentatively relate this to presolar grain composition. Methods: We used the APEX telescope to detect thermal SiO isotopologue emission toward four oxygen-rich M-type stars. Together with the data retrieved from the Herschel science archive and from the literature, we were able to obtain the 29Si/30Si ratios for a total of 15 evolved stars inferred from their optically thin 29SiO and 30SiO emission. These stars cover a range of masses and ages, and because they do not significantly alter 29Si/30Si during their lifetimes, they provide excellent probes of the ISM metallicity (or 29Si/30Si ratio) as a function of time. Results: The 29Si/30Si ratios inferred from the thermal SiO emission tend to be lower toward low-mass oxygen-rich stars (e.g., down to about unity for W Hya), and close to an interstellar or solar value of 1.5 for the higher-mass carbon star IRC+10216 and two red supergiants. There is a tentative correlation between the 29Si/30Si ratios and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, where we take the mass-loss rate as a proxy for the initial stellar mass or current stellar age. This is consistent with the different abundance ratios found in presolar grains. Before the formation of the Sun, the presolar grains indicate that the bulk of presolar grains already had 29Si/30Si ratios of about 1.5, which is also the ratio we found for the objects younger than the Sun, such as VY CMa and IRC+10216. However, we found that older objects (up to possibly 10 Gyr old) in our sample trace a previous, lower 29Si/30Si value of about 1. Material with this isotopic ratio is present in two subclasses of presolar grains, providing independent evidence of the lower ratio. Therefore, the 29Si/30Si ratio derived from the SiO emission of

  7. Stable Carbon Isotopes (δ 13C) in Coral Skeletons: Experimental Approach and Applications for Paleoceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottoli, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    natural field conditions corals feed on zooplankton below this `nutrient threshold' and that increases in heterotrophy should result in decreases skeletal δ 13C values. Overall, changes in photosynthesis and heterotrophy have significant effects on coral skeletal δ 13C. In shallower corals, photosynthesis drives the bulk of the variation in δ 13C. In addition, boron isotope data indicate that pH levels do not vary with changes in photosynthesis or heterotrophy suggesting that metabolically driven δ 13C fractionation during skeletogenesis is not pH driven. Thus the skeletal δ 13C records from shallow corals in non-upwelling regions where zooplankton concentrations are relatively constant should represent a reliable proxy of light variability. Due to the complexity associated with nutrients and heterotrophy, δ 13C records from upwelling regions or deep corals are still difficult to resolve.

  8. Application of non-lethal stable isotope analysis to assess feeding patterns of juvenile pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus: a comparison of tissue types and sample preservation methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andvik, R.T.; VanDeHey, J.A.; Fincel, M.J.; French, William E.; Bertrand, K.N.; Chipps, Steven R.; Klumb, R.A.; Graeb, B.D.S.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional techniques for stable isotope analysis (SIA) generally require sacrificing animals to collect tissue samples; this can be problematic when studying diets of endangered species such as the pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus. Our objectives were to (i) determine if pectoral fin tissue (non-lethal) could be a substitute for muscle tissue (lethal) in SIA of juvenile pallid sturgeon, and (ii) evaluate the influence of preservation techniques on stable isotope values. In the laboratory, individual juvenile pallid sturgeon were held for up to 186 day and fed chironomids, fish, or a commercially available pellet diet. Significant, positive relationships (r² ≥ 0.8) were observed between fin and muscle tissues for both δ15N and δ13C; in all samples isotopes were enriched in fins compared to muscle tissue. Chironomid and fish based diets of juvenile pallid sturgeon were distinguishable for fast growing fish (0.3 mm day−1) using stable δ15N and δ13C isotopes. Frozen and preserved fin tissue δ15N isotopes were strongly related (r2 = 0.89) but δ13C isotopes were weakly related (r2 = 0.16). Therefore, freezing is recommended for preservation of fin clips to avoid the confounding effect of enrichment by ethanol. This study demonstrates the utility of a non-lethal technique to assess time integrated food habits of juvenile pallid sturgeon and should be applicable to other threatened or endangered species.

  9. Stable isotope model for assessing production of short chain fatty acids from colon-derived sugar: application in pigs.

    PubMed

    Kien, C L; Murray, R D; Ailabouni, A; Powers, P; Kepner, J; Powers, L; Brunengraber, H

    1996-12-01

    Sugar reaching the colon because of intestinal maldigestion or malabsorption may be fermented to acetate and other short-chain fatty acids, resulting in stimulation of colonic water absorption and cell proliferation. To explore this phenomenon in more detail, we have developed a stable isotope model for estimating the fraction of colon-derived glucose or lactose that is fermented to acetate, propionate and butyrate. In an initial application of the model, [d3]-acetate and either [1-(13)C]-glucose or [D-1-(13)C]-lactose were infused into the cecum or colon of piglets, and plateau plasma acetate enrichment was monitored in the carotid artery. In acutely anesthetized piglets, the fractions of glucose and lactose fermented to acetate were 17.0 and 20.0%, respectively. In a chronically catheterized piglet, fermentation was higher (34.2%). When conducted in chronically catheterized animals or via a colostomy or ileostomy in infants, this model may be used to determine how age, previous surgery or antibiotic therapy affects the efficiency of colonic assimilation of carbohydrate. PMID:9001376

  10. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Sukhov, I. A.; Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu S.; Filippov, V. G.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2013-06-01

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed.

  11. Digital Technology Snapshot of the Literacy and Essential Skills Field 2013. Summary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trottier, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    From January to March 2013, "Canadian Literacy and Learning Network" (CLLN) conducted a snapshot to provide information about how digital technology tools are being used in the Literacy and Essential Skills (L/ES) field. The snapshot focused primarily on digital tools and activities that meet the organizational needs of provincial and…

  12. Occupational Task Profiles: Canadian Literacy and Essential Skills Workforce. A Pan-Canadian Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This "Pan-Canadian Snapshot" explores the competencies needed to work with adults participating in Literacy and/or Essential Skills (L/ES) programs in Canada. The purpose of the "Snapshot" is to: (1) lay a foundation from which to explore the topic of professionalism; (2) identify the types of supports that the L/ES workforce…

  13. The Role of "Family Snapshots" in Teaching Art History within a Dialogic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Studying images of families in works of art and in snapshots is compelling, and the author wondered if looking at both types of images side by side might help students understand both kinds of images more fully. Snapshots often prompt detailed and vivid stories among family members and friends. Therefore, she wondered if dialogue about snapshots…

  14. Making Science Teaching and Learning Visible through Web-Based "Snapshots of Practice"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Roberts, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Documentary websites known as "snapshots of practice" provide vivid examples of teachers' inquiries into issues they have formulated in the context of their own teaching practices and students' learning. Designed with assistance from Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, snapshots of practice can be accessed in the K-12 section of…

  15. Proper encoding for snapshot-entropy scaling in two-dimensional classical spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsueda, Hiroaki; Ozaki, Dai

    2015-10-01

    We reexamine the snapshot entropy of the Ising and three-states Potts models on the L ×L square lattice. Focusing on how to encode the spin snapshot, we find that the entropy at Tc scales asymptotically as S ˜(1 /3 )lnL that strongly reminds us of the entanglement entropy in one-dimensional quantum critical systems. This finding seems to support that the snapshot entropy after the proper encoding is related to the holographic entanglement entropy. On the other hand, the anomalous scaling Sχ˜χηlnχ for the coarse-grained snapshot entropy holds even for the proper encoding. These features originate in the fact that the largest singular value of the snapshot matrix is regulated by the proper encoding.

  16. Hydrogen isotope correction for laser instrument measurement bias at low water vapor concentration using conventional isotope analyses: application to measurements from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Sharp, Z D; Galewsky, J; Strong, M; Van Pelt, A D; Dong, F; Noone, D

    2011-03-15

    The hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of water vapor can be measured with commercially available laser spectroscopy analyzers in real time. Operation of the laser systems in relatively dry air is difficult because measurements are non-linear as a function of humidity at low water concentrations. Here we use field-based sampling coupled with traditional mass spectrometry techniques for assessing linearity and calibrating laser spectroscopy systems at low water vapor concentrations. Air samples are collected in an evacuated 2 L glass flask and the water is separated from the non-condensable gases cryogenically. Approximately 2 µL of water are reduced to H(2) gas and measured on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. In a field experiment at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), we ran Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) laser analyzers for a period of 25 days in addition to periodic sample collection in evacuated flasks. When the two laser systems are corrected to the flask data, they are strongly coincident over the entire 25 days. The δ(2)H values were found to change by over 200‰ over 2.5 min as the boundary layer elevation changed relative to MLO. The δ(2)H values ranged from -106 to -332‰, and the δ(18)O values (uncorrected) ranged from -12 to -50‰. Raw data from laser analyzers in environments with low water vapor concentrations can be normalized to the international V-SMOW scale by calibration to the flask data measured conventionally. Bias correction is especially critical for the accurate determination of deuterium excess in dry air. PMID:21290447

  17. Advances in Methane Isotope Measurements via Direct Absorption Spectroscopy with Applications to Oil and Gas Source Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacovitch, T. I.; Herndon, S. C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Petron, G.; Shorter, J. H.; Jervis, D.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Kolb, C. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental developments in the measurement of multiple isotopes of methane (12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D) are presented. A first generation 8-micron instrument quantifies 12CH4 and 13CH4 at a 1-second rate via tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS). A second generation instrument uses two 3-micron intraband cascade lasers in an Aerodyne dual laser chassis for simultaneous measurement of 12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D. Sensitivity and noise performance improvements are examined. The isotopic signature of methane provides valuable information for emission source identification of this greenhouse gas. A first generation spectrometer has been deployed in the field on a mobile laboratory along with a sophisticated 4-tank calibration system. Calibrations are done on an agressive schedule, allowing for the correction of measured isotope ratios to an absolute isotope scale. Distinct isotopic signatures are found for a number of emission sources in the Denver-Julesburg Basin: oil and gas gathering stations, compressor stations and processing plants; a municipal landfill, and dairy/cattle operations. The isotopic signatures are compared with measured ethane/methane ratios. These direct absorption measurements have larger uncertainties than samples measured via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, but have several advantages over canister sampling methods: individual sources of short duration are easier to isolate; calibrated isotope ratio results are available immediately; replicate measurements on a single source are easily performed; and the number of sources sampled is not limited by canister availability and processing time.

  18. Application of iron and zinc isotopes to track the sources and mechanisms of metal loading in a mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ian, Ridley W.; Lamothe, P.J.; Kimball, B.A.; Verplanck, P.L.; Runkel, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Here the hydrogeochemical constraints of a tracer dilution study are combined with Fe and Zn isotopic measurements to pinpoint metal loading sources and attenuation mechanisms in an alpine watershed impacted by acid mine drainage. In the tested mountain catchment, ??56Fe and ??66Zn isotopic signatures of filtered stream water samples varied by ???3.5??? and 0.4???, respectively. The inherent differences in the aqueous geochemistry of Fe and Zn provided complimentary isotopic information. For example, variations in ??56Fe were linked to redox and precipitation reactions occurring in the stream, while changes in ??66Zn were indicative of conservative mixing of different Zn sources. Fen environments contributed distinctively light dissolved Fe (<-2.0???) and isotopically heavy suspended Fe precipitates to the watershed, while Zn from the fen was isotopically heavy (>+0.4???). Acidic drainage from mine wastes contributed heavier dissolved Fe (???+0.5???) and lighter Zn (???+0.2???) isotopes relative to the fen. Upwelling of Fe-rich groundwater near the mouth of the catchment was the major source of Fe (??56Fe ??? 0???) leaving the watershed in surface flow, while runoff from mining wastes was the major source of Zn. The results suggest that given a strong framework for interpretation, Fe and Zn isotopes are useful tools for identifying and tracking metal sources and attenuation mechanisms in mountain watersheds. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Ab Initio Calculation of the Zn Isotope Effect in Phosphates, Citrates, and Malates and Applications to Plants and Soil

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pH<5, the Zn isotopic compositions of the various parts of the plants are expected to be similar to those of groundwater. In the neutral to alkaline region, the calculations correctly predict that 66Zn is enriched over 64Zn in roots, which concentrate phosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils. PMID:22363478

  20. Engaging with Families in Out-of-School Time Learning. Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot. Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard University Harvard Family Research Project, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Harvard Family Research Project's series of Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshots distills the wealth of information compiled in our Out-of-School Time Program Evaluation Database into a single report. Each Snapshot examines a specific aspect of out-of-school time (OST) evaluation. This Snapshot provides an overview of how researchers are…

  1. HydroCrowd: Citizen-empowered snapshot sampling to assess the spatial distribution of stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Philipp; Breuer, Lutz; Bach, Martin; Aubert, Alice H.; Frede, Hans-Georg

    2016-04-01

    Large parts of groundwater bodies in Central Europe shows elevated nitrate concentrations. While groundwater samplings characterize the water quality for a longer period, surface water resources, in particular streams, may be subject of fast concentration fluctuations and measurements distributed in time cannot by compared. Thus, sampling should be done in a short time frame (snapshot sampling). To describe the nitrogen status of streams in Germany, we organized a crowdsourcing experiment in the form of a snapshot sampling at a distinct day. We selected a national holiday in fall 2013 (Oct, 3rd) to ensure that a) volunteers have time to take a sample, b) stream water is unlikely to be influenced by recent agricultural fertilizer application, and c) low flow conditions are likely. We distributed 570 cleaned sample flasks to volunteers and got 280 filled flasks back with coordinates and other meta data about the sampled stream. The volunteers were asked to visit any stream outside of settlements and fill the flask with water from that stream. The samples were analyzed in our lab for concentration of nitrate, ammonium and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), results are presented as a map on the web site http://www.uni-giessen.de/hydrocrowd. The measured results are related to catchment features such as population density, soil properties, and land use derived from national geodata sources. The statistical analyses revealed a significant correlation between nitrate and fraction of arable land (0.46), as well as soil humus content (0.37), but a weak correlation with population density (0.12). DON correlations were weak but significant with humus content (0.14) and arable land (0.13). The mean contribution of DON to total dissolved nitrogen was 22%. Crowdsourcing turned out to be a useful method to assess the spatial distribution of stream solutes, as considerable amounts of samples were collected with comparatively little effort at a single day.

  2. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    PubMed Central

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-01-01

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of data can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies. PMID:25995845

  3. Snapshot imaging Fraunhofer line discriminator for detection of plant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta Roy, S.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2015-05-01

    Non-invasive quantification of plant health is traditionally accomplished using reflectance based metrics, such as the normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI). However, measuring plant fluorescence (both active and passive) to determine photochemistry of plants has gained importance. Due to better cost efficiency, lower power requirements, and simpler scanning synchronization, detecting passive fluorescence is preferred over active fluorescence. In this paper, we propose a high speed imaging approach for measuring passive plant fluorescence, within the hydrogen alpha Fraunhofer line at ~656 nm, using a Snapshot Imaging Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (SIFOLD). For the first time, the advantage of snapshot imaging for high throughput Fraunhofer Line Discrimination (FLD) is cultivated by our system, which is based on a multiple-image Fourier transform spectrometer and a spatial heterodyne interferometer (SHI). The SHI is a Sagnac interferometer, which is dispersion compensated using blazed diffraction gratings. We present data and techniques for calibrating the SIFOLD to any particular wavelength. This technique can be applied to quantify plant fluorescence at low cost and reduced complexity of data collection.

  4. SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics.

    PubMed

    Pileggi, H; Stolper, C D; Boyle, J M; Stasko, J T

    2012-12-01

    Sports analysts live in a world of dynamic games flattened into tables of numbers, divorced from the rinks, pitches, and courts where they were generated. Currently, these professional analysts use R, Stata, SAS, and other statistical software packages for uncovering insights from game data. Quantitative sports consultants seek a competitive advantage both for their clients and for themselves as analytics becomes increasingly valued by teams, clubs, and squads. In order for the information visualization community to support the members of this blossoming industry, it must recognize where and how visualization can enhance the existing analytical workflow. In this paper, we identify three primary stages of today's sports analyst's routine where visualization can be beneficially integrated: 1) exploring a dataspace; 2) sharing hypotheses with internal colleagues; and 3) communicating findings to stakeholders.Working closely with professional ice hockey analysts, we designed and built SnapShot, a system to integrate visualization into the hockey intelligence gathering process. SnapShot employs a variety of information visualization techniques to display shot data, yet given the importance of a specific hockey statistic, shot length, we introduce a technique, the radial heat map. Through a user study, we received encouraging feedback from several professional analysts, both independent consultants and professional team personnel. PMID:26357191

  5. A Snapshot-Based Mechanism for Celestial Orientation.

    PubMed

    El Jundi, Basil; Foster, James J; Khaldy, Lana; Byrne, Marcus J; Dacke, Marie; Baird, Emily

    2016-06-01

    In order to protect their food from competitors, ball-rolling dung beetles detach a piece of dung from a pile, shape it into a ball, and roll it away along a straight path [1]. They appear to rely exclusively on celestial compass cues to maintain their bearing [2-8], but the mechanism that enables them to use these cues for orientation remains unknown. Here, we describe the orientation strategy that allows dung beetles to use celestial cues in a dynamic fashion. We tested the underlying orientation mechanism by presenting beetles with a combination of simulated celestial cues (sun, polarized light, and spectral cues). We show that these animals do not rely on an innate prediction of the natural geographical relationship between celestial cues, as other navigating insects seem to [9, 10]. Instead, they appear to form an internal representation of the prevailing celestial scene, a "celestial snapshot," even if that scene represents a physical impossibility for the real sky. We also find that the beetles are able to maintain their bearing with respect to the presented cues only if the cues are visible when the snapshot is taken. This happens during the "dance," a behavior in which the beetle climbs on top of its ball and rotates about its vertical axis [11]. This strategy for reading celestial signals is a simple but efficient mechanism for straight-line orientation. PMID:27185557

  6. Serial snapshot crystallography for materials science with SwissFEL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dejoie, Catherine; Smeets, Stef; Baerlocher, Christian; Tamura, Nobumichi; Pattison, Philip; Abela, Rafael; McCusker, Lynne B.

    2015-04-21

    New opportunities for studying (sub)microcrystalline materials with small unit cells, both organic and inorganic, will open up when the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) presently being constructed in Switzerland (SwissFEL) comes online in 2017. Our synchrotron-based experiments mimicking the 4%-energy-bandpass mode of the SwissFEL beam show that it will be possible to record a diffraction pattern of up to 10 randomly oriented crystals in a single snapshot, to index the resulting reflections, and to extract their intensities reliably. The crystals are destroyed with each XFEL pulse, but by combining snapshots from several sets of crystals, a complete set of datamore » can be assembled, and crystal structures of materials that are difficult to analyze otherwise will become accessible. Even with a single shot, at least a partial analysis of the crystal structure will be possible, and with 10–50 femtosecond pulses, this offers tantalizing possibilities for time-resolved studies.« less

  7. Joint Application of Concentrations and Isotopic Signatures to Investigate the Global Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Budget: Inverse Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Mak, J. E.; Emmons, L. K.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon monoxide is not only an important component for determining the atmospheric oxidizing capacity but also a key trace gas in the atmospheric chemistry of the Earth's background environment. The global CO cycle and its change are closely related to both the change of CO mixing ratio and the change of source strength. Previously, to estimate the global CO budget, most top-down estimation techniques have been applied the concentrations of CO solely. Since CO from certain sources has a unique isotopic signature, its isotopes provide additional information to constrain its sources. Thus, coupling the concentration and isotope fraction information enables to tightly constrain CO flux by its sources and allows better estimations on the global CO budget. MOZART4 (Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers), a 3-D global chemical transport model developed at NCAR, MPI for meteorology and NOAA/GFDL and is used to simulate the global CO concentration and its isotopic signature. Also, a tracer version of MOZART4 which tagged for C16O and C18O from each region and each source was developed to see their contributions to the atmosphere efficiently. Based on the nine-year-simulation results we analyze the influences of each source of CO to the isotopic signature and the concentration. Especially, the evaluations are focused on the oxygen isotope of CO (δ18O), which has not been extensively studied yet. To validate the model performance, CO concentrations and isotopic signatures measured from MPI, NIWA and our lab are compared to the modeled results. The MOZART4 reproduced observational data fairly well; especially in mid to high latitude northern hemisphere. Bayesian inversion techniques have been used to estimate the global CO budget with combining observed and modeled CO concentration. However, previous studies show significant differences in their estimations on CO source strengths. Because, in addition to the CO mixing ratio, isotopic signatures are independent tracers

  8. Application of isotopic and geochemical tools for the evaluation of nitrogen cycling in an agricultural basin, the Fucino Plain, Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitta, Marco; Fracchiolla, Domenico; Aravena, Ramon; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2009-06-01

    SummaryGeochemical and isotope data collected in the agricultural area of Fucino Plain, Central Italy provided information about the relationship between the nitrate cycle and agricultural practices and seasonal changes in hydrology, in particular concerning the interaction between groundwater and surface water. The nitrate cycle of the alluvial aquifer of the Plain has been summarized in a seasonal-dependent conceptual model, where the shallow alluvial aquifer plays a fundamental role contributing to contamination of irrigation channels during periods of no manure application. Based on isotopic fingerprinting, chemical characterization and agricultural practices, the main nitrate source involved in the nitrate cycle in the study area is manure that is applied during the fall and winter periods. A nitrogen contribution from the deep alluvial-lacustrine aquifer was also documented in this study. The isotope data also showed the occurrence of denitrification occurring in nitrate pools in the shallow aquifer, which is characterized by low-permeability layers. The nitrate pool in the shallow aquifer is related to infiltration after the application of manure. The isotope and concentration data showed that the increase of nitrate in the irrigation channels under non-runoff conditions is controlled by seepage from the shallow aquifer. The cycle ends with a new application of manure, generating considerable increases of "fresh" nitrate concentration in the channels. The historical trend of decreasing water table conditions and increasing nitrate content in the shallow aquifer threatens the deep aquifer, used for drinking purposes, since heavy pumping can induce the transport of nitrate from the shallow aquifer toward the capture zone of the deep wells.

