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Sample records for isotopically controlled semiconductors

  1. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2001-12-21

    Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

  2. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  3. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  4. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E. E.

    2010-07-15

    This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

  5. Isotopically engineered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1995-04-01

    Scientific interest, technological promise, and increased availability of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This review of mostly recent activities begins with an introduction to some past classical experiments which have been performed on isotopically controlled semiconductors. A review of the natural isotopic composition of the relevant elements follows. Some materials aspects resulting in part from the high costs of enriched isotopes are discussed next. Raman spectroscopy studies with a number of isotopically pure and deliberately mixed Ge bulk crystals show that the Brillouin-zone-center optical phonons are not localized. Their lifetime is almost independent of isotopic disorder, leading to homogeneous Raman line broadening. Studies with short period isotope superlattices consisting of alternating layers of n atomic planes of 70Ge and 74Ge reveal a host of zone-center phonons due to Brillouin-zone folding. At n≳40 one observes two phonon lines at frequencies corresponding to the bulk values of the two isotopes. In natural diamond, isotope scattering of the low-energy phonons, which are responsible for the thermal conductivity, is very strongly affected by small isotope disorder. Isotopically pure 12C diamond crystals exhibit thermal conductivities as high as 410 W cm-1 K-1 at 104 K, leading to projected values of over 2000 W cm-1 K-1 near 80 K. The changes in phonon properties with isotopic composition also weakly affect the electronic band structures and the lattice constants. The latter isotope dependence is most relevant for future standards of length based on crystal lattice constants. Capture of thermal neutrons by isotope nuclei followed by nuclear decay produces new elements, resulting in a very large number of possibilities for isotope selective doping of semiconductors. This neutron transmutation of isotope nuclei, already used

  6. Cameras for semiconductor process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, W. A.; Parker, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The application of X-ray topography to semiconductor process control is described, considering the novel features of the high speed camera and the difficulties associated with this technique. The most significant results on the effects of material defects on device performance are presented, including results obtained using wafers processed entirely within this institute. Defects were identified using the X-ray camera and correlations made with probe data. Also included are temperature dependent effects of material defects. Recent applications and improvements of X-ray topographs of silicon-on-sapphire and gallium arsenide are presented with a description of a real time TV system prototype and of the most recent vacuum chuck design. Discussion is included of our promotion of the use of the camera by various semiconductor manufacturers.

  7. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  8. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  9. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  10. ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1959-08-25

    An improved isotope separating apparatus of the electromagnetic type, commonly referred to as a calutron, is described. Improvements in detecting and maintaining optimum position and focus of the ion beam are given. The calutron collector is provided with an additional electrode insulated from and positioned between the collecting pockets. The ion beams are properly positioned and focused until the deionizing current which flows from ground to this additional electrode ts a minimum.

  11. Exposure tool control for advanced semiconductor lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2015-08-01

    This is a review paper to show how we control exposure tool parameters in order to satisfy patterning performance and productivity requirements for advanced semiconductor lithography. In this paper, we will discuss how we control illumination source shape to satisfy required imaging performance, heat-induced lens aberration during exposure to minimize the aberration impact on imaging, dose and focus control to realize uniform patterning performance across the wafer and patterning position of circuit patterns on different layers. The contents are mainly about current Nikon immersion exposure tools.

  12. External control of semiconductor nanostructure lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Nader A.

    2011-12-01

    Novel semiconductor nanostructure laser diodes such as quantum-dot and quantum-dash are key optoelectronic candidates for many applications such as data transmitters in ultra fast optical communications. This is mainly due to their unique carrier dynamics compared to conventional quantum-well lasers that enables their potential for high differential gain and modified linewidth enhancement factor. However, there are known intrinsic limitations associated with semiconductor laser dynamics that can hinder the performance including the mode stability, spectral linewidth, and direct modulation capabilities. One possible method to overcome these limitations is through the use of external control techniques. The electrical and/or optical external perturbations can be implemented to improve the parameters associated with the intrinsic laser's dynamics, such as threshold gain, damping rate, spectral linewidth, and mode selectivity. In this dissertation, studies on the impact of external control techniques through optical injection-locking, optical feedback and asymmetric current bias control on the overall performance of the nanostructure lasers were conducted in order to understand the associated intrinsic device limitations and to develop strategies for controlling the underlying dynamics to improve laser performance. In turn, the findings of this work can act as a guideline for making high performance nanostructure lasers for future ultra fast data transmitters in long-haul optical communication systems, and some can provide an insight into making a compact and low-cost terahertz optical source for future implementation in monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuits.

  13. Advanced diffusion studies with isotopically controlled materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Haller, Eugene E.

    2004-11-14

    The use of enriched stable isotopes combined with modern epitaxial deposition and depth profiling techniques enables the preparation of material heterostructures, highly appropriate for self- and foreign-atom diffusion experiments. Over the past decade we have performed diffusion studies with isotopically enriched elemental and compound semiconductors. In the present paper we highlight our recent results and demonstrate that the use of isotopically enriched materials ushered in a new era in the study of diffusion in solids which yields greater insight into the properties of native defects and their roles in diffusion. Our approach of studying atomic diffusion is not limited to semiconductors and can be applied also to other material systems. Current areas of our research concern the diffusion in the silicon-germanium alloys and glassy materials such as silicon dioxide and ion conducting silicate glasses.

  14. Microeconomics of process control in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Kevin M.

    2003-06-01

    Process window control enables accelerated design-rule shrinks for both logic and memory manufacturers, but simple microeconomic models that directly link the effects of process window control to maximum profitability are rare. In this work, we derive these links using a simplified model for the maximum rate of profit generated by the semiconductor manufacturing process. We show that the ability of process window control to achieve these economic objectives may be limited by variability in the larger manufacturing context, including measurement delays and process variation at the lot, wafer, x-wafer, x-field, and x-chip levels. We conclude that x-wafer and x-field CD control strategies will be critical enablers of density, performance and optimum profitability at the 90 and 65nm technology nodes. These analyses correlate well with actual factory data and often identify millions of dollars in potential incremental revenue and cost savings. As an example, we show that a scatterometry-based CD Process Window Monitor is an economically justified, enabling technology for the 65nm node.

  15. Optically controlled spins in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia

    2010-03-01

    Spins in charged semiconductor quantum dots are currently generating much interest, both from a fundamental physics standpoint, as well as for their potential technological relevance. Being naturally a two-level quantum system, each of these spins can encode a bit of quantum information. Optically controlled spins in quantum dots possess several desirable properties: their spin coherence times are long, they allow for all-optical manipulation---which translates into fast logic gates---and their coupling to photons offers a straightforward route to exchange of quantum information between spatially separated sites. Designing the laser fields to achieve the unprecedented amount of control required for quantum information tasks is a challenging goal, towards which there has been recent progress. Special properties of hyperbolic secant optical pulses enabled the design of single qubit rotations, initially developed about the growth axis z [1], and later about an arbitrary direction [2]. Recently we demonstrated our theoretical proposal [1] in an ensemble of InAs/GaAs quantum dots by implementing ultrafast rotations about the z axis by an arbitrary angle [3], with the angle of rotation as a function of the optical detuning in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction. We also developed two-qubit conditional control in a quantum dot `molecule' using the electron-hole exchange interaction [4]. In addition to its importance in quantum dot-based quantum computation, our two-qubit gate can also play an important role in photonic cluster state generation for measurement-based quantum computing [5]. [1] S. E. Economou, L. J. Sham, Y. Wu, D. S. Steel, Phys. Rev. 74, 205415 (2006) [2] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 217401 (2007) [3] A. Greilich, S. E. Economou et al, Nature Phys. 5, 262 (2009) [4] S. E. Economou and T. L. Reinecke, Phys. Rev. B, 78, 115306 (2008) [5] S. E. Economou, N. H. Lindner, and T. Rudolph, in preparation

  16. Exposure and control assessment of semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, James H.

    1988-07-01

    From 1980 to 1984, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), along with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), sponsored a study of worker exposures and controls in semiconductor manufacturing. The study was conducted by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and PEDCO Environmental. Walk-through surveys were conducted at 21 plants and in-depth studies were done at four of these plants. Processes studied included photolithography, chemical vapor deposition, wet chemical etching and cleaning, plasma etching, diffusion, ion implantation, and metallization. Air samples were collected for acetone, antimony, arsenic, boron, n-butyl acetate, diborane, 2-ethoxyethyl acetate, hexamethyldisilizane, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, 2-methoxyethanol, methyl ethyl ketone, nitric acid, phosphorus, sulfuric acid, and xylene. In addition, radio-frequency and ionizing radiation were monitored and ventilation measured. In general, results were well below recommended standards for routine operations. One exception was radio-frequency radiation where there was the potential for overexposure in several instances. Worker exposures during maintenance operations and process upset conditions were not able to be evaluated.

  17. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Jesse H.; Surendranath, Yogesh; Alivisatos, Paul

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  18. Intelligent monitoring and control of semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Janet L.; Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    1991-01-01

    The use of AI methods to monitor and control semiconductor fabrication in a state-of-the-art manufacturing environment called the Rapid Thermal Multiprocessor is described. Semiconductor fabrication involves many complex processing steps with limited opportunities to measure process and product properties. By applying additional process and product knowledge to that limited data, AI methods augment classical control methods by detecting abnormalities and trends, predicting failures, diagnosing, planning corrective action sequences, explaining diagnoses or predictions, and reacting to anomalous conditions that classical control systems typically would not correct. Research methodology and issues are discussed, and two diagnosis scenarios are examined.

  19. Quality Control On Strained Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2010-11-24

    New semiconductor devices are based very often on strained silicon which promises to squeeze more device performance out of current devices. With strained silicon it is possible to get the same device performance using less power. The technique is using strain as a 'design element' for silicon to improve the device performance and has become a hot topic in semiconductor research in the past years. However in the same time topics like 'System in Package'(SiP) on thin wafers are getting more and more important. The chips of thin wafers in advanced packaging are extremely sensitive to induced stresses due to packaging issues. If we are using now strain as a design element for improving device performance we increase the sensitivity again and therefore also the risk of aging of such SiP's. High Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) techniques such as Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) are therefore very powerful tools to study the stresses in packaged devices.

  20. Mode control of semiconductor laser with diffraction and dispersion feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsuji, R.; Fujii, K.; Nakayama, S.; Amano, M.; Kiyono, H.; Uchiyama, Y.; Tokita, Y.; Hanasawa, Y.; Mirov, S.B.; McCutcheon, M.J.; Whinnery, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    We have constructed two kinds of external cavity semiconductor laser. The first one is a diffraction feedback system consisting of a collimating lens, a diffraction grating and a mirror controlled by a PZT element. The second one is a dispersion feedback system in which the diffraction grating is replaced with a prism. Changing the angle of the external mirror by controlling the voltage to be supplied to the PZT, we have succeeded to tune the longitudinal mode of semiconductor laser continuously in the range of about 1 GHz. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Methods of Measurement for Semiconductor Materials, Process Control, and Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reported. Significant accomplishments include: (1) Completion of an initial identification of the more important problems in process control for integrated circuit fabrication and assembly; (2) preparations for making silicon bulk resistivity wafer standards available to the industry; and (3) establishment of the relationship between carrier mobility and impurity density in silicon. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; characterization of generation-recombination-trapping centers, including gold, in silicon; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; study of scanning electron microscopy for wafer inspection and test; measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices; determination of S-parameters and delay time in junction devices; and characterization of noise and conversion loss of microwave detector diodes.

  2. A semiconductor laser with monolithically integrated dynamic polarization control.

    PubMed

    Holmes, B M; Naeem, M A; Hutchings, D C; Marsh, J H; Kelly, A E

    2012-08-27

    We report the first demonstration of a semiconductor laser monolithically integrated with an active polarization controller, which consists of a polarization mode converter followed by an active, differential phase shifter. High speed modulation of the device output polarization is demonstrated via current injection to the phase shifter section. PMID:23037101

  3. Low temperature carrier transport properties in isotopically controlled germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.

    1994-12-01

    Investigations of electronic and optical properties of semiconductors often require specimens with extremely homogeneous dopant distributions and precisely controlled net-carrier concentrations and compensation ratios. The previous difficulties in fabricating such samples are overcome as reported in this thesis by growing high-purity Ge single crystals of controlled {sup 75}Ge and {sup 70}Ge isotopic compositions, and doping these crystals by the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) technique. The resulting net-impurity concentrations and the compensation ratios are precisely determined by the thermal neutron fluence and the [{sup 74}Ge]/[{sup 70}Ge] ratios of the starting Ge materials, respectively. This method also guarantees unprecedented doping uniformity. Using such samples the authors have conducted four types of electron (hole) transport studies probing the nature of (1) free carrier scattering by neutral impurities, (2) free carrier scattering by ionized impurities, (3) low temperature hopping conduction, and (4) free carrier transport in samples close to the metal-insulator transition.

  4. Vibrational and thermal properties of ternary semiconductors and their isotopic dependence: chalcopyrite CuGaS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Aldo; Cardona, M.; Kremer, R.; Lauck, R.; Muñoz, A.

    2011-03-01

    The availability of ab initio electronic calculations and the concomitant techniques for deriving the corresponding lattice dynamics have been profusely used in the past decade for calculating thermodynamic and vibrational properties of semiconductors, as well as their dependence on isotopic masses. The latter have been compared with experimental data for elemental and binary semiconductors with different isotopic compositions. Here we present theoretical and experimental data for several vibronic and thermodynamic properties of a canonical ternary semiconductor of the chalcopyrite family: CuGaS2. Among these properties are the lattice parameters, the phonon dispersion relations and densities of states (projected on the Cu, Ga, and S constituents), the specific heat and the volume expansion coefficient. The calculations were performed with the ABINIT and VASP codes within the LDA approximation for exchange and correlation. Supported by CONACYT under projects J-59853-F and J-83247-F.

