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Sample records for isotopic equilibrium method

  1. Modeling equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A.; Jarzecki, A.; Spiro, T.

    2003-04-01

    Research into the stable isotope biogeochemistry of Fe and other transition metals has been driven primarily by analytical innovations which have revealed significant isotope effects in nature and the laboratory. Further development of these new isotope systems requires complementary theoretical research to guide analytical efforts. The results of the first such studies show some discrepancies with experiments. For example, Johnson et al. (2002) report an experimentally-determined 56Fe/54Fe equilibrium fractionation factor between Fe(II) and Fe(III) aquo complexes of ˜1.0025. This effect is ˜50% smaller than predicted theoretically by Schauble et al. (2001). It is important to resolve such discrepancies. Equilibrium isotope fractionation factors can be predicted from vibrational spectroscopic data of isotopically-substituted complexes, or from theoretical predictions of some or all of these frequencies obtained using force field models. The pioneering work of Schauble et al. (2001) utilized a modified Urey-Bradley force field (MUBFF) model. This approach is limiting in at least three ways: First, it is not ab initio, requiring as input some measured vibrational frequencies. Such data are not always available, or may have significant uncertainties. Second, the MUBFF does not include potentially important effects of solvent interaction. Third, because it makes certain assumptions about molecular symmetry, the MUBFF-based approach is not able to model the spectra of mixed-ligand complexes. To address these limitations, we are evaluating the use of density functional theory (DFT) as an ab initio method to predict vibrational frequencies of isotopically-substituted complexes and, hence, equilibrium fractionation factors. In a preliminary examination of the frequency shift upon isotope substitution of the bending and asymmetric stretching modes of the tetrahedral FeCl_42- complex, we find substantial differences between MUBFF and DFT predictions. Results for other Fe

  2. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation in isotopic equilibrium: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Pure CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on characterization of vaterite at equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~ 0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.5 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥ 94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield of up to 235 mg relative to a total dissolved CaCO3 amount of 370 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  3. Experimental determination of equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between spinel, forsterite, and magnesite by the three-isotope method at 700 °C and 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, C. A.; Young, E. D.; Manning, C. E.; Schauble, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium isotopes are potentially powerful tools for high-temperature geochemistry if relevant fractionation factors are known. However, experimental data for Mg isotope fractionation are lacking at high temperatures. We performed piston-cylinder experiments at 700 °C and 1 GPa to establish the equilibrium magnesium isotope partitioning between forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and magnesite (MgCO3), and between spinel (MgAl2O4) and magnesite, making use of the well-established advantages of using carbonates as an isotope exchange medium (e.g. Clayton et al., 1989). Our results provide the first experimental calibration of the equilibrium 26Mg/24Mg fractionation between minerals at high temperature. For these experiments we used a high-pressure piston cylinder apparatus and a three-isotope spike technique. The present study extends the applicability of the three-isotope method to experiments involving simple isotope exchange rather than exchange by heterogeneous reaction (Shahar et al., 2008). In these experiments we used magnesite as the exchange medium (and exchange partner) to overcome the sluggish diffusion-limited exchange between spinel and forsterite alone. The carbonate media facilitates chemical and isotopic exchange by promoting annealing and re-crystallization of minerals during the experiment. The combination of a three-isotope method with the use of carbonate as exchange media, used for the first time in this study, allows the experimentalist to determine the partitioning of Mg isotopes between two solid phases without requiring heterogeneous reaction. Results show that at 700 °C and 1 GPa 26ΔFo-Mgs = -0.16 ± 0.13% and 26ΔSp-Mgs = 0.93 ± 0.28%. From these two experimentally-determined equilibrium fractionation values, we can derive the equilibrium fractionation between spinel and forsterite by difference, yielding 26ΔSp-Fo = 1.09 ± 0.31%. This agrees within error with a first- principles estimate of equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation of 26

  4. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    factors. The derivations can be extended to calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for ion pairs and equilibrium constants for isotopic species of other chemical elements. The individual isotope approach calculates the same phase isotopic compositions as existing methods, but also provides concentrations of individual species, which are needed in calculations of mass-dependent effects in transport processes. The equilibrium constants derived in this paper are used to calculate the example of gas-water equilibrium for CO2 in an acidic aqueous solution. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, Donald C.; Parkhurst, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by , where is n the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example and , and to include the effects of nonideality. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions provide a basis for calculating the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the geochemical modeling reactions. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation factors. Equilibrium constants are calculated for all species that can be formed from and selected species containing , in the molecules and the ion pairs with where the subscripts g, aq, l, and s refer to gas, aqueous, liquid, and solid, respectively. These equilibrium constants are used in the geochemical model PHREEQC to produce an equilibrium and reaction-transport model that includes these isotopic species. Methods are presented for calculation of the individual isotope equilibrium constants for the asymmetric bicarbonate ion. An example calculates the equilibrium of multiple isotopes among multiple species and phases.

  6. Unbiased isotope equilibrium factors from partial isotope exchange experiments in 3-exchange site systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrinier, Pierre; Javoy, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Two methods are available in order to evaluate the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between exchange sites or phases from partial isotope exchange experiments. The first one developed by Northrop and Clayton (1966) is designed for isotope exchanges between two exchange sites (hereafter, the N&C method), the second one from Zheng et al. (1994) is a refinement of the first one to account for a third isotope exchanging site (hereafter, the Z method). In this paper, we use a simple model of isotope kinetic exchange for a 3-exchange site system (such as hydroxysilicates where oxygen occurs as OH and non-OH groups like in muscovite, chlorite, serpentine, or water or calcite) to explore the behavior of the N&C and Z methods. We show that these two methods lead to significant biases that cannot be detected with the usual graphical tests proposed by the authors. Our model shows that biases originate because isotopes are fractionated between all these exchanging sites. Actually, we point out that the variable mobility (or exchangeability) of isotopes in and between the exchange sites only controls the amplitude of the bias, but is not essential to the production of this bias as previously suggested. Setting a priori two of the three exchange sites at isotopic equilibrium remove the bias and thus is required for future partial exchange experiments to produce accurate and unbiased extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors. Our modeling applied to published partial oxygen isotope exchange experiments for 3-exchange site systems (the muscovite-calcite (Chacko et al., 1996), the chlorite-water (Cole and Ripley, 1998) and the serpentine-water (Saccocia et al., 2009)) shows that the extrapolated equilibrium fractionation factors (reported as 1000 ln(α)) using either the N&C or the Z methods lead to bias that may reach several δ per mil in a few cases. These problematic cases, may be because experiments were conducted at low temperature and did not reach high

  7. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  8. Nuclear Volume Effects in Equilibrium Stable Isotope Fractionations of Hg, Tl and Pb Isotope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Many evidences showed that heavy isotope systems could be significantly fractionated as the consequence of the nuclear volume effect (NVE) or so-called nuclear field shift effect. Here we investigate NVEs of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems by using quantum chemistry computational methods with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wavefunction. Our results generally agree with previous studies but with noticeable differences in many cases. With the unique NVE driving force, equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg and 205Tl/203Tl isotopes can be fractionated up to 3.94‰ and 2.78‰ at 0℃, respectively, showing potentially large equilibrium isotope fractionations can be expected for future studies of these two isotope systems. Moreover, the NVE causes large mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆199NVHg and ∆201NVHg) and small MIFs for even-mass isotopes (e.g., ∆200NVHg). For Pb isotope system, NVEs induce isotope fractionations up to 1.62‰ (207Pb/206Pb) and 4.06‰ (208Pb/206Pb) at 0℃. However, contributions from classical mass-dependent driving force are small, about 0.1-0.5‰ for 207Pb/206Pb and 0.2-0.9‰ for 208Pb/206Pb. We find that Pb4+-bearing species can be significantly enriched heavy isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species. Comparing to Pb0, Pb2+-bearing species even enrich lighter Pb isotopes. A very strange and interesting thing is that the beta value of Pb2+-bearing species can be smaller than the unity (1.000). Similar thing has been found on Tl+-bearing species. This is an impossible and unexplained situation if only based on classical mass-dependent isotope fractionation theory (e.g., Bigeleisen-Mayer equation). The consequence is that the different direction of beta values of Pb2+-bearing species will let the Pb isotope fractionation even larger when they fractionate with Pb4+-bearing species. Moreover, NVEs also cause mass-independent fractionation (MIF) of odd 207Pb

  9. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  10. First Principles Calculation on Equilibrium Si Isotope Fractionation Factors and its Implementation on Si Isotope Distributions in Earth Surface Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; He, H. T.; Zhu, C.

    2014-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors are calculated here. We use a so-called volume-variable-cluster-model (VVCM) method for solids and the "water-droplet" method for aqueous species for isotope fractionation calculation at the same quantum chemistry level. The calculation results show that several silicate minerals, such as quartz, feldspar, kaolinite, etc., all enrich heavy Si isotopes relative to aqueous H4SiO4 and can be up to 3.3‰ at 25°C, different from most field observations. Meanwhile stable organosilicon complexes can enrich even lighter Si isotopes than aqueous H4SiO4. For explaining the difference between the calculation results and field observations, we calculate the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the formation of amorphous silica, and find that amorphous silica will enrich extremely light Si isotopes. From amorphous silica to crystalline quartz, the structural adjustment & transition needs getting rid of small amount of Si to re-organize the structure. Light Si isotopes will be preferentially lost and let the final crystalline quartz with a little bit more heavy Si isotopes. However, such late-stage Si heavy isotope enrichment cannot erase the total isotopic signal, crystalline quartz still inherit much light Si isotopic composition from amorphous quartz. That is the reason for the discrepancy between the calculation results and the field observations, because the formation of amorphous quartz is under a non-equilibrium process but theoretical calculations are for equilibrium isotope fractionations. With accurate equilibrium fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in earth surface environments including soil, groundwater and plants can be further interpreted. We find that δ30Si variations in soil are mainly driven by secondary minerals precipitation and adsorption. Also, bulk soil δ30Si maybe have a parabolic distribution with soil age, with a minimum value at where allophane is

  11. Equilibrium stable-isotope fractionation of thallium and mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    In this study first-principles quantum mechanical and empirical force-field models are used to estimate equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionations among a variety of thallium and mercury compounds. High-precision MC-ICP-MS measurements have recently uncovered evidence of stable isotope fractionation for many elements, including 2-4‰ variability in the isotopic compositions of thallium[1] (atomic no. 81) and mercury[2] (atomic no. 80). The observed thallium- and mercury-isotope fractionations are remarkable, given that the magnitude of isotopic fractionation typically decreases as atomic number increases[3]. Stable isotope measurements could improve our understanding of geochemical and biogeochemical cycling of both elements, but little is known about the mechanisms driving these fractionations. A better understanding of the chemical processes controlling stable isotope compositions could help maximize the utility of these new geochemical tracers. Standard equilibrium stable isotope fractionation theory holds that the energy driving fractionation comes from isotopic effects on vibrational frequencies, which have generally not been measured. In the present study both quantum-mechanical and empirical force fields are used to estimate unknown frequencies. Results suggest that thallium and mercury fractionations of ≥ 0.5‰ are likely during the relevant redox reactions Tl+ ↔ Tl3+ and HgO ↔ Hg2+. Methyl-mercury and mercury-halide compounds like CH3HgCl will have ~ 1‰ higher 202Hg/198Hg than atomic vapor at room temperature. Fractionations between coexisting Hg2+ species appear to be much smaller, however. 205Tl/203Tl in Tl(H2O)_63+ is predicted to be ~0.5‰ higher than in coexisting Tl+-bearing substances. This result is in qualitative agreement with data from ferromanganese crusts [1], suggesting that Tl3+ in manganese-oxides will have higher 205Tl/203Tl than aqueous Tl+. Equilibrium fractionations for both elements are much smaller than the observed

  12. The oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite species and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Breuer, Christian; Coleman, Max; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Sulfite is an important sulfoxy intermediate in oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling in the marine and terrestrial environment. Different aqueous sulfite species exist, such as dissolved sulfur dioxide (SO2), bisulfite (HSO3-), pyrosulfite (S2O52-) and sulfite sensu stricto (SO32-), whereas their relative abundance in solution depends on the concentration and the pH. Conversion of one species into another is rapid and involves in many cases incorporation of oxygen from, or release of oxygen to, water (e.g. SO2 + H2O ↔ HSO3- + H+), resulting in rapid oxygen isotope exchange between sulfite species and water. Consequently, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfite is strongly influenced by the oxygen isotope composition of water. Since sulfate does not exchange oxygen isotopes with water under most earth surface conditions, it can preserve the sulfite oxygen isotope signature that it inherits via oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling. Therefore, interpretation of δO values strongly hinges on the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water which is poorly constrained. This is in large part due to technical difficulties in extraction of sulfite from solution for oxygen isotope analysis.

  13. Predicting equilibrium uranium isotope fractionation in crystals and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the rapidly growing interest in using 238U/235U measurements as a proxy for changes in oxygen abundance in surface and near-surface environments, the present theoretical understanding of uranium isotope fractionation is limited to a few simple gas-phase molecules and analogues of dissolved species (e.g., 1,2,3). Understanding uranium isotope fractionation behavior in more complicated species, such as crystals and adsorption complexes, will help in the design and interpretation of experiments and field studies, and may suggest other uses for 38U/235U measurements. In this study, a recently developed first-principles method for estimating the nuclear volume component of field shift fractionation in crystals and complex molecular species (4) is combined with mass-dependent fractionation theory to predict equilibrium 38U/235U fractionations in aqueous and crystalline uranium compounds, including uraninite (UO2). The nuclear field shift effect, caused by the interaction of electrons with the finite volume of the positive charge distribution in uranium nuclei, is estimated using Density Functional Theory and the Projector Augmented Wave method (DFT-PAW). Tests against relativistic electronic structure calculations and Mössbauer isomer shift data indicate that the DFT-PAW method is reasonably accurate, while being much better suited to models of complex and crystalline species. Initial results confirm previous predictions that the nuclear volume effect overwhelms mass depdendent fractionation in U(VI)-U(IV) exchange reactions, leading to higher 238U/235U in U(IV) species (i.e., for UO2 xtal vs. UO22+aq, ln αNV ≈ +1.8‰ , ln αMD ≈ -0.8‰, ln αTotal ≈ +1.0‰ at 25ºC). UO2 and U(H2O)94+, are within ~0.4‰ of each other, while U(VI) species appear to be more variable. This suggests that speciation is likely to significantly affect natural uranium isotope fractionations, in addition to oxidation state. Tentatively, it appears that uranyl-type (UO22

  14. Theoretical estimates of equilibrium chlorine-isotope fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Rossman, George R.; Taylor, H. P.

    2003-09-01

    Equilibrium chlorine-isotope ( 37Cl/ 35Cl) fractionations have been determined by using published vibrational spectra and force-field modeling to calculate reduced partition function ratios for Cl-isotope exchange. Ab initio force fields calculated at the HF/6-31G(d) level are used to estimate unknown vibrational frequencies of 37Cl-bearing molecules, whereas crystalline phases are modeled by published lattice-dynamics models. Calculated fractionations are principally controlled by the oxidation state of Cl and its bond partners. Molecular mass (or the absence of C-H bonds) also appears to play a role in determining relative fractionations among simple Cl-bearing organic species. Molecules and complexes with oxidized Cl (i.e., Cl 0, Cl +, etc.) will concentrate 37Cl relative to chlorides (substances with Cl -). At 298 K, ClO 2 (containing Cl 4+) and [ClO 4] - (containing Cl 7+) will concentrate 37Cl relative to chlorides by as much as 27‰ and 73‰, respectively, in rough agreement with earlier calculations. Among chlorides, 37Cl will be concentrated in substances where Cl is bonded to +2 cations (i.e., FeCl 2, MnCl 2, micas, and amphiboles) relative to substances where Cl is bonded to +1 cations (such as NaCl) by ˜2 to 3‰ at 298 K; organic molecules with C-Cl bonds will be even richer in 37Cl (˜5 to 9‰ at 298 K). Precipitation experiments, in combination with our results, provide an estimate for Cl-isotope partitioning in brines and suggest that silicates (to the extent that their Cl atoms are associated with nearest-neighbor +2 cations analogous with FeCl 2 and MnCl 2) will have higher 37Cl/ 35Cl ratios than coexisting brine (by ˜2 to 3‰ at room temperature). Calculated fractionations between HCl and Cl 2, and between brines and such alteration minerals, are in qualitative agreement with both experimental results and systematics observed in natural samples. Our results suggest that Cl-bearing organic molecules will have markedly higher 37Cl/ 35Cl

  15. Method for separating isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jepson, B.E.

    1975-10-21

    Isotopes are separated by contacting a feed solution containing the isotopes with a cyclic polyether wherein a complex of one isotope is formed with the cyclic polyether, the cyclic polyether complex is extracted from the feed solution, and the isotope is thereafter separated from the cyclic polyether.

  16. Spinel-olivine-pyroxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, François L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-01

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fetot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (β-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fetot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fetot on the β-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite-fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fetot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  17. Spinel-olivine-pryoxene equilibrium iron isotopic fractionation and applications to natural peridotites

    SciTech Connect

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Sio, Corliss K. I.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Bi, Wenli; Tissot, Francois L. H.; Hu, Michael Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, Esen E.

    2015-11-15

    Eight spinel-group minerals were synthesized by a flux-growth method producing spinels with varying composition and Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios. The mean force constants of iron bonds in these minerals were determined by synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) in order to determine the reduced isotopic partition function ratios (beta-factors) of these spinels. The mean force constants are strongly dependent on the Fe3+/Fe-tot of the spinel but are independent, or weakly dependent on other structural and compositional parameters. From our spectroscopic data, it is found that a single redox-dependent calibration line accounts for the effects of Fe3+/Fe-tot on the beta-factors of spinels. This calibration successfully describes the equilibrium Fe isotopes fractionation factors between spinels and silicates (olivine and pyroxenes). Our predictions are in excellent agreement with independent determinations for the equilibrium Fe isotopic fractionations for the magnetite- fayalite and the magnetite-hedenbergite couples. Our calibration applies to the entire range of Fe3+/Fe-tot ratios found in natural spinels and provides a basis for interpreting iron isotopic variations documented in mantle peridotites. Except for a few exceptions, most of the samples measured so far are in isotopic disequilibrium, reflecting metasomatism and partial melting processes.

  18. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Spevack, J.S.

    1957-04-01

    An isotope concentration process is described which consists of exchanging, at two or more different temperature stages, two isotopes of an element between substances that are physically separate from each other and each of which is capable of containing either of the isotopes, and withdrawing from a point between at least two of the temperatare stages one of the substances containing an increased concentration of the desired isotope.

  19. Method for separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1978-01-01

    A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

  20. Iron isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite revisited: New insights based on a multi-direction approach to equilibrium and isotopic exchange rate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Beard, Brian L.; Reddy, Thiruchelvi R.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2014-08-01

    The Fe isotope compositions of naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals provide insights into biogeochemical processes that occur in modern and ancient environments. Key to understanding isotopic variations in such minerals is knowledge of the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation factors between common minerals and aqueous Fe species. Because experimental measurements of isotopic fractionation may reflect a combination of kinetic and equilibrium fractionations during rapid dissolution and precipitation, even in experiments that employ the three-isotope method, assessment of the attainment of equilibrium is often difficult. Here, we re-examine Fe isotope exchange, via a 57Fe tracer, and natural mass-dependent fractionation, through changes in initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, between aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) and goethite. This approach uses the three-isotope method, but is distinct in its evaluation of kinetic isotope fractionation and the attainment of equilibrium by: (i) employing a multi-direction approach to equilibrium at 22 °C via reaction of three Fe(II)aq solutions that had different initial 56Fe/54Fe ratios, (ii) conducting isotopic exchange experiments at elevated temperature (50 °C), and (iii) modifying the rate of isotopic exchange through a combination of trace-element substitutions and particle coarsening to evaluate corresponding temporal changes in fractionation trajectories that may reflect changing instantaneous fractionation factors. We find that rapid isotopic exchange produces kinetic isotope effects between Fe(II)aq and goethite, which shifts the 56Fe/54Fe ratios of Fe(II)aq early in reactions toward that of goethite, indicating that the instantaneous Fe(II)aq-goethite fractionation factor under kinetic conditions is small. Importantly, however, this kinetic fractionation is “erased” with continued reaction, and this is evident by the congruence for multiple-exchange trajectories of distinct initial Fe(II)aq solutions toward the same final value

  1. A process-based model for non-equilibrium clumped isotope effects in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The equilibrium clumped isotope composition of carbonate minerals is independent of the composition of the aqueous solution. However, many carbonate minerals grow at rates that place them in a non-equilibrium regime with respect to carbon and oxygen isotopes with unknown consequences for clumped isotopes. We develop a process-based model that allows one to calculate the oxygen, carbon, and clumped isotope composition of calcite as a function of temperature, crystal growth rate, and solution pH. In the model, carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation occurs through the mass-dependent attachment/detachment kinetics of the isotopologues of HCO-3 and CO2-3 to and from the calcite surface, which in turn, influence the clumped isotope composition of calcite. At experimental and biogenic growth rates, the mineral is expected to inherit a clumped isotopic composition that is similar to that of the DIC pool, which helps to explain (1) why different organisms share the same clumped isotope versus temperature calibration curves, (2) why many inorganic calibration curves are slightly different from one another, and (3) why foraminifera, coccoliths, and deep sea corals can have near-equilibrium clumped isotope compositions but far-from-equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope compositions. Some aspects of the model can be generalized to other mineral systems and should serve as a useful reference in future efforts to quantify kinetic clumped isotope effects.

  2. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

    1981-01-23

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

  3. Method of separating boron isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Reed J.; Thorne, James M.; Cluff, Coran L.; Hayes, John K.

    1984-01-01

    A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

  4. Equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors and their implications on Si isotope distributions in the Earth's surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several important equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among minerals, organic molecules and the H4SiO4 solution are complemented to facilitate explanation of distributions of Si isotope in the Earth's surface environments. The results reveal that heavy Si isotopes will be significantly enriched in the secondary silicate minerals in comparison to aqueous H4SiO4. On the contrary, quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes are enriched in light silicon isotope relative to the solution. The extent of 28Si-enrichment in hyper-coordinated organosilicon complexes is found the largest. In addition, the large kinetic isotope effect associated with the polymerization of monosilicic acid and dimer is calculated and the result supports previous statement that highly 28Si-enrichment in the formation of amorphous quartz precursor contributes to the discrepancy between theoretical calculations and field observations. With equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, Si isotope distributions in many surface systems of the Earth can be explained. For example, the change of bulk soil δ30Si can be predicted as a concave pattern with respect to weathering degree, with the minimum value where allophane completely dissolves and the total amount of sesqui-oxides and poorly crystalline minerals reaches its maximum. When well-crystallized clays start to precipitate from pore solutions under equilibrium conditions, the bulk soil δ30Si will increase again and reach a constant value. Similarly, the precipitation of crystalline smectite and the dissolution of poorly crystalline kaolinite may explain δ30Si variations in the ground water profile. Equilibrium Si isotope fractionations among quadra-coordinated organosilicon complexes and the H4SiO4 solution may also shed the light on the Si isotope distributions in Si-accumulating plants.

  5. Isotope separation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Feldman, Barry J.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferably substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. Because the molecules in the beam occupy various degenerate energy levels, if the laser beam comprises chirped pulses comprising selected wavelengths, the laser beam will very efficiently excite substantially all unexcited molecules and will cause stimulated emission of substantially all excited molecules of a selected one of the isotopes in the beam which such pulses encounter. Excitation caused by first direction chirped pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning chirped pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement of essentially all the molecules containing the one isotope is accomplished by a large number of chirped pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

  6. Low temperature equilibrium isotope fractionation and isotope exchange kinetics between U(IV) and U(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangli; Johnson, Thomas M.; Lundstrom, Craig C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the uranium (U) isotope ratio 238U/235U provide an emerging redox proxy in environmental and paleoredox studies, but many key parameters concerning U isotope fractionation are still poorly constrained. Here we report the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI), and rates of isotope exchange between solid-phase U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). We conducted one experiment at high concentration [35 mM U(IV) and 32 mM U(VI)] and low pH (0.2) in hydrochloric acid media at room temperature to determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation between dissolved U(IV) and dissolved U(VI). Isotopic equilibrium was reached in about 19 days under such experimental conditions. The equilibrium isotope fractionation was determined to be 1.64 ± 0.16‰, with U(IV) being enriched in 238U relative to U(VI). Applicability of the determined equilibrium fractionation is discussed. We also conducted a set of experiments to determine isotopic exchange rates between dissolved U(VI) and nanouraninite U(IV) under conditions closer to those in natural system, with lower concentrations and neutral pH. The exchange rate was found to conform to the rate law R = k[U(VI)]adsorbed, in which R is the isotopic exchange rate (μM day-1); k is the rate constant determined to be 0.21 day-1; and [U(VI)]adsorbed is the concentration of U(VI) adsorbed to nanouraninite (μM). Our results, combined with consideration of the variables controlling U(VI)-U(IV) contact in natural settings, indicate that the timescale for significant isotope equilibration varies depending on environmental conditions, mostly uranium concentrations. In natural uncontaminated sediments with low uranium concentrations, equilibration is expected to occur on a timescale of hundreds to thousands of years. In contrast, in U-contaminated aquifers with high U concentrations, significant equilibration could occur on timescales of weeks to years.

  7. Isotope separation apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Cotter, Theodore P.

    1982-12-28

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for laser isotope separation by photodeflection. A molecular beam comprising at least two isotopes to be separated intersects, preferable substantially perpendicular to one broad side of the molecular beam, with a laser beam traveling in a first direction. The laser beam is reflected back through the molecular beam, preferably in a second direction essentially opposite to the first direction. The laser beam comprises .pi.-pulses of a selected wavelength which excite unexcited molecules, or cause stimulated emission of excited molecules of one of the isotopes. Excitation caused by first direction .pi.-pulses moves molecules of the isotope excited thereby in the first direction. Stimulated emission of excited molecules of the isotope is brought about by returning .pi.-pulses traveling in the second direction. Stimulated emission moves emitting molecules in a direction opposite to the photon emitted. Because emitted photons travel in the second direction, emitting molecules move in the first direction. Substantial molecular movement is accomplished by a large number of .pi.-pulse-molecule interactions. A beam corer collects the molecules in the resulting enriched divergent portions of the beam.

  8. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of dissolved organic groundwater pollutants by equilibrium sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhener, Patrick; Yu, Xianjing

    2012-03-01

    Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were established which relate equilibrium vapor-liquid isotope effects to stable carbon and hydrogen isotope enrichment factors for equilibrium sorption to geosorbents. The LFERs were established for normal, cyclic or branched alkanes, monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroethenes. These LFERs predict that isotopic light compounds sorb more strongly than their heavy counterparts. Defining fractionation as in classical literature by "heavy divided by light", carbon enrichment factors for equilibrium sorption were derived which ranged from - 0.13 ± 0.04‰ (benzene) to - 0.52 ± 0.19‰ (trichloroethene at 5-15 °C). Hydrogen enrichment factors for sorption of 14 different compounds were between - 2.4 and - 9.2‰. For perdeuterated hydrocarbons the predicted enrichment factors ranged from - 19 ± 5.4‰ (benzene) to - 64 ± 30‰ (cyclohexane). Equilibrium sorption experiments with a soil and activated carbon as sorbents were performed in the laboratory for perdeuterocyclohexane and perdeuterotoluene. The measured D/H enrichments agreed with the LFER prediction for both compounds and both sorbents within the uncertainty estimate of the prediction. The results of this work suggest that equilibrium sorption does create only very small isotope shifts for 13C in groundwater pollutants in aquifers. It is also suggested that deuterium shifts are expected to be higher, especially for strongly sorbing pollutants.

  9. METHOD OF ISOTOPE CONCENTRATION

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, T.I.; Spindel, W.

    1960-02-01

    A method of concentrating N/sup 15/ in a liquid is described. Gaseous nitric oxide and at least one liquid selected from the group consisting of the aqueous oxyacids and oxides of nitrogen, wherein the atomic ratio of oxygen to nitrogen is greater than unity, are brought into intimate contact to cause an enrichment of the liquid and a depletion of the gas in N/sup 15/. The liquid is, thereafter, reacted with sulfur dioxide to produce a gas contuining nitric oxide. The gas contuining nitric oxide is then continuously passed in countercurrent contact with the liquid to cause further enrichment of the liquid.

  10. Isotopic equilibrium between mantle peridotite and melt: Evidence from the Corsica ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, Elisabetta; Hofmann, Albrecht W.; Raczek, Ingrid

    2009-11-01

    A widely used assumption of mantle geochemistry and the theory of partial melting at oceanic settings is the existence of isotopic equilibrium between mantle source and melt. Yet, recent diffusion studies and isotopic investigations of ophiolites, abyssal peridotites and associated MORBs have cast doubts on this assumption, by providing evidence for isotopic disequilibrium between residual peridotites and MORBs. Here we present Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data on mantle peridotites and gabbroic intrusions from the Mt. Maggiore (Alpine Corsica, France) Tethyan ophiolite, which document Nd isotopic homogeneity, implying isotopic equilibrium, on a 1-kilometer scale. The peridotites record multi-stage melt-rock interaction and melt intrusion occurring at different lithospheric depths. Samples studied are residual cpx-poor spinel lherzolites, reactive spinel harzburgites, impregnated plagioclase peridotites and related gabbronoritic veinlets, later gabbroic dykes. Strontium isotopes in peridotites and gabbros are highly variable, due to interaction with sea-water derived fluids, and cannot be used to test melt-residue isotopic equilibrium. In contrast, Nd isotopes are unaffected by sea-water alteration. Peridotites display present-day high 147Sm/ 144Nd (0.49-0.59) and 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.513367-0.513551) ratios, with no appreciable differences between residual and reactive spinel peridotites, and between spinel and plagioclase peridotites. Gabbroic dykes have present-day Nd isotopic compositions typical of MORB ( 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.513122-0.513138). Internal (plag-whole rock-cpx) Sm-Nd isochrons for olivine gabbro dykes and a gabbronoritic veinlet yield Jurassic ages (162 ± 10 and 159 ± 15 Ma in ol-gabbros, 155 ± 6 Ma in gabbronorite), and initial ɛNd = 8.9-9.7 indicative of a MORB-type source. Sm-Nd isotopic compositions of peridotites conform to the linear array defined by the gabbroic rocks, and yield initial (160 Ma) ɛNd values of 7.6-8.9, again consistent with a MORB

  11. Method for laser induced isotope enrichment

    DOEpatents

    Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2004-09-07

    Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

  12. Ab initio prediction of equilibrium boron isotope fractionation between minerals and aqueous fluids at high P and T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr M.; Wunder, Bernd; Jahn, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade experimental studies have shown a large B isotope fractionation between materials carrying boron incorporated in trigonally and tetrahedrally coordinated sites, but the mechanisms responsible for producing the observed isotopic signatures are poorly known. In order to understand the boron isotope fractionation processes and to obtain a better interpretation of the experimental data and isotopic signatures observed in natural samples, we use first principles calculations based on density functional theory in conjunction with ab initio molecular dynamics and a new pseudofrequency analysis method to investigate the B isotope fractionation between B-bearing minerals (such as tourmaline and micas) and aqueous fluids containing HBO and HBO4- species. We confirm the experimental finding that the isotope fractionation is mainly driven by the coordination of the fractionating boron atoms and have found in addition that the strength of the produced isotopic signature is strongly correlated with the Bsbnd O bond length. We also demonstrate the ability of our computational scheme to predict the isotopic signatures of fluids at extreme pressures by showing the consistency of computed pressure-dependent β factors with the measured pressure shifts of the Bsbnd O vibrational frequencies of HBO and HBO4- in aqueous fluid. The comparison of the predicted with measured fractionation factors between boromuscovite and neutral fluid confirms the existence of the admixture of tetrahedral boron species in neutral fluid at high P and T found experimentally, which also explains the inconsistency between the various measurements on the tourmaline-mica system reported in the literature. Our investigation shows that the calculated equilibrium isotope fractionation factors have an accuracy comparable to the experiments and give unique and valuable insight into the processes governing the isotope fractionation mechanisms on the atomic scale.

  13. Evidence for equilibrium iron isotope fractionation by nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kappler, A; Johnson, C M; Crosby, H A; Beard, B L; Newman, D K

    2010-05-10

    Iron isotope fractionations produced during chemical and biological Fe(II) oxidation are sensitive to the proportions and nature of dissolved and solid-phase Fe species present, as well as the extent of isotopic exchange between precipitates and aqueous Fe. Iron isotopes therefore potentially constrain the mechanisms and pathways of Fe redox transformations in modern and ancient environments. In the present study, we followed in batch experiments Fe isotope fractionations between Fe(II)(aq) and Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates produced by the Fe(III) mineral encrusting, nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Isotopic fractionation in (56)Fe/(54)Fe approached that expected for equilibrium conditions, assuming an equilibrium Δ(56)Fe(Fe(OH)3 - Fe(II)aq) fractionation factor of +3.0 ‰. Previous studies have shown that Fe(II) oxidation by this Acidovorax strain occurs in the periplasm, and we propose that Fe isotope equilibrium is maintained through redox cycling via coupled electron and atom exchange between Fe(II)(aq) and Fe(III) precipitates in the contained environment of the periplasm. In addition to the apparent equilibrium isotopic fractionation, these experiments also record the kinetic effects of initial rapid oxidation, and possible phase transformations of the Fe(III) precipitates. Attainment of Fe isotope equilibrium between Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates and Fe(II)(aq) by neutrophilic, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria or through abiologic Fe(II)(aq) oxidation is generally not expected or observed, because the poor solubility of their metabolic product, i.e. Fe(III), usually leads to rapid precipitation of Fe(III) minerals, and hence expression of a kinetic fractionation upon precipitation; in the absence of redox cycling between Fe(II)(aq) and precipitate, kinetic isotope fractionations are likely to be retained. These results highlight the distinct Fe isotope fractionations that are produced by different pathways of

  14. Clumped-isotope signatures at equilibrium of CH4, NH3, H2O, H2S and SO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Liu, Yun

    2016-02-01

    High precision Δi values at equilibrium determined by theoretical methods are imperatively needed as references for the development of new clumped-isotope thermometers (or tracers). In this study, quantum chemistry methods with corrections beyond the harmonic approximation are used to obtain the clumped-isotope signatures at equilibrium of several gas-phase molecules (i.e., CH4, NH3, H2O, H2S, and SO2). Here, we consider as many corrections to the traditional Bigeleisen-Mayer equation as possible to obtain accurate Δi values at equilibrium and their temperature dependences. The corrections include anharmonic correction for zero-point energy, anharmonic correction for vibrational excited states, vibration-rotation coupling correction for zero-point energy, vibration-rotation coupling correction for vibrational excited states, quantum mechanical correction to rotation, and centrifugal distortion correction, which are important for theoretical understanding of clumped-isotope signals. Specifically, molecular constants are calculated via second-order perturbative analysis at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. The CCSD/6-311+G(3df,3pd) and CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ levels are further employed to ensure the precision of harmonic frequencies of methane. For methane, a polynomial fit of ΔCH133D values over the temperature range of from 273.15 to 1000 K is obtained:

  15. Isotopic Dilution Analysis and Secular Equilibrium Study: Two Complementary Radiochemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kathryn R.; Lipford, Levin C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a complementary pair of radiochemistry experiments for instruction of isotopic dilution analysis and secular equilibrium. Both experiments use the readily available cesium-137 nuclide and the simple precipitation technique for cesium with the tetraphenylborate anion. Procedures used and typical results obtained are provided and…

  16. Extragradient methods for searching for equilibrium points in the parametric problem of equilibrium programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem'eva, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    The parametric problem of equilibrium programming is examined. The mathematical programming problem, the search for a saddle-point, the multicriteria search for a Pareto point, etc. are particular cases of this parametric problem. The primal and dual variants of the extragradient method are proposed as a tool for searching for equilibrium points. The convergence of both variants is analyzed.

  17. Equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between aqueous Mg2+ and carbonate minerals: Insights from path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Carlos; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne; Natarajan, Suresh K.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    The theoretical determination of the isotopic fractionation between an aqueous solution and a mineral is of utmost importance in Earth sciences. While for crystals, it is well established that equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors can be calculated using a statistical thermodynamic approach based on the vibrational properties, several theoretical methods are currently used to model ions in aqueous solution. In this work, we present a systematic study to determine the reduced partition function ratio (β-factor) of aqueous Mg2+ using several levels of theory within the simulations. In particular, using an empirical force field, we compare and discuss the performance of the exact results obtained from path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations, with respect to the more traditional methods based on vibrational properties and the cluster approximation. The results show the importance of including configurational disorder for the estimation of the equilibrium isotope fractionation factor. We also show that using the vibrational frequencies computed from snapshots taken from equilibrated classical molecular dynamics represents a good approximation for the study of aqueous ions. Based on these conclusions, the β-factor of aqueous Mg2+ have been estimated from a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulation with an ab initio force field, and combined with the β-factors of carbonate minerals (magnesite, dolomite, calcite and aragonite). Mg β-factor of Mg-bearing aragonite, calculated here for the first time, displays a lower value than the three other carbonate minerals. This is explained by a strong distortion of the cationic site leading to a decrease of the coordination number during Ca-Mg substitution. Overall, the equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation factors between aqueous Mg2+ and carbonate minerals that derive from this methodological study support the previous theoretical results obtained from embedded cluster models.

  18. A modified graphical method for determination of equilibrium constants

    PubMed Central

    Kilroe-Smith, T. A.

    1966-01-01

    A modification is described of the method of Dixon (1965) for determining equilibrium constants (K) of combinations of the type A+B⇌AB. The method obviates drawing of a tangent to the curve at the origin. PMID:5968534

  19. Isotopic Equilibrium in Mature Oceanic Lithosphere: Insights From Sm-Nd Isotopes on the Corsica (France) Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampone, E.; Hofmann, A. W.; Raczek, I.; Romairone, A.

    2003-12-01

    .6-8.9. Sm/Nd isotopic compositions of the peridotites are therefore consistent with a Jurassic age of melting and melt impregnation, and point to isotopic compositional similarities between depleted peridotites and associated magmatic rocks. In a regional geodynamic context, Sm/Nd isotope data for the Mt.Maggiore gabbro-peridotite association represent the first record of the attainment of a mature oceanic stage of the Ligurian Tethys ocean. Also, the data presented provide striking evidence of the existence of isotopic equilibrium between melts and their mantle residue. References Snow et al. (1994), Nature 371, 57-60. Salters and Dick (2002), Nature 418,68-72.

  20. Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium Isotopic Fractionation of Water. How well can classical water models predict it?

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Horita, Juske

    2009-01-01

    The liquid-vapor equilibrium isotopic fractionation of water is determined by molecular-based simulation, via Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo and isothermal-isochoric molecular dynamics involving two radically different but realistic models, the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and the Gaussian charge polarizable (GCP) models. The predicted temperature dependence of the liquid-vapor equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors for H 2 18O / H 2 16O, H 2 17O / H 2 16O, and 2H 1H 16O / 1H 2 16O are compared against the most accurate experimental datasets to assess the ability of these intermolecular potential models to describe quantum effects according to the Kirkwood-Wigner free energy perturbation ! 2 !expansion. Predictions of the vapor pressure isotopic effect for the H 2 18O / H 2 16O and H 2 17O / H 2 16O pairs are also presented in comparison with experimental data and two recently proposed thermodynamic modeling approaches. Finally, the simulation results are used to discuss some approximations behind the microscopic interpretation of isotopic fractionation based on the underlying roto-translational coupling.

  1. Equilibrium fractionation of H and O isotopes in water from path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Carlos; Blanchard, Marc; Balan, Etienne; Ferlat, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Mauri, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The equilibrium fractionation factor between two phases is of importance for the understanding of many planetary and environmental processes. Although thermodynamic equilibrium can be achieved between minerals at high temperature, many natural processes involve reactions between liquids or aqueous solutions and solids. For crystals, the fractionation factor α can be theoretically determined using a statistical thermodynamic approach based on the vibrational properties of the phases. These calculations are mostly performed in the harmonic approximation, using empirical or ab-initio force fields. In the case of aperiodic and dynamic systems such as liquids or solutions, similar calculations can be done using finite-size molecular clusters or snapshots obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) runs. It is however difficult to assess the effect of these approximate models on the isotopic fractionation properties. In this work we present a systematic study of the calculation of the D/H and 18O/16O equilibrium fractionation factors in water for the liquid/vapour and ice/vapour phases using several levels of theory within the simulations. Namely, we use a thermodynamic integration approach based on Path Integral MD calculations (PIMD) and an empirical potential model of water. Compared with standard MD, PIMD takes into account quantum effects in the thermodynamic modeling of systems and the exact fractionation factor for a given potential can be obtained. We compare these exact results with those of modeling strategies usually used, which involve the mapping of the quantum system on its harmonic counterpart. The results show the importance of including configurational disorder for the estimation of isotope fractionation in liquid phases. In addition, the convergence of the fractionation factor as a function of parameters such as the size of the simulated system and multiple isotope substitution is analyzed, showing that isotope fractionation is essentially a local effect in

  2. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac's formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium (202)Hg/(198)Hg, (205)Tl/(203)Tl, (207)Pb/(206)Pb and (208)Pb/(206)Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of [formula in text] for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb(4+)-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb(2+)-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of (208)Pb/(206)Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb(2+)-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., [formula in text]) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., [formula in text) are almost the same but with opposite signs. PMID:26224248

  3. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac’s formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg, 205Tl/203Tl, 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of vs. for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb4+-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of 208Pb/206Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb2+-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., ) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., ) are almost the same but with opposite signs. PMID:26224248

  4. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR COLLECTING ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Leyshon, W.E.

    1957-08-01

    A method and apparatus for collecting isotopes having a high vapor pressure, such as isotopes of mercury, in a calutron are described. Heretofore, the collected material would vaporize and escape from the ion receiver as fast as it was received. By making the receiver of pure silver, the mercury isotopes form a nonvolatile amalgam with the silver at the water cooled temperature of the receiver, and the mercury is thus retained.

  5. Method for isotope separation by photodeflection

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1977-01-01

    In the method of separating isotopes wherein a desired isotope species is selectively deflected out of a beam of mixed isotopes by irradiating the beam with a directed beam of light of narrowly defined frequency which is selectively absorbed by the desired species, the improvement comprising irradiating the deflected beam with light from other light sources whose frequencies are selected to cause the depopulation of any metastable excited states.

  6. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  7. Isotopic equilibrium between precipitation and water vapor: evidence from continental rains in central Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, K.; Gerlein, C.; Kemeny, P. C.; Caylor, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate understanding of the relationships between the isotopic composition of liquid water and that of water vapor in the environment can help describe hydrologic processes across many scales. One such relationship is the isotopic equilibrium between falling raindrops and the surrounding vapor. The degree of equilibration is used to model the isotopic composition of precipitation in isotope-enable general circulation models and land-atmosphere exchange models. Although this equilibrium has been a topic of isotope hydrology research for more than four decades, few studies have included vapor measurements to validate modeling efforts. Recent advances in laser technology have allowed for in situ vapor measurements at high temporal resolution (e.g., >1 Hz). Here we present concomitant rain and vapor measurements for a series of 17 rain events during the 'Continental' rainy season (June through August) at Mpala Research Center in central Kenya. Rain samples (n=218) were collected at intervals of 2 to 35 minutes (median of 3 minutes) depending on the rain rate (0.4 to 10.5 mm/hr). The volume-weighted mean rain values for δ18O, δ2H and D-excess (δ2H - 8* δ18O) were 0.1 ‰, 10.7 ‰, and 10.1 ‰. These values are more enriched than the annual weighted means reported for the area (-2.2 ‰, -7.6 ‰, and 11.0 ‰, respectively). Vapor was measured continuously at ~2Hz (DLT-100, Los Gatos Research), with an inverted funnel intake 4m above the ground surface. The mean vapor isotopic composition during the rain events was -10.0 +/- 1.2 ‰ (1 σ) for δ18O and -73.9 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. The difference between the rain sample isotopic composition and that of liquid in isotopic equilibrium with the corresponding vapor at the ambient temperature was 0.8 +/- 2.2 ‰ for δ18O and 6.2 +/- 7.0 ‰ for δ2H. This disequilibrium was found to correlate with the natural log of rain rate (R2 of 0.26 for δ18O and 0.46 for δ2H), with lower rain rates having larger

  8. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  9. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, K.K.; Wielandt, D.; Schiller, M.; Bizzarro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr3+, CrCl2+ and CrCl2+) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ~1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr3+, intermediates in CrCl2+ and the lightest in CrCl2+/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ~25% Cr (in the form of Cr3+) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected 53Cr/52Cr (μ53 Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and 54Cr/52Cr (μ54Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr3+ by >5 days exposure to HNO3 —H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >~98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a chromatographic elution strategy that

  10. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120°C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  11. Equilibrium-disequilibrium relations in the Monte Rosa Granite, Western Alps: Petrological, Rb-Sr and stable isotope data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, M.; Hunziker, J.C.; O'Neil, J.R.; Schwander, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Nine samples from the Monte Rosa Granite have been investigated by microscopic, X-ray, wet chemical, electron microprobe, stable isotope and Rb-Sr and K-Ar methods. Two mineral assemblages have been distinguished by optical methods and dated as Permian and mid-Tertiary by means of Rb-Sr age determinations. The Permian assemblage comprises quartz, orthoclase, oligoclase, biotite, and muscovite whereas the Alpine assemblage comprises quartz, microcline, albite+epidote or oligoclase, biotite, and phengite. Disequilibrium between the Permian and Alpine mineral assemblages is documented by the following facts: (i) Two texturally distinguishable generations of white K-mica are 2 M muscovite (Si=3.1-3.2) and 2 M or 3 T phengite (Si=3.3-3.4). Five muscovites show Permian Rb-Sr ages and oxygen isotope fractionations indicating temperatures between 520 and 560 ?? C; however, K-Ar ages are mixed or rejuvenated. Phengite always shows mid-Tertiary Rb-Sr ages, (ii) Two biotite generations can be recognized, although textural evidence is often ambiguous. Three out of four texturally old biotites show mid-Tertiary Rb-Sr cooling ages while the oxygen isotopic fractionations point to Permian, mixed or Alpine temperatures, (iii) Comparison of radiogenic and stable isotope relations indicates that the radiogenic isotopes in the interlayer positions of the micas were mobilized during Alpine time without recrystallization, that is, without breaking Al-O or Si-O bonds. High Ti contents in young muscovites and biotites also indicate that the octahedral (and tetrahedral) sites remained undisturbed during rejuvenation. (iv) 'Isotopic reversals' in the order of O18 enrichment between K-feldspar and albite exist. Arguments for equilibrium during Permian time are meagre because of Alpine overprinting effects. Texturally old muscovites show high temperatures and Permian Rb-Sr ages in concordancy with Rb-Sr whole rock ages. For the tectonically least affected samples, excellent concordance

  12. Equilibrium uranium isotope fractionation by nuclear volume and mass-dependent processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2006-12-01

    Uranium serves as a geochemical tracer of oxidation near the Earth's surface, and is also the basis for several isotopic geochronometers. It is thus important to understand possible non-radiogenic and non-radioactive isotopic fractionation of uranium in natural systems. This study presents theoretical estimates of equilibrium uranium isotope fractionations in U-bearing molecules and complexes, calculated using first-principles computational chemistry. Ion-exchange experiments (1,2) have indicated that mass-dependent mechanisms, alone, cannot explain 238U/234U and 238U/^{235}U fractionations, so nuclear volume (i.e., field shift) fractionation effects are also considered in theoretical calculations. The results indicate that equilibrium isotopic fractionation is likely when U4+ and U6+ species equilibrate. Nuclear volume fractionation leads to higher 238U/^{235}U in U4+-bearing species, overwhelming a smaller mass- dependent fractionation in the opposite direction. The calculated net fractionation between U(H2O)_94+ and UO2Cl3(H2O)_2^- is approximately 1 per mil at 20-150°C, in agreement with earlier experiments. These results also reproduce the apparent non mass-dependent signature observed in 238U/234U relative to 238U/^{235}U. In addition to redox reactions, significant fractionation is expected between different U6+-bearing uranyl complexes (e.g., UO2(H2O)_52+, UO2(NO3)_3^-, UO2(CO3)(H2O)3). These results suggest that U-isotope composition could be used as a proxy for the oxidation state and speciation of natural waters, and that U-isotope ratios are not constant in materials formed or equilibrated at low temperatures. More generally, nuclear volume fractionations are expected to partially cancel or reverse mass-dependent fractionations caused by redox transitions among the high oxidation states (≥+2) of lanthanides, actinides, and heavy transition elements. References: 1. Nomura, Higuchi and Fujii, 1996, J. Am. Chem. Soc., v. 118, p. 9127-9130. 2. Bigeleisen

  13. Using equilibrium isotope effects to detect intramolecular OH/OH hydrogen bonds: structural and solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Thomas E; Bergset, Jon M; Fierman, Matthew B; Nelson, Alshakim; Roth, Joshua; Khan, Saeed I; O'Leary, Daniel J

    2002-03-27

    A comparative (1)H NMR study of partially deuterated 1,3- and 1,4-diols has demonstrated that intramolecular hydrogen bonds of different geometry can give rise to equilibrium isotope shifts of opposite sign in hydrogen-bond-accepting solvents such as DMSO-d(6), acetone-d(6), and THF-d(8). The sign inversion is interpreted in terms of the ability of solvent molecules to form competitive intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the diol and in terms of the limiting chemical shifts for the interior and exterior hydroxyl groups. Deuterium is shown to prefer the intermolecular solvent hydrogen bond by 10.9 +/- 0.5 cal/mol for 1,4-diol 3 dissolved in DMSO-d(6) at room temperature. Pyridine-d(5) is shown to be capable of amplifying positive (downfield) isotope shifts measured in DMSO-d(6), in some cases by as much as a factor of 3. Its use is demonstrated for the assignment of the syn or anti relative configuration of 2,4-pentanediol and for the amplification of isotope shifts used to detect intramolecular hydrogen bonds in alpha- and beta-cyclodextrin. Studies in apolar solvents such as CD(2)Cl(2) and benzene-d(6) reveal that the isotope shift is negative (upfield) for all hydrogen bond geometries studied. Larger isotope shifts are measured in benzene-d(6), and a rationale for this amplification is presented. The use of apolar solvents is particularly useful for assigning the syn or anti configuration of 2,4-pentanediol. PMID:11902884

  14. Antarctic seawater temperature evaluation based on stable isotope measurements on Adamussium colbecki shells: kinetic effects vs. isotopic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisiol, A.; Bergamasco, A.; Montagna, P.; Sprovieri, M.; Taviani, M.

    2013-10-01

    A year-long controlled growth experiment of 60 specimens of the Antarctic bivalve Adamussium colbecki was conducted in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea) to evaluate its reliability as a suitable archive of water mass properties. Nine shells were sub-sampled for stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis to study the inter and intra specimen variations. Slow-growing A. colbecki precipitate their calcitic shells close to the expected oxygen and carbon isotopic equilibrium, whereas the fast-growing individuals are strongly influenced by biogenetic and kinetic effects. The equation of Kim and O'Neil (1997) is considered a fair approximation for the δ18O-temperature relationship in slow-growing individuals. The reconstructed temperature is closer to the mean experimental summer temperature than the annual one. This fact is interpreted as reflecting a possible winter decrease of shell growth, the salinity variation and the corrections for negative temperature on calibrating the δ18O-temperature relationship. Our results support the hypothesis that A. colbecki might represent a good archive for encoding Antarctic Shelf water summer temperature information. Further improvements in adopting A. colbecki as a paleotemperature archive will require the evaluation of the seasonal variability in shell growth rate through culturing slow-growing A. colbecki individuals at near-freezing temperatures to calibrate a species-specific δ18O-temperature equation.

  15. Equilibrium structures of heterocyclic molecules with large principal axis rotations upon isotopic substitution.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G; Margulès, Laurent D; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Equilibrium structures, r(e), of the heterocyclic molecules oxirane, furazan, furan, ethylene ozonide, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole have been determined using three different, somewhat complementary techniques: a completely experimental technique (r(m)), a semiexperimental technique (r(e)(SE), whereby equilibrium rotational constants are derived from experimental effective ground-state rotational constants and corrections based principally on an ab initio cubic force field), and an ab initio technique (r(e)(BO), whereby geometry optimizations are usually performed at the coupled cluster level of theory including single and double excitations augmented by a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] using quadruple-ζ Gaussian basis sets). All these molecules are asymmetric tops with the moment of inertia I(c) much larger than the other two moments of inertia, I(a) and I(b). Molecules of this shape experience a large rotation of the principal axis system upon certain isotopic substitutions. For such isotopologues it is difficult to obtain a good structural fit to the semiexperimental moments of inertia I(a) and I(b), which may significantly reduce the accuracy of the r(e)(SE) structural parameters. The origin of this difficulty is explained. For the heavy-atom skeleton of these molecules it was possible to determine a rather accurate empirical mass-dependent structure without a priori knowledge of the equilibrium structure. PMID:22032750

  16. Determination and application of the equilibrium oxygen isotope effect between water and sulfite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Eldridge, Daniel L.; Johnston, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The information encoded by the two stable isotope systems in sulfate (δ34SSO4 and δ18OSO4) has been widely applied to aid reconstructions of both modern and ancient environments. Interpretation of δ18OSO4 records has been complicated by rapid oxygen isotope equilibration between sulfoxyanions and water. Specifically, the apparent relationship that develops between δ18OSO4 and δ18Owater during microbial sulfate reduction is thought to result from rapid oxygen isotope equilibrium between intracellular water and aqueous sulfite - a reactive intermediate of the sulfate reduction network that can back-react to produce sulfate. Here, we describe the oxygen equilibrium isotope effect between water and sulfite (referring to all the sum of all S(IV)-oxyanions including sulfite and both isomers and the dimer of bisulfite). Based on experiments conducted over a range of pH (4.5-9.8) and temperature (2-95 °C), where ε = 1000 * (α - 1), we find εSO3-H2O=13.61-0.299∗pH-0.081∗T °C. Thus, at a pH (7.0) and temperature (25 °C) typifying commonly used experimental conditions for sulfate reducing bacterial cultures, sulfite is enriched in 18O by 9.5‰ (±0.8‰) relative to ambient water. We examine the implication of these results in a sulfate reduction network that has been revised to reflect our understanding of the reactions involving oxygen. By evaluating previously published data within this new architecture, our results are consistent with previous suggestions of high reversibility of the sulfate reduction biochemical network. We also demonstrate that intracellular exchange rates between SO32- and water must be on average 1-3 orders of magnitude more rapid than intracellular fluxes of sulfate reduction intermediates and that kinetic isotope effects upstream of SO32- are required to explain previous laboratory and environmental studies of δ18OSO4 resulting as a consequence of sulfate reduction.

  17. Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Sander, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

  18. Ab Initio Path-Integral Calculations of Kinetic and Equilibrium Isotope Effects on Base-Catalyzed RNA Transphosphorylation Models

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Yuqing, Xu; York, Darrin M.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2′-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This paper significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and non-enzymatic 2′-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a “gold-standard” coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely-used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently-developed ab initio path-integral method, i.e., automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis. PMID:24841935

  19. The early bird gets the shrimp: confronting assumptions of isotopic equilibrium and homogeneity in a wild bird population.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Michael B; Jehl, Joseph R; Stricker, Craig A

    2012-11-01

    1. Because stable isotope distributions in organic material vary systematically across energy gradients that exist in ecosystems, community and population structures, and in individual physiological systems, isotope values in animal tissues have helped address a broad range of questions in animal ecology. It follows that every tissue sample provides an isotopic profile that can be used to study dietary or movement histories of individual animals. Interpretations of these profiles depend on the assumption that metabolic pools are isotopically well mixed and in equilibrium with dietary resources prior to tissue synthesis, and they extend to the population level by assuming isotope profiles are identically distributed for animals using the same proximal dietary resource. As these assumptions are never fully met, studying structure in the variance of tissue isotope values from wild populations is informative. 2. We studied variation in δ(13) C, δ(15) N, δ(2) H and δ(18) O data for feathers from a population of eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) that migrate to Great Salt Lake each fall to moult feathers. During this time, they cannot fly and feed almost exclusively on superabundant brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). The ecological simplicity of this situation minimized the usual spatial and trophic complexities often present in natural studies of feather isotope values. 3. Ranges and variances of isotope values for the feathers were larger than those from previously published studies that report feather isotopic variance, but they were bimodally distributed in all isotope dimensions. Isotope values for proximal dietary resources and local surface water show that some of the feathers we assumed to have been grown locally must have been grown before birds reached isotopic equilibrium with local diet or immediately prior to arrival at Great Salt Lake. 4. Our study provides novel insights about resource use strategies in eared grebes during migration. More generally

  20. The early bird gets the shrimp: Confronting assumptions of isotopic equilibrium and homogeneity in a wild bird population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wunder, Michael B.; Jehl, Joseph R., Jr.; Stricker, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    1. Because stable isotope distributions in organic material vary systematically across energy gradients that exist in ecosystems, community and population structures, and in individual physiological systems, isotope values in animal tissues have helped address a broad range of questions in animal ecology. It follows that every tissue sample provides an isotopic profile that can be used to study dietary or movement histories of individual animals. Interpretations of these profiles depend on the assumption that metabolic pools are isotopically well mixed and in equilibrium with dietary resources prior to tissue synthesis, and they extend to the population level by assuming isotope profiles are identically distributed for animals using the same proximal dietary resource. As these assumptions are never fully met, studying structure in the variance of tissue isotope values from wild populations is informative. 2. We studied variation in δ13C, δ15N, δ2H and δ18O data for feathers from a population of eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) that migrate to Great Salt Lake each fall to moult feathers. During this time, they cannot fly and feed almost exclusively on superabundant brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana). The ecological simplicity of this situation minimized the usual spatial and trophic complexities often present in natural studies of feather isotope values. 3. Ranges and variances of isotope values for the feathers were larger than those from previously published studies that report feather isotopic variance, but they were bimodally distributed in all isotope dimensions. Isotope values for proximal dietary resources and local surface water show that some of the feathers we assumed to have been grown locally must have been grown before birds reached isotopic equilibrium with local diet or immediately prior to arrival at Great Salt Lake. 4. Our study provides novel insights about resource use strategies in eared grebes during migration. More generally, it

  1. EQUILIBRIUM AND NONEQUILIBRIUM FOUNDATIONS OF FREE ENERGY COMPUTATIONAL METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    C. JARZYNSKI

    2001-03-01

    Statistical mechanics provides a rigorous framework for the numerical estimation of free energy differences in complex systems such as biomolecules. This paper presents a brief review of the statistical mechanical identities underlying a number of techniques for computing free energy differences. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium methods are covered.