  9. 135Cs/137Cs isotopic composition of environmental samples across Europe: Environmental transport and source term emission applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2015-11-02

    135Cs/137Cs isotopic analyses represent an important tool for studying the fate and transport of radiocesium in the environment; in this work the 135Cs/137Cs isotopic composition in environmental samples taken from across Europe is reported. Surface soil and vegetation samples from western Russia, Ukraine, Austria, and Hungary show consistent aged thermal fission product 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios of 0.58 ± 0.01 (age corrected to 1/1/15), with the exception of one sample of soil-moss from Hungary which shows an elevated 135Cs/137Cs ratio of 1.78 ± 0.12. With the exception of the outlier sample from Hungary, surface soil/vegetation data are in quantitative agreement withmore » values previously reported for soils within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, suggesting that radiocesium at these locations is primarily composed of homogenous airborne deposition from Chernobyl. Seawater samples taken from the Irish Sea show 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios of 1.22 ± 0.11 (age corrected to 1/1/15), suggesting aged thermal fission product Cs discharged from Sellafield. Furthermore, the differences in 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios between Sellafield, Chernobyl, and global nuclear weapons testing fallout indicate that 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can be utilized to discriminate between and track radiocesium transport from different nuclear production source terms, including major emission sources in Europe.« less

  10. (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotopic composition of environmental samples across Europe: Environmental transport and source term emission applications.

    PubMed

    Snow, Mathew S; Snyder, Darin C

    2016-01-01

    (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotopic analyses represent an important tool for studying the fate and transport of radiocesium in the environment; in this work the (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotopic composition in environmental samples taken from across Europe is reported. Surface soil and vegetation samples from western Russia, Ukraine, Austria, and Hungary show consistent aged thermal fission product (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotope ratios of 0.58 ± 0.01 (age corrected to 1/1/15), with the exception of one sample of soil-moss from Hungary which shows an elevated (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratio of 1.78 ± 0.12. With the exception of the outlier sample from Hungary, surface soil/vegetation data are in quantitative agreement with values previously reported for soils within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, suggesting that radiocesium at these locations is primarily composed of homogenous airborne deposition from Chernobyl. Seawater samples taken from the Irish Sea show (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotope ratios of 1.22 ± 0.11 (age corrected to 1/1/15), suggesting aged thermal fission product Cs discharged from Sellafield. The differences in (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotope ratios between Sellafield, Chernobyl, and global nuclear weapons testing fallout indicate that (135)Cs/(137)Cs isotope ratios can be utilized to discriminate between and track radiocesium transport from different nuclear production source terms, including major emission sources in Europe. PMID:26540258

  11. New untargeted metabolic profiling combining mass spectrometry and isotopic labeling: application on Aspergillus fumigatus grown on wheat.

    PubMed

    Cano, Patricia M; Jamin, Emilien L; Tadrist, Souria; Bourdaud'hui, Pascal; Péan, Michel; Debrauwer, Laurent; Oswald, Isabelle P; Delaforge, Marcel; Puel, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of fungal secondary metabolomes has become a challenge due to the industrial applications of many of these molecules, and also due to the emergence of fungal threats to public health and natural ecosystems. Given that, the aim of the present study was to develop an untargeted method to analyze fungal secondary metabolomes by combining high-accuracy mass spectrometry and double isotopic labeling of fungal metabolomes. The strain NRRL 35693 of Aspergillus fumigatus , an important fungal pathogen, was grown on three wheat grain substrates: (1) naturally enriched grains (99% (12)C), (2) grains enriched 96.8% with (13)C, (3) grains enriched with 53.4% with (13)C and 96.8% with (15)N. Twenty-one secondary metabolites were unambiguously identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) analysis. AntiBase 2012 was used to confirm the identity of these metabolites. Additionally, on the basis of tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments, it was possible to identify for the first time the formula and the structure of fumigaclavine D, a new member of the fumigaclavines family. Post biosynthesis degradation of tryptoquivaline F by methanol was also identified during HPLC-HRMS analysis by the detection of a carbon atom of nonfungal origin. The interest of this method lies not only on the unambiguous determination of the exact chemical formulas of fungal secondary metabolites but also on the easy discrimination of nonfungal products. Validation of the method was thus successfully achieved in this study, and it can now be applied to other fungal metabolomes, offering great possibilities for the discovery of new drugs or toxins. PMID:23901908

  12. Isotope Inversion Experiment evaluating the suitability of calibration in surrogate matrix for quantification via LC-MS/MS-Exemplary application for a steroid multi-method.

    PubMed

    Suhr, Anna Catharina; Vogeser, Michael; Grimm, Stefanie H

    2016-05-30

    For quotable quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes in complex biological samples by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS, the creation of appropriate calibrators is a challenge, since analyte-free authentic material is in general not available. Thus, surrogate matrices are often used to prepare calibrators and controls. However, currently employed validation protocols do not include specific experiments to verify the suitability of a surrogate matrix calibration for quantification of authentic matrix samples. The aim of the study was the development of a novel validation experiment to test whether surrogate matrix based calibrators enable correct quantification of authentic matrix samples. The key element of the novel validation experiment is the inversion of nonlabelled analytes and their stable isotope labelled (SIL) counterparts in respect to their functions, i.e. SIL compound is the analyte and nonlabelled substance is employed as internal standard. As a consequence, both surrogate and authentic matrix are analyte-free regarding SIL analytes, which allows a comparison of both matrices. We called this approach Isotope Inversion Experiment. As figure of merit we defined the accuracy of inverse quality controls in authentic matrix quantified by means of a surrogate matrix calibration curve. As a proof-of-concept application a LC-MS/MS assay addressing six corticosteroids (cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, 11-deoxycorticosterone, and 17-OH-progesterone) was chosen. The integration of the Isotope Inversion Experiment in the validation protocol for the steroid assay was successfully realized. The accuracy results of the inverse quality controls were all in all very satisfying. As a consequence the suitability of a surrogate matrix calibration for quantification of the targeted steroids in human serum as authentic matrix could be successfully demonstrated. The Isotope Inversion Experiment fills a gap in the validation process for LC-MS/MS assays

  13. Application of MC-ICPMS to the precise determination of tellurium isotope compositions in chondrites, iron meteorites and sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Manuela A.; Rehkämper, Mark; Halliday, Alex N.

    2004-03-01

    New mass spectrometric techniques have been developed for the precise and accurate determination of Te isotope compositions. The methods are suitable for the analysis of stony and iron meteorites as well as sulfide mineral separates, such that they can be applied to search for Te isotope anomalies in various solar system materials. Tellurium is first separated from its matrix with a two-stage liquid chromatographic procedure. For iron meteorites, solvent-extraction is used to isolate Te from Fe prior to the column separation. The isotope composition of Te is then determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). Tellurium has a very high first ionization potential and thus MC-ICPMS is much more suitable for the isotopic analyses than positive ion thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Only about 100 ng Te are required for a single high precision measurement. Analyses of two terrestrial sulfides, the carbonaceous chondrite Allende and the iron meteorite Canyon Diablo reveal that these have Te isotope compositions that are identical to the terrestrial standard within uncertainty. The Te isotope data acquired for standard solutions as well as meteorites and sulfides display reproducibilities (2[sigma]) of approximately +/-4500 ppm for 120Te/128Te, +/-140 ppm for 122Te/128Te, +/-100 ppm for 124Te/128Te, +/-30 ppm for 126Te/128Te, and +/-60 ppm for 130Te/128Te. Compared to published results for meteorite samples obtained by TIMS, this represents an improvement in precision of about one to two orders of magnitude for 122-130Te/128Te and by a factor of 4 for 120Te/128Te. A number of experiments furthermore demonstrate that the isotope data acquired by MC-ICPMS are accurate, even for complex geological samples.

  14. Quantifying sediment-associated metal dispersal using Pb isotopes: application of binary and multivariate mixing models at the catchment-scale.

    PubMed

    Bird, Graham; Brewer, Paul A; Macklin, Mark G; Nikolova, Mariyana; Kotsev, Tsvetan; Mollov, Mihail; Swain, Catherine

    2010-06-01

    In this study Pb isotope signatures were used to identify the provenance of contaminant metals and establish patterns of downstream sediment dispersal within the River Maritsa catchment, which is impacted by the mining of polymetallic ores. A two-fold modelling approach was undertaken to quantify sediment-associated metal delivery to the Maritsa catchment; employing binary mixing models in tributary systems and a composite fingerprinting and mixing model approach in the wider Maritsa catchment. Composite fingerprints were determined using Pb isotopic and multi-element geochemical data to characterize sediments delivered from tributary catchments. Application of a mixing model allowed a quantification of the percentage contribution of tributary catchments to the sediment load of the River Maritsa. Sediment delivery from tributaries directly affected by mining activity contributes 42-63% to the sediment load of the River Maritsa, with best-fit regression relationships indicating that sediments originating from mining-affected tributaries are being dispersed over 200 km downstream. PMID:20338677

  15. Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

  16. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  17. Implementation of response to intervention: a snapshot of progress.

    PubMed

    Berkeley, Sheri; Bender, William N; Gregg Peaster, Lindsay; Saunders, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of how all 50 states are progressing with the development and implementation of response-to-intervention (RtI) models 1 year after the final regulations for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act were passed. Data were collected through a review of existing state department of education Web sites and conversations with representatives in each state department of education. Information related to RtI model type, implementation status, professional development, criteria for eligibility, and specific features of individual state RtI models are presented. Findings indicate that most states are in some phase of RtI development, although approaches vary widely throughout the country. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:19103800

  18. Snapshot 3D optical coherence tomography system using image mappingspectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuc-Uyen; Pierce, Mark C; Higgins, Laura; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2013-01-01

    A snapshot 3-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography system was developed using Image MappingSpectrometry. This system can give depth information (Z) at different spatial positions (XY) withinone camera integration time to potentially reduce motion artifact and enhance throughput. Thecurrent (x,y,λ) datacube of (85×356×117) provides a 3Dvisualization of sample with 400 μm depth and 13.4μm in transverse resolution. Axial resolution of 16.0μm can also be achieved in this proof-of-concept system. We present ananalysis of the theoretical constraints which will guide development of future systems withincreased imaging depth and improved axial and lateral resolutions. PMID:23736629

  19. A snapshot of global health education at North American universities.

    PubMed

    Lencucha, Raphael; Mohindra, Katia

    2014-03-01

    Global health education is becoming increasingly prominent in North America. It is widely agreed upon that global health is an important aspect of an education in the health sciences and increasingly in other disciplines such as law, economics and political science. There is currently a paucity of studies examining the content of global health courses at the post-secondary level. The purpose of our research is to identify the content areas being covered in global health curricula in North American universities, as a first step in mapping global health curricula across North America. We collected 67 course syllabi from 31 universities and analyzed the topics covered in the course. This snapshot of global health education will aid students searching for global health content, as well as educators and university administrators who are developing or expanding global health programs in Canada and the United States. PMID:24458005

  20. Snapshot fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter tomography.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mehadi; Greenberg, Joel A; Odinaka, Ikenna; Brady, David J

    2016-08-01

    We use coherently scattered X-rays to measure the molecular composition of an object throughout its volume. We image a planar slice of the object in a single snapshot by illuminating it with a fan beam and placing a coded aperture between the object and the detectors. We characterize the system and demonstrate a resolution of 13 mm in range and 2 mm in cross-range and a fractional momentum transfer resolution of 15%. In addition, we show that this technique allows a 100x speedup compared to previously-studied pencil beam systems using the same components. Finally, by scanning an object through the beam, we image the full 4-dimensional data cube (3 spatial and 1 material dimension) for complete volumetric molecular imaging. PMID:27505791

  1. A snapshot of foundational attitudes toward quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian; Kofler, Johannes; Zeilinger, Anton

    2013-08-01

    Foundational investigations in quantum mechanics, both experimental and theoretical, gave birth to the field of quantum information science. Nevertheless, the foundations of quantum mechanics themselves remain hotly debated in the scientific community, and no consensus on essential questions has been reached. Here, we present the results of a poll carried out among 33 participants of a conference on the foundations of quantum mechanics. The participants completed a questionnaire containing 16 multiple-choice questions probing opinions on quantum-foundational issues. Participants included physicists, philosophers, and mathematicians. We describe our findings, identify commonly held views, and determine strong, medium, and weak correlations between the answers. Our study provides a unique snapshot of current views in the field of quantum foundations, as well as an analysis of the relationships between these views.

  2. Snapshots of the Universe: A Multilingual Astronomy Book

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, R. L.; Sokal, K. R.; Liss, S. E.; Johnson, K. E.

    2015-11-01

    Dark Skies, Bright Kids! (DSBK) is an outreach organization at the University of Virginia, focused on enhancing elementary level science education in under-served communities. Early in the program, DSBK volunteers encountered difficulties connecting with English as a second language (ESL) students. To meet that challenge, DSBK volunteers created story-book style art with short descriptions of astronomical objects in both Spanish and English to help communicate basic astronomy concepts to these students. Building on this initial success, our simple project has evolved into a full multilingual children's book targeted at 2nd-5th grade students. Though originally in Spanish and English, a partnership with the University of Alberta (Canada) has produced a French translation of the text, broadening the outreach potential of the book. In this contribution, we describe Snapshots of the Universe (Instantáneas del Universo) and reflect upon the process of creating this unique resource.

  3. Strontium Isotope Fractionation in the marine Realm: first application of a 87Sr/84Sr-Double Spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhauer, A.; Krabbenhöft, A.; Böhm, F.; Liebetrau, V.; Fietzke, J.; Augustin, N.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Vollstaedt, H.

    2009-04-01

    In order to precisely determine 88Sr/86Sr- and 87Sr/86Sr-isotope variations in natural samples using TIMS-technique we developed a mixed 87Sr/84Sr-double spike from two solutions enriched in 84Sr and 87Sr, respectively. After mixing the two solutions the Sr-spike ratios have precisely been determined by calibration to the NBS 987 standard. For the determination of natural 88Sr/86Sr- and 87Sr/86Sr-isotope variations in carbonates and silicates two TIMS measurements are required: an unspiked and a spiked run where the Sr-isotope ratios are arbitrarily normalized to a fixed Sr isotope ratio (e.g. mean of the first block). For denormalization and data reduction we adopted the algorithm for Ca isotope measurements (1) presented earlier by Heuser et al.(2003) modified for Sr-isotope measurements. It was found that best results can be achieved if the 84Srspike/84Srsample ratio is higher than about 12. The algorithm allows the simultaneous calculation of 87Sr/86Sr and 88Sr/86Sr ratios. Standard measurements showed a ^88•86Sr-value (^88•86Sr=((88Sr/86Sr)Sample/(88Sr/86Sr)SRM987)-1)*1000) of 0.39 for the IAPSO seawater standard corresponding to an external reproducibility of ±0.012 (n=19). The IAPSO ^88•86Sr-value corresponds to a 87Sr/86Sr-ratio of 0.709317(9). Both values are in accordance with earlier publications (2) and theoretical predictions based on the ^88•86Sr ratio of seawater and assuming mass-dependent isotope fractionation. This technique allows us to correct the 88Sr/86Sr- and 87Sr/86Sr-isotope-ratios for mass dependent fractionation during both column chemistry and TIMS measurement procedure. Furthermore a direct comparison of double spike TIMS, bracketing standard and laser-ablation MC-ICP-MS (3) results are in agreement and can be used to discuss limitation and perspectives of future Sr isotope measurements. References: 1 Heuser A., Eisenhauer A., Gussone N., Bock B., Hansen B.T. and Nägler Th.F. (2003) Measurement of Calcium Isotopes (^44Ca) Using a

  4. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  5. Application of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in individual particles for nuclear safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao Zhi; Esaka, Fumitaka; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2007-10-01

    The capability of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the determination of uranium isotope ratios in individual particles was determined. For this purpose, we developed an experimental procedure including single particle transfer with a manipulator, chemical dissolution and isotope ratio analysis, and applied to the analysis of individual uranium particles in certified reference materials (NBL CRM U050 and U350). As the result, the 235U/ 238U isotope ratio for the particle with the diameter between 0.5 and 3.9 μm was successfully determined with the deviation from the certified ratio within 1.8%. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the 235U/ 238U isotope ratio was within 4.2%. Although the analysis of 234U/ 238U and 236U/ 238U isotope ratios gave the results with inferior precision, the R.S.D. within 20% was possible for the measurement of the particle with the diameter more than 2.1 μm. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of a simulated environmental sample prepared from a mixture of indoor dust (NIST SRM 2583) and uranium particles (NBL CRM U050, U350 and U950a). From the results, the proposed procedure was found to be an alternative analytical tool for nuclear safeguards.

  6. Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycles from Isotopic Ratios of Waste Products Applicable to Measurement by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Biegalski, S R; Whitney, S M; Buchholz, B

    2005-08-24

    An extensive study was conducted to determine isotopic ratios of nuclides in spent fuel that may be utilized to reveal historical characteristics of a nuclear reactor cycle. This forensic information is important to determine the origin of unknown nuclear waste. The distribution of isotopes in waste products provides information about a nuclear fuel cycle, even when the isotopes of uranium and plutonium are removed through chemical processing. Several different reactor cycles of the PWR, BWR, CANDU, and LMFBR were simulated for this work with the ORIGEN-ARP and ORIGEN 2.2 codes. The spent fuel nuclide concentrations of these reactors were analyzed to find the most informative isotopic ratios indicative of irradiation cycle length and reactor design. Special focus was given to long-lived and stable fission products that would be present many years after their creation. For such nuclides, mass spectrometry analysis methods often have better detection limits than classic gamma-ray spectroscopy. The isotopic ratios {sup 151}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, {sup 149}Sm/{sup 146}Sm, and {sup 244}Cm/{sup 246}Cm were found to be good indicators of fuel cycle length and are well suited for analysis by accelerator mass spectroscopy.

  7. Source apportionment of methane using a triple isotope approach - Method development and application in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Julia; Holmstrand, Henry; Semiletov, Igor; Shakhova, Natalia; Shcherbakova, Kseniia; Kosmach, Denis; Sapart, Célia J.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    We present a method for measurements of the stable and radiocarbon isotope systems of methane in seawater and sediments. The triple isotope characterization of methane is useful in distinguishing different sources and for improving our understanding of biogeochemical processes affecting methane in the water column. D14C-CH4 is an especially powerful addition to stable isotope analyses in distinguishing between thermogenic and biogenic origins of the methane. Such measurements require large sample sizes, due to low natural abundance of the radiocarbon in CH4. Our system for sample collection, methane extraction and purification builds on the approach by Kessler and Reeburgh (Limn. & Ocean. Meth., 2005). An in-field system extracts methane from 30 -120 l water or 1-2 l sediment (depending on the in-situ methane concentration) by purging the samples with Helium to transfer the dissolved methane to the headspace and circulating it through cryogenically cooled absorbent traps where methane is collected. The in-field preparation eliminates the risks of storage and transport of large seawater quantities and subsequent leakage of sample gas as well as ongoing microbial processes and chemical reactions that may alter the sample composition. In the subsequent shore-based treatment, a laboratory system is used to purify and combust the collected CH4 to AMS-amenable CO2. Subsamples from the methane traps are analyzed for stable isotopes and compared to stable isotope measurements directly measured from small water samples taken in parallel, to correct for any potential fractionation occurring during this process. The system has been successfully tested and used on several shorter shipboard expeditions in the Baltic Sea and on a long summer expedition across the Arctic Ocean. Here we present the details of the method and testing, as well as first triple isotope field data from two cruises to the Landsort Deep area in the Central Baltic Sea.