  5. Voltage-controlled quantum light from an atomically thin semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Beams, Ryan; Vamivakas, A. Nick

    2015-06-01

    Although semiconductor defects can often be detrimental to device performance, they are also responsible for the breadth of functionality exhibited by modern optoelectronic devices. Artificially engineered defects (so-called quantum dots) or naturally occurring defects in solids are currently being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to high-resolution metrology. In parallel, the quantum confinement exhibited by atomically thin materials (semi-metals, semiconductors and insulators) has ushered in an era of flatland optoelectronics whose full potential is still being articulated. In this Letter we demonstrate the possibility of leveraging the atomically thin semiconductor tungsten diselenide (WSe2) as a host for quantum dot-like defects. We report that this previously unexplored solid-state quantum emitter in WSe2 generates single photons with emission properties that can be controlled via the application of external d.c. electric and magnetic fields. These new optically active quantum dots exhibit excited-state lifetimes on the order of 1 ns and remarkably large excitonic g-factors of 10. It is anticipated that WSe2 quantum dots will provide a novel platform for integrated solid-state quantum photonics and quantum information processing, as well as a rich condensed-matter physics playground with which to explore the coupling of quantum dots and atomically thin semiconductors.

  6. Coherent Terahertz Control of Vertical Transport in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vänskä, O.; Tittonen, I.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent-control protocols are introduced to selectively transport electrons, excitons, or pure two-particle correlations through semiconductor interfaces. The scheme is tested in a double-quantum-well structure where a sequence of terahertz pulses is applied to induce the vertical excitation transfer between the wells. Using a microscopic theory, it is shown that efficient and highly selective transfer can be realized even in the presence of the unavoidable scattering and dephasing processes.

  7. Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of semiconductor nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Wang, George T.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical (QSC-PEC) etching provides a new route to the precision fabrication of epitaxial semiconductor nanostructures in the sub-10-nm size regime. For example, quantum dots (QDs) can be QSC-PEC-etched from epitaxial InGaN thin films using narrowband laser photoexcitation, and the QD sizes (and hence bandgaps and photoluminescence wavelengths) are determined by the photoexcitation wavelength.

  8. Estimation of the isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity of group IV and group III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D. T.; Heremans, J. P.; Slack, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    The isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity for group IV and group III-V semiconductors is calculated using the Debye-Callaway model modified to include both transverse and longitudinal phonon modes explicitly. The frequency and temperature dependences of the normal and umklapp phonon-scattering rates are kept the same for all compounds. The model requires as adjustable parameters only the longitudinal and transverse phonon Grüneisen constants and the effective sample diameter. The model can quantitatively account for the observed isotope effect in diamond and germanium but not in silicon. The magnitude of the isotope effect is predicted for silicon carbide, boron nitride, and gallium nitride. In the case of boron nitride the predicted increase in the room-temperature thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment is in excess of 100%. Finally, a more general method of estimating normal phonon-scattering rate coefficients for other types of solids is presented.

  9. Controlling the stoichiometry and doping of semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Albin, David; Burst, James; Metzger, Wyatt; Duenow, Joel; Farrell, Stuart; Colegrove, Eric

    2016-08-16

    Methods for treating a semiconductor material are provided. According to an aspect of the invention, the method includes annealing the semiconductor material in the presence of a compound that includes a first element and a second element. The first element provides an overpressure to achieve a desired stoichiometry of the semiconductor material, and the second element provides a dopant to the semiconductor material.

  10. A Statistical Process Control Method for Semiconductor Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomoaki; Ino, Tomomi; Minami, Kazuhiro; Minami, Masateru; Homma, Tetsuya

    To maintain stable operation of semiconductor fabrication lines, statistical process control (SPC) methods are recognized to be effective. However, in semiconductor fabrication lines, there exist a huge number of process state signals to be monitored, and these signals contain both normally and non-normally distributed data. Therefore, if we try to apply SPC methods to those signals, we need one which satisfies three requirements: 1) It can deal with both normally distributed data, and non-normally distributed data, 2) It can be set up automatically, 3) It can be easily understood by engineers and technicians. In this paper, we propose a new SPC method which satisfies these three requirements at the same time. This method uses similar rules to the Shewhart chart, but can deal with non-normally distributed data by introducing “effective standard deviations”. Usefulness of this method is demonstrated by comparing false alarm ratios to that of the Shewhart chart method. In the demonstration, we use various kinds of artificially generated data, and real data observed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process tool in a semiconductor fabrication line.

  11. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Activities directed toward the development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices are described. Topics investigated include: measurements of transistor delay time; application of the infrared response technique to the study of radiation-damaged, lithium-drifted silicon detectors; and identification of a condition that minimizes wire flexure and reduces the failure rate of wire bonds in transistors and integrated circuits under slow thermal cycling conditions. Supplementary data concerning staff, standards committee activities, technical services, and publications are included as appendixes.

  12. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1971-01-01

    The development of methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is discussed. The following subjects are also presented: (1) demonstration of the high sensitivity of the infrared response technique by the identification of gold in a germanium diode, (2) verification that transient thermal response is significantly more sensitive to the presence of voids in die attachment than steady-state thermal resistance, and (3) development of equipment for determining susceptibility of transistors to hot spot formation by the current-gain technique.

  13. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, S.W.

    1960-01-26

    A method is described for controlling the position of the ion beams in a calutron used for isotope separation. The U/sup 238/ beams is centered over the U/sup 235/ receiving pocket, the operator monitoring the beam until a maximum reading is achieved on the meter connected to that pocket. Then both beams are simultaneously shifted by a preselected amount to move the U/sup 235/ beam over the U/sup 235/ pocket. A slotted door is placed over the entrance to that pocket during the U/sup 238/ beam centering to reduce the contamination to the pocket, while allowing enough beam to pass for monitoring purposes.

  14. Spin-Polarization Control in a Two-Dimensional Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Li, Pengke

    2016-05-01

    Long carrier spin lifetimes are a double-edged sword for the prospect of constructing "spintronic" logic devices: Preservation of the logic variable within the transport channel or interconnect is essential to successful completion of the logic operation, but any spins remaining past this event will pollute the environment for subsequent clock cycles. Electric fields can be used to manipulate these spins on a fast time scale by careful interplay of spin-orbit effects, but efficient controlled depolarization can only be completely achieved with amenable materials properties. Taking III-VI monochalcogenide monolayers as an example 2D semiconductor, we use symmetry analysis, perturbation theory, and ensemble calculation to show how this longstanding problem can be solved by suitable manipulation of conduction electrons.

  15. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  16. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1994-06-07

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure. 6 figs.

  17. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.

    1994-01-01

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission beam of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  18. Semiconductor diode laser having an intracavity spatial phase controller for beam control and switching

    SciTech Connect

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    A high-power broad-area semiconductor laser having a intracavity spatial phase controller is disclosed. The integrated intracavity spatial phase controller is easily formed by patterning an electrical contact metallization layer when fabricating the semiconductor laser. This spatial phase controller changes the normally broad far-field emission bean, of such a laser into a single-lobed near-diffraction-limited beam at pulsed output powers of over 400 mW. Two operating modes, a thermal and a gain operating mode, exist for the phase controller, allowing for steering and switching the beam as the modes of operation are switched, and the emission beam may be scanned, for example, over a range of 1.4 degrees or switched by 8 degrees. More than one spatial phase controller may be integrated into the laser structure.

  19. Optimal doping control of magnetic semiconductors via subsurfactant epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Changgan; Zhang, Zhenyu; van Benthem, Klaus; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weitering, Harm H

    2008-02-01

    Dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) with high ferromagnetic ordering temperatures (T{sub c}) have vast potential for advancing spin-based electronics or 'spintronics'. To date, achieving high-T{sub c} DMS typically required doping levels of order 5%. Such high doping levels inevitably compromise the structural homogeneity and carrier mobility of the DMS. Here, we establish 'subsurfactant epitaxy' as a novel kinetic pathway for synthesizing Mn-doped germanium with T{sub c} much higher than room temperature, at dramatically reduced doping levels. This is accomplished by optimal control of the diffusion kinetics of the dopant atoms near the growth front in two separate deposition steps. The first involves a submonolayer dose of Mn on Ge(100) at low temperature, which populates subsurface interstitial sites with Mn while suppressing lateral Mn diffusion and clustering. The second step involves epitaxial growth of Ge at elevated temperature, taking advantage of the strong floating ability of the interstitial Mn dopants towards the newly defined subsurface sites at the growth front. Most remarkably, the Mn dopants trapped inside the film are uniformly distributed at substitutional sites, and the resulting film exhibits ferromagnetism above 400 K at the nominal doping level of only 0.2%.

  20. Continuing progress toward controlled intracellular delivery of semiconductor quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-01-01

    The biological applications of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) continue to grow at a nearly unabated pace. This growth is driven, in part, by their unique photophysical and physicochemical properties which have allowed them to be used in many different roles in cellular biology including: as superior fluorophores for a wide variety of cellular labeling applications; as active platforms for assembly of nanoscale sensors; and, more recently, as a powerful tool to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated drug delivery. Given that controlled cellular delivery is at the intersection of all these applications, the latest progress in delivering QDs to cells is examined here. A brief discussion of relevant considerations including the importance of materials preparation and bioconjugation along with the continuing issue of endosomal sequestration is initially provided for context. Methods for the cellular delivery of QDs are then highlighted including those based on passive exposure, facilitated strategies that utilize peptides or polymers and fully active modalities such as electroporation and other mechanically based methods. Following on this, the exciting advent of QD cellular delivery using multiple or combined mechanisms is then previewed. Several recent methods reporting endosomal escape of QD materials in cells are also examined in detail with a focus on the mechanisms by which access to the cytosol is achieved. The ongoing debate over QD cytotoxicity is also discussed along with a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve in the future. PMID:25154379

  1. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Myers, D.R.; Vook, F.L.

    1988-06-16

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  2. Electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process in semiconductor device fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.; Vook, Frederick L.

    1989-01-01

    An electronic-carrier-controlled photochemical etching process for carrying out patterning and selective removing of material in semiconductor device fabrication includes the steps of selective ion implanting, photochemical dry etching, and thermal annealing, in that order. In the selective ion implanting step, regions of the semiconductor material in a desired pattern are damaged and the remainder of the regions of the material not implanted are left undamaged. The rate of recombination of electrons and holes is increased in the damaged regions of the pattern compared to undamaged regions. In the photochemical dry etching step which follows ion implanting step, the material in the undamaged regions of the semiconductor are removed substantially faster than in the damaged regions representing the pattern, leaving the ion-implanted, damaged regions as raised surface structures on the semiconductor material. After completion of photochemical dry etching step, the thermal annealing step is used to restore the electrical conductivity of the damaged regions of the semiconductor material.

  3. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  4. Domain control of carrier density at a semiconductor-ferroelectric interface

    PubMed Central

    Misirlioglu, I. B.; Yildiz, M.; Sendur, K.

    2015-01-01

    Control of charge carrier distribution in a gated channel via a dielectric layer is currently the state of the art in the design of integrated circuits such as field effect transistors. Replacing linear dielectrics with ferroelectrics would ultimately lead to more energy efficient devices as well as the added advantage of the memory function of the gate. Here, we report that the channel-off/channel-on states in a metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor stack are actually transitions from a multi domain state to a single domain state of the ferroelectric under bias. In our approach, there is no a priori assumption on the single or multi-domain nature of the ferroelectric layer that is often neglected in works discussing the ferroelectric-gate effect on channel conductivity interfacing a ferroelectric. We also predict that semiconductor/ferroelectric/semiconductor stacks can function at even lower gate voltages than metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor stacks when an n-type semiconductor is placed between the ferroelectric and the gate metal. Our results suggest the ultimate stability of the multidomain state whenever it interfaces a semiconductor electrode and that a switchable single domain state may not be necessary to achieve effective control of conductivity in a p-type channel. Finally, we discuss some experimental results in the literature in light of our findings. PMID:26477394

  5. Domain control of carrier density at a semiconductor-ferroelectric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misirlioglu, I. B.; Yildiz, M.; Sendur, K.

    2015-10-01

    Control of charge carrier distribution in a gated channel via a dielectric layer is currently the state of the art in the design of integrated circuits such as field effect transistors. Replacing linear dielectrics with ferroelectrics would ultimately lead to more energy efficient devices as well as the added advantage of the memory function of the gate. Here, we report that the channel-off/channel-on states in a metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor stack are actually transitions from a multi domain state to a single domain state of the ferroelectric under bias. In our approach, there is no a priori assumption on the single or multi-domain nature of the ferroelectric layer that is often neglected in works discussing the ferroelectric-gate effect on channel conductivity interfacing a ferroelectric. We also predict that semiconductor/ferroelectric/semiconductor stacks can function at even lower gate voltages than metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor stacks when an n-type semiconductor is placed between the ferroelectric and the gate metal. Our results suggest the ultimate stability of the multidomain state whenever it interfaces a semiconductor electrode and that a switchable single domain state may not be necessary to achieve effective control of conductivity in a p-type channel. Finally, we discuss some experimental results in the literature in light of our findings.

  6. Microeconomics of yield learning and process control in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Kevin M.

    2003-06-01

    Simple microeconomic models that directly link yield learning to profitability in semiconductor manufacturing have been rare or non-existent. In this work, we review such a model and provide links to inspection capability and cost. Using a small number of input parameters, we explain current yield management practices in 200mm factories. The model is then used to extrapolate requirements for 300mm factories, including the impact of technology transitions to 130nm design rules and below. We show that the dramatic increase in value per wafer at the 300mm transition becomes a driver for increasing metrology and inspection capability and sampling. These analyses correlate well wtih actual factory data and often identify millions of dollars in potential cost savings. We demonstrate this using the example of grating-based overlay metrology for the 65nm node.