  2. Feasibility of Isotopic Measurements: Graphite Isotopic Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Gerlach, David C.; Reid, Bruce D.; Morgan, W. C.

    2001-04-30

    This report addresses the feasibility of the laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios for selected trace constituents in irradiated nuclear-grade graphite, based on the results of a proof-of-principal experiment completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1994. The estimation of graphite fluence through measurement of isotopic ratio changes in the impurity elements in the nuclear-grade graphite is referred to as the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). Combined with reactor core and fuel information, GIRM measurements can be employed to estimate cumulative materials production in graphite moderated reactors. This report documents the laboratory procedures and results from the initial measurements of irradiated graphite samples. The irradiated graphite samples were obtained from the C Reactor (one of several production reactors at Hanford) and from the French G-2 Reactor located at Marcoule. Analysis of the irradiated graphite samples indicated that replicable measurements of isotope ratios could be obtained from the fluence sensitive elements of Ti, Ca, Sr, and Ba. While these impurity elements are present in the nuclear-grade graphite in very low concentrations, measurement precision was typically on the order of a few tenths of a percent to just over 1 percent. Replicability of the measurements was also very good with measured values differing by less than 0.5 percent. The overall results of this initial proof-of-principal experiment are sufficiently encouraging that a demonstration of GIRM on a reactor scale basis is planned for FY-95.

  3. Rare-event simulation methods for equilibrium and non-equilibrium events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziff, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Rare events are those that occur with a very low probability in experiment, or are common but difficult to sample using standard computer simulation techniques. Such processes require advanced methods in order to obtain useful results in reasonable amounts of computer time. We discuss some of those techniques here, including the ``barrier'' method, splitting methods, and a Forward-Flux Sampling in Time (FFST) algorithm, and apply them to measure the nucleation times of the first-order transition in the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model of surface catalysis, including nucleation in finite equilibrium states, which are measured to occur with probabilities as low as 10°C(-40). We also study the transitions in the Maier-Stein model of chemical kinetics, and use the methods to find the harmonic measure in percolation and Diffusion-Limited Aggregation (DLA) clusters. co-authors: David Adams, Google, and Leonard Sander, University of Michigan.

  4. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    PubMed

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. PMID:25877865

  5. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  6. Meshless method for solving fixed boundary problem of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2015-07-01

    This study solves the Grad-Shafranov equation with a fixed plasma boundary by utilizing a meshless method for the first time. Previous studies have utilized a finite element method (FEM) to solve an equilibrium inside the fixed separatrix. In order to avoid difficulties of FEM (such as mesh problem, difficulty of coding, expensive calculation cost), this study focuses on the meshless methods, especially RBF-MFS and KANSA's method to solve the fixed boundary problem. The results showed that CPU time of the meshless methods was ten to one hundred times shorter than that of FEM to obtain the same accuracy.

  7. Theoretical estimation for equilibrium Mo isotope fractionations between dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed complexes on (Fe,Mn)-oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Liu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Although Mo isotopes have been increasingly used as a paleoredox proxy in the study of paleo-oceanographic condition changes (Barling et al., 2001; Siebert et al., 2003, 2005,2006; Arnold et al., 2004; Poulson et al., 2006), some very basic aspects of Mo isotopes geochemistry have not been obtained yet. First, although there are several previous studies on equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors(Tossell,2005; Weeks et al.,2007; Wasylenki et al.,2008), these studies were dealing with situations in vacuum and we find unfortunately the solvation effects for Ge species in solution cannot be ignored. Therefore, accurate Ge fractionation factors are actually not determined yet. Second, except the dominant dissolved Mo species in seawater which is known as molybdate ion (MoO42-), the forms of possible other minor species remain elusive. Third, the Mo removal mechanisms from seawater are only known for the anoxia and euxinic conditions (e.g. Helz et al., 1996; Zheng et al., 2000), the Mo removal mechanism under oxic condition are still arguing. Fourth, the adsorption effects on Mo isotope fractionation are almost completely unknown. Especially, without the adsorption fractionation knowledge, it is difficult to understand many distinct fractionations found in a number of geologic systems and it is difficult to explain the exceptionally long residence time of Mo in seawater. Urey model or Bigeleisen-Mayer equation based theoretical method and the super-molecule clusters are used to precisely evaluate the fractionation factors. The B3LYP/(6-311+G(2df,p),LANL2DZ) level method is used for frequencies calculation. 24 water molecules are used to form the supermolecues surrounding the Mo species. At least 4 different conformers for each supermolecule are used to prevent the errors from the diversity of configurations in solution. This study provides accurate equilibrium Mo isotope fractionation factors between possible dissolved Mo species and the adsorbed Mo species on the

  8. Primordial radionuclides in Canadian background sites: secular equilibrium and isotopic differences.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I; Ilin, M; Tait, J; Sanipelli, B

    2008-06-01

    A literature review and field sampling were done to obtain information on primordial (natural-series) radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial environments in diverse locations across Canada. Of special interest was the degree of secular equilibrium among members of decay series. The analytes measured in soils and plants were (nat)U by neutron activation-delayed neutron counting, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra and (210)Po by alpha spectroscopy, (210)Pb by gas flow proportional counting, (228)Ra by beta counting and (137)Cs by gamma spectroscopy. In addition, ICP-MS was used to obtain concentrations of about 50 analytes including elemental U, Pb, and Th. Samples were from seven representative background sites with a total of 162 plant samples from 38 different species. These data were supplemented by a review that gathered a large portion of the similar data from published sources. The sites chosen were semi-natural, far from any nuclear industry, although several were specifically located in areas with slightly elevated natural U concentrations. As might be expected, there were many cases of non-detectable concentrations. However, certain trends were evident. The activity ratio (210)Po/(210)Pb was unity in soils and non-annual plant tissues such as lichens. It was about 0.6 in annual plant tissues. These results are consistent with the time required for ingrowth of (210)Po to reach secular equilibrium. There was evidence from several sources that (210)Pb in plants came predominantly from deposition of (210)Pb from air after the decay of airborne (222)Rn. This was expected. Somewhat unexpected was the observation that (228)Th seemed to be much more plant available than (232)Th, even though both are in the same decay series and should be chemically similar. The difference was attributed to the combined effects of ingrowth from (228)Ra in the plant and effects of alpha recoil in mobilizing (228)Th in the soil. In general, the results of this study will benefit

  9. A Variational Method in Out-of-Equilibrium Physical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Mario J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new variational principle for out-of-equilibrium dynamic systems that are fundamentally based on the method of Lagrange multipliers applied to the total entropy of an ensemble of particles. However, we use the fundamental equation of thermodynamics on differential forms, considering U and S as 0-forms. We obtain a set of two first order differential equations that reveal the same formal symplectic structure shared by classical mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. From this approach, a topological torsion current emerges of the form , where Aj and ωk denote the components of the vector potential (gravitational and/or electromagnetic) and where ω denotes the angular velocity of the accelerated frame. We derive a special form of the Umov-Poynting theorem for rotating gravito-electromagnetic systems. The variational method is then applied to clarify the working mechanism of particular devices. PMID:24316718

  10. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinitsa, V. A.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing 233U from 232Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  11. The procedure and results of calculations of the equilibrium isotopic composition of a demonstration subcritical molten salt reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Nevinitsa, V. A. Dudnikov, A. A.; Blandinskiy, V. Yu.; Balanin, A. L.; Alekseev, P. N.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    A subcritical molten salt reactor with an external neutron source is studied computationally as a facility for incineration and transmutation of minor actinides from spent nuclear fuel of reactors of VVER-1000 type and for producing {sup 233}U from {sup 232}Th. The reactor configuration is chosen, the requirements to be imposed on the external neutron source are formulated, and the equilibrium isotopic composition of heavy nuclides and the key parameters of the fuel cycle are calculated.

  12. Experimental determination of equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between spinel, forsterite, and magnesite from 600 °C to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, C. A.; Young, E. D.; Manning, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium isotopes are potentially powerful tools for high-temperature geochemistry if relevant fractionation factors are known. However, experimental data for Mg isotope fractionation are lacking at high temperatures. We performed piston-cylinder experiments at 600, 700, and 800 °C at 1 GPa to establish the equilibrium magnesium isotope partitioning between forsterite (Mg2SiO4) and magnesite (MgCO3) and between spinel (MgAl2O4) and magnesite, making use of the well-established advantages of using carbonates as an isotope exchange medium (e.g. Clayton et al., 1989). In these experiments we implemented the three-isotope method with forsterite and magnesite, and with spinel and magnesite, at three different temperatures in high-pressure piston cylinder apparatus for varying lengths of time. The present study extends the applicability of the three-isotope method to experiments involving simple isotope exchange rather than exchange by heterogeneous reaction (Shahar et al., 2008). We used magnesite as the exchange medium (and exchange partner) to overcome the sluggish diffusion-limited exchange between spinel and forsterite alone. The carbonate medium evidently facilitates chemical and isotopic exchange by promoting annealing and re-crystallization of minerals during the experiment. Results are as follows: 600 °C and 1 GPa 26ΔSp-Mgs = 1.73 ± 0.38‰ and 26ΔFo-Mgs = 0.44 ± 0.10‰; 700 °C 26ΔSp-Mgs = 1.10 ± 0.27‰ and 26ΔFo-Mgs = -0.13 ± 0.13‰; 800 °C 26ΔSp-Mgs = 0.90 ± 0.28‰ and 26ΔFo-Mgs = 0.04 ± 0.04‰. From these experimentally determined equilibrium fractionation values, we derive the temperature-dependent equilibrium fractionation between spinel and forsterite by difference, yielding 26ΔSp-Fo = 1.29 ± 0.39‰, 26ΔSp-Fo = 1.22 ± 0.30‰, and 26ΔSp-Fo = 0.86 ± 0.29‰ for 600, 700, and 800 °C respectively. These results agree within error with first- principles estimates of equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between spinel and

  13. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  14. Effect of parent body evolution on equilibrium and kinetic isotope fractionation: a combined Ni and Fe isotope study of iron and stony-iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Goderis, Steven; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-08-01

    resolvable differences, similar in magnitude but opposite in sign (Δ56/54Femet-oliv of +0.178 ± 0.092‰ and Δ60/58Nimet-oliv of -0.212 ± 0.082‰, 2SD). As such, the heavier Fe isotope ratios for the metal (δ56/54Fe = +0.023‰ to +0.247‰) and lighter values for the corresponding olivines (δ56/54Fe = -0.155‰ to -0.075‰) are interpreted to reflect later-stage Fe isotopic re-equilibration between these phases, rather than a pristine record of mantle-core differentiation. In the case of mesosiderites, the similarly lighter Ni and Fe isotopic signatures found for the silicate phase (-0.149‰ to +0.023‰ for δ60/58Ni, -0.214‰ to -0.149‰ for δ56/54Fe) compared to the metal phase (+0.168‰ to +0.191‰ for δ60/58Ni, +0.018‰ to +0.120‰ for δ56/54Fe) likely result from Fe and Ni diffusion. Overall, the Fe and Ni isotopic compositions of iron-rich meteorites reflect multiple, often superimposed, processes of equilibrium or kinetic nature, illustrating convoluted parent body histories and late-stage interaction between early-formed planetesimal reservoirs.

  15. Yang-Yang Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: A Brilliant Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xi-Wen; Chen, Yang-Yang

    C. N. Yang and C. P. Yang in 1969 (J. Math. Phys. 10, 1115 (1969)) for the first time proposed a rigorous approach to the thermodynamics of the one-dimensional system of bosons with a delta-function interaction. This paper was a breakthrough in exact statistical mechanics, after C. N. Yang (Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1312 (1967)) published his seminal work on the discovery of the Yang-Baxter equation in 1967. Yang and Yang's brilliant method yields significant applications in a wide range of fields of physics. In this communication, we briefly introduce the method of the Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics and demonstrate a fundamental application of the Yang-Yang method for the study of thermodynamics of the Lieb-Liniger model with strong and weak interactions in a whole temperature regime. We also consider the equivalence between the Yang-Yang's thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equation and the thermodynamics of the ideal gas with the Haldane's generalized exclusion statistics.

  16. Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics: A brilliant method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xi-Wen; Chen, Yang-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Yang and Yang in 1969 [J. Math. Phys. 10, 1115 (1969)] for the first time proposed a rigorous approach to the thermodynamics of the one-dimensional system of bosons with a delta-function interaction. This paper was a breakthrough in exact statistical mechanics, after Yang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 19, 1312 (1967)] published his seminal work on the discovery of the Yang-Baxter equation in 1967. Yang and Yang’s brilliant method yields significant applications in a wide range of fields of physics. In this paper, we briefly introduce the method of the Yang-Yang equilibrium statistical mechanics and demonstrate a fundamental application of the Yang-Yang method for the study of thermodynamics of the Lieb-Liniger model with strong and weak interactions in a whole temperature regime. We also consider the equivalence between the Yang-Yang’s thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equation and the thermodynamics of the ideal gas with the Haldane’s generalized exclusion statistics.

  17. Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound

    DOEpatents

    Watrous, Matthew G.

    2012-12-11

    A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

  18. A survey of upwind methods for flows with equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemistry and thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Garrett, J.; Cinnella, P.

    1989-01-01

    Several versions of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were compared with regard to general applicability and complexity. Test computations were performed using curve-fit equilibrium air chemistry for an M = 5 high-temperature inviscid flow over a wedge, and an M = 24.5 inviscid flow over a blunt cylinder for test computations; for these cases, little difference in accuracy was found among the versions of the same flux-split algorithm. For flows with nonequilibrium chemistry, the effects of the thermodynamic model on the development of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms were investigated using an equilibrium model, a general nonequilibrium model, and a simplified model based on vibrational relaxation. Several numerical examples are presented, including nonequilibrium air chemistry in a high-temperature shock tube and nonequilibrium hydrogen-air chemistry in a supersonic diffuser.

  19. Wide reflective equilibrium as a method of justification in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Carson Strong has recently argued that wide reflective equilibrium (WRE) is an unacceptable method of justification in bioethics. In its place, Strong recommends a methodology in which certain foundational moral judgments play a central role in the justification of moral beliefs, and coherence plays a limited justificatory role in that the rest of our judgments are made to cohere with these foundational judgments. In this paper, I argue that Strong's chief criticisms of WRE are unsuccessful and that his proposed alternative is in fact just another version of WRE. In the course of doing so, I specify which theses are central to WRE and which are not, and thus, provide a response to an additional objection, advanced by Peter Singer, that WRE is vacuous. I conclude by arguing that there may be better prospects for advancing the debate regarding methodology in bioethics if we focus on restricted epistemic and methodological theses rather than broad approaches, such as WRE, that come in many different varieties. PMID:22752538

  20. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of enhancing the thermal desorption of a first isotope of a diatomic gas from a metal comprises the steps of (a) establishing a partial pressure of a second isotope of the diatomic gas in vicinity of the metal; heating the metal to a temperature such that the first isotope is desorbed from the metal; and reducing the partial pressure of the desorbed first isotope while maintaining the partial pressure of the second isotope substantially constant. The method is especially useful for enhancing the desorption of tritium from the Zr-Al getter in a plasma confinement device.

  1. Modeling of Non-equilibrium Processes in Oil Trunk Pipeline Using Godunov Type Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumskoi, S. I.; Sverchkov, A. M.

    The Article presents the numerical method of solving the system of one-dimensional non-stationary equations describing oil movement in the oil pipeline. The method is aimed at modeling the non-equilibrium and transitional processes in the oil pipelines in the normal and emergency modes. This new developed method can be applied for relaxation non-equilibrium flow case, that can't be modeling using another methods. Also this method is aimed at modeling the non-equilibrium and transitional processes in the liquefied hydrocarbon pipelines in the normal and emergency modes. Phase non-equilibrium flow is considered for boiling liquids transporting pipeline.

  2. Current Methods in Sedimentation Velocity and Sedimentation Equilibrium Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Brautigam, Chad A.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress in the interpretation of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) data in the last decade has led to profound changes in the practice of AUC, both for sedimentation velocity (SV) and sedimentation equilibrium (SE). Modern computational strategies have allowed for the direct modeling of the sedimentation process of heterogeneous mixtures, resulting in SV size-distribution analyses with significantly improved detection limits and strongly enhanced resolution. These advances have transformed the practice of SV, rendering it the primary method of choice for most existing applications of AUC, such as the study of protein self- and hetero-association, the study of membrane proteins, and applications in biotechnology. New global multi-signal modeling and mass conservation approaches in SV and SE, in conjunction with the effective-particle framework for interpreting the sedimentation boundary structure of interacting systems, as well as tools for explicit modeling of the reaction/diffusion/sedimentation equations to experimental data, have led to more robust and more powerful strategies for the study of reversible protein interactions and multi-protein complexes. Furthermore, modern mathematical modeling capabilities have allowed for a detailed description of many experimental aspects of the acquired data, thus enabling novel experimental opportunities, with important implications for both sample preparation and data acquisition. The goal of the current commentary is to supplement previous AUC protocols, Current Protocols in Protein Science 20.3 (1999) and 20.7 (2003), and 7.12 (2008), and provide an update describing the current tools for the study of soluble proteins, detergent-solubilized membrane proteins and their interactions by SV and SE. PMID:23377850

  3. Method for isotope enrichment by photoinduced chemiionization

    DOEpatents

    Dubrin, James W.

    1985-01-01

    Isotope enrichment, particularly .sup.235 U enrichment, is achieved by irradiating an isotopically mixed vapor feed with radiant energy at a wavelength or wavelengths chosen to selectively excite the species containing a desired isotope to a predetermined energy level. The vapor feed if simultaneously reacted with an atomic or molecular reactant species capable of preferentially transforming the excited species into an ionic product by a chemiionization reaction. The ionic product, enriched in the desired isotope, is electrostatically or electromagnetically extracted from the reaction system.

  4. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures.

    PubMed

    Loyd, S J; Sample, J; Tripati, R E; Defliese, W F; Brooks, K; Hovland, M; Torres, M; Marlow, J; Hancock, L G; Martin, R; Lyons, T; Tripati, A E

    2016-01-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ∼0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings. PMID:27447820

  5. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, S. J.; Sample, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Defliese, W. F.; Brooks, K.; Hovland, M.; Torres, M.; Marlow, J.; Hancock, L. G.; Martin, R.; Lyons, T.; Tripati, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ∼0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings. PMID:27447820

  6. Methane seep carbonates yield clumped isotope signatures out of equilibrium with formation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, S. J.; Sample, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Defliese, W. F.; Brooks, K.; Hovland, M.; Torres, M.; Marlow, J.; Hancock, L. G.; Martin, R.; Lyons, T.; Tripati, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Methane cold seep systems typically exhibit extensive buildups of authigenic carbonate minerals, resulting from local increases in alkalinity driven by methane oxidation. Here, we demonstrate that modern seep authigenic carbonates exhibit anomalously low clumped isotope values (Δ47), as much as ~0.2‰ lower than expected values. In modern seeps, this range of disequilibrium translates into apparent temperatures that are always warmer than ambient temperatures, by up to 50 °C. We examine various mechanisms that may induce disequilibrium behaviour in modern seep carbonates, and suggest that the observed values result from several factors including kinetic isotopic effects during methane oxidation, mixing of inorganic carbon pools, pH effects and rapid precipitation. Ancient seep carbonates studied here also exhibit potential disequilibrium signals. Ultimately, these findings indicate the predominance of disequilibrium clumped isotope behaviour in modern cold seep carbonates that must be considered when characterizing environmental conditions in both modern and ancient cold seep settings.

  7. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    1986-12-01

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO/sub 2/ excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37/sup 0/C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water, local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O/sub 2/ and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO/sub 2/ production.

  8. Ethanol isotope method (EIM) for uncovering illegal wine.

    PubMed

    Smajlović, I; Sparks, K L; Sparks, J P; Čukalović, I Leskošek; Jović, S

    2013-01-01

    Isotopic methods have proven to be a powerful analytical tool for the determination of origin and authenticity of wine. In addition, measuring the stable isotope ratio provides useful information for the detection of many illegal practices in the production of wine. The determinations of the stable isotope composition of compounds are based on measuring the relative ratios using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. This article describes a new isotopic method for measuring the δD value of non-exchangeable hydrogen stable isotopes in ethanol for investigating adulteration practices in wine making. With this new method, we are able to determine the addition of water and sugar in wine with higher accuracy, repeatability and reliability. PMID:22462798

  9. Method of isotope separation by chemi-ionization

    DOEpatents

    Wexler, Sol; Young, Charles E.

    1977-05-17

    A method for separating specific isotopes present in an isotopic mixture by aerodynamically accelerating a gaseous compound to form a jet of molecules, and passing the jet through a stream of electron donor atoms whereby an electron transfer takes place, thus forming negative ions of the molecules. The molecular ions are then passed through a radiofrequency quadrupole mass filter to separate the specific isotopes. This method may be used for any compounds having a sufficiently high electron affinity to permit negative ion formation, and is especially useful for the separation of plutonium and uranium isotopes.

  10. Equilibrium oxygen isotope behavior of sulfate in marine sediments: A new paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R.; Boettcher, M.; Surkov, A.; Ferdelman, T.; Jorgensen, B.

    2006-05-01

    We have determined the oxygen (18O/16O) and sulfur (34S/32S) isotope ratios of porewater sulfate to depths of over 400 mbsf in sediments from open-ocean and upwelling sites in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific ocean. Sulfate δ18O ranges from near-normal seawater values (9.5 permil) at organic-poor open-ocean sites, to approximately 30 permil at sites with higher organic matter content and higher associated microbial activity. Depth-correlative trends of δ18O, δ34S, alkalinity, methane, ammonium and the presence of sulfide, indicate significant oxidation of sedimentary organic matter by sulfate-reducing microbial populations as well as anaerobic oxidation of methane. δ18O ?SO4 values at low-activity sites reveal the presence of significant microbial sulfur-cycling activity despite relatively flat sulfate concentration and δ34S profiles. This activity may include contributions from several processes including: enzyme-catalyzed equilibration between oxygen in sulfate and water superimposed upon microbial sulfate reduction, sulfide oxidation, and bacterial disproportionation of sulfur intermediates. Positive correlation between water and sulfate δ18O values supports sulfate-water O isotope exchange as the dominant process controlling porewater sulfate δ18O values. Results of this study indicate that coupled measurements of S and O isotope ratios of porewater sulfate are essential for interpreting microbial sulfur cycling in marine sediments.

  11. Stable isotope geochemical study of Pamukkale travertines: New evidences of low-temperature non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kele, Sándor; Özkul, Mehmet; Fórizs, István; Gökgöz, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Alçiçek, Mehmet Cihat; Németh, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present the first detailed geochemical study of the world-famous actively forming Pamukkale and Karahayit travertines (Denizli Basin, SW-Turkey) and associated thermal waters. Sampling was performed along downstream sections through different depositional environments (vent, artificial channel and lake, terrace-pools and cascades of proximal slope, marshy environment of distal slope). δ 13C travertine values show significant increase (from + 6.1‰ to + 11.7‰ PDB) with increasing distance from the spring orifice, whereas the δ 18O travertine values show only slight increase downstream (from - 10.7‰ to - 9.1‰ PDB). Mainly the CO 2 outgassing caused the positive downstream shift (~ 6‰) in the δ 13C travertine values. The high δ 13C values of Pamukkale travertines located closest to the spring orifice (not affected by secondary processes) suggest the contribution of CO 2 liberated by thermometamorphic decarbonation besides magmatic sources. Based on the gradual downstream increase of the concentration of the conservative Na +, K +, Cl -, evaporation was estimated to be 2-5%, which coincides with the moderate effect of evaporation on the water isotope composition. Stable isotopic compositions of the Pamukkale thermal water springs show of meteoric origin, and indicate a Local Meteoric Water Line of Denizli Basin to be between the Global Meteoric Water Line (Craig, 1961) and Western Anatolian Meteoric Water Line (Şimşek, 2003). Detailed evaluation of several major and trace element contents measured in the water and in the precipitated travertine along the Pamukkale MM section revealed which elements are precipitated in the carbonate or concentrated in the detrital minerals. Former studies on the Hungarian Egerszalók travertine (Kele et al., 2008a, b, 2009) had shown that the isotopic equilibrium is rarely maintained under natural conditions during calcite precipitation in the temperature range between 41 and 67 °C. In this paper

  12. A regularized Newton method for solving equilibrium programming problems with an inexactly specified set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, A. S.; Vasil'Ev, F. P.; Stukalov, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Unstable equilibrium problems are examined in which the objective function and the set where the equilibrium point is sought are specified inexactly. A regularized Newton method, combined with penalty functions, is proposed for solving such problems, and its convergence is analyzed. A regularizing operator is constructed.

  13. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Isotope engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G.

    2000-11-01

    Major applications of the novel and extremely promising technology of isotope engineering are reviewed which, along with basic research, also include — by no means exhaustively — optical fibers, optoelectronics, tunable solid-state lasers, neutron transmutation doping, and information storage.

  14. A rapid method for the computation of equilibrium chemical composition of air to 15000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Erickson, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid computational method has been developed to determine the chemical composition of equilibrium air to 15000 K. Eleven chemically reacting species, i.e., O2, N2, O, NO, N, NO+, e-, N+, O+, Ar, and Ar+ are included. The method involves combining algebraically seven nonlinear equilibrium equations and four linear elemental mass balance and charge neutrality equations. Computational speeds for determining the equilibrium chemical composition are significantly faster than the often used free energy minimization procedure. Data are also included from which the thermodynamic properties of air can be computed. A listing of the computer program together with a set of sample results are included.

  15. Reconciling Empirical Carbonate Clumped Isotope Calibrations: A Comparison of Calcite Precipitation and Acid Digestion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, J.; Huntington, K. W.; Schauer, A. J.; Saenger, C.; Lechler, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    An accurate empirical calibration is necessary to confidently apply the carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometer. Previous synthetic carbonate calibrations disagree in temperature sensitivity, with one group of calibrations displaying a shallow Δ47-temperature slope (e.g., Dennis & Schrag, GCA, 2010), and the other a steep slope (e.g., Zaarur et al., EPSL, 2013). These calibrations differ in both the method of mineral precipitation and the temperature of the phosphoric acid used to digest carbonates for analysis, making it difficult to isolate the cause of the discrepancy. Here, we precipitate synthetic carbonates at temperatures of 6-80ºC using 4 different precipitation methods, and analyze the samples using both 90 and 25°C acid digestion. Precipitation experiments varied the use of salts (NaHCO3 and CaCl2) vs. dissolved CaCO3 as a starting solution, the use of carbonic anhydrase to promote isotopic equilibrium among dissolved inorganic carbon species in solution, and the method by which CO2 degasses to force carbonate precipitation. Carbonates precipitated by using salts and allowing CO2 to passively degas produce a shallow calibration slope that we hypothesize to approach isotopic equilibrium. Precipitation methods that bubble CO2 into solution then degas that CO2 (either passively or actively by bubbling N2) produce carbonates with consistently lower Δ47 and higher δ18O values for a given growth temperature. We infer that these carbonates grew in disequilibrium during rapid CO2 degassing. Varying acid digestion temperature does not change the results; acid fractionation factor is not correlated with grain size, Δ47, or d47 values. No precipitation method produces a steep calibration slope. Our large sample set of >60 carbonates lend confidence to a shallow slope calibration, and inform interpretations of Δ47 and δ18O values of natural carbonates that grow under conditions of isotopic disequilibrium.

  16. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Holt, B.D.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO{sub 2} and CuCl. The CO{sub 2} is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH{sub 3}I to form CH{sub 3}Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio. 9 figs.

  17. Method for isotopic analysis of chlorinated organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Ben D.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for preparing a VOC sample for carbon and chlorine isotope ratio analysis by mass spectrometer. A VOC sample is placed in a combustion tube and reacted with CuO to form CO.sub.2 and CuCl. The CO.sub.2 is then extracted and analyzed for the carbon isotope ratio. The CuCl is separated from the excess CuO and reacted with CH.sub.3 I to form CH.sub.3 Cl, extracted and analyzed for chlorine isotope ratio.

  18. Computational methods for reactive transport modeling: A Gibbs energy minimization approach for multiphase equilibrium calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan M. M.; Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Kosakowski, Georg

    2016-02-01

    We present a numerical method for multiphase chemical equilibrium calculations based on a Gibbs energy minimization approach. The method can accurately and efficiently determine the stable phase assemblage at equilibrium independently of the type of phases and species that constitute the chemical system. We have successfully applied our chemical equilibrium algorithm in reactive transport simulations to demonstrate its effective use in computationally intensive applications. We used FEniCS to solve the governing partial differential equations of mass transport in porous media using finite element methods in unstructured meshes. Our equilibrium calculations were benchmarked with GEMS3K, the numerical kernel of the geochemical package GEMS. This allowed us to compare our results with a well-established Gibbs energy minimization algorithm, as well as their performance on every mesh node, at every time step of the transport simulation. The benchmark shows that our novel chemical equilibrium algorithm is accurate, robust, and efficient for reactive transport applications, and it is an improvement over the Gibbs energy minimization algorithm used in GEMS3K. The proposed chemical equilibrium method has been implemented in Reaktoro, a unified framework for modeling chemically reactive systems, which is now used as an alternative numerical kernel of GEMS.

  19. An iterative method for the solution of the statistical and radiative equilibrium equations in expanding atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. J.

    1990-05-01

    A method for the solution of the statistical equilibrium, and radiative equilibrium equations in spherical atmospheres is presented. The iterative scheme uses a tridiagonal (or pentadiagonal) Newton-Raphson operator, and is based on the complete linearization method of Auer and Mihalas (1969) but requires less memory, and imposes no limit on the number of transitions that can be treated. The method is also related to iterative techniques that use approximate diagonal lambda operators but it has a vastly superior convergence rate. Calculations of WN and WC model atmospheres illustrate the excellent rate of convergence.

  20. Multigrid method for the equilibrium equations of elasticity using a compact scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taasan, S.

    1986-01-01

    A compact difference scheme is derived for treating the equilibrium equations of elasticity. The scheme is inconsistent and unstable. A multigrid method which takes into account these properties is described. The solution of the discrete equations, up to the level of discretization errors, is obtained by this method in just two multigrid cycles.

  1. Distance, Dialogue and Reflection: Interpersonal Reflective Equilibrium as Method for Professional Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Hoven, Mariëtte; Kole, Jos

    2015-01-01

    The method of reflective equilibrium (RE) is well known within the domain of moral philosophy, but hardly discussed as a method in professional ethics education. We argue that an interpersonal version of RE is very promising for professional ethics education. We offer several arguments to support this claim. The first group of arguments focus on a…

  2. Study of plasma equilibrium in toroidal fusion devices using mesh-free numerical calculation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, C.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Rokrok, B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma confinement using external magnetic field is one of the successful ways leading to the controlled nuclear fusion. Development and validation of the solution process for plasma equilibrium in the experimental toroidal fusion devices is the main subject of this work. Solution of the nonlinear 2D stationary problem as posed by the Grad-Shafranov equation gives quantitative information about plasma equilibrium inside the vacuum chamber of hot fusion devices. This study suggests solving plasma equilibrium equation which is essential in toroidal nuclear fusion devices, using a mesh-free method in a condition that the plasma boundary is unknown. The Grad-Shafranov equation has been solved numerically by the point interpolation collocation mesh-free method. Important features of this approach include truly mesh free, simple mathematical relationships between points and acceptable precision in comparison with the parametric results. The calculation process has been done by using the regular and irregular nodal distribution and support domains with different points. The relative error between numerical and analytical solution is discussed for several test examples such as small size Damavand tokamak, ITER-like equilibrium, NSTX-like equilibrium, and typical Spheromak.

  3. Ab-initio structure, energy and stable Fe isotope equilibrium fractionation of some geochemically relevant H-O-Fe complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottonello, Giulio; Zuccolini, Marino Vetuschi

    2009-11-01

    The hexa-aqua complexes [Fe(H 2O) 6-m-n(OH) n] (2-n)+n = 0 → 3, m = 0 → 6 - n; [Fe(H 2O) 6-m-n(OH) n] (3-n)+n = 0 → 4, m = 0 → 6 - n were investigated by ab-initio methods with the aim of determining their ground-state geometries, total energies and vibrational properties by treating their inner solvation shell as part of their gaseous precursor (or " hybrid approach"). After a gas-phase energy optimization within the Density Functional Theory (DFT), the molecules were surrounded by a dielectric representing the Reaction Field through an implicit Polarized Continuum Model (PCM). The exploration of several structural ligand arrangements allowed us to quantify the relative stabilities of the various ionic species and the role of the various forms of energy (solute-solvent electronic interaction, cavitation, dispersion, repulsion, liberation free energy) that contribute to stabilize the aqueous complexes. A comparison with experimental thermochemistries showed that ab-initio gas-phase + solvation energies are quite consistent with experimental evidence and allow the depiction of the most stable form in solution and the eventual configurational disorder of water/hydroxyl species around central cations. A vibrational analysis performed on the 54Fe, 56Fe, 57Fe and 58Fe isotopomers indicated important separative effects systematically affected by the extent of deprotonation. The role of the system's redox state (fO 2) and acidity (pH) on the isotopic imprinting of the aqueous species in solution was investigated by coupling the separative effects with speciation calculations. The observed systematics provided a tool of general utility in the interpretation of the iron isotopic signature of natural waters. Applications to the interpretation of isotopic fractionation in solution dictated by redox equilibria and to the significance of the Fe-isotopic imprinting of Banded Iron Formations are given. With "gaseous precursor" it is intended here the isolated gaseous

  4. Computational methods for multiphase equilibrium and kinetics calculations for geochemical and reactive transport applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan; Saar, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Computational methods for geochemical and reactive transport modeling are essential for the understanding of many natural and industrial processes. Most of these processes involve several phases and components, and quite often requires chemical equilibrium and kinetics calculations. We present an overview of novel methods for multiphase equilibrium calculations, based on both the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) approach and on the solution of the law of mass-action (LMA) equations. We also employ kinetics calculations, assuming partial equilibrium (e.g., fluid species in equilibrium while minerals are in disequilibrium) using automatic time stepping to improve simulation efficiency and robustness. These methods are developed specifically for applications that are computationally expensive, such as reactive transport simulations. We show how efficient the new methods are, compared to other algorithms, and how easy it is to use them for geochemical modeling via a simple script language. All methods are available in Reaktoro, a unified open-source framework for modeling chemically reactive systems, which we also briefly describe.

  5. Online Method for Oxygen Triple Isotope Analyses of Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Houlton, B.; Roeckmann, T.; Sigman, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    Combined 17O/16O and 18O/16O isotope ratio analyses of nitrate in ground and surface waters help to understand the partitioning between atmospheric and terrestrial nitrate sources because only terrestrial nitrate shows mass-dependent relative enrichments in 17O and 18O, whereas atmospheric nitrate displays an anomalous enrichment in 17O. The 17O isotope anomaly of nitrate is therefore a sensitive tracer of fresh water pollution. Furthermore, isotope measurements of atmospheric nitrate in aerosols and precipitation provide insight into the partitioning between atmospheric NOx cycling pathways via ozone or hydroxy/peroxy radicals because only ozone has a significant non-mass dependent enrichment in 17O. Previous methods to analyze the oxygen triple isotope composition of nitrate rely on offline thermal decomposition of AgNO3 amounts in the µ mol range. We have recently developed an online (coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) method that requires two to three orders of magnitude less material to achieve essentially the same analytical precision: 30 nmol of nitrate give a 1σ uncertainty of 1.0 ‰ for the δ ^{18}O value and 0.3 \\permil for the ^{17}O anomaly (\\Delta17O). The method uses a strain of bacterial denitrifiers to convert nitrate to N2O [Casciotti et al., 2002], which is then quantitatively converted to elemental nitrogen and oxygen in a gold furnace at 800° C. Both gases are separated on a molecular sieve capillary column and introduced into the isotope ratio mass spectrometer. There is no significant memory effect, but calibration via nitrate or N2O standards is required for scale normalization. This novel method was used to analyze nitrate isotopes in rain water and streams and, thanks to the low sample size requirements, will also be suitable for ice core samples, which have very low nitrate concentrations. A tight correlation between Δ 17O and δ 18O in rain water was found with a slope of about 0.3 (R2 = 0.86), which reflects the

  6. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOEpatents

    Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

    1983-07-26

    This invention relates generally to the field of gas desorption from metals; and, more particularly, to a method of enhancing the selective desorption of a particular isotope of a gas from metals. Enhanced selective desorption is especially useful in the operation of fusion devices.

  7. RECTIFIED ABSORPTION METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, C.D.; Hanson, D.N.

    1961-10-17

    A method is described for separating and recovering heavy hydrogen isotopes from gaseous mixtures by multiple stage cyclic absorption and rectification from an approximate solvent. In particular, it is useful for recovering such isoteoes from ammonia feedstock streams containing nitrogen solvent. Modifications of the process ranging from isobaric to isothermal are provided. Certain impurities are tolerated, giving advantages over conventional fractional distillation processes. (AEC)

  8. Efficient methods and practical guidelines for simulating isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, Michele; Markland, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    The shift in chemical equilibria due to isotope substitution is frequently exploited to obtain insight into a wide variety of chemical and physical processes. It is a purely quantum mechanical effect, which can be computed exactly using simulations based on the path integral formalism. Here we discuss how these techniques can be made dramatically more efficient, and how they ultimately outperform quasi-harmonic approximations to treat quantum liquids not only in terms of accuracy, but also in terms of computational cost. To achieve this goal we introduce path integral quantum mechanics estimators based on free energy perturbation, which enable the evaluation of isotope effects using only a single path integral molecular dynamics trajectory of the naturally abundant isotope. We use as an example the calculation of the free energy change associated with H/D and (16)O/(18)O substitutions in liquid water, and of the fractionation of those isotopes between the liquid and the vapor phase. In doing so, we demonstrate and discuss quantitatively the relative benefits of each approach, thereby providing a set of guidelines that should facilitate the choice of the most appropriate method in different, commonly encountered scenarios. The efficiency of the estimators we introduce and the analysis that we perform should in particular facilitate accurate ab initio calculation of isotope effects in condensed phase systems. PMID:23298033

  9. [Equilibrium surface charge distribution in phospholipid vesicles. I. Method of calculation].

    PubMed

    Tenchov, B G; Raĭchev, B D

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a method of calculation of the surface charge equilibrium distribution between the two surfaces of a spherically closed phospholipid bilayer suspended in aqueous electrolyte solution. The net surface charge is supposed to be provided by the ionized polar groups of the phospholipid molecules. Its equilibrium distribution is found by minimization of the free electrostatic energy. The procedure of minimization utilizes the solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which describes the double electric layers of the membrane and an expression for the membrane potential derived under the assumption of absence of charges in the membrane phase. An analytical solution of the problem in the range of validity of the linearized Poisson-Boltzman equation is obtained. It is shown that in this case an equilibrium transmembrane potential exists, and the surface charge density is greater at the outer surface of the vesicle. PMID:588604

  10. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    DOEpatents

    Harney, Robert C.; Bloom, Stewart D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances.

  11. Equilibrium vs. kinetic fractionation of oxygen isotopes in two low-temperature travertine-depositing systems with differing hydrodynamic conditions at Baishuitai, Yunnan, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Sun, Hailong; Liu, Zaihua

    2012-10-01

    In order to understand the behavior of oxygen isotopic fractionation and obtain more reliable paleoclimatic data from surficial travertine deposits, the hydrochemistry, carbonate precipitation rates, and the temporal and spatial variations in δ18O values of the modern travertine in two low-temperature travertine-depositing systems (canal and pool) with differing hydrodynamic conditions at Baishuitai, Yunnan, SW China, were investigated during the warm rainy season (May 24 to November 2) in 2010. It was found that the oxygen isotopic composition of travertine in the two systems showed distinct controlling mechanisms mainly due to different carbonate precipitation rates and water residence times. For the canal system with fast flow, large deviations between the calculated and measured temperatures indicated that travertine precipitated out of isotopic equilibrium. This was due to rapid carbonate precipitation with intense CO2 degassing. δ18Otravertine values and water temperature increased downstream (˜1‰ and 4 °C, respectively) while δ18Owater values remained relatively stable. It was shown that the δ18O values of travertine in the canal system recorded the δ18O values of dissolved carbonates (HCO3-) which also increased along the canal, controlled by Rayleigh-distillation effects. In contrast, in the pools system with slow flow, oxygen isotopic equilibrium between dissolved carbonates (HCO3-) and H2O was achieved and the δ18Otravertine values did not display spatial variations. Calculated water temperatures using the equilibrium fractionation factors of Coplen (2007) were identical to the measured ones, which indicates that travertine in such pools system is suitable for the reconstruction of paleo-precipitating temperatures. Finally, by comparing these two systems we have obtained a simple criterion to determine the suitability of travertine to estimate temperatures - the δ18O value of BaCO3 precipitated from water samples is compared with the

  12. Combining sources in stable isotope mixing models: alternative methods.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Donald L; Newsome, Seth D; Gregg, Jillian W

    2005-08-01

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants; or water bodies, and many others. A common problem is having too many sources to allow a unique solution. We discuss two alternative procedures for addressing this problem. One option is a priori to combine sources with similar signatures so the number of sources is small enough to provide a unique solution. Aggregation should be considered only when isotopic signatures of clustered sources are not significantly different, and sources are related so the combined source group has some functional significance. For example, in a food web analysis, lumping several species within a trophic guild allows more interpretable results than lumping disparate food sources, even if they have similar isotopic signatures. One result of combining mixing model sources is increased uncertainty of the combined end-member isotopic signatures and consequently the source contribution estimates; this effect can be quantified using the IsoError model (http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models/isotopes/isoerror1_04.htm). As an alternative to lumping sources before a mixing analysis, the IsoSource mixing model (http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models/isosource/isosource.htm) can be used to find all feasible solutions of source contributions consistent with isotopic mass balance. While ranges of feasible contributions for each individual source can often be quite broad, contributions from functionally related groups of sources can be summed a posteriori, producing a range of solutions for the aggregate source that may be considerably narrower. A paleo-human dietary analysis example illustrates this method, which involves a terrestrial meat food source, a combination of three terrestrial plant foods, and a combination of three marine foods. In this case, a posteriori aggregation of sources allowed

  13. Quantum chemical study of the Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B siderophore complex—Electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium Fe-isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Paul, K. W.; Sparks, D. L.; Kubicki, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study presents molecular orbital/density functional theory (MO/DFT) calculations of the electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium isotope fractionation factors for iron desferrioxamine B (Fe-DFO-B) complexes in aqueous solution. In general, there was good agreement between the predicted properties of Fe(III)-DFO-B and previously published experimental and theoretical results. The predicted fractionation factor for equilibrium between Fe(III)-DFO-B and Fe(III)-catecholate at 22 °C, 0.68 ± 0.25‰, was in good agreement with a previously measured isotopic difference between bacterial cells and solution during the bacterial-mediated dissolution of hornblende [Brantley S. L., Liermann L. and Bullen T. D. (2001) Fractionation of Fe isotopes by soil microbes and organic acids. Geology29, 535-538]. Conceptually, this agreement is consistent with the notion that Fe is first removed from mineral surfaces via complexation with small organic acids (e.g., oxalate), subsequently sequestered by DFO-B in solution, and ultimately delivered to bacterial cells by Fe(III)-DFO-B complexes. The ability of DFO-B to discriminate between Fe(III) and Fe(II)/Al(III) was investigated with Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis and geometry calculations of each metal-DFO-B complex. The results indicated that higher affinity for Fe(III) is not strictly a function of bond length but also the degree of Fe-O covalent bonding.

  14. A Hybrid Method for Flows in Local Chemical Equilibrium and Nonequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currier, Nicholas G.

    The primary objective of this work is to develop a more efficient chemically active compressible Euler equation solver. Currently, a choice between the physical accuracy of a finite-rate solver or the computational efficiency of an equilibrium flow solver must be made. The number of species modeled continues to increase with available computational resources. A method of further leveraging the increase in computational power is desired. The hybrid chemistry scheme proposed here attempts to maintain the accuracy of finite-rate schemes while retaining some of the cost savings associated with equilibrium chemistry solvers. The method given uses a full finite-rate flux in regions where chemistry is slow compared to the advection rate and an equilibrium chemistry scheme in regions where the chemistry outpaces the fluid transport. Control volume switching is based on a locally defined Damkohler number. This method could be extremely useful for full reaction path modeling or the tracking of a very large number of species. The cost of symmetric Gauss-Seidel iterations grows like the number of species plus four, quantity squared. Thus, eliminating the increased cost of solving for a large number of unknowns in regions where it is unjustified can be very useful. Tenasi, a University of Tennessee SimCenter research code, is used as a base for the new solver. The hybrid method is implemented and tested with an explicit solution technique in one dimension. In combination with a five species air chemistry model, a high-temperature shock tube is used as a verification test case. Results are compared with those from pure equilibrium, full finite-rate, perfect gas Euler, and exact perfect gas Riemann solvers. Timings are also given, suggesting the cost savings that would be possible should the hybrid method be extended using implicit algorithms.

  15. Development of a non-equilibrium quantum transport calculation method based on constrained density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han Seul; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel first-principles method for the calculation of non-equilibrium quantum transport process. Within the scheme, non-equilibrium situation and quantum transport within the open-boundary condition are described by the region-dependent Δ self-consistent field method and matrix Green's function theory, respectively. We will discuss our solutions to the technical difficulties in describing bias-dependent electron transport at complicated nanointerfaces and present several application examples. Global Frontier Program (2013M3A6B1078881), Basic Science Research Grant (2012R1A1A2044793), EDISON Program (No. 2012M3C1A6035684), and 2013 Global Ph.D fellowship program of the National Research Foundation. KISTI Supercomputing Center (KSC-2014-C3-021).

  16. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  17. Technical Note: A simple method for vaterite precipitation for isotopic studies: implications for bulk and clumped isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) plays an important role in the natural environment as a major constituent of the skeleton and supporting structure of marine life and has high economic importance as an additive in food, chemicals and medical products. Anhydrous CaCO3 occurs in the three different polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, whereof calcite is the most abundant and best characterized mineral. In contrast, little is known about the rare polymorph vaterite, in particular with regard to the oxygen isotope fractionation between H2O and the mineral. Synthetic precipitation of vaterite in the laboratory typically involves rapid processes and isotopic non-equilibrium, which excludes isotope studies focused on the characterization of vaterite under equilibrium conditions. Here, we used a new experimental approach that enables vaterite mineral formation from an isotopically equilibrated solution. The solution consists of a ~0.007 mol L-1 CaCO3 solution that is saturated with NaCl at room temperature (up to 6.4 mol L-1). Vaterite precipitated as single phase or major phase (≥94%) in experiments performed between 23 and 91 °C. Only at 80 °C was vaterite a minor phase with a relative abundance of 27%. The high mineral yield per experiment of up to 235 mg relative to the initially dissolved CaCO3 amount of on average 360 mg enables an investigation of the oxygen isotope fractionation between the mineral and water, and the determination of clumped isotope values in vaterite.

  18. A New Method of Assessing the Extent of Topographic Equilibrium at Different Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcott, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's surface represents the current resultant state of the interaction between forces working to lower topography and those working to resist this, or to raise topography. A diversity of processes generate these forces and in some cases coupled feedbacks allow a dynamic equilibrium to emerge at certain spatial and temporal scales. Dynamic equilibrium is typically expressed by distinctive geometries (e.g., regular catchment shapes, first order geometry of an orogen, constant thickness of a soil horizon over space). However, the presence of stochastic surface and tectonic processes also means that regular geometries are rarely observed at all scales. Determining the scale and temporal range over which topography can be considered to be in equilibrium can be difficult and expensive, requiring a large range of spatially distributed data, and/or data that spans significant time periods. Here we present a new morphometric method that focuses on the product of erosive competition between catchments, that is the geometry of drainage divide intersections. We use this method to show that stable areas, with minimal tectonic disturbance and homogeneous rock types have distinctive drainage divide geometry (e.g. Eastern USA) which differs from the geometry of drainage divide intersections in other environments (e.g. tectonically active regions such as the South Island of New Zealand). With a few caveats, this method could be used to predict areas prone to drainage divide migration and river network reconfiguration.

  19. An Analytical Investigation of Three General Methods of Calculating Chemical-Equilibrium Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1960-01-01

    The Brinkley, Huff, and White methods for chemical-equilibrium calculations were modified and extended in order to permit an analytical comparison. The extended forms of these methods permit condensed species as reaction products, include temperature as a variable in the iteration, and permit arbitrary estimates for the variables. It is analytically shown that the three extended methods can be placed in a form that is independent of components. In this form the Brinkley iteration is identical computationally to the White method, while the modified Huff method differs only'slightly from these two. The convergence rates of the modified Brinkley and White methods are identical; and, further, all three methods are guaranteed to converge and will ultimately converge quadratically. It is concluded that no one of the three methods offers any significant computational advantages over the other two.

  20. A new method of tree xylem water extraction for isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, C.; Newton, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    waters (IW), allowing diffusive processes to proceed to equilibrium, measuring the composition of the resulting mixture or final water (FW) then, solving a simple mixing equation. To evaluate this method, we collected several twig samples from Douglas Firs in the Sacramento Mountains. Twig water was prepared for isotopic analysis both by cryogenic distillation and the mixing method. Soil in close proximity to these trees was also sampled and water was extracted by cryogenic distillation. Preliminary results show that the isotopic composition of distilled twig water and soil waters plot to the right of the local meteoric water line (LMWL) suggesting that trees are extracting shallow evaporated soil water. Twig water obtained from the mixing method plot near the LMWL within the range expected for local snow melt, suggesting a possibly deeper non-evaporated source. In general, distillation values are approximately 4% heavier with respect to delta 18O than waters obtained from the mixing method. It is possible that this difference is due to the contribution of the fractionated water of the twig phloem that is released during the distillation process. This difference is quite significant and can lead to very different interpretations. These results are being addressed with additional experiments.

  1. Method of rapid determination of MHD equilibrium properties with the modified version of the SURFAS code

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.K.; Hirshman, S.P.; Okabayashi, M.; Reusch, M.F.; Sun, Y.C.

    1993-09-01

    Rapid determination of MHD eqilibrium properties of tokamak plasmas is carried out by means of an approximation method based on the use of database files. These are computed a priori from MHD equilibrium solutions obtained by performing reconstruction to match experimental measurements, which include motional Stark effect (MSE) data. The procedure carries out a single iteration of Newton`s method to determine the poloidal variation of the toroidal plasma current density in the equilibrium form j{sub {phi}} = {minus}2{pi}({mu}{sub 0}Rp{prime} + FF{prime}/R) by representing p{prime}({psi}) and F({psi})F{prime}({psi}) in series expansions of Chebyshev polynomials. The polynominal expansion coefficients are obtained through a least-squares data fitting process similar to that used in the equilibrium reconstruction. Knowing the current density j{phi} allows the determination of the internal q-profile from the MSE data. This important stability parameter is generally unavailable from a current filament model. Numerical results calculated in this approach are compared with those determined from an accurate solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation, subject to a similar set of magnetic and pressure measurement constraints.

  2. Prospects of lithium enrichment on 7Li isotope by method of controlled ions electro-migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Kalugin, M. M.; Gabrielyan, A. V.; Martoyan, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a new electro-membrane method of enrichment of 7Li isotope. The data are presented on the importance and application fields regarding the use of 7Li isotopes. Existing methods and criteria of separation of lithium isotopes are discussed. The principle of new technology, regimes of enrichment experiments, and analysis details of obtained products are briefly described.

  3. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOEpatents

    Rich, Joseph W.; Homicz, Gregory F.; Bergman, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  4. Methods for separating medical isotopes using ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Luo, Huimin; Boll, Rose Ann; Bell, Jason Richard; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for extracting a radioisotope from an aqueous solution, the method comprising: a) intimately mixing a non-chelating ionic liquid with the aqueous solution to transfer at least a portion of said radioisotope to said non-chelating ionic liquid; and b) separating the non-chelating ionic liquid from the aqueous solution. In preferred embodiments, the method achieves an extraction efficiency of at least 80%, or a separation factor of at least 1.times.10.sup.4 when more than one radioisotope is included in the aqueous solution. In particular embodiments, the method is applied to the separation of medical isotopes pairs, such as Th from Ac (Th-229/Ac-225, Ac-227/Th-227), or Ra from Ac (Ac-225 and Ra-225, Ac-227 and Ra-223), or Ra from Th (Th-227 and Ra-223, Th-229 and Ra-225).

  5. A refined method for calculating paleotemperatures from linear correlations in bamboo coral carbon and oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Casey; Watkins, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Bamboo corals represent an emerging paleoclimate archive with the potential to record variability at intermediate depths throughout much of the global ocean. Realizing this potential has been complicated by biologically mediated vital effects, which are evident in linear correlations of skeletal carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope composition. Previous efforts to develop a bamboo coral δ18O paleothermometer by accounting for such vital effects have not been completely successful as they still rely on empirical calibrations that are offset from the temperature dependence of abiogenic experiments. Here we describe an approach that better corrects for bamboo coral vital effects and allows paleotemperatures to be calculated directly from the abiogenic temperature dependence. The success of the method lies in calculating apparent equilibrium carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation at the temperature, pH, and growth rate of each coral, as well as in the use of model II regressions. Rigorous propagation of uncertainty suggests typical errors of ±2-3°C, but in select cases errors as low as ±0.65°C can be achieved for densely sampled and strongly correlated data sets. This lower limit approaches the value attributed to uncertainty in pH and growth rate estimates alone, as predicted by a series of pseudoproxy experiments. The incorporation of isotopically light metabolic CO2 appears to be negligible in most Pacific corals, but may be significant in Atlantic specimens, potentially requiring an additional correction. The success of the method therefore hinges on how well complex environmental systems and biomineralization strategies are constrained, with the most reliable temperatures occurring when calcifying fluid pH, growth rate, and incorporation of metabolic carbon into skeletal calcite are constrained using multiple geochemical proxies.

  6. The mass dependent and independent equilibrium fractionation of stable mercury isotopes during laboratory synthesis of metacinnabar and other mercury-bearing phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S.; Wiederhold, J. G.; Bourdon, B.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2010-12-01

    that precipitates created from the Hg-nitrate had a Hg:S stoichiometry greater than 1:1 suggesting the formation of mixed Hg-S-nitrate phases. In contrast, the stoichiometry of the precipitates from the Hg-acetate experiments was close to 1:1. XRD analysis of the precipitates from the Hg-acetate system confirmed that metacinnabar was formed. The similarity of the concentration and isotope results obtained from the two time steps suggests that reactant and product were in equilibrium for both Hg systems. In all experimental samples, the precipitates were isotopically lighter than the corresponding supernatants. Small negative MIF anomalies for the odd mass Hg isotopes were found in the supernatants of the Hg-acetate. The observed MDF and MIF signatures can be explained by the change from Hg-O to Hg-S coordination during precipitation and are consistent in direction and magnitude with the predictions for equilibrium isotope effects caused by a combination of MDF and nuclear volume fractionation (Wiederhold et al., ES&T, 2010, 44:4191-4197). Additional experiments will be performed to confirm these findings.

  7. Meshless Method for Solving Fixed Boundary Problem of Axisymmetric Plasma Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imazawa, Ryota; Kawano, Yasunori; Itami, Kiyoshi

    2013-10-01

    This study is to solve Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation with the fixed plasma boundary by utilizing the meshless method for the first time. The previous studies have utilized the finite element method (FEM) to solve the equilibrium inside the fixed separatrix. In order to avoid the difficulty of FEM (e.g. mesh problem, difficulty of coding, expensive calculation cost, etc.), this study proposes the new method to apply the meshless methods, especially RBF-MFS and Kansa's method to inhomogeneous and nonlinear partial differential equations (PDE). Although the RBF-MFS and Kansa's method are applicable to the inhomogeneous PDE, the application of these methods to the GS equation is not straight-forward. Since the current profile is usually parameterized by the normalized poloidal flux, the inhomogeneous term of the GS equation contains the normalized poloidal flux, not just a poloidal flux. This is the difficulty for solving the GS equation. Accuracy and calculation time of the meshless method and FEM are compared in the condition of the same total number of nodes. The results show that the error of magnetic field obtained by the meshless methods is one hundredth of that by FEM and that the calculation time of the meshless method is one tenth of that of FEM. Moreover, this study shows that the meshless methods can be easily accelerated by parallel computing.

  8. Evaluation of soil water stable isotope analysis by H2O(liquid)-H2O(vapor) equilibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralher, Benjamin; Stumpp, Christine

    2014-05-01

    Environmental tracers like stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δ2H) have proven to be valuable tools to study water flow and transport processes in soils. Recently, a new technique for soil water isotope analysis has been developed that employs a vapor phase being in isothermal equilibrium with the liquid phase of interest. This has increased the potential application of water stable isotopes in unsaturated zone studies as it supersedes laborious extraction of soil water. However, uncertainties of analysis and influencing factors need to be considered. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate different methodologies of analysing stable isotopes in soil water in order to reduce measurement uncertainty. The methodologies included different preparation procedures of soil cores for equilibration of vapor and soil water as well as raw data correction. Two different inflatable sample containers (freezer bags, bags containing a metal layer) and equilibration atmospheres (N2, dry air) were tested. The results showed that uncertainties for δ18O were higher compared to δ2H that cannot be attributed to any specific detail of the processing routine. Particularly, soil samples with high contents of organic matter showed an apparent isotope enrichment which is indicative for fractionation due to evaporation. However, comparison of water samples obtained from suction cups with the local meteoric water line indicated negligible fractionation processes in the investigated soils. Therefore, a method was developed to correct the raw data reducing the uncertainties of the analysis.. We conclude that the evaluated method is advantageous over traditional methods regarding simplicity, resource requirements and sample throughput but careful consideration needs to be made regarding sample handling and data processing. Thus, stable isotopes of water are still a good tool to determine water flow and transport processes in the unsaturated zone.