  8. The combined application of organic sulphur and isotope geochemistry to assess multiple sources of palaeobiochemicals with identical carbon skeletons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohnen, M. E.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Merrit, D.; Hayes, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Five immature sediments from a Messinian evaporitic basin, representing one evaporitic cycle, were studied using molecular organic sulphur and isotope geochemistry. It is shown that a specific carbon skeleton which is present in different "modes of occurrence" ("free" hydrocarbon, alkylthiophene, alkylthiolane, alkyldithiane, alkylthiane, and sulphur-bound in macromolecules) may have different biosynthetic precursors which are possibly derived from different biota. It is demonstrated that the mode of occurrence and the carbon isotopic composition of a sedimentary lipid can be used to "reconstruct" its biochemical precursor. This novel approach of recognition of the suite of palaeobiochemicals present during the time of deposition allows for identification of the biological sources with an unprecedented specificity.

  9. Combined application of conservative transport modelling and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses to assess in situ attenuation of benzene, toluene, and o-xylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, K. S.; Griebler, C.; Meckenstock, R. U.; Liedl, R.; Peter, A.

    2006-12-01

    In recent years, compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) have developed into one of the most powerful tools for the quantification of in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants. In this approach, the calculation of the extent of biodegradation of organic contaminants in aquifers is usually based on the Rayleigh equation, and thus neglects physical transport processes such as dispersion that contribute to contaminant dilution in aquifers. Here we combine compound specific isotope analyses with a conservative transport model to study the attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons at a former gasworks site. The conservative transport model was first used to simulate concentration reductions caused by dilution at wells downgradient of a BTEX source. In a second step, the diluted concentrations, together with the available stable carbon isotope ratios and carbon fractionation factors for benzene, toluene and o-xylene were applied in the Rayleigh equation to quantify the degree of biodegradation at each of those wells. At the investigated site, where other attenuation processes such as sorption and volatilisation were proven to be negligible, the combined approach is recommended for benzene, which represents a compound for which the effect of biodegradation is comparable to or less than the effect of dilution. As demonstrated for toluene and o-xylene, the application of the Rayleigh equation alone is sufficient if dilution can be proved to be insignificant in comparison to biodegradation. The analysis also suggests that the source width and the position of the observation wells relative to the plume center line are significantly related to the degree of dilution.

  10. Applications of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to high precision isotope ratio measurement of 13C/12C in carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Ed H; Fidric, Bernard; Rella, Chris W; Koulikov, Sergei; Kharlamov, Boris; Tan, Sze; Kachanov, Alexander A; Richman, Bruce A; Crosson, Eric R; Paldus, Barbara A; Kalaskar, Shashi; Bowling, David R

    2006-03-01

    Recent measurements of carbon isotopes in carbon dioxide using near-infrared, diode-laser-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are presented. The CRDS system achieved good precision, often better than 0.2 per thousand, for 4% CO2 concentrations, and also achieved 0.15-0.25 per thousand precision in a 78 min measurement time with cryotrap-based pre-concentration of ambient CO2 concentrations (360 ppmv). These results were obtained with a CRDS system possessing a data rate of 40 ring-downs per second and a loss measurement of 4.0 x 10(-11) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). Subsequently, the measurement time has been reduced to under 10 min. This standard of performance would enable a variety of high concentration (3-10%) isotopic measurements, such as medical human breath analysis or animal breath experiments. The extension of this ring-down to the 2 microm region would enable isotopic analysis at ambient concentrations, which, combined with the small size, robust design, and potential for frequent measurements at a remote site, make CRDS technology attractive for remote atmospheric measurement applications. PMID:16500752

  11. Cancer Snapshots: Facts and statistics for each cancer type or topic

    Cancer.gov

    Snapshots provide key information on disease incidence and mortality, NCI funding trends, relevant research activities, and recent scientific advances related to specific types of cancer and on special populations and scientific topics.

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  13. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Saint Martin/Sint Maarten

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the northeast Caribbean island Saint Martin. The island is divided between two nations, France in the north (Saint-Martin) and the Netherlands in the south (Sint Maarten).

  14. Symptoms: Personal snapshots of anxiety disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Symptoms: Personal snapshots of anxiety ... And it was scary.” Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia): "In any social situation, I felt fear. I ...

  15. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - British Virgin Islands (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the British Virgin Islands (BVI), one of three sets of the Virgin Island territories in an archipelago making up the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles.

  16. 77 FR 2340 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Snapshot: Painters and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Snapshot: Painters and Photography... Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States,...

  17. Single-snapshot 2D color measurement by plenoptic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kensuke; Yamanaka, Yuji; Maruyama, Go; Nagai, Sho; Hirai, Hideaki; Meng, Lingfei; Tosic, Ivana

    2014-03-01

    Plenoptic cameras enable capture of directional light ray information, thus allowing applications such as digital refocusing, depth estimation, or multiband imaging. One of the most common plenoptic camera architectures contains a microlens array at the conventional image plane and a sensor at the back focal plane of the microlens array. We leverage the multiband imaging (MBI) function of this camera and develop a single-snapshot, single-sensor high color fidelity camera. Our camera is based on a plenoptic system with XYZ filters inserted in the pupil plane of the main lens. To achieve high color measurement precision of this system, we perform an end-to-end optimization of the system model that includes light source information, object information, optical system information, plenoptic image processing and color estimation processing. Optimized system characteristics are exploited to build an XYZ plenoptic colorimetric camera prototype that achieves high color measurement precision. We describe an application of our colorimetric camera to color shading evaluation of display and show that it achieves color accuracy of ΔE<0.01.

  18. Provenancing of unidentified World War II casualties: Application of strontium and oxygen isotope analysis in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Font, Laura; Jonker, Geert; van Aalderen, Patric A; Schiltmans, Els F; Davies, Gareth R

    2015-01-01

    In 2010 and 2012 two sets of unidentified human remains of two World War II soldiers were recovered in the area where the 1944-1945 Kapelsche Veer bridgehead battle took place in The Netherlands. Soldiers of four Allied nations: British Royal Marine Commandos, Free Norwegian Commandos, Free Poles and Canadians, fought against the German Army in this battle. The identification of these two casualties could not be achieved using dental record information of DNA analysis. The dental records of Missing in Action soldiers of the Allied nations did not match with the dental records of the two casualties. A DNA profile was determined for the casualty found in 2010, but no match was found. Due to the lack of information on the identification of the casualties provided by routine methods, an isotope study was conducted in teeth from the soldiers to constrain their provenance. The isotope study concluded that the tooth enamel isotope composition for both casualties matched with an origin from the United Kingdom. For one of the casualties a probable origin from the United Kingdom was confirmed, after the isotope study was conducted, by the recognition of a characteristic belt buckle derived from a Royal Marine money belt, only issued to British Royal Marines, found with the remains of the soldier. PMID:25577002

  19. Application of mercury isotopes for tracing trophic transfer and internal distribution of mercury in marine fish feeding experiments.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sae Yun; Blum, Joel D; Chirby, Michelle A; Chesney, Edward J

    2013-10-01

    Feeding experiments were performed to investigate mercury (Hg) isotope fractionation during trophic transfer and internal distribution of total Hg (THg) in marine fish on exposure to natural seafood. Young-of-the-year amberjack (Seriola dumerili) were fed with either blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus; 2647 ng/g THg) or brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus; 25.1 ng/g THg) for 80 d or 50 d, respectively, and dissected for muscle, liver, kidney, brain, and blood. After 30 d of tuna consumption, Hg isotopes (δ(202) Hg and Δ(199)Hg) of the amberjack organs shifted to the tuna value (δ(202)Hg = 0.55‰, Δ(199)Hg = 1.54‰,), demonstrating the absence of Hg isotope fractionation. When amberjack were fed a shrimp diet, there was an initial mixing of the amberjack organs toward the shrimp value (δ(202)Hg = -0.48‰, Δ(199)Hg = 0.32‰), followed by a cessation of further shifts in Δ(199)Hg and a small shift in δ(202)Hg. The failure of Δ(199)Hg to reach the shrimp value can be attributed to a reduction in Hg bioaccumulation from shrimp resulting from feeding inhibition and the δ(202)Hg shift can be attributed to a small internal fractionation during excretion. Given that the feeding rate and Hg concentration of the diet can influence internal Hg isotope distribution, these parameters must be considered in biosentinel fish studies. PMID:23787815

  20. Evidence for life in the isotopic analysis of surface sulphates in the Haughton impact structure, and potential application on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, John; Boyce, Adrian J.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Banerjee, Neil; Flemming, Roberta; Lee, Pascal

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of sulphur isotopic compositions in three sets of surface sulphate samples from the soil zone in the Haughton impact structure shows that they are distinct. They include surface gypsum crusts remobilized from the pre-impact gypsum bedrock (mean δ34S +31‰), efflorescent copiapite and fibroferrite associated with hydrothermal marcasite (mean δ34S -37‰), and gypsum-iron oxide crusts representing weathering of pyritic crater-fill sediments (mean δ34S +7‰). Their different compositions reflect different histories of sulphur cycling. Two of the three sulphates have isotopically light (low δ34S) compositions compared with the gypsum bedrock (mean δ34S +31‰), reflecting derivation by weathering of sulphides (three sets of pyrite/marcasite samples with mean δ34S of -41, -20 and -8‰), which had in turn been precipitated by microbial sulphate reduction. Thus, even in the absence of the parent sulphides due to surface oxidation, evidence of life would be preserved. This indicates that on Mars, where surface oxidation may rule out sampling of sulphides during robotic exploration, but where sulphates are widespread, sulphur isotope analysis is a valuable tool that could be sensitive to any near-surface microbial activity. Other causes of sulphur isotopic fractionation on the surface of Mars are feasible, but any anomalous fractionation would indicate the desirability of further analysis.

  1. Application of Stable Isotope in Hydrologic Analysis of a Rainfall-Runoff Event in the Xin'an Jiang River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Yi, P.; Chen, L.; Aldahan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes abundance of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) are very sensitive to environmental changes and can help understand the complex recharges between surface water and groundwater. However, details of variability in the different components of water supply to watersheds are generally missing. We present here evaluation of isotopic changes in small watershed (0.19 km2) in the upstream of Xin'an River, Anhui province, China based on daily sampling of rainfall events and runoff (river and soil water). The δ2H and δ18O of different water sources in the watershed were aimed in order explore interactions between different parts of the hydrological processes. The collected water samples were analyzed for δ2H and δ18O using Picarro L-2120i analyzer at a precision of 1.0 and 0.1 ‰, respectively. The results indicated higher abundance of 2H and 18O in precipitation than those in river. Additionally, the content of the heavy isotopes also decreases in soil water with depth, while surface soil water was enriched because of evaporation. The response of the watershed to the changes in δ2H and δ18O varied, where water in upstream gained more heavy isotopes rapidly, while in the downstream part the enrichment happened after a few days. This feature suggests a different but still strong hydraulic connection between surface water and groundwater in the small watershed tested here. Accordingly, variability of δ2H and δ18O should be carefully evaluated on a local scale before application in transport system of large rivers and exchange with groundwater.

  2. Climatic Controls on the Stable Isotopic Composition of Precipitation in Northeast Asia : applicability to groundwater recharge study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Wenner, D. B.; Grunstein, A. J.; Choi, M.; Woo, N.

    2001-05-01

    Based on the data available from the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP), spatial and temporal variability of oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of precipitation is reviewed for 9 selected sites in the Northeast Asia. These sites include Pohang (Korea), Tokyo and Ryori (Japan) and Shijiazhuang, Baotou, Tianjin, Wulumuqi, Zhangye and Qiqihar (China). The temperature is the main factor controlling the stable isotope composition of precipitation in the northwestern (inner continental) region of the study area, whereas the amount effect for summer rains is overshadowing the temperature effect in the southeastern (coastal) region. The IAEA/WMO data set reveals that many sites in Northeast Asia show a distinct winter-summer cyclic pattern in deuterium excess values that appears to reflect different climatic conditions. To further understand this pattern, stable isotopic data were obtained for individual rainfall events over a two-year period at Cheju Island, Korea. The d18- and dD- values of precipitation at Cheju Island are not dependent upon temperature. However, the deuterium excess values, which range from 3.0 to 40.6 per mil show a distinct seasonal variation with higher d-values in winter (> ~15 per mil) and lower values in summer (~10 permil). Such a seasonal variation appears to be closely related to different air masses affecting the island during different seasons: cold-dry continental polar air mass in winter and hot-humid maritime tropical air mass in summer. Such stable isotopic characteristics in Northeast Asia could potentially provide a means for evaluating the relative contribution of summer and winter precipitation to groundwater recharge.

  3. Terpane biomarkers and carbon isotopes in environmental geochemistry-application of a case study from Prince William Sound, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Hostetter, D.E.; Castle, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    Geochemical studies in Prince William Sound, Alaska, following the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill have provided information that is being used to interpret preliminary environmental geochemical observations made in coastal California. Although the shorelines of Prince William Sound still retain traces of the 1989 oil spill, most of the flattened tar balls that can be found today on these shorelines are not residues of Exxon Valdez oil. Rather, the hydrocarbon-biomarker and carbon-isotopic signatures of these tar balls have remarkably similar characteristics that are consistent with those of oil products that originated from Monterey Formation source rocks of California. Some of these products were spilled into the sound during the 1964 Alaskan earthquake. Selected terpane biomarker ratios and carbon isotope composition of whole oil samples can geochemically distinguish Exxon Valdez residues from the tar balls. Results are discussed.

  4. Calculation of simultaneous isotopic and trace element variations during water-rock interaction with applications to carbonate diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Banner, J.L. ); Hanson, G.N. )

    1990-11-01

    Equations are developed for the calculation of the simultaneous variations in trace element concentrations and radiogenic and stable isotopic compositions that occur during water-rock interaction. The equations are of general use for modeling chemical and isotopic variations in porous media and are applied here to the diagenesis of carbonate rocks and sediments. Owing to the extreme differences in the concentrations of oxygen and carbon in diagenetic fluids, carbonate minerals equilibrate with fluid {delta}{sup 18}O values at three orders of magnitude lower waterrock ratios (< 10) than the waterrock ratios at which they equilibrate with fluid {delta}{sup 13}C values (10{sup 3}). {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios are affected at variable rates. In order to reset the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr value of a marine limestone during freshwater diagenesis, waterrock ratios similar to those calculated for equilibration of {delta}{sup 13}C values are required, while Sr-Ca-rich brines can reset the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr value of a limestone at low waterrock ratios, similar to those calculated for equilibration of {delta}{sup 18}O values. These large, relative differences in the response of different isotopic systems to water-rock interaction translate into characteristic trends on isotope and trace element covariation diagrams that can be used to distinguish between (1) different models for water-rock interaction and (2) different processes such as water-rock interaction, mixing of fluids, and mixing of mineral endmembers. These modeling approaches are applied to the regionally extensive dolomites of the Mississippian Burlington-Keokuk Formation.

  5. Chemical Synthesis of Deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[(13)C₆]-glucoside and Application in Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    PubMed

    Habler, Katharina; Frank, Oliver; Rychlik, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Modified mycotoxins have been gaining importance in recent years and present a certain challenge in LC-MS/MS analysis. Due to the previous lack of a labeled isotopologue of the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, in our study we synthesized the first (13)C-labeled internal standard. Therefore, we used the Königs-Knorr method to synthesize deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[(13)C₆]-glucoside originated from unlabeled deoxynivalenol and [(13)C₆]-labeled glucose. Using the synthesized isotopically-labeled standard deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[(13)C₆]-glucoside and the purchased labeled standard [(13)C15]-deoxynivalenol, a stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was firstly developed for deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and deoxynivalenol in beer. The preparation and purification of beer samples was based on a solid phase extraction. The validation data of the newly developed method gave satisfying results. Intra- and interday precision studies revealed relative standard deviations below 0.5% and 7%, respectively. The recoveries ranged for both analytes between 97% and 112%. The stable isotope dilution assay was applied to various beer samples from four different countries. In summary, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and deoxynivalenol mostly appeared together in varying molar ratios but were quantified in rather low contents in the investigated beers. PMID:27355938

  6. Applications of isotope geochemistry to the reconstruction of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, paleohydrology -- Status of investigations: June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.F.; Moscati, R.J.; Allerton, S.B.M.; Marshall, B.D.

    1998-11-01

    Tunneling of the Exploratory Studies Facility has offered the opportunity to sample and examine occurrences of secondary mineralization found in the unsaturated-zone tuffs of Yucca Mountain, nevada. Petrographic and paragenetic analyses, calcite and silica-phase stable isotopic analyses, and preliminary strontium tracer isotope and radiocarbon age analyses of these samples indicate that (1) an early stage of secondary mineralization consisting largely of chalcedony and quartz, but possibly with or slightly preceded by calcite, probably formed at warmer than ambient temperatures; (2) later secondary mineralization consisting of calcite and opal appears completely consistent with formation from percolation of surface infiltration whose solute load and carbon isotopic compositions reflect passage through the overlying soils; (3) based on textural studies, all unsaturated-zone secondary mineral occurrences exposed within the Exploratory Studies Facility tunnel, with the exception of the vapor-phase assemblages that formed at high temperatures during cooling of the tuffs, probably formed in unsaturated settings; and (4) calcite radiocarbon ages, based on preliminary results, have not been compromised by post-depositional exchange with carbon-bearing water and gases in the unsaturated zone.

  7. Phosphoprotein Isotope-coded Affinity Tags: Application to the Enrichment and Identification of Low-Abundance Phosphoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Goshe, Michael; Veenstra, Timothy D. ); Panisko, Ellen A.; Conrads, Thomas P. ); Angell, Nicolas H.; Smith, Richard D. )

    2002-02-01

    A novel approach using different isotopic labeling and biotinylation has been developed for the enrichment and quantitation of phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl-peptides. The phosphoprotein isotope-coded affinity tag (PhIAT) exploits the high affinity biotin-avidin interaction to isolate modified phosphopeptides from a complex mixture of peptides. The PhIAT strategy for quantifying and enriching mixtures for phosphopeptides was demonstrated using a commercially available sample of the phosphoprotein B-casein. A denatured solution of B-casein was labeled using the PhIAT method and after proteolytic digestion, the labeled peptides were isolated using immobilize avidin. The recovered peptides were separated by capillary reversed-phase liquid chromatography and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. PhIAT-labeled peptides corresponding to known O-phosphorylated peptides from B-casein were identified as were phosphorylated peptides from as1-casein and ase-casein, known low-level (< 5%) contaminants of commercially available B-casein. All of the identified phosphopeptides from these caseins have been previously documented to be phosphorylated at the sites elucidated by the PhIAT approach. The results illustrate the efficancy of the PhIAT-labeling strategy to enrich mixtures for phosphopeptides and permit the detection and identification of low abundance phosphopeptides. In addition, experiments using light and heavy isotopic version of the PhIAT reagents demonstrated that a 10% difference in phosphorylation state could be determined between phosphopeptides in comparative samples.

  8. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  9. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Bret D; Beard, William A; Cuneo, Matthew J; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  10. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  11. Dual-order snapshot spectral imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusz, Gregory J.; Marinakos, Stella M.; Rangarajan, Srinath; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-07-01

    The development of truly scalable, multiplexed optical microarrays requires a detection platform capable of simultaneous detection of multiple signals in real-time. We present a technique we term dual-order snapshot spectroscopic imaging (DOSSI) and demonstrate that it can be effectively used to collect spectrally resolved images of a full field of view of sparsely located spots in real time. Resonant peaks of plasmonic gold nanoparticles were tracked as a function of their surrounding refractive index. Measurement uncertainty analysis indicated that the spectral resolution of DOSSI in the described configuration is approximately 0.95nm. Further, real-time measurements by DOSSI allowed discrimination between optically identical nanoparticles that were functionalized with two homologous small molecule ligands that bound to the same protein, albeit with different affinity, based purely on their different molecular interaction kinetics---a feat not possible with slower raster-type hyperspectral imaging systems, or other dark-field optical detection systems that solely rely on end point measurements. Kinetic measurements of plasmon bands by DOSSI can be performed with a relatively simple optical system, thereby opening up the possibility of developing low-cost detectors for arrayed plasmonic diagnostics.