  7. Controls over the strontium isotope composition of river water

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. ); Edmond, J.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Strontium concentrations and isotope ratios have been measured in river and ground waters from the Granges, Orinoco, and Amazon river basins. When compared with major element concentrations, the data set has allowed a detailed examination of the controls over the strontium isotope systematics of riverine input to the oceans in the following environments: (1) typical drainage basins containing limestones, evaporites, shales, and alumino-silicate metamorphic and igneous rocks; (2) shield terrains containing no chemical or biogenic sediments; and (3) the flood plains that constitute the largest areas of many large rivers. The strontium concentration and isotope compositions of river waters are largely defined by mixing of strontium derived from limestones and evaporites with strontium derived from silicate rocks. The strontium isotope composition of the limestone end member generally lies within the Phanerozoic seawater range, which buffers the [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios of major rivers. A major exception is provided by the rivers draining the Himalayas, where widescale regional metamorphism appears to have led to an enrichment in limestones of radiogenic strontium derived from coexisting silicate rocks. The strontium isotope systematics of rivers draining shield areas are controlled by the intense, transport-limited, nature of the weathering reactions, and thereby limits variations in the strontium flux from these terrains. Flood plains are only a minor source of dissolved strontium to river waters, and precipitation of soil salts in some flood plains can reduce the riverine flux of dissolved strontium to the oceans.

  8. Emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shohei; Sato, Yu; Yamamura, Ariyoshi; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have paid much attention as it is a promising candidate for quantum, optical devices, such as quantum computer and quantum dot laser. We propose a local emission energy control method of semiconductor quantum dots using applying strain by volume expansion of phase change material. Phase change material can change its phase crystalline to amorphous, and the volume expand by its phase change. This method can control energy shift direction and amount by amorphous religion and depth. Using this method, we matched emission energy of two InAs/InP quantum dots. This achievement can connect to observing superradiance phenomenon and quantum dot coupling effect.

  9. Controls over the strontium isotope composition of river water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, M. R.; Edmond, J. M.

    1992-05-01

    Strontium concentrations and isotope ratios have been measured in river and ground waters from the Ganges, Orinoco, and Amazon river basins. When compared with major element concentrations, the data set has allowed a detailed examination of the controls over the strontium isotope systematics of riverine input to the oceans in the following environments: (1) "typical" drainage basins containing limestones, evaporites, shales, and alumino-silicate metamorphic and igneous rocks; (2) shield terrains containing no chemical or biogenic sediments; and (3) the floodplains that constitute the largest areas of many large rivers. The strontium concentration and isotope composition of river waters are largely defined by mixing of strontium derived from limestones and evaporites with strontium derived from silicate rocks. The strontium isotope composition of the limestone endmember generally lies within the Phanerozoic seawater range, which buffers the 87Sr /86Sr ratios of major rivers. A major exception is provided by the rivers draining the Himalayas, where widescale regional metamorphism appears to have led to an enrichment in limestones of radiogenic strontium derived from coexisting silicate rocks. The strontium isotope systematics of rivers draining shield areas are controlled by the intense, transportlimited, nature of the weathering reactions, and thereby limits variations in the strontium flux from these terrains. Floodplains are only a minor source of dissolved strontium to river waters, and precipitation of soil salts in some floodplains can reduce the riverine flux of dissolved strontium to the oceans. The most effective mechanisms for altering the isotope ratio and flux of riverine strontium to the oceans are increased glaciation and large-scale regional metamorphism of the type produced during continental collision. Both mechanisms provide a means for increasing the 87Sr /86Sr ratio of the global riverine flux.

  10. Compound semi-conductors and controlled doping thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, David J. (Inventor); Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor); Matus, Lawrence G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method of controlling the amount of impurity incorporation in a crystal grown by a chemical vapor deposition process. Conducted in a growth chamber, the method includes the controlling of the concentration of the crystal growing components in the growth chamber to affect the demand of particular growth sites within the growing crystal thereby controlling impurity incorporation into the growth sites.

  11. 77 FR 26789 - Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... violation of section 337 in the infringement of certain patents. 73 FR 75131. The principal respondent was... order. 75 FR 44989-90 (July 30, 2010). The Commission also issued cease and desist orders against those... COMMISSION Certain Semiconductor Chips Having Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory Controllers...

  12. Controlled aggregation of magnetic ions in a semiconductor: an experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, A; Navarro-Quezada, A; Li, Tian; Wegscheider, M; Matĕj, Z; Holý, V; Lechner, R T; Bauer, G; Rovezzi, M; D'Acapito, F; Kiecana, M; Sawicki, M; Dietl, T

    2008-09-26

    The control on the distribution of magnetic ions into a semiconducting host is crucial for the functionality of magnetically doped semiconductors. Through a structural analysis at the nanoscale, we give experimental evidence that the aggregation of Fe ions in (Ga,Fe)N and consequently the magnetic response of the material are affected by the growth rate and doping with shallow impurities. PMID:18851460

  13. Protection of semiconductor converters for controlled bypass reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgopolov, A. G.; Akhmetzhanov, N. G.; Karmanov, V. F.

    2010-05-15

    Possible ways of protecting thyristor converters in systems for magnetizing 110 - 500 kV controlled bypass reactors during switching and automatic reclosing are examined based on experience with the development of equipment, line tests, and mathematical modelling.

  14. Controlling ferromagnetism of (In,Fe)As semiconductors by electron doping

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Vu, Nguyen; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2014-02-21

    Based on experimental results, using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method and Monte Carlo simulation, we study the mechanism of ferromagnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As. We show that with doped Be atoms occupying in interstitial sites, chemical pair interactions between atoms and magnetic exchange interactions between Fe atoms change due to electron concentration. Therefore, by controlling the doping process, magnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As is controlled and ferromagnetism is observed in this semiconductor.

  15. Nonlinear burn condition control in tokamaks using isotopic fuel tailoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Mark D.; Schuster, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    One of the fundamental problems in tokamak fusion reactors is how to control the plasma density and temperature in order to regulate the amount of fusion power produced by the device. Control of these parameters will be critical to the success of burning plasma experiments like ITER. The most previous burn condition control efforts use either non-model based control designs or techniques based on models linearized around particular operating points. Such strategies limit the potential operational space and must be carefully retuned or redesigned to accommodate changes in operating points or plasma parameters. In this work, a nonlinear dynamic model of the spatial averages of energy and ion species densities is used to synthesize a nonlinear feedback controller for stabilizing the burn condition. The nonlinear model-based control strategy guarantees a much larger operational space than previous linear controllers. Because it is not designed around a particular operating point, the controller can be used to move from one burn condition to another. The proposed scheme first attempts to use regulation of the auxiliary heating power to reject temperature perturbations, then, if necessary, uses isotopic fuel tailoring as a way to reduce fusion heating during positive temperature perturbations. A global model of hydrogen recycling is incorporated into the model used for design and simulation, and the proposed control scheme is tested for a range of recycling model parameters. As we find the possibility of changing the isotopic mix can be limited for certain unfavorable recycling conditions, we also consider impurity injection as a back-up method for controlling the system. A simple supervisory control strategy is proposed to switch between the primary and back-up control schemes based on stability and performance criteria. A zero-dimensional simulation study is used to study the performance of the control scheme for several scenarios and model parameters. Finally, a one

  16. Electrically pumped semiconductor laser with monolithic control of circular polarization

    PubMed Central

    Rauter, Patrick; Lin, Jiao; Genevet, Patrice; Khanna, Suraj P.; Lachab, Mohammad; Giles Davies, A.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Capasso, Federico

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate surface emission of terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from a monolithic quantum cascade laser with built-in control over the degree of circular polarization by “fishbone” gratings composed of orthogonally oriented aperture antennas. Different grating concepts for circularly polarized emission are introduced along with the presentation of simulations and experimental results. Fifth-order gratings achieve a degree of circular polarization of up to 86% within a 12°-wide core region of their emission lobes in the far field. For devices based on an alternative transverse grating design, degrees of circular polarization as high as 98% are demonstrated for selected far-field regions of the outcoupled THz radiation and within a collection half-angle of about 6°. Potential and limitations of integrated antenna gratings for polarization-controlled emission are discussed. PMID:25512515

  17. Active RF Pulse Compression using Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2008-01-30

    In this paper, we will present our recent results on the research of the ultra-fast high power RF switches based on silicon. We have developed a switch module at X-band which can use a silicon window as the switch. The switching is realized by generation of carriers in the bulk silicon. The carriers can be generated electrically or/and optically. The electrically controlled switches use PIN diodes to inject carrier. We have built the PIN diode switches at X-band, with <300ns switching time. The optically controlled switches use powerful lasers to excite carriers. By combining the laser excitation and electrical carrier generation, significant reduction in the required power of both the laser and the electrical driver is expected. High power test is under going.

  18. Electrically pumped semiconductor laser with monolithic control of circular polarization.

    PubMed

    Rauter, Patrick; Lin, Jiao; Genevet, Patrice; Khanna, Suraj P; Lachab, Mohammad; Giles Davies, A; Linfield, Edmund H; Capasso, Federico

    2014-12-30

    We demonstrate surface emission of terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from a monolithic quantum cascade laser with built-in control over the degree of circular polarization by "fishbone" gratings composed of orthogonally oriented aperture antennas. Different grating concepts for circularly polarized emission are introduced along with the presentation of simulations and experimental results. Fifth-order gratings achieve a degree of circular polarization of up to 86% within a 12°-wide core region of their emission lobes in the far field. For devices based on an alternative transverse grating design, degrees of circular polarization as high as 98% are demonstrated for selected far-field regions of the outcoupled THz radiation and within a collection half-angle of about 6°. Potential and limitations of integrated antenna gratings for polarization-controlled emission are discussed. PMID:25512515

  19. Continuously controlled optical band gap in oxide semiconductor thin films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Herklotz, Andreas; Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-02-02

    The optical band gap of the prototypical semiconducting oxide SnO2 is shown to be continuously controlled through single axis lattice expansion of nanometric films induced by low-energy helium implantation. While traditional epitaxy-induced strain results in Poisson driven multidirectional lattice changes shown to only allow discrete increases in bandgap, we find that a downward shift in the band gap can be linearly dictated as a function of out-of-plane lattice expansion. Our experimental observations closely match density functional theory that demonstrates that uniaxial strain provides a fundamentally different effect on the band structure than traditional epitaxy-induced multiaxes strain effects. In conclusion, chargemore » density calculations further support these findings and provide evidence that uniaxial strain can be used to drive orbital hybridization inaccessible with traditional strain engineering techniques.« less

  20. Continuously Controlled Optical Band Gap in Oxide Semiconductor Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Herklotz, Andreas; Rus, Stefania Florina; Ward, Thomas Zac

    2016-03-01

    The optical band gap of the prototypical semiconducting oxide SnO2 is shown to be continuously controlled through single axis lattice expansion of nanometric films induced by low-energy helium implantation. While traditional epitaxy-induced strain results in Poisson driven multidirectional lattice changes shown to only allow discrete increases in bandgap, we find that a downward shift in the band gap can be linearly dictated as a function of out-of-plane lattice expansion. Our experimental observations closely match density functional theory that demonstrates that uniaxial strain provides a fundamentally different effect on the band structure than traditional epitaxy-induced multiaxes strain effects. Charge density calculations further support these findings and provide evidence that uniaxial strain can be used to drive orbital hybridization inaccessible with traditional strain engineering techniques. PMID:26836282

  1. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab... 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  2. 77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab... 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  3. Control of the crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers using overlap condition and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the effects of overlap condition and surface wettability of dielectric layers on the drying process and crystalline structure of inkjet-printed semiconductor layers. 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS pentacene) was utilized to inkjet-print the semiconductor layer. Using various overlap conditions, semiconductor layers were inkjet-printed on dielectric layers with different surface wettabilities. It is observed that crystal growth and the resulting crystalline structures in inkjet-printed semiconductor layers are primarily determined by evaporation behavior, particularly the contact line movement of the drying semiconductor layers, which can be controlled via the overlap condition. With inappropriate overlap conditions, randomly oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures are generated in the semiconductor layer through irregular contact line recession. One-dimensionally oriented TIPS pentacene crystal structures can be obtained using the optimized overlap condition of 50% as a result of the uniform contact line movement. Relatively hydrophobic dielectric layers help to generate good crystallinity in the semiconductor layer. All-inkjet-printed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with well-oriented TIPS pentacene crystalline structures in the semiconductor layer show a high field effect mobility of ~0.1 cm2 V-1s-1, suggesting that, when printing inkjet semiconductor layers, the overlap condition and surface wettability of the dielectric layer are important factors for generating a well-oriented crystalline structure and thereby fabricating high-performance all-inkjet-printed OTFTs.

  4. Control of the spin geometric phase in semiconductor quantum rings

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Fumiya; Frustaglia, Diego; Saarikoski, Henri; Richter, Klaus; Nitta, Junsaku

    2013-01-01

    Since the formulation of the geometric phase by Berry, its relevance has been demonstrated in a large variety of physical systems. However, a geometric phase of the most fundamental spin-1/2 system, the electron spin, has not been observed directly and controlled independently from dynamical phases. Here we report experimental evidence on the manipulation of an electron spin through a purely geometric effect in an InGaAs-based quantum ring with Rashba spin-orbit coupling. By applying an in-plane magnetic field, a phase shift of the Aharonov–Casher interference pattern towards the small spin-orbit-coupling regions is observed. A perturbation theory for a one-dimensional Rashba ring under small in-plane fields reveals that the phase shift originates exclusively from the modulation of a pure geometric-phase component of the electron spin beyond the adiabatic limit, independently from dynamical phases. The phase shift is well reproduced by implementing two independent approaches, that is, perturbation theory and non-perturbative transport simulations. PMID:24067870

  5. Automated visual inspection stations for next-generation semiconductor package quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYong, Mark R.; Eskridge, Thomas C.; Grace, John W.; Newberry, Jeff E.; Jones, J. H.; Hart, B. E.