  9. Towards bulk thermodynamics via non-equilibrium methods: gaseous methane as a case study.

    PubMed

    Zerbetto, Mirco; Frezzato, Diego

    2015-01-21

    We illustrate how the Jarzynski equality (JE), which is the progenitor of non-equilibrium methods aimed at constructing free energy landscapes for molecular-sized fluctuating systems subjected to steered transformations, can be applied to derive equations of state for bulk systems. The key-step consists of physically framing the computational strategy of "total energy morphing", recently presented by us as an efficient implementation of the JE [M. Zerbetto, A. Piserchia, D. Frezzato, J. Comput. Chem., 2014, 35, 1865-1881], in terms of build-up of the real thermodynamic state of a bulk material from the corresponding ideal state, in which the particles are non-interacting. In this context, the JE machinery yields the excess free energy versus suitably chosen controlled state variables, whose thermodynamic derivatives eventually lead to the equation of state. As an explanatory case study, we apply the methodology to derive the equation of state of gaseous methane by constructing the Helmholtz free energy versus the particle density (at fixed temperature) and then evaluating the thermodynamic derivative with respect to the volume. In our intent, this "old-style" work on gaseous methane should open the way for the investigation of thermodynamics of extended systems via non-equilibrium methods. PMID:25475171

  10. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Plasma isotope separation based on ion cyclotron resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgolenko, Dmitrii A.; Muromkin, Yurii A.

    2009-04-01

    Experiments that have been conducted in the USA, France, and Russia to investigate isotopically selective ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) as a tool for plasma isotope separation are analyzed. Because this method runs into difficulties at low values of the relative isotope mass difference ΔM/M, for some elements (for gadolinium, as an example) isotope separation still remains a problem. There are ways to solve it, however, as experimental results and theoretical calculations suggest.

  11. A Modal Expansion Equilibrium Cycle Perturbation Method for Optimizing High Burnup Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touran, Nicholas W.

    This dissertation develops a simulation tool capable of optimizing advanced nuclear reactors considering the multiobjective nature of their design. An Enhanced Equilibrium Cycle (EEC) method based on the classic equilibrium method is developed to evaluate the response of the equilibrium cycle to changes in the core design. Advances are made in the consideration of burnup-dependent cross sections and dynamic fuel performance (fission gas release, fuel growth, and bond squeeze-out) to allow accuracy in high-burnup reactors such as the Traveling Wave Reactor. EEC is accelerated for design changes near a reference state through a new modal expansion perturbation method that expands arbitrary flux perturbations on a basis of λ-eigenmodes. A code is developed to solve the 3-D, multigroup diffusion equation with an Arnoldi-based solver that determines hundreds of the reference flux harmonics and later uses these harmonics to determine expansion coefficients required to approximate the perturbed flux. The harmonics are only required for the reference state, and many substantial and localized perturbations from this state are shown to be well-approximated with efficient expressions after the reference calculation is performed. The modal expansion method is coupled to EEC to produce the later-in-time response of each design perturbation. Because the code determines the perturbed flux explicitly, a wide variety of core performance metrics may be monitored by working within a recently-developed data management system called the ARMI. Through ARMI, the response of each design perturbation may be evaluated not only for the flux and reactivity, but also for reactivity coefficients, thermal hydraulics parameters, economics, and transient performance. Considering the parameters available, an automated optimization framework is designed and implemented. A non-parametric surrogate model using the Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm is trained with many design

  12. Rotational spectra of rare isotopic species of fluoroiodomethane: Determination of the equilibrium structure from rotational spectroscopy and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Cazzoli, Gabriele; López, Juan Carlos; Alonso, José Luis; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Stopkowicz, Stella; Cheng, Lan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-07-01

    Supported by accurate quantum-chemical calculations, the rotational spectra of the mono- and bi-deuterated species of fluoroiodomethane, CHDFI and CD2FI, as well as of the 13C-containing species, 13CH2FI, were recorded for the first time. Three different spectrometers were employed, a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, a millimeter/submillimter-wave spectrometer, and a THz spectrometer, thus allowing to record a huge portion of the rotational spectrum, from 5 GHz up to 1.05 THz, and to accurately determine the ground-state rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants. Sub-Doppler measurements allowed to resolve the hyperfine structure of the rotational spectrum and to determine the complete iodine quadrupole-coupling tensor as well as the diagonal elements of the iodine spin-rotation tensor. The present investigation of rare isotopic species of CH2FI together with the results previously obtained for the main isotopologue [C. Puzzarini, G. Cazzoli, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, S. Stopkowicz, L. Cheng, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 174312 (2011);, 10.1063/1.3583498 G. Cazzoli, A. Baldacci, A. Baldan, and C. Puzzarini, Mol. Phys. 109, 2245 (2011)], 10.1080/00268976.2011.609142 enabled us to derive a semi-experimental equilibrium structure for fluoroiodomethane by means of a least-squares fit procedure using the available experimental ground-state rotational constants together with computed vibrational corrections. Problems related to the missing isotopic substitution of fluorine and iodine were overcome thanks to the availability of an accurate theoretical equilibrium geometry (computed at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations).

  13. Non-equilibrium simulation of CH4 production through the depressurization method from gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Khadijeh; Kvamme, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    as non-equilibrium processes under local constraint of mass and heat fluxes. In this work, we have extended RCB by adding another route for dissociation or reformation of CH4-hydrate towards CH4 into the aqueous phase and water. CH4-hydrate formation and dissociation is resolved by looking at supersaturation and undersaturation with respect to thermodynamics variables. Hydrate instability due to undersaturation of CH4 in the contacting water phase is also considered. A complete non-equilibrium thermodynamic package, developed in-house, was combined with RCB to account for competing phase transitions by considering the minimization of Gibb's free energy. The energy differences were calculated from variations in chemical potentials of hydrate and hydrate formers. Mass transport, heat transport and non-equilibrium thermodynamic effects were implemented through classical nucleation theory to model the kinetic rate of hydrate phase transitions. To illustrate our implementations we ran simulations covering time-spans in the order of hundred years. CH4 production was modelled using the depressurization method, where we employed the Messoyakha field data. We discuss our implementations, as well as results obtained from simulations utilizing our modifications.

  14. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-09-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes.

  15. A comparison of Coulombic interaction methods in non-equilibrium studies of heat transfer in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, Jordan; Bresme, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the impact of the treatment of electrostatic interactions on the heat conduction of liquid water. With this purpose, we report a series of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations of the Modified Central Force Model of water. We consider both the Ewald summation approach, which includes the full range of the electrostatic interactions, and the Wolf method, which uses a cutoff to truncate the long range contributions. It is shown that the relaxation of the temperature profiles towards the stationary state solution and the equation of state of the liquid are not affected by the treatment of the electrostatic interactions. However, the truncation of the interactions results in lower internal energy fluxes as well as lower thermal conductivities. We also find that the anomalous increase of the thermal conductivity of water with temperature is reproduced by the different methods considered in this work, showing that this physical behavior is independent of the treatment of the long range electrostatic interactions.

  16. A model-based method for the prediction of the isotopic distribution of peptides.

    PubMed

    Valkenborg, Dirk; Jansen, Ivy; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2008-05-01

    The process of monoisotopic mass determination, i.e., nomination of the correct peak of an isotopically resolved group of peptide peaks as a monoisotopic peak, requires prior information about the isotopic distribution of the peptide. This points immediately to the difficulty of monoisotopic mass determination, whereas a single mass spectrum does not contain information about the atomic composition of a peptide and therefore the isotopic distribution of the peptide remains unknown. To solve this problem a technique is required, which is able to estimate the isotopic distribution given the information of a single mass spectrum. Senko et al. calculated the average isotopic distribution for any mass peptide via the multinomial expansion (Yergey 1983), using a scaled version of the average amino acid Averagine (Senko et al. 1995). Another method, introduced by Breen et al., approximates the result of the multinomial expansion by a Poisson model (Breen et al. 2000). Although both methods perform well, they have their specific limitations. In this manuscript, we propose an alternative method for the prediction of the isotopic distribution based on a model for consecutive ratios of peaks from the isotopic distribution, similar in spirit to the approach introduced by Gay et al. (1999). The presented method is computationally simple and accurate in predicting the expected isotopic distribution. Further, we extend our method to estimate the isotopic distribution of sulphur-containing peptides. This is important because the naturally occurring isotopes of sulphur have an impact on the isotopic distribution of a peptide. PMID:18325782

  17. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1986-12-16

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

  18. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

  19. Phases, periphases, and interphases equilibrium by molecular modeling. I. Mass equilibrium by the semianalytical stochastic perturbations method and application to a solution between (120) gypsum faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedesseau, Laurent; Jouanna, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The SASP (semianalytical stochastic perturbations) method is an original mixed macro-nano-approach dedicated to the mass equilibrium of multispecies phases, periphases, and interphases. This general method, applied here to the reflexive relation Ck⇔μk between the concentrations Ck and the chemical potentials μk of k species within a fluid in equilibrium, leads to the distribution of the particles at the atomic scale. The macroaspects of the method, based on analytical Taylor's developments of chemical potentials, are intimately mixed with the nanoaspects of molecular mechanics computations on stochastically perturbed states. This numerical approach, directly linked to definitions, is universal by comparison with current approaches, DLVO Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek, grand canonical Monte Carlo, etc., without any restriction on the number of species, concentrations, or boundary conditions. The determination of the relation Ck⇔μk implies in fact two problems: a direct problem Ck⇒μk and an inverse problem μk⇒Ck. Validation of the method is demonstrated in case studies A and B which treat, respectively, a direct problem and an inverse problem within a free saturated gypsum solution. The flexibility of the method is illustrated in case study C dealing with an inverse problem within a solution interphase, confined between two (120) gypsum faces, remaining in connection with a reference solution. This last inverse problem leads to the mass equilibrium of ions and water molecules within a 3 Å thick gypsum interface. The major unexpected observation is the repulsion of SO42- ions towards the reference solution and the attraction of Ca2+ ions from the reference solution, the concentration being 50 times higher within the interphase as compared to the free solution. The SASP method is today the unique approach able to tackle the simulation of the number and distribution of ions plus water molecules in such extreme confined conditions. This result is of prime

  20. Equilibrium Iron Isotope Fractionation Factors of Minerals: Reevaluation from the Data of Nuclear Inelastic Resonant X-ray Scattering and Mossbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, Dr. V. B.; Clayton, R. N.; Horita, Juske; Mineev, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    We have critically reevaluated equilibrium iron isotope fractionation factors for oxide and sulfide minerals using recently acquired data obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy and inelastic nuclear resonant X-ray scattering (INRXS) synchrotron radiation. Good agreement was observed in the iron {beta}-factors of metallic iron ({alpha}-Fe) and hematite calculated using both Moessbauer- and INRXS-derived data, which supports the validity and reliability of the calculations. Based on this excellent agreement, we suggest the use of the present data on the iron {beta}-factors of hematite as a reference. The previous Moessbauer-derived iron {beta}-factor for magnetite has been modified significantly based on the Fe-sublattice density of states obtained from the INRXS experiments. This resolves the disagreement between naturally observed iron isotope fractionation factors for mineral pairs involving magnetite and those obtained from the calculated {beta}-factors. The correctness of iron {beta}-factor for pyrite has been corroborated by the good agreement with experimental data of sulfur isotope geothermometers of pyrite-galena and pyrite-sphalerite. A good correlation between the potential energy of the cation site, the oxidation state of iron and the iron {beta}-factor value has been established. Specifically, ferric compounds, which have a higher potential energy of iron than ferrous compounds, have higher {beta}-factors. A similar dependence of b-factors on the oxidation state and potential energy could be extended to other transition metals. Extremely low values of INRXS-derived iron {beta}-factors for troilite and Fe{sub 3}S significantly widen the range of iron b-factors for covalently bonded compounds.

  1. Air-snow transfer of nitrate on the East Antarctic Plateau - Part 1: Isotopic evidence for a photolytically driven dynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbland, J.; Vicars, W. C.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Frey, M. M.; Frosini, D.; Vince, E.; Martins, J. M. F.

    2012-10-01

    Here we report the measurement of the comprehensive isotopic composition (δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O) of nitrate at the air-snow interface at Dome C, Antarctica (DC, 75° 06' S, 123° 19' E) and in snow pits along a transect across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) between 66° S and 78° S. For each of the East Antarctic snow pits in most of which nitrate loss is observed, we derive apparent fractionation constants associated with this loss as well as asymptotic values of nitrate concentration and isotopic ratios below the photic zone. Nitrate collected from snow pits on the plateau have average apparent fractionation constants of (-59±10)‰, (+2.0±1.0)‰ and (+8.7±2.4)‰, for δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O, respectively. In contrast, snow pits sampled on the coast show distinct isotopic signatures with average apparent fractionation constants of (-16±14)‰, (-0.2±1.5)‰ and (+3.1±5.8)‰, for δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O, respectively. From a lab experiment carried out at DC in parallel to the field investigations, we find that the 15N/14N fractionation associated with the physical release of nitrate is (-8.5±2.5)‰, a value significantly different from the modelled estimate previously found for photolysis (-48‰, Frey et al., 2009) when assuming a Rayleigh-type process. Our observations corroborate that photolysis is the dominant nitrate loss process on the East Antarctic Plateau, while on the coast the loss is less pronounced and could involve both physical release and photochemical processes. Year-round isotopic measurements at DC show a close relationship between the Δ17O of atmospheric nitrate and Δ17O of nitrate in skin layer snow, suggesting a photolytically-driven isotopic equilibrium imposed by nitrate recycling at this interface. The 3-4 weeks shift observed for nitrate concentration in these two compartments may be explained by the different sizes of the nitrate reservoirs and by deposition from the atmosphere to the snow. Atmospheric nitrate

  2. Generalized non-equilibrium vertex correction method in coherent medium theory for quantum transport simulation of disordered nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiawei; Ke, Youqi

    In realistic nanoelectronics, disordered impurities/defects are inevitable and play important roles in electron transport. However, due to the lack of effective quantum transport method, the important effects of disorders remain poorly understood. Here, we report a generalized non-equilibrium vertex correction (NVC) method with coherent potential approximation to treat the disorder effects in quantum transport simulation. With this generalized NVC method, any averaged product of two single-particle Green's functions can be obtained by solving a set of simple linear equations. As a result, the averaged non-equilibrium density matrix and various important transport properties, including averaged current, disordered induced current fluctuation and the averaged shot noise, can all be efficiently computed in a unified scheme. Moreover, a generalized form of conditionally averaged non-equilibrium Green's function is derived to incorporate with density functional theory to enable first-principles simulation. We prove the non-equilibrium coherent potential equals the non-equilibrium vertex correction. Our approach provides a unified, efficient and self-consistent method for simulating non-equilibrium quantum transport through disorder nanoelectronics. Shanghaitech start-up fund.

  3. Application of the non-equilibrium statistical operator method (NESOM) to dissipation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M. Y.; Kantorovich, L.

    2001-02-01

    We apply the non-equilibrium statistical operator method to non-contact atomic force microscopy, considering explicitly the statistical effects of (classical) vibrations of surface atoms and associated energy transfer from the tip to the surface. We derive several, physically and mathematically equivalent, forms of the equation of motion for the tip, each containing a friction term due to the so-called intrinsic mechanism of energy dissipation first suggested by Gauthier and Tsukada. Our exact treatment supports the results of some earlier work which were all approximate. We also demonstrate, using the same theory, that the distribution function of the tip in the coordinate-momentum phase subspace is governed by the Fokker-Planck equation and should be considered as strongly peaked around the exact values t and t of the momentum and the position of the tip, respectively.

  4. Isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: methods for isotopic calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Brand, W. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    In trial analyses of a series of n-alkanes, precise determinations of 13C contents were based on isotopic standards introduced by five different techniques and results were compared. Specifically, organic-compound standards were coinjected with the analytes and carried through chromatography and combustion with them; or CO2 was supplied from a conventional inlet and mixed with the analyte in the ion source, or CO2 was supplied from an auxiliary mixing volume and transmitted to the source without interruption of the analyte stream. Additionally, two techniques were investigated in which the analyte stream was diverted and CO2 standards were placed on a near-zero background. All methods provided accurate results. Where applicable, methods not involving interruption of the analyte stream provided the highest performance (sigma = 0.00006 at.% 13C or 0.06% for 250 pmol C as CO2 reaching the ion source), but great care was required. Techniques involving diversion of the analyte stream were immune to interference from coeluting sample components and still provided high precision (0.0001 < or = sigma < or = 0.0002 at.% or 0.1 < or = sigma < or = 0.2%).

  5. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    DOEpatents

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  6. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor–corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  7. A moving mesh finite difference method for equilibrium radiation diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weizhang; Qiu, Jianxian

    2015-10-01

    An efficient moving mesh finite difference method is developed for the numerical solution of equilibrium radiation diffusion equations in two dimensions. The method is based on the moving mesh partial differential equation approach and moves the mesh continuously in time using a system of meshing partial differential equations. The mesh adaptation is controlled through a Hessian-based monitor function and the so-called equidistribution and alignment principles. Several challenging issues in the numerical solution are addressed. Particularly, the radiation diffusion coefficient depends on the energy density highly nonlinearly. This nonlinearity is treated using a predictor-corrector and lagged diffusion strategy. Moreover, the nonnegativity of the energy density is maintained using a cutoff method which has been known in literature to retain the accuracy and convergence order of finite difference approximation for parabolic equations. Numerical examples with multi-material, multiple spot concentration situations are presented. Numerical results show that the method works well for radiation diffusion equations and can produce numerical solutions of good accuracy. It is also shown that a two-level mesh movement strategy can significantly improve the efficiency of the computation.

  8. General methods for sensitivity analysis of equilibrium dynamics in patch occupancy models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a useful tool for the study of ecological models that has many potential applications for patch occupancy modeling. Drawing from the rich foundation of existing methods for Markov chain models, I demonstrate new methods for sensitivity analysis of the equilibrium state dynamics of occupancy models. Estimates from three previous studies are used to illustrate the utility of the sensitivity calculations: a joint occupancy model for a prey species, its predators, and habitat used by both; occurrence dynamics from a well-known metapopulation study of three butterfly species; and Golden Eagle occupancy and reproductive dynamics. I show how to deal efficiently with multistate models and how to calculate sensitivities involving derived state variables and lower-level parameters. In addition, I extend methods to incorporate environmental variation by allowing for spatial and temporal variability in transition probabilities. The approach used here is concise and general and can fully account for environmental variability in transition parameters. The methods can be used to improve inferences in occupancy studies by quantifying the effects of underlying parameters, aiding prediction of future system states, and identifying priorities for sampling effort.

  9. Air-snow transfer of nitrate on the East Antarctic Plateau - Part 1: Isotopic evidence for a photolytically driven dynamic equilibrium in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbland, J.; Vicars, W. C.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.; Frey, M. M.; Frosini, D.; Vince, E.; Martins, J. M. F.

    2013-07-01

    Here we report the measurement of the comprehensive isotopic composition (δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O) of nitrate at the air-snow interface at Dome C, Antarctica (DC, 75°06' S, 123°19' E), and in snow pits along a transect across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) between 66° S and 78° S. In most of the snow pits, nitrate loss (either by physical release or UV photolysis of nitrate) is observed and fractionation constants associated are calculated. Nitrate collected from snow pits on the plateau (snow accumulation rate below 50 kg m-2 a-1) displays average fractionation constants of (-59±10) ‰, (+2.0±1.0) ‰ and (+8.7±2.4)‰ for δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O, respectively. In contrast, snow pits sampled on the coast show distinct isotopic signatures with average fractionation constants of (-16±14) ‰, (-0.2±1.5) ‰ and (+3.1±5.8) ‰, for δ15N, Δ17O and δ18O, respectively. Our observations corroborate that photolysis (associated with a 15N / 14N fractionation constant of the order of -48 ‰ according to Frey et al. (2009) is the dominant nitrate loss process on the East Antarctic Plateau, while on the coast the loss is less pronounced and could involve both physical release and photochemical processes. Year-round isotopic measurements at DC show a~close relationship between the Δ17O of atmospheric nitrate and Δ17O of nitrate in skin layer snow, suggesting a photolytically driven isotopic equilibrium imposed by nitrate recycling at this interface. Atmospheric nitrate deposition may lead to fractionation of the nitrogen isotopes and explain the almost constant shift of the order of 25 ‰ between the δ15N values in the atmospheric and skin layer nitrate at DC. Asymptotic δ15N(NO3-) values calculated for each snow pit are found to be correlated with the inverse of the snow accumulation rate (ln(δ15N as. + 1) = (5.76±0.47) ċ (kg m-2 a-1/ A) + (0.01±0.02)), confirming the strong relationship between the snow accumulation rate and the degree of isotopic

  10. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-28

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space. PMID:27369495

  11. Non-Condon equilibrium Fermi's golden rule electronic transition rate constants via the linearized semiclassical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang; Geva, Eitan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we test the accuracy of the linearized semiclassical (LSC) expression for the equilibrium Fermi's golden rule rate constant for electronic transitions in the presence of non-Condon effects. We do so by performing a comparison with the exact quantum-mechanical result for a model where the donor and acceptor potential energy surfaces are parabolic and identical except for shifts in the equilibrium energy and geometry, and the coupling between them is linear in the nuclear coordinates. Since non-Condon effects may or may not give rise to conical intersections, both possibilities are examined by considering: (1) A modified Garg-Onuchic-Ambegaokar model for charge transfer in the condensed phase, where the donor-acceptor coupling is linear in the primary mode coordinate, and for which non-Condon effects do not give rise to a conical intersection; (2) the linear vibronic coupling model for electronic transitions in gas phase molecules, where non-Condon effects give rise to conical intersections. We also present a comprehensive comparison between the linearized semiclassical expression and a progression of more approximate expressions. The comparison is performed over a wide range of frictions and temperatures for model (1) and over a wide range of temperatures for model (2). The linearized semiclassical method is found to reproduce the exact quantum-mechanical result remarkably well for both models over the entire range of parameters under consideration. In contrast, more approximate expressions are observed to deviate considerably from the exact result in some regions of parameter space.

  12. A body-force based method to generate supersonic equilibrium turbulent boundary layer profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waindim, M.; Gaitonde, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We further develop a simple counterflow body force-based approach to generate an equilibrium spatially developing turbulent boundary layer suitable for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of viscous-inviscid interactions. The force essentially induces a small separated region in an incoming specified laminar boundary layer. The resulting unstable shear layer then transitions and breaks down to yield the desired unsteady profile. The effects of wall thermal conditions are explored to demonstrate the capability of the method for both fixed wall and adiabatic wall conditions. We then describe an efficient method to select parameters that ensure transition by examining precursor signatures using generalized stability variables. These precursors are shown to be evident in a computational domain spanning only a small region around the trip and can also be detected using 2D simulations. Finally, the method is tested for different Mach numbers ranging from 1.7 to 2.9, with emphasis on flow field surveys, Reynolds stresses, and energy spectra. These results provide guidance on boundary conditions for desired boundary layer thickness at each Mach number. The consequences of using a much lower Reynolds number in computation relative to experiment are evident at the higher Mach number, where a self sustaining turbulent boundary layer is more difficult to obtain.

  13. A comparison of the toluene distillation and vacuum/heat methods for extracting soil water for stable isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingraham, Neil L.; Shadel, Craig

    1992-12-01

    not enough to affect the remaining unbound introduced soil water. Pretreatment of the soil to equilibrate the heat-labile water to the test water produced good results for the toluene distillation but not the vacuum/heat extraction method. Vapors collected over the soils also show stable isotopic variations related to soilwater content. These vapors also appear to be in closer equilibrium with the free water, as extracted by the toluene method, than with the originally introduced water; thus, the soil vapors do not appear to be isotopically affected by the heat-labile water. The toluene method appears to be better for extracting soil water for stable isotopic analysis because it allows more precise temperature control and excludes the extraction of heat-labile water which is isotopically fractionated. The bound nature of this heat-labile water limits association with the hydrologically active soil water; thus, the exclusion of this water from the soil water attained by toluene distillation may be advantageous. However, the azeotropic nature of toluene distillation affords no benefit and the extraction procedure must continue to completion.

  14. An isotopic exchange method for the characterization of the irreversibility of pesticide sorption-desorption in soil.

    PubMed

    Celis, R; Koskinen, W C

    1999-02-01

    An isotopic exchange method is presented that characterizes the irreversibility of pesticide sorption-desorption by soil observed in batch equilibration experiments. The isotopic exchange of (12)C- and (14)C-labeled triadimefon [(1-(4-chlorophenoxy)-3,3-dimethyl-1-(1H-1, 2,4-triazol-1-yl)-2-butanone] and imidacloprid-guanidine [1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-amine] in Hanford sandy loam soil indicated that these systems can be described by a two-compartment model in which about 90% of sorption occurs on reversible, easily desorbable sites, whereas 10% of the sorbed molecules are irreversibly sorbed on soil and do not participate in the sorption-desorption equilibrium. This model closely predicted the hysteresis observed in the desorption isotherms from batch equilibration experiments. The isotopic exchange of triadimefon and imidacloprid-guanidine in Drummer silty clay loam soil indicated that there was a fraction of the sorbed (14)C-labeled pesticide that was resistant to desorption, which increased as pesticide concentration decreased and was higher for triadimefon than for imidacloprid-guanidine. In contrast, the batch equilibration method resulted in ill-defined desorption isotherms for the Drummer soil, which made accurate desorption characterization problematic. PMID:10563969

  15. VELOCITY SELECTOR METHOD FOR THE SEPARATION OF ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Britten, R.J.

    1957-12-31

    A velocity selector apparatus is described for separating and collecting an enriched fraction of the isotope of a particular element. The invention has the advantage over conventional mass spectrometers in that a magnetic field is not used, doing away with the attendant problems of magnetic field variation. The apparatus separates the isotopes by selectively accelerating the ionized constituents present in a beam of the polyisotopic substance that are of uniform kinetic energy, the acceleration being applied intermittently and at spaced points along the beam and in a direction normal to the direction of the propagation of the uniform energy beam whereby a transverse displacement of the isotopic constituents of different mass is obtained.

  16. Some Developments of the Equilibrium Particle Simulation Method for the Direct Simulation of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrossan, M. N.

    1995-01-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the established technique for the simulation of rarefied gas flows. In some flows of engineering interest, such as occur for aero-braking spacecraft in the upper atmosphere, DSMC can become prohibitively expensive in CPU time because some regions of the flow, particularly on the windward side of blunt bodies, become collision dominated. As an alternative to using a hybrid DSMC and continuum gas solver (Euler or Navier-Stokes solver) this work is aimed at making the particle simulation method efficient in the high density regions of the flow. A high density, infinite collision rate limit of DSMC, the Equilibrium Particle Simulation method (EPSM) was proposed some 15 years ago. EPSM is developed here for the flow of a gas consisting of many different species of molecules and is shown to be computationally efficient (compared to DSMC) for high collision rate flows. It thus offers great potential as part of a hybrid DSMC/EPSM code which could handle flows in the transition regime between rarefied gas flows and fully continuum flows. As a first step towards this goal a pure EPSM code is described. The next step of combining DSMC and EPSM is not attempted here but should be straightforward. EPSM and DSMC are applied to Taylor-Couette flow with Kn = 0.02 and 0.0133 and S(omega) = 3). Toroidal vortices develop for both methods but some differences are found, as might be expected for the given flow conditions. EPSM appears to be less sensitive to the sequence of random numbers used in the simulation than is DSMC and may also be more dissipative. The question of the origin and the magnitude of the dissipation in EPSM is addressed. It is suggested that this analysis is also relevant to DSMC when the usual accuracy requirements on the cell size and decoupling time step are relaxed in the interests of computational efficiency.

  17. Investigation of the Photochemical Method for Uranium Isotope Separation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Urey, H. C.

    1943-07-10

    To find a process for successful photochemical separation of isotopes several conditions have to be fulfilled. First, the different isotopes have to show some differences in the spectrum. Secondly, and equally important, this difference must be capable of being exploited in a photochemical process. Parts A and B outline the physical and chemical conditions, and the extent to which one might expect to find them fulfilled. Part C deals with the applicability of the process.

  18. The equilibrium molecular structures of 2-deoxyribose and fructose by the semiexperimental mixed estimation method and coupled-cluster computations.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Natalja; Demaison, Jean; Cocinero, Emilio J; Écija, Patricia; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter; Vogt, Jürgen

    2016-06-21

    Fructose and deoxyribose (24 and 19 atoms, respectively) are too large for determining accurate equilibrium structures, either by high-level ab initio methods or by experiments alone. We show in this work that the semiexperimental (SE) mixed estimation (ME) method offers a valuable alternative for equilibrium structure determinations in moderate-sized molecules such as these monosaccharides or other biochemical building blocks. The SE/ME method proceeds by fitting experimental rotational data for a number of isotopologues, which have been corrected with theoretical vibration-rotation interaction parameters (αi), and predicate observations for the structure. The derived SE constants are later supplemented by carefully chosen structural parameters from medium level ab initio calculations, including those for hydrogen atoms. The combined data are then used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine an equilibrium structure (r). We applied the ME method here to fructose and 2-deoxyribose and checked the accuracy of the calculations for 2-deoxyribose against the high level ab initio r structure fully optimized at the CCSD(T) level. We show that the ME method allows determining a complete and reliable equilibrium structure for relatively large molecules, even when experimental rotational information includes a limited number of isotopologues. With a moderate computational cost the ME method could be applied to larger molecules, thereby improving the structural evidence for subtle orbital interactions such as the anomeric effect. PMID:27212641

  19. A Shrinkage Method for Testing the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Yuan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Testing for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is often used as an initial step for checking the quality of genotyping. When testing the HWE for case-control data, the impact of a potential genetic association between the marker and the disease must be controlled for otherwise the results may be biased. Li and Li (2008) proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRT) that accounts for this potential genetic association and it is more powerful than the commonly used control-only χ2 test. However, the LRT is not efficient when the marker is independent of the disease, and also requires numerical optimization to calculate the test statistic. In this article, we propose a novel shrinkage test for assessing the HWE. The proposed shrinkage test yields higher statistical power than the LRT when the marker is independent of or weakly associated with the disease, and converges to the LRT when the marker is strongly associated with the disease. In addition, the proposed shrinkage test has a closed form and can be easily used to test the HWE for large datasets that result from genome-wide association studies. We compare the performance of the shrinkage test with existing methods using simulation studies, and apply the shrinkage test to a genome-wide association dataset for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23934751

  20. Isotopes Separation Method using Physical Vapor Deposition Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed Akhtar, S. M.; Saleem, M.; Mahmood, Nasir

    2010-02-01

    An isotope separation technique using effusive emission of vapors from the heated molybdenum boat is presented. The technique is applied for the separation of the lithium isotopes. Lithium fluoride with natural isotopic abundance was chosen for evaporation and it was achieved by resistive heating of the molybdenum boat with an exit orifice in the center that provides a point source emission. Glass substrates were placed in a semi-circle around the source of evaporation at different positions of peripheral region to deposit the evaporated material. A non-commercial laboratory developed linear Time of Flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was used for isotopic abundance measurements of lithium in the deposited thin films. The dependence of the size of exit orifice on the separation is also studied for the three exit orifices with diameters of 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 mm. The separation factors of the isotopes as a function of different peripheral locations are calculated and presented. The abundance of the 6Li isotope has been increased up to 16% on the peripheral positions.

  1. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Otani, Akihito; Maginn, Edward J

    2015-08-11

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics is often used in conjunction with a Green-Kubo integral of the pressure tensor autocorrelation function to compute the shear viscosity of fluids. This approach is computationally expensive and is subject to a large amount of variability because the plateau region of the Green-Kubo integral is difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we propose a time decomposition approach for computing the shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formalism. Instead of one long trajectory, multiple independent trajectories are run and the Green-Kubo relation is applied to each trajectory. The averaged running integral as a function of time is fit to a double-exponential function with a weighting function derived from the standard deviation of the running integrals. Such a weighting function minimizes the uncertainty of the estimated shear viscosity and provides an objective means of estimating the viscosity. While the formal Green-Kubo integral requires an integration to infinite time, we suggest an integration cutoff time tcut, which can be determined by the relative values of the running integral and the corresponding standard deviation. This approach for computing the shear viscosity can be easily automated and used in computational screening studies where human judgment and intervention in the data analysis are impractical. The method has been applied to the calculation of the shear viscosity of a relatively low-viscosity liquid, ethanol, and relatively high-viscosity ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]), over a range of temperatures. These test cases show that the method is robust and yields reproducible and reliable shear viscosity values. PMID:26574439

  2. Supplementing environmental isotopes with time series methods to date groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farlin, Julien

    2015-04-01

    A popular method to estimate the transit time of groundwater is to fit the predictions of a lumped parameter model (LPM) to environmental isotope measurements. The fitting, or inverse modeling, procedure consists in rejecting all parameters (or parameter combinations for more complex LPMs) that exceeds a given error threshold. In many usual cases where this does not lead to a single acceptable solution, additional and independent data can prove useful to further eliminate some of the remaining solutions. In the case study presented here, groundwater transit times have been estimated by combining tritium, temperature, and discharge measurements. Tritium measurements from a series of contact springs draining the Luxembourg Sandstone aquifer were used to estimate the two parameters of an exponential piston flow model. The piston flow parameter gives the transit time of tritium through the thick unsaturated zone of the aquifer, while the exponential component corresponds to its mean transit time in the saturated zone. Due to the limited extent of the tritium time series and the fact that tritium activity has nearly returned to its background concentration, the solution of the inverse modeling was not unique. The discharge measurements were then used to reduce the number of retained parameter combinations by estimating independently from tritium the transit time through the unsaturated and saturated zones. The former was calculated from the time lag between a time series of net annual recharge over ten years and the fluctuations in discharge over that same period, while the latter was calculated from the discharge recession during the dry season. Although both methods necessitate relatively long time series of at least a few years, they reduce dramatically the range of estimated transit times. Another possibility is to use the temperature signal measured in spring water. The amplitude damping and its shift relatively to air temperature (which we used as proxy for the

  3. A Computational Method for Determining the Equilibrium Composition and Product Temperature in a LH2/LOX Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sozen, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    In what follows, the model used for combustion of liquid hydrogen (LH2) with liquid oxygen (LOX) using chemical equilibrium assumption, and the novel computational method developed for determining the equilibrium composition and temperature of the combustion products by application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics will be described. The modular FORTRAN code developed as a subroutine that can be incorporated into any flow network code with little effort has been successfully implemented in GFSSP as the preliminary runs indicate. The code provides capability of modeling the heat transfer rate to the coolants for parametric analysis in system design.

  4. Reducing the matrix effects in chemical analysis: fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris

    2016-04-01

    The combination of isotope dilution and mass spectrometry has become an ubiquitous tool of chemical analysis. Often perceived as one of the most accurate methods of chemical analysis, it is not without shortcomings. Current isotope dilution equations are not capable of fully addressing one of the key problems encountered in chemical analysis: the possible effect of sample matrix on measured isotope ratios. The method of standard addition does compensate for the effect of sample matrix by making sure that all measured solutions have identical composition. While it is impossible to attain such condition in traditional isotope dilution, we present equations which allow for matrix-matching between all measured solutions by fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods.

  5. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, William M.

    1988-05-24

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtainable in the prior art.

  6. Liquid-phase thermal diffusion isotope separation apparatus and method having tapered column

    DOEpatents

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1985-12-04

    A thermal diffusion counterflow method and apparatus for separating isotopes in solution in which the solution is confined in a long, narrow, vertical slit which tapers from bottom to top. The variation in the width of the slit permits maintenance of a stable concentration distribution with relatively long columns, thus permitting isotopic separation superior to that obtained in the prior art.

  7. Simple, rapid method for the preparation of isotopically labeled formaldehyde

    DOEpatents

    Hooker, Jacob Matthew; Schonberger, Matthias; Schieferstein, Hanno; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-10-04

    Isotopically labeled formaldehyde (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O) is prepared from labeled methyl iodide (*C.sup..sctn.H.sub.3I) by reaction with an oxygen nucleophile having a pendant leaving group. The mild and efficient reaction conditions result in good yields of *C.sup..sctn.H.sub.2O with little or no *C isotopic dilution. The simple, efficient production of .sup.11CH.sub.2O is described. The use of the .sup.11CH.sub.2O for the formation of positron emission tomography tracer compounds is described. The reaction can be incorporated into automated equipment available to radiochemistry laboratories. The isotopically labeled formaldehyde can be used in a variety of reactions to provide radiotracer compounds for imaging studies as well as for scintillation counting and autoradiography.

  8. Semiexperimental Equilibrium Structures for the Equatorial Conformers of N-Methylpiperidone and Tropinone by the Mixed Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C.; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, H. D.

    2012-06-01

    N-methylpiperidone and tropinone, which contain a structural motif found in numerous alkaloids, are too large for determining an accurate equilibrium structure either by ab initio methods or by experiment. However, the ground state rotational constants of the parent species and of all isotopologues with a substituted heavy atom (13C, 15N, 18O) are known from microwave spectroscopy. These constants have been corrected for the rovibrational contribution calculated from an ab initio cubic force field. These semiexperimental equilibrium rotational constants have been supplemented by carefully chosen structural parameters from medium level ab initio calculations. In the mixed estimation method, the two sets of data have been used in a weighted least-squares fit to determine a reliable equilibrium structure for both molecules. This work shows that it is possible to determine reliable equilibrium structures for large molecules (34 degrees of freedom in the case of tropinone). The method could be applied without too much difficulty to still larger molecules. L. Evangelisti, A. Lesarri, M. K. Jahn, E. J. Cocinero, W. Caminati, J.-U. Grabow J. Phys. Chem. A 115, 9545-9551 (2011) E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño PCCP 12, 6076-6083 (2010)

  9. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  10. A General Method for Automatic Computation of Equilibrium Compositions and Theoretical Rocket Performance of Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Sanford; Zeleznik, Frank J.; Huff, Vearl N.

    1959-01-01

    A general computer program for chemical equilibrium and rocket performance calculations was written for the IBM 650 computer with 2000 words of drum storage, 60 words of high-speed core storage, indexing registers, and floating point attachments. The program is capable of carrying out combustion and isentropic expansion calculations on a chemical system that may include as many as 10 different chemical elements, 30 reaction products, and 25 pressure ratios. In addition to the equilibrium composition, temperature, and pressure, the program calculates specific impulse, specific impulse in vacuum, characteristic velocity, thrust coefficient, area ratio, molecular weight, Mach number, specific heat, isentropic exponent, enthalpy, entropy, and several thermodynamic first derivatives.

  11. Nash equilibrium in differential games and the construction of the programmed iteration method

    SciTech Connect

    Averboukh, Yurii V

    2011-05-31

    This work is devoted to the study of nonzero-sum differential games. The set of payoffs in a situation of Nash equilibrium is examined. It is shown that the set of payoffs in a situation of Nash equilibrium coincides with the set of values of consistent functions which are fixed points of the program absorption operator. A condition for functions to be consistent is given in terms of the weak invariance of the graph of the functions under a certain differential inclusion. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  12. Preliminary results of oxygen isotope ratio measurement with a particle-gamma coincidence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borysiuk, Maciek; Kristiansson, Per; Ros, Linus; Abdel, Nassem S.; Elfman, Mikael; Nilsson, Charlotta; Pallon, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The possibility to study variations in the oxygen isotopic ratio with photon tagged nuclear reaction analysis (pNRA) is evaluated in the current work. The experiment described in the article was performed at Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility (LIBAF) with a 2 MeV deuteron beam. Isotopic fractionation of light elements such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen is the basis of many analytical tools in hydrology, geology, paleobiology and paleogeology. IBA methods provide one possible tool for measurement of isotopic content. During this experimental run we focused on measurement of the oxygen isotopic ratio. The measurement of stable isotopes of oxygen has a number of applications; the particular one driving the current investigation belongs to the field of astrogeology and specifically evaluation of fossil extraterrestrial material. There are three stable isotopes of oxygen: 16O, 17O and 18O. We procured samples highly enriched with all three isotopes. Isotopes 16O and 18O were easily detected in the enriched samples, but no significant signal from 17O was detected in the same samples. The measured yield was too low to detect 18O in a sample with natural abundances of oxygen isotopes, at least in the current experimental setup, but the spectral line from the reaction with 16O was clearly visible.

  13. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  14. COMBINING SOURCES IN STABLE ISOTOPE MIXING MODELS: ALTERNATIVE METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope mixing models are often used to quantify source contributions to a mixture. Examples include pollution source identification; trophic web studies; analysis of water sources for soils, plants, or water bodies; and many others. A common problem is having too many s...

  15. A numerical method for retrieving high oxygen isotope temperatures from plutonic igneous rocks: An example from the Laramie Anorthosite Complex, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, J.; Chacko, T. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The Sybille Pit is a late-stage magnetite-ilmenite-plagioclase-bearing differentiate of the Laramie Anorthosite with a wide range of grain sizes and modal mineralogy. This variability makes Sybille an ideal locality in which to study the factors that affect isotopic thermometry in plutonic environments. The authors have developed a numerical model based on isotope exchange trajectories that retrieves close to magmatic temperatures for samples from Sybille. This method is based on the premise that hand sample-scale sub-systems close to exchange with each other at temperatures that exceed those of the constituent minerals. The temperature of hand-sample scale closure is retrieved by back calculating the isotope exchange trajectories to the temperature at which two samples with widely different model compositions are in isotopic equilibrium. Application of these methods to samples from Sybille provides promising results. Whereas conventional isotopic thermometry of individual samples yields a wide range of temperatures ([approximately]600 to > 1000 C) depending on the mineral-pair chosen, application of this numerical model to multiple samples yields temperatures of 1,070 [+-] 100 C which corresponds closely to the inferred solidus for these rocks.

  16. METHOD TO QUANTIFY THE CARBON CYCLE OF FOREST BIOMES IN THE FORMER SOVIET UNION (EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activities have caused a measurable increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 which is predicted to cause the earth's temperatures to rise and accelerate rates of plant respiration and the decay of organic matter, disrupting the equilibrium of the terrestrial carbon ...

  17. A time-accurate implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1992-01-01

    A new time accurate coupled solution procedure for solving the chemical non-equilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide range of Mach numbers is described. The scheme is shown to be very efficient and robust for flows with velocities ranging from M less than or equal to 10(exp -10) to supersonic speeds.

  18. A Simple Method to Calculate the Temperature Dependence of the Gibbs Energy and Chemical Equilibrium Constants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs energy and important quantities such as Henry's law constants, activity coefficients, and chemical equilibrium constants is usually calculated by using the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. Although, this is a well-known approach and traditionally covered as part of any physical chemistry course, the required…

  19. A method for incorporating equilibrium chemical reactions into multiphase flow models for CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaltink, Maarten W.; Vilarrasa, Victor; De Gaspari, Francesca; Silva, Orlando; Carrera, Jesús; Rötting, Tobias S.

    2013-12-01

    CO2 injection and storage in deep saline aquifers involves many coupled processes, including multiphase flow, heat and mass transport, rock deformation and mineral precipitation and dissolution. Coupling is especially critical in carbonate aquifers, where minerals will tend to dissolve in response to the dissolution of CO2 into the brine. The resulting neutralization will drive further dissolution of both CO2 and calcite. This suggests that large cavities may be formed and that proper simulation may require full coupling of reactive transport and multiphase flow. We show that solving the latter may suffice whenever two requirements are met: (1) all reactions can be assumed to occur in equilibrium and (2) the chemical system can be calculated as a function of the state variables of the multiphase flow model (i.e., liquid and gas pressure, and temperature). We redefine the components of multiphase flow codes (traditionally, water and CO2), so that they are conservative for all reactions of the chemical system. This requires modifying the traditional constitutive relationships of the multiphase flow codes, but yields the concentrations of all species and all reaction rates by simply performing speciation and mass balance calculations at the end of each time step. We applied this method to the H2O-CO2-Na-Cl-CaCO3 system, so as to model CO2 injection into a carbonate aquifer containing brine. Results were very similar to those obtained with traditional formulations, which implies that full coupling of reactive transport and multi-phase flow is not really needed for this kind of systems, but the resulting simplifications may make it advisable even for cases where the above requirements are not met. Regarding the behavior of carbonate rocks, we find that porosity development near the injection well is small because of the low solubility of calcite. Moreover, dissolution concentrates at the front of the advancing CO2 plume because the brine below the plume tends to reach

  20. Stable isotopes and elasmobranchs: tissue types, methods, applications and assumptions.

    PubMed

    Hussey, N E; MacNeil, M A; Olin, J A; McMeans, B C; Kinney, M J; Chapman, D D; Fisk, A T

    2012-04-01

    Stable-isotope analysis (SIA) can act as a powerful ecological tracer with which to examine diet, trophic position and movement, as well as more complex questions pertaining to community dynamics and feeding strategies or behaviour among aquatic organisms. With major advances in the understanding of the methodological approaches and assumptions of SIA through dedicated experimental work in the broader literature coupled with the inherent difficulty of studying typically large, highly mobile marine predators, SIA is increasingly being used to investigate the ecology of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates and rays). Here, the current state of SIA in elasmobranchs is reviewed, focusing on available tissues for analysis, methodological issues relating to the effects of lipid extraction and urea, the experimental dynamics of isotopic incorporation, diet-tissue discrimination factors, estimating trophic position, diet and mixing models and individual specialization and niche-width analyses. These areas are discussed in terms of assumptions made when applying SIA to the study of elasmobranch ecology and the requirement that investigators standardize analytical approaches. Recommendations are made for future SIA experimental work that would improve understanding of stable-isotope dynamics and advance their application in the study of sharks, skates and rays. PMID:22497393

  1. Method and apparatus for maintaining equilibrium in a helical axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, A.; Boozer, A.

    1984-10-31

    Apparatus for maintaining three-dimensional MHD equilibrium in a plasma contained in a helical axis stellarator includes a resonant coil system, having a configuration such that current therethrough generates a magnetic field cancelling the resonant magnetic field produced by currents driven by the plasma pressure on any given flux surface resonating with the rotational transform of another flux surface in the plasma. Current through the resonant coil system is adjusted as a function of plasma beta.

  2. Method and apparatus for maintaining equilibrium in a helical axis stellarator

    DOEpatents

    Reiman, Allan; Boozer, Allen

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus for maintaining three-dimensional MHD equilibrium in a plasma contained in a helical axis stellerator includes a resonant coil system, having a configuration such that current therethrough generates a magnetic field cancelling the resonant magnetic field produced by currents driven by the plasma pressure on any given flux surface resonating with the rotational transform of another flux surface in the plasma. Current through the resonant coil system is adjusted as a function of plasma beta.

  3. A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry method for determining isotopic distributions in organic compounds used in the chemical approach to stable isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.M.; Spall, W.D.; Smith, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods have been developed to resolve benzene, benzophenone, anthracene, fluorenone, and their respective stable isotope analogs from other components by gas chromatography. The ratio of stable isotope-labeled material to natural isotopic abundance compounds is determined from the mass spectra averaged across the chromatographic peak. Both total ion and selective ion chromatographic approaches were used for relative data and comparison. 9 refs., 11 tabs.

  4. Viscosity-projection method for a family of general equilibrium problems and asymptotically strict pseudocontractions in the intermediate sense.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a Meir-Keeler contraction is introduced to propose a viscosity-projection approximation method for finding a common element of the set of solutions of a family of general equilibrium problems and the set of fixed points of asymptotically strict pseudocontractions in the intermediate sense. Strong convergence of the viscosity iterative sequences is obtained under some suitable conditions. Results presented in this paper extend and unify the previously known results announced by many other authors. PMID:24285937

  5. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Busca, R.; Facca, C.; Huang, L.; Irei, S.; Kornilova, A.; Lane, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2013-05-01

    A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4™ resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high-volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA. Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3‰ to 0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m-3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m-3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  6. Method for the determination of concentration and stable carbon isotope ratios of atmospheric phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccon, M.; Busca, R.; Facca, C.; Huang, L.; Irei, S.; Kornilova, A.; Lane, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2013-11-01

    A method for the determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrophenols in the gas and particulate phases is presented. It has been proposed to use the combination of concentration and isotope ratio measurements of precursor and product to test the applicability of results of laboratory studies to the atmosphere. Nitrophenols are suspected to be secondary products formed specifically from the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds. XAD-4TM resin was used as an adsorbent on quartz filters to sample ambient phenols using conventional high volume air samplers at York University in Toronto, Canada. Filters were extracted in acetonitrile, with a HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) clean-up step and a solid phase extraction step prior to derivatization with BSTFA (bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide). Concentration measurements were done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used for isotope ratio analysis. The technique presented allows for atmospheric compound-specific isotopic composition measurements for five semi-volatile phenols with an estimated accuracy of 0.3-0.5‰ at atmospheric concentrations exceeding 0.1 ng m-3 while the detection limits for concentration measurements are in the pg m-3 range. Isotopic fractionation throughout the entire extraction procedure and analysis was proven to be below the precision of the isotope ratio measurements. The method was tested by conducting ambient measurements from September to December 2011.

  7. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  8. A Stochastic Method for Estimating the Effect of Isotopic Uncertainties in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    2001-08-24

    This report describes a novel approach developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the estimation of the uncertainty in the prediction of the neutron multiplication factor for spent nuclear fuel. This technique focuses on burnup credit, where credit is taken in criticality safety analysis for the reduced reactivity of fuel irradiated in and discharged from a reactor. Validation methods for burnup credit have attempted to separate the uncertainty associated with isotopic prediction methods from that of criticality eigenvalue calculations. Biases and uncertainties obtained in each step are combined additively. This approach, while conservative, can be excessive because of a physical assumptions employed. This report describes a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo sampling to directly estimate the total uncertainty in eigenvalue calculations resulting from uncertainties in isotopic predictions. The results can also be used to demonstrate the relative conservatism and statistical confidence associated with the method of additively combining uncertainties. This report does not make definitive conclusions on the magnitude of biases and uncertainties associated with isotopic predictions in a burnup credit analysis. These terms will vary depending on system design and the set of isotopic measurements used as a basis for estimating isotopic variances. Instead, the report describes a method that can be applied with a given design and set of isotopic data for estimating design-specific biases and uncertainties.

  9. A new method of snowmelt sampling for water stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penna, D.; Ahmad, M.; Birks, S. J.; Bouchaou, L.; Brencic, M.; Butt, S.; Holko, L.; Jeelani, G.; Martinez, D. E.; Melikadze, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Sokratov, S. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Sugimoto, A.; Vreca, P.

    2014-01-01

    We modified a passive capillary sampler (PCS) to collect snowmelt water for isotopic analysis. Past applications of PCSs have been to sample soil water, but the novel aspect of this study was the placement of the PCSs at the ground-snowpack interface to collect snowmelt. We deployed arrays of PCSs at 11 sites in ten partner countries on five continents representing a range of climate and snow cover worldwide. The PCS reliably collected snowmelt at all sites and caused negligible evaporative fractionation effects in the samples. PCS is low-cost, easy to install, and collects a representative integrated snowmelt sample throughout the melt season or at the melt event scale. Unlike snow cores, the PCS collects the water that would actually infiltrate the soil; thus, its isotopic composition is appropriate to use for tracing snowmelt water through the hydrologic cycle. The purpose of this Briefing is to show the potential advantages of PCSs and recommend guidelines for constructing and installing them based on our preliminary results from two snowmelt seasons.

  10. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept.

  11. RAPID FUSION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES IN LARGE RICE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-03-01

    A new rapid fusion method for the determination of plutonium in large rice samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used to determine very low levels of plutonium isotopes in rice. The recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid, reliable radiochemical analyses for radionuclides in environmental and food samples. Public concern regarding foods, particularly foods such as rice in Japan, highlights the need for analytical techniques that will allow very large sample aliquots of rice to be used for analysis so that very low levels of plutonium isotopes may be detected. The new method to determine plutonium isotopes in large rice samples utilizes a furnace ashing step, a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a column separation process with TEVA Resin cartridges. The method can be applied to rice sample aliquots as large as 5 kg. Plutonium isotopes can be determined using alpha spectrometry or inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory plutonium particles are effectively digested. The MDA for a 5 kg rice sample using alpha spectrometry is 7E-5 mBq g{sup -1}. The method can easily be adapted for use by ICP-MS to allow detection of plutonium isotopic ratios.

  12. Magnetic measurement based methods in determination of plasma equilibrium parameters in Damavand tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, E.; Sadeghi, Y.; Mehdian, H.

    2016-06-01

    Determination of plasma equilibrium parameters such as poloidal beta (βp) with half of plasma internal inductance (li) known as Shafranov parameter (asymmetry factor) (βp+𝔡li2) and edge safety factor plays very important role in primary equilibrium and stability analysis and control of tokamak plasma. In this study, the well known Shafranov semi-empirical model, based on external magnetic measurements is used to extract Shafranov parameter and effective edge safety factor in low-β operating regime of Damavand tokamak. The well known integral representation of βp+𝔡li2 was modified for non-circular tokamaks with ellipse-like cross section. After calibration of magnetic pick-up coils, Shafranov parameter was estimated with respect to the first and second Fourier harmonic of radial and poloidal components of magnetic field. The results were compared with approximate, semi-analytical determination of Shafranov parameter which is based on analytical solution of Grad-Shafranov equation (GSE). Founding evolution of Shafranov parameter, effective edge safety factor was obtained in terms of Shafranov parameter and compared with semi-empirical description. It was found that between the ramp-up and ramp-down domain of the plasma current, the result from Shafranov model is approximately in good agreement with the semi-analytical and semi-empirical benchmarks and the integral model provides more reliable trace of the Shafranov parameter in out of ramp domains of the discharge.

  13. Equilibrium strategy-based optimization method for the coal-water conflict: A perspective from China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiuping; Lv, Chengwei; Zhang, Mengxiang; Yao, Liming; Zeng, Ziqiang

    2015-09-01

    Environmental water problems have become increasingly severe, with the coal-water conflict becoming one of the most difficult issues in large scale coal mining regions. In this paper, a bi-level optimization model based on the Stackelberg-Nash equilibrium strategy with fuzzy coefficients is developed to deal with environmental water problems in large scale coal fields, in which both the groundwater quality and quantity are considered. Using the proposed model, and fully considering the relationship between the authority and the collieries and also the equilibrium between economic development and environmental protection, an environmental protection based mining quotas competition mechanism is established. To deal with the inherent uncertainties, the model is defuzzified using a possibility measure, and a solution approach based on the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker condition is designed to search for the solutions. A case study is presented to demonstrate the practicality and efficiency of the model, and different constraint violation risk levels and related results are also obtained. The results showed that under the environmental protection based mining quotas competition mechanism, collieries attempt to conduct environmentally friendly exploitation to seek greater mining quotas. This demonstrates the practicality and efficiency in the proposed model of reducing the coal-water conflict. Finally, a comprehensive discussion is provided and some propositions is given as a foundation for the proposed management recommendations. PMID:26144559

  14. A hydrogen gas-water equilibration method produces accurate and precise stable hydrogen isotope ratio measurements in nutrition studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable hydrogen isotope methodology is used in nutrition studies to measure growth, breast milk intake, and energy requirement. Isotope ratio MS is the best instrumentation to measure the stable hydrogen isotope ratios in physiological fluids. Conventional methods to convert physiological fluids to ...

  15. Estimating groundwater exchange with lakes: 1. The stable isotope mass balance method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Bowser, Carl J.; Anderson, Mary P.; Valley, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater inflow and outflow contributions to the hydrologic budget of lakes can be determined using a stable isotope (18O/16O) mass balance method. The stable isotope method provides a way of integrating the spatial and temporal complexities of the flow field around a lake, thereby offering an appealing alternative to the traditional time and labor intensive methods using seepage meters and an extensive piezometer network. In this paper the method is applied to a lake in northern Wisconsin, demonstrating that it can be successfully applied to lakes in the upper midwest where thousands of similar lakes exist. Inflow and outflow rates calculated for the Wisconsin lake using the isotope mass balance method are 29 and 54 cm/yr, respectively, which compare well to estimates, derived independently using a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model, of 20 and 50 cm/yr. Such a favorable comparison lends confidence to the use of the stable isotope method to estimate groundwater exchange with lakes. In addition, utilization of stable isotopes in studies of groundwater-lake systems lends insight into mixing processes occurring in the unsaturated zone and in the aquifer surrounding the lake and verifies assumed flow paths based on head measurements in piezometers.

  16. An equilibrium method for prediction of transverse shear stresses in a thick laminated plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, R. Z.

    1986-01-01

    First two equations of equilibrium are utilized to compute the transverse shear stress variation through thickness of a thick laminated plate after in-plane stresses have been computed using an assumed quadratic displacement triangular element based on transverse inextensibility and layerwise constant shear angle theory (LCST). Centroid of the triangle is the point of exceptional accuracy for transverse shear stresses. Numerical results indicate close agreement with elasticity theory. An interesting comparison between the present theory and that based on assumed stress hybrid finite element approach suggests that the latter does not satisfy the condition of free normal traction at the edge. Comparison with numerical results obtained by using constant shear angle theory suggests that LCST is close to the elasticity solution while the CST is closer to classical (CLT) solution. It is also demonstrated that the reduced integration gives faster convergence when the present theory is applied to a thin plate.