  12. The tenebrionidae of california: a time sensitive snapshot assessment.

    PubMed

    Aalbu, Rolf L; Smith, Aaron D

    2014-01-01

    DUE TO A DIVERSITY OF HABITATS AND ITS GEOLOGIC HISTORY, THE US STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOSTS A SPECTACULAR ASSEMBLAGE OF DARKLING BEETLE SPECIES (COLEOPTERA: Tenebrionidae). In addition to being part of the California Floristic Province, one of 34 global biodiversity hotspots identified by Conservation International, California also has additional areas which are parts of the Great Basin, Mojave, and Sonoran deserts. California is divided into nine floristic regions. Each region is assessed in terms of faunal composition and endemism. A "snapshot" of our present knowledge of the Tenebrionidae indicates that 447 currently recognized species, representing 108 genera, occur in California of which one hundred and ninety are endemic. California is compared to other nearby regions in diversity and endemism. An analysis of currently valid species vs a more realistic species account based on unpublished records of likely synonyms and known species yet to be described in the scientific literature is presented. The California Floristic Region, rather than other more arid parts of California, has the highest number of total and endemic species. Because of their high diversity and endemism, tenebrionids could potentially provide a valuable tool for monitoring the environment for conservation purposes. PMID:25009422

  13. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  14. Dual Order Snapshot Spectral Imaging of Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nusz, Gregory J.; Marinakos, Stella M.; Rangarajan, Srinath; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    The development of truly scalable, multiplexed optical microarrays requires a detection platform capable of simultaneous detection of multiple independent signals in real-time. We present a technique we term dual order snapshot spectroscopic imaging (DOSSI) and demonstrate that it can be effectively used to collect spectrally-resolved images of a full field of view of sparsely located spots in real-time. Resonant peaks of plasmonic gold nanoparticles were tracked as a function of their surrounding refractive index. Measurement uncertainty analysis indicated that the spectral resolution of DOSSI in the described configuration is approximately 0.95 nm. Further, real-time measurements by DOSSI allowed discrimination between optically identical nanoparticles that were functionalized with two homologous small molecule ligands that bound to the same protein, albeit with different affinity, based purely on their different molecular interaction kinetics– a feat not possible with slower raster-type hyperspectral imaging systems, or other darkfield optical detection systems that solely rely on end-point measurements. Kinetic measurements of plasmon bands by DOSSI can be performed with a relatively simple optical system, thereby opening up the possibility of developing low-cost detectors for arrayed plasmonic diagnostics. PMID:21772408

  15. Alignment error analysis of the snapshot imaging polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Yang, Wei-Feng; Ye, Qing-Hao; Hong, Jin; Gong, Guan-Yuan; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2016-03-10

    A snapshot imaging polarimeter (SIP) system is able to reconstruct two-dimensional spatial polarization information through a single interferogram. In this system, the alignment errors of the half-wave plate (HWP) and the analyzer have a predominant impact on the accuracies of reconstructed complete Stokes parameters. A theoretical model for analyzing the alignment errors in the SIP system is presented in this paper. Based on this model, the accuracy of the reconstructed Stokes parameters has been evaluated by using different incident states of polarization. An optimum thickness of the Savart plate for alleviating the perturbation introduced by the alignment error of the HWP is found by using the condition number of the system measurement matrix as an objective function in a minimization procedure. The result shows that when the thickness of a Savart plate is 23 mm, corresponding to the condition number 2.06, the precision of the SIP system can reach to 0.21% at 1° alignment tolerance of the HWP. PMID:26974785

  16. Single-snapshot DOA estimation by using Compressed Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunati, Stefano; Grasso, Raffaele; Gini, Fulvio; Greco, Maria S.; LePage, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of estimating the directions of arrival (DOA) of multiple source signals from a single observation vector of an array data. In particular, four estimation algorithms based on the theory of compressed sensing (CS), i.e., the classical ℓ 1 minimization (or Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator, LASSO), the fast smooth ℓ 0 minimization, and the Sparse Iterative Covariance-Based Estimator, SPICE and the Iterative Adaptive Approach for Amplitude and Phase Estimation, IAA-APES algorithms, are analyzed, and their statistical properties are investigated and compared with the classical Fourier beamformer (FB) in different simulated scenarios. We show that unlike the classical FB, a CS-based beamformer (CSB) has some desirable properties typical of the adaptive algorithms (e.g., Capon and MUSIC) even in the single snapshot case. Particular attention is devoted to the super-resolution property. Theoretical arguments and simulation analysis provide evidence that a CS-based beamformer can achieve resolution beyond the classical Rayleigh limit. Finally, the theoretical findings are validated by processing a real sonar dataset.

  17. Snapshots of tRNA sulphuration via an adenylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Numata, Tomoyuki; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Fukai, Shuya; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nureki, Osamu

    2006-07-27

    Uridine at the first anticodon position (U34) of glutamate, lysine and glutamine transfer RNAs is universally modified by thiouridylase into 2-thiouridine (s2U34), which is crucial for precise translation by restricting codon-anticodon wobble during protein synthesis on the ribosome. However, it remains unclear how the enzyme incorporates reactive sulphur into the correct position of the uridine base. Here we present the crystal structures of the MnmA thiouridylase-tRNA complex in three discrete forms, which provide snapshots of the sequential chemical reactions during RNA sulphuration. On enzyme activation, an alpha-helix overhanging the active site is restructured into an idiosyncratic beta-hairpin-containing loop, which packs the flipped-out U34 deeply into the catalytic pocket and triggers the activation of the catalytic cysteine residues. The adenylated RNA intermediate is trapped. Thus, the active closed-conformation of the complex ensures accurate sulphur incorporation into the activated uridine carbon by forming a catalytic chamber to prevent solvent from accessing the catalytic site. The structures of the complex with glutamate tRNA further reveal how MnmA specifically recognizes its three different tRNA substrates. These findings provide the structural basis for a general mechanism whereby an enzyme incorporates a reactive atom at a precise position in a biological molecule. PMID:16871210

  18. Transuranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1985-12-01

    The needs of the research community for the production of transuranium isotopes, the quantities required, the continuity of production desired, and what a new steady state neutron source would have to provide to satisfy these needs are discussed. Examples of past frontier research which need these isotopes as well as an outline of the proposed Large Einsteinium Activation Program, LEAP, which requires roughly ten times the current production of /sup 254/Es are given. 15 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. MIRG Survey 2011: snapshot of rapidly evolving label-free technologies used for characterizing molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Satya P; Bergqvist, Simon; Doyle, Michael L; Neubert, Thomas A; Yamniuk, Aaron P

    2012-09-01

    The field of label-free biophysical technologies used to quantitatively characterize macromolecular interactions with each other and with small molecules has grown enormously in the last 10 years. The most widely used analytical technologies for characterizing biomolecular interactions are surface plasmon resonance (SPR), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), biolayer interferometry (BLI), and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC). Measuring interaction parameters accurately and quantitatively is challenging, as it requires specialized expertise, training, and instrumentation. The Molecular Interaction Research Group (MIRG) conducted an online survey designed to capture the current profile of label-free technologies, including ITC, SPR, and other biosensors used in academia and the pharmaceutical industry sector. The main goal of the survey was to take a snapshot of laboratory, instrumentation, applications for measuring various biophysical parameters, confidence in data interpretation, data validation and acceptability, and limitations of using various technologies. Through this survey, we anticipate that the participating laboratories will be able to gauge their own capabilities and gain insights into the relative success of the different technologies that they use for characterizing molecular interactions. PMID:22942789

  20. Optical system design of the snapshot imaging spectrometerusing image replication based on Wollaston prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Lin-lin; Min, Huang; Lv, Qun-bo; Wang, Jian-wei; Li, Wei-yan

    2015-01-01

    Imaging spectral is a novel detection approach which simultaneously acquires two-dimensional visual picture and one-dimensional spectral information.The imaging spectrometer not only provides abundant data for aeronautics and astronautics remote sensing, but also offers promising applications on biomedical imaging, conservation and identification of art works,surveillance of food safety,prevention and control of plant diseases and elimination of pests,and so forth. In this paper, the snapshot imaging spectrometer using image replication based on Wollaston prisms is designed. This system includes the telescope objective, the collimator lens, the wave plates, Wollaston prisms, and the imaging lens.The imaging spectrometer system based on multi-configuration can obtain a high diffraction efficiency. Every configuration provide a kind of wave. The 16 configurations are in one mechanical structure. The system's MTF at 56 line pairs is better than 0.75. The RMS of the spots are all in one pixel.The imaging spectrometer can obtain perfect data.

  1. A case study on the application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in determining the provenance of a rock used in an alleged nickel switching incident.

    PubMed

    Roelofse, F; Horstmann, U E

    2008-01-15

    The application of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in forensic science to establish the provenance of a range of questioned substances including soils, drugs, explosives, currency, ivory and rhino horn has been widely documented. The present study wishes to highlight the applicability of IRMS and specifically stable carbon IRMS in determining the provenance of a carbonate rock that was switched for nickel metal exported from South Africa to Israel. The technique employed effectively argued against a South African origin for the rock whilst simultaneously supporting an Israeli origin, enabling investigators to focus their attention accordingly. The study represents the first documented instance known to the authors where IRMS has been employed in the forensic geo-location of a rock. PMID:17418515

  2. Isotopic geochemistry and cosmochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchukoliukov, Iu. A.

    The book includes recent information on isotope geology, geochemistry, and cosmochemistry, discussed at a recent Soviet-Japanese symposium (at Irkutsk, USSR). Attention is given to numerical modeling of geochronometric systems, a classification of noble-gas components in the earth's interior, the feasibility of using ion microprobe for local isotope analysis of zircons for the purpose of deriving the early history of the earth (on the example of the Novopavlovsk complex from the Ukranian shield), a geological and geochronological study of the Ganalski complex of Kamchatka, and strontium isotopes as a criterion of the nature of acid melts (i.e., mantle- or crust-related). Other papers are on the geochronology and geology of Siberian kimberlites, the nature of sulfur from effusive rocks of the Kamchatka-Kuril-Japan island arc, mass-spectrometric studies of volatile components in exocontact rocks of alkaline-basic intrusions, and an analytical method for stable-isotope analysis in ultrasmall amounts of CO2 and its application to studies of the microscale isotopic zoning in calcite and graphite crystals in marble.

  3. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope composition as a fingerprint for sediment transport: Reproducibility, homogeneity and application in a catchment of the Swiss plateau.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkholz, Axel; Niemann, Helge; Alewell, Christine

    2014-05-01

    A new field for the applications of compound-specific isotope analyses (CSIA) has opened in the recent years. The isotopic signature in fatty acids (FA) can be used to track sediment transport pathways from erosional areas to river systems. In this approach distinct FA d13C values of even numbered saturated and/or unsaturated FAs from soils are traced in suspended river sediments, ie. the place of deposition. CSIA has been shown to be particularly useful in catchment areas with C4 plant crops because, compared to the regularly occurring C3-plants, they are (naturally) depleted in 13C. However, in theory, all plant species even among C3 plants should inherit significant differences in their d13C of FAs. Thus, we tried to differentiate between source areas for suspended sediments from three different land use types: forest (C3 plants), grassland (C3 plants) and arable land (mixture of C3 and C4 plants). Statistical geo software (eg. Isosource) can be used to additionally model the spatial and temporal variability of erosion. We present d13C values of FAs from 8 erosion areas from the Enziwigger catchment of the Swiss plateau (Canton of Lucerne). Each area was assessed through randomised triplicate sampling to test the spatial homogeneity of each one. The homogeneity of a single sample, as well as the reproducibility of our measurements was tested by extracting and analysing the same sample bag in triplicates. We compare compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) fingerprints of source areas to d13C-values of FAs from suspended sediments of two high-flow events and one base flow period at 3 different sites of the Enziwiger river (upstream, midstream, downstream).

  4. Combined application of conservative transport modelling and compound-specific carbon isotope analyses to assess in situ attenuation of benzene, toluene, and o-xylene.

    PubMed

    Mak, K S; Griebler, C; Meckenstock, R U; Liedl, R; Peter, A

    2006-12-15

    In recent years, compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) have developed into one of the most powerful tools for the quantification of in situ biodegradation of organic contaminants. In this approach, the calculation of the extent of biodegradation of organic contaminants in aquifers is usually based on the Rayleigh equation, and thus neglects physical transport processes such as dispersion that contribute to contaminant dilution in aquifers. Here we combine compound specific isotope analyses with a conservative transport model to study the attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons at a former gasworks site. The conservative transport model was first used to simulate concentration reductions caused by dilution at wells downgradient of a BTEX source. In a second step, the diluted concentrations, together with the available stable carbon isotope ratios and carbon fractionation factors for benzene, toluene and o-xylene were applied in the Rayleigh equation to quantify the degree of biodegradation at each of those wells. At the investigated site, where other attenuation processes such as sorption and volatilisation were proven to be negligible, the combined approach is recommended for benzene, which represents a compound for which the effect of biodegradation is comparable to or less than the effect of dilution. As demonstrated for toluene and o-xylene, the application of the Rayleigh equation alone is sufficient if dilution can be proved to be insignificant in comparison to biodegradation. The analysis also suggests that the source width and the position of the observation wells relative to the plume center line are significantly related to the degree of dilution. PMID:17011071

  5. Combined application of stable carbon isotope analysis and specific metabolites determination for assessing in situ degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in a tar oil-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Griebler, Christian; Safinowski, Michael; Vieth, Andrea; Richnow, Hans H; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2004-01-15

    To evaluate the intrinsic bioremediation potential in an anoxic tar oil-contaminated aquifer at a former gasworks site, groundwater samples were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and signature metabolites analysis (SMA). 13C/12C fractionation data revealed conclusive evidence for in situ biodegradation of benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m/p-xylene, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene. In laboratory growth studies, 13C/12C isotope enrichment factors for anaerobic degradation of naphthalene (epsilon = -1.1 +/- 0.4) and 2-methylnaphthalene (epsilon = -0.9 +/- 0.1) were determined with the sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47, which was isolated from the investigated test site. On the basis of these and other laboratory-derived enrichment factors from the literature, in situ biodegradation could be quantified for toluene, o-xylene, m/p-xylene, and naphthalene. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in the field was also observed for ethylbenzene, 2-methylnaphthalene, and benzothiophene but without providing conclusive results. Further evidence for the in situ turnover of individual BTEX compounds was provided by the presence of acetophenone, o-toluic acid, and p-toluic acid, three intermediates in the anaerobic degradation of ethylbenzene, o-xylene, and p-xylene, respectively. A number of groundwater samples also contained naphthyl-2-methylsuccinic acid, a metabolite that is highly specific for the anaerobic degradation of 2-methylnaphthalene. Additional metabolites that provided evidence on the anaerobic in situ degradation of naphthalenes were 1-naphthoic acid, 2-naphthoic acid, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthoic acid, and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthoic acid. 2-Carboxybenzothiophene, 5-carboxybenzothiophene, a putative further carboxybenzothiophene isomer, and the reduced derivative dihydrocarboxybenzothiophene indicated the anaerobic conversion of the heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzothiophene. The combined application

  6. A review of applications of U-Th-Pb isotope systematics to investigations of uranium source rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    U, Th and Pb concentrations and the isotopic composition of Pb can be used to evaluate crystalline rocks as a source for U in sedimentary deposits. Under favourable geologic circumstances, the technique can yield information on both the timing and the amount of U released to the sedimentary environment. The technique is best suited to the study of Archean rocks that have high U/Pb, a known common Pb composition, and a simple two-stage history. Less ideal rock units can also be evaluated, but conclusions reached for rocks of Phanerozoic age or younger will generally be qualitative at best.-Author

  7. Precise laser frequency scanning using frequency-synthesized optical frequency sidebands - Application to isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayman, M. D.; Aminoff, C. G.; Hall, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on an efficient broadband electrooptic modulator producing RF optical sidebands locked to a stable cavity, a tunable dye laser can be scanned under computer control with frequency-synthesizer precision. Cavity drift is suppressed in software by using a strong feature in the spectrum for stabilization. Mercury isotope shifts are measured with a reproducibility of about 50 kHz. This accuracy of about 1/300 of the linewidth illustrates the power of the technique. Derived hyperfine-structure constants are compared with previous atomic-beam data.

  8. International Polar Year 2007/2008 - snapshots from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezek, K.

    2003-04-01

    Satellite observations are revolutionizing our ability to observe the poles and polar processes. No other technology developed since the IGY of 1957 provides the high-resolution, continental-scale, frequent-repeat, and all-weather observations available from spaceborne sensors. The utility of that technology is evidenced by associated scientific advances including measurements of long term trends in polar sea ice cover and extent, the realization that the polar ice sheets can change dramatically at decade or less time scales, and the quantification of relationships between processes at the poles and at mid and equatorial latitudes. There are many examples of successful spaceborne observations from pole to pole for scientific, commercial and governmental purposes. These successes encourage the use of the capabilities and consequently, the competition for access to resources from the international constellation of satellites becomes increasingly more intense. Frequently, this means that there are only limited opportunities for conducting large-scale projects that consume a significant fraction of system capabilities for some dedicated period of time. An example of a large-scale coordinated effort is the Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project that required months of dedicated satellite and ground support time to achieve its objective of obtaining near instantaneous 'snapshots' of Antarctica to serve as gauges for measuring future changes. Large-scale coordinated-experiments will continue to be important for polar scientists seeking to understand the role of polar processes in climate change. These future missions will be further enhanced if complementary observations and data analysis from different satellite sensors can be coordinated (for example IceSAT laser altimeter observations of ice sheet surface topography with EnviSAT SAR observation of ice sheet motion). That coordination is challenging in part because of resource allocation issues and in part because space

  9. International Polar Year 2007/2008 - A Snapshot from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noltimier, K.; Jezek, K.; Box, J.

    2002-12-01

    Satellite observations are revolutionizing our ability to observe the poles and polar processes. No other technology developed since the IGY of 1957 provides the high-resolution, continental-scale, frequent-repeat, and all-weather observations available from spaceborne sensors. The utility of that technology is evidenced by associated scientific advances including measurements of long term trends in polar sea ice cover and extent, the realization that the polar ice sheets can change dramatically at decade or less time scales, and the quantification of relationships between processes at the poles and at mid and equatorial latitudes. There are many examples of successful spaceborne observations from pole to pole for scientific, commercial and governmental purposes. These successes encourage the use of the capabilities and consequently, the competition for access to resources from the international constellation of satellites becomes increasingly more intense. Frequently, this means that there are only limited opportunities for conducting large-scale projects that consume a significant fraction of system capabilities for some dedicated period of time. An example of a large-scale coordinated effort is the Radarsat Antarctic Mapping Project that required months of dedicated satellite and ground support time to achieve its objective of obtaining near instantaneous 'snapshots' of Antarctica to serve as gauges for measuring future changes. Large-scale coordinated-experiments will continue to be important for polar scientists seeking to understand the role of polar processes in climate change. These future missions will be further enhanced if complementary observations and data analysis from different satellite sensors can be coordinated (for example IceSAT laser altimeter observations of ice sheet surface topography with EnviSAT SAR observation of ice sheet motion). That coordination is challenging in part because of resource allocation issues and in part because space

  10. Isotope separation by laser means

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Jensen, Reed J.; Cotter, Theodore P.; Greiner, Norman R.; Boyer, Keith

    1982-06-15

    A process for separating isotopes by selective excitation of isotopic species of a volatile compound by tuned laser light. A highly cooled gas of the volatile compound is produced in which the isotopic shift is sharpened and defined. Before substantial condensation occurs, the cooled gas is irradiated with laser light precisely tuned to a desired wavelength to selectively excite a particular isotopic species in the cooled gas. The laser light may impart sufficient energy to the excited species to cause it to undergo photochemical reaction or even to photoionize. Alternatively, a two-photon irradiation may be applied to the cooled gas to induce photochemical reaction or photoionization. The process is particularly applicable to the separation of isotopes of uranium and plutonium.

  11. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS): Status and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, George; LOFAR Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) is the first large-area survey of the northern sky with the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR). By producing images of the sky at 16 frequencies from 30 to 160 MHz, MSSS probes the low-frequency sky at a sensitivity of order 10 mJy/beam, and angular resolution of 1-2 arcmin or better. It thus dramatically expands the frequency range sampled in high-resolution radio surveys, and, crucially, provides low-frequency spectral information about the detected sources. Using LOFAR's unique multi-beaming mode, the survey requires only a rather modest investment in observing time. MSSS began observations in late 2011, and has nearly completed observations in both frequency components (8 frequencies spanning the 30 to 74 MHz range, and another 8 spanning 120 to 160 MHz). MSSS has driven the initial development of the first production version of LOFAR's automatic Imaging Pipeline and spearheaded efforts aimed at solving some of the ongoing low-frequency calibration challenges. In this contribution, I will briefly review the survey design, including an overview of MSSS science topics. I will also present a status update, highlighting early results from the survey such as an in-depth look at the 100 square degree “MSSS Verification Field,” new sources discovered in MSSS images, and a sneak peek at the full survey area. I will conclude by describing plans for the future of MSSS, including the possibility of reprocessing the data to obtain enhanced data products such as higher resolution imaging and polarization. LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array designed and constructed by ASTRON, has facilities in several countries, that are owned by various parties (each with their own funding sources), and that are collectively operated by the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) foundation under a joint scientific policy.