    1996-09-01

    In the last several years, the semiconductor industry has come to the realization that the package into which a die is placed is at least as critical to the performance of the complete electronic system as the die itself. This realization has led to an explosive effort across the entire industry to advance the state-of-the-art in semiconductor packaging. To date, this effort has already produced semiconductor packaging options on the scale of the die (i.e., chip scale packaging -- CSP). While CSPs and other advanced packaging techniques provide improved electronic system performance, they also increase the quality control burden (despite the highly automated processes used to manufacture the packages, quality control remains, for the most part, a manual operation). This paper addresses the necessary requirements of automated visual inspection (AVI) for quality control of current and future semiconductor packaging. The necessary requirements of the station are subdivided into two categories: those pertaining to the hardware platform, and those pertaining to the software reasoning engine. Hardware requirements are discussed in terms of finding the best match between commercial, off-the- shelf, hardware components and a given inspection application. Components reviewed include: imagers, optics, illumination systems, auto-focus/alignment systems, material handlers, parallel image preprocessors, and host computers. Applications reviewed include: pin grid array (PGA), ball grid array (BGA), and flip-chip package inspection. Also discussed in the hardware section are options that may be used when commercial components are not adequate. Software requirements are discussed in terms of the functionality required to provide accurate, real-time characterization of package quality, to gain operator acceptance, and to produce meaningful statistics for use in process control.

  6. X-ray topography as a process control tool in semiconductor and microcircuit manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. L.; Porter, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    A bent wafer camera, designed to identify crystal lattice defects in semiconductor materials, was investigated. The camera makes use of conventional X-ray topographs and an innovative slightly bent wafer which allows rays from the point source to strike all portions of the wafer simultaneously. In addition to being utilized in solving production process control problems, this camera design substantially reduces the cost per topograph.

  7. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  8. Dynamical and Microphysical Controls on Subtropical Water Vapor Isotope Ratios: Using New Spectroscopic Measurements to Link Isotopic and Climatic Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raudzens Bailey, A.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Sato, P.; Noone, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Water vapor isotope ratios are critical in shaping the isotopic composition of paleo-proxies used to interpret past climate. Indeed, previous research suggests speleothems are sensitive to water vapor transport, and experiments currently underway are evaluating the role of Greenlandic vapor in setting the isotopic record of the ice sheet. The recent and rapid spread of commercial vapor isotopic analyzers—based on cavity-enhanced near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy—is creating unparalleled opportunities to elucidate which climatic factors control the vapor isotopic composition globally. This presentation describes both an exciting application of this new technology and relevant limitations imposed by measurement uncertainties associated with long-term field deployments. Using three years of continuous water vapor isotope ratio observations from Hawaii's Mauna Loa Observatory—one of the longest records of its kind—we evaluate the influence of large-scale dynamics and cloud microphysical processes in establishing the isotopic composition of water vapor during strong convective activity. Despite the fact that vapor isotope ratios tend to decrease with latitude, greater enrichment in Mauna Loa vapor is associated with a westward retraction of the jet stream, which funnels Asiatic outflow southward, while greater depletion is associated with southwesterly low-level flow. Differences in precipitation efficiency—which are verified by differences in aerosol concentration and total scattering—cause this apparent discrepancy. These results suggest local cloud and precipitation processes are more influential than airmass origin in setting the isotope ratios observed during these strong convective events. The length of the Mauna Loa record, meanwhile, presents a unique opportunity to evaluate long-term stability of biases associated with laser-based isotopic analyzers and to discuss calibration strategies best suited for monitoring programs designed to

  9. Controlling spin lifetime with Dresselhaus and Rashba fields in the 2D semiconductor MX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Li, Pengke

    It is widely believed that whenever spin encodes logic state in a semiconductor device, transport channel materials with the longest spin lifetime are the most suitable choice. However, once a logic operation is completed, residual spins can and will interfere with those involved in future operations. We propose to solve this problem by utilizing the unique properties of spin-orbit effects in the electronic structure of monolayer of group-III metal-monochalcogenide (MX) semiconductors. The interplay of Dresselhaus and Rashba effective magnetic fields in these materials will be shown to provide effective external control over spin polarization lifetime, potentially useful for future spin-enabled digital devices. Based upon: Pengke Li and Ian Appelbaum, arXiv:1508.06963 (to appear in Phys. Rev. B). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  10. Iron isotope fractionation during proton-promoted, ligand-controlled, and reductive dissolution of Goethite.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Kraemer, Stephan M; Teutsch, Nadya; Borer, Paul M; Halliday, Alex N; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2006-06-15

    Iron isotope fractionation during dissolution of goethite (alpha-FeOOH) was studied in laboratory batch experiments. Proton-promoted (HCl), ligand-controlled (oxalate dark), and reductive (oxalate light) dissolution mechanisms were compared in order to understand the behavior of iron isotopes during natural weathering reactions. Multicollector ICP-MS was used to measure iron isotope ratios of dissolved iron in solution. The influence of kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation during different time scales of dissolution was investigated. Proton-promoted dissolution did not cause iron isotope fractionation, concurrently demonstrating the isotopic homogeneity of the goethite substrate. In contrast, both ligand-controlled and reductive dissolution of goethite resulted in significant iron isotope fractionation. The kinetic isotope effect, which caused an enrichment of light isotopes in the early dissolved fractions, was modeled with an enrichment factor for the 57Fe/ 54Fe ratio of -2.6 per thousandth between reactive surface sites and solution. Later dissolved fractions of the ligand-controlled experiments exhibit a reverse trend with a depletion of light isotopes of approximately 0.5 per thousandth in solution. We interpret this as an equilibrium isotope effect between Fe(III)-oxalate complexes in solution and the goethite surface. In conclusion, different dissolution mechanisms cause diverse iron isotope fractionation effects and likely influence the iron isotope signature of natural soil and weathering environments. PMID:16830543

  11. The control of purity and stoichiometry of compound semiconductors by high vapor pressure transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.; Ito, Kazufumi; Scroggs, Jeffery S.; Tran, Hien T.

    1995-01-01

    In this report we summarize the results of a three year research program on high pressure vapor transport (HPVT) of compound semiconductors. Most of our work focused onto pnictides, in particular ZnGeP2, as a model system. Access to single crystals of well controlled composition of this material is desired for advancing the understanding and control of its point defect chemistry in the contest of remote, real-time sensing of trace impurities, e.g., greenhouse gases, in the atmosphere by ZnGeP2 optical parametric oscillators (OPO's).

  12. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgström, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  13. Controlling the Interface Areas of Organic/Inorganic Semiconductor Heterojunction Nanowires for High-Performance Diodes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Yang, Hui; Gao, Juan; Li, Jiaofu; Chen, Yanhuan; Jia, Zhiyu; Li, Yongjun; Liu, Huibiao; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Yuliang; Li, Dan

    2016-08-24

    A new method of in situ electrically induced self-assembly technology combined with electrochemical deposition has been developed for the controllable preparation of organic/inorganic core/shell semiconductor heterojunction nanowire arrays. The size of the interface of the heterojunction nanowire can be tuned by the growing parameter. The heterojunction nanowires of graphdiyne/CuS with core/shell structure showed the strong dependence of rectification ratio and perfect diode performance on the size of the interface. It will be a new way for controlling the structures and properties of one-dimensional heterojunction nanomaterials. PMID:27472226

  14. Semiconductor processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The primary thrust of the semiconductor processing is outlined. The purpose is to (1) advance the theoretical basis for bulk growth of elemental and compound semiconductors in single crystal form, and (2) to develop a new experimental approaches by which semiconductor matrices with significantly improved crystalline and chemical perfection can be obtained. The most advanced approaches to silicon crystal growth is studied. The projected research expansion, directed toward the capability of growth of 4 inch diameter silicon crystals was implemented. Both intra and interdepartmental programs are established in the areas of process metallurgy, heat transfer, mass transfer, and systems control. Solutal convection in melt growth systems is also studied.

  15. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  16. Computer Controlled Magnetotransport Setup for the Characterization of Semiconductor Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducoudray, G. O.; Collazo, R.; Martinez, A.

    1997-01-01

    We have considered a computer controlled magnetotransport setup using LabWindows environment. It allows for measurements of resistivity, Hall resistance, carrier concentration and charge mobility in semiconductor thin films using a van der Pauw configuration. The setup features an electromagnet (B = 0.7 Tesla) a 80486-DX 33 computer with a National Instrument AT-MIO 16 AD/DA and a GPIB interface board. A Keithely 224 current source and a Keithley 196 digital voltmeter were also used in the setup. Plans for the addition of capabilities to allow for magnetic field sweeping and the performance of measurements as a function of temperature will be presented.

  17. Control of polarization and dipole moment in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. H.; Ridha, P.; Mexis, M.; Smowton, P. M.; Blood, P.; Bozkurt, M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Patriarche, G.

    2009-11-30

    We demonstrate the control of polarization and dipole moment in semiconductor nanostructures, through nanoscale engineering of shape and composition. Rodlike nanostructures, elongated along the growth direction, are obtained by molecular beam epitaxial growth. By varying the aspect ratio and compositional contrast between the rod and the surrounding matrix, we rotate the polarization of the dominant interband transition from transverse-electric to transverse-magnetic, and modify the dipole moment producing a radical change in the voltage dependence of absorption spectra. This opens the way to the optimization of quantum dot amplifiers and electro-optical modulators.

  18. Controlled deposition or organic semiconductor single crystals and its application in field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhong

    single crystals are selectively nucleated on patterned templates of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. Several organic semiconductor materials are successfully patterned, including p-type pentacene, tetracene, sexiphenylene, and sexithiophene, as well as n-type tetracyanoquinodimethane. This study suggests that the selective growth of crystals onto patterned carbon nanotubes is most likely due to the coarse topography of the CNT bundles. Moreover, I observe that the crystals nucleate from CNT bundles and grow onto CNT bundles in a conformal fashion. The crystal growth can be directly applied onto transistor source-drain electrodes and arrays of organic single-crystal field effect transistors are demonstrated. To investigate the impact of CNTs on device performance, CNT bundles are incorporated into thin-film FETs and a mobility enhancement of organic semiconductors is observed. In the third approach, organic single crystals with well controlled sizes and shapes are successfully grown using patterned Au films as templates. It is observed that sexithiophene crystals nucleate from the edge or the top surface of Au films and then grow two dimensionally on SiO2 surface. The sizes and shapes of sexithiophene crystals are precisely determined by that of the Au patterns. After removing Au templates, large arrays of sexithiophene crystals with controlled sizes and various shapes such as stripes, squares, hexagons, etc. are achieved. Top-contact FETs made of sexithiophene ribbons are demonstrated. Besides organic single crystals, Au templates can also act as templates to pattern vapor- and solution-deposited organic semiconductor thin films. Patterned organic thin-film FETs exhibit superior performance compared to unpatterned devices. Finally, oriented growth of organic semiconductor single crystals on templates with various features is studied. On substrates with aligned features, such as friction-transferred poly(tetrafluoroethylene) thin films, organic semiconductor thin films

  19. Optically engineered ultrafast pulses for controlled rotations of exciton qubits in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamouras, Angela; Mathew, Reuble; Hall, Kimberley C.

    2012-07-01

    Shaped ultrafast pulses designed for controlled-rotation (C-ROT) operations on exciton qubits in semiconductor quantum dots are demonstrated using a quantum control apparatus operating at ˜1 eV. Optimum pulse shapes employing amplitude and phase shaping protocols are implemented using the output of an optical parametric oscillator and a programmable pulse shaping system, and characterized using autocorrelation and multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan techniques. We apply our pulse characterization results and density matrix simulations to assess the fundamental limits on the fidelity of the C-ROT operation, providing a benchmark for the evaluation of sources of noise in other quantum control experiments. Our results indicate the effectiveness of pulse shaping techniques for achieving high fidelity quantum operations in quantum dots with a gate time below 1 ps.

  20. Quantum control and process tomography of a semiconductor quantum dot hybrid qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun; Shi, Zhan; Simmons, C. B.; Ward, D. R.; Prance, J. R.; Koh, Teck Seng; Gamble, John King; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2014-07-01

    The similarities between gated quantum dots and the transistors in modern microelectronics--in fabrication methods, physical structure and voltage scales for manipulation--have led to great interest in the development of quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor quantum dots. Although quantum dot spin qubits have demonstrated long coherence times, their manipulation is often slower than desired for important future applications, such as factoring. Furthermore, scalability and manufacturability are enhanced when qubits are as simple as possible. Previous work has increased the speed of spin qubit rotations by making use of integrated micromagnets, dynamic pumping of nuclear spins or the addition of a third quantum dot. Here we demonstrate a qubit that is a hybrid of spin and charge. It is simple, requiring neither nuclear-state preparation nor micromagnets. Unlike previous double-dot qubits, the hybrid qubit enables fast rotations about two axes of the Bloch sphere. We demonstrate full control on the Bloch sphere with π-rotation times of less than 100 picoseconds in two orthogonal directions, which is more than an order of magnitude faster than any other double-dot qubit. The speed arises from the qubit's charge-like characteristics, and its spin-like features result in resistance to decoherence over a wide range of gate voltages. We achieve full process tomography in our electrically controlled semiconductor quantum dot qubit, extracting high fidelities of 85 per cent for X rotations (transitions between qubit states) and 94 per cent for Z rotations (phase accumulation between qubit states).