  17. System and method of adjusting the equilibrium temperature of an inductively-heated susceptor

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R; Negley, Mark A; Geren, William Preston

    2015-02-24

    A system for inductively heating a workpiece may include an induction coil, at least one susceptor face sheet, and a current controller coupled. The induction coil may be configured to conduct an alternating current and generate a magnetic field in response to the alternating current. The susceptor face sheet may be configured to have a workpiece positioned therewith. The susceptor face sheet may be formed of a ferromagnetic alloy having a Curie temperature and being inductively heatable to an equilibrium temperature approaching the Curie temperature in response to the magnetic field. The current controller may be coupled to the induction coil and may be configured to adjust the alternating current in a manner causing a change in at least one heating parameter of the susceptor face sheet.

  18. Using stable isotopes to monitor forms of sulfur during desulfurization processes: A quick screening method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Chao-Li; Hackley, Keith C.; Coleman, D.D.; Kruse, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method using stable isotope ratio analysis to monitor the reactivity of sulfur forms in coal during thermal and chemical desulfurization processes has been developed at the Illinois State Geological Survey. The method is based upon the fact that a significant difference exists in some coals between the 34S/32S ratios of the pyritic and organic sulfur. A screening method for determining the suitability of coal samples for use in isotope ratio analysis is described. Making these special coals available from coal sample programs would assist research groups in sorting out the complex sulfur chemistry which accompanies thermal and chemical processing of high sulfur coals. ?? 1987.

  19. A hybrid smoothed extended finite element/level set method for modeling equilibrium shapes of nano-inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xujun; Bordas, Stéphane P. A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2013-12-01

    Interfacial energy plays an important role in equilibrium morphologies of nanosized microstructures of solid materials due to the high interface-to-volume ratio, and can no longer be neglected as it does in conventional mechanics analysis. When designing nanodevices and to understand the behavior of materials at the nano-scale, this interfacial energy must therefore be taken into account. The present work develops an effective numerical approach by means of a hybrid smoothed extended finite element/level set method to model nanoscale inhomogeneities with interfacial energy effect, in which the finite element mesh can be completely independent of the interface geometry. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity model is used to account for the interface stress effect and the Wachspress interpolants are used for the first time to construct the shape functions in the smoothed extended finite element method. Selected numerical results are presented to study the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method as well as the equilibrium shapes of misfit particles in elastic solids. The presented results compare very well with those obtained from theoretical solutions and experimental observations, and the computational efficiency of the method is shown to be superior to that of its most advanced competitor.

  20. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  1. An Efficient Method to Calculate the Aggregated Isotopic Distribution and Exact Center-Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesen, Jürgen; Dittwald, Piotr; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    In this article, we present a computation- and memory-efficient method to calculate the probabilities of occurrence and exact center-masses of the aggregated isotopic distribution of a molecule. The method uses fundamental mathematical properties of polynomials given by the Newton-Girard theorem and Viete's formulae. The calculation is based on the atomic composition of the molecule and the natural abundances of the elemental isotopes in normal terrestrial matter. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, which we named BRAIN, we compare it with the results obtained from five existing software packages ( IsoPro, Mercury, Emass, NeutronCluster, and IsoDalton) for 10 biomolecules. Additionally, we compare the computed mass centers with the results obtained by calculating, and subsequently aggregating, the fine isotopic distribution for two of the exemplary biomolecules. The algorithm will be made available as a Bioconductor package in R, and is also available upon request.

  2. Isobaric molecular dynamics version of the generalized replica exchange method (gREM): Liquid–vapor equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Malolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-09-23

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed for simulating first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed and a study is presented of the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. As a result, phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained.

  3. In vitro interaction study of retinoic acid isomers with telmisartan and amlodipine by equilibrium dialysis method using UV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Susheel John; Johny, Sojimol K.; Paul, David; Ravi, Thengungal Kochupappy

    2011-07-01

    The in vitro protein binding of retinoic acid isomers (isotretinoin and tretinoin) and the antihypertensive drugs (amlodipine and telmisartan) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method. In this study, free fraction of drugs and the % of binding of drugs in the mixture to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were calculated. The influence of retinoic acid isomers on the % of protein binding of telmisartan and amlodipine at physiological pH (7.4) and temperature (37 ± 0.5 °C) was also evaluated. The in vitro displacement interaction study of drugs telmisartan and amlodipine on retinoic acid isomers and also interaction of retinoic acid isomers on telmisartan and amlodipine were carried out.

  4. Isobaric Molecular Dynamics Version of the Generalized Replica Exchange Method (gREM): Liquid-Vapor Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Edyta; Secor, Maxim; Keyes, Tom

    2015-10-22

    A prescription for sampling isobaric generalized ensembles with molecular dynamics is presented and applied to the generalized replica exchange method (gREM), which was designed to simulate first-order phase transitions. The properties of the isobaric gREM ensemble are discussed, and a study is presented for the liquid-vapor equilibrium of the guest molecules given for gas hydrate formation with the mW water model. Phase diagrams, critical parameters, and a law of corresponding states are obtained. PMID:26398582

  5. Hydrogen Isotope Behavior in Type 316 Stainless Steel Sorbed by Various Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Oya, Y.; Onishi, Y.; Okuno, K.; Kawano, T.; Asakura, Y.; Uda, T.; Tanaka, S.

    2005-07-15

    Typical materials for components, type 316 stainless steel (316-SS), were chosen as a sample and hydrogen isotope was charged by various methods, water adsorption, electrolysis and ion irradiation to elucidate hydrogen isotope behavior on/in SS. The chemical states of SS surface were studied by XPS and the hydrogen isotope retention and its desorption behavior were analyzed by TDS. Two types of surface finish, namely non-pretreated sample and pretreated sample by polish and annealing were prepared. It was found that the oxy-hydroxide and hydroxide were formed on the surface layer. The hydrogen isotope desorption stages consisted of three stages, namely the desorption stages from oxy-hydroxide, hydroxide and bulk hydrogen. A large amount of deuterium was trapped by the oxy-hydroxide layer for the non-pretreated sample with electrolysis. The hydrogen isotope trapping by this layer would have a large influence on the hydrogen isotope retention. The surface finish would be one of the effective improvement for decreasing its retention on SS.

  6. Development of an identification method of pressure anisotropy based on equilibrium analysis and magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Cooper, W. A.

    2013-02-15

    We evaluate the fluxes measured by the magnetic flux loops installed in LHD by using a three dimensional MHD equilibrium analysis code, ANIMEC, which enable us to directly determine the calibration function between the anisotropic pressure and the measured fluxes for the non-axisymmetric plasmas for the first time. The result indicates that the diamagnetic flux represents a nearly single-valued function of the beta perpendicular with respect to the field, and the saddle loop flux represents a nearly single-valued function of an equally weighted average of the beta values parallel and perpendicular to the field, regardless of the pressure anisotropy or the amount of energetic trapped particles. The values of the beta perpendicular to the field and the equal weighting averaged beta estimated by the single-valued functions (calibration functions) are investigated in order to clarify the magnitude of deviation from those original values, and the range of anisotropy where the beta value evaluated by the magnetic flux measurement is calculated within a 10% error.

  7. Computational Efficiency and Accuracy of the Two Forms of the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Fatemeh; Sheikhi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE) method in constraint potential and constraint forms have been investigated in terms of accuracy and numerical performance. The RCCE originates from the observation that chemical systems evolve based on different time scales, dividing reactions into rate-controlling and fast reactions. Each group of rate-controlling reactions imposes a slowly changing constraint on the allowed states of the system. The fast reactions relax the system to the associated constrained-equilibrium state on a time scale shorter than that of constraints. The two RCCE formulations are equivalent mathematically; however, they involve different numerical procedures and thus show different computational performance. In this work, the RCCE method is applied to study methane oxygen combustion in an adiabatic, isobaric stirred reactor. The RCCE results are compared with those obtained by direct integration of detailed chemical kinetics. Both methods are shown to provide very accurate representation of the kinetics. It is also evidenced that while the constraint form involves less numerical stiffness, the constraint potential implementation results in more overall saving in computation time.

  8. A robust and efficient numerical method for multiphase equilibrium calculations: Application to CO2-brine-rock systems at high temperatures, pressures and salinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Allan M. M.; Blunt, Martin J.; LaForce, Tara C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a robust and efficient method for calculating chemical equilibria of general multiphase systems. The method is based on a stoichiometric approach, which uses Newton's method to solve a system of mass-action equations coupled with a system of equilibrium constraints. A stabilisation procedure is developed to promote convergence of the calculation when a presupposed phase in the chemical system is absent in the equilibrium state. The formulation of the chemical equilibrium problem is developed by presuming no specific details of the involved phases and species. As a consequence, the method is flexible and general enough so that the calculation can be customised with a combination of thermodynamic models that are appropriate for the problem of interest. Finally, we show the use of the method to solve relevant geochemical equilibrium problems for modelling carbon storage in highly saline aquifers.

  9. A METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific "microequilibrium" constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  10. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  11. A stable isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura; Gan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Methods for determining bioavailability of organic contaminants suffer various operational limitations. We explored the use of stable isotope labeled references in developing an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measure the exchangeable pool (E) of pyrene and bifenthrin as an approximation of their bioavailability in sediments. The exchange of deuterated bifenthrin or pyrene with its native counterpart was completed within 48 h. The derived E was 38–82% for pyrene and 28–59% for bifenthrin. Regression between E and the sum of rapid and slow desorption fractions obtained from sequential desorption showed a slope close to 1.0. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a strong relationship (r2 > 0.93) between E and bioaccumulation into Chironomus tentans. Given the abundance of stable isotope labeled references and their relatively easy analysis, the IDM has the potential to become a readily adoptable tool for estimating organic contaminants bioaccessibility in various matrices. PMID:23434573

  12. Trigonometric and hyperbolic functions method for constructing analytic solutions to nonlinear plane magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moawad, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we present a solution method for constructing exact analytic solutions to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The method is constructed via all the trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. The method is applied to MHD equilibria with mass flow. Applications to a solar system concerned with the properties of coronal mass ejections that affect the heliosphere are presented. Some examples of the constructed solutions which describe magnetic structures of solar eruptions are investigated. Moreover, the constructed method can be applied to a variety classes of elliptic partial differential equations which arise in plasma physics.

  13. Trigonometric and hyperbolic functions method for constructing analytic solutions to nonlinear plane magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium equations

    SciTech Connect

    Moawad, S. M.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we present a solution method for constructing exact analytic solutions to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations. The method is constructed via all the trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. The method is applied to MHD equilibria with mass flow. Applications to a solar system concerned with the properties of coronal mass ejections that affect the heliosphere are presented. Some examples of the constructed solutions which describe magnetic structures of solar eruptions are investigated. Moreover, the constructed method can be applied to a variety classes of elliptic partial differential equations which arise in plasma physics.

  14. 2D Quantum Simulation of MOSFET Using the Non Equilibrium Green's Function Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objectives this viewgraph presentation summarizes include: (1) the development of a quantum mechanical simulator for ultra short channel MOSFET simulation, including theory, physical approximations, and computer code; (2) explore physics that is not accessible by semiclassical methods; (3) benchmarking of semiclassical and classical methods; and (4) study other two-dimensional devices and molecular structure, from discretized Hamiltonian to tight-binding Hamiltonian.

  15. Isotopic quantum effects in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ralf

    2005-07-11

    Density functional calculations (B3 LYP/6-31+G*) on molecular clusters and a quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) model were used to calculate thermodynamic and structural properties of four isotopically labeled methanol species. The method allowed the reproduction of the characteristic differences in boiling points and heats of vaporization. Structural changes were also detected and related to recent experimental findings. It was shown that isotopic effects clearly have a quantum-mechanical origin. PMID:15991271

  16. RAPID AND PRECISE METHOD FOR MEASURING STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF DISSOLVED INORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for rapid preparation, concentration and stable isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (d13C-DIC). Liberation of CO2 was accomplished by placing 100 ?l phosphoric acid and 0.9 ml water in an evacuated 1.7-ml gas chromatography (GC) injection vial. Fo...

  17. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  18. General method and thermodynamic tables for computation of equilibrium composition and temperature of chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford; Morrell, Virginia E

    1951-01-01

    A rapidly convergent successive approximation process is described that simultaneously determines both composition and temperature resulting from a chemical reaction. This method is suitable for use with any set of reactants over the complete range of mixture ratios as long as the products of reaction are ideal gases. An approximate treatment of limited amounts of liquids and solids is also included. This method is particularly suited to problems having a large number of products of reaction and to problems that require determination of such properties as specific heat or velocity of sound of a dissociating mixture. The method presented is applicable to a wide variety of problems that include (1) combustion at constant pressure or volume; and (2) isentropic expansion to an assigned pressure, temperature, or Mach number. Tables of thermodynamic functions needed with this method are included for 42 substances for convenience in numerical computations.

  19. A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

    2011-04-04

    Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

  20. A New Method to Quantify the Isotopic Signature of Leaf Transpiration: Implications for Landscape-Scale Evapotranspiration Partitioning Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Good, S. P.; Caylor, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing the constituent components of evapotranspiration is crucial to better understand ecosystem-level water budgets and water use dynamics. Isotope based evapotranspiration partitioning methods are promising but their utility lies in the accurate estimation of the isotopic composition of underlying transpiration and evaporation. Here we report a new method to quantify the isotopic signature of leaf transpiration under field conditions. This method utilizes a commercially available laser-based isotope analyzer and a transparent leaf chamber, modified from Licor conifer leaf chamber. The method is based on the water mass balance in ambient air and leaf transpired air. We verified the method using “artificial leaves” and glassline extracted samples. The method provides a new and direct way to estimate leaf transpiration isotopic signatures and it has wide applications in ecology, hydrology and plant physiology.

  1. A method to extract soil water for stable isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, K.; Woods, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to extract soil water for determination of deuterium (D) and 18O content. The principle of this method is based on the observation that water and toluene form an azeotropic mixture at 84.1??C, but are completely immiscible at ambient temperature. In a specially designed distillation apparatus, the soil water is distilled at 84.1??C with toluene and is separated quantitatively in the collecting funnel at ambient temperature. Traces of toluene are removed and the sample can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Kerosene may be substituted for toluene. The accuracy of this technique is ?? 2 and ?? 0.2???, respectively, for ??D and ??18O. Reduced accuracy is obtained at low water contents. ?? 1990.

  2. METHOD OF SEPARATING ISOTOPES OF URANIUM IN A CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, F.A.

    1958-05-01

    Mass separation devices of the calutron type and the use of uranium hexachloride as a charge material in the calutron ion source are described. The method for using this material in a mass separator includes heating the uranium hexachloride to a temperature in the range of 60 to 100 d C in a vacuum and thereby forming a vapor of the material. The vaporized uranium hexachloride is then ionized in a vapor ionizing device for subsequent mass separation processing.

  3. Oxygen isotopes in nitrite: Analysis, calibration, and equilibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casciotti, K.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; McIlvin, M.R.; Mroczkowski, S.J.; Hannon, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Nitrite is a central intermediate in the nitrogen cycle and can persist in significant concentrations in ocean waters, sediment pore waters, and terrestrial groundwaters. To fully interpret the effect of microbial processes on nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrous oxide (N2O) cycling in these systems, the nitrite pool must be accessible to isotopic analysis. Furthermore, because nitrite interferes with most methods of nitrate isotopic analysis, accurate isotopic analysis of nitrite is essential for correct measurement of nitrate isotopes in a sample that contains nitrite. In this study, nitrite salts with varying oxygen isotopic compositions were prepared and calibrated and then used to test the denitrifier method for nitrite oxygen isotopic analysis. The oxygen isotopic fractionation during nitrite reduction to N2O by Pseudomonas aureofaciens was lower than for nitrate conversion to N2O, while oxygen isotopic exchange between nitrite and water during the reaction was similar. These results enable the extension of the denitrifier method to oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite (in the absence of nitrate) and correction of nitrate isotopes for the presence of nitrite in "mixed" samples. We tested storage conditions for seawater and freshwater samples that contain nitrite and provide recommendations for accurate oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrite by any method. Finally, we report preliminary results on the equilibrium isotope effect between nitrite and water, which can play an important role in determining the oxygen isotopic value of nitrite where equilibration with water is significant. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  4. A New Method of Separating 210Pb from Ra-DEF for a Radioactive Equilibrium Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, C. M.; Lo, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment in which lead-210 is separated from bismuth-210 and polonium-210 by means of solvent extraction of their diethyldithiocarbamate complexes. The method involves a simple extraction procedure which allows complete separation of lead-210 from commercially available…

  5. General Retarded Contact Self-energies in and beyond the Non-equilibrium Green's Functions Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Tillmann; He, Yu; Andrawis, Robert; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Retarded contact self-energies in the framework of nonequilibrium Green's functions allow to model the impact of lead structures on the device without explicitly including the leads in the actual device calculation. Most of the contact self-energy algorithms are limited to homogeneous or periodic, semi-infinite lead structures. In this work, the complex absorbing potential method is extended to solve retarded contact self-energies for arbitrary lead structures, including irregular and randomly disordered leads. This method is verified for regular leads against common approaches and on physically equivalent, but numerically different irregular leads. Transmission results on randomly alloyed In0.5Ga0.5As structures show the importance of disorder in the leads. The concept of retarded contact self-energies is expanded to model passivation of atomically resolved surfaces without explicitly increasing the device's Hamiltonian.

  6. Equilibrium properties of quantum water clusters by the variational Gaussian wavepacket method.

    PubMed

    Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

    2008-03-01

    The variational Gaussian wavepacket (VGW) method in combination with the replica-exchange Monte Carlo is applied to calculations of the heat capacities of quantum water clusters, (H(2)O)(8) and (H(2)O)(10). The VGW method is most conveniently formulated in Cartesian coordinates. These in turn require the use of a flexible (i.e., unconstrained) water potential. When the latter is fitted as a linear combination of Gaussians, all the terms involved in the numerical solution of the VGW equations of motion are analytic. When a flexible water model is used, a large difference in the timescales of the inter- and intramolecular degrees of freedom generally makes the system very difficult to simulate numerically. Yet, given this difficulty, we demonstrate that our methodology is still practical. We compare the computed heat capacities to those for the corresponding classical systems. As expected, the quantum effects shift the melting temperatures toward the lower values. PMID:18331090

  7. Finite-Temperature Non-equilibrium Quasicontinuum Method based on Langevin Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Venturini, G; Hansen, B; Knap, J; Ortiz, M; Campbell, G

    2009-05-08

    The concurrent bridging of molecular dynamics and continuum thermodynamics presents a number of challenges, mostly associated with energy transmission and changes in the constitutive description of a material across domain boundaries. In this paper, we propose a framework for simulating coarse dynamic systems in the canonical ensemble using the Quasicontinuum method (QC). The equations of motion are expressed in reduced QC coordinates and are strictly derived from dissipative Lagrangian mechanics. The derivation naturally leads to a classical Langevin implementation where the timescale is governed by vibrations emanating from the finest length scale occurring in the computational cell. The equations of motion are integrated explicitly via Newmark's ({beta} = 0; {gamma} = 1/2) method, leading to a robust numerical behavior and energy conservation. In its current form, the method only allows for wave propagations supported by the less compliant of the two meshes across a heterogeneous boundary, which requires the use of overdamped dynamics to avoid spurious heating due to reflected vibrations. We have applied the method to two independent crystallographic systems characterized by different interatomic potentials (Al and Ta) and have measured thermal expansion in order to quantify the vibrational entropy loss due to homogenization. We rationalize the results in terms of system size, mesh coarseness, and nodal cluster diameter within the framework of the quasiharmonic approximation. For Al, we find that the entropy loss introduced by mesh coarsening varies linearly with the element size, and that volumetric effects are not critical in driving the anharmonic behavior of the simulated systems. In Ta, the anomalies of the interatomic potential employed result in negative and zero thermal expansion at low and high temperatures, respectively.

  8. Limitations of SRTM, Logan graphical method, and equilibrium analysis for measuring transient dopamine release with [(11)C]raclopride PET.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jenna M; Kim, Su Jin; Cosgrove, Kelly P; Morris, Evan D

    2013-01-01

    Conventional PET methods to estimate [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP ND) assume that endogenous dopamine concentration does not change during the scan time. However, this assumption is purposely violated in studies using pharmacological or behavioral stimuli to invoke acute dopamine release. When the assumption of steady-state dopamine is violated, conventional analysis methods may produce biased or even unusable estimates of BP ND. To illustrate this problem, we examined the effect of scan duration on ΔBP ND estimated by three common analysis methods (simplified reference tissue model, Logan graphical reference method, and equilibrium analysis) applied to simulated and experimental single-scan activation studies. The activation - dopamine release - in both the simulated and experimental studies was brief. Simulations showed ΔBP ND to be highly dependent on the window of data used to determine BP ND in the activation state. A similar pattern was seen in the data from human smoking studies. No such pattern of ΔBP ND dependence on the window of data used was apparent in simulations where dopamine was held constant. The dependence of ΔBP ND on the duration of data analyzed illustrates the inability of conventional methods to reliably quantify short-lived increases in endogenous dopamine. PMID:23638336

  9. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  10. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

    2011-05-01

    A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is presented. It has been found in numerous laboratory studies that these compounds are photooxidation products of toluene in PM. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. PM was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers for PM 2.5. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid phase extraction (SPE). The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA), was added to the solution for Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. The second half of the sample was stored at low temperature. When GC/MS analysis showed high enough concentrations the remaining sample was derivatized with BSTFA and analysed for stable isotope ratio using a Gas Chromatography/Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-IRMS). In all atmospheric PM samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol. Nevertheless, due to low pollution levels occurring in the rural area, no samples had concentrations high enough to perform stable carbon isotope composition measurements of the methylnitrophenols. Samples collected in the suburban area could be analysed for carbon stable isotope ratio using GC-IRMS. The procedure described in this paper provides a very sensitive and selective method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric PM at concentrations as low as 1 pg m-3. For accurate (within ±0.5‰) stable isotope ratio analysis significantly higher concentrations in the range of 100 pg m-3 or more are required.

  11. When stable-stage equilibrium is unlikely: integrating transient population dynamics improves asymptotic methods

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Raymond L.; Raventos, Josep; Ackerman, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Evaluation of population projection matrices (PPMs) that are focused on asymptotically based properties of populations is a commonly used approach to evaluate projected dynamics of managed populations. Recently, a set of tools for evaluating the properties of transient dynamics has been expanded to evaluate PPMs and to consider the dynamics of populations prior to attaining the stable-stage distribution, a state that may never be achieved in disturbed or otherwise ephemeral habitats or persistently small populations. This study re-evaluates data for a tropical orchid and examines the value of including such analyses in an integrative approach. Methods Six small populations of Lepanthes rubripetala were used as a model system and the R software package popdemo was used to produce estimates of the indices for the asymptotic growth rate (lambda), sensitivities, reactivity, first-time step attenuation, maximum amplification, maximum attenuation, maximal inertia and maximal attenuation. The response in lambda to perturbations of demographic parameters using transfer functions and multiple perturbations on growth, stasis and fecundity were also determined. The results were compared with previously published asymptotic indices. Key Results It was found that combining asymptotic and transient dynamics expands the understanding of possible population changes. Comparison of the predicted density from reactivity and first-time step attenuation with the observed change in population size in two orchid populations showed that the observed density was within the predicted range. However, transfer function analysis suggests that the traditional approach of measuring perturbation of growth rates and persistence (inertia) may be misleading and is likely to result in erroneous management decisions. Conclusions Based on the results, an integrative approach is recommended using traditional PPMs (asymptotic processes) with an evaluation of the diversity of dynamics

  12. Spectral-Lagrangian methods for collisional models of non-equilibrium statistical states

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, Irene M. Tharkabhushanam, Sri Harsha

    2009-04-01

    We propose a new spectral Lagrangian based deterministic solver for the non-linear Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) in d-dimensions for variable hard sphere (VHS) collision kernels with conservative or non-conservative binary interactions. The method is based on symmetries of the Fourier transform of the collision integral, where the complexity in its computation is reduced to a separate integral over the unit sphere S{sup d-1}. The conservation of moments is enforced by Lagrangian constraints. The resulting scheme, implemented in free space, is very versatile and adjusts in a very simple manner to several cases that involve energy dissipation due to local micro-reversibility (inelastic interactions) or elastic models of slowing down process. Our simulations are benchmarked with available exact self-similar solutions, exact moment equations and analytical estimates for the homogeneous Boltzmann equation, both for elastic and inelastic VHS interactions. Benchmarking of the simulations involves the selection of a time self-similar rescaling of the numerical distribution function which is performed using the continuous spectrum of the equation for Maxwell molecules as studied first in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, G. Toscani, Proof of an asymptotic property of self-similar solutions of the Boltzmann equation for granular materials, Journal of Statistical Physics 111 (2003) 403-417] and generalized to a wide range of related models in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, I.M. Gamba, On the self-similar asymptotics for generalized non-linear kinetic Maxwell models, Communication in Mathematical Physics, in press. URL: ()]. The method also produces accurate results in the case of inelastic diffusive Boltzmann equations for hard spheres (inelastic collisions under thermal bath), where overpopulated non-Gaussian exponential tails have been conjectured in computations by stochastic methods [T.V. Noije, M. Ernst

  13. A new method for calibrating a boron isotope paleo-pH proxy using massive Porites corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2015-09-01

    The boron isotope ratio (δ11B) of marine biogenic carbonates can reconstruct pH and pCO2 of seawater, and potentially CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. To date, δ11B-pHSW calibration has been proposed via culturing experiments, where calcifying organisms are cultured under artificially acidified seawater. However, in scleractinian corals, reconstructed pH values using culture-based calibrations do not agree well with actual observations of seawater CO2 chemistry. Thus, another approach is needed to establish a more reliable calibration method. In this study, we established field-based calibrations for Chichijima and Tahiti, both located in subtropical gyres where surface seawater is close to CO2 equilibrium. We suggest a new approach to calibration of δ11B-pH in which the long-term δ11B variation of massive Porites corals is compared with the decreasing pH trend (i.e., ocean acidification) that has occurred since the Industrial Revolution. This calibration will offer a new avenue for studying seawater CO2 chemistry using coral δ11B in diverse settings, such as upwelling regions, coral reefs, and coastal areas.

  14. Method and apparatus for noble gas atom detection with isotopic selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, G. Samuel; Payne, Marvin G.; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Parks, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods of operation are described for determining, with isotopic selectivity, the number of noble gas atoms in a sample. The analysis is conducted within an evacuated chamber which can be isolated by a valve from a vacuum pumping system capable of producing a pressure of 10.sup.-8 Torr. Provision is made to pass pulses of laser beams through the chamber, these pulses having wavelengths appropriate for the resonance ionization of atoms of the noble gas under analysis. A mass filter within the chamber selects ions of a specific isotope of the noble gas, and means are provided to accelerate these selected ions sufficiently for implantation into a target. Specific types of targets are discussed. An electron measuring device produces a signal relatable to the number of ions implanted into the target and thus to the number of atoms of the selected isotope of the noble gas removed from the gas sample. The measurement can be continued until a substantial fraction, or all, of the atoms in the sample have been counted. Furthermore, additional embodiments of the apparatus are described for bunching the atoms of a noble gas for more rapid analysis, and for changing the target for repetitive cycling of the gas in the chamber. The number of repetitions of the cyclic steps depend upon the concentration of the isotope of interest, the separative efficiency of the mass filter, etc. The cycles are continued until a desired selectivity is achieved. Also described are components and a method of operation for a pre-enrichment operation for use when an introduction of a total sample would elevate the pressure within the chamber to levels in excess of those for operation of the mass filter, specifically a quadrupole mass filter. Specific examples of three noble gas isotope analyses are described.

  15. A new method and application for determining the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, M. G.; Miller, D. J.; Wojtal, P.; O'Connor, M.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play key roles in atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and radiative forcing, and contribute to nitric acid deposition. Sources of NOx include both natural and anthropogenic emissions, which vary significantly in space and time. NOx isotopic signatures offer a potentially valuable tool to trace source impacts on atmospheric chemistry and regional acid deposition. Previous work on NOx isotopic signatures suggests large ranges in values, even from the same emission source, as well as overlapping ranges amongst different sources, making it difficult to use the isotopic composition as a quantitative tracer of source influences. These prior measurements have utilized a variety of methods for collecting the NOx as nitrate or nitrite for isotopic analysis, and testing of some of these methods (including active and passive collections) reveal inconsistencies in efficiency of collection, as well as issues related to changes in conditions such as humidity, temperature, and NOx fluxes. A recently developed method allows for accurately measuring the nitrogen isotopic composition of NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) after capturing the NOx in a potassium permanganate/sodium hydroxide solution as nitrate (Fibiger et al., Anal. Chem., 2014). The method has been thoroughly tested in the laboratory and field, and efficiently collects NO and NO2 under a variety of conditions. There are several advantages to collecting NOx actively, including the ability to collect over minutes to hourly time scales, and the ability to collect in environments with highly variable NOx sources and concentrations. Challenges include a nitrate background present in potassium permanganate (solid and liquid forms), accurately deriving ambient NOx concentrations based upon flow rate and solution concentrations above this variable background, and potential interferences from other nitrogen species. This method was designed to collect NOx in environments with very different

  16. Isotopic Dilution GC/MS Method for Methionine Determination in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horj, Elena; Iordache, Andreea; Culea, Monica

    2011-10-01

    The isotopic dilution mass spectrometry technique is the method of choice for sensitive and accurate determination of analytes in biological samples. The aim of this work was to establish a sensitive analytical method for the determination of methionine in different biological media. Quantitation of methionine from the resultant tracer spectrum requires deconvolution of the enrichment of the isotopomers. Deconvolution of the ion abundance ratios to yield tracer-to-tracee ratio for the isotopomer was done using Brauman's least squares approach. Comparison with regression curve calculation method is presented. The method was applied for amino-acids determination in beef, pork and fish meat.

  17. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhtar, S.; Saccon, M.; Kornilova, A.; Irei, S.; Huang, L.; Rudolph, J.

    2011-11-01

    A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl-1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m-3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m-3. In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m-3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m-3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  18. New online method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Leuenberger, Markus; Fleitmann, Dominik

    2013-04-01

    Speleothems are increasingly becoming key archives for paleoclimate reconstruction. The fluid inclusions contained in these speleothems represent natural repositories of cave drip waters. The hydrogen (δD) and oxygen (δ18O) isotopic composition of fluid inclusions can yield direct information on the isotopic composition of paleoprecipitation, which can then be combined with isotopic analyses of speleothem calcite to either directly calculate paleotemperatures or to reveal changes in the source of moisture. To liberate speleothem fluid inclusion water and to measure its isotopic composition, a new method was developed. It consists of a simple hydraulic crushing device similar to the one used to extract noble gases from fluid inclusions. Prior to crushing, the sample tube is conditioned by heating and flushing with nitrogen in order to release adsorbed water. Thereafter, the speleothem sample (approximately 1g of calcite) is crushed and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by a nitrogen gas stream to a laser spectrometer using a wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. The main task we would like to address with this method is a comparison between the isotope signals of the fluid inclusion and calcite to reduce uncertainties associated with the interpretation of calcite δ18O values in speleothems in Switzerland and Turkey. Currently, we are mainly focussing on a stalagmite (M6) from Milandre cave, Jura, Switzerland. We installed a high precision drip logger, which continuously counts the number of water drops per time unit using an acoustic technique. This way we can monitor the drip water rate at the sampling site and collect drip water, which was originally dripping and precipitating on the M6 stalagmite. In parallel, we collected rainfall water at the MeteoSwiss station "Le Mormont" located close to the cave. Thus we are able to compare δD and

  19. DoE optimization of a mercury isotope ratio determination method for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Berni, Alex; Baschieri, Carlo; Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Marchetti, Andrea; Manzini, Daniela; Berto, Daniela; Rampazzo, Federico

    2016-05-15

    By using the experimental design (DoE) technique, we optimized an analytical method for the determination of mercury isotope ratios by means of cold-vapor multicollector ICP-MS (CV-MC-ICP-MS) to provide absolute Hg isotopic ratio measurements with a suitable internal precision. By running 32 experiments, the influence of mercury and thallium internal standard concentrations, total measuring time and sample flow rate was evaluated. Method was optimized varying Hg concentration between 2 and 20ngg(-1). The model finds out some correlations within the parameters affect the measurements precision and predicts suitable sample measurement precisions for Hg concentrations from 5ngg(-1) Hg upwards. The method was successfully applied to samples of Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) coming from the Marano and Grado lagoon (NE Italy), a coastal environment affected by long term mercury contamination mainly due to mining activity. Results show different extents of both mass dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass independent fractionation (MIF) phenomena in clams according to their size and sampling sites in the lagoon. The method is fit for determinations on real samples, allowing for the use of Hg isotopic ratios to study mercury biogeochemical cycles in complex ecosystems. PMID:26992509

  20. Treatment methods for the determination of delta2H and delta18O of hair keratin by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Chesson, Lesley; Nielson, Kristine; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    The structural proteins that comprise approximately 90% of animal hair have the potential to record environmentally and physiologically determined variation in delta2H and delta18O values of body water. Broad, systematic, geospatial variation in stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of environmental water and the capacity for rapid, precise measurement via methods such as high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA-IRMS) make these isotope systems particularly well suited for applications requiring the geolocation of hair samples. In order for such applications to be successful, however, methods must exist for the accurate determination of hair delta2H and delta18O values reflecting the primary products of biosynthesis. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to examine two potential inaccuracies affecting delta2H and delta18O measurements of hair: the contribution of non-biologic hydrogen and oxygen to samples in the form of sorbed molecular water, and the exchange of hydroxyl-bound hydrogen between hair keratin and ambient water vapor. We show that rapid sorption of molecular water from the atmosphere can have a substantial effect on measured delta2H and delta18O values of hair (comprising approximately 7.7% of the measured isotopic signal for H and up to approximately 10.6% for O), but that this contribution can be effectively removed through vacuum-drying of samples for 6 days. Hydrogen exchange between hair keratin and ambient vapor is also rapid (reaching equilibrium within 3-4 days), with 9-16% of the total hydrogen available for exchange at room temperature. Based on the results of these experiments, we outline a recommended sample treatment procedure for routine measurement of delta2H and delta18O in mammal hair. PMID:16047316

  1. Evolution of the South African mantle — A case study of garnet peridotites from the Finsch diamond mine (Kaapvaal craton); part 1: Inter-mineral trace element and isotopic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarov, Marina; Brey, Gerhard P.; Weyer, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    A thorough assessment of inter-mineral equilibrium is essential for the understanding of trace element partitioning and also for the interpretation of isotopic data. Here we investigated high temperature (~ 1200 °C and 6 GPa) garnet peridotite xenoliths from the Kaapvaal craton (Finsch mine, South Africa), with exceptionally well equilibrated mineral major element compositions, for their trace element and isotopic inter-mineral equilibrium. Trace element compositions for all major mineral phases, i.e. olivine, orthopyroxene (opx), clinopyroxene (cpx) and garnet, were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Garnet, cpx and opx of selected samples were analysed for their Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isotope compositions by multi collector ICP-MS. Most important mineral characteristics include: a) olivines from most samples are enriched in high-field-strength elements relative to other incompatible trace elements. Their lithium content correlates negatively with Mg#, indicating a depletion signature; b) all other minerals are depleted in heavy and middle rare earth elements (H- and M-REE) and enriched in light REE and large ion lithophile elements. This implies a complex history of depletion and metasomatic overprint for the Finsch cratonic mantle; c) orthopyroxene has similarly shaped trace element patterns as cpx, with one to two orders of magnitude lower abundances; and d) both, garnet and cpx, display variable, mostly positive ɛHf coupled with moderate variations in ɛNd. Trace element partitioning between garnet/cpx, cpx/opx and garnet/opx, displays only a weak pressure and temperature dependency. However, equilibrium partitioning of most trace elements between garnet and cpx shows a strong compositional dependency, i.e. on the Cr- (and Ca-) content of the garnets. Garnet-cpx partition coefficients follow a second grade polynomial correlation with Cr2O3 of garnet, whereby high chromium garnets (Cr2O3 > 6 wt.%) have generally higher

  2. Isotopically sensitive branching and its effect on the observed intramolecular isotope effects in cytochrome P-450 catalyzed reactions: a new method for the estimation of intrinsic isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.P.; Korzekwa, K.R.; Rettie, A.E.; Trager, W.F.

    1986-10-29

    Two selectively deuterated n-octanes (octane-1-/sup 2/H/sub 3/ and octane-1,2,3-/sup 2/H/sub 7/) were synthesized and subjected to hydroxylation by phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes and purified cytochrome P-450b. The results of these experiments provide evidence which clarifies the interplay between a branched reaction pathway and the equilibration of an enzyme-substrate complex, in determining the magnitude of an observed isotope effect. An equation is derived that allows limits to placed on the intrinsic isotope effect. The equation is based on the observed isotope effect and the regioselectivity of a branch reaction pathway, catalyzed by an enzyme that forms two products via a single enzyme-substrate complex. The intrinsic isotope effect for the formation of 1-octanol was determined by this equation to lie between 9.5 and 9.8.

  3. Method for correcting for isotope burn-in effects in fission neutron dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for correcting for effect of isotope burn-in in fission neutron dosimeters. Two quantities are measured in order to quantify the "burn-in" contribution, namely P.sub.Z',A', the amount of (Z', A') isotope that is burned-in, and F.sub.Z', A', the fissions per unit volume produced in the (Z', A') isotope. To measure P.sub.Z', A', two solid state track recorder fission deposits are prepared from the very same material that comprises the fission neutron dosimeter, and the mass and mass density are measured. One of these deposits is exposed along with the fission neutron dosimeter, whereas the second deposit is subsequently used for observation of background. P.sub.Z', A' is then determined by conducting a second irradiation, wherein both the irradiated and unirradiated fission deposits are used in solid state track recorder dosimeters for observation of the absolute number of fissions per unit volume. The difference between the latter determines P.sub.Z', A' since the thermal neutron cross section is known. F.sub.Z', A' is obtained by using a fission neutron dosimeter for this specific isotope, which is exposed along with the original threshold fission neutron dosimeter to experience the same neutron flux-time history at the same location. In order to determine the fissions per unit volume produced in the isotope (Z', A') as it ingrows during the irradiation, B.sub.Z', A', from these observations, the neutron field must generally be either time independent or a separable function of time t and neutron energy E.

  4. Integral Method for the Assessment of U-RANS Effectiveness in Non-Equilibrium Flows and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, Ian; Edabi, Alireza; Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Reynolds Average Navier Stokes (RANS) modeling has established itself as a critical design tool in many engineering applications, thanks to its superior computational efficiency. The drawbacks of RANS models are well known, but not necessarily well understood: poor prediction of transition, non equilibrium flows, mixing and heat transfer, to name the ones relevant to our study. In the present study, we use a DNS of a reciprocating channel flow driven by an oscillating pressure gradient to test several low- and high-Reynolds RANS models. Temperature is introduced as a passive scalar to study heat transfer modeling. Low-Reynolds models manage to capture the overall physics of wall shear and heat flux well, yet with some phase discrepancies, whereas high Reynolds models fail. Under the microscope of the integral method for wall shear and wall heat flux, the qualitative agreement appears more serendipitous than driven by the ability of the models to capture the correct physics. The integral method is shown to be more insightful in the benchmarking of RANS models than the typical comparisons of statistical quantities. The authors acknowledges the support of NSF and DOE under grant NSF/DOE 1258697 (VT) and 1258702 (NH).

  5. Evaluation of Isotope 32P Method to Mark Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxing; Shi, Guihong; Zhao, Yuqiang; Yan, Dongmei; Li, Huaiju; Liu, Hongmei; Wiwatanaratanabutr, Itsanun; Gong, Maoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the current study was to develop a marking technique as an internal marker to mark post blood meal mosquitoes by using stable phosphate isotope 32P and determine the optimal concentration of it. Methods: An isotonic physiological saline solution, containing different concentration of radioactive isotope 32P-labeled disodium phosphate (Na2H32PO4) was injected into rabbits via the jugular vein in the laboratory. Emerged Cx. pipiens were marked after feeding on rabbit. At the same time, the labeled conditions of emerged Cx. pipiens were also measured by placing feces of No. 6 rabbit into containers with mosquito larvae and pupae inside. Results: According to the label condition of Cx. pipiens after taking blood and the effect of different dosage Na2H32PO4 on rabbit health, the optimal concentration of radioactive isotope was determined, that is, 0.1211 mCi/kg. By placing feces of No. 6 rabbit into containers with mosquito larvae and pupae inside, the emerged mosquitoes were also labeled. Therefore, feeding mosquitoes on the animal injected with radioactive Na2H32PO4 was more practical for detecting and tracing mosquitoes. Conclusion: The method was less time-consuming, more sensitive and safer. This marking method will facilitate post-bloodmeal studies of mosquitoes and other blood-sucking insects. PMID:27308279

  6. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2010-07-26

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for large soil samples. The new soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using this two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time.

  7. A method for the rapid radiochemical analysis of uranium and thorium isotopes in impure carbonates.

    PubMed

    Elyahyaoui, A; Zarki, R; Chiadli, A

    2003-01-01

    A simple method combining solvent extraction and electrodeposition procedures is described for the determination of the isotopic composition and content of uranium and thorium in travertine samples. The actinide elements are extracted with diethyl ether from a calcium nitrate solution. The isolation of the elements and the alpha source preparation are performed in two steps after the sample digestion. The acid leaching of samples is performed using both partial and total dissolution methods. High recoveries of both uranium and thorium and good alpha-spectra are obtained with both partial and total dissolution methods. PMID:12485673

  8. Evaluating gull diets: A comparison of conventional methods and stable isotope analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiser, E.L.; Powell, A.N.

    2011-01-01

    Samples such as regurgitated pellets and food remains have traditionally been used in studies of bird diets, but these can produce biased estimates depending on the digestibility of different foods. Stable isotope analysis has been developed as a method for assessing bird diets that is not biased by digestibility. These two methods may provide complementary or conflicting information on diets of birds, but are rarely compared directly. We analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of feathers of Glaucous Gull (Larus hyperboreus) chicks from eight breeding colonies in northern Alaska, and used a Bayesian mixing model to generate a probability distribution for the contribution of each food group to diets. We compared these model results with probability distributions from conventional diet samples (pellets and food remains) from the same colonies and time periods. Relative to the stable isotope estimates, conventional analysis often overestimated the contributions of birds and small mammals to gull diets and often underestimated the contributions of fish and zooplankton. Both methods gave similar estimates for the contributions of scavenged caribou, miscellaneous marine foods, and garbage to diets. Pellets and food remains therefore may be useful for assessing the importance of garbage relative to certain other foods in diets of gulls and similar birds, but are clearly inappropriate for estimating the potential impact of gulls on birds, small mammals, or fish. However, conventional samples provide more species-level information than stable isotope analysis, so a combined approach would be most useful for diet analysis and assessing a predator's impact on particular prey groups. ?? 2011 Association of Field Ornithologists.

  9. Physical and Mathematical Methods for Removing Organic Interference from Optical Isotope Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, G.; Chappellet-Volini, L.; Vu, D.

    2012-12-01

    Portable high precision isotope analyzers using CRDS technology have greatly increased the use of stable isotopes in hydrological, oceanographic, and ecological studies over the past five years. However studies of some water samples yielded incorrect isotopic values indicating some form of spectroscopic interference. Subsequent work has shown that waters derived from some plants containing interfering alcohols but meteoric waters are not affected. The initial approach to handling such samples was to use spectroscopic anomalies to identify and flag affected samples for later analysis by non-optical methods. This presentation will examine the approaches developed within the past year to allow for accurate analysis of such samples by optical methods. The first approach uses an advanced spectroscopic model to identify and quantify alcohols present in the sample. The alcohol signal is incorporated into the overall fit of the measure spectra to calculate the concentration of the individual isotopes. It was found that the δ18O value could be calculated with high accuracy, the result for the δ2H value was sufficient for many applications. The second approach uses physical treatment of the sample to break down the organic molecules into non-interfering species. The liquid sample is injected into a flash vaporizer then the vapor travels through a cartridge for physical treatment prior to analysis by CRDS. Inside the cartridge the organic molecules undergo oxidation at high temperature in the air carrier gas when exposed to the catalyst. This approach is highly effective for ethanol solutions as high as 5% as well as for the complex mixtures of alcohols found in plants. Comparison of the results of both of these methods will be compared with tertiary techniques such as IRMS where possible.

  10. Effect of cohesion and fill amplification on seismic stability of municipal solid waste landfills using limit equilibrium method.

    PubMed

    Savoikar, Purnanand; Choudhury, Deepankar

    2010-12-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in seismic zones are subjected to the seismic forces both in the horizontal and vertical directions. The stability of landfills against these seismic forces was evaluated by computing the factor of safety of landfills with different modes of failure among which failures of landfills due to translation are very common. Conventionally, the seismic stability of landfill is evaluated by using pseudo-static limit equilibrium method. In the present study, seismic stability of landfills is evaluated by both the conventional pseudo-static and modern pseudo-dynamic method. The pseudo-dynamic method is superior as it takes into account the effect of duration and frequency of earthquake motion and corresponding body waves in addition to the variation of earthquake accelerations along depth and time. In the present study, the effects of cohesion and fill amplification on seismic stability of landfill are also taken into account. It was noticed that, neglecting cohesion of fill material as well as liner material, results in a lower factor of safety and, hence, a very conservative/uneconomic design. Also, fill amplification is found to reduce the factor of safety values computed only by using the pseudo-dynamic method, showing its advantage. Generalized expressions are developed for factor of safety and yield acceleration against translational failure, which can be used for evaluating the seismic stability of MSW landfills. Comparisons of results under static condition with existing, similar methodology show a very good agreement. However, the present study seems to provide unique results for the seismic case. PMID:19837709

  11. A validated method for the quantitation of 1,1-difluoroethane using a gas in equilibrium method of calibration.

    PubMed

    Avella, Joseph; Lehrer, Michael; Zito, S William

    2008-10-01

    1,1-Difluoroethane (DFE), also known as Freon 152A, is a member of a class of compounds known as halogenated hydrocarbons. A number of these compounds have gained notoriety because of their ability to induce rapid onset of intoxication after inhalation exposure. Abuse of DFE has necessitated development of methods for its detection and quantitation in postmortem and human performance specimens. Furthermore, methodologies applicable to research studies are required as there have been limited toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic reports published on DFE. This paper describes a method for the quantitation of DFE using a gas chromatography-flame-ionization headspace technique that employs solventless standards for calibration. Two calibration curves using 0.5 mL whole blood calibrators which ranged from A: 0.225-1.350 to B: 9.0-180.0 mg/L were developed. These were evaluated for linearity (0.9992 and 0.9995), limit of detection of 0.018 mg/L, limit of quantitation of 0.099 mg/L (recovery 111.9%, CV 9.92%), and upper limit of linearity of 27,000.0 mg/L. Combined curve recovery results of a 98.0 mg/L DFE control that was prepared using an alternate technique was 102.2% with CV of 3.09%. No matrix interference was observed in DFE enriched blood, urine or brain specimens nor did analysis of variance detect any significant differences (alpha = 0.01) in the area under the curve of blood, urine or brain specimens at three identical DFE concentrations. The method is suitable for use in forensic laboratories because validation was performed on instrumentation routinely used in forensic labs and due to the ease with which the calibration range can be adjusted. Perhaps more importantly it is also useful for research oriented studies because the removal of solvent from standard preparation eliminates the possibility for solvent induced changes to the gas/liquid partitioning of DFE or chromatographic interference due to the presence of solvent in specimens. PMID:19007521

  12. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  13. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea).

    PubMed

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  14. Preservation Methods Alter Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values in Crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea)

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Fabiene Maria; Pereira, Marcelo Ribeiro; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Moreira, Marcelo Zacharias; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA) is an important tool for investigation of animal dietary habits for determination of feeding niche. Ideally, fresh samples should be used for isotopic analysis, but logistics frequently demands preservation of organisms for analysis at a later time. The goal of this study was to establish the best methodology for preserving forest litter-dwelling crickets for later SIA analysis without altering results. We collected two cricket species, Phoremia sp. and Mellopsis doucasae, from which we prepared 70 samples per species, divided among seven treatments: (i) freshly processed (control); preserved in fuel ethanol for (ii) 15 and (iii) 60 days; preserved in commercial ethanol for (iv) 15 and (v) 60 days; fresh material frozen for (vi) 15 and (vii) 60 days. After oven drying, samples were analyzed for δ15N, δ13C values, N(%), C(%) and C/N atomic values using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. All preservation methods tested, significantly impacted δ13C and δ15N and C/N atomic values. Chemical preservatives caused δ13C enrichment as great as 1.5‰, and δ15N enrichment as great as 0.9‰; the one exception was M. doucasae stored in ethanol for 15 days, which had δ15N depletion up to 1.8‰. Freezing depleted δ13C and δ15N by up to 0.7 and 2.2‰, respectively. C/N atomic values decreased when stored in ethanol, and increased when frozen for 60 days for both cricket species. Our results indicate that all preservation methods tested in this study altered at least one of the tested isotope values when compared to fresh material (controls). We conclude that only freshly processed material provides adequate SIA results for litter-dwelling crickets. PMID:26390400

  15. Uranium and Calcium Isotope Ratio Measurements using the Modified Total Evaporation Method in TIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Kuehn, H.; Berglund, M.; Hennessy, C.

    2010-12-01

    A new version of the "modified total evaporation" (MTE) method for isotopic analysis by multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), with high analytical performance and designed in a more user-friendly and routinely applicable way, is described in detail. It is mainly being used for nuclear safeguards measurements of U and Pu and nuclear metrology, but can readily be applied to other scientific tasks in geochemistry, e.g. for Sr, Nd and Ca, as well. The development of the MTE method was organized in collaboration of several "key nuclear mass spectrometry laboratories", namely the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL), the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (now Safeguards Analytical Services, SGAS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), with IRMM taking the leading role. The manufacturer of the TRITON TIMS instrument, Thermo Fisher Scientific, integrated this method into the software of the instrument. The development has now reached its goal to become a user-friendly and routinely useable method for uranium isotope ratio measurements with high precision and accuracy. Due to the use of the “total evaporation” (TE) method the measurement of the "major" uranium isotope ratio 235U/238U is routinely being performed with a precision of 0.01% to 0.02%. The use of a (certified) reference material measured under comparable conditions is emphasized to achieve an accuracy at a level of 0.02% - depending on the stated uncertainty of the certified value of the reference material. In contrast to the total evaporation method (TE), in the MTE method the total evaporation sequence is interrupted on a regular basis to allow for correction for background from peak tailing, internal calibration of a secondary electron multiplier (SEM) detector versus the Faraday cups, and ion source re-focusing. Therefore, the most significant improvement using the

  16. Non-equilibrium DMFT - Polaritonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatsch, Andreas; Frank, Regine

    Non-equilibrium physics recently really becomes important with the progress of ultrafast laser sciences. However in our understanding there is still a gap between equilibrium physics and the non-equilibrium, even though numerical methods have been advanced in recent years. We compare in this talk novel results at hand with equilibrium physics. The comparison will show that especially theoretical efforts are needed to explain many - so far - unresolved problems and to predict novel research on the basis of ab initio computing. We specifically discuss several non-equilibrium extensions of DMFT, numerical methods as well as semi-analytical solvers.

  17. Detection of Human Sewage in Urban Stormwater Using DNA Based Methods and Stable Isotope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLellan, S. L.; Malet, N.; Sauer, E.; Mueller-Spitz, S.; Borchardt, M.

    2008-12-01

    related to the mixed organic matter sources in polluted stormwater runoff, and that this signal will distinct from untreated sanitary sewage. Stable isotope signatures of stormwater and untreated sewage were determined and compared with the rivers. Isotopic values of stormwater was delta 15N = 1.1 ± 2 %; delta 13C = -25.5 ± 3 % and sewage was delta 15N = -1.9 ± 0.2 %; delta 13C = -23.6 ± 0.3. Suspended particular organic matter (SPOM) of Milwaukee River showed depleted delta 13C (-28.6 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 15N (7.7 ± 1.9 %) values. SPOM of the KK River exhibited the most depleted delta 15N (0.2 ± 1.6 %) and enriched delta 13C (-24.8 ± 1.8 %) isotopic values. Menomonee River SPOM showed intermediate isotopic values. The delta 13C values of each river and the estuary enriched significantly throughout the summer storm periods. The isotope signals in the KK and Menomonee were indicative of stormwater runoff and sewage contamination. These results suggest that unrecognized sewage inputs are chronically present and may be delivered through urban stormwater systems. DNA based methods combined with isotope analysis may provide a useful tool for urban watershed assessments and to identify sewage inputs. Delineating the relative contribution of stormwater and sewage to overall degraded water quality might give the first indication of the impact of these sources on the Michigan Lake waters.

  18. Stable isotope analysis of plant-derived nitrate - novel method for discrimination between organically and conventionally grown vegetables.

    PubMed

    Mihailova, A; Pedentchouk, N; Kelly, S D

    2014-07-01

    The lack of reliable markers for the discrimination between organic and conventional products makes the organic food market susceptible to attempted fraud. Robust analytical methodologies for organic food authentication are urgently needed. In this study a new approach, compound-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of plant-derived nitrate, has been applied alongside bulk nitrogen isotope analysis for discrimination between organically and conventionally greenhouse-grown lettuce and retail potatoes and tomatoes. The method revealed significant differences between conventional and organic fertilisation. An intra-plant isotopic variation as well as significant impact of the fertiliser application rate on the nitrogen and oxygen isotope values of plant-derived nitrate has been observed. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of nitrate has a potential for differentiation between organic and conventional crops. Further analysis is needed to improve our understanding of the scope of application and robustness of this compound-specific approach. PMID:24518338

  19. A rapid method for the sampling of atmospheric water vapour for isotopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Peters, Leon I; Yakir, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric moisture is widely applied in the environmental sciences. Traditional methods for obtaining isotopic compositional data from ambient moisture have required complicated sampling procedures, expensive and sophisticated distillation lines, hazardous consumables, and lengthy treatments prior to analysis. Newer laser-based techniques are expensive and usually not suitable for large-scale field campaigns, especially in cases where access to mains power is not feasible or high spatial coverage is required. Here we outline the construction and usage of a novel vapour-sampling system based on a battery-operated Stirling cycle cooler, which is simple to operate, does not require any consumables, or post-collection distillation, and is light-weight and highly portable. We demonstrate the ability of this system to reproduce delta(18)O isotopic compositions of ambient water vapour, with samples taken simultaneously by a traditional cryogenic collection technique. Samples were collected over 1 h directly into autosampler vials and were analysed by mass spectrometry after pyrolysis of 1 microL aliquots to CO. This yielded an average error of < +/-0.5 per thousand, approximately equal to the signal-to-noise ratio of traditional approaches. This new system provides a rapid and reliable alternative to conventional cryogenic techniques, particularly in cases requiring high sample throughput or where access to distillation lines, slurry maintenance or mains power is not feasible. PMID:19960497

  20. A new method for stable carbon isotope analysis of chlorofluorocarbons in contaminated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, Axel; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) have been widely used as refrigerants, propellants, solvents, foaming agents and are important intermediates in the production of anesthetics and other fluorinated compounds. Due to their ozone depletion potential, production was banned for most uses under the Montreal Protocol (1987) and its amendments and atmospheric mixing ratios have started to decrease. In addition to the atmosphere, CFCs and HCFCs have been detected in groundwater, and emissions from various sources such as landfill sites are still ongoing. Previous studies have shown that both abiotic and biotic transformation of CFCs may occur under certain conditions. To investigate degradation that may take place in soils and groundwaters, a purge and trap method (P&T) has been developed to measure the stable carbon isotopic composition of CFCs and HCFCs extracted from waters. A set of pure phase working standards (HCFC-22, CFC-11, CFC-113) has been prepared offline and characterized by sealed tube combustion dual inlet mass spectrometry. Comparison between isotopic standards and CFCs extracted by our method demonstrates the sample P&T extraction steps do not induce significant δ13C fractionation (lt;0.5 per mill). Standards characterized by continuous flow CSIA (compound specific isotope analysis) after extraction agree with offline characterized values. Evaporation experiments were carried out to investigate any isotope effects due to volatile loss that might occur either due to sampling methods or sample handling in the lab. Monitoring δ13C values during progressive evaporation showed small isotopic fractionation associated with evaporation. Enrichment factors, obtained from Rayleigh plots, showed inverse isotope fractionation i.e depletion in 13C in the remaining compound. Notably, this effect is in the opposite direction to the fractionation (13C enrichment) that is likely to be associated with abiotic or biotic transformation effects

  1. A New, Rapid, Precise and Sensitive Method for Chlorine Stable Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Acker, M. R.; Shahar, A.; Young, E. D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) are recognized common groundwater contaminants. Because of their physico-chemical properties, their lifespan in groundwater is in the order of decades (Pankow and Cherry, 1996). Stable isotopes can play a role in determining the rate and extent of CAH attenuation (Slater, 2003). The use of chlorine has been hampered by the current time consuming and insensitive analytical methods. We present a new analytical procedure to measure chlorine stable isotope values using a gas chromatograph coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometer (GC-MC-ICP-MS). The GC has a Porapack Q packed column. The carrier gas was helium and the temperature was constant at 160°C. The GC was coupled to the MC-ICP-MS by heated stainless steel tubing. Our high resolution spectra showed that 37Cl is free of its main interference 36Ar-H over a range of 0.004 amu. Two pure CAH, trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE), were used for zero enrichment (sample relative to itself) and standard-sample difference measurements. Integrations and background corrections of transient signals were performed using Microsoft Excel after import of the raw data from the MC-ICPMS acquisition software. Zero enrichment tests with TCE and PCE yielded δ37Cl of -0.04±0.16‰ and -0.03±0.17‰, respectively, results for sample injections of 0.12 to 0.02 microliters. Accuracy was tested by injecting 0.24 microliters of a 50/50 mixture of TCE and PCE of known isotopic compositions as the difference between the two solvents was of paramount interest. The δ37Cl(TCE) value of PCE was -1.99±0.16‰. A highly satisfactory comparison with the conventional method is shown by published values for TCE and PCE, -2.04±0.12‰ and -0.30±0.14‰, respectively (Jendrzejewski et al., 2001), giving a δ37Cl(TCE) value for PCE of -2.34±0.18‰. These tests of the GC-MC-ICP-MS method showed that we can obtain reproducible and accurate Cl isotope values using an

  2. Rapid fusion method for the determination of refractory thorium and uranium isotopes in soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    Recently, approximately 80% of participating laboratories failed to accurately determine uranium isotopes in soil samples in the U.S Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) Session 30, due to incomplete dissolution of refractory particles in the samples. Failing laboratories employed acid dissolution methods, including hydrofluoric acid, to recover uranium from the soil matrix. The failures illustrate the importance of rugged soil dissolution methods for the accurate measurement of analytes in the sample matrix. A new rapid fusion method has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to prepare 1-2 g soil sample aliquots very quickly, with total dissolution of refractory particles. Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 ºC in zirconium crucibles to enable complete dissolution of the sample. Uranium and thorium are separated on stacked TEVA and TRU extraction chromatographic resin cartridges, prior to isotopic measurements by alpha spectrometry on cerium fluoride microprecipitation sources. Plutonium can also be separated and measured using this method. Batches of 12 samples can be prepared for measurement in <5 hours.