  12. Near-UV Snapshot Survey of Low Luminosity AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa

    2005-07-01

    Low-luminosity active galactic nuclei {LLAGNs} comprise 30% of all bright galaxies {B<12.5} and are the most common type of AGN. These include low-luminosity Seyfert galaxies, LINERs, and transition-type objects {TOs, also called weak-[OI] LINERs}. What powers them is still at the forefront of AGN research. To unveil the nature of the central source we propose a near-UV snapshot survey of 50 nearby LLAGNs using ACS/HRC and the filter {F330W}, a configuration which is optimal to detect faint star forming regions around their nuclei. These images will complement optical and near-IR images available in the HST archive, providing a panchromatic atlas of the inner regions of these galaxies, which will be used to study their nuclear stellar population. Our main goals are to: 1} Investigate the presence of nuclear unresolved sources that can be attributed to an AGN; 2} Determine the frequency of nuclear and circumnuclear stellar clusters, and whether they are more common in Transition Objects {TOs} than in LINERs; 3} Characterize the sizes, colors, luminosities, masses and ages of these clusters; 4} Derive the luminosity function of star clusters and study their evaporation over time in the vicinity of AGNs. Finally, the results of this project will be combined with those of a previous similar one for Seyfert galaxies in order to compare the nature of the nuclear sources and investigate if there could be an evolution from Seyferts to TOs and LINERs. By adding UV images to the existing optical and near-IR ones, this project will also create an extremely valuable database for astronomers with a broad range of scientific interests.

  13. Fast and precise method for Pb isotope ratio determination in complex matrices using GC-MC-ICPMS: application to crude oil, kerogen, and asphaltene samples.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ortega, Georgia; Pécheyran, Christophe; Bérail, Sylvain; Donard, Olivier F X

    2012-09-18

    A new method to determine Pb isotope ratio without ion-exchange-matrix separation is proposed. After acid digestion, Pb was ethylated to Et(4)Pb, separated from the digested solution (black shale, asphaltene, crude oil and kerogen) by extraction in isooctane, and then injected into a gas chromatograph coupled to a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Seven isotopes ((202)Hg, (203)Tl, (204)Pb, (205)Tl, (206)Pb, (207)Pb, (208)Pb) were monitored simultaneously with peak duration of 23 s. GC elution was operated under wet plasma conditions where a thallium standard solution was introduced to the mass spectrometer for mass bias correction. The total time of the procedure (sample preparation and analysis, after acid digestion) was reduced by a factor of 15 compared to conventional-continuous sample introduction. Data treatment was carried out using the linear regression slope method. Mass bias was corrected using the double correction method (first thallium normalization followed by classical bracketing). For the (208/206)Pb and (207/206)Pb ratios, precision (2RSD(EXT), n = 21) was 49 and 69 ppm, and the bias between experimental results and reference values was better than 0.0033 and 0.0007 ‰, when injecting 1.2 ng of ethylated Pb SRM NIST 981 solution. Results obtained by this method were validated by comparison with those obtained via conventional-continuous sample introduction. The applicability of this approach was demonstrated with the analysis of black shale, asphaltene, crude oil and kerogen samples. PMID:22845833

  14. Application of stable carbon isotope analysis to the detection of 17beta-estradiol administration to cattle.

    PubMed

    Buisson, C; Hebestreit, M; Weigert, A Preiss; Heinrich, K; Fry, H; Flenker, U; Banneke, S; Prevost, S; Andre, F; Schaenzer, W; Houghton, E; Le Bizec, B

    2005-11-01

    The use of anabolic agents in food producing animals is prohibited within the EU since 1988 (96/22/EC directive). The control of the illegal use of natural steroid hormones in cattle is still an exciting analytical challenge as far as no definitive method and non-ambiguous analytical criteria are available. The ability of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to demonstrate the administration of 17beta-estradiol to bovine has been investigated in this paper. By comparison of 13C/12C isotopic ratio of main urinary estradiol metabolite, i.e. 17alpha-estradiol, with two endogenous reference compounds (ERCs), i.e. dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and 5-androstene-3beta,17alpha-diol, the differentiation of estradiol metabolite origin, either endogenous or exogenous, has been proved to be achievable. After treatment, the delta(13)C(VPDB)-values of 17alpha-estradiol reached -27 per thousand to -29 per thousand, whereas delta13CVPDB-values of DHEA remained between -13 per thousand and -20 per thousand depending on the diet, maize and grass, respectively. A significant difference of delta13CVPDB between ERCs and 17alpha-estradiol was measurable over a period of 2 weeks after estradiol ester administration to the animal. PMID:16233872

  15. A calibration of the triple oxygen isotope fractionation in the SiO2-H2O system and applications to natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Gibbons, J. A.; Maltsev, O.; Atudorei, V.; Pack, A.; Sengupta, S.; Shock, E. L.; Knauth, L. P.

    2016-08-01

    It is now recognized that variations in the Δ17O of terrestrial materials resulting from purely mass dependent fractionations, though small, have geological significance. In this study, the δ18O and δ17O values of selected low temperature quartz and silica samples were measured in order to derive the quartz-water fractionation-temperature relationship for the three oxygen isotope system. A 18O/16O quartz-water fractionation equation valid for all temperatures was generated from published high temperature exchange experiments and low temperature empirical estimates and is given by 1000ln αqz-H2O18O /16O = 4.20 (0.11) ×106/T2 - 3.3 (0.2) × 1000/T (T in Kelvins). The equilibrium δ17O-δ18O relationship is given by the equation lnα17O/16O = θlnα18O/16O . The variation of θ with temperature for the quartz-water system was determined empirically using low temperature marine diatoms, microcrystalline quartz and a modern sinter sample. A best fit to the data give the equation θSiO2 - H2O = -(1.85 ± 0.04)/T + 0.5305 , indistinguishable from an earlier theoretical estimate. Application of the quartz-water triple isotope system to low temperature samples provides constraints on both temperature and composition of the water with which the silica last equilibrated. Authigenic quartz crystallization temperatures cluster around 50 °C, which are lower than many previous estimates. The combined δ18O and δ17O values of samples considered to be in equilibrium with ocean or meteoric waters can be used to estimate both formation temperatures and the δ18O value of the meteoric water. Unlike other multiple isotopes systems, such as combined H and O isotopes in cherts, the oxygen source and diagenetic potential for both 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios are identical, simplifying interpretations from ancient samples.

  16. A calibration of the triple oxygen isotope fractionation in the SiO2-H2O system and applications to natural samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Z. D.; Gibbons, J. A.; Maltsev, O.; Atudorei, V.; Pack, A.; Sengupta, S.; Shock, E. L.; Knauth, L. P.

    2016-08-01

    It is now recognized that variations in the Δ17O of terrestrial materials resulting from purely mass dependent fractionations, though small, have geological significance. In this study, the δ18O and δ17O values of selected low temperature quartz and silica samples were measured in order to derive the quartz-water fractionation-temperature relationship for the three oxygen isotope system. A 18O/16O quartz-water fractionation equation valid for all temperatures was generated from published high temperature exchange experiments and low temperature empirical estimates and is given by 1000ln αqz-H2O 18O /16O =4.20 (0.11) ×106/T2 - 3.3 (0.2) × 1000/T (T in Kelvins). The equilibrium δ17O-δ18O relationship is given by the equation lnα17O/16O = θlnα18O/16O . The variation of θ with temperature for the quartz-water system was determined empirically using low temperature marine diatoms, microcrystalline quartz and a modern sinter sample. A best fit to the data give the equation θSiO2-H2O = -(1.85 ± 0.04)/T + 0.5305 , indistinguishable from an earlier theoretical estimate. Application of the quartz-water triple isotope system to low temperature samples provides constraints on both temperature and composition of the water with which the silica last equilibrated. Authigenic quartz crystallization temperatures cluster around 50 °C, which are lower than many previous estimates. The combined δ18O and δ17O values of samples considered to be in equilibrium with ocean or meteoric waters can be used to estimate both formation temperatures and the δ18O value of the meteoric water. Unlike other multiple isotopes systems, such as combined H and O isotopes in cherts, the oxygen source and diagenetic potential for both 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios are identical, simplifying interpretations from ancient samples.

  17. C and N Isotopes in Ostrich Eggshell as Proxies of Paleovegetation and Paleoprecipitation: Extraction, Preservation, and Application to Pleistocene Archaeological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niespolo, E. M.; Sharp, W. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Miller, M.; Dawson, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoenvironmental change is commonly invoked as a factor in the development of modern human behaviors and the successful expansion of H. sapiens out of Africa, and paleoenvironmental information from archaeological sequences is central to addressing such questions. Ostrich eggshell (OES) are common in many African archaeological sequences and may be dated by 14C and U-series methods. In modern ratite eggshells (large flightless birds including the ostrich and emu), the δ13C in eggshell calcite and the δ13C and δ15N in eggshell organic fractions have been shown to vary systematically across climate gradients in South Africa and Australia with δ15N varying inversely with mean annual precipitation, and δ13C varying with the C isotopes of vegetation (1,2). Thus, if primary C and N isotopic signatures are preserved, assemblages of OES can provide dated records of paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation at archaeological sites. Since the C isotopic fractionation between calcite and eggshell organics is constant in modern OES (Δ13Ccalcite-organic = 14.7 ± 1.3‰) (3), evaluating that offset in ancient OES provides a test for preservation of primary isotopic signatures. Johnson et al. (3) showed that OES from Equus Cave (South Africa) retained the expected fractionation for up to 17 ka. We present a new protocol to extract C and N of OES organics for online analysis that preserves pristine δ13C and δ15N values and C and N contents. We find that using sodium hydroxide (NaOH), common to many bone collagen extraction procedures, destroys and degrades the organic component of OES, resulting in low C and N and altered δ13C and δ15N values. Analysis of a series of OES samples directly dated by 14C and U-series from the GvJm-22 rockshelter (Lukenya Hill, Kenya) (4,5) will demonstrate the first application of this protocol to OES from the last ~50,000 yr. 1. Johnson, B.J. et al. (1998) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 62, 2451-2461. 2. Newsome, S.D. et al. (2011) Oecologia 167

  18. The oxygen isotopic composition of phytoliths from tropical rainforest soils (Queensland, Australia): application of a new paleoenvironmental tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Crespin, J.; Sylvestre, F.; Sonzogni, C.; Hilbert, D. W.

    2011-05-01

    Variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oprecipitation) in inter-tropical areas mainly record variations in water sources, amounts of precipitation, and atmospheric temperature and provide information regarding local climate and regional atmospheric circulation changes. On continents, fossil biogenic minerals and speleothems formed in isotopic equilibrium with water can produce continuous δ18O records and are becoming increasingly valuable for reconstructing past climate changes. Here, we explore the efficiency and limitations of using the oxygen isotopic composition of wood phytoliths (δ18Owood phytolith) from tropical rainforest soils as a suitable proxy for atmospheric temperature and δ18Oprecipitation values, under conditions that are assumed to be non-evaporative. Soil phytolith assemblages, that should contain 100s of years of phytolith production, were collected along four altitude, temperature, and precipitation gradients in the Queensland rainforests (Australia). Oxygen isotopic analyses were performed on 1.6 mg phytolith samples, after controlled isotopic exchange (CIE), using the IR Laser-Heating Fluorination Technique. Long-term mean annual precipitation (MAP) and mean annual temperature (MAT) values at the sampled sites were obtained using a regional GIS database. The δ18Oprecipitation values were estimated. The δ18Owood phytolith values from the leeward slopes were scattered but recorded the modern combination of weighted mean annual δ18Oprecipitation values and MAT. The empirical relationship was &Delta18Owood phytolith-precipitation (‰ vs. VSMOW) = -0.4 (±0.2) t (°C) + 46 (±3) (R2 = 0.4, p<0.05; n=12). δ18Oprecipitation estimates were close to estimates for δ18Oforming water when using the temperature-dependant relationships previously described for sedimentary diatoms and natural quartz. However, they were 3 ‰ higher than estimates for δ18Oforming water when using the fractionation relationship obtained

  19. ISOTOPE SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, C.G.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement is presented in the structure of an isotope separation apparatus and, in particular, is concerned with a magnetically operated shutter associated with a window which is provided for the purpose of enabling the operator to view the processes going on within the interior of the apparatus. The shutier is mounted to close under the force of gravity in the absence of any other force. By closing an electrical circuit to a coil mouated on the shutter the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus coacts with the magnetic field of the coil to force the shutter to the open position.

  20. Application of strontium isotope measurements to trace sediment sources in an upstream agricultural catchment (Loire River basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, Marion; Evrard, Olivier; Thil, François; Foucher, Anthony; Salvador-Blanes, Sébastien; Cerdan, Olivier; Ayrault, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion is recognized as one of the main processes of land degradation in agricultural areas. It accelerates the supply of sediment to the rivers and degrades water quality. To limit those impacts and optimize management programs in such areas, sources of sediment need to be identified and sediment transport to be controlled. Here, we determined the sources of suspended sediment in the Louroux (24 km², French Loire River basin), a small catchment representative of lowland cultivated environments of Northwestern Europe. In this catchment, channels have been reshaped and 220 tile drain outlets have been installed over the last several decades. As a result, soil erosion and sediment fluxes have increased drastically. The variation of 87Sr/86Sr ratios, driven by the weathering of rocks with different ages and chemical composition, may reflect the mixing of different sediment sources. Strontium isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr) were therefore determined in potential soil sources, suspended particulate matter (SPM) and a sediment core sampled in the Louroux Pond at the catchment outlet. Soil, SPM and core samples displayed significantly different isotopic signatures. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in soil samples varied from 0.712763 to 0.724631 ± 0.000017 (2σ, n=20). Highest values were observed in silicic parts of the catchment whereas the lower values were identified in a calcareous area close to the Louroux Pond. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in SPM (0.713660 to 0.725749 ± 0.000017, 2σ, n=20) plotted between the soil and sediment core (0.712255 to 0.716415 ± 0.000017, 2σ, n=12), suggesting the presence of particles originating from at least two different lithological sources, i.e. silicic rocks and carbonate material. Variations in 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the outlet core sample were used to reconstruct the sedimentary dynamics in the catchment during the last decades. These results will guide the future implementation of appropriate management practices aiming to reduce erosion in upstream

  1. Pb isotopic systematics in dolomitic rocks and their application to geochronology, provenance, and fluid-rock interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    In the Burlington-Keokuk Fms. (Miss.; Iowa-Illinois) the two major dolomite generations (dolomites I and II) exhibit a difference in initial [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb. This difference is used to constrain the sources of dolomitizing fluids. The composition of dolomite I is consistent with a marine source for Pb, which had an ultimate derivation from rocks uplifted along eastern North America during the Acadian Orogeny. In contrast, dolomite II has a significantly higher [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb character. Fluid-rock modeling is used to show that dolomite II could have formed by interaction of dolomite I with a saline fluid that had previously interacted with underlying sedimentary units. The Pb isotopic data indicates that this saline fluid did not derive its Pb from the more radiogenic (basement ) sources samples by the ore solutions that precipitated the MVT deposits in the region. Whole-rock dolostones from both the Burlington-Keokuk Fms. and the Wahoo Em. (Penn.; Prudhoe Bay, Alaska) are enriched in U (up to 67 ppm) relative to their constituent dolomites (<2 ppm). The enrichment of U, high [mu]'s ([sup 238]U/[sup 204]Pb), and low k's ([sup 232]Th/[sup 238]U) exhibited by wholerocks from both sequences suggest that U was mobile relative to Th and Pb during diagenesis. The timing of U-enrichment/mobility are constrained using Pb isotopic data. Despite high [mu]'s, Burlington-Keokuk Fms. dolostones are relatively unradiogenic. Calculations require U-enrichment to be relatively recent (i.e., <5 Ma). In contrast, dolostones from the Wahoo Fm. are relatively uranogenic and the spread of isotopic data yields Pb-Pb and U-Pb ages of [approximately]260 Ma. These ages are consistent with U enrichment concurrent with the development of a regional unconformity during the Permian. In both the Burlington-Keokuk and Wahoo Fms., U was probably transported as U(VI) complexes in near surface oxidized waters and enriched in local reducing zones adjacent to exposure surfaces.

  2. Bayesian algorithms for recovering structure from single-particle diffraction snapshots of unknown orientation: a comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Moths, Brian; Ourmazd, Abbas

    2011-09-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers are being used to determine the three-dimensional structure of objects from random snapshots. The two apparently very different Bayesian algorithms capable of performing this at ultra-low signal are fundamentally the same. The advent of X-ray free-electron lasers promises the possibility to determine the structure of individual particles such as microcrystallites, viruses and biomolecules from single-shot diffraction snapshots obtained before the particle is destroyed by the intense femtosecond pulse. This program requires the ability to determine the orientation of the particle giving rise to each snapshot at signal levels as low as ~10{sup −2} photons per pixel. Two apparently different approaches have recently demonstrated this capability. Here we show they represent different implementations of the same fundamental approach, and identify the primary factors limiting their performance.

  3. A new approach for deciphering between single and multiple accumulation events using intra-tooth isotopic variations: Application to the Middle Pleistocene bone bed of Schöningen 13 II-4.

    PubMed

    Julien, Marie-Anne; Rivals, Florent; Serangeli, Jordi; Bocherens, Hervé; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    It is often difficult to differentiate between archaeological bonebeds formed by one event such as a mass kill of a single herd, and those formed by multiple events that occurred over a longer period of time. The application of high temporal resolution studies such as intra-tooth isotopic profiles on archaeological mammal cohorts offers new possibilities for exploring this issue, allowing investigators to decipher between single and multiple accumulation events. We examined (18)O and (13)C isotopic variations from the enamel carbonate of 23 horse third molars from the Middle Pleistocene archaeological site of Schöningen. We employed a new approach to investigate processes of fossil accumulation that uses both bulk and intra-tooth isotopic variations and takes into account animal behavior, age at death and dental development to test the degree of isotopic affinity of animals from the same fossil assemblage. Oxygen and carbon isotope bulk values indicate that the horses from Schöningen 13 II-4 experienced relatively similar climatic and dietary regimes. Inter-individual differences of the bulk values of the horses sampled in the current study present nevertheless inter-individual variability similar to individuals from multi-layered localities. In addition, the intra-tooth isotopic variation of specimens of the same age at death seems to indicate that the studied cohort corresponds to a mix of individuals that recorded both similar and different isotopic histories. Finally, the conditions recorded in the isotopic signal shortly before death (i.e., for teeth not fully mineralized) varied between sampled individuals, suggesting possible differences in the seasonality of death. Considering those results, we discuss the possibility that the horses from Schöningen 13 II-4 correspond to an accumulation of different death events. PMID:25912820

  4. Using Web-Based "Snapshots of Practice" to Explore Science Learning and Teaching in a Course for Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.

    2005-01-01

    Prospective teachers can examine documentary websites known as "snapshots of practice" in an on-line "Gallery of Teaching and Learning" http://gallery.carnegiefoundation.org). Developed by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the Gallery of Teaching and Learning includes a wide variety of web-based "snapshots" developed by…

  5. On-line sulfur isotope analysis of organic material by direct combustion: Preliminary results and potential applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kester, C.L.; Rye, R.O.; Johnson, C.A.; Schwartz, C.H.; Holmes, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur isotopes have received little attention in ecology studies because plant and animal materials typically have low sulfur concentrations (< 1 wt.%) necessitating labor-intensive chemical extraction prior to analysis. To address the potential of direct combustion of organic material in an elemental analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer, we compared results obtained by direct combustion to results obtained by sulfur extraction with Eschka's mixture. Direct combustion of peat and animal tissue gave reproducibility of better than 0.5??? and on average, values are 0.8??? higher than values obtained by Eschka extraction. Successful direct combustion of organic material appears to be a function of sample matrix and sulfur concentration. Initial results indicate that direct combustion provides fast, reliable results with minimal preparation. Pilot studies underway include defining bear diets and examining fluctuations between freshwater and brackish water in coastal environments.

  6. Forensic applications of stable isotope analysis: case studies of the origins of water in mislabeled beer and contaminated diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Papesch, Wolfgang; Horacek, Micha

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the use of oxygen (18O) isotope analysis of water contained in two different materials--beer and diesel fuel--involved in the resolution of two separate cases. In the first case study, it was possible to demonstrate that a sample of beer labelled as premium brand in fact belonged to a cheap brand. The second case related to the contamination of diesel fuel from a service station. The diesel fuel contained visible amounts of water, which caused vehicles that had been filled up with it to become defective. For insurance purposes, it was necessary to determine the source of water. The delta18O values for the water of nearly all samples of diesel was close to the delta18O of local tap water at the filling station. PMID:19606593

  7. Application of stable isotope measurements and microbiological analysis for detecting methanogenic activity in a temperate forest wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, M.; Katsuyama, C.; Kondo, N.; Ohte, N.; Kato, K.