  1. Chemical and thermodynamic control of the surface of semiconductor nanocrystals for designer white light emitters.

    PubMed

    Krause, Michael M; Mooney, Jonathan; Kambhampati, Patanjali

    2013-07-23

    Small CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals with diameters below 2 nm are thought to emit white light due to random surface defects which result in a broad distribution of midgap emitting states, thereby preventing rational design of small nanocrystal white light emitters. We perform temperature dependent photoluminescence experiments before and after ligand exchange and electron transfer simulations to reveal a very simple microscopic picture of the origin of the white light. These experiments and simulations reveal that these small nanocrystals can be physically modeled in precisely the same way as normal-sized semiconductor nanocrystals; differences in their emission spectra arise from their surface thermodynamics. The white light emission is thus a consequence of the thermodynamic relationship between a core excitonic state and an optically bright surface state with good quantum yield. By virtue of this understanding of the surface and the manner in which it is coupled to the core excitonic states of these nanocrystals, we show both chemical and thermodynamic control of the photoluminescence spectra. We find that using both temperature and appropriate choice in ligands, one can rationally control the spectra so as to engineer the surface to target color rendering coordinates for displays and white light emitters. PMID:23802709

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW A review of the coherent optical control of the exciton and spin states of semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The spin of a carrier trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot has the potential to be a robust optically active qubit that is compatible with existing III-V semiconductor device technology. A key requirement for building a quantum processor is the ability to dynamically prepare, control and detect single quantum states. Here, experimental progress in the coherent optical control of single semiconductor quantum dots over the past decade is reviewed, alongside an introductory discussion of the basic principles of coherent control.

  3. Control mechanisms for the oceanic distribution of silicon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischmeyer, André G.; de La Rocha, Christina L.; Maier-Reimer, Ernst; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.

    2003-09-01

    Marine diatoms take up silicic acid for the buildup of their opaline shells and discriminate against the heavier silicon isotope. For the first time, the overall oceanic distribution of silicon isotopes has been estimated by integration of the Hamburg Model of the Ocean Carbon Cycle, version 4 (HAMOCC4). It is shown that the relationship between the silicic acid concentration and its silicon isotope composition is not a simple Rayleigh distillation curve. Only the Southern Ocean and the equatorial Pacific show a clear functional dependency similar to the Rayleigh distillation curve. Model results can be used to predict opal silicon isotope compositions in the sediment and constrain the use of silicon isotopes as a proxy for silicic acid utilization. Owing to the structure of the Pacific current system, it might be valid to apply a relationship between surface silicic acid concentrations and the silicon isotope signal in the equatorial Pacific sediments.

  4. Gain transient control for wavelength division multiplexed access networks using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, T. B.; Osadchiy, A. V.; Kjær, R.; Jensen, J. B.; Monroy, I. Tafur

    2009-06-01

    Gain transients can severely hamper the upstream network performance in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) access networks featuring erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) or Raman amplification. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time using 10 Gb/s fiber transmission bit error rate measurements how a near-saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) can be used to control these gain transients. An SOA is shown to reduce the penalty of transients originating in an EDFA from 2.3 dB to 0.2 dB for 10 Gb/s transmission over standard single mode fiber using a 2 31-1 PRBS pattern. The results suggest that a single SOA integrated within a WDM receiver at the metro node could offer a convenient all-optical solution for upstream transient control in WDM access networks.

  5. Ordered nanocolumn-array organic semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingchu; Duan, Haichao; Zhou, Conghua; Gao, Yongli; Yang, Junliang

    2013-12-01

    Ordered nanocolumn-array phthalocynine semiconductor thin films with controllable molecular orientation were fabricated by combining molecular template growth (MTG) and glancing angle deposition (GLAD) techniques. The pre-deposited planar perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic-3,4,9,10-dianhydride (PTCDA) molecular template layer induces phthalocynine molecules arrange with a lying-down molecular orientation, in which the π-π stacking is vertical to the substrate improving the charge transport along the vertical direction; While the GLAD technique supports the formation of nanocolumn-array thin films, supplying a much larger exposed surface area than the conventional compact thin films. The ordered nanocolumn-array thin films with controllable molecular orientation fabricated by combining MTG and GLAD techniques show the potentials to fabricate ordered bulk heterojunction for improving the performance in organic photovoltaics.

  6. Automation, Control and Modeling of Compound Semiconductor Thin-Film Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Breiland, W.G.; Coltrin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Horn, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Klem, J.F.; Tsao, J.Y.

    1999-02-01

    This report documents the results of a laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) project on control and agile manufacturing in the critical metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) materials growth processes essential to high-speed microelectronics and optoelectronic components. This effort is founded on a modular and configurable process automation system that serves as a backbone allowing integration of process-specific models and sensors. We have developed and integrated MOCVD- and MBE-specific models in this system, and demonstrated the effectiveness of sensor-based feedback control in improving the accuracy and reproducibility of semiconductor heterostructures. In addition, within this framework we have constructed ''virtual reactor'' models for growth processes, with the goal of greatly shortening the epitaxial growth process development cycle.

  7. Evaluation of model predictive control in run-to-run processing in semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, James A.; Campbell, W. J.; Stock, Allen D.

    1997-08-01

    Many steps in the manufacturing of semiconductors offer no opportunity for real-time measurement of the wafer state, necessitating the use of pre- and post-process measurements of the wafer state in a run-to-run control algorithm. The predominant algorithm in the industry is an extended form of SPC using an EWMA filter to adjust a model parameter vector using the available measurements. This paper evaluates the merits of using an optimal discrete controller relying on a discrete-time constrained state-space process model that incorporates feedforward action using the pre-process measurement and feedback using the post-process measurement, accounts for the process statistics using a noise model and optimal filtering theory, and ensures integral action in the controller by estimating unmeasured disturbances. Comparison to the EWMA algorithm are presented using simulations based on actual plant data from a chemical-mechanical polishing application. The polish process is particularly suitable for the application of such a controller because of the natural method the controller provides for incorporating unmeasured disturbances, like pad and slurry changes, in the control action.

  8. Temperature controlled infrared broadband cloaking with the bilayer coatings of semiconductor and superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Youwen; Feng, Yuncai

    2015-06-01

    The infrared broadband tunable cloaking have been proposed and investigated with the bilayer coating materials of semiconductor (n-Ge) and high-temperature superconductor (YBa2Cu3O7), whose cloaking frequency can be controlled by external temperature. The analytical solution is derived based on the scattering cancellation cloaking technique from the Mie scattering theory, and the full-wave numerical simulation is performed by the finite element method. The calculated and simulated results have demonstrated that this invisibility cloak may reduce the total scattering cross section of the composite structure of 90% over a broad frequency band of nearly 20 THz, and the infrared cloaking frequency can be tuned by the external temperature. It can provide a feasible way to design a broadband tunable cloak.

  9. Controlled electrical doping of organic semiconductors: a combined intra- and intermolecular perspective from first principles.

    PubMed

    Joo, Bora; Kim, Eung-Gun

    2016-07-21

    The process of introducing extra charge carriers into organic semiconductors, or simply molecular doping, takes place via intermolecular charge transfer from the donor to the acceptor molecule. Using density functional theory calculations on diverse donor-acceptor pairs, we show that there are two modes of charge transfer; in one, charge transfer is controlled by the sign and in the other, by the magnitude of the donor HOMO-acceptor LUMO level offset. Despite doping being an intermolecular process, the identification of the transfer modes requires a full account of intramolecular geometric changes during charge transfer. We further show that the degree of charge transfer can be represented entirely by the reorganization energy, a common measure of geometric changes, of either the donor or the acceptor. PMID:27314750

  10. Control of Nanostructures and Interfaces of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Quantum-Dots-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2015-05-21

    Nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors (MOS), such as TiO2 and ZnO, have been regarded as an attractive material for the quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), owing to their large specific surface area for loading a large amount of quantum dots (QDs) and strong scattering effect for capturing a sufficient fraction of photons. However, the large surface area of such nanostructures also provides easy pathways for charge recombination, and surface defects and connections between adjacent nanoparticles may retard effective charge injection and charge transport, leading to a loss of power conversion efficiency. Introduction of the surface modification for MOS or QDs has been thought an effective approach to improve the performance of QDSC. In this paper, the recent advances in the control of nanostructures and interfaces in QDSCs and prospects for the further development with higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) have been discussed. PMID:26263261

  11. Controlling the metal to semiconductor transition of MoS2 and WS2 in solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Yi-Kai Huang; Kim, Jaemyung; Kaehr, Bryan James; Foley, Brian M.; Lu, Ping; Conner Dykstra; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiaxing Huang; et al

    2015-01-22

    Lithiation-exfoliation produces single to few-layered MoS2 and WS2 sheets dispersible in water. However, the process transforms them from the pristine semiconducting 2H phase to a distorted metallic phase. Recovery of the semiconducting properties typically involves heating of the chemically exfoliated sheets at elevated temperatures. Therefore, it has been largely limited to sheets deposited on solid substrates. We report the dispersion of chemically exfoliated MoS2 sheets in high boiling point organic solvents enabled by surface functionalization and the controllable recovery of their semiconducting properties directly in solution. Ultimately, this process connects the scalability of chemical exfoliation with the simplicity of solutionmore » processing, enabling a facile method for tuning the metal to semiconductor transitions of MoS2 and WS2 within a liquid medium.« less

  12. Environmental controls on stable isotope ratios in New Zealand Podocarpaceae: Implications for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Marianne J.; Baldini, James U. L.; Gröcke, Darren R.

    2014-09-01

    Stable isotope ratios of various proxies are widely used for palaeoclimate reconstruction, and it is often assumed that isotope ratios reflect vegetation abundance or type. However, very little research exists on the isotopic equilibration of extant biomes under variable environmental conditions. In this study, carbon and oxygen isotope ratios from leaves of various Podocarpaceae genera, endemic to New Zealand, are linked to environmental parameters from the Land Environments New Zealand model. The dominant influence on stable isotope ratios within the majority of Podocarpaceae studied here is vapour pressure deficit (VPD). A simple latitudinal trend does not exist, and neither temperature nor rainfall (decoupled from VPD) controls the stable isotope ratios. The results suggest that modern spatial heterogeneity in VPD affects the stable isotope values of vegetation, and that historic VPD variability would change the stable isotope ratios of Podocarpaceae without necessitating a change in vegetation type, density, or productivity. This represents an alternative model for temporal isotope change within geochemical proxies and reinforces the need for increased stable isotopic research in modern plant ecosystems to better understand modern, and eventually palaeoclimatic processes affecting the terrestrial biosphere.

  13. 77 FR 64143 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambridge Isotope Lab By Notice dated June 18, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on June 26, 2012, 77 FR 38086, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application by renewal to...

  14. Carrier-lifetime-controlled selective etching process for semiconductors using photochemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Myers, David R.

    1992-01-01

    The minority carrier lifetime is significantly much shorter in semiconductor materials with very high impurity concentrations than it is in semiconductor materials with lower impurity concentration levels. This phenomenon of reduced minority carrier lifetime in semiconductor materials having high impurity concentration is utilized to advantage for permitting highly selective semiconductor material etching to be achieved using a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. Various means may be employed for increasing the local impurity concentration level in specific near-surface regions of a semiconductor prior to subjecting the semiconductor material to a carrier-driven photochemical etching reaction. The regions having the localized increased impurity concentration form a self-aligned mask inhibiting photochemical etching at such localized regions while the adjacent regions not having increased impurity concentrations are selectively photochemically etched. Liquid- or gas-phase etching may be performed.

  15. Patterns of chemical use and exposure control in the Semiconductor Health Study.

    PubMed

    Hallock, M F; Hammond, S K; Hines, C J; Woskie, S R; Schenker, M B

    1995-12-01

    Information on chemical use and exposure control between 1986 and 1990 was collected from 14 companies participating in the Semiconductor Health Study. Questionnaires and site visits provided data used to develop exposure categories for three epidemiological studies: prospective, historical, and cross-sectional. Patterns of use of target chemicals were compiled for 82 silicon-wafer fabrication rooms (fabs), including 47 from which subjects were selected for study. Chemical use was examined by operation, year, and epidemiological component. Target agents for epidemiological analyses were present in more than 50% of fabs. Use of these agents was fairly constant from 1986 to 1990, except for a moderate increase in use of propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, a solvent being substituted for ethylene-based glycol ethers (EGE) in photoresists. The distribution of personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and other factors potentially affecting employee exposure was also examined. Controls designed to manage processes or high acute toxicity were present in most fabs; their prevalence remained unchanged from 1986 through 1990. Controls designed to reduce exposures to chemicals with low acute toxicity were less widely distributed; their prevalence increased moderately from 1986 to 1990. PMID:8588557

  16. Performance of MEMS-based gas distribution and control systems for semiconductor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Albert K.; Fitch, John; Harris, James M.; Arkilic, Errol B.; Cozad, Brad A.; Dehan, Ben

    1998-09-01

    The advent of microelectromechanical systems has enabled dramatic changes in diverse technological areas. In terms of control and distribution of liquids and gases (microfluidics), MEMS-based devices offer opportunities to achieve increased performance, and higher levels of functional integration, at lower cost, with decreased size and increased reliability. This work focuses on recent research and development of high-purity gags distribution and control systems for semiconductor processing. These systems include the following components, based upon both normally-open and normally-closed microvalves: pressure- based mass flow controllers; vacuum leak-rate shut-off valves; and pressure regulators. Advanced packaging techniques enable these components to be integrated into gas sticks and panels which have small size, corrosion-resistant wetted materials, small dead volumes, and minimal particle generation. Principles of operation of components and panels, and performance data at both the component and system level, will be presented. The potential for 10X size reduction (linear dimension), 2X product yield improvement (through increased reliability, improved flow accuracy and repeatability, and contamination reduction), and 5X reduction in process gas consumption, will also be addressed. Particular emphasis on characterization and verification of flow measurements in mass flow controllers (versus NIST standards), and the flow models used in designing and characterizing these systems, will be made.