  3. Rapid fusion method for the determination of refractory thorium and uranium isotopes in soil samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Hutchison, Jay B.; McAlister, Daniel R.

    2015-02-14

    Recently, approximately 80% of participating laboratories failed to accurately determine uranium isotopes in soil samples in the U.S Department of Energy Mixed Analyte Performance Evaluation Program (MAPEP) Session 30, due to incomplete dissolution of refractory particles in the samples. Failing laboratories employed acid dissolution methods, including hydrofluoric acid, to recover uranium from the soil matrix. The failures illustrate the importance of rugged soil dissolution methods for the accurate measurement of analytes in the sample matrix. A new rapid fusion method has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to prepare 1-2 g soil sample aliquots very quickly, withmore » total dissolution of refractory particles. Soil samples are fused with sodium hydroxide at 600 ºC in zirconium crucibles to enable complete dissolution of the sample. Uranium and thorium are separated on stacked TEVA and TRU extraction chromatographic resin cartridges, prior to isotopic measurements by alpha spectrometry on cerium fluoride microprecipitation sources. Plutonium can also be separated and measured using this method. Batches of 12 samples can be prepared for measurement in <5 hours.« less

  4. Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-08-10

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

  5. The effect of carbonic anhydrase on the kinetics and equilibrium of the oxygen isotope exchange in the CO2-H2O system: Implications for δ18O vital effects in biogenic carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, Joji; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2012-10-01

    Interpretations of the primary paleoceanographic information recorded in stable oxygen isotope values (δ18O) of biogenic CaCO3 can be obscured by disequilibrium effects. CaCO3 is often depleted in 18O relative to the δ18O values expected for precipitation in thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater as a result of vital effects. Vital effects in δ18O have been explained in terms of the influence of fluid pH on the overall δ18O of the sum of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) species (often referred to as "pH model") and in terms of 18O depletion as a result of the kinetic effects associated with CO2 hydration (CO2 + H2O ↔ H2CO3 ↔ HCO3- + H+) and CO2 hydroxylation (CO2 + OH- ↔ HCO3-) in the calcification sites (so-called "kinetic model"). This study addresses the potential role of an enzyme, carbonic anhydrase (CA), that catalyzes inter-conversion of CO2 and HCO3- in relation to the underlying mechanism of vital effects. We performed quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments in order to examine the changes in 18O equilibration rate as a function of CA concentration. Experiments were performed at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are comparable to the average surface ocean pH and elevated pH levels observed in the calcification sites of some coral and foraminiferal species, respectively. The rate of uncatalyzed 18O exchange in the CO2-H2O system is governed by the pH-dependent DIC speciation and the kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydration and hydroxylation, which can be summarized by a simple mathematical expression. The results from control experiments (no CA addition) are in agreement with this expression. The results from control experiments also suggest that the most recently published kinetic rate constant for CO2 hydroxylation has been overestimated. When CA is present, the 18O equilibration process is greatly enhanced at both pH levels due to the catalysis of CO2 hydration by the enzyme. For example, the time required for 18O

  6. Rapid Method for the Determination of the Stable Oxygen Isotope Ratio of Water in Alcoholic Beverages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daobing; Zhong, Qiding; Li, Guohui; Huang, Zhanbin

    2015-10-28

    This paper demonstrates the first successful application of an online pyrolysis technique for the direct determination of oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)O) of water in alcoholic beverages. Similar water concentrations in each sample were achieved by adjustment with absolute ethyl alcohol, and then a fixed GC split ratio can be used. All of the organic ingredients were successfully separated from the analyte on a CP-PoraBond Q column and subsequently vented out, whereas water molecules were transferred into the reaction furnace and converted to CO. With the system presented, 15-30 μL of raw sample was diluted and can be analyzed repeatedly; the analytical precision was better than 0.4‰ (n = 5) in all cases, and more than 50 injections can be made per day. No apparent memory effect was observed even if water samples were injected using the same syringe; a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.9998) was found between the water δ(18)O of measured sample and that of working standards. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the mean δ(18)O value and that obtained by the traditional method (CO2-water equilibration/isotope ratio mass spectrometry) and the newly developed method in this study. The advantages of this new method are its rapidity and straightforwardness, and less test portion is required. PMID:26373434

  7. A robust method for ammonium nitrogen isotopic analysis in freshwater and seawater at natural abundance levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Altabet, M. A.; Wu, T.; Hadas, O.

    2006-12-01

    Natural ammonium N isotopic abundance has been increasingly used in studies of marine and freshwater biogeochemistry. However, current methods are time-consuming, subject to interference from DON, and not reliable at low concentrations. Our new method for determining the δ15N of ammonium overcomes these difficulties by employing the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite followed by conversion of nitrite to nitrous oxide. In the first step, ammonium is quantitatively oxidized by hypobromite at pH~12. After the addition of sodium arsenite to consume excess hypobromite, yield is verified by colorimetric NO2-measurement using sulfanilamide and naphthyl ethylenediamine (NED). Nitrite is further reduced to N2O by a 1:1 sodium azide and acetic acid buffer solution using previously established procedures. Buffer concentration can be varied according to sample matrix to ensure that a reaction pH between 2 and 4 is reached. The product nitrous oxide is then isotopically analyzed using a continuous flow purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Reliable δ15N values (±0.31‰) are obtained over a concentration range of 0.5 μM to 20 μM using 20 ml volumes of either fresh or seawater samples. Reagent blanks are very low, about 0.05 μM. There is no interference from any of the nitrogen containing compounds tested except short chain aliphatic amino acid (i.e. glycine) which typically are not present at sufficiently high environmental concentrations to pose a problem.

  8. Use of Isotope Dilution Method To Predict Bioavailability of Organic Pollutants in Historically Contaminated Sediments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many cases of severe environmental contamination arise from historical episodes, where recalcitrant contaminants have resided in the environment for a prolonged time, leading to potentially decreased bioavailability. Use of bioavailable concentrations over bulk chemical levels improves risk assessment and may play a critical role in determining the need for remediation or assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation operations. In this study, we applied the principle of isotope dilution to quantify bioaccessibility of legacy contaminants DDT and PCBs in marine sediments from a Superfund site. After addition of 13C or deuterated analogues to a sediment sample, the isotope dilution reached a steady state within 24 h of mixing. At the steady state, the accessible fraction (E) derived by the isotope dilution method (IDM) ranged from 0.28 to 0.89 and was substantially smaller than 1 for most compounds, indicating reduced availability of the extensively aged residues. A strong linear relationship (R2 = 0.86) was found between E and the sum of rapid (Fr) and slow (Fs) desorption fractions determined by sequential Tenax desorption. The IDM-derived accessible concentration (Ce) was further shown to correlate closely with tissue residue in the marine benthic polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed in the same sediments. As shown in this study, the IDM approach involves only a few simple steps and may be readily adopted in laboratories equipped with mass spectrometers. This novel method is expected to be especially useful for historically contaminated sediments or soils, for which contaminant bioavailability may have changed significantly due to aging and other sequestration processes. PMID:24946234

  9. Use of isotope dilution method to predict bioavailability of organic pollutants in historically contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Jia, Fang; Bao, Lian-Jun; Crago, Jordan; Schlenk, Daniel; Gan, Jay

    2014-07-15

    Many cases of severe environmental contamination arise from historical episodes, where recalcitrant contaminants have resided in the environment for a prolonged time, leading to potentially decreased bioavailability. Use of bioavailable concentrations over bulk chemical levels improves risk assessment and may play a critical role in determining the need for remediation or assessing the effectiveness of risk mitigation operations. In this study, we applied the principle of isotope dilution to quantify bioaccessibility of legacy contaminants DDT and PCBs in marine sediments from a Superfund site. After addition of 13C or deuterated analogues to a sediment sample, the isotope dilution reached a steady state within 24 h of mixing. At the steady state, the accessible fraction (E) derived by the isotope dilution method (IDM) ranged from 0.28 to 0.89 and was substantially smaller than 1 for most compounds, indicating reduced availability of the extensively aged residues. A strong linear relationship (R2=0.86) was found between E and the sum of rapid (Fr) and slow (Fs) desorption fractions determined by sequential Tenax desorption. The IDM-derived accessible concentration (Ce) was further shown to correlate closely with tissue residue in the marine benthic polychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed in the same sediments. As shown in this study, the IDM approach involves only a few simple steps and may be readily adopted in laboratories equipped with mass spectrometers. This novel method is expected to be especially useful for historically contaminated sediments or soils, for which contaminant bioavailability may have changed significantly due to aging and other sequestration processes. PMID:24946234

  10. Subjective Well-Being: Revisions to Dynamic Equilibrium Theory Using National Panel Data and Panel Regression Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headey, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    This paper partly revises the dynamic equilibrium (DE) theory of subjective well-being (SWB), sometimes termed set point theory. Results from four national panel surveys show that correlations among measures of SWB diminish over time, and that the SWB set points of a minority of individuals substantially change. These results mean that DE theory…

  11. A benchmark study of molecular structure by experimental and theoretical methods: Equilibrium structure of uracil from gas-phase electron diffraction data and coupled-cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Natalja; Khaikin, Leonid S.; Grikina, Olga E.; Rykov, Anatolii N.

    2013-10-01

    The equilibrium structure of uracil, one of the nucleobases, which build nucleic acids, has been determined for the first time by the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) method. The necessary rovibrational corrections to the experimental internuclear distances have been calculated with quadratic and cubic force constants in the MP2(all)/cc-pVTZ approximation. For the first time, the equilibrium structure has been optimized by the very time-consuming coupled-cluster method with single and double excitations and perturbative treatment of connected triples using the correlation-consistent polarized weighted core-valence triple-zeta basis set with all electrons being correlated (CCSD(T)(all)/cc-pwCVTZ). The optimized structural parameters have been corrected for the diffuse-function effects and extrapolated to the higher basis set (cc-pwCVQZ) using results of MP2 computations (named as best ab initio structure). The GED equilibrium structure remarkably agrees with the best ab initio one as well as with that one derived from microwave (MW) rotational constants by Puzzarini and Barone. Thus, it has been revealed that the precise experiment and coupled-cluster calculations yield the same results when accurate vibrational corrections (including anharmonic ones) are considered in the experimental structural analysis. Moreover, it has been shown that the equilibrium structure derived from the GED data, being in general of one order less accurate than that determined from the MW rotational constants, is still reliable and accurate.

  12. An isotope-dilution standard GC/MS/MS method for steroid hormones in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, William T.; Gray, James L.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Lindley, Chris E.; Losche, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    An isotope-dilution quantification method was developed for 20 natural and synthetic steroid hormones and additional compounds in filtered and unfiltered water. Deuterium- or carbon-13-labeled isotope-dilution standards (IDSs) are added to the water sample, which is passed through an octadecylsilyl solid-phase extraction (SPE) disk. Following extract cleanup using Florisil SPE, method compounds are converted to trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Validation matrices included reagent water, wastewater-affected surface water, and primary (no biological treatment) and secondary wastewater effluent. Overall method recovery for all analytes in these matrices averaged 100%; with overall relative standard deviation of 28%. Mean recoveries of the 20 individual analytes for spiked reagent-water samples prepared along with field samples analyzed in 2009–2010 ranged from 84–104%, with relative standard deviations of 6–36%. Detection levels estimated using ASTM International’s D6091–07 procedure range from 0.4 to 4 ng/L for 17 analytes. Higher censoring levels of 100 ng/L for bisphenol A and 200 ng/L for cholesterol and 3-beta-coprostanol are used to prevent bias and false positives associated with the presence of these analytes in blanks. Absolute method recoveries of the IDSs provide sample-specific performance information and guide data reporting. Careful selection of labeled compounds for use as IDSs is important because both inexact IDS-analyte matches and deuterium label loss affect an IDS’s ability to emulate analyte performance. Six IDS compounds initially tested and applied in this method exhibited deuterium loss and are not used in the final method.

  13. Double isotopic method using dansyl chloride for the determination of GABA in rat C6 astrocytoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, R.L.; Quay, W.B.; Perez-Polo, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are described for the quantitative measurement of GABA in culture. The method can be adapted to any amino acid or dansyl-chloride-reactive species. The sensitivity and selectivity of the procedure result from the double isotopic design in which (/sup 14/C)-labeled internal standard was added to the samples before reaction with (3M)-labeled dansyl chloride. Values obtained by ion-exchange amino acid analysis of cultures agree closely with the values obtained by the double isotopic method. This method is sensitive enough to measure GABA intracellularly and the condition medium.

  14. An approximate method for solving the problem of the establishment of chemical equilibrium in the products of explosion of gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shargatov, V. A.; Gubin, S. A.; Okunev, D. Yu

    2015-11-01

    Based on the assumption of the existence of the partial chemical equilibrium in the detonation products, an approximate method for calculating composition of the detonation products is developed. The method uses the assumption of the existence of extremum of Helmholtz free energy for a given density, temperature, and molecular weight of the detonation products mixture. Without significant loss of accuracy to the solution of stiff differential equations, detailed kinetic mechanism can be replaced by one differential equation and a system of algebraic equations. This method is always consistent with the detailed mechanism and can be used separately or in conjunction with the decision of a stiff system, replacing it when bimolecular reactions are near equilibrium.

  15. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Charles E.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a systematic method for the analysis of photo-induced isotopic fractionation. The physical basis for this fractionation mechanism centers on the fact that isotopic substitution alters the energy levels, molecular symmetries, spin statistical weights and other fundamental molecular properties, producing spectroscopic signatures distinguishable from that of the parent isotopomer. These mass-dependent physical properties are identical to those invoked by Urey to explain stable isotope fractionation in chemical systems subject to thermodynamic equilibrium. Photo-induced isotopic fractionation is a completely general phenomenon and should be observable in virtually all gas phase photochemical systems. Water photo-induced isotopic fractionation has been examined in detail using experimental and theoretical data. These results illustrate the salient features of this fractionation mechanism for molecules possessing continuous UV absorption spectra and unit photodissociation quantum yields. Using the photo-induced isotopic fractionation methodology in conjunction with standard photochemical models, we predict substantial deuterium enrichment of water vapor in the planetary atmospheres of Earth and Mars.

  16. Sampling and analytical methods of stable isotopes and dissolved inorganic carbon from CO2 injection sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geldern, Robert; Myrttinen, Anssi; Becker, Veith; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2010-05-01

    The isotopic composition (δ13C) of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in combination with DIC concentration measurements, can be used to quantify geochemical trapping of CO2 in water. This is of great importance in monitoring the fate of CO2 in the subsurface in CO2 injection projects. When CO2 mixes with water, a shift in the δ13C values, as well as an increase in DIC concentrations is observed in the CO2-H2O system. However, when using standard on-site titration methods, it is often challenging to determining accurate in-situ DIC concentrations. This may be due to CO2 degassing and CO2-exchange between the sample and the atmosphere during titration, causing a change in the pH value or due to other unfavourable conditions such as turbid water samples or limited availability of fluid samples. A way to resolve this problem is by simultaneously determining the DIC concentration and carbon isotopic composition using a standard continuous flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (CF-IRMS) setup with a Gasbench II coupled to Delta plusXP mass spectrometer. During sampling, in order to avoid atmospheric contact, water samples taken from the borehole-fluid-sampler should be directly transferred into a suitable container, such as a gasbag. Also, to avoid isotope fractionation due to biological activity in the sample, it is recommended to stabilize the gasbags prior to sampling with HgCl2 for the subsequent stable isotope analysis. The DIC concentration of the samples can be determined from the area of the sample peaks in a chromatogram from a CF-IRMS analysis, since it is directly proportional to the CO2 generated by the reaction of the water with H3PO4. A set of standards with known DIC concentrations should be prepared by mixing NaHCO3 with DIC free water. Since the DIC concentrations of samples taken from CO2 injection sites are expected to be exceptionally high due to the additional high amounts of added CO2, the DIC concentration range of the standards should be set high

  17. Integrated use of soil physical and water isotope methods for ecohydrological characterization of desertified areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külls, Christoph; Nunes, Alice; Köbel-Batista, Melanie; Branquinho, Cristina; Bianconi, Nadja; Costantini, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    marked decrease in water permeability at 0.04, 0.20, or 0.40 m depth. Soil isotope profiles indicated that percolation beneath the root zone and groundwater recharge ranges from 21.7 mm/y to 29.7 mm/y. The recharge rate was positively related to mean annual rainfall and soil organic matter, and interestingly, increased with aridity and desertification. The difference between mean annual rainfall and percolation was positively related to plant cover and in inverse proportion to the aridity index. Our results highlight the importance of combining different methods of site characterization by soil physics, soil water isotopes and soil water chemistry (chloride) with vegetation data, providing a more specific analysis of ecohydrological conditions and their relation to ecosystem functioning and recovery potential. The field protocol applied can provide relevant information for guiding restoration strategies. Costantini, E. A. C., Urbano, F., Aramini, G., Barbetti, R., Bellino, F., Bocci, M., & Tascone, F. (2009). Rationale and methods for compiling an atlas of desertification in Italy. Land Degradation & Development, 20(3), 261-276. Garvelmann, J., Külls, C., & Weiler, M. (2012). A porewater-based stable isotope approach for the investigation of subsurface hydrological processes. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 631-640.

  18. A Robust and Fully-Automated Chromatographic Method for the Quantitative Purification of Ca and Sr for Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H. B.; Kim, H.; Romaniello, S. J.; Field, P.; Anbar, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    High throughput methods for sample purification are required to effectively exploit new opportunities in the study of non-traditional stable isotopes. Many geochemical isotopic studies would benefit from larger data sets, but these are often impractical with manual drip chromatography techniques, which can be time-consuming and demand the attention of skilled laboratory staff. Here we present a new, fully-automated single-column method suitable for the purification of both Ca and Sr for stable and radiogenic isotopic analysis. The method can accommodate a wide variety of sample types, including carbonates, bones, and teeth; silicate rocks and sediments; fresh and marine waters; and biological samples such as blood and urine. Protocols for these isotopic analyses are being developed for use on the new prepFAST-MCTM system from Elemental Scientific (ESI). The system is highly adaptable and processes up to 24-60 samples per day by reusing a single chromatographic column. Efficient column cleaning between samples and an all Teflon flow path ensures that sample carryover is maintained at the level of background laboratory blanks typical for manual drip chromatography. This method is part of a family of new fully-automated chromatographic methods being developed to address many different isotopic systems including B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb, and U. These methods are designed to be rugged and transferrable, and to allow the preparation of large, diverse sample sets via a highly repeatable process with minimal effort.

  19. Enhanced Method for Molybdenum Separation and Isotopic Determination in Geological Samples and Uranium-Rich Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migeon, V.; Bourdon, B.; Pili, E.

    2014-12-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) shares analogous geochemical properties with uranium. Mo ispresent as a minor or a trace element in uranium ores under two main oxidation states: +IVand +VI. Mo has seven stable isotopes (92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 and 100). In natural systems,Mo and Mo isotopes were shown to fractionate during redox reactions. Because Morepresents an impurity difficult to separate in the nuclear fuel cycle, it has the potential to beused as an indicator of the origins of uranium concentrates, in the framework of nuclearforensics. This work focuses on developing an enhanced separation method for Mo from auranium-rich matrix (uranium ore, uranium concentrate) in order to analyze the massfractionation induced by processes typical of the nuclear fuel cycle. Purification of Mo forisotope ratio measurements is performed with a three-step separation on ion-exchange resins,with yields between 45 and 82%. Matrix and isobaric interferences (Zr, Ru) were reduced ingeological and uranium standards, such as U/Mo ≤ 2*10-4, Zr/Mo ≤ 1*10-3, Ru/Mo ≤ 6*10-4and Fe/Mo ≤ 4*10-3. Mo isotopic compositions were measured on a Neptune Plus MC-ICPMSequipped with Jet cones, for a concentration of 30 ng/ml. The achieved sensitivity is~1200-1800 V/ppm with interferences below 10 mV and an overall reproducibility of 0.02 ‰on the δ98Mo values. A double spike, with 97Mo and 100Mo, was added to the samples beforethe purification. It allows for correction of the chemical and instrumental mass fractionations,without requiring a quantitative yield. For igneous rocks, δ98Mo values range between -0.55and -0.03 ‰, relative to the NIST-SRM 3134 molybdenum standard. Fractionation amonguranium ore concentrates is higher, with δ98Mo ranging between 0.02 and -2.84 ‰.

  20. Chemical method for nitrogen isotopic analysis of ammonium at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongwei; Fang, Yunting; Tu, Ying; Pan, Yuepeng

    2014-04-15

    We report a new chemical method to determine the (15)N natural abundance (δ(15)N) for ammonium (NH4(+)) in freshwater (e.g., precipitation) and soil KCl extract. This method is based on the isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide (N2O). Ammonium is initially oxidized to nitrite (NO2(-)) by hypobromite (BrO(-)) using previously established procedures. NO2(-) is then quantitatively converted into N2O by hydroxylamine (NH2OH) under strongly acid conditions. The produced N2O is analyzed by a commercially available purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (PT-IRMS). On the basis of a typical analysis size of 4 mL, the standard deviation of δ(15)N measurements is less than 0.3‰ and often better than 0.1‰ (3 to 5 replicates). Compared to previous methods, the technique here has several advantages and the potential to be used as a routine method for (15)N/(14)N analysis of NH4(+): (1) substantially simplified preparation procedures and reduced preparation time particularly compared to the methods in which diffusion or distillation is involved since all reactions occur in the same vial and separation of NH4(+) from solution is not required; (2) more suitability for low volume samples including those with low N concentration, having a blank size of 0.6 to 2 nmol; (3) elimination of the use of extremely toxic reagents (e.g., HN3) and/or the use of specialized denitrifying bacterial cultures which may be impractical for many laboratories. PMID:24654992

  1. Isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  2. Methods for the separation of rhenium, osmium and molybdenum applicable to isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Golightly, D.W.; Dorrzapf, A.F., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Effective methods are described for the chemical separation of rhenium, osmium and molybdenum. The methods are based on distillation and anion-exchange chromatography, and have been the basis for rhenium-osmium isotope studies of ore deposits and meteorites. Successful anion-exchange separation of osmium requires both recognition and careful control of the osmium species in solution; thus, distillation of osmium tetroxide from a mixture of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide is preferred to anion-exchange. Distribution coefficients measured for perrhenate in sulfuric acid media are sufficiently high (Kd > 500) for rhenium to be directly loaded onto an ion-exchange column from a distillation residue and subsequently eluted with nitric acid. Polymerization of molybdenum species during elution is prevented by use of a solution that is 1M in hydrochloric acid and 1M in sodium chloride. ?? 1991.

  3. Clumped isotope thermometry and catagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiler, J. M.; Clog, M. D.; Dallas, B.; Douglas, P. M.; Piasecki, A.; Sessions, A. L.; Stolper, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Clumped- and site-specific isotopic compositions of organic compounds can constrain their formation temperatures, sources, and chemical reaction histories. The large number of isotopologues of organic molecules may allow for the isotopic composition of a single compound to illuminate many processes. For example, it is possible that clumping or site specific effects in different parts of the same molecule will differ in blocking temperature, such that a molecule's full isotopic structure could simultaneously constrain conditions of biosynthesis, catagenic 'cracking', and storage in the crust. Recent innovations in high-resolution mass spectrometry and methods of IR and NMR spectroscopy make it possible to explore these questions. Methane is the first organic molecule to have its clumped isotope geochemistry analyzed in a variety of natural environments and controlled experiments. Methane generated through catagenic cracking of kerogen and other organic matter forms in equilibrium with respect to isotopic clumping, and preserves that state through later storage or migration, up to temperatures of ~250 ˚C. This kinetic behavior permits a variety of useful geological applications. But it is unexpected because the bulk stable isotope composition of thermogenic methane is thought to reflect kinetic isotope effects on irreversible reactions. Our observations imply a new interpretation of the chemical physics of catagenic methane formation. Additional instrument and methods developments are currently extending the measurement of isotopic clumping and position specific effects to larger alkanes, other hydrocarbon compounds, and amino acids. These measurements will ultimately expand our capacity to understand the formational conditions and fates of organic molecules in high- and low-temperature environments through geological time.

  4. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  5. A new method for the labelling of proteins with radioactive arsenic isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennewein, M.; Hermanne, A.; Mason, R. P.; Thorpe, P. E.; Rösch, F.

    2006-12-01

    Radioarsenic labelled radiopharmaceuticals could be a valuable asset to positron emission tomography. In particular, the long half-lives of 72As ( T=26 h) and 74As ( T=17.8 d) allow to investigate slow physiological or metabolical processes, like the enrichment and distribution of monoclonal antibodies (mab) in tumour tissue. In this work, a new method for the labelling of proteins with various radioactive arsenic isotopes was developed. For this purpose, two proteins, namely a chimeric IgG 3 monoclonal antibody, ch3G4, directed against anionic phospholipids, and Rituxan (Rituximab), were labelled as a proof of principle with no-carrier-added radioarsenic isotopes ( 74As and 77As). The developed labelling chemistry gives high yields (>99.9%), is reliable and could easily be transferred to automated labelling systems in a clinical environment. At least for the mab used in this work, this route of radioarsenic labelling does not affect the immunoreactivity of the product. The arsenic label stays stable for up to 72 h at the molecular mass of the monoclonal antibody, which is in particular relevant to follow the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of the labelled mab for several days.

  6. Strontium isotopic-paleontological method as a high-resolution paleosalinity tool for lagoonal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Eduard G.; Stanley, Daniel Jean; Patterson, R. Timothy

    1998-11-01

    A combined strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) and paleontological method is newly applied to a modern lagoon in Egypt's Nile River delta to test its applicability as a paleosalinity proxy. Analyses of 22 surficial samples collected throughout the lagoon include 81 Sr isotopic analyses of mollusks, foraminifera, ostracods, barnacles, bryozoans, serpulid worm tubes, pore water, and gypsum crystals. Two salinity groups are distinguished in each sample: a lower salinity group (˜1 ppt) mixed with a higher salinity group (˜3 10 ppt) that, respectively, are interpreted as the modern biocoenosis and an older relict fauna. The relict fauna denotes higher salinity conditions in the lagoon prior to closure of the Aswan High Dam (1964), and the modern fauna records freshening of the lagoon. Recent decreased salinity is a response to regulated Nile River flow and increased discharge into Manzala of fresh water via canals and drains. Quantification of this short-term salinity change holds promise for study of modern lagoons in other world settings, and may provide paleoclimatic information for older lagoon sequences in the Nile River delta and the geologic record.

  7. Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method

    SciTech Connect

    Kohring, M.W.

    1987-04-01

    Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

  8. METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF LIGHT ISOTOPE PRODUCT FROM LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION UNITS

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, J.D.; Ballou, J.K.

    1957-11-19

    A method and apparatus are described for removing the lighter isotope of a gaseous-liquid product from a number of diffusion columns of a liquid thermal diffusion system in two stages by the use of freeze valves. The subject liquid flows from the diffusion columns into a heated sloping capsule where the liquid is vaporized by the action of steam in a heated jacket surrounding the capsule. When the capsule is filled the gas flows into a collector. Flow between the various stages is controlled by freeze valves which are opened and closed by the passage of gas and cool water respectively through coils surrounding portions of the pipes through which the process liquid is passed. The use of the dual stage remover-collector and the freeze valves is an improvement on the thermal diffusion separation process whereby the fraction containing the lighter isotope many be removed from the tops of the diffusion columns without intercolumn flow, or prior stage flow while the contents of the capsule is removed to the final receiver.

  9. A method for in situ monitoring of the isotope composition of tree xylem water using laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Till H M; Kühnhammer, Kathrin; Herbstritt, Barbara; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Field studies analyzing the stable isotope composition of xylem water are providing important information on ecosystem water relations. However, the capacity of stable isotopes to characterize the functioning of plants in their environment has not been fully explored because of methodological constraints on the extent and resolution at which samples could be collected and analysed. Here, we introduce an in situ method offering the potential to continuously monitor the stable isotope composition of tree xylem water via its vapour phase using a commercial laser-based isotope analyser and compact microporous probes installed into the xylem. Our technique enables efficient high-frequency measurement with intervals of only a few minutes per sample while eliminating the need for costly and cumbersome destructive collection of plant material and laboratory-based processing. We present field observations of xylem water hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions obtained over several days including a labelled irrigation event and compare them against results from concurrent destructive sampling with cryogenic distillation and mass spectrometric analysis. The data demonstrate that temporal changes as well as spatial patterns of integration in xylem water isotope composition can be resolved through direct measurement. The new technique can therefore present a valuable tool to study the hydraulic architecture and water utilization of trees. PMID:27260852

  10. Comparison of isotope dilution and excretion methods for determining the half-life of ascorbic acid in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, D.E.; Rivers, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The half-life of ascorbic acid (AA) in guinea pigs was investigated by the isotope dilution and excretion methods. The dilution method measures (1-14C)AA disappearance from the plasma, whereas the excretion method measures the elimination of (1-14C)AA and the metabolites from the body. Two groups of animals underwent both isotope studies in reverse order. Animals were conditioned to the experimental procedures and fed 2.5 mg AA/100 g body weight orally to maintain a daily intake of the vitamin independent of food consumption. The two isotope procedures imposed similar stress on the animals, as determined by plasma cortisol levels and body weight changes. The AA half-life calculations of the rapidly exchangeable pool by the isotope dilution method yielded values of 1.23 and 0.34 hours for the two groups, respectively. The half-life of the slowly exchangeable pool for the two groups was 60.2 and 65.8 hours, respectively. The half-life of AA in the rapidly exchangeable pool, as measured by the excretion studies, was 4.57-8.75 hours. For the slowly exchangeable pool, it was 146-149 hours. The longer half-life of both pools obtained with the excretion method indicates that the isotope is disappearing from the plasma more rapidly than it is being excreted. This suggests that a portion of the (1-14C)AA leaving the plasma is removed to a body pool that is not sampled by the isotope excretion method.

  11. Method for the identification and elimination of contamination during carbon isotopic analyses of extraterrestrial samples

    SciTech Connect

    Swart, P.K.; Grady, M.M.; Pillinger, C.T.

    1983-06-30

    A stepped combustion method for the elimination of carbon-containing contamination and weathering products from meteorite and lunar samples is presented. Samples of the Allende CV3 chondrite, the Sharps and Weston ordinary chondrite falls, one ordinary and five Antarctic finds, and lunar soils from Apollo 11 were oxidized in pure O2 at increasing temperatures, from 200 to 1200 C in 100-C, 30-min steps and C yield and delta-(C-13) were measured after each step. It is found that some C contamination is present in all samples and can adversely affect C-isotopic-abundance measurements. Except for C1 and C2 carbonaceous chondrites, C combustion below 425 + or - 25 C is limited to the terrestrial contaminants, demonstrating the usefulness of stepped combustion in removing them. Graphs and tables of the results are presented and discussed. 34 references.

  12. Radiometric method for determining concentration of naturally occurring isotopes and device therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubovich, S.L.; Gerling, V.E.; Golubnichy, V.V.; Kotsen, M.E.; Stepanov, J.N.

    1984-10-09

    The proposed method essentially consists in that a sample of a substance is placed between two scintillators in immediate contact therewith whereupon said sample is hermetically sealed. Arranged in close proximity to each scintillator is a photomultiplier tube recording ionizing ..cap alpha..- and b-radiation. A selector is utilized to select pulses corresponding to ..cap alpha..- and b-particles, and delayed coincidence circuits of a recording element separate and record b-..cap alpha.. and ..cap alpha..-..cap alpha.. cascade pairs of delayed coincidences of RaC, ThC, and AcA radionuclides. Flows are measured twice at a predetermined time interval to account for emanation build-up tendency and concentration of isotopes of radium is determined from a formula.

  13. Phonon coherence in isotopic silicon superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Frieling, R.; Radek, M.; Eon, S.; Bracht, H.; Wolf, D. E.

    2014-09-29

    Recent experimental and theoretical investigations have confirmed that a reduction in thermal conductivity of silicon is achieved by isotopic silicon superlattices. In the present study, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed to identify the isotope doping and isotope layer ordering with minimum thermal conductivity. Furthermore, the impact of isotopic intermixing at the superlattice interfaces on phonon transport is investigated. Our results reveal that the coherence of phonons in isotopic Si superlattices is prevented if interfacial mixing of isotopes is considered.

  14. Sensitivity analysis and stability charts for uniform slopes computed via the MLD methods in the frame of the limit equilibrium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausilia Paparo, Maria; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Stability charts represent a graphical solution to derive the safety factor (F) without incurring the difficulties of mathematical and numerical methods for the analysis of slope stability, widely used in the engineering field: employed in a preliminary phase of analysis, the consultation of charts allows one to determine the approximate equilibrium conditions. The first to develop this method is Taylor (1948) who made them of common use: his stability charts are the relationships between the height and the inclination of a schematic slope, for particular types of failure surface (toe circle, circle slope, and midpoint circle) and for different values of friction angle. Thereafter the charts have become more detailed and complete (Janbu, 1968), thanks to the continuous introduction of new methods, like the limit equilibrium method (LEM), the limit analysis method and the finite element method (FEM). The aim of this work is to compare sets of stability charts found in literature (Michalowski, 1997; 2002; Li et alii, 2009; Steward et alii, 2011; Zhang et alii, 2011) with new charts obtained with the results obtained by means of the method of minimum lithostatic deviation (MLD) introduced by Tinti and Manucci (2006 and 2008) for 2D problems: the slope is a homogenous body and we analyze different cases, by varying the geometry (e.g. the slope angle and height), the geotechnical parameters (such as cohesion and angle of friction), the pore pressure and the external loads (as seismic or hydrostatic loadings) treated as quasi-static forcing.

  15. Multi-mycotoxin stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method for Fusarium toxins in cereals.

    PubMed

    Habler, Katharina; Rychlik, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A multi-mycotoxin stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was developed for 14 Fusarium toxins including modified mycotoxins in cereals (deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, HT2-toxin, T2-toxin, enniatin B, enniatin B1, enniatin A1, enniatin A, beauvericin, fusarenone X, nivalenol, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, and zearalenone). The chromatographic separation of the toxins with particular focus on deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside was achieved using a C18-hydrosphere column. An expedient sample preparation method was developed that uses solid-phase extraction for the purification of trichothecenes combined with zearalenone, enniatins, and beauvericin and provides excellent validation data. Linearity, intra-day precision, inter-day precision, and recoveries were ≥0.9982, 1-6%, 5-12%, and 79-117%, respectively. Method accuracy was verified by analyzing certified reference materials for deoxynivalenol, HT2-toxin, and T2-toxin with deviations below 7%. The results of this method found barley malt samples from 2012, 2013, and 2014 frequently contaminated with high concentrations of enniatin B, deoxynivalenol, and its modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside. Samples from 2012 were especially contaminated. Fusarenone X was not detected in any of the analyzed samples. PMID:26514672

  16. Multiple ion counting ICPMS double spike method for precise U isotopic analysis at ultra-trace levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Jonathan E.; Friedrich, Jon M.

    2005-04-01

    Of the various methods for the measurement of the isotopic composition of U in solids and solutions, few offer both sensitivity and precision. In recent years, the use of ICPMS technology for this determination has become increasingly prevalent. Here we describe a method for the determination of the 235U/238U ratio in very small quantities (<=350 pg) with an accuracy of better than 3[per mille sign]. We measured several terrestrial standard materials and repeated analyses of the U960 isotopic composition standard. We used a 233U/236U double spike, with multiple ion counting on an unmodified Nu Instruments multicollector ICPMS and a non-standard detector configuration that allows an approximately 20-fold sensitivity gain over the best conventional techniques. This technique shows promise for the detection of isotopic tracers in the environment (for example anthropogenic 238U) at very extreme dilutions, or in cases where the total amount of analyte is necessarily limited.

  17. About possibility of isotope dating of native gold by the (U-Th)/He method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukolyukov, Yu. A.; Yakubovich, O. V.; Rytsk, Yu. A.

    2010-01-01

    1032, correspond to such values of activation energies. This is caused probably by helium migration in the form of gas bubbles. The received data indicate the very high stability of the (U-Th)/He isotope system in native gold. Using the (U-Th)/He method of isotope geochronology seems to be very promising for isotope dating of these strategic raw materials.

  18. Evaluation of a Stable Isotope Method to Mark Naturally-Breeding Larval Mosquitoes for Adult Dispersal Studies

    PubMed Central

    HAMER, GABRIEL L.; DONOVAN, DANIELLE J.; HOOD-NOWOTNY, REBECCA; KAUFMAN, MICHAEL G.; GOLDBERG, TONY L.; WALKER, EDWARD D.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mosquito dispersal is critically important for vector-borne disease control and prevention. Mark–release–recapture methods using various marking techniques have made substantial contributions to the study of mosquito biology. However, the ability to mark naturally breeding mosquitoes noninvasively and with life-long retention has remained problematic. Here, we describe a method to mark naturally breeding mosquitoes with stable isotopes. Culexpipiens f. molestus mosquitoes were provisioned as larvae in laboratory experiments with 15N-labeled potassium nitrate and 13C-labeled glucose. Larval enrichment was sufficient to differentiate marked adult mosquitoes from unmarked control mosquitoes and the natural source population from Chicago Illinois, using either δ15N or δ13C. Isotopic retention lasted for at least 55 d for adult male and females mosquitoes. There were no consistent effects of isotopic enrichment on immature mosquito survival or adult mosquito body size. We then applied this marking technique to naturally breeding Culex pipiens mosquitoes in suburban Chicago, IL, and for the first time, report successful isotopic enrichment of mosquitoes in the field. This stable isotope marking technique will facilitate studies of mosquito dispersal. PMID:22308772

  19. Forebody and base region real gas flow in severe planetary entry by a factored implicit numerical method. II - Equilibrium reactive gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davy, W. C.; Green, M. J.; Lombard, C. K.

    1981-01-01

    The factored-implicit, gas-dynamic algorithm has been adapted to the numerical simulation of equilibrium reactive flows. Changes required in the perfect gas version of the algorithm are developed, and the method of coupling gas-dynamic and chemistry variables is discussed. A flow-field solution that approximates a Jovian entry case was obtained by this method and compared with the same solution obtained by HYVIS, a computer program much used for the study of planetary entry. Comparison of surface pressure distribution and stagnation line shock-layer profiles indicates that the two solutions agree well.

  20. Partitioning net ecosystem exchange of CO2: A comparison of a Bayesian/isotope approach to environmental regression methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobitz, J. M.; Burns, S. P.; OgéE, J.; Reichstein, M.; Bowling, D. R.

    2007-09-01

    Separation of the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (F) into its component fluxes of net photosynthesis (FA) and nonfoliar respiration (FR) is important in understanding the physical and environmental controls on these fluxes, and how these fluxes may respond to environmental change. In this paper, we evaluate a partitioning method based on a combination of stable isotopes of CO2 and Bayesian optimization in the context of partitioning methods based on regressions with environmental variables. We combined high-resolution measurements of stable carbon isotopes of CO2, ecosystem fluxes, and meteorological variables with a Bayesian parameter optimization approach to estimate FA and FR in a subalpine forest in Colorado, United States, over the course of 104 days during summer 2003. Results were generally in agreement with the independent environmental regression methods of Reichstein et al. (2005a) and Yi et al. (2004). Half-hourly posterior parameter estimates of FA and FR derived from the Bayesian/isotopic method showed a strong diurnal pattern in both, consistent with established gross photosynthesis (GEE) and total ecosystem respiration (TER) relationships. Isotope-derived FA was functionally dependent on light, but FR exhibited the expected temperature dependence only when the prior estimates for FR were temperature-based. Examination of the posterior correlation matrix revealed that the available data were insufficient to independently resolve all the Bayesian-estimated parameters in our model. This could be due to a small isotopic disequilibrium (?) between FA and FR, poor characterization of whole-canopy photosynthetic discrimination or the isotopic flux (isoflux, analogous to net ecosystem exchange of 13CO2). The positive sign of ? indicates that FA was more enriched in 13C than FR. Possible reasons for this are discussed in the context of recent literature.

  1. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    PubMed

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies. PMID:18186546

  2. [Research on the experiment of hydrogen isotope fractionation using diamond anvil cell and Raman spectra].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-xia; Zheng, Hai-fei

    2011-03-01

    Hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell and Raman spectroscopy were used to measure the hydrogen isotope fractionation factor between gypsum and liquid water. Hydrogen isotopes of deuterium (D) and hydrogen (H) show the largest relative mass difference in all stable isotope systems. The exchange reaction between D and H would easily take place and the extent of exchange would be larger than others under same condition. So we selected the hydrogen isotopes for the investigation. The concept of fractionation factor is the quotient of ratios of heavy and light isotopes in different minerals, and can be expressed as alpha(A-B) = R(A)/R(B). There is a linear relationship between ratio of Raman peak intensities and ratio of corresponding amount of substances. So the fractionation factor between gypsum and heavy water can be expressed as [formula: see text] The experimental study for the isotope fractionation is based on the dissolution and recrystallization of minerals in aqueous solutions. The process can reach the total isotope fractionation equilibrium and get isotope fractionation factors with different temperatures. Compared with other methods, chemical synthesis one has following advantages: (1) short time for the experiment; (2) no problem about the equilibrium for isotope exchanges. It was proved that the new method would be more convenient and reliable for obtaining the isotopic fractionation factor compared with previous ways. PMID:21595220

  3. Stable isotope dilution method for the determination of guanidinoacetic acid by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    For more than 30 years, guanidinoacetic acid (GAA), together with other guanidino compounds, has been proposed as an important marker for renal failure, in kidney transplantation, and for renal metabolism, especially for the metabolic activity of the renal proximal tubules. Since the discovery of the first patient with guanidinoacetic acid methyltransferase deficiency in 1994 by Stöckler et al. (Pediatr. Res. 1994; 36: 409), GAA has become of great interest for all laboratories involved in the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. In the literature there are several methods described for the determination of GAA, ranging from ion-exchange chromatography with post-column derivatisation, enzymatic methods, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS). Here a stable isotope dilution method for quantitative and accurate determination of GAA in urine, plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid is described. GAA is converted to the bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidine di(tert-butyldimethylsilyl) derivative by stepwise derivatisation with hexafluoroacetylacetone and N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Analysis can be performed using a standard benchtop GC/MS system. For quantitative GAA determination with 1,2-(13)C-GAA as internal standard, selected ion monitoring is performed using m/z 460/462, with m/z 432/433 and 375/376 as qualifiers. PMID:12661026

  4. Novel non-isotopic method for the localization of receptors in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Desnoyers, L; Simonette, R A; Vandlen, R L; Fendly, B M

    2001-12-01

    We describe a novel fluorescent method for the detection of receptors for chimeric proteins in tissue sections. The technique was developed using a recombinant human insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) chimera, bearing six additional histidine residues at the carboxy-terminal end (IGF-1-His). We demonstrated that dehydration of the tissue sections was detrimental for binding and that its prevention dramatically increased sensitivity. The specificity of IGF-1-His interaction was shown by gradual abolition of the fluorescent signal in the presence of increasing concentrations of IGF-1. Combining immunofluorescence with in situ ligand binding, we showed that IGF-1-His binding corresponded to the IGF-1 receptor (IGFR-1) distribution in human fetal kidney. Moreover, incubation of the tissue sections with an anti-IGFR-1 blocking antibody abolished IGF-1-His binding, demonstrating that the interaction was mediated by the IGFR-1. The method was also used to localize the IGFR-1 in E18 rat embryo sagittal sections. The IGF-1-His binding pattern was observed in brain, cartilage, lung, skin, heart, diaphragm, and tongue, and paralleled the previously reported IGFR-1 distribution. We believe that this new non-isotopic in situ ligand binding method will facilitate rapid and accurate localization of receptors in tissue sections. PMID:11724898

  5. LC/MS Method for the Determination of Stable Isotope Labeled Promethazine in Human Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuwei, Wang; Boyd, Jason; Berens, Kurt L.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    Promethazine (PMZ) is taken by astronauts orally (PO), intramuscularly (IM) or rectally (PR) for space motion sickness. LC/MS method was developed with off-line solid phase extraction to measure plasma concentrations of PMZ given as stable isotope-labeled (SIL) formulations by the three different routes of administration simultaneously. Samples (0.5ml) were loaded on to Waters Oasis HLB co-polymer cartridges and eluted with 1.0 mL methanol. HPLC separation of the eluted sample was performed using an Agilent Zorbax SB-CN column (50 x 2.1 mm) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min for 6 min. Acetonitrile/ ammonium acetate (30 mM) in water (3:2, v/v), pH 5.6 plus or minus 0.1, was used as the mobile phase for separation. Concentrations of PMZ, PMZ-d4 and PMZ-d7 and chlorpromazine (internal standard) were determined using a Micromass ZMD single quadrupole mass spectrometer with Electrospray Ionization (ESI). ESI mass spectra were acquired in positive ion mode with selected ion monitoring of [M+ H]dot plus. The method is rapid, reproducible and the assay specific parameters are listed in a table. A novel, sensitive and specific method for the measurement of PMZ and SIL PMZ in human plasma is reported.

  6. A novel method for the quantification of quinic acid in food using stable isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Erk, Thomas; Bergmann, Hannah; Richling, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Organic acids play an important role in the flavor and taste of plant-derived foods. Quinic acid (QA) is one of the major acids. In the past, several methods like HPLC/UV, GC, and capillary electrophoresis were used for identification and quantification of QA. For the first time, a novel, sensitive, and selective method for the quantification of QA in food using stable isotope dilution analysis with HPLC/MS/MS has been established. Uniformly labeled 13C-QA was used as a standard to reduce sample preparations and to overcome matrix and ionization effects. The method was used to determine the QA content of red wines, instant coffees, and cloudy apple juices. QA contents of instant coffees were 64.4 and 63.6 g/kg powder. The concentrations in red wines were 24.0 and 25.1 mg/L, and 1493.3 and 1705.2 mg/L in cloudy apple juices. PMID:19610361

  7. Molecular electronic states near metal surfaces at equilibrium using potential of mean force and numerical renormalization group methods: Hysteresis revisited.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-02-21

    We investigate equilibrium observables for molecules near metals by employing a potential of mean force (PMF) that takes level broadening into account. Through comparison with exact data, we demonstrate that this PMF approach performs quite well, even for cases where molecule-electrode couplings depend on nuclear position. As an application, we reexamine the possibility of hysteresis effects within the Anderson-Holstein model (i.e., an impurity coupled both to a metal surface and a nuclear oscillator). As compared against the standard mean field approach by Galperin et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 125 (2005)], our PMF approach agrees much better with exact results for average electronic populations both at zero and finite temperature; we find, however, that mean field theory can be very useful for predicting the onset of dynamical instabilities, metastable states, and hysteresis. PMID:26896978

  8. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    1977-01-01

    An isotope separation method which comprises physically adsorbing an isotopically mixed molecular species on an adsorptive surface and irradiating the adsorbed molecules with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite a desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thereby separate them from the unexcited undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  9. Isotope separation by photochromatography

    DOEpatents

    Suslick, K.S.

    1975-10-03

    A photochromatographic method for isotope separation is described. An isotopically mixed molecular species is adsorbed on an adsorptive surface, and the adsorbed molecules are irradiated with radiation of a predetermined wavelength which will selectively excite desired isotopic species. Sufficient energy is transferred to the excited molecules to desorb them from the surface and thus separate them from the undesired isotopic species. The method is particularly applicable to the separation of hydrogen isotopes. (BLM)

  10. Fe, Zn, and Cd stable isotopes from the eastern tropical South Pacific from GEOTRACES cruise GP16 - Methods and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgoe, J. M.; Townsend, E.; John, S.

    2014-12-01

    A new method has been developed for the rapid analysis of metal concentrations and stable isotope ratios using a prepFAST automated sample processing robot. Although concentrations and isotopes are processed separately, similar methods are used for both. Initially all seawater is acidified to pH 2. Then Nobias resin with EDTA/IDA functional groups is added to either 10mL of sample for concentrations or ~1L samples for isotopes. Fe binds to the resin at low pH, and the pH is subsequently raised to allow Zn and Cd to bind. For concentration analyses, all subsequent chemistry is automated on the prepFAST including removal of seawater, rinsing of resin, and elution of resin into acid. For isotope samples these extraction techniques are performed manually, but the subsequent purification of Fe, Zn, and Cd by anion exchange chromatography is automated using the prepFAST. With these new methods, samples from the US GEOTRACES cruise GP16, in the eastern tropical South Pacific, are being analyzed. High concentrations of dissolved Fe are observed near the continental shelf and near submarine hydrothermal vents. Interestingly, isotope data show that dissolved Fe near the continental shelf generally has a δ56Fe close to 0 ‰. This δ56 Fe signature is suggestive of a non-reductive dissolution source for Fe, as Fe(II) released by reductive dissolution is typically closer to -2 ‰. Preliminary data show nutrient-type profiles for Zn and Cd, with Zn matching Si and Cd having a similar distribution to P. An increase in dissolved Zn near hydrothermal vents suggests a possible hydrothermal zinc source to the deep ocean. Continuing analysis of isotope data will reveal more about the source and biogeochemical cycling of these three chemically and biologically important trace metals throughout the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean.

  11. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  12. The equilibrium dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavriyev, Anton; Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented of computing the dayside global earth magnetic field which is in equilibrium with the plasma pressure, based on satellite observations at a local region of the magnetosphere. The method, which utilizes a perturbation around a dipole magnetic field, involves computation of the global plasma pressure profile based on the equatorial (anisotropic) pressure data, derivation of the current profile which satisfies the equilibrium condition, and computation of the magnetic field using the current profile and the boundary current produced by the solar wind. The method is applied for the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers data, and the result of the computation is found to compare reasonably well with the observed magnetic field profile near the geomagnetic equator.

  13. Comparing three methods of NEE-flux partitioning from the same grassland ecosystem: the 13C, 18O isotope approach and using simulated Ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, R.; Bantelmann, E.; Saurer, M.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N.

    2007-12-01

    As a change in the global climate occurs with increasing temperatures, the Carbon exchange processes of terrestrial ecosystems will change as well. However, it is difficult to quantify the degree to what ecosystem respiration will change relative to the CO2 uptake by photosynthesis. To estimate the carbon sequestration potential of terrestrial vegetation cover it is essential to know both fluxes: ecosystem respiration and the carbon uptake by the vegetation cover. Therefore the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured with the eddy covariance method and separated into assimilation and respiration flux. We applied three different approaches, 1) the conventional method, applying the nighttime relationship between soil temperature and NEE for calculating the respiration flux during the day, 2) the use of stable carbon and 3) oxygen isotopes. We compared the results of the three partitioning exercises for a temperate grassland ecosystem in the pre-Alps of Switzerland for four days in June 2004. The assimilation flux derived with the conventional NEE partitioning approach, was best represented at low PAR and low temperatures, in the morning between 5 and 9 am. With increasing temperature and PAR the assimilation for the whole canopy was underestimated. For partitioning NEE via 18O approach, correlations of temperature and radiation with assimilation and respiration flux were significantly higher for the partitioning approach with 18O than for the 13C NEE partitioning. A sensitivity analysis showed the importance of an accurate determination of the equilibrium term θ between CO2 and leaf water δ18O for the NEE partitioning with 18O. For using 13C to partition NEE, the correct magnitude of the 13C fractionation and for the respiration term is essential. The analysis of the data showed that for low light and low morning temperatures the conventional method delivers reasonably good results. When the temperatures exceeded 21°C the isotope approach provided the

  14. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: A methods assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lazarus, Brynne E.; Germino, Matthew; Vander Veen, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant–soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics.

  15. Online induction heating for determination of isotope composition of woody stem water with laser spectrometry: a methods assessment.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Brynne E; Germino, Matthew J; Vander Veen, Jessica L

    2016-06-01

    Application of stable isotopes of water to studies of plant-soil interactions often requires a substantial preparatory step of extracting water from samples without fractionating isotopes. Online heating is an emerging approach for this need, but is relatively untested and major questions of how to best deliver standards and assess interference by organics have not been evaluated. We examined these issues in our application of measuring woody stem xylem of sagebrush using a Picarro laser spectrometer with online induction heating. We determined (1) effects of cryogenic compared to induction-heating extraction, (2) effects of delivery of standards on filter media compared to on woody stem sections, and (3) spectral interference from organic compounds for these approaches (and developed a technique to do so). Our results suggest that matching sample and standard media improves accuracy, but that isotopic values differ with the extraction method in ways that are not due to spectral interference from organics. PMID:26963293

  16. A routine high-precision method for Lu-Hf isotope geochemistry and chronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patchett, P.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1981-01-01

    A method for chemical separation of Lu and Hf from rock, meteorite and mineral samples is described, together with a much improved mass spectrometric running technique for Hf. This allows (i) geo- and cosmochronology using the176Lu???176Hf+??- decay scheme, and (ii) geochemical studies of planetary processes in the earth and moon. Chemical yields for the three-stage ion-exchange column procedure average 90% for Hf. Chemical blanks are <0.2 ng for Lu and Hf. From 1 ??g of Hf, a total ion current of 0.5??10-11 Ampere can be maintained for 3-5 h, yielding 0.01-0.03% precision on the ratio176Hf/177Hf. Normalisation to179Hf/177Hf=0.7325 is used. Extensive results for the Johnson Matthey Hf standard JMC 475 are presented, and this sample is urged as an international mass spectrometric standard; suitable aliquots, prepared from a single batch of JMC 475, are available from Denver. Lu-Hf analyses of the standard rocks BCR-1 and JB-1 are given. The potential of the Lu-Hf method in isotope geochemistry is assessed. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Source apportionment of methane using a triple isotope approach - Method development and application in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Julia; Holmstrand, Henry; Semiletov, Igor; Shakhova, Natalia; Shcherbakova, Kseniia; Kosmach, Denis; Sapart, Célia J.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2015-04-01

    We present a method for measurements of the stable and radiocarbon isotope systems of methane in seawater and sediments. The triple isotope characterization of methane is useful in distinguishing different sources and for improving our understanding of biogeochemical processes affecting methane in the water column. D14C-CH4 is an especially powerful addition to stable isotope analyses in distinguishing between thermogenic and biogenic origins of the methane. Such measurements require large sample sizes, due to low natural abundance of the radiocarbon in CH4. Our system for sample collection, methane extraction and purification builds on the approach by Kessler and Reeburgh (Limn. & Ocean. Meth., 2005). An in-field system extracts methane from 30 -120 l water or 1-2 l sediment (depending on the in-situ methane concentration) by purging the samples with Helium to transfer the dissolved methane to the headspace and circulating it through cryogenically cooled absorbent traps where methane is collected. The in-field preparation eliminates the risks of storage and transport of large seawater quantities and subsequent leakage of sample gas as well as ongoing microbial processes and chemical reactions that may alter the sample composition. In the subsequent shore-based treatment, a laboratory system is used to purify and combust the collected CH4 to AMS-amenable CO2. Subsamples from the methane traps are analyzed for stable isotopes and compared to stable isotope measurements directly measured from small water samples taken in parallel, to correct for any potential fractionation occurring during this process. The system has been successfully tested and used on several shorter shipboard expeditions in the Baltic Sea and on a long summer expedition across the Arctic Ocean. Here we present the details of the method and testing, as well as first triple isotope field data from two cruises to the Landsort Deep area in the Central Baltic Sea.