    2009-12-01

    Generally, forest soils act as a sink for methane (CH4). However, wetlands in riparian zones are recently reported to be “hot spots” of CH4 emissions, especially in forests under a humid climate. To understand how environmental conditions (i.e. hydrological and/or geomorphic condition) control on CH4 production, we investigated both methanogenic pathways (CO2/H2 reduction and acetate fermentation) and metahanogenic microbial communities in a wetland in a temperate forest catchment, central Japan. We used stable carbon isotopic analysis for detecting change in methanogenic pathways, and applied microbiological analysis for understanding the structure of methanogenic community. CH4 emission rates in wetland were strongly dependent on soil temperatures, and were highest in summer and lowest in winter. δ13CO2 increased with CH4 production in every summer, suggesting preferential use of 12CO2 as substrate for CO2/H2 reduction methanogenesis during high CH4 production period. δ13CH4 also increased in summer with δ13CO2. δ13CH4 changed more wildly than δ13CO2 did in summer with normal precipitation when CH4 production was strongly activated under high temperature and high groundwater table condition. This indicates increase in acetoclastic methanogenesis under hot and wet condition, considering that acetclastic methnogens produce heavier CH4 than that from CO2/H2 reducing pathway. Methanogen community composition estimated by cloning and sequence analyses implied that both acetoclastic and CO2/H2 reducing methanogens prevailed in wetland soil sampled in summer. This was consistent with the results of isotope measuremaents. Our results contribute to understand fully how the CH4 production changes with environmental conditions, with considering the activities of both main methanogenic pathway (from CO2 and acetate).

  8. Applications of optical spectroscopy and stable isotope analyses to organic aerosol source discrimination in an urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Delgado, A.; Molina, A.; Reche, I.

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the chemical character of organic aerosols is extremely important for evaluating their role in climate forcing and human respiratory health. Aerosol columnar properties retrieved by sun photometry represent a large dataset of information about the physical and light absorbing and scattering properties of the total aerosol, but lack more detailed chemical information about the organic fraction of atmospheric particulate matter. To obtain additional information about relationships between organic aerosol sources and columnar properties, we simultaneously examined stable isotope properties of PM 10 aerosols from urban (Granada, Spain) and remote (Sierra Nevada, Spain) sites and diesel exhaust, spectroscopic properties of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of PM 10 aerosols, and sun photometry measurements. We demonstrated that C and N stable isotopes and parameters from UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy are able to discriminate between aerosols receiving substantial fossil fuel pollution and those influenced by Saharan dust in an urban area. More depleted δ 13C was associated with low asymmetry parameter, g λ, and high values of the spectral slope ratio, S R, were associated with high effective radius, typical of pollution situations. The humification index (HIX), used predominantly to evaluate the degree of organic matter humification, was significantly related to g λ and the radius of fine mode particles, r f, and may reflect aging of the Saharan dust-influenced aerosols. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling identified a fluorescent component (C3) with a spectrum similar to that of naphthalene, which was significantly related to g λ and r f. The diesel exhaust sample represented a pollution end-member, with the lightest δ 13C value (-26.4‰), lowest S R (0.95), lowest HIX (2.77) and highest %C3 (20%) of all samples.

  9. SnapShot: Key Advances in hiPSC Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Valeria; Mummery, Christine

    2016-03-01

    This SnapShot presents a timeline of key advances in directed differentiation and disease modeling using human pluripotent stem cells. The selected papers are color-coded for different systems and show progress in the field, from making disease- and tissue-specific hiPSC derivatives to the development of disease models for drug screening and therapeutics and the generation of complex systems that mimic tissue architecture and self-organized structures. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:26942854

  10. Snapshot full-volume coded aperture x-ray diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Joel A.; Brady, David J.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray diffraction tomography (XRDT) is a well-established technique that makes it possible to identify the material composition of an object throughout its volume. We show that using coded apertures to structure the measured scatter signal gives rise to a family of imaging architectures than enables snapshot XRDT in up to 4-dimensions. We consider pencil, fan, and cone beam snapshot XRDT and show results from both experimental and simulation-based studies. We find that, while lower-dimensional systems typically result in higher imaging fidelity, higher-dimensional systems can perform adequately for a specific task at orders of magnitude faster scan times.

  11. Snapshots of America's Families II: A View of the Nation and 13 States from the National Survey of America's Families, 1997-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Jane, Ed.

    This collection of snapshots examines the well-being of America's children and adults through the lens of the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Snapshots include: "Foreword: Snapshots of America's Families II: A View of the Nation and 13 States from the National Survey of America's Families" (Alyssa Wigton and Alan Weil); "Family…

  12. ANALYTICAL CAPABILITY - ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes.Analytical capabilities at IHL include light stable isotope radio mass...

  13. ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY LABORATORY (WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT BRANCH, WATER SUPPLY AND WATER RESOURCES DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of NRMRL's Water Supply and Water Resources Division's Isotope Hydrology Laboratory (IHL) is to resolve environmental hydrology problems through research and application of naturally occurring isotopes.The emergent field of isotope hydrology follows advances in anal...

  14. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  15. Compelling Research Opportunities using Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-04-23

    Isotopes are vital to the science and technology base of the US economy. Isotopes, both stable and radioactive, are essential tools in the growing science, technology, engineering, and health enterprises of the 21st century. The scientific discoveries and associated advances made as a result of the availability of isotopes today span widely from medicine to biology, physics, chemistry, and a broad range of applications in environmental and material sciences. Isotope issues have become crucial aspects of homeland security. Isotopes are utilized in new resource development, in energy from bio-fuels, petrochemical and nuclear fuels, in drug discovery, health care therapies and diagnostics, in nutrition, in agriculture, and in many other areas. The development and production of isotope products unavailable or difficult to get commercially have been most recently the responsibility of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy program. The President's FY09 Budget request proposed the transfer of the Isotope Production program to the Department of Energy's Office of Science in Nuclear Physics and to rename it the National Isotope Production and Application program (NIPA). The transfer has now taken place with the signing of the 2009 appropriations bill. In preparation for this, the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) was requested to establish a standing subcommittee, the NSAC Isotope Subcommittee (NSACI), to advise the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics. The request came in the form of two charges: one, on setting research priorities in the short term for the most compelling opportunities from the vast array of disciplines that develop and use isotopes and two, on making a long term strategic plan for the NIPA program. This is the final report to address charge 1. NSACI membership is comprised of experts from the diverse research communities, industry, production, and homeland security. NSACI discussed research opportunities divided into three areas: (1) medicine

  16. Water - Isotope - Map (δ 18O, δ 2H, 3H) of Austria: Applications, Extremes and Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyhlidal, Stefan; Kralik, Martin; Benischke, Ralf; Leis, Albrecht; Philippitsch, Rudolf

    2016-04-01

    The isotopic ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in water (2H/1H and 18O/16O) are important tools to characterise waters and their cycles. This starts in the atmosphere as rain or snow and continues in surface water and ends in shallow groundwater as well as in deep groundwater. Tritium formed by natural cosmic radiation in the upper atmosphere and in the last century by tests of thermonuclear bombs in the atmosphere, is characterised by its radioactive decay with a half-life of 12.32 years and is an ideal age-marker during the last 60 years. To determine the origin and mean age of waters in many projects concerning water supply, engineering and scientific projects in the last 45 years on more than 1,350 sites, more than 40,000 isotope measurements were performed in Austria. The median value of all sites of oxygen-18 is δ 18O -10.7 ‰ and for hydrogen-2 δ 2H -75 ‰. As the fractionation is mainly temperature dependent the lowest negative values are observed in winter precipitation (oxygen-18 as low as δ 18O -23 ‰) and in springs in the mountain regions (δ 18O -15.1 ‰). In contrast the highest values were observed in summer precipitation (up to δ 18O - 0.5 ‰) and in shallow lakes in the Seewinkel (up to δ 18O + 5 ‰). The isotopic ratios of the Austrian waters are also influenced by the origin of the evaporated water masses. Therefore the precipitation in the region south of the main Alpine crest (East-Tyrol, Carinthia and South-East Styria) is approximately 1 ‰ higher in δ 18O-values than sites at the same altitude in the northern part. This is most probably caused by the stronger influence of precipitation from the mediterranean area. The median value of all 1,120 sampling sites of decay corrected (2015) tritium measurements is 6.2 tritium units (TU). This is somewhat smaller than the median value of all precipitation stations with 7.2 TU. This can be explained by the fact that in most cases in groundwater the median value has been reduced by decay

  17. Application of stable isotope labeled glutathione and rapid scanning mass spectrometers in detecting and characterizing reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Lam, Wing; Atherton, Jim; Chen, Hao; Galatsis, Paul; Stolle, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The formation of reactive metabolites from a number of compounds was studied in vitro using a mixture of non-labeled and stable isotope labeled glutathione (GSH) as a trapping agent. GSH was labeled by incorporating [1,2-(13)C(2),(15)N]glycine into the tripeptide to give an overall increase of 3 Da over the naturally occurring substance. Detection and characterization of reactive metabolites was greatly facilitated by using the data-dependent scanning features of the linear ion trap mass spectrometers to give complimentary and confirmatory data in a single analytical run. A comparison was made by analyzing the samples simultaneously on a triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the constant neutral loss mode. The compounds studied included 2-acetamidophenol, 3-acetamidophenol, 4-acetamidophenol (acetaminophen), and flufenamic acid. GSH adducts for each of these compounds produced a characteristic pattern of 'twin ions' separated by 3 Da in the mass spectral data. This greatly facilitated the detection and characterization of any GSH-related adducts present in the microsomal extracts. Furthermore, characterization of these adducts was greatly facilitated by the rapid scanning capability of linear ion trap instruments that provided full-scan, MS/MS and MS(3) data in one single analysis. This method of detecting and characterizing reactive metabolites generated in vitro was found to be far superior to any of the existing methods previously employed in this laboratory. The combination of two techniques, stable isotope labeled glutathione and linear ion traps, provided a very sensitive and specific method of identifying compounds capable of producing reactive metabolites in a discovery setting. The complimentary set of mass spectral data (including full-scan, MS/MS and MS(3) mass spectra), obtained rapidly in a single analysis with the linear ion trap instruments, greatly accelerated identification of metabolically bioactivated soft spots on the molecules

  18. Application of isotopic tracers as a tool for understanding hydrodynamic behavior of the highly exploited Diass aquifer system (Senegal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madioune, Diakher Hélène; Faye, Serigne; Orban, Philippe; Brouyère, Serge; Dassargues, Alain; Mudry, Jacques; Stumpp, Christine; Maloszewski, Piotr

    2014-04-01

    The Diass horst aquifer system located 50 km east of Dakar (Senegal) is exploited in two main aquifers covered by a sandy superficial aquifer: the confined/unconfined Palaeocene karstic limestone and the confined Maastrichtian sandstone aquifer underneath. This system has experienced intensive groundwater abstraction during the last 50 years to supply increasing water demand, agricultural and industrial needs. The high abstraction rate from 1989 to 2009 (about 109,000 m3/d) has caused a continuous groundwater level decline (up to 30 m), a modification of the groundwater flow and salinization in parts of the aquifers. The objective of the study is to improve our understanding of the system functioning with regards to high pumping, identify the geochemical reactions that take place in the system, infer origin and timing of recharge by using mainly stable (δ18O, δ2H, 13C) and radioactive (3H and 14C) isotopes. Water types defined in the Piper diagram vary in order of abundance from Ca-HCO3 (65%), Ca/Na-Cl (20%), Na-HCO3 (3%) and Na-Cl (12%). Values of δ18O and δ2H for the superficial aquifer range between -5.8 and -4.2‰ and between -42 and -31‰, respectively. For the Palaeocene aquifer they range from -5.8 to -5.0‰ and from -38 to -31‰, respectively; values in the Maastrichtian aquifer are between -5.9 and -4.3‰ for δ18O and -38 to -26‰ for δ2H. Plotted against the conventional δ18O vs δ2H diagram, data from the upper aquifer exhibit a dispersed distribution with respect to isotopic fractionation while those of the Palaeocene and Maastrichtian aquifers are aligned parallel and slightly below/or on the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL) evidencing ancient waters which had evaporated during infiltration. The low tritium (generally <0.7 TU) and 14C (0.7-57.2 pmc) contents indicate predominance of older water being recharged during the Pleistocene and Holocene periods. However, few boreholes which exhibit high tritium (1.2-4.3 TU) and 14C (65.7-70.8 pmc

  19. Converting isotope ratios to diet composition - the use of mixing models - June 2010

    EPA Science Inventory

    One application of stable isotope analysis is to reconstruct diet composition based on isotopic mass balance. The isotopic value of a consumer’s tissue reflects the isotopic values of its food sources proportional to their dietary contributions. Isotopic mixing models are used ...

  20. STABLE ISOTOPES IN ECOLOGICAL STUDIES: NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MIXING MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers in ecological studies. One application uses isotopic ratios to quantify the proportional contributions of multiple sources to a mixture. Examples include food sources for animals, water sources for plants, pollution sources...

  1. X-ray backscatter imaging for radiography by selective detection and snapshot: Evolution, development, and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Daniel

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a single-sided imaging technique that uses the penetrating power of radiation and unique interaction properties of radiation with matter to image subsurface features. CBI has a variety of applications that include non-destructive interrogation, medical imaging, security and military applications. Radiography by selective detection (RSD), lateral migration radiography (LMR) and shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) are different CBI techniques that are being optimized and developed. Radiography by selective detection (RSD) is a pencil beam Compton backscatter imaging technique that falls between highly collimated and uncollimated techniques. Radiography by selective detection uses a combination of single- and multiple-scatter photons from a projected area below a collimation plane to generate an image. As a result, the image has a combination of first- and multiple-scatter components. RSD techniques offer greater subsurface resolution than uncollimated techniques, at speeds at least an order of magnitude faster than highly collimated techniques. RSD scanning systems have evolved from a prototype into near market-ready scanning devices for use in a variety of single-sided imaging applications. The design has changed to incorporate state-of-the-art detectors and electronics optimized for backscatter imaging with an emphasis on versatility, efficiency and speed. The RSD system has become more stable, about 4 times faster, and 60% lighter while maintaining or improving image quality and contrast over the past 3 years. A new snapshot backscatter radiography (SBR) CBI technique, shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR), has been developed from concept and proof-of-principle to a functional laboratory prototype. SABR radiography uses digital detection media and shaded aperture configurations to generate near-surface Compton backscatter images without scanning, similar to how transmission radiographs are taken. Finally, a

  2. Isotopic analysis of planetary solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Neuland, M.; Meyer, S.; Wurz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Isotopic analysis of planetary surfaces is of considerable interest for planetology. Studies of isotope composition can deliver information on radio-isotope chronology of planetary soil/regolith, an insight to processes that altered planetary surface (space weathering) or on possible biogenic processes that occurred or still occur on the planet. Mass spectrometry is a well-suited method that delivers accurate and precise isotope composition. Among other instruments (LAZMA and LAMS), the miniature laser ablation/ionisation mass analyser, LMS developed in Bern for in situ space research can be used to measure the elemental and isotopic composition of planetary solids. LMS support mass spectrometric investigation with a mass resolution of m/Δm≈500-1500, dynamic range of at least 8 decades and detection sensitivity of ~10 ppb. Current studies of various solid materials and standard reference materials show that isotope composition can be conducted with an accuracy and precision at per mill level if the isotope concentration exceeds 10-100 ppm. Implications of the studies for in situ application are discussed.

  3. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  4. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  5. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  6. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  7. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  8. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Oklahoma. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  9. Snapshot of a Multi-Year Multidisciplinary Environmental Mapping and Restoration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusignan, Molly; Abilock, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a snapshot of the authors' first restoration project with young children which grew out of a fourth- and fifth-grade forestry curriculum. The restoration project was part of a long-term plan for enhancing the wild areas of the campus for wildlife habitat and for educational use. It is a native oak woodland and riparian…

  10. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Massachusetts. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  11. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. California. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Louisiana. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  13. D.C.'s Achievement Gap: Why Place Matters. Data Snapshot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DC Action for Children, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Every child deserves educational opportunity and the chance to achieve, no matter his or her school, neighborhood or background. Unfortunately, large and persistent disparities in achievement among public school students in the District of Columbia indicate that all children here may not have the same opportunities. This Data Snapshot examines…

  14. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Wyoming. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  15. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Wyoming. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  16. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Nebraska. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  17. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Nebraska. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  18. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Colorado. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  19. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  20. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  1. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Indiana. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  2. New Jersey City Kids Count 2006: A Snapshot of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This is the 2nd "New Jersey City Kids Count," a snapshot of child well-being in New Jersey's largest and poorest cities. The report serves to measure progress and challenges in the cities where most of New Jersey's poorest children are growing up. The Association for Children of New Jersey, with funding from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, produces…

  3. Family Album: Snapshots of Home-Start in Words and Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinman, Sheila M.

    Home-Start is an international organization in which volunteers offer regular support, friendship, and practical help to young families under stress in their own homes in order to prevent family crisis and breakdown. It is available to any family with at least one child under 5 years of age. This book presents a snapshot of the day-to-day…

  4. Resistance and Resilience in a Life Full of Professionals and Labels: Narrative Snapshots of Chris

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hove, Geert; Gabel, Susan L.; De Schauwer, Elisabeth; Mortier, Kathleen; Van Loon, Jos; Loots, Gerrit; Devlieger, Patrick; Roets, Griet; Claes, Lien

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors relate the life of Chris through narrative snapshots. Chris asked the authors to tell her story. They decided that it could be used to provide an insight into the different ways people with labels are confronted with professional practices and rituals. Although Chris lived a "tough life," her story is full of…

  5. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Georgia. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  6. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Georgia. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  7. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Georgia. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  8. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Georgia. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  9. New Hampshire's Multi-Tiered Approach to Dropout Prevention. Snapshot: New Hampshire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National High School Center, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Many states and districts across the country struggle with designing and implementing coherent dropout prevention initiatives that promote academic advancement, especially for special needs students, who drop out at much higher rates than the general student population. This "snapshot" describes New Hampshire's innovative use of data collection…

  10. Washington View: Not a Snapshot of Public Opinion but an Album

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The columnist weighs in on the most recent PDK/Gallup poll. The real value of the poll, the author says, comes from looking at each response and then thinking about the connective tissue between and among them. The poll's 47-year history adds yet another layer of rich context. Uniquely, the poll provides not a snapshot of public opinion, rather an…

  11. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. North Carolina. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. North Carolina. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. North Carolina. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  14. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. North Carolina. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  15. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  16. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  17. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  18. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  19. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  20. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Kansas. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  1. A Snapshot of Industry and Academic Professional Activities, Compensation, and Engagement in Educational Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Sheryl; Camara, Wayne J.; Huff, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a snapshot of educational measurement professionals--their educational, professional and demographic backgrounds, as well as their workplace settings, job tasks, professional involvement, and compensation practices. Two previous studies have surveyed employers, but this is the first attempt to conduct a comprehensive survey of…

  2. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guadeloupe; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-27

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guadeloupe, an overseas region of France located in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Guadeloupe’s utility rates are approximately $0.18 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  3. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  4. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  5. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  6. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 12, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Grade 12 Reading and Mathematics State Pilot assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This paper presents the results for South Dakota's student achievement in mathematics.…

  7. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  8. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 12, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 Grade 12 Reading and Mathematics State Pilot assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. This report presents the results for South Dakota's student achievement in reading. In…

  9. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  10. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. South Dakota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  11. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  14. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  15. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  16. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. New Mexico. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  17. A Snapshot of Creativity: Evaluating a Quick and Simple Method for Assessing Divergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvia, Paul J.; Martin, Christopher; Nusbaum, Emily C.

    2009-01-01

    Creativity assessment commonly uses open-ended divergent thinking tasks. The typical methods for scoring these tasks (uniqueness scoring and subjective ratings) are time-intensive, however, so it is impractical for researchers to include divergent thinking as an ancillary construct. The present research evaluated snapshot scoring of divergent…

  18. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - U.S. Virgin Islands (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) - St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix. The Virgin Islands archipelago makes up the northern portion of the Lesser Antilles and the western island group of the Leeward Islands, forming the border between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.

  19. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Antigua and Barbuda; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Antigua and Barbuda, an independent nation in the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Antigua and Barbuda’s utility rates are approximately $0.37 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Trinidad and Tobago; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island nation located off the coast of Venezuela. Trinidad and Tobago’s electricity rates are some of the lowest in the Caribbean at approximately $0.04 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), well below the regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  1. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Indiana. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  2. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. DoDEA. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  3. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. New Hampshire. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  4. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. DoDEA. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  5. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  6. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  7. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2009 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2009 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2009 to other…

  8. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  9. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Minnesota. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  10. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Tennessee. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  11. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Tennessee. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  12. The Nation's Report Card Reading 2011 State Snapshot Report. Tennessee. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 reading assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to other…

  13. The Nation's Report Card Mathematics 2011 State Snapshot Report. Tennessee. Grade 4, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each state and jurisdiction that participated in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 2011 mathematics assessment receives a one-page snapshot report that presents key findings and trends in a condensed format. Overall results, achievement level percentages and average score results, comparison of the average score in 2011 to…

  14. Application of lead isotopic methods to the study of the anthropogenic lead provenance in Spanish overbank floodplain deposits.