  17. Pulse propagation and optically controllable switch in coupled semiconductor-double-quantum-dot nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of pulse propagation is theoretically investigated through a coupled semiconductor-double-quantum-dot (SDQD) nanostructure. Solving the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations for the SDQD and field simultaneously, the dynamic control of pulse propagation through the medium is numerically explored. It is found that when all the control fields are in exact resonance with their corresponding transitions, a weak Gaussian-shaped probe pulse is transmitted through the medium nearly without any significant absorption and losses so that it can preserve its shape for quite a long propagation distance. In contrast, when one of the control fields is not in resonance with its corresponding transition, the probe pulse will be absorbed by the QD medium after a short distance. Then we consider the probe pulses with higher intensities. It is realized that an intense probe pulse experiences remarkable absorption and broadening during propagation. Finally, we demonstrate that this SDQD system can be employed as an optically controllable switch for the wave propagation to transit from an absorbing phase to a perfect transparency for the probe field. The required time for such switch is also estimated through realistic values.

  18. Microwave phase shifter with controllable power response based on slow- and fast-light effects in semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weiqi; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We suggest and experimentally demonstrate a method for increasing the tunable rf phase shift of semiconductor waveguides while at the same time enabling control of the rf power. This method is based on the use of slow- and fast-light effects in a cascade of semiconductor optical amplifiers combined with the use of spectral filtering to enhance the role of refractive index dynamics. A continuously tunable phase shift of approximately 240 degrees at a microwave frequency of 19 GHz is demonstrated in a cascade of two semiconductor optical amplifiers, while maintaining an rf power change of less than 1.6 dB. The technique is scalable to more amplifiers and should allow realization of an rf phase shift of 360 degrees. PMID:19340174

  19. Weathering and vegetation controls on nickel isotope fractionation in surface ultramafic environments (Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrade, Nicolas; Cloquet, Christophe; Echevarria, Guillaume; Sterckeman, Thibault; Deng, Tenghaobo; Tang, YeTao; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    The dissolved nickel (Ni) isotopic composition of rivers and oceans presents an apparent paradox. Even though rivers represent a major source of Ni in the oceans, seawater is more enriched in the heavier isotopes than river-water. Additional sources or processes must therefore be invoked to account for the isotopic budget of dissolved Ni in seawater. Weathering of continental rocks is thought to play a major role in determining the magnitude and sign of isotopic fractionation of metals between a rock and the dissolved product. We present a study of Ni isotopes in the rock-soil-plant systems of several ultramafic environments. The results reveal key insights into the magnitude and the control of isotopic fractionation during the weathering of continental ultramafic rocks. This study introduces new constraints on the influence of vegetation during the weathering process, which should be taken into account in interpretations of the variability of Ni isotopes in rivers. The study area is located in a temperate climate zone within the ophiolitic belt area of Albania. The serpentinized peridotites sampled present a narrow range of heavy Ni isotopic compositions (δ60Ni = 0.25 ± 0.16 ‰, 2SD n = 2). At two locations, horizons within two soil profiles affected by different degrees of weathering all presented light isotopic compositions compared to the parent rock (Δ60Nisoil-rock up to - 0.63 ‰). This suggests that the soil pool takes up the light isotopes, while the heavier isotopes remain in the dissolved phase. By combining elemental and mineralogical analyses with the isotope compositions determined for the soils, the extent of fractionation was found to be controlled by the secondary minerals formed in the soil. The types of vegetation growing on ultramafic-derived soils are highly adapted and include both Ni-hyperaccumulating species, which can accumulate several percent per weight of Ni, and non-accumulating species. Whole-plant isotopic compositions were found

  20. Spatially Controlled Fe Isotope Variations at Torres del Paine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajos, N.; Lundstrom, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in mass-spectrometry have identified systematic trends of non-traditional stable isotope variation in igneous rocks with differentiation index. We present new Fe isotope data for the Torres del Paine igneous complex in southern Chile. The multi-composition pluton consists of a 1 km vertical exposure of homogenous granite overlying a contemporaneous and possibly cogenetic 0.5 km mafic gabbro suite. Whereas previous isotopic investigations do little to address variations across important magmatic contacts, this study focuses on a first-of-its-kind spatially dependent non-traditional stable isotope investigation of an igneous pluton. Samples were collected at Torres del Paine in spatially significant transects, focusing on major contacts between country rock, granite and mafic units. Results collected by bracketed double spike MC-ICP-MS (2s precision of ×0.03) show an increase in δ56Fe towards the high silica margins of the pluton with values as high as δ56Fe 0.36. Additionally, the data show a decrease in δ56Fe toward the mafic center of the pluton with δ56Fe values ranging from δ56Fe -0.05 to 0.18. Samples collected on the contact between the granite and mafic complex show intermediate values of δ56Fe= 0.18(×) 0.03. Country rock samples in contact with granite show an isotopically light signature of δ56Fe=0.04 (×) 0.03. Analysis of 50 samples in total show a trend of increasing δ56Fe with SiO2 content. The process responsible for Fe isotope variations remains debated but is suggested to reflect four mechanisms: (1) crustal assimilation, (2) fractional crystallization, (3) late stage fluid exsolution [1] and (4) thermal migration [3]. Preliminary results show that mechanisms #1 and #2 would produce isotopic signatures opposite of those seen at Torres del Paine and other plutonic rocks. Isotopically light Torres country rock samples reveal that assimilation of rocks would not produce the isotopically heavy granites seen at Torres. Based on

  1. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Hirabayashi, M.; Winkler, R.; Satow, K.; Prié, F.; Bayou, N.; Brun, E.; Cuffey, K. M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Dumont, M.; Guillevic, M.; Kipfstuhl, J.; Landais, A.; Popp, T.; Risi, C.; Steffen, K.; Stenni, B.; Sveinbjörnsdottír, A.

    2013-10-01

    Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically-enabled atmospheric models. However, post-deposition processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, a monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD) of surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of top (0.5 cm) snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. The measurements also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11 ‰ °C-1 (R = 0.76) for 2012). The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess) is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1-5 days periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere using the CROCUS snow model. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or condensation. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic weather and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in-between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in surface vapor isotopic composition. This

  2. What controls the isotopic composition of Greenland surface snow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Hirabayashi, M.; Winkler, R.; Satow, K.; Prié, F.; Bayou, N.; Brun, E.; Cuffey, K. M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Dumont, M.; Guillevic, M.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Landais, A.; Popp, T.; Risi, C.; Steffen, K.; Stenni, B.; Sveinbjörnsdottír, A. E.

    2014-02-01

    Water stable isotopes in Greenland ice core data provide key paleoclimatic information, and have been compared with precipitation isotopic composition simulated by isotopically enabled atmospheric models. However, post-depositional processes linked with snow metamorphism remain poorly documented. For this purpose, monitoring of the isotopic composition (δ18O, δD) of near-surface water vapor, precipitation and samples of the top (0.5 cm) snow surface has been conducted during two summers (2011-2012) at NEEM, NW Greenland. The samples also include a subset of 17O-excess measurements over 4 days, and the measurements span the 2012 Greenland heat wave. Our observations are consistent with calculations assuming isotopic equilibrium between surface snow and water vapor. We observe a strong correlation between near-surface vapor δ18O and air temperature (0.85 ± 0.11‰ °C-1 (R = 0.76) for 2012). The correlation with air temperature is not observed in precipitation data or surface snow data. Deuterium excess (d-excess) is strongly anti-correlated with δ18O with a stronger slope for vapor than for precipitation and snow surface data. During nine 1-5-day periods between precipitation events, our data demonstrate parallel changes of δ18O and d-excess in surface snow and near-surface vapor. The changes in δ18O of the vapor are similar or larger than those of the snow δ18O. It is estimated using the CROCUS snow model that 6 to 20% of the surface snow mass is exchanged with the atmosphere. In our data, the sign of surface snow isotopic changes is not related to the sign or magnitude of sublimation or deposition. Comparisons with atmospheric models show that day-to-day variations in near-surface vapor isotopic composition are driven by synoptic variations and changes in air mass trajectories and distillation histories. We suggest that, in between precipitation events, changes in the surface snow isotopic composition are driven by these changes in near-surface vapor

  3. Formation and all-optical control of optical patterns in semiconductor microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, R.; Tsang, C. Y.; Tse, Y. C.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Leung, P. T.; Lewandowski, P.; Schumacher, Stefan; Lafont, O.; Baudin, E.; Tignon, J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor microcavities offer a unique way to combine transient all-optical manipulation of GaAs quantum wells with the benefits of structural advantages of microcavities. In these systems, exciton-polaritons have dispersion relations with very small effective masses. This has enabled prominent effects, for example polaritonic Bose condensation, but it can also be exploited for the design of all-optical communication devices. The latter involves non-equilibrium phase transitions in the spatial arrangement of exciton-polaritons. We consider the case of optical pumping with normal incidence, yielding a spatially homogeneous distribution of exciton-polaritons in optical cavities containing the quantum wells. Exciton-exciton interactions can trigger instabilities if certain threshold behavior requirements are met. Such instabilities can lead, for example, to the spontaneous formation of hexagonal polariton lattices (corresponding to six-spot patterns in the far field), or to rolls (corresponding to two-spot far field patterns). The competition among these patterns can be controlled to a certain degree by applying control beams. In this paper, we summarize the theory of pattern formation and election in microcavities and illustrate the switching between patterns via simulation results.

  4. Electric field control of room temperature ferromagnetism in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepal, N.; Luen, M. Oliver; Zavada, J. M.; Bedair, S. M.; Frajtag, P.; El-Masry, N. A.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the electrical field control of ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature in III-N dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) films. A GaMnN layer was grown on top of an n-GaN substrate and found to be almost always paramagnetic. However, when grown on a p-type GaN layer, a strong saturation magnetization (Ms) was observed. This FM in GaMnN can be controlled by depletion of the holes in the GaMnN/p-GaN/n-GaN multilayer structures. We have demonstrated the dependence of the FM on the thickness of the p-GaN in this heterostructure and on the applied bias to the GaN p-n junction. The Ms was measured by an alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) and a strong correlation between the hole concentration near the GaMnN/p-GaN interface and the magnetic properties of the DMS was observed. At room temperature an anomalous Hall effect was measured for zero bias and an ordinary Hall effect for reverse bias in a fully depleted p-GaN layer. This is in close agreement with the AGM measurement results.

  5. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products.

  6. Energetics and Control of Ultracold Isotope-Exchange Reactions between Heteronuclear Dimers in External Fields.

    PubMed

    Tomza, Michał

    2015-08-01

    We show that isotope-exchange reactions between ground-state alkali-metal, alkaline-earth-metal, and lanthanide heteronuclear dimers consisting of two isotopes of the same atom are exothermic with an energy change in the range of 1-8000 MHz, thus resulting in cold or ultracold products. For these chemical reactions, there are only one rovibrational and at most several hyperfine possible product states. The number and energetics of open and closed reactive channels can be controlled by the laser and magnetic fields. We suggest a laser-induced isotope- and state-selective Stark shift control to tune the exothermic isotope-exchange reactions to become endothermic, thus providing the ground for testing models of the chemical reactivity. The present proposal opens the way for studying the state-to-state dynamics of ultracold chemical reactions beyond the universal limit with a meaningful control over the quantum states of both reactants and products. PMID:26296115

  7. Controls of Isotopic Patterns in Saprotrophic and Ectomycorrhizal Fungi

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) in ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi contain important information about ecological functioning, but the complexity of physiological and ecosystem processes contributing to fungal carbon and nitrogen dynamics has limited our abil...

  8. Controlled buckling structures in semiconductor interconnects and nanomembranes for stretchable electronics

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A; Meitl, Matthew; Sun, Yugang; Ko, Heung Cho; Carlson, Andrew; Choi, Won Mook; Stoykovich, Mark; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Zhu, Zhengtao; Menard, Etienne; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2014-05-20

    In an aspect, the present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, components such as semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed, and related methods of making or tuning such stretchable components. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention are adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Controlled buckling structures in semiconductor interconnects and nanomembranes for stretchable electronics

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Meitl, Matthew; Sun, Yugang; Ko, Heung Cho; Carlson, Andrew; Choi, Won Mook; Stoykovich, Mark; Jiang, Hanqing; Huang, Yonggang; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Lee, Keon Jae; Zhu, Zhengtao; Menard, Etienne; Khang, Dahl-Young; Kan, Seong Jun; Ahn, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hoon-sik

    2012-07-10

    In an aspect, the present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, components such as semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed, and related methods of making or tuning such stretchable components. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention are adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  10. Materials design of dilute magnetic semiconductors based on the control of spinodal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    Recently, spinodal decomposition phenomena attract much attention in the fabrication of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Many experimental results indicate that the magnetic properties of DMS are strongly affected by the occurrence of spinodal decomposition [1], thus people are now interested in controlling the magnetic properties of DMS by tuning the spinodal decomposition. In this talk, I will discuss spinodal decomposition in DMS based on the first-principles calculation. The electronic structure of DMS is calculated by using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation method. Based on the calculated mixing energy I will discuss phase diagrams of DMS systems and their chemical trends. By using the calculated chemical pair interactions between magnetic impurities in DMS, the self-organization of nano-structures in DMS of the nano-structures are simulated by using the Monte Carlo method. The simulation results indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the nano-structures by changing the crystal growth condition [2]. Next, I will propose co-doping method to control solubility limit of magnetic impurities in DMS. From the total energy calculations, it is shown that the solubility of magnetic impurities is strongly enhanced under the existence of interstitial donors [2]. However, due to the compensation of holes by the co-dopants, the ferromagnetism is suppressed. Based on the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we propose low temperature annealing method to remove interstitial co-dopants for recovering the ferromagnetism. By combining the co-doping and the low temperature annealing, we can fabricate DMS with high concentration of magnetic impurities which should show high-Tc. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Fujii, L. Bergqvist, P. H. Dederichs and H. Katayama-Yoshida.[4pt] [1] A. Bonanni, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 22 (2007) R41.[0pt] [2] K. Sato et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. Phys

  11. Computational Nano-materials Design for Spin-Currents Control in Semiconductor Nano-spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Dinh, Van An; Sato, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    We design the different exchange mechanism like Zener's double exchange, Zener's p-d exchange and super-exchange in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) by ab initio calculations. We obtain a universal trend for the exchange interactions [1]. We show that self-organized spinodal nano-decomposition (Dairiseki- Phase) offers the functionality to have high Curie temperatures[2]. We show that spinodal nano-decomposition under layer-by-layer crystal growth condition (2D) leads to quasi-one dimensional nano-structures (Konbu-Phase) with highly anisotropic shape and high TC[2]. We design a spin-currents- controlled 100 Tera bits/icnh^2, Tera Hz switching, and non- volatile MRAM without Si-CMOS based on Konbu-Phase [2]. In addition to the conventional Peltier effect, we propose a colossal thermoelectric-cooling power based on the adiabatic spin-entropy expansion in a Konbu-Phase [3]. [1] B. Belhadaji et al., J. Phys.-Condens. Matter, 19 (2007) 436227. [2] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Phys. stat. sol. (a) 204 (2007) 15. [3] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46 (2007) L777.