  18. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography isotope dilution mass spectrometry method for the reliable quantification of alkylphenols in environmental water samples by isotope pattern deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Fabregat-Cabello, Neus; Sancho, Juan V; Vidal, Andreu; González, Florenci V; Roig-Navarro, Antoni Francesc

    2014-02-01

    We present here a new measurement method for the rapid extraction and accurate quantification of technical nonylphenol (NP) and 4-t-octylphenol (OP) in complex matrix water samples by UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The extraction of both compounds is achieved in 30min by means of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) using 1-octanol as acceptor phase, which provides an enrichment (preconcentration) factor of 800. On the other hand we have developed a quantification method based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) and singly (13)C1-labeled compounds. To this end the minimal labeled (13)C1-4-(3,6-dimethyl-3-heptyl)-phenol and (13)C1-t-octylphenol isomers were synthesized, which coelute with the natural compounds and allows the compensation of the matrix effect. The quantification was carried out by using isotope pattern deconvolution (IPD), which permits to obtain the concentration of both compounds without the need to build any calibration graph, reducing the total analysis time. The combination of both extraction and determination techniques have allowed to validate for the first time a HF-LPME methodology at the required levels by legislation achieving limits of quantification of 0.1ngmL(-1) and recoveries within 97-109%. Due to the low cost of HF-LPME and total time consumption, this methodology is ready for implementation in routine analytical laboratories. PMID:24423386

  19. Use of Isotope Ratio Determination (13C/12C) to Assess the Production Method of Sparkling Wine.

    PubMed

    Rossier, Joël S; Maury, Valérie; Gaillard, Laetitia; Pfammatter, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    The production of a sparkling wine can be performed with different methods taking from a few weeks to several years, which often justifies a difference in added value for the consumer. This paper presents the use of isotope ratio δ(13)C measurements combined with physico-chemical analyses for the determination of mislabelling of sparkling wines produced by 'ancestral', 'traditional', 'closed tank' or 'gasification' methods. This work shows that the isotope composition of CO(2) compared with that of the corresponding dried residue of wine (DRW) can assess whether carbonate CO(2) in a sparkling wine originates from alcohol fermentation or from artificial gas addition. Isotopic ratios expressed as δ(13)C(CO2) and δ(13)C(DRW) measurements have been obtained for each wine by gasbench isotopic ratio mass spectroscopy and cavity ring down infrared spectroscopy, respectively. When the difference between δ(13)C(CO2) and δ(13)C(DRW) is negative, the presence of artificial CO(2) can be undoubtedly inferred, which would exclude the production methods 'ancestral' or 'traditional' for instance. Other parameters such as alcohol content, sugar and acid distributions are also important to complete the analytical panel to aid fraud tracking. PMID:27198811

  20. Present limitations and future prospects of stable isotope methods for nitrate source identification in surface- and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dongmei; Botte, Jorin; De Baets, Bernard; Accoe, Frederik; Nestler, Angelika; Taylor, Philip; Van Cleemput, Oswald; Berglund, Michael; Boeckx, Pascal

    2009-03-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) contamination of surface- and groundwater is an environmental problem in many regions of the world with intensive agriculture and high population densities. Knowledge of the sources of NO3(-) contamination in water is important for better management of water quality. Stable nitrogen (delta15N) and oxygen (delta18O) isotope data of NO3(-) have been frequently used to identify NO3(-) sources in water. This review summarizes typical delta15N- and delta18O-NO3(-) ranges of known NO3(-) sources, interprets constraints and future outlooks to quantify NO3(-) sources, and describes three analytical techniques ("ion-exchange method", "bacterial denitrification method", and "cadmium reduction method") for delta15N- and delta18)O-NO3(-) determination. Isotopic data can provide evidence for the presence of dominant NO3(-) sources. However, quantification, including uncertainty assessment, is lacking when multiple NO3(-) sources are present. Moreover, fractionation processes are often ignored, but may largely constrain the accuracy of NO3(-) source identification. These problems can be overcome if (1) NO3(-) isotopic data are combined with co-migrating discriminators of NO3(-) sources (e.g. (11)B), which are not affected by transformation processes, (2) contributions of different NO3(-) sources can be quantified via linear mixing models (e.g. SIAR), and (3) precise, accurate and high throughput isotope analytical techniques become available. PMID:19157489

  1. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  2. An upwind, kinetic flux-vector splitting method for flows in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppard, W. M.; Grossman, B.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed new upwind kinetic difference schemes for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry. These schemes are derived from the Boltzmann equation with the resulting Euler schemes developed as moments of the discretized Boltzmann scheme with a locally Maxwellian velocity distribution. Splitting the velocity distribution at the Boltzmann level is seen to result in a flux-split Euler scheme and is called Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS). Extensions to flows with finite-rate chemistry and vibrational relaxation is accomplished utilizing nonequilibrium kinetic theory. Computational examples are presented comparing KFVS with the schemes of Van Leer and Roe for a quasi-one-dimensional flow through a supersonic diffuser, inviscid flow through two-dimensional inlet, and viscous flow over a cone at zero angle-of-attack. Calculations are also shown for the transonic flow over a bump in a channel and the transonic flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. The results show that even though the KFVS scheme is a Riemann solver at the kinetic level, its behavior at the Euler level is more similar to the existing flux-vector splitting algorithms than to the flux-difference splitting scheme of Roe.

  3. Vapour liquid equilibrium of a pure fluid from test particle method in combination with NpT molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Dietmar; Fischer, Johann

    In order to determine the vapour liquid equilibrium of a pure fluid, the liquid and the vapour branch of the isotherms in the chemical potential μ vs pressure p-diagram, are constructed explicitly. The liquid branch is obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in an NpT-ensemble into which test particles are inserted to calculate the chemical potential. The vapour branch is obtained at lower temperatures by using the second virial coefficient, at higher temperatures it is determined again by simulations. As an example the two-centre Lennard-Jones fluid with elongation L = 0·505 is considered at temperatures ranging from 0·69 to 0·92 of the estimated critical temperature. As expected, the inaccuracies of the liquid chemical potential increase with decreasing temperature as a consequence of the increasing saturated density. The uncertainties in μ/RT range from 0·02 at the highest to 0·10 at the lowest temperature which creates an uncertainty in the reduced vapour pressure Pσ3/ɛ of the order of 0·002. Within that uncertainty, the vapour pressures agree with those obtained previously from perturbation theory. The saturated liquid densities agree within 2 per cent which is consistent with a previous comparison between perturbation theory and experimental results for fluorine. Finally, we note that all simulations were performed with vectorized codes on a CYBER 205.

  4. Quantifying the ion atmosphere of unfolded, single-stranded nucleic acids using equilibrium dialysis and single-molecule methods

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, David R.; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    To form secondary structure, nucleic acids (NAs) must overcome electrostatic strand–strand repulsion, which is moderated by the surrounding atmosphere of screening ions. The free energy of NA folding therefore depends on the interactions of this ion atmosphere with both the folded and unfolded states. We quantify such interactions using the preferential ion interaction coefficient or ion excess: the number of ions present near the NA in excess of the bulk concentration. The ion excess of the folded, double-helical state has been extensively studied; however, much less is known about the salt-dependent ion excess of the unfolded, single-stranded state. We measure this quantity using three complementary approaches: a direct approach of Donnan equilibrium dialysis read out by atomic emission spectroscopy and two indirect approaches involving either single-molecule force spectroscopy or existing thermal denaturation data. The results of these three approaches, each involving an independent experimental technique, are in good agreement. Even though the single-stranded NAs are flexible polymers that are expected to adopt random-coil configurations, we find that their ion atmosphere is quantitatively described by rod-like models that neglect large-scale conformational freedom, an effect that we explain in terms of the competition between the relevant structural and electrostatic length scales. PMID:27036864

  5. The equilibrium shape of fluid-fluid interfaces: derivation and a new numerical method for Young's and Young-Laplace equations.

    PubMed

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2014-12-28

    Many physical problems require explicit knowledge of the equilibrium shape of the interface between two fluid phases. Here, we present a new numerical method which is simply implementable and easily adaptable for a wide range of problems involving capillary deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces. We apply a simulated annealing algorithm to find the interface shape that minimizes the thermodynamic potential of the system. First, for completeness, we provide an analytical proof that minimizing this potential is equivalent to solving the Young-Laplace equation and the Young law. Then, we illustrate our numerical method showing two-dimensional results for fluid-fluid menisci between vertical or inclined walls and curved surfaces, capillary interactions between vertical walls, equilibrium shapes of sessile heavy droplets on a flat horizontal solid surface, and of droplets pending from flat or curved solid surfaces. Finally, we show illustrative three-dimensional results to point out the applicability of the method to micro- or nano-particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface. PMID:25554170

  6. The equilibrium shape of fluid-fluid interfaces: Derivation and a new numerical method for Young’s and Young-Laplace equations

    SciTech Connect

    Soligno, Giuseppe; Roij, René van; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2014-12-28

    Many physical problems require explicit knowledge of the equilibrium shape of the interface between two fluid phases. Here, we present a new numerical method which is simply implementable and easily adaptable for a wide range of problems involving capillary deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces. We apply a simulated annealing algorithm to find the interface shape that minimizes the thermodynamic potential of the system. First, for completeness, we provide an analytical proof that minimizing this potential is equivalent to solving the Young-Laplace equation and the Young law. Then, we illustrate our numerical method showing two-dimensional results for fluid-fluid menisci between vertical or inclined walls and curved surfaces, capillary interactions between vertical walls, equilibrium shapes of sessile heavy droplets on a flat horizontal solid surface, and of droplets pending from flat or curved solid surfaces. Finally, we show illustrative three-dimensional results to point out the applicability of the method to micro- or nano-particles adsorbed at a fluid-fluid interface.

  7. A Novel Method for Relative Quantitation of N-Glycans by Isotopic Labeling Using 18O-Water

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shujuan; Orlando, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Quantitation is an essential aspect of comprehensive glycomics study. Here, a novel isotopic-labeling method is described for N-glycan quantitation using 18O-water. The incorporation of the 18O-labeling into the reducing end of N-glycans is simply and efficiently achieved during peptide-N4-(N-acetyl-β-glucosaminyl) asparagine amidase F release. This process provides a 2-Da mass difference compared with the N-glycans released in 16O-water. A mathematical calculation method was also developed to determine the 18O/16O ratios from isotopic peaks. Application of this method to several standard glycoprotein mixtures and human serum demonstrated that this method can facilitate the relative quantitation of N-glycans over a linear dynamic range of two orders, with high accuracy and reproducibility. PMID:25365792

  8. A New Method for Evaluating the Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Carbonate Formed Under Cryogenic Conditions Analogous to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Socki, R. A.; Hredzak, P. L.

    2007-01-01

    soil or dust. This study demonstrates an innovative new method for measuring the isotopic composition of gas evolved from the freezing of carbonate solutions in real time, which allows for a much clearer view of the chemical processes involved. This method now sets the stage for detailed analysis of the chemical and isotopic mechanisms that produce cryogenic carbonates.

  9. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

  10. Improved field methods to quantify methane oxidation in landfill cover materials using stable carbon isotopes.

    PubMed

    Chanton, J P; Powelson, D K; Abichou, T; Hater, G

    2008-02-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a robust approach toward quantification of methanotrophic activity in landfill covers. The field method often applied to date has compared the delta13C of emitted to anaerobic zone CH4. Recent laboratory mass balance studies have indicated thatthis approach tends to underestimate CH4 oxidation. Therefore, we examined the CH4-delta13C at various soil depths in field settings and compared these values to emitted CH4. At 5-10 cm depth, we observed the most enrichment in CH4-delta13C (-46.0 to -32.1 per thousand). Emitted CH4-delta13C was more negative, ranging from -56.5 to -43.0 per thousand. The decrease in CH4-delta13C values from the shallow subsurface to the surface is the result of processes that result in selective emission of 12CH4 and selective retention of 13CH4 within the soil. Seasonal percent oxidation was calculated at seven sites representing four cover materials. Probe samples averaged greater (21 +/- 2%, p < 0.001, n = 7) oxidation than emitted CH4 data. We argue that calculations of fraction oxidized based on soil derived CH4 should yield upper limit values. When considered with emitted CH4 values, this combined approach will more realistically bracket the actual oxidation value. Following this guideline, we found the percent oxidation to be 23 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 16% for four soil and three compost covers, respectively. PMID:18323085

  11. A comparison of force fields and calculation methods for vibration intervals of isotopic H3(+) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, G. D.; Adler-Golden, S. M.; Lesseski, D. C.

    1986-04-01

    This paper reports (1) improved values for low-lying vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) calculated using the variational method and Simons-Parr-Finlan (1973) representations of the Carney-Porter (1976) and Dykstra-Swope (1979) ab initio H3(+) potential energy surfaces, (2) quartic normal coordinate force fields for isotopic H3(+) molecules, (3) comparisons of variational and second-order perturbation theory, and (4) convergence properties of the Lai-Hagstrom internal coordinate vibrational Hamiltonian. Standard deviations between experimental and ab initio fundamental vibration intervals of H3(+), H2D(+), D2H(+), and D3(+) for these potential surfaces are 6.9 (Carney-Porter) and 1.2/cm (Dykstra-Swope). The standard deviations between perturbation theory and exact variational fundamentals are 5 and 10/cm for the respective surfaces. The internal coordinate Hamiltonian is found to be less efficient than the previously employed 't' coordinate Hamiltonian for these molecules, except in the case of H2D(+).

  12. Artifactual responses of mesophyll conductance to CO2 and irradiance estimated with the variable J and online isotope discrimination methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lianhong; Sun, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Studies with the variable J method have reported that mesophyll conductance (gm) rapidly decreases with increasing intercellular CO2 partial pressures (Ci) or decreasing irradiance. Similar responses have been suggested with the online isotope discrimination method, although with less consistency. Here we show that even when the true gm is constant, the variable J method can produce an artifactual dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance similar to those reported in previous studies for any of the following factors: day respiration and chloroplastic CO2 photocompensation point are estimated with Laisk method; Ci or electron transport rate is positively biased; net photosynthetic rate is negatively biased; insufficient NADPH is assumed while insufficient ATP limits RuBP regeneration. The isotopic method produces similar artifacts if fractionation of carboxylation or Ci are positively biased or 13 negatively biased. A nonzero chloroplastic resistance to CO2 movement results in a qualitatively different dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance and this dependence is only sensitive at low Ci. We thus cannot rule out the possibility that previously reported dependence of gm on Ci or irradiance is a methodological artifact. Recommendations are made to take advantage of sensitivities of the variable J and isotopic methods for estimating gm.

  13. Determination of residual vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride, vinyl chloride copolymers, and articles from polyvinyl chloride by the method of equilibrium vapor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykova, T.A.; Konstantinova, E.I.; Lazaris, A. Ya.

    1985-11-01

    In connection with the fact that vinyl chloride (VC) has carcinogenic properties, norms for its content both in the work place and also in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and articles made from it have been sharply reduced. The method of equilibrium vapor analysis (EVA) has been used to determine vinyl chloride; this is carried out with the aid of devices for automatic metering. In the present work, the authors have investigated the possibility of applying the EVA method to PVC resins, VC copolymers, and articles made of PVC with the objective of developing universal methods of analyzing such objects. A two-stage separation is used in which the sample is preliminarily separated in a fore-column. The separation was worked out on the model mixture of methyl chloride-VC-ethyl chloride. The limit of VC detection is shown to be 5 x 10/sup -6/ to 5 x 10/sup -7/% by wt.

  14. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  15. Determination of (241)Pu by the method of disturbed radioactive equilibrium using 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, I; Kuzmina, T

    2016-04-01

    A simple technique is proposed for the determination of the content of (241)Pu, which is based on disturbance of radioactive equilibrium in the genetically related (237)U←(241)Pu→(241)Am decay chain of radionuclides, with the subsequent use of 2πα-counting and precision gamma-spectroscopy for monitoring the process of restoration of that equilibrium. It has been shown that the data on dynamics of accumulation of the daughter (241)Am, which were obtained from the results of measurements of α- and γ-spectra of the samples, correspond to the estimates calculated for the chain of two genetically related radionuclides, the differences in the estimates of (241)Pu radioactivity not exceeding 2%. Combining the different methods of registration (2πα-counting, semiconductor alpha- and gamma-spectrometry) enables the proposed method to be efficiently applied both for calibration of (241)Pu-sources (from several hundreds of kBq and higher) and for radioisotopic analysis of plutonium mixtures. In doing so, there is a deep purification of (241)Pu from its daughter decay products required due to unavailability of commercial detectors that could make it possible, based only on analysis of alpha-spectra, to conduct quantitative analysis of the content of (238)Pu and (241)Am. PMID:26868275

  16. Modification of a method-of-characteristics solute-transport model to incorporate decay and equilibrium-controlled sorption or ion exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, D.J.; Konikow, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey computer model of two-dimensional solute transport and dispersion in ground water (Konikow and Bredehoeft, 1978) has been modified to incorporate the following types of chemical reactions: (1) first-order irreversible rate-reaction, such as radioactive decay; (2) reversible equilibrium-controlled sorption with linear, Freundlich, or Langmuir isotherms; and (3) reversible equilibrium-controlled ion exchange for monovalent or divalent ions. Numerical procedures are developed to incorporate these processes in the general solution scheme that uses method-of- characteristics with particle tracking for advection and finite-difference methods for dispersion. The first type of reaction is accounted for by an exponential decay term applied directly to the particle concentration. The second and third types of reactions are incorporated through a retardation factor, which is a function of concentration for nonlinear cases. The model is evaluated and verified by comparison with analytical solutions for linear sorption and decay, and by comparison with other numerical solutions for nonlinear sorption and ion exchange.

  17. The atomic coilgun and single-photon cooling. A method for trapping and cooling of hydrogen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libson, Adam; Bannerman, Stephen Travis; Clark, Robert J.; Mazur, Thomas R.; Raizen, Mark G.

    2012-12-01

    As the simplest atom, hydrogen has a unique role as a testing ground of fundamental physics. Precision measurements of the hydrogen atomic structure provide stringent tests of current theory, while tritium is an excellent candidate for studies of β-decay and possible measurement of the neutrino rest mass. Furthermore, precision measurement of antihydrogen would allow for tests of fundamental symmetries. Methods demonstrated in our lab provide an avenue by which hydrogen isotopes can be trapped and cooled to near the recoil limit. The atomic coilgun, which we have demonstrated with metastable neon and molecular oxygen, provides a general method of stopping a supersonic beam of any paramagnetic species. This tool provides a method by which hydrogen and its isotopes can be magnetically trapped at around 100 mK using a room temperature apparatus. Another tool developed in our laboratory, single-photon cooling, allows further cooling of a trapped sample to near the recoil limit. This cooling method has already been demonstrated on a trapped sample of rubidium. We report on the progress of implementing these methods to trap and cool hydrogen isotopes, and on the prospects for using cold trapped hydrogen for precision measurements.

  18. New treatment method for boron in aqueous solutions using Mg-Al layered double hydroxide: Kinetics and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohito; Oba, Jumpei; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2015-08-15

    Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated with NO3(-) (NO3 · Mg - Al LDHs) and with Cl(-) (Cl · Mg - Al LDHs) were found to take up boron from aqueous solutions. Boron was removed by anion exchange of B(OH)4(-) in solution with NO3(-) and Cl(-) intercalated in the interlayer of the LDH. Using three times the stoichiometric quantity of NO3 · Mg-Al LDH, the residual concentration of B decreased from 100 to 1.9 mg L(-1) in 120 min. Using five times the stoichiometric quantity of Cl · Mg - Al LDH, the residual concentration of B decreased from 100 to 5.6 mg L(-1) in 120 min. It must be emphasized that, in both cases, the residual concentration of B was less than the effluent standards in Japan (10 mg L(-1)). The rate-determining step of B removal by the NO3 · Mg - Al and Cl · Mg - Al LDHs was found to be chemical adsorption involving anion exchange of B(OH)4(-) with intercalated NO3(-) and Cl(-). The removal of B was well described by a pseudo second-order kinetic equation. The adsorption of B by NO3 · Mg - Al LDH and Cl · Mg - Al LDH followed a Langmuir-type adsorption. The values of the maximum adsorption and the equilibrium adsorption constant were 3.6 mmol g(-1) and 1.7, respectively, for NO3 · Mg - Al LDH, and 3.8 mmol g(-1) and 0.7, respectively, for Cl · Mg-Al LDH. The B(OH)4(-) in B(OH)4 · Mg - Al LDH produced by removal of B was found to undergo anion exchange with NO3(-) and Cl(-) in solution. The NO3 · Mg - Al and Cl · Mg - Al LDHs obtained after this regeneration treatment were able to remove B from aqueous solutions, indicating the possibility of recycling NO3 · Mg - Al and Cl · Mg - Al LDHs for B removal. PMID:25827268

  19. Method for determining stable isotope ratios of dissolved organic carbon in interstitial and other natural marine waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. E.; Haddad, R. I.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure is described for the analysis of the stable carbon isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in natural waters from marine and higher-salinity environments. Rapid (less than 5 min) and complete oxidation of DOC is achieved using a modification of previous photochemical oxidation techniques. The CO2 evolved from DOC oxidation can be collected in less than 10 min for isotopic analysis. The procedure is at present suitable for oxidation and collection of 1-5 micromoles of carbon and has an associated blank of 0.1-0.2 micromole of carbon. Complete photochemical oxidation of DOC standards was demonstrated by quantitative recovery of CO2 as measured manometrically. Isotopic analyses of standards by photochemical and high-temperature sealed-tube combustion methods agreed to within 0.3%. Photochemical oxidation of DOC in a representative sediment pore-water sample was also quantitative, as shown by the excellent agreement between the photochemical and sealed-tube methods. The delta 13C values obtained for pore-water DOC using the two methods of oxidation were identical, suggesting that the modified photochemical method is adequate for the isotopically non-fractionated oxidation of pore-water DOC. The procedure was evaluated through an analysis of DOC in pond and pore waters from a hypersaline microbial mat environment. Concentrations of DOC in the water column over the mat displayed a diel pattern, but the isotopic composition of this DOC remained relatively constant (average delta 13C = -12.4%). Pore-water DOC exhibited a distinct concentration maximum in the mat surface layer, and delta 13C of pore-water DOC was nearly 8% lighter at 1.5-2.0-cm depth than in the mat surface layer (0-0.5-cm depth). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in elucidating differences in DOC concentration and delta 13C over biogeochemically relevant spatial and temporal scales. Carbon isotopic analysis of DOC in natural waters, especially pore waters

  20. Determining origin in a migratory marine vertebrate: a novel method to integrate stable isotopes and satellite tracking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vander Zanden, Hannah B.; Tucker, Anton D.; Hart, Kristen M.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Addison, David S.; Mansfield, Katherine L.; Phillips, Katrina F.; Wunder, Michael B.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Pajuelo, Mariela; Bolten, Alan B.; Bjorndal, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool to track animal movements in both terrestrial and marine environments. These intrinsic markers are assimilated through the diet and may exhibit spatial gradients as a result of biogeochemical processes at the base of the food web. In the marine environment, maps to predict the spatial distribution of stable isotopes are limited, and thus determining geographic origin has been reliant upon integrating satellite telemetry and stable isotope data. Migratory sea turtles regularly move between foraging and reproductive areas. Whereas most nesting populations can be easily accessed and regularly monitored, little is known about the demographic trends in foraging populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine migration patterns of loggerhead nesting aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), where sea turtles have been historically understudied. Two methods of geographic assignment using stable isotope values in known-origin samples from satellite telemetry were compared: 1) a nominal approach through discriminant analysis and 2) a novel continuous-surface approach using bivariate carbon and nitrogen isoscapes (isotopic landscapes) developed for this study. Tissue samples for stable isotope analysis were obtained from 60 satellite-tracked individuals at five nesting beaches within the GoM. Both methodological approaches for assignment resulted in high accuracy of foraging area determination, though each has advantages and disadvantages. The nominal approach is more appropriate when defined boundaries are necessary, but up to 42% of the individuals could not be considered in this approach. All individuals can be included in the continuous-surface approach, and individual results can be aggregated to identify geographic hotspots of foraging area use, though the accuracy rate was lower than nominal assignment. The methodological validation provides a foundation for future sea turtle studies in the region to inexpensively

  1. Determining origin in a migratory marine vertebrate: a novel method to integrate stable isotopes and satellite tracking.

    PubMed

    Zanden, Hannah B Vander; Tucker, Anton D; Hart, Kristen M; Lamont, Margaret M; Fuisaki, Ikuko; Addison, David; Mansfield, Katherine L; Phillips, Katrina F; Wunder, Michael B; Bowen, Gabriel J; Pajuelo, Mariela; Bolten, Alan B; Bjorndal, Karen A

    2015-03-01

    Stable isotope analysis is a useful tool to track animal movements in both terrestrial and marine environments. These intrinsic markers are assimilated through the diet and may exhibit spatial gradients as a result of biogeochemical processes at the base of the food web. In the marine environment, maps to predict the spatial distribution of stable isotopes are limited, and thus determining geographic origin has been reliant upon integrating satellite telemetry and stable isotope data. Migratory sea turtles regularly move between foraging and reproductive areas. Whereas most nesting populations can be easily accessed and regularly monitored, little is known about the demographic trends in foraging populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine migration patterns of loggerhead nesting aggregations in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM), where sea turtles have been historically understudied. Two methods of geographic assignment using stable isotope values in known-origin samples from satellite telemetry were compared: (1) a nominal approach through discriminant analysis and (2) a novel continuous-surface approach using bivariate carbon and nitrogen isoscapes (isotopic landscapes) developed for this study. Tissue samples for stable isotope analysis were obtained from 60 satellite-tracked individuals at five nesting beaches within the GoM. Both methodological approaches for assignment resulted in high accuracy of foraging area determination, though each has advantages and disadvantages. The nominal approach is more appropriate when defined boundaries are necessary, but up to 42% of the individuals could not be considered in this approach. All individuals can be included in the continuous-surface approach, and individual results can be aggregated to identify geographic hotspots of foraging area use, though the accuracy rate was lower than nominal assignment. The methodological validation provides a foundation for future sea turtle studies in the region to

  2. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us to simultaneously measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the on-line water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δD reliability. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δD and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed into a copper tube, attached to the line and after system stabilisation is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain δD and δ18O isotopic composition of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5‰ for δD and 0.4‰ for δ18O for water measurement for an extended range (-210 to 0‰ for δD and -27 to 0‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique.

  3. New online method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-07-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us simultaneously to measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the online water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δ D robustness. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water, resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δ D and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed in a copper tube, attached to the line, and after system stabilisation it is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements, a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain &delta D; and δ18O isotopic compositions of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5 ‰ for δ D and 0.4 ‰ for δ18O for water measurements for an extended range (-210 to 0 ‰ for δ D and -27 to 0 ‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to the isotope ratio mass

  4. Improved methods for achieving the equilibrium number of phases in mixtures suitable for use in battery electrodes e. g. , for lithiating FeS/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1986-06-10

    A method is disclosed for preparing lithiated, particulate FeS/sub 2/ useful as a catholyte material in a lithium thermal battery, whereby the latter's voltage regulation properties are improved. The method comprises admixing FeS/sub 2/ and an amount of a lithium-containing compound, whereby the resultant total composition falls in an invariant region of the metallurgical phase diagram of its constituent components. Said lithium-containing compound and FeS/sub 2/ are admixed together with a solid electrolyte compatible with said catholyte, and the mixture is heated at a temperature above the melting point of said electrolyte and at which said mixture reaches its thermodynamic equilibrium number of phases.

  5. Discovery of the krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Heim, M.; Fritsch, A.; Schuh, A.; Shore, A.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-07-15

    Thirty-two krypton isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Bird Migration and Avian Influenza: A Comparison of Hydrogen Stable Isotopes and Satellite Tracking Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Xiao, Xiangming; Takekawa, John Y.; Hill, Nichola J.; Yamage, Mat; Haque, Enam Ul; Islam, Mohammad Anwarul; Mundkur, Taej; Yavuz, Kiraz Erciyas; Leader, Paul; Leung, Connie Y. H.; Smith, Bena; Spragens, Kyle A.; Vandegrift, Kurt; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Saif, Samia; Mohsanin, Samiul; Mikolon, Andrea; Islam, Ausrafal; George, Acty; Sivananinthaperumal, Balachandran; Daszak, Peter; Newman, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based tracking of migratory waterfowl is an important tool for understanding the potential role of wild birds in the long-distance transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza. However, employing this technique on a continental scale is prohibitively expensive. This study explores the utility of stable isotope ratios in feathers in examining both the distances traveled by migratory birds and variation in migration behavior. We compared the satellite-derived movement data of 22 ducks from 8 species captured at wintering areas in Bangladesh, Turkey, and Hong Kong with deuterium ratios (δD) of these and other individuals captured at the same locations. We derived likely molting locations from the satellite tracking data and generated expected isotope ratios based on an interpolated map of δD in rainwater. Although δD was correlated with the distance between wintering and molting locations, surprisingly, measured δD values were not correlated with either expected values or latitudes of molting sites. However, population-level parameters derived from the satellite-tracking data, such as mean distance between wintering and molting locations and variation in migration distance, were reflected by means and variation of the stable isotope values. Our findings call into question the relevance of the rainfall isotope map for Asia for linking feather isotopes to molting locations, and underscore the need for extensive ground truthing in the form of feather-based isoscapes. Nevertheless, stable isotopes from feathers could inform disease models by characterizing the degree to which regional breeding populations interact at common wintering locations. Feather isotopes also could aid in surveying wintering locations to determine where high-resolution tracking techniques (e.g. satellite tracking) could most effectively be employed. Moreover, intrinsic markers such as stable isotopes offer the only means of inferring movement information from birds that have died

  7. Bird migration and avian influenza: a comparison of hydrogen stable isotopes and satellite tracking methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridge, Eli S.; Kelly, Jeffrey F.; Xiao, Xiangming; Takekawa, John Y.; Hill, Nichola J.; Yamage, Mat; Haque, Enam Ul; Islam, Mohammad Anwarul; Mundkur, Taej; Yavuz, Kiraz Erciyas; Leader, Paul; Leung, Connie Y.H.; Smith, Bena; Spragens, Kyle A.; Vandegrift, Kurt J.; Hosseini, Parviez R.; Saif, Samia; Mohsanin, Samiul; Mikolon, Andrea; Islam, Ausrafal; George, Acty; Sivananinthaperumal, Balachandran; Daszak, Peter; Newman, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite-based tracking of migratory waterfowl is an important tool for understanding the potential role of wild birds in the long-distance transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza. However, employing this technique on a continental scale is prohibitively expensive. This study explores the utility of stable isotope ratios in feathers in examining both the distances traveled by migratory birds and variation in migration behavior. We compared the satellite-derived movement data of 22 ducks from 8 species captured at wintering areas in Bangladesh, Turkey, and Hong Kong with deuterium ratios (δD) in the feathers of these and other individuals captured at the same locations. We derived likely molting locations from the satellite tracking data and generated expected isotope ratios based on an interpolated map of δD in rainwater. Although δD was correlated with the distance between wintering and molting locations, surprisingly, measured δD values were not correlated with either expected values or latitudes of molting sites. However, population-level parameters derived from the satellite-tracking data, such as mean distance between wintering and molting locations and variation in migration distance, were reflected by means and variation of the stable isotope values. Our findings call into question the relevance of the rainfall isotope map for Asia for linking feather isotopes to molting locations, and underscore the need for extensive ground truthing in the form of feather-based isoscapes. Nevertheless, stable isotopes from feathers could inform disease models by characterizing the degree to which regional breeding populations interact at common wintering locations. Feather isotopes also could aid in surveying wintering locations to determine where high-resolution tracking techniques (e.g. satellite tracking) could most effectively be employed. Moreover, intrinsic markers such as stable isotopes offer the only means of inferring movement information from

  8. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Bruce K; O'Hara, Matthew J; Casella, Andrew M; Carter, Jennifer C; Addleman, R Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other U compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within a fixed reactor geometry to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of U deposits that range between approximately 0.01 and 500ngcm(-2). The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogramcm(-2) level. The isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the U source materials and we demonstrate a layering technique whereby two U solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two U sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics. Further, the method allows access to very low atomic or molecular coverages of surfaces. PMID:27154668

  9. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES FROM LITHIUM CARBONATE AND LITHIUM HYDRIDE

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-10-27

    A process is descrlbed for the production of methane and for the production of methane containing isotopes of hydrogen and/or carbon. Finely divided lithium hydrlde and litldum carbonate reactants are mixed in intimate contact and subsequently compacted under pressures of from 5000 to 60,000 psl. The compacted lithium hydride and lithium carbenate reactunts are dispised in a gas collecting apparatus. Subsequently, the compact is heated to a temperature in the range 350 to 400 deg C whereupon a solid-solid reaction takes place and gaseous methane is evolved. The evolved methane is contaminated with gaseous hydrogen and a very small amount of CO/sub 2/; however, the desired methane product is separated from sald impurities by well known chemical processes, e.g., condensation in a cold trap. The product methane contalns isotopes of carbon and hydrogen, the Isotopic composition being determined by the carbon isotopes originally present In the lithium carbonate and the hydrogen isotopes originally present in the lithium hydride.

  10. DNA-based stable isotope probing coupled with cultivation methods implicates Methylophaga in hydrocarbon degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mishamandani, Sara; Gutierrez, Tony; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria perform a fundamental role in the oxidation and ultimate removal of crude oil and its petrochemical derivatives in coastal and open ocean environments. Those with an almost exclusive ability to utilize hydrocarbons as a sole carbon and energy source have been found confined to just a few genera. Here we used stable isotope probing (SIP), a valuable tool to link the phylogeny and function of targeted microbial groups, to investigate hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in coastal North Carolina sea water (Beaufort Inlet, USA) with uniformly labeled [13C]n-hexadecane. The dominant sequences in clone libraries constructed from 13C-enriched bacterial DNA (from n-hexadecane enrichments) were identified to belong to the genus Alcanivorax, with ≤98% sequence identity to the closest type strain—thus representing a putative novel phylogenetic taxon within this genus. Unexpectedly, we also identified 13C-enriched sequences in heavy DNA fractions that were affiliated to the genus Methylophaga. This is a contentious group since, though some of its members have been proposed to degrade hydrocarbons, substantive evidence has not previously confirmed this. We used quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the SIP-identified Alcanivorax and Methylophaga to determine their abundance in incubations amended with unlabeled n-hexadecane. Both showed substantial increases in gene copy number during the experiments. Subsequently, we isolated a strain representing the SIP-identified Methylophaga sequences (99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity) and used it to show, for the first time, direct evidence of hydrocarbon degradation by a cultured Methylophaga sp. This study demonstrates the value of coupling SIP with cultivation methods to identify and expand on the known diversity of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the marine environment. PMID:24578702

  11. Isotope geochemistry in 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Billo, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    The intense interest in radioactive minerals as a source of atomic energy, and their application in searching for ore deposits and also in gamma-ray and neutron logging oil wells, have opened new vistas in every science. Many minerals containing elements of high atomic weight are radioactive, and emit a radiation which affects a photographic plate and may be detected by means of a sensitive phosphorescent screen. Most of the elements as found in nature are a mixture of isotopes. isotopes are atoms of one element which have different masses. Uranium, thorium, potassium, and rubidium isotopes are also used to date minerals and rocks. Organic materials that have been in equilibrium with CO{sub 2}-photosynthetic cycle during the past 50,000 years are dated by carbon-14 method. The stable isotopes of H{sub 2}, C, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and S are intimately associated with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere and are used in probing water resources.

  12. Inadequacy, Impurity and Infidelity; Modifying the Modified Brendel Alpha-Cellulose Extraction Method for Resinous Woods in Stable Isotope Dendroclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, T. H.; Whittaker, T. E.; King, P. L.; Horton, T. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stable isotope dendroclimatology is a burgeoning field in palaeoclimate science due to its unique potential to contribute (sub)annually resolved climate records, over millennial timescales, to the terrestrial palaeoclimate record. Until recently the time intensive methods precluded long-term climate reconstructions. Advances in continuous-flow mass spectrometry and isolation methods for α-cellulose (ideal for palaeoclimate studies as, unlike other wood components, it retains its initial isotopic composition) have made long-term, calendar dated palaeoclimate reconstructions a viable proposition. The Modified Brendel (mBrendel) α-cellulose extraction method is a fast, cost-effective way of preparing whole-wood samples for stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis. However, resinous woods often yield incompletely processed α-cellulose using the standard mBrendel approach. As climate signals may be recorded by small (<1%) isotopic shifts it is important to investigate if incomplete processing affects the accuracy and precision of tree-ring isotopic records. In an effort to address this methodological issue, we investigated three highly resinous woods: kauri (Agathis australis), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and huon pine (Lagarastrobus franklinii). Samples of each species were treated with 16 iterations of the mBrendel, varying reaction temperature, time and reagent volumes. Products were investigated using microscopic and bulk transmission Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FITR) to reveal variations in the level of processing; poorly-digested fibres display a peak at 1520cm-1 suggesting residual lignin and a peak at ~1600cm-1 in some samples suggests retained resin. Despite the different levels of purity, replicate analyses of samples processed by high temperature digestion yielded consistent δ18O within and between experiments. All α-cellulose samples were 5-7% enriched compared to the whole-wood, suggesting that even incomplete processing at high

  13. Measurement of dinitrogen fixation by Biological soil crust (BSC) from the Sahelian zone: an isotopic method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, F.; Alavoine, G.; Bertrand, I.

    2012-04-01

    Amongst the described ecological roles of Biological Soil Crust, N fixation is of importance for soil fertility, especially in arid and semi-arid ecosystems with low inputs. In BSC, the quantification of N fixation fluxes using an indirect method is widespread, usually with the Acetylene Reduction Assay (ARA) which consists in measuring the nitrogenase activity through the process of acetylene reduction into ethylene. A converting factor, still discussed in the literature and greatly depending of the constitutive organisms of the BSC, is the tool used to convert the amount of reduced ethylene into quantitative fixed Nitrogen. The aim of this poster is to describe an isotopic direct method to quantify the atmospheric dinitrogen fixation fluxes in BSC, while minimizing the variability due to manipulations. Nine different BSC from the Sahelian zone were selected and placed in an incubation room at 28° C in dark and light conditions during three days, while moisture equivalent to pF=2 was regularly adjusted using the gravimetric method with needles and deionized water, in order to activate and reach a dynamic stability of their metabolisms. Subsequently, each crust was placed into a gas-tight glass vial for incubation with a reconstituted 15N2 enriched atmosphere (31.61 % atom 15N, while the proportion of each main gas present in the air was conserved, i.e. 78% N2, 21% O2 and 0.04% CO2). Principal difficulties are to guarantee the airtighness of the system, to avoid crust desiccation and to keep the crust metabolically active under stable conditions for six hours. Several tests were performed to determine the optimum time for 15N2 incubation. Three replicated control samples per crust were also stabilized for three days and then dried at 105° C, without any incubation with 15N2 enriched atmosphere. Total N and 15N were then measured in the grounded (80μm) and dried (105° C) crust, using a Flash EA elemental analyzer (Eurovector, Milan, Italy) coupled to a Delta

  14. Evaluation of exhibits from a murder case using the lead isotope method and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gulson, Brian L; Eames, John C; Davis, Jeffrey D

    2002-09-01

    We have used a combination of lead isotopes and scanning electron microscopy to determine the relationships between different exhibits in a murder case. Samples involved lead projectiles removed from the deceased's head and a pillow, lead-rich scrapings and particles (gunshot residues) from spent cartridges and a silencer, and particles from a pillowcase. The lead projectiles had the same isotopic composition. with the lead being derived from the same dominantly geologically old source(s). The lead smear from the silencer had the same isotopic composition as the projectiles, and the lead was probably from the same source. The particles from the spent cartridges had varying elemental compositions ranging from PbO to PbCuZn +/- Ba with or without Si and are consistent with derivation from the primer. The lead isotopic compositions of the particles from the spent cartridges show some variations, but these are markedly different from those of the projectiles, indicating lead from a mixture of geologically old and geologically young lead. The particles from the pillowcase were extremely small (usually <50 microm size) and showed varying isotopic compositions, some consistent with the gunshot residue from the cartridges. As the exhibits had been handled extensively prior to the present investigation, including some being sent to North America, there is a high likelihood that handling was not done in clean room environments and may have been contaminated. In this instance, as we were concerned about contamination, especially of the pillowcase, we felt contamination negated use of the results for assistance in proving the innocence or guilt of the accused. A combination of high-precision lead isotope measurements with scanning electron microscopy provides a powerful tool for forensic investigations if precautions are taken in handling the exhibits. PMID:12353538

  15. Zirconium isotope separation

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, M.B.

    1984-12-11

    A method of separating zirconium isotopes by converting the zirconium to its iodide salt prior to separation by usual isotope methods is disclosed. After separation the desired isotopes are converted from the salt to the metal by the van Arkel-de Boer iodide process.

  16. New method for the measurement of osmium isotopes applied to a New Zealand Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.; Wilson, S.M.; Brooks, R.R.; Reeves, R.D.; Holzbecher, J.; Ryan, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of osmium content and isotopic abundances in geological materials has received increasing attention in recent years following the proposal of Alvarez et al.1 that mass extinctions at the end of the Cretaceous period were caused by the impact of a large (???10km) meteorite which left anomalously high iridium levels as a geochemical signature in the boundary shales. Here we report a new and simple method for measuring osmium in geological materials, involving fusion of the sample with sodium peroxide, distillation of the osmium as the tetroxide using perchloric acid, extraction into chloroform, and absorption of the chloroform extract onto graphite powder before instrumental neutron activation analysis. In a variant of this technique, the chloroform extract is back-extracted into an aqueous phase and the osmium isotopes are determined by plasma-source mass spectrometry (ICPMS). We have used this method on the Woodside Creek (New Zealand) Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clay and have obtained the first osmium content (6g ng g-1) for this material. The 187Os/186Os ratio is 1.12??0.16, showing a typical non-crustal signature. This combined distillation-extraction- ICPMS method will prove to be useful for measuring osmium isotopes in other geological materials. ?? 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. A Novel Method for Analyzing Chlorine Isotope Fractionation for Source and Fate Assessment of Organochlorine Soil and Groundwater Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Wiegert, Charline; Holmstrand, Henry; Andersson, Per; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    We developed a simple and accurate analytical method for compound-specific determination of chlorine isotopic composition (δ37Cl) or organochlorines based on GC/MS analysis and standard isotope bracketing. Good accuracy (comparison with off-line thermal ionization mass spectrometry) and a precision comparable to other on-line δ37Cl-methods (0.6 permil vs SMOC) were achieved. We applied this method to assess biodegradation of polychlorinated phenols used for wood preservation at a former sawmill site in northern Sweden. To come up with a δ37Cl-based estimation of the importance of on-going aerobic microbial degradation, we analyzed 37Cl-enrichment during enzymatic dechlorination of polychlorinated phenols in laboratory experiments. We also investigated δ37Cl fingerprints of chloroperoxidase-mediated chlorinated phenols, which can be used for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic sources of chlorophenols in boreal soils. Furthermore, we investigated natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes in a contaminated aquifer in the Czech Republic. At this site, the extent of naturally occurring reductive tetrachloroethene (PCE) dechlorination was estimated based on PCE-δ37Cl. Overall, our laboratory and field studies demonstrate the potential of using compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis for assessing the source and fate of organochlorine groundwater and soil contaminants.

  18. Equilibrium state of anatase to rutile transformation for nano-structured Titanium Dioxide powder using polymer template method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Tapabrata; Jena, Sidhartha S.; Pradhan, Dillip K.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we report the novel synthesis procedure of phase-pure nano-structured titania in anatase phase using polyacrylamide gel based polymer template method. The evolution of rutile phased titania with increasing temperature has also been investigated. The synthesized nano-materials are characterized using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer - Emmett - Teller surface analysis technique and Scanning electron microscopy. We have used dual phase Rietveld refinement method to analyse the X-Ray diffraction data to get clear picture of crystallographic information of the prepared samples.

  19. Matrix-product-state method with a dynamical local basis optimization for bosonic systems out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockt, C.; Dorfner, F.; Vidmar, L.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.; Jeckelmann, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method for simulating the time evolution of one-dimensional correlated electron-phonon systems which combines the time-evolving block decimation algorithm with a dynamical optimization of the local basis. This approach can reduce the computational cost by orders of magnitude when boson fluctuations are large. The method is demonstrated on the nonequilibrium Holstein polaron by comparison with exact simulations in a limited functional space and on the scattering of an electronic wave packet by local phonon modes. Our study of the scattering problem reveals a rich physics including transient self-trapping and dissipation.

  20. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  1. Gluconeogenesis from labeled carbon: estimating isotope dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, J.K.

    1986-03-01

    To estimate the rate of gluconeogenesis from steady-state incorporation of labeled 3-carbon precursors into glucose, isotope dilution must be considered so that the rate of labeling of glucose can be quantitatively converted to the rate of gluconeogenesis. An expression for the value of this isotope dilution can be derived using mathematical techniques and a model of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The present investigation employs a more complex model than that used in previous studies. This model includes the following pathways that may affect the correction for isotope dilution: 1) flux of 3-carbon precursor to the oxaloacetate pool via acetyl-CoA and the TCA cycle; 2) flux of 4- or 5-carbon compounds into the TCA cycle; 3) reversible flux between oxaloacetate (OAA) and pyruvate and between OAA and fumarate; 4) incomplete equilibrium between OAA pools; and 5) isotope dilution of 3-carbon tracers between the experimentally measured pool and the precursor for the TCA-cycle OAA pool. Experimental tests are outlined which investigators can use to determine whether these pathways are significant in a specific steady-state system. The study indicated that flux through these five pathways can significantly affect the correction for isotope dilution. To correct for the effects of these pathways an alternative method for calculating isotope dilution is proposed using citrate to relate the specific activities of acetyl-CoA and OAA.

  2. Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis: a comparison of gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/quadrupole mass spectrometry methods in an interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Anat; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Ebert, Karin; Laskov, Christine; Hunkeler, Daniel; Jeannottat, Simon; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Cretnik, Stefan; Jager, Johannes; Haderlein, Stefan B; Schmidt, Torsten C; Aravena, Ramon; Elsner, Martin

    2011-10-15

    Chlorine isotope analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) is of emerging demand because these species are important environmental pollutants. Continuous flow analysis of noncombusted TCE molecules, either by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) or by GC/quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/qMS), was recently brought forward as innovative analytical solution. Despite early implementations, a benchmark for routine applications has been missing. This study systematically compared the performance of GC/qMS versus GC/IRMS in six laboratories involving eight different instruments (GC/IRMS, Isoprime and Thermo MAT-253; GC/qMS, Agilent 5973N, two Agilent 5975C, two Thermo DSQII, and one Thermo DSQI). Calibrations of (37)Cl/(35)Cl instrument data against the international SMOC scale (Standard Mean Ocean Chloride) deviated between instruments and over time. Therefore, at least two calibration standards are required to obtain true differences between samples. Amount dependency of δ(37)Cl was pronounced for some instruments, but could be eliminated by corrections, or by adjusting amplitudes of standards and samples. Precision decreased in the order GC/IRMS (1σ ≈ 0.1‰), to GC/qMS (1σ ≈ 0.2-0.5‰ for Agilent GC/qMS and 1σ ≈ 0.2-0.9‰ for Thermo GC/qMS). Nonetheless, δ(37)Cl values between laboratories showed good agreement when the same external standards were used. These results lend confidence to the methods and may serve as a benchmark for future applications. PMID:21851081

  3. A Method of Determining the Equilibrium Performance and the Stability of an Engine Equipped with an Exhaust Turbosupercharger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, James Buchanan

    1941-01-01

    The performance of an exhaust turbine driving a supercharger is investigated by means of a sample calculation based on reasonable assumptions for the purpose of determining whether the assumed installation is stable with respect to changes in the mass of gas handled, boost pressure, etc. The arrangement was found to be stable throughout the entire range of operation. The method developed can be generally applied.

  4. Method optimization for non-equilibrium solid phase microextraction sampling of HAPs for GC/MS analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadowicz, M. A.; Del Negro, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    Hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are usually present in the atmosphere at pptv-level, requiring measurements with high sensitivity and minimal contamination. Commonly used evacuated canister methods require an overhead in space, money and time that often is prohibitive to primarily-undergraduate institutions. This study optimized an analytical method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of ambient gaseous matrix, which is a cost-effective technique of selective VOC extraction, accessible to an unskilled undergraduate. Several approaches to SPME extraction and sample analysis were characterized and several extraction parameters optimized. Extraction time, temperature and laminar air flow velocity around the fiber were optimized to give highest signal and efficiency. Direct, dynamic extraction of benzene from a moving air stream produced better precision (±10%) than sampling of stagnant air collected in a polymeric bag (±24%). Using a low-polarity chromatographic column in place of a standard (5%-Phenyl)-methylpolysiloxane phase decreased the benzene detection limit from 2 ppbv to 100 pptv. The developed method is simple and fast, requiring 15-20 minutes per extraction and analysis. It will be field-validated and used as a field laboratory component of various undergraduate Chemistry and Environmental Studies courses.

  5. Methods for achieving the equilibrium number of phases in mixtures suitable for use in battery electrodes, e.g., for lithiating FeS.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Guidotti, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    In a method for preparing lithiated, particulate FeS.sub.2 useful as a catholyte material in a lithium thermal battery, whereby the latter's voltage regulation properties are improved, comprising admixing FeS.sub.2 and an amount of a lithium-containing compound whereby the resultant total composition falls in an invariant region of the metallurgical phase diagram of its constituent components, an improvement comprises admixing said lithium-containing compound and FeS.sub.2 together with a solid electrolyte compatible with said catholyte, and heating the mixture at a temperature above the melting point of said electrolyte and at which said mixture reaches its thermodynamic equilibrium number of phases.

  6. Isotopic evidence for lateral flow and diffusive transport, but not sublimation, in a sloped seasonal snowpack, Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Samantha L.; Flores, Alejandro N.; Heilig, Achim; Kohn, Matthew J.; Marshall, Hans-Peter; McNamara, James P.

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in snow were measured in weekly profiles during the growth and decline of a sloped subalpine snowpack, southern Idaho, 2011-2012. Isotopic steps (10‰, δ18O; 80‰, δD) were preserved relative to physical markers throughout the season, albeit with some diffusive smoothing. Melting stripped off upper layers without shifting isotopes within the snowpack. Meltwater is in isotopic equilibrium with snow at the top but not with snow at each respective collection height. Transport of meltwater occurred primarily along pipes and lateral flow paths allowing the snowpack to melt initially in reverse stratigraphic order. Isotope diffusivities are ~2 orders of magnitude faster than estimated from experiments but can be explained by higher temperature and porosity. A better understanding of how snowmelt isotopes change during meltout improves hydrograph separation methods, whereas constraints on isotope diffusivities under warm conditions improve models of ice core records in low-latitude settings.

  7. What are the instrumentation requirements for measuring isotopic composition of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 via eddy covariance methods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, J.; Saleska, S.; Herndon, S.; Jimenez-Pizarro, R.; McManus, J. B.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M.

    2005-12-01

    Better quantification of isotope ratios of atmosphere-ecosystem exchange of CO2 could substantially improve our ability to probe underlying physiological and ecological mechanisms controlling ecosystem carbon exchange, but the ability to make long-term continuous measurements of isotope ratios of exchange fluxes has been limited by measurement difficulties. In particular, direct eddy covariance methods have not yet been used for measuring the isotopic composition of ecosystem fluxes. Here we explore the feasibility of such measurements by: (a) proposing a general criterion for judging whether a sensor's performance is sufficient for making such measurements (the criterion is met when the contribution of sensor error to the flux measurement error is comparable to or less than the contribution of meteorological noise inherently associated with turbulence flux measurements); (b) using data-based numerical simulations to quantify the level of sensor precision and stability required to meet this criterion for making direct eddy covariance measurements of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2 fluxes above a specific ecosystem (a mid-latitude temperate forest in central Massachusetts, USA); and (c) testing whether the performance of a new sensor -- a prototype pulsed quantum cascade laser-based isotope-ratio absorption spectrometer (and plausible improvements thereon) -- is sufficient for meeting the criterion in this ecosystem. We found that the error contribution from a prototype sensor (0.2 per mil, 1 SD of 10-sec integrations) to total isoflux measurement error was comparable to (1.5 to 2X) the irreducible meteorological noise inherently associated with turbulent flux measurements above this ecosystem (daytime measurement error SD of 60 percent of flux versus meteorological noise of 30-40 percent for instantaneous half-hour fluxes). Our analysis also shows that plausible instrument improvements (increase of sensor precision to 0.1 per mil, 1 SD of 10-sec integrations, and

  8. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    SciTech Connect

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  9. Continuous flow stable isotope methods for study of δ13C fractionation during halomethane production and degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalin, Robert M.; Hamilton, John T.G.; Harper, David B.; Miller, Laurence G.; Lamb, Clare; Kennedy, James T.; Downey, Angela; McCauley, Sean; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/MS/IRMS) methods for δ13C measurement of the halomethanes CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and methanethiol (CH3SH) during studies of their biological production, biological degradation, and abiotic reactions are presented. Optimisation of gas chromatographic parameters allowed the identification and quantification of CO2, O2, CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I and CH3SH from a single sample, and also the concurrent measurement of δ13C for each of the halomethanes and methanethiol. Precision of δ13C measurements for halomethane standards decreased (±0.3, ±0.5 and ±1.3‰) with increasing mass (CH3Cl, CH3Br, CH3I, respectively). Given that carbon isotope effects during biological production, biological degradation and some chemical (abiotic) reactions can be as much as 100‰, stable isotope analysis offers a precise method to study the global sources and sinks of these halogenated compounds that are of considerable importance to our understanding of stratospheric ozone destruction. 

  10. Method for purification of Kr from environmental samples for analysis of radiokrypton isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, R.; Heraty, L. J.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2008-12-01

    Two extremely low-abundance radioactive isotopes of Kr ((81Kr and (85Kr) are produced by cosmic-ray induced spallation (81Kr /Kr = 10-12, t½ = 229,000 yr) and by a nuclear fission (85Kr /Kr = 10-11, t½ = 10.8 yr). Radiokrypton chronologies are potentially important in diverse studies of hydrology and paleoclimate and the inertness of Kr, being a noble gas, makes radiokrypton-based chronometers superior to other hydrological tracers for many such applications (e.g., 3H-He, 14C, 36Cl, CFCs, SF6). The analysis of 81Kr in naturally occurring gases of interest, e.g. dissolved gases in hydrological reservoirs, using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) requires an extraction of ppm-level Kr from chemically air-like bulk gas. A newly developed Kr purification system is based on conventional cryogenic distillation and gas chromatography to which continuous monitoring of gas effluent composition using quadrupole mass spectrometer brings significant advantages. Simple cryogenic distillation is controlled based on the evolution of N2/Ar ratio that is relatively constant in naturally occurring, inorganic gas. Gas chromatographic separation of ppmv-level Kr from up to a few liter of bulk gas can be achieved by concentrating the Kr under the tails of major components. The system described here is capable of extracting Kr from 5-125 lSTP of bulk gas with >90% yield within several hours. Gas samples have been taken at several hydrological and geological settings: shallow groundwater at Locust Grove, MD, gas emanation from Cheaspeake Crater, VA, mid-continental saline groundwater (KS, MO), deep and shallow groundwater from northern Chile (Atacama desert), and the hydrothermal system at Yellowstone National Park, WY. Our new method was used successfully to purify microliter amounts of Kr from all of these samples, an important step en route to routine application of ATTA in hydrological studies. This work was supported by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Postdoctoral Program in

  11. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Dynamic compression of hydrogen isotopes at megabar pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trunin, Ryurik F.; Urlin, Vitalii D.; Medvedev, Aleksandr B.

    2010-09-01

    We review the results of shock compression of solid protium to the pressure 66 GPa, of liquid deuterium to 110 GPa, and of solid deuterium to 123 GPa in explosive devices of spherical geometry. The results are compared with data obtained by US scientists using traditional energy sources (explosives and light-gas guns), striker acceleration in a strong magnetic field (Z facility at Sandia), and powerful lasers (Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester). Results of density measurements of hydrogen isotopes under quasi-isentropic compression are analyzed. The absence of an anomalous increase in density under shock and quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen isotopes is demonstrated. On the other hand, both processes exhibit a sharp change in the compression curve slopes, at the respective pressures 45 and 300 GPa.

  12. Sources of groundwater nitrate revealed using residence time and isotope methods

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K B; Ekwurzel, B; Esser, B K; Hudson, G B; Moran, J E

    2004-10-07

    Nitrate concentrations approaching and greater than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) are impairing the viability of many groundwater basins as drinking water sources. Nitrate isotope data are effective in determining contaminant sources, especially when combined with other isotopic tracers such as stable isotopes of water and tritium-helium ages to give insight into the routes and timing of nitrate inputs to the flow system. This combination of techniques is demonstrated in Livermore, CA, where it is determined that low nitrate reclaimed wastewater predominates in the northwest, while two flowpaths with distinct nitrate sources originate in the southeast. Along the eastern flowpath, {delta}{sup 15}N values greater than 10{per_thousand} indicate that animal waste is the primary source. Diminishing concentrations over time suggest that contamination results from historical land use practices. The other flowpath begins in an area where rapid recharge, primarily of low-nitrate imported water (identified by stable isotopes of water and a tritium-helium residence time of less than 1 year), mobilizes a significant local nitrate source, bringing groundwater concentrations up to 53 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1}. In this area, artificial recharge of imported water via local arroyos increases the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. The low {delta}{sup 15}N value (3.1{per_thousand}) in this location implicates synthetic fertilizer. In addition to these anthropogenic sources, natural nitrate background levels between 15 and 20 mg NO{sub 3} L{sup -1} are found in deep wells with residence times greater than 50 years.

  13. Assessing of distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb in agricultural soils using isotopic labeling method coupled with BCR approach.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Yong; Xie, Hong; Cao, Ying-Lan; Cai, Chao; Zhang, Zhi

    2014-02-15

    The contamination of Pb in agricultural soils is one of the most important ecological problems, which potentially results in serious health risk on human health through food chain. Hence, the fate of exogenous Pb contaminated in agricultural soils is needed to be deeply explored. By spiking soils with the stable enriched isotopes of (206)Pb, the contamination of exogenous Pb(2+) ions in three agricultural soils sampled from the estuary areas of Jiulong River, China was simulated in the present study, and the distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb in the soils were investigated using the isotopic labeling method coupled with a four-stage BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure. Results showed that about 60-85% of exogenous Pb was found to distribute in reducible fractions, while the exogenous Pb in acid-extractable fractions was less than 1.0%. After planting, the amounts of exogenous Pb presenting in acid-extractable, reducible and oxidizable fractions in rhizospheric soils decreased by 60-66%, in which partial exogenous Pb was assimilated by plants while most of the metal might transfer downward due to daily watering and applying fertilizer. The results show that the isotopic labeling technique coupled with sequential extraction procedures enables us to explore the distribution, mobility and bioavailability of exogenous Pb contaminated in soils, which may be useful for the further soil remediation. PMID:24412626

  14. A method to calculate equilibrium concentrations of gas and defects in the vicinity of an over-pressured bubble in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noirot, L.

    2014-04-01

    We present a method devised to calculate the equilibrium concentration of point defects and gas atoms in the vicinity of a bubble in UO2. First, we neglect the mechanical energy stored in the solid around an over-pressured bubble and then we explain how to take it into account. We apply the method to helium in interstitial positions in UO2, and compare our theoretical value of Henry's constant with experiments and a molecular dynamics computation. Then, we apply the method to xenon in a Schottky defect and use it to assess the realism of two scenarios elaborated to explain the “paradox of annealing experiments”, i.e. “why a large proportion of gas is released from grains in annealing experiments on irradiated fuel, even though there are thousands of intragranular bubbles to trap the gas?” These two scenarios (thermal resolution or blockage of trapping due to the stress field around the bubbles) were both found to be unrealistic, at least with the formation energies available from ab initio calculations, and with the assumption made to calculate the Z3 term of the partition function. This term is related to the vibration frequencies of xenon atoms in Schottky defects and lattice atoms close to defects.