    PubMed

    Adánez Sanjuán, Paula; Flem, Belinda; Llamas Borrajo, Juan F; Locutura Rupérez, Juan; Garcia Cortés, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the principal sources of Pb in overbank sediment profiles have been documented for two Spanish areas by using Pb isotopes and Pb concentrations. These locations (Madrid and Tinto-Odiel basin) represent two of the most contaminated regions in Spain. The Community of Madrid is characterized by heavy industrial and urban activity, focused mainly in Madrid City. The Tinto-Odiel basin drains the Iberian Pyrite Belt, which hosts many polymetallic massive sulphides and is heavily affected by mining activities in their headwaters. It has been proven that the influence of anthropogenic activity is reflected in these overbank deposits by variations in Pb concentrations that, in general, correlate with shifts in the (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio. Rivas profile (downstream of Madrid) was found to be the most anthropogenically influenced site. The sediments within this profile which were recently deposited (170 ± 40 years BP) have the least radiogenic signatures. (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranged between 1.1763 and 1.1876 indicating significant contributions of anthropogenic Pb. In contrast, profiles upstream of Madrid possess an average (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio of 1.2272. It is difficult to clearly identify the most prominent source as the sediments appear to be characterized by an input from several sources. The floodplain profiles in the Tinto-Odiel basin exhibit uniform (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranging from 1.1627 (Odiel river) to 1.1665 (Tinto river). These ratios are similar to the ones possessed by sulphide ores in the area and differ from the ratios of other nonmineralized formations in the basin, indicating that mining activities are the primary, if not sole, source of Pb to the sediments. PMID:26100323

  15. Selective photoionisation of lutetium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    D'yachkov, Aleksei B; Kovalevich, S K; Labozin, Valerii P; Mironov, Sergei M; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Firsov, Valerii A; Tsvetkov, G O; Shatalova, G G

    2012-10-31

    A three-stage laser photoionisation scheme intended for enriching the {sup 176}Lu isotope from natural lutetium was considered. An investigation was made of the hyperfine structure of the second excited state 5d6s7s {yields} {sup 4}D{sub 3/2} with an energy of 37194 cm{sup -1} and the autoionisation state with an energy of 53375 cm{sup -1} of the {sup 176}Lu and {sup 175}Lu isotopes. The total electron momentum of the autoionisation level and the constant A of hyperfine magnetic interaction were determined. Due to a small value of the isotopic shift between {sup 176}Lu and {sup 175}Lu, appreciable selectivity of their separation may be achieved with individual hyperfine structure components. The first tentative enrichment of the 176Lu isotope was performed to a concentration of 60 % - 70 %. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Pressure estimation from single-snapshot tomographic PIV in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Pröbsting, Stefan; Dwight, Richard P.; van Oudheusden, Bas W.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    A method is proposed to determine the instantaneous pressure field from a single tomographic PIV velocity snapshot and is applied to a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. The main concept behind the single-snapshot pressure evaluation method is to approximate the flow acceleration using the vorticity transport equation. The vorticity field calculated from the measured instantaneous velocity is advanced over a single integration time step using the vortex-in-cell (VIC) technique to update the vorticity field, after which the temporal derivative and material derivative of velocity are evaluated. The pressure in the measurement volume is subsequently evaluated by solving a Poisson equation. The procedure is validated considering data from a turbulent boundary layer experiment, obtained with time-resolved tomographic PIV at 10 kHz, where an independent surface pressure fluctuation measurement is made by a microphone. The cross-correlation coefficient of the surface pressure fluctuations calculated by the single-snapshot pressure method with respect to the microphone measurements is calculated and compared to that obtained using time-resolved pressure-from-PIV, which is regarded as benchmark. The single-snapshot procedure returns a cross-correlation comparable to the best result obtained by time-resolved PIV, which uses a nine-point time kernel. When the kernel of the time-resolved approach is reduced to three measurements, the single-snapshot method yields approximately 30 % higher correlation. Use of the method should be cautioned when the contributions to fluctuating pressure from outside the measurement volume are significant. The study illustrates the potential for simplifying the hardware configurations (e.g. high-speed PIV or dual PIV) required to determine instantaneous pressure from tomographic PIV.

  17. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kinman, William S.; Hanson, Susan K.; Steiner, Robert E.

    2015-09-04

    Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.

  18. Polyatomic interferences on high precision uranium isotope ratio measurements by MC-ICP-MS: Applications to environmental sampling for nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Pollington, Anthony D.; Kinman, William S.; Hanson, Susan K.; Steiner, Robert E.

    2015-09-04

    Modern mass spectrometry and separation techniques have made measurement of major uranium isotope ratios a routine task; however accurate and precise measurement of the minor uranium isotopes remains a challenge as sample size decreases. One particular challenge is the presence of isobaric interferences and their impact on the accuracy of minor isotope 234U and 236U measurements. Furthermore, we present techniques used for routine U isotopic analysis of environmental nuclear safeguards samples and evaluate polyatomic interferences that negatively impact accuracy as well as methods to mitigate their impacts.

  19. Hydrogen Isotope Measurements of Organic Acids and Alcohols by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS: Application to Analysis of Experimentally Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R. A.; Fu, Q.; Niles, P. B.; Gibson, E. K.

    2012-03-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the H-isotope composition of organic acids and alcohols. These experiments make use of a pyroprobe interfaced with a GC and high-temperature extraction furnace to make quantitative H-isotope measurements.

  20. Measurement Tools for Evaluating Out-of-School Time Programs: An Evaluation Resource. Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot. Number 6 Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshot Measurement Tools for Evaluating Out-of-School Time Programs: An Evaluation Resource Number 6 November 2005 Updated August 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimer, Christopher; Bouffard, Suzanne; Little, Priscilla M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Harvard Family Research Project's (HFRP) series of "Out-of-School Time Evaluation Snapshots" distills the wealth of information compiled in our Out-of-School Time (OST) Program Research and Evaluation Database into a single report. Each "Snapshot" examines a specific aspect of out-of-school time (OST) evaluation. This "Snapshot" describes…

  1. δ13C and δ18O isotopic composition of CaCO3 measured by continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry: statistical evaluation and verification by application to Devils Hole core DH-11 calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga M.; Landwehr, Jurate M.

    2002-01-01

    A new method was developed to analyze the stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of small samples (400 ± 20 µg) of calcium carbonate. This new method streamlines the classical phosphoric acid/calcium carbonate (H3PO4/CaCO3) reaction method by making use of a recently available Thermoquest-Finnigan GasBench II preparation device and a Delta Plus XL continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Conditions for which the H3PO4/CaCO3 reaction produced reproducible and accurate results with minimal error had to be determined. When the acid/carbonate reaction temperature was kept at 26 °C and the reaction time was between 24 and 54 h, the precision of the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios for pooled samples from three reference standard materials was ≤0.1 and ≤0.2 per mill or ‰, respectively, although later analysis showed that materials from one specific standard required reaction time between 34 and 54 h for δ18O to achieve this level of precision. Aliquot screening methods were shown to further minimize the total error. The accuracy and precision of the new method were analyzed and confirmed by statistical analysis. The utility of the method was verified by analyzing calcite from Devils Hole, Nevada, for which isotope-ratio values had previously been obtained by the classical method. Devils Hole core DH-11 recently had been re-cut and re-sampled, and isotope-ratio values were obtained using the new method. The results were comparable with those obtained by the classical method with correlation = +0.96 for both isotope ratios. The consistency of the isotopic results is such that an alignment offset could be identified in the re-sampled core material, and two cutting errors that occurred during re-sampling then were confirmed independently. This result indicates that the new method is a viable alternative to the classical reaction method. In particular, the new method requires less sample material permitting finer resolution and allows

  2. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  3. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  4. Rates of complex formation in collisions of rotationally excited homonuclear diatoms with ions at very low temperatures: Application to hydrogen isotopes and hydrogen-containing ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashevskaya, E.I.; Litvin, I.; Nikitin, E.E.; Troe, J.

    2005-05-08

    State-selected rate coefficients for the capture of ground and rotationally excited homonuclear molecules by ions are calculated, for low temperatures, within the adiabatic channel classical (ACCl) approximation, and, for zero temperature, via an approximate calculation of the Bethe limit. In the intermediate temperature range, the accurate quantal rate coefficients are calculated for j=0 and j=1 states of hydrogen isotopes (H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2}) colliding with hydrogen-containing ions, and simple analytical expressions are suggested to approximate the rate coefficients. For the ground rotational state of diatoms, the accurate quantal rate coefficients are higher compared to their ACCl counterparts, while for the first excited rotational state the reverse is true. The physical significance of quantum effects for low-temperature capture and the applicability of the statistical description of capture are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the role of Coriolis interaction. The relevance of the present capture calculations for rates of ortho-para conversion of H{sub 2} in collisions with hydrogen-containing ions at low temperatures is discussed.

  5. Clumped isotope thermometry and catagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Clog, M. D.; Dallas, B.; Douglas, P. M.; Piasecki, A.; Sessions, A. L.; Stolper, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped- and site-specific isotopic compositions of organic compounds can constrain their formation temperatures, sources, and chemical reaction histories. The large number of isotopologues of organic molecules may allow for the isotopic composition of a single compound to illuminate many processes. For example, it is possible that clumping or site specific effects in different parts of the same molecule will differ in blocking temperature, such that a molecule's full isotopic structure could simultaneously constrain conditions of biosynthesis, catagenic 'cracking', and storage in the crust. Recent innovations in high-resolution mass spectrometry and methods of IR and NMR spectroscopy make it possible to explore these questions. Methane is the first organic molecule to have its clumped isotope geochemistry analyzed in a variety of natural environments and controlled experiments. Methane generated through catagenic cracking of kerogen and other organic matter forms in equilibrium with respect to isotopic clumping, and preserves that state through later storage or migration, up to temperatures of ~250 ˚C. This kinetic behavior permits a variety of useful geological applications. But it is unexpected because the bulk stable isotope composition of thermogenic methane is thought to reflect kinetic isotope effects on irreversible reactions. Our observations imply a new interpretation of the chemical physics of catagenic methane formation. Additional instrument and methods developments are currently extending the measurement of isotopic clumping and position specific effects to larger alkanes, other hydrocarbon compounds, and amino acids. These measurements will ultimately expand our capacity to understand the formational conditions and fates of organic molecules in high- and low-temperature environments through geological time.

  6. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Belize; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Belize, a Central American country bordering Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the west and south, and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Although not an island nation, Belize is included in this energy snapshot series because it is a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), an alliance of 15 Caribbean nations in the region.

  7. LANL-IPF responses to isotopes workshop background information survey

    SciTech Connect

    Nortier, Francois Meiring

    2008-01-01

    Responses to the following are provided: (A) Which isotopes do you (company, agency, university, community) currently use in your activities or distribute (repackage) to end-users? (B) Describe generally what these isotopes are used for, i.e. the science or application. (C) Which isotope(s) do you anticipate may have significant future increase in demand. Identify the isotope(s), its priority, possible chemical form and for what purpose it would be used. (D) Are there other isotopes that you might use but are currently unavilable or not available in difficient quantities? If so, please identify this isotope, from whom have you tired to obtain it and for what prupose would it be used. (E) Do you have any specific issues with respect to the purity, availability, reliability of supply, etc. of isotopes at present?

  8. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The systematics of stable-isotope exchange between minerals and fluids are examined in the context of modal mineralogical variations and mass-balance considerations, both in closed and in open systems. On mineral-pair ??18O plots, samples from terranes that have exchanged with large amounts of fluid typically map out steep positively-sloped non-equilibrium arrays. Analytical models are derived to explain these effects; these models allow for different exchange rates between the various minerals and the external fluids, as well as different fluid fluxes. The steep arrays are adequately modelled by calculated isochron lines that involve the whole family of possible exchange trajectories. These isochrons have initially-steep near-vertical positive slopes that rotate toward a 45?? equilibrium slope as the exchange process proceeds to completion. The actual data-point array is thus analogous to the hand of an "isotopic clock" that measures the duration of the hydrothermal episode. The dimensionless ratio of the volumetric fluid flux to the kinetic rate parameter ( u k) determines the shape of each individual exchange trajectory. In a fluid-buffered system ( u k ??? 1), the solutions to the equations: (1) are independent of the mole fractions of the solid phases; (2) correspond to Taylor's open-system water/rock equation; and (3) yield straight-line isochrons that have slopes that approach 1 f, where f is the fraction reacted of the more sluggishly exchanging mineral. The isochrons for this simple exchange model are closely congruent with the isochrons calculated for all of the more complex models, thereby simplifying the application of theory to actual hydrothermal systems in nature. In all of the models an order of magnitude of time (in units of kt) separates steep non-equilibrium arrays (e.g., slope ??? 10) from arrays approaching an equilibrium slope of unity on a ??-?? diagram. Because we know the approximate lifetimes of many hydrothermal systems from geologic and

  9. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  10. Reducing Snapshots to Points: A Visual Analytics Approach to Dynamic Network Exploration.

    PubMed

    van den Elzen, Stef; Holten, Danny; Blaas, Jorik; van Wijk, Jarke J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a visual analytics approach for the exploration and analysis of dynamic networks. We consider snapshots of the network as points in high-dimensional space and project these to two dimensions for visualization and interaction using two juxtaposed views: one for showing a snapshot and one for showing the evolution of the network. With this approach users are enabled to detect stable states, recurring states, outlier topologies, and gain knowledge about the transitions between states and the network evolution in general. The components of our approach are discretization, vectorization and normalization, dimensionality reduction, and visualization and interaction, which are discussed in detail. The effectiveness of the approach is shown by applying it to artificial and real-world dynamic networks. PMID:26529683

  11. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-10-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium.

  12. Encrypted Three-dimensional Dynamic Imaging using Snapshot Time-of-flight Compressed Ultrafast Photography

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Hai, Pengfei; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Compressed ultrafast photography (CUP), a computational imaging technique, is synchronized with short-pulsed laser illumination to enable dynamic three-dimensional (3D) imaging. By leveraging the time-of-flight (ToF) information of pulsed light backscattered by the object, ToF-CUP can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single camera snapshot. In addition, the approach unites the encryption of depth data with the compressed acquisition of 3D data in a single snapshot measurement, thereby allowing efficient and secure data storage and transmission. We demonstrated high-speed 3D videography of moving objects at up to 75 volumes per second. The ToF-CUP camera was applied to track the 3D position of a live comet goldfish. We have also imaged a moving object obscured by a scattering medium. PMID:26503834

  13. The climate of the Late Cretaceous: New insights from the application of the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer to Western Interior Seaway macrofossil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, K. J.; Cochran, J. K.; Landman, N. H.; Schrag, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    We apply the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer (Δ47) to macrofossils from the Baculites compressus (˜73.5 Ma) and the Hoploscaphites nebrascensis (˜67 Ma) ammonite zones of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS) of North America, and nearby coeval terrestrial and open marine environments. The carbonate clumped isotope thermometer is based on a single-phase isotope exchange equilibrium that promotes the 'clumping' of two heavy isotopes together within a single carbonate molecule as temperature decreases. Due to the thermometer's isotopic independence from water, coupled measurements of Δ47 and the bulk oxygen isotopic composition of a carbonate (δ18Oc) enable the reconstruction of both paleotemperature and the isotopic composition of the water in which the organisms grew. Before applying the technique to the aragonite shells of fossil marine organisms (mostly ammonites, but also some gastropods, bivalves, and one belemnite), we measure the clumped isotopic composition of modern nautilus and cuttlefish, two of the nearest living relatives to the Cretaceous ammonites. Modern cephalopods exhibit disequilibrium isotope effects with respect to Δ47, but not δ18Oc, therefore a simple correctional scheme is applied to the Late Cretaceous macrofossil data before reconstructing paleotemperatures. Diagenesis is also assessed by visual preservation and previously measured Sr concentrations (Cochran et al., 2003). Temperatures reconstructed for the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway range from 16.4±3.5 °C for an offshore Interior Seaway environment from the H. nebrascensis zone to 24.2±0.4 °C for the B. compressus ammonite zone. The seaway itself has an isotopic composition of approximately -1‰ (relative to VSMOW), the expectation for an ice-free global ocean average, while a nearby freshwater environment has an isotopic composition approaching -20‰. We compare the attributes of the reconstructed climate to predictions based on Late Cretaceous climate models

  14. Optimisation of the diffractive optical element for snapshot spectral imaging used in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, R.; Arnold, T.; De Biasio, M.; McGunnigle, G.; Rogojanu, R.; Steiner, G. E.; Hermerschmidt, A.

    2012-03-01

    Snapshot approaches address various possibilities to acquire the spectral and spatial information of a scene within a single camera frame. One advantage over the classical push broom or staring imager approaches is that the temporal inconsistency between consecutive scan lines in first case or between the acquired monochromatic images in the second case is avoided. However, this has to be paid by some effort to rearrange or reconstruct the explicit spectral cube from the entangled raw data in the single camera frame. Besides others, the utilization of a diffractive optical element (DOE) is one such snapshot approach (CTIS - computed tomography imaging spectrometer). The DOE is used to create an optical transfer function that projects both the spectral and spatial information of a scene onto a sensor array and a reconstruction algorithm is used that recovers the spectral cube from the dispersed image pattern. The design of the DOE is crucial for the overall system performance as the absolute transmission efficiency of the zeroth and first order versus the relative efficiency between the two over the required wavelength range are difficult to optimize if the limited dynamic range of a real camera is considered. We describe the optimization of such a DOE for the wavelength range from 400 to 780nm and the required reconstruction algorithm to recover the spectral cube from the entangled snapshot image. The described snapshot approach has been evaluated using experiments to assess the spatial and spectral resolution using diffuse reflectance standards. Additionally the results achieved using the described setup for multi-color in-situ fluorescence hybridized preparations (M-FISH) are discussed.

  15. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  16. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  17. Improvement of a snapshot spectroscopic retinal multi-aperture imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Lompado, Art; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2009-02-01

    Measurement of oxygen saturation has proved to give important information about the eye health and the onset of eye pathologies such as Diabetic Retinopathy. Recently, we have presented a multi-aperture system enabling snapshot acquisition of human fundus images at six different wavelengths. In our setup a commercial fundus ophthalmoscope was interfaced with the multi-aperture system to acquire spectroscopic sensitive images of the retina vessel, thus enabling assessment of the oxygen saturation in the retina. Snapshot spectroscopic acquisition is meant to minimize the effects of eye movements. Higher measurement accuracy can be achieved by increasing the number of wavelengths at which the fundus images are taken. In this study we present an improvement of our setup by introducing an other multi-aperture camera that enables us to take snapshot images of the fundus at nine different wavelengths. Careful consideration is taken to improve image transfer by measuring the optical properties of the fundus camera used in the setup and modeling the optical train in Zemax.

  18. Applicability of stable C and N isotope analysis in inferring the geographical origin and authentication of commercial fish (Mackerel, Yellow Croaker and Pollock).

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejoong; Suresh Kumar, K; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2015-04-01

    Globalisation of seafood and aquaculture products and their convenient marketing worldwide, increases the possibility for the distribution of mislabelled products; thereby, underlining the need to identify their origin. Stable isotope analysis is a promising approach to identify the authenticity and traceability of seafood and aquaculture products. In this investigation, we measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of three commercial fish, viz. Mackerel, Yellow Croaker and Pollock, originating from various countries. Apart from the species-dependent variation in the isotopic values, marked differences in the δ(13)C and δ(15)N ratios were also observed with respect to the country of origin. This suggests that C and N isotopic signatures could be reliable tools to identify and trace the origin of commercial fish. PMID:25442587

  19. Hydrogen Isotope Measurements of Organic Acids and Alcohols by Pyrolysis-GC-MS-TC-IRMS: Application to Analysis of Experimentally Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the H isotope composition of organic acids and alcohols. These experiments make use of a pyroprobe interfaced with a GC and high temperature extraction furnace to make quantitative H isotope measurements. This work compliments our previous work that focused on the extraction and analysis of C isotopes from the same compounds [1]. Together with our carbon isotope analyses our experiments serve as a "proof of concept" for making C and H isotope measurements on more complex mixtures of organic compounds on mineral surfaces in abiotic hydrocarbon formation processes at elevated temperatures and pressures. Our motivation for undertaking this work stems from observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [2-5], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Mars history [6-8]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization [9,10]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [11-13]. Our H isotope measurements utilize an analytical technique combining Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometry-High Temperature Conversion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Py-GC-MS-TC-IRMS). This technique is designed to carry a split of the pyrolyzed GC-separated product to a Thermo DSQII quadrupole mass spectrometer as a means of making qualitative and semi-quantitative compositional measurements of separated organic compounds, therefore both chemical and isotopic measurements can be carried out simultaneously on the same sample.

  20. Considerations in the Application of Multiple Ion Counting for the Trace Analysis of Plutonium and Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Thermal Ionization and Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riciputi, L. R.