  12. Particle contamination control in plasma processing: Building-in reliability for semiconductor fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma processing is used for {approximately}35% of the process steps required for semiconductor manufacturing. Recent studies have shown that plasma processes create the greatest amount of contaminant dust of all the manufacturing steps required for device fabrication. Often, the level of dust in a plasma process tool exceeds the cleanroom by several orders of magnitude. Particulate contamination generated in a plasma tool can result in reliability problems as well as device failure. Inter-level wiring shorts different levels of metallization on a device is a common result of plasma particulate contamination. We have conducted a thorough study of the physics and chemistry involved in particulate formation and transport in plasma tools. In-situ laser light scattering (LLS) is used for real-time detection of the contaminant dust. The results of this work are highly surprising: all plasmas create dust; the dust can be formed by homogeneous as well as heterogeneous chemistry; this dust is charged and suspended in the plasma; additionally, it is transported to favored regions of the plasma, such as those regions immediately above wafers. Fortunately, this work has also led to a novel means of controlling and eliminating these unwanted contaminants: electrostatic {open_quotes}drainpipes{close_quotes} engineered into the electrode by means of specially designed grooves. These channel the suspended particles out of the plasma and into the pump port before they can fall onto the wafer.

  13. Fast control of semiconductor qubits beyond the rotating-wave approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Kestner, J. P.; Wang, Xin; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of single-qubit operations by oscillatory fields on various semiconductor platforms. We explicitly show how to perform faster gate operations by going beyond the universally used rotating-wave approximation (RWA) regime, while using only two sinusoidal pulses. We first show for specific published experiments how much error is currently incurred by implementing pulses designed using standard RWA. We then show that an even modest increase in gate speed would cause problems in using RWA for gate design in the singlet-triplet (ST) and resonant-exchange (RX) qubits. We discuss the extent to which analytically keeping higher orders in the perturbation theory would address the problem. More strikingly, we give a new prescription for gating with strong coupling far beyond the RWA regime. We perform numerical calculations for the phases and the durations of two consecutive pulses to realize the key Hadamard and π/8 gates with coupling strengths up to several times the qubit splitting. Working in this manifestly non-RWA regime, the gate operation speeds up by two to three orders of magnitude and nears the quantum speed limit without requiring complicated pulse shaping or optimal control sequences.

  14. Modeling of optically controlled reflective bistability in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, L.

    2015-05-01

    Bistability switching between two optical signals has been studied theoretically utilizing the concept of cross absorption modulation in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber (VCSSA). The probe beam is fixed at a wavelength other than the low power cavity resonance wavelength, which exhibits bistable characteristic by controlling the power of a pump beam (λpump≠λprobe). The cavity nonlinear effects that arises simultaneously from the excitonic absorption bleaching, and the carrier induced nonlinear index change has been considered in the model. The high power absorption in the active region introduces thermal effects within the nonlinear cavity due to which the effective cavity length changes. This leads to a red-shift of the cavity resonance wavelength, which results a change in phase of the optical fields within the cavity. In the simulation, the phase-change due to this resonance shifting is considered to be constant over time, and it assumes the value corresponding to the maximum input power. Further, an initial phase detuning of the probe beam has been considered to investigate its effect on switching. It is observed from the simulated results that, the output of the probe beam exhibits either clockwise or counter-clockwise bistability, depending on its initial phase detuning.

  15. Semiconductor nanomembrane tubes: three-dimensional confinement for controlled neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minrui; Huang, Yu; Ballweg, Jason; Shin, Hyuncheol; Huang, Minghuang; Savage, Donald E; Lagally, Max G; Dent, Erik W; Blick, Robert H; Williams, Justin C

    2011-04-26

    In many neural culture studies, neurite migration on a flat, open surface does not reflect the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment in vivo. With that in mind, we fabricated arrays of semiconductor tubes using strained silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) nanomembranes and employed them as a cell culture substrate for primary cortical neurons. Our experiments show that the SiGe substrate and the tube fabrication process are biologically viable for neuron cells. We also observe that neurons are attracted by the tube topography, even in the absence of adhesion factors, and can be guided to pass through the tubes during outgrowth. Coupled with selective seeding of individual neurons close to the tube opening, growth within a tube can be limited to a single axon. Furthermore, the tube feature resembles the natural myelin, both physically and electrically, and it is possible to control the tube diameter to be close to that of an axon, providing a confined 3D contact with the axon membrane and potentially insulating it from the extracellular solution. PMID:21366271

  16. Optical Control of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Spin Qubits with Microcavity Exciton-Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Shruti; McMahon, Peter L.; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-03-01

    Topological surface codes demand the least stringent threshold conditions and are most promising for implementing large quantum algorithms. Based on the resource requirements to reach fault tolerance, we develop a hardware platform for large scale quantum computation with semiconductor quantum dot (QD) electron spin qubits. The current proposals for implementation of two-qubit gates and quantum non demolition (QND) readout in a QuDOS (Quantum Dots with Optically Controlled Spins) architecture suffer from large error rates. In our scheme, the optical manipulation of the QD spin qubits is carried out using their Coulomb exchange interaction with optically excited, spin-polarized, laterally confined quantum well (LcQW) exciton-polaritons. The small mass of polaritons protects them from interaction with their solid-state environment (phonons) and enables strong coupling between spin qubits separated by a few microns. Furthermore, the excitation manifold of the QD is well separated from that of the LcQW polaritons, preventing a spin-flip event during readout. We will outline schemes for implementing fast, high-fidelity, single qubit gate, two-qubit geometric phase gate and single-shot QND measurement and analyze important decoherence mechanisms. The work being presented was carried out at Stanford University. Currently the author is at University of Sherbrooke, Canada.

  17. Flow-Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of Semiconductor Nanowires: A Novel Approach for Controlled Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Smith, Nickolaus A.; Dickerson, Robert M.; Casson, Joanna L.; Baldwin, Jon K.

    2012-06-07

    Semiconductor nanowires (SC-NWs) have potential applications in diverse technologies from nanoelectronics and photonics to energy harvesting and storage due to their quantum-confined opto-electronic properties coupled with their highly anisotropic shape. Here, we explore new approaches to an important solution-based growth method known as solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth. In SLS, molecular precursors are reacted in the presence of low-melting metal nanoparticles that serve as molten fluxes to catalyze the growth of the SC-NWs. The mechanism of growth is assumed to be similar to that of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth, with the clear distinctions of being conducted in solution in the presence of coordinating ligands and at relatively lower temperatures (<300 C). The resultant SC-NWs are soluble in common organic solvents and solution processable, offering advantages such as simplified processing, scale-up, ultra-small diameters for quantum-confinement effects, and flexible choice of materials from group III-V to groups II-VI, IV-VI, as well as truly ternary I-III-VI semiconductors as we recently demonstrates. Despite these advantages of SLS growth, VLS offers several clear opportunities not allowed by conventional SLS. Namely, VLS allows sequential addition of precursors for facile synthesis of complex axial heterostructures. In addition, growth proceeds relatively slowly compared to SLS, allowing clear assessments of growth kinetics. In order to retain the materials and processing flexibility afforded by SLS, but add the elements of controlled growth afforded by VLS, we transformed SLS into a flow based method by adapting it to synthesis in a microfluidic system. By this new method - so-called 'flow-SLS' (FSLS) - we have now demonstrated unprecedented fabrication of multi-segmented SC-NWs, e.g., 8-segmented CdSe/ZnSe defined by either compositionally abrupt or alloyed interfaces as a function of growth conditions. In addition, we have studied growth rates as a

  18. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  19. An approach to real-time process control of semiconductor wire-bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Thermal probe using infrared-transparent optical fiber attached to tip of collet with resin to prevent movement during bonding is used to accurately measure temperature during wire bonding on semiconductors for use in large scale integrated circuits.

  20. Development of multiple laser frequency control system for Ca+ isotope ion cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyunghun; Yamamoto, Yuta; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2015-11-01

    We here developed and evaluated a laser frequency control system which synchronizes the laser frequency to the resonance of target Ca + isotope ion whose having more than 8 GHz of isotope shift based on the Fringe Offset Lock method for simple operation of ICPMS-ILECS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry - Ion trap Laser Cooling Spectroscopy) The system fulfilled the minimum requirements of four slave lasers stability for Doppler cooling of Ca + ions. A performance of the system was evaluated by cooling 40Ca + ions with the stabilized slave lasers. All the stable even Ca + isotope ions were trapped and their fluorescence was observed by switching laser frequencies using the system. An odd calcium isotope 43Ca +cooling was also succeeded by the control system.

  1. Microphysical controls on the isotopic composition of wintertime orographic precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M.; Blossey, P. N.; Muhlbauer, A.; Kuang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The sensitivity of mixed-phase orographic clouds, precipitation, and their isotopic content to changes in dynamics, thermodynamics, and microphysics is explored in idealized two-dimensional flow over a mountain barrier. These simulations use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with stable water isotopologues (HDO and H218O), which have been integrated into the Thompson microphysics scheme within WRF as part of the present project. In order to understand how the isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oprecip) is fixed, the mountain height, temperature, and the prescribed cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) have been varied in a series of simulations. For the given range of values explored in this work, changes in mountain height and temperature induce stronger responses in domain-averaged δ18Oprecip than do changes in CDNC by a factor of approximately 10. The strongest response to changing CDNC leads to local variations of δ18Oprecip of about 3‰, though those occur in regions of weak precipitation (<0.1 mm h-1). Changes in δ18Oprecip can be understood through the microphysical pathways by which precipitable hydrometeors are formed and by the isotopic signature associated with each pathway. The decrease in δ18Oprecip with increasing mountain height is not just a function of decreasing temperature but also reflects the changing contributions and distinct isotopic signatures of riming of cloud liquid and vapor deposition onto snow, the leading sources of precipitation in these simulations. The changes in δ18Oprecip with mountain height, temperature, and CDNC are governed in part by the microphysical pathways through which precipitating hydrometeors are formed and grow.

  2. Biphase micro/nanometer sized single crystals of organic semiconductors: Control synthesis and their strong phase dependent optoelectronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengliang; Liu, Yaling; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Hongxiang; Xu, Wei; Hu, Wenping

    2010-04-01

    The control synthesis of α and β phase micro/nanometer sized single crystals of semiconductor 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene were achieved; the device performance of individual α and β phase single crystals showed strong phase dependence; devices of β phase single crystals exhibited very high photoswitch performance (on/off current ratio ˜6×103, one of the highest values reported for organic materials), and those of α phase displayed high field-effect performance.

  3. Controls on ostracod valve geochemistry: Part 2. Carbon and oxygen isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrouy, Laurent; Vennemann, Torsten Walter; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of fossil ostracods are powerful tools to estimate past environmental and climatic conditions. The basis for such interpretations is that the calcite of the valves reflects the isotopic composition of water and its temperature of formation. However, calcite of ostracods is known not to form in isotopic equilibrium with water and different species may have different offsets from inorganic precipitates of calcite formed under the same conditions. To estimate the fractionation during ostracod valve calcification, the oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of 15 species living in Lake Geneva were related to their autoecology and the environmental parameters measured during their growth. The results indicate that: (1) Oxygen isotope fractionation is similar for all species of Candoninae with an enrichment in 18O of more than 3‰ relative to equilibrium values for inorganic calcite. Oxygen isotope fractionation for Cytheroidea is less discriminative relative to the heavy oxygen, with enrichments in 18O for these species of 1.7 to 2.3‰. Oxygen isotope fractionations for Cyprididae are in-between those of Candoninae and Cytheroidea. The difference in oxygen isotope fractionation between ostracods and inorganic calcite has been interpreted as resulting from a vital effect. (2) Comparison with previous work suggests that oxygen isotope fractionation may depend on the total and relative ion content of water. (3) Carbon isotope compositions of ostracod valves are generally in equilibrium with DIC. The specimens' δ 13C values are mainly controlled by seasonal variations in δ 13C DIC of bottom water or variation thereof in sediment pore water. (4) Incomplete valve calcification has an effect on carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of ostracod valves. Preferential incorporation of CO32- at the beginning of valve calcification may explain this effect. (5) Results presented here as well as results from synthetic carbonate

  4. Molecular controls on Cu and Zn isotopic fractionation in Fe-Mn crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, S. H.; Sherman, D. M.; Vance, D.; Hein, J. R.