  15. Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

    2007-11-01

    For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

  16. Theoretical investigations of uranium isotope fractionation caused by nuclear volume effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Because the half-life times of uranium isotopes are all very long, e.g., 4.5Ga for 238U and 0.7Ga for 235U, people actually treat uranium isotope system as a stable one in many young geologic systems (e.g., Bopp et al., 2010; Basu et al., 2014). There is an increasing trend of using U isotope method to study surface geochemistry problems. For example, people start to use U isotopes as a new tracer to determine the change of redox conditions (Holmden et al., 2015; Wang et al., 2015). However, there are only a few equilibrium U isotope fractionation factors available right now. The new enterprise of U isotope method requires a much expanded data-base of equilibrium U isotope fractionation factor. Many evidences showed that heavy isotope systems could be significantly fractionated as the consequence of the nuclear volume effect (NVE) or so-called nuclear field shift effect,which is a driving force of mass-independent fractionation induced by differences in nuclear size and nuclear shape of isotopes. Here we theoretically estimate the magnitude of equilibrium isotope fractionation factors of U-bearing gaseous and solid compounds caused by NVE via density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemistry methods with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects. Our calculation results show the NVE drives 238U/235U fractionations can be up to -4.43‰ between U(VI) and U(IV) species, or can be up to -1.68‰ between U(IV) and U(III) species, at room temperature. The U4+-bearing species or phases tend to enrich heavier isotopes (i.e., 238U) relative to the oxidized phases (U6+-bearing), and enrich lighter isotopes (i.e., 235U) relative to the reduced U(III) phases (U3+-bearing), which generally agree with the recent experimental results (Wang et al., 2015). Our results provide a base for broad applications of equilibrium U isotope fractionation in surface environments.

  17. Accuracy of some routine method used in clinical chemistry as judged by isotope dilution-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoerkhem, I.; Bergman, A.; Falk, O.; Kallner, A.; Lantto, O.; Svensson, L.; Akerloef, E.; Blomstrand, R.

    1981-05-01

    Serum from patients was pooled, filtered, dispensed, and frozen. This pooled specimen was used for accuracy control in 64 participating laboratories in Sweden. Mean values (state-of-the-art values) were obtained for creatinine, cholesterol, glucose, urea, uric acid, and cortisol. These values were compared with values obtained with highly accurate reference methods based on isotope dilution-mass spectrometry. Differences were marked in the case of determination of creatinine and cortisol. Concerning the other components, the differences between the state-of-the-art value and the values obtained with the reference methods were negligible. Moreover, the glucose oxidase and the oxime methods for determination of glucose and urea were found to give significantly lower values than the hexokinase and urease methods, respectively. Researchers conclude that methods with a higher degree of accuracy are required for routine determination of creatinine and cortisol.

  18. Site-Specific Carbon Isotopes in Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, A.; Eiler, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural organic molecules exhibit a wide range of internal site-specific isotope variation (i.e., molecules with same isotopic substitution type but different site). Such variations are generally unconstrained by bulk isotopic measurements. If known, site-specific variations might constrain temperatures of equilibrium, mechanisms of formation or consumption reactions, and possibly other details. For example, lipids can exhibit carbon isotope differences of up to 30‰ between adjacent carbon sites as a result of fractionations arising during decarboxylation of pyruvate and other steps in lipid biosynthesis(1). We present a method for site-specific carbon isotope analysis of propane, based on high-resolution, multi-collector gas source mass spectrometry, using a novel prototype instrument - the Thermo MAT 253 Ultra. This machine has an inlet system and electron bombardment ion source resembling those in conventional stable isotope gas source mass spectrometers, and the energy filter, magnet, and detector array resembling those in multi-collector ICPMS and TIMS. The detector array has 7 detector positions, 6 of which are movable, and each of which can collect ions with either a faraday cup (read through amplifiers ranging from 107-1012 ohms) or an SEM. High mass resolving power (up to 27,000, MRP = M/dM definition) is achieved through a narrow entrance slit, adjustable from 250 to 5 μm. Such resolution can cleanly separate isobaric interferences between isotopologues of organic molecules having the same cardinal mass (e.g., 13CH3 and 12CH2D). We use this technology to analyze the isotopologues and fragments of propane, and use such data to solve for the site-specific carbon isotope fractionation. By measuring isotopologues of both the one-carbon (13CH3) and the two-carbon (13C12CH4) fragment ion, we can solve for both bulk δ13C and the difference in δ13C between the terminal and central carbon position. We tested this method by analyzing mixtures between natural

  19. Capture and isotopic exchange method for water and hydrogen isotopes on zeolite catalysts up to technical scale for pre-study of processing highly tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Michling, R.; Braun, A.; Cristescu, I.; Dittrich, H.; Gramlich, N.; Lohr, N.; Glugla, M.; Shu, W.; Willms, S.

    2015-03-15

    Highly tritiated water (HTW) may be generated at ITER by various processes and, due to the excessive radio toxicity, the self-radiolysis and the exceedingly corrosive property of HTW, a potential hazard is associated with its storage and process. Therefore, the capture and exchange method for HTW utilizing Molecular Sieve Beds (MSB) was investigated in view of adsorption capacity, isotopic exchange performance and process parameters. For the MSB, different types of zeolite were selected. All zeolite materials were additionally coated with platinum. The following work comprised the selection of the most efficient zeolite candidate based on detailed parametric studies during the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2}O laboratory scale exchange experiments (about 25 g zeolite per bed) at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). For the zeolite, characterization analytical techniques such as Infrared Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetry and online mass spectrometry were implemented. Followed by further investigation of the selected zeolite catalyst under full technical operation, a MSB (about 22 kg zeolite) was processed with hydrogen flow rates up to 60 mol*h{sup -1} and deuterated water loads up to 1.6 kg in view of later ITER processing of arising HTW. (authors)

  20. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N)

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, James A.; Rozar, Katherine L.; Adams, Charles S.; Wall, Kara R.; Switzer, Theodore S.; Winner, Brent L.; Hollander, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ13C and δ15N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ15N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ13C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and corresponding

  1. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ (13)C and δ (15)N).

    PubMed

    Stallings, Christopher D; Nelson, James A; Rozar, Katherine L; Adams, Charles S; Wall, Kara R; Switzer, Theodore S; Winner, Brent L; Hollander, David J

    2015-01-01

    Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus). We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt), against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ (13)C and δ (15)N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ (15)N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ (13)C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes and

  2. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the amphiboles: Isotope effects of cation substitutions in minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, M.J.; Valley, J.W.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of coexisting amphiboles in rocks and the likelihood of concurrent isotope closure allows equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among the amphiboles to be recovered from natural samples. Oxygen isotope analyses of mineral separates using laser fluorination show that coexisting amphiboles increasingly partition {sup 18}O in the order: hornblende {much_lt} gedrite < cummingtonite {le} anthophyllite. The observed fractionations at {approximately}575 C are: {Delta}(Ged-Hbl) = 0.8%, {Delta}(Cum-Hbl) = 0.9, {Delta}(Cum-Ged) = 0.2, {Delta}(Ath-Ged) = 0.3, and {Delta}(Ath-Hbl) > 0.9. Previously published data for hornblende, actinolite, glaucophane, and garnet show that {Delta}(Act-Hbl) {approximately} 0.2, {Delta}(Gin-Grt) {much_gt} 1, and {Delta}(Hbl-Grt) {approximately} 0. Thus, glaucophane strongly partitions {sup 18}O relative to the calcic amphiboles. The fractionation between two amphiboles of arbitrary composition can be predicted from the known fractionations for mica endmembers, pyroxene endmembers, and exchange components. Applications of the exchange component method reproduce measured amphibole fractionations to within {+-}0.1 to {+-}0.2%, whereas other predictive methods cause misfit for typical metamorphic hornblende of {ge}0.5% at 575 C. Although the isotope effects of cation exchanges may be small at high-T, they magnify dramatically for minerals formed in surficial, diagenetic, and low-T metamorphic environments. Different composition clays are predicted to have equilibrium {delta}{sup 18}O differences of 2--9%. If the isotope fractionation can be determined for one mineral endmember, then calibrated exchanges allow accurate prediction of the isotope fractionations for intermediate compositions of most ortho-, ring-, chain-, and sheet-silicates.

  3. Mass spectrometric methods for studying nutrient mineral and trace element absorption and metabolism in humans using stable isotopes. A review.

    PubMed

    Crews, H M; Ducros, V; Eagles, J; Mellon, F A; Kastenmayer, P; Luten, J B; McGaw, B A

    1994-11-01

    Mass spectrometric methods for determining stable isotopes of nutrient minerals and trace elements in human metabolic studies are described and discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the techniques of electron ionization, fast atom bombardment, thermal ionization, and inductively coupled plasma and gas chromatography mass spectrometry are evaluated with reference to their accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and convenience, and the demands of human nutrition research. Examples of specific applications are described and the significance of current developments in mass spectrometry are discussed with reference to present and probable future research needs. PMID:7872491

  4. Lifetimes in neutron-rich Nd isotopes measured by Doppler profile method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    Lifetimes of the rotational levels in neutron-rich even-even Nd isotopes were deduced from the analysis of the Doppler broadened line shapes. The experiment was performed at Daresbury with the Eurogam array, which at that time consisted of 45 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and 5 Low-Energy Photon Spectrometers. The source was in the form of a 7-mm pellet which was prepared by mixing 5-mg; {sup 248}Cm and 65-mg KCl and pressing it under high pressure. Events for which three or more detectors fired were used to construct a cubic data array whose axes represented the {gamma}-ray energies and the contents of each channel the number of events with that particular combination of {gamma}-ray energies. From this cubic array, one-dimensional spectra were generated by placing gates on peaks on the other two axes. Gamma-ray spectra of even-even Nd isotopes were obtained by gating on the transitions in the complimentary Kr fragments. The gamma peaks de-exciting states with I {>=} 12 h were found to be broader than the instrumental line width due to the Doppler effect. The line shapes of they-ray peaks were fitted separately with a simple model for the feeding of the states and assuming a rotational band with constant intrinsic quadruple moment and these are shown in Fig. I-27. The quadrupole moments thus determined were found to be in good agreement with the quadrupole moments measured previously for lower spin states. Because of the success of this technique for the Nd isotopes, we intend to apply this technique to the new larger data set collected with the Eurogam II array. The results of this study were published.

  5. Practically convenient and industrially-aligned methods for iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A R; Idziak, C; Kerr, W J; Mondal, B; Paterson, L C; Tuttle, T; Andersson, S; Nilsson, G N

    2014-06-14

    The use of alternative solvents in the iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange reaction with developing phosphine/NHC Ir(I) complexes has identified reaction media which are more widely applicable and industrially acceptable than the commonly employed chlorinated solvent, dichloromethane. Deuterium incorporation into a variety of substrates has proceeded to deliver high levels of labelling (and regioselectivity) in the presence of low catalyst loadings and over short reaction times. The preparative outputs have been complemented by DFT studies to explore ligand orientation, as well as solvent and substrate binding energies within the catalyst system. PMID:24756541

  6. METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR WITHDRAWING LIGHT ISOTOPIC PRODUCT FROM A LIQUID THERMAL DIFFUSION PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Dole, M.

    1959-09-22

    An improved process and apparatus are described for removing enriched product from the columns of a thermal diffusion plant for separation of isotopes. In the removal cycle, light product at the top cf the diffusion columns is circulated through the column tops and a shipping cylinder connected thereto unttl the concertation of enriched product in the cylinder reaches the desired point. During the removal, circulation through the bottoms is blocked bv freezing. in the diffusion cycle, the bottom portion is unfrozen, fresh feed is distributed to the bottoms of the columns, ard heavy product is withdrawn from the bottoms, while the tops of the columns are blocked by freezing.

  7. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    PubMed Central

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  8. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    PubMed

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium. PMID

  9. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-10-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  10. Stable Isotope Phenotyping via Cluster Analysis of NanoSIMS Data As a Method for Characterizing Distinct Microbial Ecophysiologies and Sulfur-Cycling in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Katherine S.; Scheller, Silvan; Dillon, Jesse G.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a valuable tool for gaining insights into ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling of environmental microbial communities by tracking isotopically labeled compounds into cellular macromolecules as well as into byproducts of respiration. SIP, in conjunction with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), allows for the visualization of isotope incorporation at the single cell level. In this manner, both active cells within a diverse population as well as heterogeneity in metabolism within a homogeneous population can be observed. The ecophysiological implications of these single cell stable isotope measurements are often limited to the taxonomic resolution of paired fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy. Here we introduce a taxonomy-independent method using multi-isotope SIP and NanoSIMS for identifying and grouping phenotypically similar microbial cells by their chemical and isotopic fingerprint. This method was applied to SIP experiments in a sulfur-cycling biofilm collected from sulfidic intertidal vents amended with 13C-acetate, 15N-ammonium, and 33S-sulfate. Using a cluster analysis technique based on fuzzy c-means to group cells according to their isotope (13C/12C, 15N/14N, and 33S/32S) and elemental ratio (C/CN and S/CN) profiles, our analysis partitioned ~2200 cellular regions of interest (ROIs) into five distinct groups. These isotope phenotype groupings are reflective of the variation in labeled substrate uptake by cells in a multispecies metabolic network dominated by Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria. Populations independently grouped by isotope phenotype were subsequently compared with paired FISH data, demonstrating a single coherent deltaproteobacterial cluster and multiple gammaproteobacterial groups, highlighting the distinct ecophysiologies of spatially-associated microbes within the sulfur-cycling biofilm from White Point Beach, CA. PMID:27303371

  11. Stable Isotope Phenotyping via Cluster Analysis of NanoSIMS Data As a Method for Characterizing Distinct Microbial Ecophysiologies and Sulfur-Cycling in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Katherine S; Scheller, Silvan; Dillon, Jesse G; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) is a valuable tool for gaining insights into ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling of environmental microbial communities by tracking isotopically labeled compounds into cellular macromolecules as well as into byproducts of respiration. SIP, in conjunction with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), allows for the visualization of isotope incorporation at the single cell level. In this manner, both active cells within a diverse population as well as heterogeneity in metabolism within a homogeneous population can be observed. The ecophysiological implications of these single cell stable isotope measurements are often limited to the taxonomic resolution of paired fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy. Here we introduce a taxonomy-independent method using multi-isotope SIP and NanoSIMS for identifying and grouping phenotypically similar microbial cells by their chemical and isotopic fingerprint. This method was applied to SIP experiments in a sulfur-cycling biofilm collected from sulfidic intertidal vents amended with (13)C-acetate, (15)N-ammonium, and (33)S-sulfate. Using a cluster analysis technique based on fuzzy c-means to group cells according to their isotope ((13)C/(12)C, (15)N/(14)N, and (33)S/(32)S) and elemental ratio (C/CN and S/CN) profiles, our analysis partitioned ~2200 cellular regions of interest (ROIs) into five distinct groups. These isotope phenotype groupings are reflective of the variation in labeled substrate uptake by cells in a multispecies metabolic network dominated by Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria. Populations independently grouped by isotope phenotype were subsequently compared with paired FISH data, demonstrating a single coherent deltaproteobacterial cluster and multiple gammaproteobacterial groups, highlighting the distinct ecophysiologies of spatially-associated microbes within the sulfur-cycling biofilm from White Point Beach, CA. PMID:27303371

  12. A practical method for cell-free protein synthesis to avoid stable isotope scrambling and dilution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Jun; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Koshiba, Seizo; Tochio, Naoya; Kigawa, Takanori

    2011-04-15

    During recent years, the targets of protein structure analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have become larger and more complicated. As a result, a complete and precise stable isotope labeling technique has been desired. A cell-free protein synthesis system is appropriate for this purpose. In the current study, we achieved precise and complete (15)N and (2)H labeling using an Escherichia coli cell extract-based cell-free protein synthesis system by controlling the metabolic reactions in the system with their chemical inhibitors. The addition of aminooxyacetate, d-malate, l-methionine sulfoximine, S-methyl-l-cysteine sulfoximine, 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine, and 5-diazo-4-oxo-l-norvaline was quite effective for precise amino acid-selective (15)N labeling even for aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamic acid, and glutamine, which generally suffer from severe isotope scrambling and dilution when using the conventional cell-free system. For (2)H labeling, the back-protonation of the H(α) and H(β) positions, which commonly occurred in the conventional system, was dramatically suppressed by simply adding aminooxyacetate and d-malate to the cell-free system except for the H(α) positions in methionine and cysteine. PMID:21256106

  13. On the Use of Biomineral Oxygen Isotope Data to Identify Human Migrants in the Archaeological Record: Intra-Sample Variation, Statistical Methods and Geographical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Emma; O’Connell, Tamsin C.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope analysis of archaeological skeletal remains is an increasingly popular tool to study past human migrations. It is based on the assumption that human body chemistry preserves the δ18O of precipitation in such a way as to be a useful technique for identifying migrants and, potentially, their homelands. In this study, the first such global survey, we draw on published human tooth enamel and bone bioapatite data to explore the validity of using oxygen isotope analyses to identify migrants in the archaeological record. We use human δ18O results to show that there are large variations in human oxygen isotope values within a population sample. This may relate to physiological factors influencing the preservation of the primary isotope signal, or due to human activities (such as brewing, boiling, stewing, differential access to water sources and so on) causing variation in ingested water and food isotope values. We compare the number of outliers identified using various statistical methods. We determine that the most appropriate method for identifying migrants is dependent on the data but is likely to be the IQR or median absolute deviation from the median under most archaeological circumstances. Finally, through a spatial assessment of the dataset, we show that the degree of overlap in human isotope values from different locations across Europe is such that identifying individuals’ homelands on the basis of oxygen isotope analysis alone is not possible for the regions analysed to date. Oxygen isotope analysis is a valid method for identifying first-generation migrants from an archaeological site when used appropriately, however it is difficult to identify migrants using statistical methods for a sample size of less than c. 25 individuals. In the absence of local previous analyses, each sample should be treated as an individual dataset and statistical techniques can be used to identify migrants, but in most cases pinpointing a specific homeland should

  14. Use of the semi-equilibrium dialysis method in studying the thermodynamics of solubilization of org nic compounds in surfactant micelles. system n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride-phenol-water

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G,A.; Christian, S.D.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Tucker, E.E.

    1986-06-01

    The semi-equilibrium dialysis method has been used to infer solubilization equilibrium constants or, alternatively, activity coefficients of solutes solubilized into micelles of aqueous surfactant solutions. Methods are described for inferring the concentrationa of monomers of the organic solute and of the surfactant on both sides of the dialysis membrane, under conditions where the organic solute is in equilibrium with both the high-concentration (retentate) and low-concentration (permeate) solutions. By using a form of the Gibbs-Duhem equation, activity coefficients of both phenol (the solubilizate) and n-hexadecylpyridinium chloride (the surfactant) are obtained for aqueous solutions at 25 /sup 0/C throughout a wide range of relative compositions of surfactant and solubilizate within the micelle. The apparent solubilization constant, K = (solubilized phenol)/((monomeric phenol) (micellar surfactant)), is found to decrease significantly as the mole fraction of phenol in the micelle increases.

  15. Accounting for pore water pressure and confined aquifers in assessing the stability of slopes: a Limit Equilibrium analysis carried out through the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausilia Paparo, Maria; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The model we introduce is an implementation of the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation (MLD) method, developed by Tinti and Manucci (Tinti and Manucci 2006; 2008), that makes use of the limit equilibrium (LE) theory to estimate the stability of a slope. The main purpose here is to analyse the role of a confined aquifer on the value of the Safety Factor (F), the parameter that in the LE is used to determine if a slope is stable or unstable. The classical LE methods treat unconfined aquifers by including the water pore pressure in the Mohr-Coulomb failure formula: since the water decreases the friction shear strength, the soil above the sliding surface turns out to be more prone to instability. In case of a confined aquifer, however, due to a presence of impermeable layers, the water is not free to flow into the matrix of the overlying soil. We consider here the assumption of a permeable soil sliding over an impermeable layer, which is an occurrence that is found in several known landslide cases (e.g. Person, 2008; Strout and Tjeltja, 2008; Morgan et al., 2010 for offshore slides; and Palladino and Peck, 1972; Miller and Sias, 1998; Jiao et al. 2005; Paparo et al., 2013 for slopes in proximity of artificial or natural water basins) where clay beds form the potential sliding surface: the water, confined below, pushes along these layers and acts on the sliding body as an external bottom load. We modify the MLD method equations in order to take into account the load due to a confined aquifer and apply the new model to the Vajont case, where many have hypothesised the contribution of a confined aquifer to the failure. Our calculations show that the rain load i) infiltrating directly into the soil body and ii) penetrating into the confined aquifer below the clay layers, in addition with the lowering of the reservoir level, were key factors of destabilization of the Mt Toc flank and caused the disastrous landslide.

  16. Keeling plots for hummingbirds: a method to estimate carbon isotope ratios of respired CO(2) in small vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Scott A; Wolf, Blair O; del Rio, Carlos Martinez

    2004-09-01

    The carbon isotope composition of an animal's breath reveals the composition of the nutrients that it catabolizes for energy. Here we describe the use of Keeling plots, a method widely applied in ecosystem ecology, to measure the delta(13)C of respired CO(2) of small vertebrates. We measured the delta(13)C of Rufous Hummingbirds ( Selasphorus rufus) in the laboratory and of Mourning ( Zenaida macroura) and White-winged ( Z. asiatica) Doves in the field. In the laboratory, when hummingbirds were fed a sucrose based C3 diet, the delta(13)C of respired CO(2) was not significantly different from that of their diet (delta(13)C(C3 diet)). The delta(13)C of respired CO(2) for C3 fasted birds was slightly, albeit significantly, depleted in delta(13)C relative to delta(13)C(C3 diet). Six hours after birds were shifted to a sucrose based C4 diet, the isotopic composition of their breath revealed that birds were catabolizing a mixture of nutrients derived from both the C3 and the C4 diet. In the field, the delta(13)C of respired CO(2) from Mourning and White-winged Doves reflected that of their diets: the CAM saguaro cactus ( Carnegeia gigantea) and C3 seeds, respectively. Keeling plots are an easy, effective and inexpensive method to measure delta(13)C of respired CO(2) in the lab and the field. PMID:15309607

  17. A new method for collection of nitrate from fresh water and the analysis of nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Kendall, C.; Wilkison, D.H.; Ziegler, A.C.; Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Avanzino, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new method for concentrating nitrate from fresh waters for ??15N and ??18O analysis has been developed and field-tested for four years. The benefits of the method are: (1) elimination of the need to transport large volumes of water to the laboratory for processing; (2) elimination of the need for hazardous preservatives; and (3) the ability to concentrate nitrate from fresh waters. Nitrate is collected by, passing the water-sample through pre-filled, disposable, anion exchanging resin columns in the field. The columns are subsequently transported to the laboratory where the nitrate is extracted, converted to AgNO3 and analyzed for its isotope composition. Nitrate is eluted from the anion exchange columns with 15 ml of 3 M HCl. The nitrate-bearing acid eluant is neutralized with Ag2O, filtered to remove the AgCl precipitate, then freeze-dried to obtain solid AgNO3, which is then combusted to N2 in sealed quartz tubes for ?? 15N analysis. For ?? 18O analysis, aliquots of the neutralized eluant are processed further to remove non-nitrate oxygen-bearing anions and dissolved organic matter. Barium chloride is added to precipitate sulfate and phosphate; the solution is then filtered, passed through a cation exchange column to remove excess Ba2+, re-neutralized with Ag2O, filtered, agitated with activated carbon to remove dissolved organic matter and freeze-dried. The resulting AgNO3 is combusted with graphite in a closed tube to produce CO2, which is cryogenically purified and analyzed for its oxygen isotope composition. The 1?? analytical precisions for ??15N and ??18O are ?? 0.05%o and ??0.5???, respectively, for solutions of KNO3 standard processed through the entire column procedure. High concentrations of anions in solution can interfere with nitrate adsorption on the anion exchange resins, which may result in isotope fractionation of nitrogen and oxygen (fractionation experiments were conducted for nitrogen only; however, fractionation for oxygen is expected

  18. Equilibrium cycle pin by pin transport depletion calculations with DeCART

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Downar, T.; Taiwo, T.

    2012-07-01

    As the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) program has matured it has become more important to utilize more advanced simulation methods. The work reported here was performed as part of the AFCI fellowship program to develop and demonstrate the capability of performing high fidelity equilibrium cycle calculations. As part of the work here, a new multi-cycle analysis capability was implemented in the DeCART code which included modifying the depletion modules to perform nuclide decay calculations, implementing an assembly shuffling pattern description, and modifying iteration schemes. During the work, stability issues were uncovered with respect to converging simultaneously the neutron flux, isotopics, and fluid density and temperature distributions in 3-D. Relaxation factors were implemented which considerably improved the stability of the convergence. To demonstrate the capability two core designs were utilized, a reference UOX core and a CORAIL core. Full core equilibrium cycle calculations were performed on both cores and the discharge isotopics were compared. From this comparison it was noted that the improved modeling capability was not drastically different in its prediction of the discharge isotopics when compared to 2-D single assembly or 2-D core models. For fissile isotopes such as U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 the relative differences were 1.91%, 1.88%, and 0.59%), respectively. While this difference may not seem large it translates to mass differences on the order of tens of grams per assembly, which may be significant for the purposes of accounting of special nuclear material. (authors)

  19. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-07-01

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  20. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  1. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  2. Mathematical modeling of non-equilibrium sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliev, Ibragim A.; Mukhambetzhanov, Saltanbek T.; Sabitova, Gulnara S.; Sakhit, Anghyz E.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the system of equations modeling the process of non-equilibrium sorption. Difference approximation of differential problem by the implicit scheme is formulated. The solution of the difference problem is constructed using the sweep method. Based on the numerical results we can conclude the following: when the relaxation time decreases to 0, then the solution of non-equilibrium problem tends with increasing time to solution of the equilibrium problem.

  3. Utilization of the limit equilibrium and finite element methods for the stability analysis of the slope debris: An example of the Kalebasi District (NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemdag, Selcuk; Kaya, Ayberk; Karadag, Mustafa; Gurocak, Zulfu; Bulut, Fikri

    2015-06-01

    The stability of the slope debris in residential area of the Kalebasi District (Ozkurtun-Gumushane) was investigated using the Limit Equilibrium (LE) and Finite Element Shear-Strength Reduction (FE-SSR) methods. Along the survey lines, four trial pits were dug and fourteen boreholes having a total length of 345 m were drilled. Also, seismic refraction studies were conducted along the five lines. According to the field studies, thickness of the slope debris covering the 98 ha of the study area varies between 1 and 36 m. To determine the physical and shear strength properties of the slope debris, undisturbed samples were taken from the trial pits. As a result of the laboratory tests, soil categories of the debris were found to be as Clayey Sand (SC), Silty Sand (SM) and Low Plasticity Clay (CL). The deformation-controlled shear box tests were carried out to determine the shear strength parameters of the slope debris. According to these tests it was found that the peak cohesion and peak friction angle varies between 2.63-16.35 kN/m2 and 20-27°, respectively. Stability analyses were performed using the obtained data from field and laboratory investigations in the Slide v5.0 and Phase2 v6.0 software programs and results were compared. In LE stability analyses, the factor of safety (FOS) of survey lines were found to be as 1.44, 1.80, 1.96, and 1.72; however for the FE-SSR method they were determined as 1.39, 1.72, 1.59, and 1.58, respectively.

  4. Calcium isotopic composition of mantle peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Kang, J.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Ca isotopes are useful to decipher mantle evolution and the genetic relationship between the Earth and chondrites. It has been observed that Ca isotopes can be fractionated at high temperature [1-2]. However, Ca isotopic composition of the mantle peridotites and fractionation mechanism are still poorly constrained. Here, we report Ca isotope composition of 12 co-existing pyroxene pairs in 10 lherzolites, 1 harzburgite, and 1 wehrlite xenoliths collected from Hainan Island (South Eastern China). Ca isotope data were measured on a Triton-TIMS using the double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The long-term external error is 0.12‰ (2SD) based on repeated analyses of NIST SRM 915a and geostandards. δ44Ca of clinopyroxenes except that from the wehrlite ranges from 0.85‰ to 1.14‰, while opx yields a wide range from 0.98‰ up to 2.16‰. Co-existing pyroxene pairs show large ∆44Caopx-cpx (defined as δ44Caopx-δ44Cacpx) ranging from 0 to 1.23‰, reflecting equilibrium fractionation controlled by variable Ca contents in the opx. Notably, clinopyroxene of wehrlite shows extremely high δ44Ca (3.22‰). δ44Ca of the bulk lherzolites and harzburgites range from 0.86‰ to 1.14‰. This can be explained by extracting melts with slightly light Ca isotopic compositions. Finally, the high δ44Ca of the wehrlite (3.22‰) may reflect metasomatism by melt which has preferentially lost light Ca isotopes due to chemical diffusion during upwelling through the melt channel. [1] Amini et al (2009) GGR 33; [2] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292.

  5. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Method for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during long-term neutron dosimetry exposure

    DOEpatents

    Ruddy, Francis H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during-long term neutron dosimetry exposure. In one embodiment, duplicate pairs of solid state track recorder fissionable deposits are used, including a first, fissionable deposit of lower mass to quantify the number of fissions occuring during the exposure, and a second deposit of higher mass to quantify the number of atoms of for instance .sup.239 Pu by alpha counting. In a second embodiment, only one solid state track recorder fissionable deposit is used and the resulting higher track densities are counted with a scanning electron microscope. This method is also applicable to other burn-in interferences, e.g., .sup.233 U in .sup.232 Th or .sup.238 Pu in .sup.237 Np.

  7. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  8. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems. PMID:27078486

  9. Method for ultra-trace cesium isotope ratio measurements from environmental samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Mann, Nick R.; White, Byron M.

    2015-05-01

    135Cs/137Cs isotope ratios can provide the age, origin and history of environmental Cs contamination. Relatively high precision 135Cs/137Cs isotope ratio measurements from samples containing femtogram quantities of 137Cs are needed to accurately track contamination resuspension and redistribution following environmental 137Cs releases; however, mass spectrometric analyses of environmental samples are limited by the large quantities of ionization inhibitors and isobaric interferences which are present at relatively high concentrations in the environment. We report a new approach for Cs purification from environmental samples. An initial ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) column provides a robust method for extracting Cs under a wide variety of sample matrices and mass loads. Cation exchange separations using a second AMP-PAN column result in more than two orders of magnitude greater Cs/Rb separation factors than commercially available strong cation exchangers. Coupling an AMP-PAN cation exchanging step to a microcation column (AG50W resin) enables consistent 2-4% (2σ) measurement errors for samples containing 3-6,000 fg 137Cs, representing the highest precision 135Cs/137Cs ratio measurements currently reported for soil samples at the femtogram level.

  10. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants. PMID:26231074

  11. An isotopic method for testing the influence of leaf litter quality on carbon fluxes during decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Mauro; Lubritto, C; D'Onofrio, A; Terrasi, F; Gleixner, G; Cotrufo, M F

    2007-11-01

    During microbial breakdown of leaf litter a fraction of the C lost by the litter is not released to the atmosphere as CO(2) but remains in the soil as microbial byproducts. The amount of this fraction and the factors influencing its size are not yet clearly known. We performed a laboratory experiment to quantify the flow of C from decaying litter into the soil, by means of stable C isotopes, and tested its dependence on litter chemical properties. Three sets of (13)C-depleted leaf litter (Liquidambar styraciflua L., Cercis canadensis L. and Pinus taeda L.) were incubated in the laboratory in jars containing (13)C-enriched soil (i.e. formed C4 vegetation). Four jars containing soil only were used as a control. Litter chemical properties were measured using thermogravimetry (Tg) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS-C-IRMS). The respiration rates and the delta(13)C of the respired CO(2) were measured at regular intervals. After 8 months of incubation, soils incubated with both L. styraciflua and C. canadensis showed a significant change in delta(13)C (delta(13)C(final) = -20.2 +/- 0.4 per thousand and -19.5 +/- 0.5 per thousand, respectively) with respect to the initial value (delta(13)C(initial) = -17.7 +/- 0.3 per thousand); the same did not hold for soil incubated with P. taeda (delta(13)C(final:)-18.1 +/- 0.5 per thousand). The percentages of litter-derived C in soil over the total C loss were not statistically different from one litter species to another. This suggests that there is no dependence of the percentage of C input into the soil (over the total C loss) on litter quality and that the fractional loss of leaf litter C is dependent only on the microbial assimilation efficiency. The percentage of litter-derived C in soil was estimated to be 13 +/- 3% of total C loss. PMID:17665218

  12. Development of particle induced gamma-ray emission methods for nondestructive determination of isotopic composition of boron and its total concentration in natural and enriched samples.

    PubMed

    Chhillar, Sumit; Acharya, Raghunath; Sodaye, Suparna; Pujari, Pradeep K

    2014-11-18

    We report simple particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) methods using a 4 MeV proton beam for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the isotopic composition of boron ((10)B/(11)B atom ratio) and total boron concentrations in various solid samples with natural isotopic composition and enriched with (10)B. It involves measurement of prompt gamma-rays at 429, 718, and 2125 keV from (10)B(p,αγ)(7)Be, (10)B(p, p'γ)(10)B, and (11)B(p, p'γ)(11)B reactions, respectively. The isotopic composition of boron in natural and enriched samples was determined by comparing peak area ratios corresponding to (10)B and (11)B of samples to natural boric acid standard. An in situ current normalized PIGE method, using F or Al, was standardized for total B concentration determination. The methods were validated by analyzing stoichiometric boron compounds and applied to samples such as boron carbide, boric acid, carborane, and borosilicate glass. Isotopic compositions of boron in the range of 0.247-2.0 corresponding to (10)B in the range of 19.8-67.0 atom % and total B concentrations in the range of 5-78 wt % were determined. It has been demonstrated that PIGE offers a simple and alternate method for total boron as well as isotopic composition determination in boron based solid samples, including neutron absorbers that are important in nuclear technology. PMID:25312472

  13. Equilibrium thermodynamics of multiply substituted isotopologues of molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengrong; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.

    2004-12-01

    Isotopologues of molecular gases containing more than one rare isotope (multiply substituted isotopologues) can be analyzed with high precision (1σ <0.1 ‰), despite their low natural abundances (˜ ppm to ppt in air), and can constrain geochemical budgets of natural systems. We derive a method for calculating abundances of all such species in a thermodynamically equilibrated population of isotopologues, and present results of these calculations for O 2, CO, N 2, NO, CO 2, and N 2O between 1000 and 193 to 77 K. In most cases, multiply substituted isotopologues are predicted to be enriched relative to stochastic (random) distributions by ca. 1 to 2 ‰ at earth-surface temperatures. This deviation, defined as Δ i for isotopologue i, generally increases linearly with 1/T at temperatures ≤ 500 K. An exception is N 2O, which shows complex temperature dependences and 10's of per-mill enrichments or depletions of abundances for some isotopologues. These calculations provide a basis for discriminating between fractionations controlled by equilibrium thermodynamics and other sorts of isotopic fractionations in the budgets of atmospheric gases. Moreover, because abundances of multiply substituted isotopologues in thermodynamically equilibrated populations of molecules vary systematically with temperature, they can be used as geothermometers. Such thermometers are unusual in that they involve homogeneous rather than heterogeneous equilibria (e.g., isotopic distribution in gaseous CO 2 alone, rather than difference in isotopic composition between CO 2 and coexisting water). Also, multiple independent thermometers exist for all molecules having more than one multiply substituted isotopologue (e.g., thermometers based on abundances of 18O 13C 16O and 18O 12C 18O are independent); thus, temperatures estimated by this method can be tested for internal consistency.

  14. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  15. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Electron screening effects in (p,α) reactions induced on boron isotopes studied via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Carlin, N.; Cherubini, S.; Gameiro Munhoz, M.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Gulino, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Kubono, S.; La Cognata, M.; Li, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Wen, Qungang; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2013-04-01

    The Trojan Horse Method is a powerful indirect technique allowing one to measure the bare nucleus S(E)-factor and the electron screening potential for astrophysically relevant reactions without the needs of extrapolations. The case of the (p,α) reactions induced on the two boron isotopes 10,11B is here discussed in view of the recent Trojan Horse (TH) applications to the quasi-free 10,11B+2H reactions. The comparison between the TH and the low-energy direct data allowed us to determine the electron screening potential for the 11B(p,α) reaction, while preliminary results on the 10B(p,α) reaction have been extracted.

  17. A Method for Analyzing A+2 Isotope Patterns for Use in Undergraduate Organic Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Ray A.

    2007-01-01

    A novel ratio method is developed and automated for finding the bromine-chlorine-sulfur stoichiometry in the molecular formula of an unknown. This method is also useful in spectrometric analysis or beginning organic chemistry.

  18. Solvent effects on isotope effects: methyl cation as a model system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Philippe B; Weaver, Paul J; Greig, Ian R; Williams, Ian H

    2015-01-22

    The isotopic sensitivity (CH3(+) vs CD3(+)) of the equilibrium between the methyl cation in vacuum and in solution has been investigated. Two alternative options for describing the shape of the solute cavity within the widely used polarized continuum model for implicit solvation were compared; the UFF and UA0 methods give equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) that vary as a function of the dielectric constant in opposite directions. The same isotope effect was also obtained as the average over 40 structures from a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulation for the methyl cation explicitly solvated by many water molecules; the inverse value of the EIE agrees with UFF but not UA0. The opposing trends may be satisfactorily explained in terms of the different degrees of exposure of the atomic charges to the dielectric continuum in cavities of different shapes. PMID:25010417

  19. A preliminary report on methods of determining the age of Colorado plateau carnotite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stieff, Lorin Rollins; Girhard, M.N.; Stern, T.W.

    1950-01-01

    Four methods of dating Colorado Plateau carnotite have been examined and evaluated: mineralogic methods, radioactive-equilibrium methods, lead-uranium-ratio methods, and lead-isotope methods. The data on 12 high-grade samples, from a suite of 50 representative carnotite ores, are presented.

  20. Stable isotopes of authigenic minerals in variably-saturated fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.S.; Evans, D.D.

    1988-11-01

    Identifying stable isotope variation and mineralogical changes in fractured rock may help establish the history of climatic and geomorphological processes that might affect the isolation properties of a waste repository site. This study examines the use of the stable isotope ratios of oxygen ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in authigenic minerals as hydrogeochemical tools tracing low-temperature rock-water interaction in variably-saturated fractured stuff. Isotopic compositions of fracture-filling and rock matrix minerals in the Apache Leap tuff, near Superior, Arizona were concordant with geothermal temperatures and in equilibrium with water isotopically similar to present-day meteoric water and groundwater. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of fracture-filling, in unsaturated fractured tuff, displayed an isotopic gradient believed to result from near-surface isotopic enrichment due to evaporation rather than the effects of rock-water interaction. Oxygen isotope ratios of rock matrix opal samples exhibited an isotopic gradient believed to result from, leaching and reprecipitation of silica at depth. Methods and results can be used to further define primary flowpaths and the movement of water in variably-saturated fractured rock. 71 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experimental assessment of the purity of α-cellulose produced by variations of the Brendel method: Implications for stable isotope (δ13C, δ18O) dendroclimatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, Tom; Whittaker, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Stable isotope dendroclimatology using α-cellulose has unique potential to deliver multimillennial-scale, sub-annually resolved, terrestrial climate records. However, lengthy processing and analytical methods often preclude such reconstructions. Variants of the Brendel extraction method have reduced these limitations, providing fast, easy methods of isolating α-cellulose in some species. Here, we investigate application of Standard Brendel (SBrendel) variants to resinous soft-woods by treating samples of kauri (Agathis australis), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and huon pine (Lagarastrobus franklinii), varying reaction vessel, temperature, boiling time and reagent volume. Numerous samples were visibly `under-processed' and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) investigation showed absorption peaks at 1520 cm-1 and ˜1600 cm-1 in those fibers suggesting residual lignin and retained resin respectively. Replicate analyses of all samples processed at high temperature yielded consistent δ13C and δ18O despite color and spectral variations. Spectra and isotopic data revealed that α-cellulose δ13C can be altered during processing, most likely due to chemical contamination from insufficient acetone removal, but is not systematically affected by methodological variation. Reagent amount, temperature and extraction time all influence δ18O, however, and our results demonstrate that different species may require different processing methods. FTIR prior to isotopic analysis is a fast and cost effective way to determine α-cellulose extract purity. Furthermore, a systematic isotopic test such as we present here can also determine sensitivity of isotopic values to methodological variables. Without these tests, isotopic variability introduced by the method could obscure or `create' climatic signals within a data set.

  2. An evaluation of materials and methods for vapour measurement of the isotopic composition of pore water in deep, unsaturated zones.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Dyan L; Lu, Mengna; Lee Barbour, S; Jim Hendry, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of in situ vapour sampling methods to measure δ(2)H and δ(18)O in pore water of deep, unsaturated soil profiles, including mine tailings and waste rock, is required to improve our ability to track water migration through these deposits. To develop appropriate field sampling methods, a laboratory study was first undertaken to evaluate potential materials and sampling methods to collect and analyse vapour samples from unsaturated mine waste. Field methods were developed based on these findings and tested at two mine sites using either on-site analyses with a portable isotope laser spectrometer or sample collection and storage prior to laboratory analyses. The field sites included a series of deep (>50 m) multiport profiles within a coal waste rock dump and open wells installed in a sand tailings dyke at an oil sands mine. Laboratory results show that memory effects in sample bags and tubing require 3-5 pore volumes of vapour flushing prior to sample collection and sample storage times are limited to 24 h. Field sampling highlighted a number of challenges including the need to correct for sample humidity and in situ temperature. Best results were obtained when a portable laser spectrometer was used to measure vapour samples in situ. PMID:27002493

  3. Recoil distance transmission method: Measurement of interaction cross sections of excited states with fast rare-isotope beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Whitmore, K.; Iwasaki, H.

    2016-09-01

    The possible appearance of nuclear halos in ground and excited states close to the particle-decay threshold is of great importance in the investigation of nuclear structure and few-body correlations at the limit of stability. In order to obtain direct evidence of the halo structure manifested in nuclear excited states, we have considered a new method to measure the interaction cross sections of excited states. The combination of the transmission method and the recoil distance Doppler-shift method with a plunger device enables us to measure the number of interactions of the excited states in a target. Formulae to determine the interaction cross section are derived, and key issues to realize measurements are discussed. Dominant sources of errors are uncertainties in the excited-state lifetimes and γ-ray yields. We examine prototype experiments and perform simulations to study the impact of each uncertainty on the final result. This method provides a novel opportunity to perform cross section measurements on the excited states of rare isotopes.

  4. Development of a stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method for the Alternaria toxins tentoxin, dihydrotentoxin, and isotentoxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Rychlik, Michael

    2013-03-27

    For the Alternaria toxins tentoxin, dihydrotentoxin, and isotentoxin, a stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was first developed. Triply deuterated internal standards were prepared via total synthesis and introducing the labels in the last step before cyclization. Method validation was carried out by using potato starch, tomato puree, and white pepper powder as blank matrices. For the three toxins the limits of detection ranged from 0.10 to 0.99 μg/kg. The inter-/intraday relative standard deviations of the method were below 8.8%, and the recoveries ranged between 98 and 115%. Although cyclic peptides are known to show only negligible fragmentation, a low limit of detection was achieved with the optimization of mass spectrometry parameters and cleanup on C18-phenyl SPE columns providing a more selective binding of these phenyl-containing cyclic peptides. The method was applied to 103 food samples including bread, cereals, chips, juice, nuts, oil, sauce, seeds, and spices. Of these, 85% were contaminated with tentoxin and 55% were contaminated with dihydrotentoxin, whereas isotentoxin was not quantifiable. Maximal concentrations of tentoxin and dihydrotentoxin were 52.4 and 36.3 μg/kg, respectively, and were both detected in paprika powder. PMID:23432357

  5. Oxygen isotopes as a tracer of phosphate sources and cycling in aquatic systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. B.; Kendall, C.; Paytan, A.

    2013-12-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate can provide valuable information about sources and processes affecting phosphorus as it moves through hydrologic systems. Applications of this technique in soil and water have become more common in recent years due to improvements in extraction methods and instrument capabilities, and studies in multiple aquatic environments have demonstrated that some phosphorus sources may have distinct isotopic compositions within a given system. Under normal environmental conditions, the oxygen-phosphorus bonds in dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) can only be broken by enzymatic activity. Biological cycling of DIP will bring the phosphate oxygen into a temperature-dependent equilibrium with the surrounding water, overprinting any existing isotopic source signals. However, studies conducted in a wide range of estuarine, freshwater, and groundwater systems have found that the phosphate oxygen is often out of biological equilibrium with the water, suggesting that it is common for at least a partial isotopic source signal to be retained in aquatic systems. Oxygen isotope analysis on various potential phosphate sources such as synthetic and organic fertilizers, animal waste, detergents, and septic/wastewater treatment plant effluents show that these sources span a wide range of isotopic compositions, and although there is considerable overlap between the source groups, sources may be isotopically distinct within a given study area. Recent soil studies have shown that isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen is also useful for understanding microbial cycling across different phosphorus pools, and may provide insights into controls on phosphorus leaching. Combining stable isotope information from soil and water studies will greatly improve our understanding of complex phosphate cycling, and the increasing use of this isotopic technique across different environments will provide new information regarding anthropogenic phosphate inputs and

  6. Expanding lipid proxies to the next dimension: Developing methods for determination of oxygen isotope ratios in plant waxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T.; Silva, L. C. R.; Horwath, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    We seek to understand the δ18O signal of n-alkanols, a biosynthetically similar compound group to the highly studied n-alkanes. Alkanols of >24 carbons are produced at the leaf level, incorporating a transpiration enriched oxygen and hydrogen signal. The use of δ18O as a proxy is of great interest because of the more simplistic biosynthetic sourcing of oxygen in lipids. Complete equilibration of organic and water bound oxygen atoms is achieved in the Calvin cycle (all oxygen atoms are at some point in an exchangeable carbonyl group). This leads to a uniform signal among oxygen atoms incorporated through photosynthesis. Although it is analytically useful, the larger abundance of hydrogen isotopes in the same molecule leads to a more ambiguous signal, especially when integrating through soils and sediments. This study stems from recent work in our lab, which has shown significant relationships between an applied evapotranspiration deficit and δ18O in bulk lipid (hexane) extracts of plant material. While it is exciting that bulk lipids show this relationship, it is critical to first demonstrate that the isotopic signal is stable in order to use the signal from preserved alkanols as an integrator in soils and sediments. In this experiment, we show for the first time that a series of n-alkanols do not exchange oxygen with environmental water. Moving forward we are developing methods to address the analytical challenges of measuring oxygen isotope ratios of these compounds. Once this is overcome, we will be able to measure δD, δ18O, and δ13C from a single compound in a homogenized sample. The end result will be an improvement in the ability to interpret changes in field scale evapotranspiration, moving from a 2 dimensional (δD and δ13C only) to 3 dimensional (i.e. the addition of δ18O) model. This will apply to both modern and paleohydrologic relationships, improving our ability to reconstruct and predict the impacts of water balance variability across

  7. An Investigation Into the Molecular and Isotopic Composition of Diatom Frustule-Bound Organic Matter: Method Development for New Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridoux, M. C.; Ingalls, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Diatoms are single cell phytoplankton that are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems and are responsible for up to 40% of the carbon fixed annually in the ocean. Their intricately nanopatterned siliceous frustules are formed under the control of template organic molecules, some of which are incorporated into the frustule during growth. Several diatom frustule-based paleoproxies have been developed to exploit these microfossils because they are from a known phytoplankton source that is relatively unaltered from diagenesis. Among these proxies, diatom frustule-bound organic matter (OM) is recognized as a potentially important material for use in paleoreconstructions of past productivity (13C/12C), nutrient utilization (15N/14N) as well as to determine the radiocarbon age of sedimentary frustules (Δ14C). Despite numerous advances, diatom frustule-bound OM remains poorly characterized. Here we focus on the chemical characterization of diatom frustule-bound OM with the goal of developing molecular and compound-specific isotope methods to better reconstruct the past environments of diatom rich regions such as the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific. To do this, we 1) chemically cleaned diatom frustules, 2) dissolve them in HF to release organic compounds embedded in the frustules and 3) unambiguously characterized this organic matter by ion pairing reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to diode array, electrospray ionization - ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI/IT-MSn) and accurate mass quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF). These analyses reveal the presence of low molecular weight, UV light absorbing compounds called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and a series of long chain polyamines (LCPAs) consisting of N-methylated derivatives of polypropyleneimine units attached to putrescine. LCPAs are known to direct silicification, while MAAs are thought to provide sunscreen to many marine organisms. The presence of these specific biomarkers in sediment

  8. Nuclear Volume-Dependent Fractionation of Uranium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, S.; Schauble, E. A.; Anbar, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical reactions can fractionate isotopes because the magnitudes of equilibrium and rate constants are subtly sensitive to nuclear mass. Geoscientists have exploited this fact to learn about modern environmental processes and past environmental conditions by precisely measuring variations in the isotope compositions of a wide range of elements in natural materials. Here we present evidence from natural terrestrial samples that processes related to ¡°nuclear volume¡± rather than ¡°nuclear mass¡± significantly fractionate the isotope composition of the heaviest primordial element ¨C uranium. The isotopic composition of U in nature is generally assumed to be invariant. Here, we report variations of the 238U/235U isotope ratio in natural samples (basalts, granites, seawater, corals, black shales, suboxic sediments, ferro-manganese crusts/nodules and BIFs), which span a range of δ238U values of ~ 1.3 ‰, exceeding by far the analytical precision of our method (¡Ö 0.06‰, 2SD, based on replicate measurements of individual samples). The largest isotope variations found in our survey are between oxidized and reduced depositional environments, with seawater and suboxic sediments falling in between. U isotopes were analyzed with MC-ICP-MS. A mixed 236U-233U isotopic tracer (double spike) was used to correct for isotope fractionation during sample purification and instrumental mass bias. Sediments formed in oxic environments, such as manganese crusts from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, display δ238U of -0.54 to -0.62 ‰, slightly lighter than that of seawater (-0.41 ‰). However, sediments from reducing environments, such as black shales from the Black Sea (unit I and unit II) and the Cariaco basin, display heavy U isotope compositions with δ238U of up to +0.43 ‰ (0.84 ‰ heavier than seawater). Uranium enrichment in these sediments probably occurred during the reduction of soluble U(VI) (from seawater) to insoluble U(IV). Intriguingly, isotope

  9. Experimental methods for extracting seawater thorium isotopes from sediments as a proxy for dissolved dust inputs to the ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, T. L.; Robinson, L. F.; McManus, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Dust fertilisation of the ocean could have a significant impact on atmospheric CO2, primarily by stimulating productivity. But this mechanism is hard to test due to the challenges associated with reconstructing the dissolved fraction of dust to the ocean in the past. We have developed a method that uses thorium adsorbed from seawater onto the surface of settling marine particles to record these dissolved detrital inputs and applied it to a suite of core top sediments samples from a diverse range of oceanographic and sedimentary settings. All U and Th isotopes were analyzed by ICP mass spectrometry. Dissolved 232Th in seawater is derived exclusively from continental material. By contrast 230Th is produced in situ from the radiogenic decay of 234U in the water column so it can be used to account for sedimentary processes that would otherwise bias the 232Th record. We tested eight methods for isolating scavenged (seawater) thorium. These methods included acid leaches and complexing agents. Progressively stronger acid leaches gave higher 232Th yields, but with no significant change in the 232Th/230Th ratio for nine out of ten sites. In addition there is no relationship between the percent dissolution of the sediment and the amount of 232Th recovery. A red clay sample from the deep Atlantic presented the greatest difficulty in isolating the adsorbed from lattice-bound Th signal. There was only one case where the ratio was significantly higher when treated with the strongest acid, presumably indicative of some detrital dissolution during the procedure. Our results demonstrate that six methods are successful at isolating scavenged from lattice bound Th. The ten core top sediments, from the Pacific, Indian, Atlantic, and Southern Oceans have 232Th/230Th ratios that range from 2000 to 16000, and are close to the values predicted by modern water column measurements and present day dust loading. For example, a north south transect across the Southern Ocean shows a progressive

  10. Precision of glucose measurements in control sera by isotope dilution/mass spectrometry: proposed definitive method compared with a reference method

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, O.; Arratoon, C.

    1987-08-01

    This improved isotope-dilution gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method, in which (/sup 13/C)glucose is the internal standard, meets the requirements of a Definitive Method. In a first study with five reconstituted lyophilized sera, a nested analysis of variance of GC/MS values indicated considerable among-vial variation. The CV for 32 measurements per serum ranged from 0.5 to 0.9%. However, concentration and uncertainty values (mmol/L per gram of serum) assigned to one serum by the NBS Definitive Method (7.56 +/- 0.28) were practically identical to those obtained with the proposed method (7.57 +/- 0.20). In the second study, we used twice more (/sup 13/C)glucose diluent to assay four serum pools and two lyophilized sera. The CV ranged from 0.26 to 0.5% for the serum pools and from 0.28 to 0.59% for the lyophilized sera. In comparison, results by the hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase reference method agreed within acceptable limits with those by the Definitive Method but tended to be slightly higher (up to 3%) for lyophilized serum samples or slightly lower (up to 2.5%) for serum pools.

  11. Carbonate clumped isotope bond reordering and geospeedometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Henkes, Gregory A.

    2012-10-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on the preference of 13C and 18O to form bonds with each other. At elevated temperatures such bond ordering is susceptible to resetting by diffusion of C and O through the solid mineral lattice. This type of bond reordering has the potential to obscure primary paleoclimate information, but could also provide a basis for reconstructing shallow crustal temperatures and cooling rates. We determined Arrhenius parameters for solid-state reordering of C-O bonds in two different calcites through a series of laboratory heating experiments. We find that the calcites have different susceptibilities to solid-state reordering. Reaction progress follows a first order rate law in both calcites, but only after an initial period of non-first order reaction that we suggest relates to annealing of nonequilibrium defects when the calcites are first heated to experimental temperature. We show that the apparent equilibrium temperature equations (or "closure temperature" equations) for carbonate clumped isotope reordering are analogous Dodson's equations for first order loss of daughter isotopes. For each calcite, the sensitivity of apparent equilibrium temperature to cooling rate is sufficiently high for inference of cooling rates within a factor of ˜5 or better for cooling rates ranging from tens of degrees per day to a few degrees per million years. However, because the calcites have different susceptibilities to reordering, each calcite defines its own cooling rate-apparent equilibrium temperature relationship. The cooling rates of Carrara marble inferred from carbonate clumped isotope geospeedometry are 10-6-10-3 degrees per annum and are in broad agreement with rates inferred from thermochronometric methods. Cooling rates for 13C-depleted calcites from the late Neoproterozoic Doushantou cap carbonates in south China are on the order of 102-104 degrees per annum, consistent with rapid cooling following formation of these calcites by a

  12. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Jakob

    1991-01-01

    A method of yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus.

  13. Hybrid isotope separation scheme

    DOEpatents

    Maya, J.

    1991-06-18

    A method is described for yielding selectively a desired enrichment in a specific isotope including the steps of inputting into a spinning chamber a gas from which a scavenger, radiating the gas with a wave length or frequency characteristic of the absorption of a particular isotope of the atomic or molecular gas, thereby inducing a photochemical reaction between the scavenger, and collecting the specific isotope-containing chemical by using a recombination surface or by a scooping apparatus. 2 figures.

  14. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  15. Evaluating the fate of chlorinated ethenes in streambed sediments by combining stable isotope, geochemical and microbial methods.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yumiko; Aravena, Ramon; Zopfi, Jakob; Parker, Beth; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2009-06-26

    The occurrence of chlorinated ethene transformation in a streambed was investigated using concentration and carbon isotope data from water samples taken at different locations and depths within a 15 x 25 m study area across which a tetrachloroethene (PCE) plume discharges. Furthermore, it was evaluated how the degree of transformation is related to groundwater discharge rates, redox conditions, solid organic matter content (SOM) and microbial factors. Groundwater discharge rates were quantified based on streambed temperatures, and redox conditions using concentrations of dissolved redox-sensitive species. The degree of chlorinated ethene transformation was highly variable in space from no transformation to transformation beyond ethene. Complete reductive dechlorination to ethane and ethene occurred at locations with at least sulfate-reducing conditions and with a residence time in the samples streambed zone (80 cm depth) of at least 10 days. Among these locations, Dehalococcoides was detected using a PCR method where SOM contents were >2% w/w and where transformation proceeded beyond ethene. However, it was not detected at locations with low SOM, which may cause an insufficient H(2) supply to sustain a detectably dense Dehalococcoides population. Additionally, it is possible that other organisms are responsible for the biodegradation. A microcosm study with streambed sediments demonstrated the potential of VC oxidation throughout the site even at locations without a pre-exposure to VC, consistent with the detection of the epoxyalkane:coenzyme M transferase (EaCoMT) gene involved in the degradation of chlorinated ethenes via epoxidation. In contrast, no aerobic transformation of cDCE in microcosms over a period of 1.5 years was observed. In summary, the study demonstrated that carbon isotope analysis is a sensitive tool to identify the degree of chlorinated ethene transformation even in hydrologically and geochemically complex streambed systems. In addition, it was

  16. Dual-isotope method for determination of human zinc absorption: the use of a test meal of turkey meat

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, P.R.; Cluett, J.; Chamberlain, M.J.; Valberg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The percentage of /sup 65/Zn taken up (absorbed) from extrinsically labeled turkey meat was calculated from the amounts of /sup 65/Zn and a nonabsorbed /sup 51/Cr marker present in the body or in a single stool specimen after 1-2 d. /sup 51/CrCl/sub 3/ proved to be a suitable marker for unabsorbed /sup 65/Zn and so the early determination of /sup 65/Zn absorption was possible. With stool counting, /sup 65/Zn absorption data from first stool samples after 1-2 d were accurate as judged by correlation with the amount of /sup 65/Zn in the body 7-10 d later (retention); results from subsequent stools gave lower absorption values due to the early excretion of some absorbed /sup 65/Zn. The dual-isotope method gave reproducible results when four successive tests of zinc absorption were carried out in a group of six subjects. The average (mean +/- SD) /sup 65/Zn absorption from turkey meals containing 31 mumol (2 mg) and 46 mumol (3 mg) of zinc was 39 +/- 8% and 29 +/- 6%, respectively, measured by stool counting; /sup 65/Zn absorption and retention correlated well in both studies. A series of different beverages was given in place of water with the turkey meal. Orange juice significantly reduced /sup 65/Zn absorption and milk also showed this tendency, but tea, whiskey, wine or beer had no significant effect on the absorption of /sup 65/Zn from the turkey meal. In groups of subjects the mean ratio of /sup 65/Zn absorption from extrinsically labeled turkey meat on two occasions (1.06) was not significantly different from that of the absorption of extrinsic to intrinsic /sup 65/Zn labels (1.16). The dual-isotope technique with either stool or body counting is suitable for the rapid determination of /sup 65/Zn absorption from extrinsically labeled turkey within 2 d.