    2008-12-01

    The use of simultaneous multiple-ion counting for the analysis of small samples of plutonium and uranium has been investigated using three different instruments, the ThermoElectron Neptune inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer, the ThermoElectron Triton thermal ionization mass spectrometer, and the Isotopex Iso-T thermal ionization mass spectrometer. The Neptune and Triton instruments utilize identical multiple ion counter arrays, with ions impinging directly on the channeltron surface. The Isotopex instruments utilize a different style of channeltron detector. The most significant difference in the Isotopex detectors is the presence of a conversion dynode at the entrance to the channeltron. Results suggest that the performance of the ThermoElectron MIC system varies between the Neptune and Triton instruments, which probably reflects both differences in the inherent characteristics of plasma and thermal sources and the performance of the MICS themselves. Differences in performance and stability between the '"naked"' and conversion dynode equipped channeltrons on the two thermal ionization instruments support these observations. These differences suggest that different analytical approaches to calibration of the multiple-ion counters may be required. Differences in potential analytical strategies employing multiple ion counters on the different instruments, including calibration schemes, precision and accuracy limits, and analytical strategies that can be employed, will be discussed. Results from both thermal ionization and inductively-coupled plasma sources suggest that the dominant source of uncertainty in isotope ratio measurement using multiple ion counting shifts from counting limitations for very small signals to uncertainties in gain calibration and detector drift among the ion counters at higher count rates. These characteristics place limits on the applicability of multiple ion counters; results from mixed Faraday/multiple ion counting analysis will

  1. Application of the Reference Method Isotope Dilution Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (ID/GC/MS) to Establish Metrological Traceability for Calibration and Control of Blood Glucose Test Systems

    PubMed Central

    Andreis, Elisabeth; Küllmer, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose (BG) by means of handheld BG systems is a cornerstone in diabetes therapy. The aim of this article is to describe a procedure with proven traceability for calibration and evaluation of BG systems to guarantee reliable BG measurements. Isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (ID/GC/MS) is a method that fulfills all requirements to be used in a higher-order reference measurement procedure. However, this method is not applicable for routine measurements because of the time-consuming sample preparation. A hexokinase method with perchloric acid (PCA) sample pretreatment is used in a measurement procedure for such purposes. This method is directly linked to the ID/GC/MS method by calibration with a glucose solution that has an ID/GC/MS-determined target value. BG systems are calibrated with whole blood samples. The glucose levels in such samples are analyzed by this ID/GC/MS-linked hexokinase method to establish traceability to higher-order reference material. For method comparison, the glucose concentrations in 577 whole blood samples were measured using the PCA-hexokinase method and the ID/GC/MS method; this resulted in a mean deviation of 0.1%. The mean deviation between BG levels measured in >500 valid whole blood samples with BG systems and the ID/GC/MS was 1.1%. BG systems allow a reliable glucose measurement if a true reference measurement procedure, with a noninterrupted traceability chain using ID/GC/MS linked hexokinase method for calibration of BG systems, is implemented. Systems should be calibrated by means of a traceable and defined measurement procedure to avoid bias. PMID:24876614

  2. A novel methodology to investigate isotopic biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B. Y.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2012-04-01

    . coli (e.g. membranes, cytosol, etc.), including the catalytic metal atoms within CdCA. These experiments allow isotopic exchange reactions to be observed in biological systems at an unparalleled resolution, demonstrating that isotopic fractionation can occur, in vivo, on length scales as small as a few Å. We will explore future applications of this technique using the marine geochemistry of Cd as a case study. This experimental approach has great promise for studying the individual isotopic biosignatures of other biochemical reactions, in particular those which may have been active during early Earth History.

  3. Multiple linear regression for isotopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Alonso, J. I.

    2012-04-01

    There are two typical applications of isotopic measurements: the detection of natural variations in isotopic systems and the detection man-made variations using enriched isotopes as indicators. For both type of measurements accurate and precise isotope ratio measurements are required. For the so-called non-traditional stable isotopes, multicollector ICP-MS instruments are usually applied. In many cases, chemical separation procedures are required before accurate isotope measurements can be performed. The off-line separation of Rb and Sr or Nd and Sm is the classical procedure employed to eliminate isobaric interferences before multicollector ICP-MS measurement of Sr and Nd isotope ratios. Also, this procedure allows matrix separation for precise and accurate Sr and Nd isotope ratios to be obtained. In our laboratory we have evaluated the separation of Rb-Sr and Nd-Sm isobars by liquid chromatography and on-line multicollector ICP-MS detection. The combination of this chromatographic procedure with multiple linear regression of the raw chromatographic data resulted in Sr and Nd isotope ratios with precisions and accuracies typical of off-line sample preparation procedures. On the other hand, methods for the labelling of individual organisms (such as a given plant, fish or animal) are required for population studies. We have developed a dual isotope labelling procedure which can be unique for a given individual, can be inherited in living organisms and it is stable. The detection of the isotopic signature is based also on multiple linear regression. The labelling of fish and its detection in otoliths by Laser Ablation ICP-MS will be discussed using trout and salmon as examples. As a conclusion, isotope measurement procedures based on multiple linear regression can be a viable alternative in multicollector ICP-MS measurements.

  4. Protein-lipid interactions: paparazzi hunting for snap-shots.

    PubMed

    Haberkant, Per; van Meer, Gerrit

    2009-08-01

    Photoactivatable groups meeting the criterion of minimal perturbance allow the investigation of interactions in biological samples. Here, we review the application of photoactivatable groups in lipids enabling the study of protein-lipid interactions in (biological) membranes. The chemistry of various photoactivatable groups is summarized and the specificity of the interactions detected is discussed. The recent introduction of 'click chemistry' in photocrosslinking of membrane proteins by photo-activatable lipids opens new possibilities for the analysis of crosslinked products and will help to close the gap between proteomics and lipidomics. PMID:19426134

  5. Simultaneous N, C, S isotopic analyses using purge and trap EA technology. Application to δ34S analyses of natural phosphate material NBS120c and BCR32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourel, F. P.; Lecuyer, C.; Martineau, F.

    2013-12-01

    The first example of stable isotope analyses in continuous flow mode by Preston et al in 19861 involved Elemental Analyser Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (EA-IRMS) dedicated to carbon isotopes in combustion mode. EA-IRMS has since then evolved to allow 34S/32S determinations still in combustion mode and mainly to access pyrolysis reaction for O and H isotopes. As far as combustion EA-IRMS is concerned the technique itself has remained unchanged since the development of 'purge and trap' separation techniques online with IRMS instruments. Here we have used a high-precision, easy, low-cost and rapid method of simultaneous carbon, nitrogen and sulphur isotope analysis using this new type of elemental analyser based on 'purge and trap' technology 2,3. Simultaneous determinations, performed on the same aliquot of 13C, 15N and 34S are demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the high quality of 34S/32S determinations. First concentrating on peak shapes, yields of conversion and preliminary results. Then the reliability and accuracy of such a technique is illustrated using analyses from various international reference materials. Alongside international reference material working NCS calibrated material has been selected and characterized prior to apply this technology to calibrate natural phosphate material used as compositional reference material BCR32 and NBS120c. δ34S values of respectively 15.62×0.32‰ and 16.5×0.17‰ are proposed for those samples with sulphur concentrations below the 1% level. The possibility to reliably measure S isotopes on that kind of samples opens up new fields of investigation especially for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Keywords: carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, isotope, combustion, phosphate, elemental-analyser 1. T. Preston, N.J.P. Owens: Preliminary 13C Measurements using a Gas Chromatograph Interfaced to an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. Biomedical. Mass Spectrom. 1985, 12-9, 510. 2. H.P. Sieper, H.J. Kupka, L. Lange, A. Rossmann, N. Tanz

  6. Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound

    DOEpatents

    Watrous, Matthew G.

    2012-12-11

    A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

  7. Atomic balm: Finding hope in isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.

    1996-12-31

    This article provides a glimpse of the research program at ORNL carried out as part of the nuclear medicine group, aimed at the application of radioisotopes for medical applications. These can be either diagnostic or treatment based applications. Faced with shrinking research budgets, the department focuses primarily on applications of reactor produced isotopes because of the continued availability of a reactor for producing such isotopes. This paper describes collaborative work to use rhenium-188 and iodine-123 for cancer and pain treatments, and for diagnosing Alzheimer`s disease.

  8. 135Cs/137Cs isotopic composition of environmental samples across Europe: Environmental transport and source term emission applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2015-11-02

    135Cs/137Cs isotopic analyses represent an important tool for studying the fate and transport of radiocesium in the environment; in this work the 135Cs/137Cs isotopic composition in environmental samples taken from across Europe is reported. Surface soil and vegetation samples from western Russia, Ukraine, Austria, and Hungary show consistent aged thermal fission product 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios of 0.58 ± 0.01 (age corrected to 1/1/15), with the exception of one sample of soil-moss from Hungary which shows an elevated 135Cs/137Cs ratio of 1.78 ± 0.12. With the exception of the outlier sample from Hungary, surface soil/vegetation data are in quantitative agreement with values previously reported for soils within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, suggesting that radiocesium at these locations is primarily composed of homogenous airborne deposition from Chernobyl. Seawater samples taken from the Irish Sea show 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios of 1.22 ± 0.11 (age corrected to 1/1/15), suggesting aged thermal fission product Cs discharged from Sellafield. Furthermore, the differences in 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios between Sellafield, Chernobyl, and global nuclear weapons testing fallout indicate that 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can be utilized to discriminate between and track radiocesium transport from different nuclear production source terms, including major emission sources in Europe.

  9. Isotope pattern deconvolution as rising tool for isotope tracer studies in environmental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgeher, Johanna; Zitek, Andreas; Prohaska, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade stable isotope tracers have emerged as versatile tool in ecological research. Besides 'intrinsic' isotope tracers caused by the natural variation of isotopes, the intentional introduction of 'extrinsic' enriched stable isotope tracers into biological systems has gained significant interest. Hereby the induced change in the natural isotopic composition of an element allows amongst others for studying the fate and fluxes of metals, trace elements and species in organisms or provides an intrinsic marker or tag of particular biological samples. Due to the shoreless potential of this methodology, the number of publications dealing with applications of isotope (double) spikes as tracers to address research questions in 'real world systems' is constantly increasing. However, some isotope systems like the natural Sr isotopic system, although potentially very powerful for this type of application, are still rarely used, mainly because their adequate measurement/determination poses major analytical challenges; as e.g. Sr is available in significant amounts in natural samples. In addition, biological systems underlie complex processes such as metabolism, adsorption/desorption or oxidation/reduction. As a consequence, classic evaluation approaches such as the isotope dilution mass spectrometry equation are often not applicable because of the unknown amount of tracer finally present in the sample. Isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), based on multiple linear regression, serves as simplified alternative data processing strategy to double spike isotope dilution calculations. The outstanding advantage of this mathematical tool lies in the possibility of deconvolving the isotope pattern in a spiked sample without knowing the quantities of enriched isotope tracer being incorporated into the natural sample matrix as well as the degree of impurities and species-interconversion (e.g. from sample preparation). Here, the potential of IPD for environmental tracer

  10. Exploring water cycle dynamics through sampling multitude stable water isotope pools in a small developed landscape of Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, N.; Kraft, P.; Breuer, L.

    2015-02-01

    Conducting a dual stable water isotope (δ2H and δ18O) study in the developed landscape of the Schwingbach catchment (Germany) helped to unravel connectivity and disconnectivity between the different water cycle components. The two-year weekly to biweekly measurements of precipitation, stream, and groundwater isotopes revealed that surface and groundwater are decoupled from the annual precipitation cycle but showed bidirectional interactions between each other. Seasonal variations based on temperature effects were observed in the precipitation signal but neither reflected in stream nor in groundwater isotopic signatures. Apparently, snowmelt played a fundamental role for groundwater recharge explaining the observed differences to precipitation δ-values. A spatially distributed snapshot sampling of soil water isotopes in two soil depths at 52 sampling points across different land uses (arable land, forest, and grassland) revealed that top soil isotopic signatures were similar to the precipitation input signal. Preferential water flow paths occurred under forested soils explaining the isotopic similarities between top and subsoil isotopic signatures. Due to human-impacted agricultural land use (tilling and compression) of arable and grassland soils, water delivery to the deeper soil layers was reduced, resulting in significant different isotopic signatures. However, the land use influence smoothed out with depth and soil water approached groundwater δ-values. Seasonally tracing stable water isotopes through soil profiles showed that the influence of new percolating soil water decreased with depth as no remarkable seasonality in soil isotopic signatures was obvious at depth > 0.9 m and constant values were observed through space and time. Little variation in individual isotope time series of stream and groundwater restricted the use of classical isotope hydrology techniques e.g. mean transit time estimation or hydrograph separation. Still, tracing stable water

  11. A Crystallographic Snapshot of Tyrosine Trans-phosphorylation in Action

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Xu, C; Ma, J; Eliseenkova, A; Li, W; Pollock, P; Pitteloud, N; Miller, W; Neubert, T; Mohammadi, M

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine trans-phosphorylation is a key event in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, yet, the structural basis for this process has eluded definition. Here, we present the crystal structure of the FGF receptor 2 kinases caught in the act of trans-phosphorylation of Y769, the major C-terminal phosphorylation site. The structure reveals that enzyme- and substrate-acting kinases engage each other through elaborate and specific interactions not only in the immediate vicinity of Y769 and the enzyme active site, but also in regions that are as much of 18 {angstrom} away from D626, the catalytic base in the enzyme active site. These interactions lead to an unprecedented level of specificity and precision during the trans-phosphorylation on Y769. Time-resolved mass spectrometry analysis supports the observed mechanism of trans-phosphorylation. Our data provide a molecular framework for understanding the mechanism of action of Kallmann syndrome mutations and the order of trans-phosphorylation reactions in FGFRs. We propose that the salient mechanistic features of Y769 trans-phosphorylation are applicable to trans-phosphorylation of the equivalent major phosphorylation sites in many other RTKs.

  12. Xenon Isotope Releases from Buried Transuranic Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresel, P. E.; Waichler, S. R.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hayes, J. C.; McIntyre, J. I.; Giles, J. R.; Sondrup, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Xenon is an inert rare gas produced as a fission product in nuclear reactors and through spontaneous fission of some transuranic isotopes. Thus, xenon will be released from buried transuranic waste. Two complementary methods are used to measure xenon isotopes: radiometric analysis for short-lived radioxenon isotopes and mass spectrometry for detection of stable xenon isotopes. Initial measurements near disposal facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site show radioxenon and stable xenon isotopic signatures that are indicative of transuranic waste. Radioxenon analysis has greater sensitivity due to the lower background concentrations and indicates spontaneous fission due to the short half life of the isotopes. Stable isotope ratios may be used to distinguish irradiated fuel sources from pure spontaneous fission sources and are not as dependent on rapid release from the waste form. The release rate is dependent on the type of waste and container integrity and is the greatest unknown in application of this technique. Numerical multi-phase transport modeling of burial grounds at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory indicates that, under generalized conditions, the radioxenon isotopes will diffuse away from the waste and be found in the soil cap and adjacent to the burial ground at levels many orders of magnitude above the detection limit.

  13. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  14. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Aires, Ricardo S; Francisco, Alexandre P; Madeira, Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules) under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1) apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2) ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3) neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4) limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots). Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in functionally enriched

  15. Identification of a Debris Cloud from the Nuclear Powered SNAPSHOT Satellite with Haystack Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokely, C.; Stansbery, E.

    2006-01-01

    Data from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) Long Range Imaging Radar (known as the Haystack radar) have been used in the past to examine families of objects from individual satellite breakups or families of orbiting objects that can be isolated in altitude and inclination. This is possible because for some time after a breakup, the debris cloud of particles can remain grouped together in similar orbit planes. This cloud will be visible to the radar, in fixed staring mode, for a short time twice each day, as the orbit plane moves through the field of view. There should be a unique three-dimensional pattern in observation time, range, and range rate which can identify the cloud. Eventually, through slightly differing precession rates of the right ascension of ascending node of the debris cloud, the observation time becomes distributed so that event identification becomes much more difficult. Analyses of the patterns in observation time, range, and range rate have identified good debris candidates released from the polar orbiting SNAPSHOT satellite (International Identifier: 1965-027A). For orbits near 90o inclination, there is essentially no precession of the orbit plane. The SNAPSHOT satellite is a well known nuclear powered satellite launched in 1965 to a near circular 1300 km orbit with an inclination of 90.3o. This satellite began releasing debris in 1979 with new pieces being discovered and cataloged over the years. 51 objects are still being tracked by the United States Space Surveillance Network. An analysis of the Haystack data has identified at least 60 pieces of debris separate from the 51 known tracked debris pieces, where all but 2 of the 60 pieces have a size less than 10cm. The altitude and inclination (derived from range-rate with a circular orbit assumption) are consistent with the SNAPSHOT satellite and its tracked debris cloud.

  16. Cambro-Ordovician Granites in the Araçuaí Belt, in Brazil: snapshots from a late orogenic collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Campos, Cristina P.; Mendes, Júlio Cesar; de Medeiros, Silvia Regina; Ludka, Isabel P.

    2014-05-01

    Along the Brazilian Coast, surrounding the São Francisco Craton and adjacent mobile belts, deep segments of a Neoproterozoic orogen (Araçuaí-West Congo) generated over 120 Ma of successive magmatic episodes of granitic magmatism. The c.630-585 Ma calc-alkaline magmatic arc consists of metatonalite to metagranodiorite, with metadioritic to noritic facies and enclaves. During the syn-collisional and crustal thickening stage (c. 585 to 560 Ma) S-type metagranites have been built by dehydration melting of a diverse package of sediments. Around 545-525 Ma late orogenic crustal remelting formed mostly non-foliated garnet-cordierite leucogranites. In the post-orogenic stage (c. 510-480 Ma) inversely zoned calc-alkaline to alkaline plutons intruded previous units. This work will focus on the youngest post-orogenic magmatism. It will present the state of the art by reviewing structural measurements, detailed mapping of flow patterns and additional geochemical and isotopic data. The architecture of around 10 plutons, ranging from c. 20 to 200 km2 in surface area, unravels deep mushroom- to funnel-like magma chambers and/or conduits. Available data point towards different compositional domains, which are interfingered in complex concentric layers, so that, each pluton depicts a unique internal flow pattern. In the silica-richer structures concentric fragmented or folded layers of granite, in a hybrid K-gabbroic/dioritic matrix, contrast with predominantly homogeneous K-basaltic to gabbroic regions. These may be separated by magmatic shear zones where mixing is enhanced, also resulting in hybrid compositions. Sharp and pillow-like contacts between granitic and K-basaltic rocks locally depict a frozen-in situation of different intrusive episodes. In the silica-poorer plutonic bodies gradational contacts are more frequent and may be the result of convection enhanced diffusion. For all plutons, however, mostly sub-vertical internal contacts between most- and least

  17. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  18. Snapshot Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) with high sampling density for hyperspectral microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Liang; Kester, Robert T.; Hagen, Nathan; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2010-01-01

    A snapshot Image Mapping Spectrometer (IMS) with high sampling density is developed for hyperspectral microscopy, measuring a datacube of dimensions 285 × 285 × 60 (x, y, λ). The spatial resolution is ~0.45 µm with a FOV of 100 × 100 µm2. The measured spectrum is from 450 nm to 650 nm and is sampled by 60 spectral channels with average sampling interval ~3.3 nm. The channel’s spectral resolution is ~8nm. The spectral imaging results demonstrate the potential of the IMS for real-time cellular fluorescence imaging. PMID:20639917

  19. Multimodal snapshot spectral imaging for oral cancer diagnostics: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bedard, Noah; Schwarz, Richard A.; Hu, Aaron; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Howe, Jana; Williams, Michelle D.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2013-01-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy have emerged as effective tools for detecting malignant changes associated with oral cancer. While clinical studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for detection, current devices either interrogate a small region or can have reduced performance for some benign lesions. We describe a snapshot imaging spectrometer that combines the large field-of-view of widefield imaging with the diagnostic strength of spectroscopy. The portable device can stream RGB images at 7.2 frames per second and record both autofluorescence and reflectance spectral datacubes in < 1 second. We report initial data from normal volunteers and oral cancer patients. PMID:23760882

  20. Snapshot 2D tomography via coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging

    PubMed Central

    MacCabe, Kenneth P.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Brady, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a fan beam coded aperture x-ray scatter imaging system which acquires a tomographic image from each snapshot. This technique exploits cylindrical symmetry of the scattering cross section to avoid the scanning motion typically required by projection tomography. We use a coded aperture with a harmonic dependence to determine range, and a shift code to determine cross-range. Here we use a forward-scatter configuration to image 2D objects and use serial exposures to acquire tomographic video of motion within a plane. Our reconstruction algorithm also estimates the angular dependence of the scattered radiance, a step toward materials imaging and identification. PMID:23842254