  17. A novel method of carbon dioxide clumped isotope analysis with tunable infra-red laser direct absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, Ivan; Kluge, Tobias; Janssen, Christof

    2016-04-01

    Precise clumped isotopes analysis of carbon dioxide opens up new horizons of atmospheric and biogeochemical research. Recent advances in laser and spectroscopic techniques provides us necessary instrumentation to access extremely low sub-permill variations of multiply-substituted isotopologues. We present an advanced analysis method of carbon dioxide clumped isotopes using direct absorption spectroscopy. Our assessments predict the ultimate precision of the new method on the sub-permill level comparable to state of the art mass spectrometry. Among the most auspicious intrinsic properties of this method we highlight genuine Δ16O13C18O and Δ16O13C18O measurements without isobaric interference, measurement cycle duration of several minutes versus hours for mass spectrometric analysis, reduced sample size of ˜ 10 μmol and high flexibility, allowing us to perform in-situ measurements. The pilot version of the instrument is being developed in an international collaboration framework between Heidelberg University, Germany and Pierre and Marie Curie University, Paris, France. It employs two continuous interband quantum cascade lasers tuned at 4.439 μm and 4.329 μm to measure doubly ( 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O) and singly ( 16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, 16O12C17O, 16O12C18O) substituted isotopologues, respectively. Two identical Herriot cells are filled with dry pure CO2 sample and reference gas at working pressure of 1 ‑ 10 mbar. Cells provide optical path lengths of ˜ 17 m for the laser tuned at doubly substituted isotopologues lines and use a single pass for the laser tuned at the stronger lines of singly substituted isotopologues. Light outside of the gas cells is coupled into optical fiber to avoid absorption by ambient air CO2. Simulations predict sub-permill precision at working pressure of 1 mbar and room temperature stabilised at the ±10 mK level. Our prime target is to apply the proposed method for continuous in-situ analysis of CO2. We are foreseeing potential

  18. Isotopic Biogeochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is provided of the biogeochemical research. The funding, productivity, personnel and facilities are reviewed. Some of the technical areas covered are: carbon isotopic records; isotopic studies of banded iron formations; isotope effects in microbial systems; studies of organic compounds in ancient sediments; and development in isotopic geochemistry and analysis.

  19. Sensitive isotope dilution liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of acrylamide in chocolate.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yiping; Zhang, Yu; Jiao, Jingjing; Cai, Zengxuan; Zhang, Ying

    2006-03-01

    Isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was applied to the quantification of acrylamide in chocolate matrixes (dark chocolate, milk chocolate, chocolate with nuts, chocolate with almonds, and chocolate with wheat best element). The method included defatting with petroleum ether, extracting with aqueous solution of 2 mol l(-1) sodium chloride and clean-up by solid-phase (SPE) with OASIS HLB 6 cm3 cartridges. Acrylamide was detected with an Atlantis dC18 5 microm 210 x 1.5 mm column using 10% methanol/0.1% formic acid in water as the mobile phase. The analytical method was in-house validated and good results were obtained with respect to repeatability (RSD < 3.5%) and recovery (86-93%), which fulfilled the requirements defined by European Union legislation. The acrylamide levels in chocolate were 23-537 microg kg(-1). Therefore, the method was successfully used for the quantitative analysis of acrlyamide in various chocolate products. PMID:16517524

  20. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  1. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: Implications for planetary accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, Samuel; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Impact-induced devolatilization of porous serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery and the solid recovery method, each yielding nearly identical results. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization, the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved H2O is very close to that of the starting material. For shock pressures at which up to 12 percent impact-induced devolatilization occurs, the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at these higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. Gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition. Bulk gas-residual solid isotopic fractionations indicate nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can strongly affect the long-term planetary isotopic ratios of planetary bodies, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. Depending on the model used for extrapolation of the isotopic fractionation to devolatilization fractions greater than those investigated experimentally can result from this process.

  2. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHODS FOR LEAD ISOTOPES AND TRACE ELEMENTS IN NIST SRM 1400 BONE ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of an interlaboratory comparison are reported for he lead isotope composition and for trace element concentrations in NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash obtained using quadrupole and magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and (for the Pb isotopes on...

  3. A method for the routine determination of methylmercury in marine tissue by GC isotope dilution-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Valdersnes, Stig; Maage, Amund; Fliegel, Daniel; Julshamn, Kåre

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no legal limit for methyl mercury (MeHg) in food; thus, no standardized method for the determination of MeHg in seafood exists within the European jurisdiction. In anticipation of a future legislative limit an inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-ID-MS) method was developed in collaboration with the European Standardization Organization (CEN). The method comprises spiking the tissue sample with Me201Hg, followed by decomposition with tetramethylammonium hydroxide, pH adjustment and derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate, and finally organic extraction of the derivatized MeHg in a hexane phase. Subsequently, the sample is analyzed via GC-ICP-MS and the result calculated using the ID equation. The working range of the method was 0.0005-1.321 mg/kg MeHg in marine tissue, with an internal reproducibility (RSD) of 12-1%. The method was validated based on statistical measures, such as the z-scores, using the commercially available reference materials from National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material (NIST SRM) 1566b, NIST SRM 2977 and National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) TORT 2, NRCC, DORM 3, NRCC DOLT 4, and European Reference Material (ERM) CE 464. Z-scores for all standard reference materials, except for NIST SRM 1566b, were better than 11.51. The wide range of marine tissues used during the validation ensures that the method will be applicable for measuring of MeHg in seafood matrixes of all kinds. PMID:22970590

  4. Isotopic Methods for Determining the Relative Importance of Bioavailability Versus Trophic Position in Controlling Mercury Concentrations in Everglades Mosquitofish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, B. E.; Kendall, C.

    2007-12-01

    The concentration of mercury in fish tissues is widely used as an indicator of the magnitude of mercury contamination in aquatic ecosystems. Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrookii) is an important sentinel species used for this purpose in the varied environments of the Florida Everglades, because mosquitofish are abundant, have a short lifespan, and migrate little. Like other freshwater fish, the primary route of mercury uptake into mosquitofish tissues is through diet as bioavailable methylmercury. Yet, it is unclear whether variations in mosquitofish mercury observed across the Everglades are due primarily to differences in bioaccumulation (i.e., trophic position) or abundance of methylmercury available to the food web base. We use isotopic methods to investigate the importance of these two controls on mosquitofish mercury at the landscape scale. As part of the USEPA REMAP project, mosquitofish and periphyton were collected during September 1996 from over one hundred sites throughout the Everglades and analyzed for mercury concentration. The USGS analyzed splits of the samples for nitrogen (d15N), carbon (d13C), and sulfur (d34S) isotopic composition, to investigate the causes of mercury variations. The d15N value of tissues is often used to estimate the relative trophic positions of organisms in a food web, and should correlate positively with tissue mercury if bioaccumulation is an important control on mosquitofish mercury concentration. The d13C value can be useful for detecting differences in food web base (e.g., algal versus detrital), and thus the entry point of contaminants. Tissue d34S potentially indicates the extent of dissimilatory sulfate reduction in sediments, a process used by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) during conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to bioavailable methylmercury. Because this process increases the d34S value of remaining sulfate, which enters the food web base, mosquitofish sulfur isotopes should show positive correlations with SRB

  5. Position-Specific Isotope Analysis of Xanthines: A (13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Method to Determine the (13)C Intramolecular Composition at Natural Abundance.

    PubMed

    Diomande, Didier G; Martineau, Estelle; Gilbert, Alexis; Nun, Pierrick; Murata, Ariaki; Yamada, Keita; Watanabe, Naoharu; Tea, Illa; Robins, Richard J; Yoshida, Naohiro; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-07-01

    The natural xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are of major commercial importance as flavor constituents in coffee, cocoa, tea, and a number of other beverages. However, their exploitation for authenticity, a requirement in these commodities that have a large origin-based price-range, by the standard method of isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS) is limited. We have now developed a methodology that overcomes this deficit that exploits the power of isotopic quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry combined with chemical modification of the xanthines to enable the determination of positional intramolecular (13)C/(12)C ratios (δ(13)Ci) with high precision. However, only caffeine is amenable to analysis: theobromine and theophylline present substantial difficulties due to their poor solubility. However, their N-methylation to caffeine makes spectral acquisition feasible. The method is confirmed as robust, with good repeatability of the δ(13)Ci values in caffeine appropriate for isotope fractionation measurements at natural abundance. It is shown that there is negligible isotope fractionation during the chemical N-methylation procedure. Thus, the method preserves the original positional δ(13)Ci values. The method has been applied to measure the position-specific variation of the (13)C/(12)C distribution in caffeine. Not only is a clear difference between caffeine isolated from different sources observed, but theobromine from cocoa is found to show a (13)C pattern distinct from that of caffeine. PMID:26067163

  6. Determination of niobium in rocks by an isotope dilution spectrophotometric method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Campbell, E.Y.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks and minerals are fused with sodium peroxide in the presence of carrierfree 95Nb. The fusion cake is leached with water and the precipitate dissolved in hydrofluoric-sulfuric acid mixture. Niobium is extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone and further purified by ion exchange. The amount of niobium is determined spectrophotometrically with 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcinol, and the chemical yield of the separations determined by counting 95Nb. This procedure is faster and less sensitive to interferences than previously proposed methods for determining niobium in rocks.The high purity of the separated niobium makes the method applicable to nearly all matrices. ?? 1970.

  7. Mass spectrometric methods for the direct elemental and isotopic analysis of solid material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, A. A.; Gubal, A. R.; Potapov, S. V.; Agafonova, N. N.; Nemets, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the direct analysis of solids have a number of undeniable advantages over the methods that require preliminary dissolution of samples. High sensitivity and selectivity make the direct mass spectrometric techniques the most in-demand. The review concerns spark source mass spectrometry, laser ionization mass spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, secondary neutral mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry. Basic principles, analytical characteristics and trends in the development of these techniques are discussed. Particular attention is given to applications of the techniques as well as to their competitive advantages and drawbacks. The bibliography includes 123 references.

  8. A Stable Isotope Method for the Simultaneous Measurement of Matrix Synthesis and Cell Proliferation in Articular Cartilage In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kelvin W.; Siraj, Sebrin A.; Cheng, Erika W.; Awada, Mohamad; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Turner, Scott M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Measurements of cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in cartilage explants have identified regulatory factors (e.g., interleukin 1, IL-1) that contribute to osteoarthritis and anabolic mediators (e.g., BMP-7) that may have therapeutic potential. The objective of this study was to develop a robust method for measuring cell proliferation and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in articular cartilage that could be applied in vivo. Methods A stable isotope-mass spectrometry approach was validated by measuring the metabolic effects of IL-1 and BMP-7 in cultures of mature and immature bovine cartilage explants. The method was also applied in vivo to quantify physiologic turnover rates of matrix and cells in the articular cartilage of normal rats. Heavy water was administered to explants in the culture medium and to rats via drinking water, and cartilage was analyzed for labeling of chondroitin sulfate (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA) and DNA. Results As expected, IL-1 inhibited the synthesis of DNA and CS in cartilage explants. However, IL-1 inhibited HA synthesis only in immature cartilage. Futhermore, BMP-7 was generally stimulatory, but immature cartilage was significantly more responsive than mature cartilage, particularly in terms of HA and DNA synthesis. In vivo, labeling of CS and DNA in normal rats for up to a year indicated half-lives of 22 and 862 days, respectively, in the joint. Conclusions We describe a method by which deuterium from heavy water is traced into multiple metabolites from a single cartilage specimen to profile its metabolic activity. This method was demonstrated in tissue culture and rodents but may have significant clinical applications. PMID:19230856

  9. Sequential injection method for rapid and simultaneous determination of 236U, 237Np, and Pu isotopes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2013-11-19

    An automated analytical method implemented in a novel dual-column tandem sequential injection (SI) system was developed for simultaneous determination of (236)U, (237)Np, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu in seawater samples. A combination of TEVA and UTEVA extraction chromatography was exploited to separate and purify target analytes, whereupon plutonium and neptunium were simultaneously isolated and purified on TEVA, while uranium was collected on UTEVA. The separation behavior of U, Np, and Pu on TEVA-UTEVA columns was investigated in detail in order to achieve high chemical yields and complete purification for the radionuclides of interest. (242)Pu was used as a chemical yield tracer for both plutonium and neptunium. (238)U was quantified in the sample before the separation for deducing the (236)U concentration from the measured (236)U/(238)U atomic ratio in the separated uranium target using accelerator mass spectrometry. Plutonium isotopes and (237)Np were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is robust and efficient, providing satisfactory chemical yields (70-100%) of target analytes and relatively short analytical time (8 h/sample). PMID:24134480

  10. A novel method to measure isotopic labeled gas-phase nitrous acid (HO15NO) in biogeochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianming; Kampf, Christopher; Pöschl, Ulrich; Oswald, Robert; Cui, Junfang; Ermel, Michael; Hu, Chunsheng; Trebs, Ivonne; Sörgel, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    We developed a new method (gas-phase stripping-derivatization coupled to LC-MS) to measure the 15N atom percent excess (APE) of HONO in the gas-phase. Gaseous HONO is quantitatively collected and transferred to an azo dye by the well-known Griess reaction in the Long Path Absorption Photometer (LOPAP). The reaction solutions containing the dye are collected at the outflow of the LOPAP, purified by solid-phase extraction and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). The unlabeled azo dye (C18H19O2N5S) with a monoisotopic molecular mass of 369.41 g mol-1 can be detected as its protonated molecular ion ([M+H+], M) by HPLC-MS at a retention time of 2.8 min. Due to the natural isotope distribution M + 0, M + 1, M + 2, and M + 3 ions were considered for the calculation of the 15N APE. The optimal working range was found to be between 20 and 50% for the 15N/14N ratio. The optimum pH and solvents for extraction by SPE and potential interferences are discussed. The method has been applied for the measurement of HO15NO emissions from soil in a dynamic chamber with and without spiking 15N labeled urea. Our results confirm biogenic HONO emissions from soil as HO15NO was measured after addition of 15N urea.

  11. Detection of adulteration in honey samples added various sugar syrups with 13C/12C isotope ratio analysis method.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Murat

    2013-06-01

    Honey can be adulterated in various ways. One of the adulteration methods is the addition of different sugar syrups during or after honey production. Starch-based sugar syrups, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), glucose syrup (GS) and saccharose syrups (SS), which are produced from beet or canes, can be used for adulterating honey. In this study, adulterated honey samples were prepared with the addition of HFCS, GS and SS (beet sugar) at a ratio of 0%, 10%, 20%, 40% and 50% by weight. (13)C/(12)C analysis was conducted on these adulterated honey samples using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer in combination with an elemental analyser (EA-IRMS). As a result, adulteration using C(4) sugar syrups (HFCS and GS) could be detected to a certain extent while adulteration of honey using C(3) sugar syrups (beet sugar) could not be detected. Adulteration by using SS (beet sugar) still has a serious detection problem, especially in countries in which beet is used in manufacturing sugar. For this reason, practice and analysis methods are needed to meet this deficit and to detect the adulterations precisely in the studies that will be conducted. PMID:23411291

  12. Isotope dilution gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the determination of isoflavonoids, coumestrol, and lignans in food samples.

    PubMed

    Mazur, W; Fotsis, T; Wähälä, K; Ojala, S; Salakka, A; Adlercreutz, H

    1996-01-15

    We present a method for the quantitative determination of the phytoestrogens formononetin, biochanin A, daidzein, genistein, and coumestrol and simultaneously the lignans secoisolariciresinol (SECO) and matairesinol in plant-derived foods. These compounds are measured by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the selected ion monitoring mode (ID/GC/MS/SIM) using synthesized deuterated internal standards for the correction of losses during the procedure. A three-step hydrolysis--a rehydration with distilled H2O, followed by enzymatic and acid hydrolysis--has been applied in order to convert the diphenolic glycosides into their respective aglycones. Purification and separation are carried out in two ion-exchange chromatographic steps followed by derivatization and GC-MS. The within-assay imprecision values vary 3.1-9.6% and the between-assay imprecision 7.0-21.2%. The mean recovery of authentic standards processed through the whole procedure varied from 95.5 to 105.5%. Values for some different food samples are presented. The simultaneous determination of the biologically most interesting phytoestrogens and lignans in foods has not been carried out previously and the method will be useful for screening of important foods in populations with different risk of cancer and coronary heart disease, and for metabolic studies. PMID:8789715

  13. Low-temperature, non-stoichiometric oxygen isotope exchange coupled to Fe(II)-goethite interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Beard, Brian L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Spicuzza, Michael J.; Valley, John W.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of natural iron oxide minerals has been widely used as a paleoclimate proxy. Interpretation of their stable isotope compositions, however, requires accurate knowledge of isotopic fractionation factors and an understanding of their isotopic exchange kinetics, the latter of which informs us how diagenetic processes may alter their isotopic compositions. Prior work has demonstrated that crystalline iron oxides do not significantly exchange oxygen isotopes with pure water at low temperature, which has restricted studies of isotopic fractionation factors to precipitation experiments or theoretical calculations. Using a double three-isotope method (¹⁸O-¹⁷O-¹⁶O and ⁵⁷Fe-⁵⁶Fe-⁵⁴Fe) we compare O and Fe isotope exchange kinetics, and demonstrate, for the first time, that O isotope exchange between structural O in crystalline goethite and water occurs in the presence of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq) at ambient temperature (i.e., 22–50 °C). The three-isotope method was used to extrapolate partial exchange results to infer the equilibrium, mass-dependent isotope fractionations between goethite and water. In addition, this was combined with a reversal approach to equilibrium by reacting goethite in two unique waters that vary in composition by about 16‰ in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Our results show that interactions between Fe(II)aq and goethite catalyzes O isotope exchange between the mineral and bulk fluid; no exchange (within error) is observed when goethite is suspended in ¹⁷O-enriched water in the absence of Fe(II)aq. In contrast, Fe(II)-catalyzed O isotope exchange is accompanied by significant changes in ¹⁸O/¹⁶O ratios. Despite significant O exchange, however, we observed disproportionate amounts of Fe versus O exchange, where Fe isotope exchange in goethite was roughly three times that of O. This disparity provides novel insight into the reactivity of oxide minerals in aqueous

  14. Continuous measurements of isotopic composition of water vapour on the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, Mathieu; Landais, Amaelle; Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Genthon, Christophe; Kerstel, Erik; Kassi, Samir; Arnaud, Laurent; Picard, Ghislain; Prie, Frederic; Cattani, Olivier; Steen-Larsen, Hans-Christian; Vignon, Etienne; Cermak, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Water stable isotopes in central Antarctic ice cores are critical to quantify past temperature changes. Accurate temperature reconstructions require one to understand the processes controlling surface snow isotopic composition. Isotopic fractionation processes occurring in the atmosphere and controlling snowfall isotopic composition are well understood theoretically and implemented in atmospheric models. However, post-deposition processes are poorly documented and understood. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum between surface water vapour, precipitation, surface snow and buried snow. Here, we target the isotopic composition of water vapour at Concordia Station, where the oldest EPICA Dome C ice cores have been retrieved. While snowfall and surface snow sampling is routinely performed, accurate measurements of surface water vapour are challenging in such cold and dry conditions. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed at Concordia, allowing continuous, in situ measurements for 1 month in December 2014-January 2015. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with laboratory measurements of discrete samples trapped using cryogenic sampling validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. We observe very large diurnal cycles in isotopic composition well correlated with temperature diurnal cycles. Identification of different behaviours of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated with turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction. Even if the vapour isotopic composition seems to be, at least part of the time, at equilibrium with the local snow, the slope of δD against δ18O prevents us from identifying a unique origin leading

  15. 13C Isotope-Assisted Methods for Quantifying Glutamine Metabolism in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ahn, Woo Suk; Gameiro, Paulo A.; Keibler, Mark A.; Zhang, Zhe; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine has recently emerged as a key substrate to support cancer cell proliferation, and the quantification of its metabolic flux is essential to understand the mechanisms by which this amino acid participates in the metabolic rewiring that sustains the survival and growth of neoplastic cells. Glutamine metabolism involves two major routes, glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation, both of which begin with the deamination of glutamine to glutamate and the conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate. In glutaminolysis, α-ketoglutarate is oxidized via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and decarboxylated to pyruvate. In reductive carboxylation, α-ketoglutarate is reductively converted into isocitrate, which is isomerized to citrate to supply acetyl-CoA for de novo lipogenesis. Here, we describe methods to quantify the metabolic flux of glutamine through these two routes, as well as the contribution of glutamine to lipid synthesis. Examples of how these methods can be applied to study metabolic pathways of oncological relevance are provided. PMID:24862276

  16. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  17. An Isotope Dilution Method for High-frequency Measurements of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon concentration in the Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Bender, M. L.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Cassar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is one of the most important species in the ocean carbon system. An autonomous system using isotope dilution as its core method has been developed to obtain high-frequency measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the surface ocean. This system accurately mixes a seawater sample and a 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate solution (spike). The mixed solution is then acidified and sent through a gas permeable membrane contactor. CO2 derived from DIC in the mixture is extracted by a CO2-free gas stream, and is sent to a cavity ring-down spectrometer to analyze its 13C/12C ratio. [DIC] of the seawater can then be derived from the measured 13C/12C, the known mixing ratio and the [DI13C] of the spike. The method has been tested under a wide [DIC] range (1800-2800 μmol/kg) in the laboratory. It has also been deployed on a cruise that surveyed ocean waters to the south of Florida. At a sampling resolution of 4 minutes (15 samples per hour), the relative standard deviation of DIC determined from the laboratory tests and the field deployment is ×0.07% and ×0.09%, respectively. The accuracy of the method is better than 0.1% except where [DIC] varies faster than 5 μmol/kg per minute. Based on the laboratory and field evaluations, we conclude that this method can provide accurate underway [DIC] measurements at high resolution in most oceanic regions. Schematic illustration of the work flow.

  18. Equilibrium games in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng; Peng, Pan

    2014-12-01

    It seems a universal phenomenon of networks that the attacks on a small number of nodes by an adversary player Alice may generate a global cascading failure of the networks. It has been shown (Li et al., 2013) that classic scale-free networks (Barabási and Albert, 1999, Barabási, 2009) are insecure against attacks of as small as O(logn) many nodes. This poses a natural and fundamental question: Can we introduce a second player Bob to prevent Alice from global cascading failure of the networks? We proposed a game in networks. We say that a network has an equilibrium game if the second player Bob has a strategy to balance the cascading influence of attacks by the adversary player Alice. It was shown that networks of the preferential attachment model (Barabási and Albert, 1999) fail to have equilibrium games, that random graphs of the Erdös-Rényi model (Erdös and Rényi, 1959, Erdös and Rényi, 1960) have, for which randomness is the mechanism, and that homophyly networks (Li et al., 2013) have equilibrium games, for which homophyly and preferential attachment are the underlying mechanisms. We found that some real networks have equilibrium games, but most real networks fail to have. We anticipate that our results lead to an interesting new direction of network theory, that is, equilibrium games in networks.

  19. Phonon Mapping in Flowing Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, J. P. C.

    2015-03-01

    When a material conducts heat, a modification of the phonon population occurs. The equilibrium Bose-Einstein distribution is perturbed towards flowing-equilibrium, for which the distribution function is not analytically known. Here I argue that the altered phonon population can be efficiently mapped over broad regions of reciprocal space, via diffuse x-ray scattering or time-of-flight neutron scattering, while a thermal gradient is applied across a single crystal sample. When compared to traditional transport measurements, this technique offers a superior, information-rich new perspective on lattice thermal conductivity, wherein the band and momentum dependences of the phonon thermal current are directly resolved. The proposed method is benchmarked using x-ray thermal diffuse scattering measurements of single crystal diamond under transport conditions. CHESS is supported by the NSF & NIH/NIGMS via NSF Award DMR-1332208.

  20. 3D quantification of dynamic fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media with fast x-ray microtomography: A comparison with quasi-equilibrium methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisenheimer, D.; Brueck, C. L.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray microtomography imaging of fluid-fluid interfaces in three-dimensional porous media allows for the testing of thermodynamically derived predictions that seek a unique relationship between capillary pressure, fluid saturation, and specific interfacial area (Pc-Sw-Anw). Previous experimental studies sought to test this functional dependence under quasi-equilibrium conditions (assumed static on the imaging time-scale); however, applying predictive models developed under static conditions for dynamic scenarios can lead to substantial flaws in predicted outcomes. Theory and models developed using dynamic data can be verified using fast x-ray microtomography which allows for the unprecedented measurement of developing interfacial areas, curvatures, and trapping behaviors of fluid phases in three-dimensional systems. We will present results of drainage and imbibition experiments of air and water within a mixture of glass beads. The experiments were performed under both quasi-equilibrium and dynamic conditions at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Fast x-ray microtomography was achieved by utilizing the high brilliance of the x-ray beam at the APS under pink-beam conditions where the white beam is modified with a 4 mm Al absorber and a 0.8 mrad Pt-coated mirror to eliminate low and high-energy photons, respectively. We present a comparison of the results from the quasi-equilibrium and dynamic experiments in an effort to determine if the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is comparable under either experimental condition and to add to the discussion on whether the Pc-Sw-Anw relationship is unique as hypothesized by existing theory.

  1. Equilibrium deformations and excitation energies of single-quasiproton band heads of rare-earth nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarewicz, W.; Riley, M. A.; Garrett, J. D.

    1990-05-01

    Noncollective single-proton states in odd- Z (Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, Ta, Ir and Au) rare-earth nuclei have been calculated using the shell correction method with an average Woods-Saxon potential and a monopole pairing residual interaction. Calculated equilibrium deformations of the lowest single-proton states are presented, and calculated band head excitation energies are compared with experimental proton band heads for odd- Z rare-earth nuclei. Good agreement is found between the experimental and calculated band heads. We find that strong polarisation effects due to the odd proton explain many of the systematic trends of known band heads. Different deformation driving forces of the odd-proton orbitals can also partly explain deviations seen in high-spin data. Shape co-existence effects in Ir and Au isotopes are discussed. In addition, equilibrium deformations of even-even rare-earth nuclei are computed and compared with experimental values.

  2. International experiences in assessing vitamin A status and applying the vitamin A-labeled isotope dilution method.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Teros, Veronica; Chileshe, Justin; Idohou-Dossou, Nicole; Fajarwati, Tetra; Medoua Nama, Gabriel; Newton, Sam; Vinod Kumar, Malavika; Wang, Zhixu; Wasantwisut, Emorn; Hunt, Janet R

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate vitamin A (VA) nutrition continues to be a major problem worldwide, and many interventions being implemented to improve VA status in various populations need to be evaluated. The interpretation of results after an intervention depends greatly on the method selected to assess VA status. To evaluate the effect of an intervention on VA status, researchers in Cameroon, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Senegal and Zambia have used serum retinol as an indicator, and have not always found improvement in response to supplementation. One problem is that homeostatic control of serum retinol may mask positive effects of treatment in that changes in concentration are observed only when status is either moderately to severely depleted or excessive. Because VA is stored mainly in the liver, measurements of hepatic VA stores are the “gold standard” for assessing VA status. Dose response tests such as the relative dose response (RDR) and the modified relative dose response (MRDR), allow a qualitative assessment of VA liver stores. On the other hand, the use of the vitamin A-labeled isotope dilution (VALID) technique, (using 13C or 2H-labeled retinyl acetate) serves as an indirect method to quantitatively estimate total body and liver VA stores. Countries including Cameroon, China, Ghana, Mexico, Thailand and Zambia are now applying the VALID method to sensitively assess changes in VA status during interventions, or to estimate a population’s dietary requirement for VA. Transition to the use of more sensitive biochemical indicators of VA status such as the VALID technique is needed to effectively assess interventions in populations where mild to moderate VA deficiency is more prevalent than severe deficiency. PMID:25537105

  3. Automated method for simultaneous lead and strontium isotopic analysis applied to rainwater samples and airborne particulate filters (PM10).

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Blanca; Avivar, Jessica; Mola, Montserrat; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor; Leal, Luz O

    2013-09-01

    A new automated, sensitive, and fast system for the simultaneous online isolation and preconcentration of lead and strontium by sorption on a microcolumn packed with Sr-resin using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detector was developed, hyphenating lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA). Pb and Sr are directly retained on the sorbent column and eluted with a solution of 0.05 mol L(-1) ammonium oxalate. The detection limits achieved were 0.04 ng for lead and 0.03 ng for strontium. Mass calibration curves were used since the proposed system allows the use of different sample volumes for preconcentration. Mass linear working ranges were between 0.13 and 50 ng and 0.1 and 50 ng for lead and strontium, respectively. The repeatability of the method, expressed as RSD, was 2.1% and 2.7% for Pb and Sr, respectively. Environmental samples such as rainwater and airborne particulate (PM10) filters as well as a certified reference material SLRS-4 (river water) were satisfactorily analyzed obtaining recoveries between 90 and 110% for both elements. The main features of the LOV-MSFIA-ICP-MS system proposed are the capability to renew solid phase extraction at will in a fully automated way, the remarkable stability of the column which can be reused up to 160 times, and the potential to perform isotopic analysis. PMID:23883353

  4. An instrumental and numerical method to determine the hydrogenic ratio in isotopic experiments in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciero, A.; Zurro, B.; Martínez, M.

    2014-11-01

    The isotope effect is an important topic that is relevant for future D-T fusion reactors, where the use of deuterium, rather than hydrogen, may lean to improved plasma confinement. An evaluation of the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium is needed for isotope effect studies in current isotopic experiments. Here, the spectral range around Hα and Dα lines, obtained with an intensified multi-channel detector mounted to a 1-m focal length spectrometer, is analyzed using a fit function that includes several Gaussian components. The isotopic ratio evolution for a single operational day of the TJ-II stellarator is presented. The role of injected hydrogen by Neutral Beam Injection heating is also studied.

  5. An instrumental and numerical method to determine the hydrogenic ratio in isotopic experiments in the TJ-II stellarator.

    PubMed

    Baciero, A; Zurro, B; Martínez, M

    2014-11-01

    The isotope effect is an important topic that is relevant for future D-T fusion reactors, where the use of deuterium, rather than hydrogen, may lean to improved plasma confinement. An evaluation of the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium is needed for isotope effect studies in current isotopic experiments. Here, the spectral range around Hα and Dα lines, obtained with an intensified multi-channel detector mounted to a 1-m focal length spectrometer, is analyzed using a fit function that includes several Gaussian components. The isotopic ratio evolution for a single operational day of the TJ-II stellarator is presented. The role of injected hydrogen by Neutral Beam Injection heating is also studied. PMID:25430312

  6. An instrumental and numerical method to determine the hydrogenic ratio in isotopic experiments in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Baciero, A. Zurro, B.; Martínez, M.

    2014-11-15

    The isotope effect is an important topic that is relevant for future D-T fusion reactors, where the use of deuterium, rather than hydrogen, may lean to improved plasma confinement. An evaluation of the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium is needed for isotope effect studies in current isotopic experiments. Here, the spectral range around H{sub α} and D{sub α} lines, obtained with an intensified multi-channel detector mounted to a 1-m focal length spectrometer, is analyzed using a fit function that includes several Gaussian components. The isotopic ratio evolution for a single operational day of the TJ-II stellarator is presented. The role of injected hydrogen by Neutral Beam Injection heating is also studied.

  7. A mass spectrometric method for measuring glycerol levels and enrichments in plasma using 13C and 2H stable isotopic tracers.

    PubMed

    Gilker, C D; Pesola, G R; Matthews, D E

    1992-08-15

    The stable isotope tracer [1,1,2,3,3,-2H5]glycerol has been commonly used as a tracer to measure glycerol kinetics and lipolysis in vivo. The method for measuring samples using the trimethylsilyl derivative and electron impact gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry retains only three of the five deuteriums, resulting in the possibility of incorrectly identifying the whole glycerol tracer molecule. This reports preparation of glycerol as the heptafluorobutyrl derivative and measurement by negative ion chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to produce a derivative with an intense molecular ion that retains all five deuterium labels. Thus the heptafluorobutyrl derivative analyzed by negative ion mass spectrometry overcomes the problems associated with fragmentation and loss of the isotopic label. Glycerol concentration using a labeled internal standard can be determined in plasma with a precision of 3%. Nanomole amounts of glycerol can be analyzed for 13C or 2H enrichments with a precision of +/- 0.14 mol% excess isotope. This simple, sensitive method for measuring glycerol levels and stable isotopic enrichment in plasma uses a simple extraction procedure and requires a minimal volume of plasma (less than 300 microliters). PMID:1443555

  8. Towards breaking temperature equilibrium in multi-component Eulerian schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, John W; Masser, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects ofthermal equilibrium on hydrodynamic flows and describe models for breaking the assumption ofa single temperature for a mixture of components in a cell. A computational study comparing pressure-temperature equilibrium simulations of two dimensional implosions with explicit front tracking is described as well as implementation and J-D calculations for non-equilibrium temperature methods.

  9. Discovery of Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Erin; Thoennessen, Michael

    2011-10-01

    To date, no comprehensive study has been undertaken regarding the initial detection and identification of isotopes. At NSCL, a project has been initiated to catalog and report the initial observation of every isotope. The conditions characterizing the successful discovery of an isotope include a clear and unambiguous mass and element identification through decay curves, mass spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectra, and/or relationships to other isotopes, as well as the publication of such findings in a refereed journal. I will present the documentation for eight elements: cesium, lanthanum, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, and terbium. The year and author of each initial publication along with the location and methods of production and identification will be shown. A summary and overview of all ~3000 isotopes documented so far as a function of discovery year, method and place will also be presented.

  10. A facile stable-isotope dilution method for determination of sphingosine phosphate lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung H; Eltanawy, Abeer; Rangan, Apoorva; Saba, Julie D

    2016-01-01

    A new technique for quantifying sphingosine phosphate lyase activity in biological samples is described. In this procedure, 2-hydrazinoquinoline is used to convert (2E)-hexadecenal into the corresponding hydrazone derivative to improve ionization efficiency and selectivity of detection. Combined utilization of liquid chromatographic separation and multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry allows for simultaneous quantification of the substrate S1P and product (2E)-hexadecenal. Incorporation of (2E)- d5-hexadecenal as an internal standard improves detection accuracy and precision. A simple one-step derivatization procedure eliminates the need for further extractions. Limits of quantification for (2E)-hexadecenal and sphingosine-1-phosphate are 100 and 50fmol, respectively. The assay displays a wide dynamic detection range useful for detection of low basal sphingosine phosphate lyase activity in wild type cells, SPL-overexpressing cell lines, and wild type mouse tissues. Compared to current methods, the capacity for simultaneous detection of sphingosine-1-phosphate and (2E)-hexadecenal greatly improves the accuracy of results and shows excellent sensitivity and specificity for sphingosine phosphate lyase activity detection. PMID:26408264

  11. Evaluation of sample pretreatment methods for analysis of polonium isotopes in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Sathyapriya R; Nair, Madhu G; Rao, D D

    2014-12-01

    Herbal infusions like ayurvedic aristas are widely consumed by Indian population for good health. With increasing awareness about radiological assessment, an effort was made to assess the radioactivity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in herbal medicines. (210)Po is an important alpha particle emitter contributing to internal dose to man from ingestion. Though (210)Po can be spontaneously deposited on silver disk for alpha spectrometric measurements with less radiochemical step, great care has to be taken during the sample pretreatment step owing to the high volatility of polonium even at low temperatures. Aim of the study was to evaluate an appropriate sample pretreatment method for estimation of polonium in herbal medicines. (209)Po was used for radiochemical yield calculation. Conventional open vessel wet ashing, physical evaporation, freeze-drying and microwave digestion in a Teflon vessel were examined. The recovery ranged between 9 and 79%. The lowest recovery was obtained for the samples that were processed by open vessel digestion without any volume reduction. The recoveries were comparable for those samples that were freeze dried and subjected to HNO3 + HClO4 + H2O2 + HF acid digestion and microwave digested samples. (210)Po concentration in the samples ranged from 11.3 to 39.6 mBq/L. PMID:25176601

  12. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  13. Stable isotopes as ecological tracers: an efficient method for assessing the contribution of multiple sources to mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugalho, M. N.; Barcia, P.; Caldeira, M. C.; Cerdeira, J. O.

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers of ecological processes potentially providing relevant information to environmental management issues. An application of the methodology consists in relating the stable isotopic composition of a sample mixture to that of sources. The number of stable isotopes, however, is usually lower than that of potential sources existing in an ecosystem, which creates mathematical difficulties in correctly tracing sources. We discuss a linear programming model which efficiently derives information on the contribution of sources to mixtures for any number of stable isotopes and any number of sources by addressing multiple sources simultaneously. The model identifies which sources are present in all, present in a subset of the samples or absent from all samples simultaneously and calculates minimum and maximum values of each source in the mixtures. We illustrate the model using a data set consisting of the isotopic signatures of different plant sources ingested by primary consumers in tropical riverine habitat in Asia. The model discussed may contribute to extend the scope of stable isotopes methodology to a range of new problems dealing with multiple sources and multiple tracers. For instance, in food web studies, if particular organic matter sources disappear or decrease in availability (e.g. climate change scenarios) the model allows simulation of alternative diets of the consumers providing potentially relevant information for managers and decision makers.

  14. Stable isotopes as ecological tracers: an efficient method for assessing the contribution of multiple sources to mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugalho, M. N.; Barcia, P.; Caldeira, M. C.; Cerdeira, J. O.

    2008-06-01

    Stable isotopes are increasingly being used as tracers of ecological processes potentially providing relevant information to environmental management issues. An application of the methodology consists in relating the stable isotopic composition of a sample mixture to that of sources. The number of stable isotopes, however, is usually lower than that of potential sources existing in an ecosystem, which creates mathematical difficulties in correctly tracing sources. We discuss a linear programming model which efficiently derives information on the contribution of sources to mixtures for any number of stable isotopes and any number of sources by addressing multiple sources simultaneously. The model identifies which sources are present in all, present in a subset of the samples or absent from all samples simultaneously and calculates minimum and maximum values of each source in the mixtures. We illustrate the model using a data set consisting on the isotopic signatures of different plant sources ingested by primary consumers in tropical riverine habitat in Asia. The model discussed may contribute to extend the scope of stable isotopes methodology to a range of new problems dealing with multiple sources and multiple tracers. For instance, in food web studies, if particular organic matter sources disappear or decrease in availability (e.g. climate change scenarios) the model allows simulation of alternative diets of the consumers providing potentially relevant information for managers and decision makers.

  15. Fractal Geometry of Equilibrium Payoffs in Discounted Supergames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Kimmo; Kitti, Mitri

    2014-08-01

    This paper examines the pure-strategy subgame-perfect equilibrium payoffs in discounted supergames with perfect monitoring. It is shown that the equilibrium payoffs can be identified as sub-self-affine sets or graph-directed iterated function systems. We propose a method to estimate the Hausdorff dimension of the equilibrium payoffs and relate it to the equilibrium paths and their graph presentation.

  16. Easy Extraction Method To Evaluate δ13C Vanillin by Liquid Chromatography-Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry in Chocolate Bars and Chocolate Snack Foods.

    PubMed

    Bononi, Monica; Quaglia, Giancarlo; Tateo, Fernando

    2015-05-20

    An easy extraction method that permits the use of a liquid chromatography-isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (LC-IRMS) system to evaluate δ(13)C of vanillin in chocolate products and industrial flavorings is presented. The method applies the determination of stable isotopes of carbon to discriminate between natural vanillin from vanilla beans and vanillin from other sources (mixtures from beans, synthesis, or biotechnology). A series of 13 chocolate bars and chocolate snack foods available on the Italian market and 8 vanilla flavorings derived from industrial quality control processes were analyzed. Only 30% of products considered in this work that declared "vanilla" on the label showed data that permitted the declaration "vanilla" according to European Union (EU) Regulation 1334/2008. All samples not citing "vanilla" or "natural flavoring" on the label gave the correct declaration. The extraction method is presented with data useful for statistical evaluation. PMID:25965784

  17. Method for determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by liquid-liquid extraction with triisooctylamine/xylene in hydrochloric media and alpha spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Popov, L

    2012-10-01

    Alternative method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The method is based on total decomposition of the solid materials and preconcentration of liquid samples. The separation of uranium from interfering radionuclides and stable matrix elements is attained by liquid-liquid extraction with triisooctylamine/xylene in hydrochloric media. After the additional removal of stable iron by extraction with diisopropyl ether, purified uranium is electrodeposited on stainless steel disks and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been successfully applied to the determination of uranium isotopes in water and bottom sediments from the rivers Danube, Ogosta and Tzibritza in Northwestern Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials with different matrices. PMID:22871440

  18. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  19. New method for caffeine quantification by planar chromatography coupled with electropray ionization mass spectrometry using stable isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Mario; Morlock, Gertrud

    2007-01-01

    A new high-performance thin-layer chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPTLC/ESI-MS) method for the quantification of caffeine in pharmaceutical and energy drink samples was developed using stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA). After sample preparation, samples and caffeine standard were applied on silica gel 60 F254 HPTLC plates and over-spotted with caffeine-d3 used for correction of the plunger positioning. After chromatography, densitometric detection was performed by UV absorption at 274 nm. The bands were then eluted by means of a plunger-based extractor into the ESI interface of a single-quadrupole mass spectrometer. For quantification by MS the [M+H]+ ions of caffeine and caffeine-d3 were recorded in the positive ion single ion monitoring (SIM) mode at m/z 195 and 198, respectively. The calibration showed a linear regression with a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.9998. The repeatability (RSD, n=6) in matrix wasmethod accuracy was evaluated by comparing the results obtained by HPTLC/SIDA-ESI-MS with those from the validated HPTLC/UV method. The results for pharmaceutical and energy drink samples were (ng/band) 99.82+/-3.75 and 338.09+/-4.87 by HPTLC/SIDA-ESI-MS and 104.74+/-1.51 and 334.86+/-5.63 by HPTLC/UV. According to the F-test (homogeneity of variances) and the t-test (comparison of means) the two methods show no significant difference. The detection and quantification limits were 75 and 250 microg L-1 (0.75 and 2.5 ng/band), respectively, which were a factor of 13 lower than those established for HPTLC/UV. The positioning error (RSD+/-6%) was calculated by comparing HPTLC/SIDA-ESI-MS with HPTLC/ESI-MS. However, using SIDA the positioning error was nullified. HPTLC/SIDA-ESI-MS was demonstrated to be a

  20. Selective IR multiphoton dissociation of molecules in a pulsed gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface as an alternative to low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Petin, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of studies on the isotope-selective infrared multiphoton dissociation (IR MFD) of SF6 and CF3I molecules in a pulsed, gas-dynamically cooled molecular flow interacting with a solid surface. The productivity of this method in the conditions of a specific experiment (by the example of SF6 molecules) is evaluated. A number of low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation based on the use of infrared lasers for selective excitation of molecules are analysed and their productivity is estimated. The methods are compared with those of selective dissociation of molecules in the flow interacting with a surface. The advantages of this method compared to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation and the IR MPD method in the unperturbed jets and flows are shown. It is concluded that this method could be a promising alternative to the low-energy methods of molecular laser isotope separation.

  1. The Theory of Variances in Equilibrium Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Lewandowski, Jerome; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Levinton, Fred M.; Yuh, Howard Y.; Drozdov, Vladimir; McDonald, Darren

    2008-01-14

    The theory of variances of equilibrium reconstruction is presented. It complements existing practices with information regarding what kind of plasma profiles can be reconstructed, how accurately, and what remains beyond the abilities of diagnostic systems. The σ-curves, introduced by the present theory, give a quantitative assessment of quality of effectiveness of diagnostic systems in constraining equilibrium reconstructions. The theory also suggests a method for aligning the accuracy of measurements of different physical nature.

  2. Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC) For Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujling

    2014-02-24

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids

  3. Precise isotopic analysis of Mo in seawater using multiple collector-inductively coupled mass spectrometry coupled with a chelating resin column preconcentration method.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yusuke; Firdaus, M Lutfi; Norisuye, Kazuhiro; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Irisawa, Keita; Hirata, Takafumi

    2008-12-01

    It is widely recognized that the natural isotopic variation of Mo can provide crucial information about the geochemical circulation of Mo, and the ocean is an important reservoir of Mo. To obtain precise isotopic data on Mo in seawater samples using multiple collector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS), we have developed a preconcentration technique using 8-hydroxyquinoline bonded covalently to a vinyl polymer resin (TSK-8HQ). By optimizing the procedure, Mo in seawater could be effectively separated from matrix elements such as alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals. With this technique, even with a 50-fold enrichment factor, the changes in the 98Mo/95Mo ratio during preconcentration were smaller than twice the standard deviation (SD) in this study. Mass discrimination of Mo isotopes during the measurement was externally corrected for by normalizing 86Sr/88Sr to 0.1194 using an exponential law. We evaluated delta98/95Mo to a precision of +/- 0.08 per thousand (+/-2 SD); this value was found to be less than one-third of previous reported values. Moreover, we were able to determine an accurate ratio for every pair of stable Mo isotopes, which was impossible with previous methods owing to the isobaric interference from the external elements (Zr and Ru). In this study, delta92/98Mo in seawater was first determined so that it had the smallest relative error. We applied the proposed method to four kinds of seawater samples. The Mo compositions were constant among them, with average delta98/95Mo and delta92/98Mo values of 2.45 +/- 0.11 and -4.94 +/- 0.09 per thousand (+/-2 SD), respectively. Our data indicate that seawater is enriched in heavy Mo isotopes than previously reported. PMID:19551942

  4. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  5. Theoretical Calibration on the 13C-18O Clumped Isotope Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M.; Zhang, S. T.; LIU, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) arisen from phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates has been noticed since the beginning of stable isotope geochemistry. However, the molecular level details of this reaction have not been fully understood yet. Equilibrium 13C-18O clumped isotope distribution in carbonates has been suggested as a new thermometer for surface temperature systems; nevertheless, existing Δ47-T relationships calibrated by several different groups are incompatible, generating substantial confusions and debates about those variations. Here we propose a new molecular-level mechanism with three parallel pathways for the phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates. We show that the KIE of such reaction can be different if the relative contributions of the three parallel pathways are changed. This new mechanism abandons completely a previously proposed molecular mechanism (i.e., Guo et al., 2009) and can explain (at least partly) why the Δ47-T relationships provided by different groups are different. Together with a re-calculated equilibrium clumped isotope fractionation factors of carbonate minerals using a new volume-variable-cluster-model method with higher theoretical-level treatments and higher-order anharmonic corrections, we present a theoretical (equilibrium + KIE) Δ47-T relationship for carbonates. Our theoretical calibration line is with large variations due to considering possible changes of relative contributions of the three parallel pathways and different carbonate mineral used. For minimizing the variation, we suggest using the same amount of sample, the same mineral and the same temperature of phosphoric acid digestion for this experiment.

  6. Developing a Clinically Useful Calcium Isotope Biomarker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romaniello, Stephen J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Skulan, Joseph L.; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.; Monge, Jorge; Fonseca, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Naturally-occurring Ca is mixture of six isotopes Ca-40, Ca-42, Ca-43, Ca-44, Ca-46, Ca-48). Biological reaction rates and equilibrium constants depend slightly, but measurably, on atomic mass, causing the relative abundances of Ca isotopes to vary between different tissues. During bone formation, light isotopes of Ca are preferentially incorporated into bone, leaving soft tissue depleted in light isotopes. In contrast, bone resorption exhibits no isotopic preference, and thus transfers the light isotope signature of bone back to soft tissue. This balance makes the Ca isotope composition of soft tissue (e.g. serum, urine) a highly sensitive, quantitative tracer for whole-body bone mineral balance (BMB).

  7. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  8. Equilibrium 2H/ 1H fractionations in organic molecules: I. Experimental calibration of ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Sessions, Alex L.; Nielsen, Robert J.; Goddard, William A., III

    2009-12-01

    Carbon-bound hydrogen in sedimentary organic matter can undergo exchange over geologic timescales, altering its isotopic composition. Studies investigating the natural abundance distribution of 1H and 2H in such molecules must account for this exchange, which in turn requires quantitative knowledge regarding the endpoint of exchange, i.e., the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factor ( α eq). To date, relevant data have been lacking for molecules larger than methane. Here we describe an experimental method to measure α eq for C-bound H positions adjacent to carbonyl group (H α) in ketones. H at these positions equilibrates on a timescale of days as a result of keto-enol tautomerism, allowing equilibrium 2H/ 1H distributions to be indirectly measured. Molecular vibrations for the same ketone molecules are then computed using Density Functional Theory at the B3LYP/6-311G∗∗ level and used to calculate α eq values for H α. Comparison of experimental and computational results for six different straight and branched ketones yields a temperature-dependent linear calibration curve with slope = 1.081-0.00376 T and intercept = 8.404-0.387 T, where T is temperature in degrees Celsius. Since the dominant systematic error in the calculation (omission of anharmonicity) is of the same size for ketones and C-bound H in most other linear compounds, we propose that this calibration can be applied to analogous calculations for a wide variety of organic molecules with linear carbon skeletons for temperatures below 100 °C. In a companion paper ( Wang et al., 2009) we use this new calibration dataset to calculate the temperature-dependent equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors for a range of linear hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, ketones, esters and acids.

  9. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  10. Silicon isotope fractionation during the precipitation of quartz and the adsorption of H4SiO4(aq) on Fe(Ⅲ)-oxyhydroxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; He, H.; Zhang, S.

    2015-12-01

    Equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factors among orthosilicic acid (i.e.,H4SiO4(aq)), quartz and the adsorption complexes of H4SiO4(aq) on Fe (Ⅲ)-oxyhydroxide surface were calculated using the full-electron wave-function quantum chemistry methods (i.e., B3LYP/6-311G(2df,p)) with a new cluster-model-based treatment. Solvation effects were carefully included in our calculations via water-droplet method combined with implicit solvent models (e.g., PCM). The results revealed that, if it is under equilibrium conditions, heavy Si isotopes would be significantly enriched in quartz in comparison to H4SiO4(aq). However, most of the field observations suggested that quartz would have identical or even depleted d30Si values compared to that of H4SiO4(aq). To explain this discrepancy between the equilibrium calculation results and the field observations, the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with the formation of amorphous silica, which usually is the precursor of crystalline quartz, was investigated using quantum chemistry methods. The KIE results showed that amorphous silica would be significantly enriched in light Si isotopes during its formation. Our equilibrium fractionation results, however, matched a special type of quartz (i.e., Herkimer "diamond") very well, due to its nearly equilibrated precipitation condition. Opposite to the case of precipitated quartz, a large equilibrium Si isotope fractionation (i.e., -3.0‰) was found between the absorbed bidentate Si surface complexes (i.e., 2C>Fe2O2Si(OH)2) and H4SiO4(aq). This calculated equilibrium Si isotope fractionation factor largely differed from a previous experimental result (ca. -1.08‰). We found that the formation of transient or temporary surface complexes (e.g., 1V>Fe2OSi(OH)3) may have accounted for the smaller net fractionation observed. With the equilibrium and kinetic Si isotope fractionation factors provided here, the distributions and changes of Si isotope compositions in the Earth's surface

  11. The Impact of Differing Land Surface Models and Water Isotopic Parameterizations to the Distribution of Water Isotopes in a Coupled Atmosphere-Land Global Climate Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusbaumer, J. M.; Wong, T. E.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Isotope-enabled Global Climate Models (GCMs) are becoming important tools in facilitating the synthesis of disparate isotope proxy data, allowing for uncertainties in proxy-based reconstructions to be tested in a way not possible with inversion methods. They also provide a means to test processes and parameterizations in the GCMs themselves, as new in-situ and remote sensing systems now can measure water isotopes at the spatial and temporal scale needed to validate global models. However, one issue with isotope-enabled GCMs is that much of the past focus and development has been on the atmosphere and ocean, which means other components of the earth system are poorly understood in comparison. Newly developed isotope-enabled GCMs with fully-functional land surface models, along with new observational platforms, allow for one to examine the importance of the land surface on the distribution of water isotopes in the earth system. We report here on experiments using the new NCAR isotope-enabled Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (iCAM5) and the isotope-enabled Community Land Model Version 4 (iCLM4), as well as a growing number of measurements of isotopic ratios in precipitation and water vapor. In particular, iCAM5 is used to simulate the modern isotopic climate coupled to a. a simple bucket model for isotopes, b. iCLM4 with equilibrium fractionation only, and c. fully-fractionating iCLM4. Along with the use of iCLM4, numerous variations in the representation of kinetic fractionation are examined, as well as different parameterizations for the impact of dew and frost on the isotope ratios in the surface water vapor, snow, and soil moisture. Results show that having a fully-functioning land surface model has a large impact on the simulated isotope ratios, and is necessary if one wants to simulate water isotopes in the earth system accurately. Accurately simulating d-excess and O17-excess requires having a kinetic fractionation factor that properly accounts for the

  12. New Method for Determining Isotopic Values of Glutamic Acid and Phenylalanine for Estimation of Precise Trophic Position in Food Web Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, T.; Broek, T.; McCarthy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Compound Specific Isotope Analysis of Amino Acids (CSI-AA) has emerged as a highly precise new method of determining trophic levels of both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Multiple studies have now shown that δ15N values for glutamic acid (Glu) and phenylalanine (Phe) can be coupled to provide extremely precise estimates of trophic position in diverse food web studies. The standard gas chromatography—isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-IRMS) approach is presently limited to a select number of labs since necessary equipment is both expensive and not widely accessible. Furthermore, typical GC-IRMS δ15N precision (±1‰) is significantly lower than usual bulk δ15N values (±0.1‰), thus presenting a considerable setback for precise trophic level calculations. In this study, we develop a new dual-column method to purify Glu and Phe using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Phe is purified using an analytical scale reverse phase column embedded with anionic ion-pairing reagents and collected using automated fraction collection. Glu is separated from the non-polar amino acids using the same column and further purified using a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) cation and anion-exchange column and collected via automated fraction collection. Isotopic analysis of the purified AAs is then conducted on an elemental analyzer—isotope ratio mass spectrometer (EA-IRMS). As a test of this method, we present and compare the trophic position of five marine organisms—cyanobacteria, deep-sea bamboo coral, juvenile and adult white sea bass, and harbor seal, calculated using Glu and Phe δ15N values produced by both GC-IRMS and our HPLC-EA-IRMS approach. The preliminary results of this study suggest that the HPLC-EA-IRMS method is a viable alternative to GC-IRMS, which should allow accurate trophic position estimates to be made by more researchers using more readily available instrumentation.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of water isotope fractionation during ice crystal growth in clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoping; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for simulating water isotope fractionation during diffusion-limited ice crystal growth by vapor deposition from water-oversaturated air. These conditions apply to the growth of snow crystals in clouds where the vapor composition is controlled by the presence of both ice crystals and water droplets. Modeling of water condensation with the LB method has the advantage of allowing concentration fields to evolve based on local conditions so that the controls on grain shapes of the condensed phase can be studied simultaneously with the controls on isotopic composition and growth rate. Water isotope fractionation during snow crystal growth involves kinetic effects due to diffusion of water vapor in air, which requires careful consideration of the boundary conditions at the ice-vapor interface. The boundary condition is relatively simple for water isotopes because the molecular exchange rate for water at the interface is large compared to the crystal growth rate. Our results for the bulk crystal isotopic composition are consistent with simpler models using analytical solutions for radial geometry. However, the model results are sufficiently different for oxygen isotopes that they could affect the interpretation of D-excess values of snow and ice. The extent of vapor oversaturation plays a major role in determining the water isotope fractionation as well as the degree of dendritic growth. Departures from isotopic equilibrium increase at colder temperatures as diffusivity decreases. Dendritic crystals are isotopically heterogeneous. Isotopic variations within individual snow crystals could yield information on the microphysics of ice condensation as well as on the accommodation or sticking coefficient of water associated with vapor deposition. Our results are ultimately a first step in implementing LB models for kinetically controlled condensation or precipitation reactions, but needs to be extended also to cases where the

  14. A simple isotopic labeling method to study cysteine oxidation in Alzheimer's disease: oxidized cysteine-selective dimethylation (OxcysDML).

    PubMed

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A S

    2016-04-01

    Cysteine is widely involved in redox signaling pathways through a number of reversible and irreversible modifications. Reversible modifications (e.g., S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, disulfide bonds, and sulfenic acid) are used to protect proteins from oxidative attack and maintain cellular homeostasis, while irreversible oxidations (e.g., sulfinic acid and sulfonic acid) serve as hallmarks of oxidative stress. Proteomic analysis of cysteine-enriched peptides coupled with reduction of oxidized thiols can be used to measure the oxidation states of cysteine, which is helpful for elucidating the role that oxidative stress pl