    2014-06-01

    The isotopic systems of the transition metals are increasingly being developed as oceanic tracers, due to their tendency to be fractionated by biological and/or redox-related processes. However, for many of these promising isotope systems the molecular level controls on their isotopic fractionations are only just beginning to be explored. Here we investigate the relative roles of abiotic and biotic fractionation processes in controlling modern seawater Cu and Zn isotopic compositions. Scavenging to Fe-Mn oxides represents the principal output for Cu and Zn to sediments deposited under normal marine (oxic) conditions. Using Fe-Mn crusts as an analogue for these dispersed phases, we investigate the phase association and crystal chemistry of Cu and Zn in such sediments. We present the results of an EXAFS study that demonstrate unequivocally that Cu and Zn are predominantly associated with the birnessite (δ-MnO2) phase in Fe-Mn crusts, as previously predicted from sequential leaching experiments (e.g., Koschinsky and Hein, 2003). The crystal chemistry of Cu and Zn in the crusts implies a reduction in coordination number in the sorbed phase relative to the free metal ion in seawater. Thus, theory would predict equilibrium fractionations that enrich the heavy isotope in the sorbed phase (e.g., Schauble, 2004). In natural samples, Fe-Mn crusts and nodules are indeed isotopically heavy in Zn isotopes (at ∼1‰) compared to deep seawater (at ∼0.5‰), consistent with the predicted direction of equilibrium isotopic fractionation based on our observations of the coordination environment of sorbed Zn. Further, ∼50% of inorganic Zn‧ is chloro-complexed (the other ∼50% is present as the free Zn2+ ion), and complexation by Cl- is also predicted to favour equilibrium partitioning of light Zn isotopes into the dissolved phase. The heavy Zn isotopic composition of Fe-Mn crusts and nodules relative to seawater can therefore be explained by an inorganic fractionation during

  5. Controllable photo-brightening/photo-darkening of semiconductor quantum dots under laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivenkov, Victor; Tretyachenko, Anna; Samokhvalov, Pavel S.; Chistyakov, Alexander A.; Nabiev, Igor

    2016-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that photo-induced changes in the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be controlled by tuning the parameters of their laser irradiation to vary the relative contributions of photo-brightening and photo-darkening of QDs. For this purpose, the effects of the QD size, photon energy, and intensity of irradiation of QDs on the competing processes of photo-darkening and photo-brightening have been investigated. We have found that photo-brightening of QDs is not accompanied by detectable growth of their photoluminescence (PL) decay time, this process being most pronounced for QDs with an originally low PL quantum yield (QY). In this case, an increase in the PL QY is assumed to be caused by transition of some QDs from the dark (non-emissive) state to the bright (emissive) state. On the other hand, the photo-darkening effect, which was observed only under UV irradiation at 266 nm, was accompanied by simultaneous drop of both the QD QY and their PL decay time. We have also found that, at a constant dose of absorbed energy, the photo-brightening and photo-darkening processes do not depend on the excitation intensity. Thus, the photo-induced changes in the optical properties of QDs are one-photon processes. These data may help to optimize the QD operational conditions in practical applications requiring their intense excitation and add to understanding the fundamental mechanisms of the irreversible photo-induced changes that occur in colloidal QDs under illumination.

  6. Controlling Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductors with Hybrid Nano-Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehl, Michael R.

    Nano-structures, such as photonic crystal cavities and metallic antennas, allow one to focus and store optical energy into very small volumes, greatly increasing light-matter interactions. These structures produce resonances which are typically characterized by how well they confine energy both temporally (quality factor -- Q) and spatially (mode volume -- V). In order to observe non-linear effects, modified spontaneous emission (e.g. Purcell enhancement), or quantum effects (e.g. vacuum Rabi splitting), one needs to maximize the ratio of Q/V while also maximizing the coupling between the resonance and the active medium. In this dissertation I will discuss several projects related by the goal of controlling light-matter interactions using such nano-structures. In the first portion of this dissertation I will discuss the deterministic placement of self-assembled InAs quantum dots, which would allow one to precisely position an optically-active material, for maximum interaction, inside of a photonic crystal cavity. Additionally, I will discuss the use of atomic layer deposition to tune and improve both the resonance wavelength and quality factor of silicon based photonic crystal cavities. Moving from dielectric materials to metals allows one to achieve mode-volumes well below the diffraction limit. The quality factor of these resonators is severely limited by Ohmic loss in the metal; however, the small mode-volume still allows for greatly enhanced light-matter interaction. In the second portion of this dissertation I will investigate the coupling between an array of metallic resonators (antennas) and a nearby semiconductor quantum well. Using time-resolved pump-probe measurements I study the properties of the coupled system and compare the results to a model which allows one to quantitatively compare various antenna geometries.

  7. Design of dilute magnetic semiconductors with room temperature ferromagnetism by controlling spinodal decompostion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    Owing to the recent development of the first-principles method for calculating magnetic properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), it has been recognized that the magnetic percolation effect is disastrous to the high temperature ferromagnetism in DMS in particular for low concentrations [1]. The exchange interactions calculated from first-principles are strong for nearest neighbors, but those interactions are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high- TC because the solubility of magnetic impurities into DMS is too low to achieve magnetic percolation. To overcome this difficulty and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we focus on the spinodal decomposition in DMS, and suggest that by controlling the spinodal decomposition high blocking temperature can be realized leading to ferromagnetic behaviour at high temperature [2]. We calculate electronic structure of DMS from first-principles by using the Korringa- Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. Then, chemical pair interactions and magnetic exchange interactions between magnetic are calculated. We use the Monte Carlo techniques to simulate spinodal decomposition of DMS and to estimate the magnetic properties of them [3]. The computer simulations for the magnetization process of the decomposition phases indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the clusters by changing the crystal growth condition. This simulation suggests the material design of high blocking temperature DMS by controlling the spinodal decomposition [2].As another approach for realizing high-Tc DMS we propose co-doping method to increase solubility limit of transition metal impurities in DMS [4]. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Katayama-Yoshida and T. Fukushima. [1] L. Bergqvist et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 137202 (2004), K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 201202 (2004) [2] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46, L682

  8. Organic semiconductor density of states controls the energy level alignment at electrode interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Oehzelt, Martin; Koch, Norbert; Heimel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Minimizing charge carrier injection barriers and extraction losses at interfaces between organic semiconductors and metallic electrodes is critical for optimizing the performance of organic (opto-) electronic devices. Here, we implement a detailed electrostatic model, capable of reproducing the alignment between the electrode Fermi energy and the transport states in the organic semiconductor both qualitatively and quantitatively. Covering the full phenomenological range of interfacial energy level alignment regimes within a single, consistent framework and continuously connecting the limiting cases described by previously proposed models allows us to resolve conflicting views in the literature. Our results highlight the density of states in the organic semiconductor as a key factor. Its shape and, in particular, the energy distribution of electronic states tailing into the fundamental gap is found to determine both the minimum value of practically achievable injection barriers as well as their spatial profile, ranging from abrupt interface dipoles to extended band-bending regions. PMID:24938867

  9. Atmospheric controls on the precipitation isotopes over the Andaman Islands, Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, S; Sinha, N; Chattopadhyay, R; Sengupta, S; Mohan, P M; Datye, A

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of precipitation over the Andaman Island, Bay of Bengal was carried out for the year 2012 and 2013 in order to study the atmospheric controls on rainwater isotopic variations. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions are typical of the tropical marine sites but show significant variations depending on the ocean-atmosphere conditions; maximum depletion was observed during the tropical cyclones. The isotopic composition of rainwater seems to be controlled by the dynamical nature of the moisture rather than the individual rain events. Precipitation isotopes undergo systematic depletions in response to the organized convection occurring over a large area and are modulated by the integrated effect of convective activities. Precipitation isotopes appear to be linked with the monsoon intraseasonal variability in addition to synoptic scale fluctuations. During the early to mid monsoon the amount effect arose primarily due to rain re-evaporation but in the later phase it was driven by moisture convergence rather than evaporation. Amount effect had distinct characteristics in these two years, which appeared to be modulated by the intraseasonal variability of monsoon. It is shown that the variable nature of amount effect limits our ability to reconstruct the past-monsoon rainfall variability on annual to sub-annual time scale. PMID:26806683

  10. Atmospheric controls on the precipitation isotopes over the Andaman Islands, Bay of Bengal

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, S.; Sinha, N.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Sengupta, S.; Mohan, P. M.; Datye, A.

    2016-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of precipitation over the Andaman Island, Bay of Bengal was carried out for the year 2012 and 2013 in order to study the atmospheric controls on rainwater isotopic variations. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions are typical of the tropical marine sites but show significant variations depending on the ocean-atmosphere conditions; maximum depletion was observed during the tropical cyclones. The isotopic composition of rainwater seems to be controlled by the dynamical nature of the moisture rather than the individual rain events. Precipitation isotopes undergo systematic depletions in response to the organized convection occurring over a large area and are modulated by the integrated effect of convective activities. Precipitation isotopes appear to be linked with the monsoon intraseasonal variability in addition to synoptic scale fluctuations. During the early to mid monsoon the amount effect arose primarily due to rain re-evaporation but in the later phase it was driven by moisture convergence rather than evaporation. Amount effect had distinct characteristics in these two years, which appeared to be modulated by the intraseasonal variability of monsoon. It is shown that the variable nature of amount effect limits our ability to reconstruct the past-monsoon rainfall variability on annual to sub-annual time scale. PMID:26806683

  11. Status of international co-operation. Case study: Elucidation of the cause and control of second impurity pattern in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Tatau

    1992-01-01

    Cause and control of the 2nd impurity patterns in tellurium doped gallium antimonide and sulfur doped indium phosphide semiconductors were studied. The semiconductors were made using the Travelling Heater Method (THM) on Spacelab SL-1 (1983) and D-1 (1985). Samples were chemically etched and observed by spatial resolution photo luminescence method. As a result, the condition to control the formation of the 2nd impurity pattern is elucidated, and crystal growth without 1st or 2nd impurity patterns can be obtained using the THM method in microgravity. Methods to remove the macrosteps formed by LPE (Liquid Phase Epitaxy), which is a method for the formation of semiconductor thin solids, are found. It is made clear that the latter result is attributable to ground technology improvement yielded by analyzing experiments in microgravity. It is made clear that accurate research on the formation and disappearance of 2nd impurity patterns and accurate measurement of physical constants, such as the diffusion coefficient, are possible in microgravity conditions due to lack of thermal convection.

  12. Factors that control the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in an anoxic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alperin, M. J.; Blair, Neal E.; Albert, D. B.; Hoehler, T. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of methane produced in anoxic marine sediment is controlled by four factors: (1) the pathway of methane formation, (2) the isotopic composition of the methanogenic precursors, (3) the isotope fractionation factors for methane production, and (4) the isotope fractionation associated with methane oxidation. The importance of each factor was evaluated by monitoring stable carbon isotope ratios in methane produced by a sediment microcosm. Methane did not accumulate during the initial 42-day period when sediment contained sulfate, indicating little methane production from 'noncompetitive' substrates. Following sulfate depletion, methane accumulation proceeded in three distinct phases. First, CO2 reduction was the dominant methanogenic pathway and the isotopic composition of the methane produced ranged from -80 to -94 per thousand. The acetate concentration increased during this phase, suggesting that acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria were unable to keep pace with acetate production. Second, acetate fermentation became the dominant methanogenic pathway as bacteria responded to elevated acetate concentrations. The methane produced during this phase was progressively enriched in C-13, reaching a maximum delta(C-13) value of -42 per thousand. Third, the acetate pool experienced a precipitous decline from greater than 5 mM to less than 20 micro-M and methane production was again dominated by CO2 reduction. The delta(C-13) of methane produced during this final phase ranged from -46 to -58 per thousand. Methane oxidation concurrent with methane production was detected throughout the period of methane accumulation, at rates equivalent to 1 to 8 percent of the gross methane production rate. Thus methane oxidation was too slow to have significantly modified the isotopic signature of methane. A comparison of microcosm and field data suggests that similar microbial interactions may control seasonal variability in the isotopic composition of methane

  13. A structurally-controllable spin filter in a δ-doped magnetically modulated semiconductor nanostructure with zero average magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li-Hua; Ma, Wen-Yue; Zhang, Gui-Lian; Yang, Shi-Peng

    2015-07-01

    We report on a theoretical investigation of spin-polarized transport in a δ-doped magnetically modulated semiconductor nanostructure, which can be experimentally realized by depositing a ferromagnetic stripe on the top of a semiconductor heterostructure and by using the atomic layer doping technique such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is shown that although such a nanostructure has a zero average magnetic filed, a sizable spin polarization exists due to the Zeeman splitting mechanism. It is also shown that the degree of spin polarization varies sensitively with the weight and/or position of the δ-doping. Therefore, one can conveniently tailor the behaviour of the spin-polarized electron by tuning the δ -doping, and such a device can be employed as a controllable spin filter for spintronics.

  14. Application of statistical methods (SPC) for an optimized control of the irradiation process of high-power semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittendorfer, J.; Zwanziger, P.

    2000-03-01

    High-power bipolar semiconductor devices (thyristors and diodes) in a disc-type shape are key components (semiconductor switches) for high-power electronic systems. These systems are important for the economic design of energy transmission systems, i.e. high-power drive systems, static compensation and high-voltage DC transmission lines. In their factory located in Pretzfeld, Germany, the company, eupec GmbH+Co.KG (eupec), is producing disc-type devices with ceramic encapsulation in the high-end range for the world market. These elements have to fulfil special customer requirements and therefore deliver tailor-made trade-offs between their on-state voltage and dynamic switching behaviour. This task can be achieved by applying a dedicated electron irradiation on the semiconductor pellets, which tunes this trade-off. In this paper, the requirements to the irradiation company Mediscan GmbH, from the point of view of the semiconductor manufacturer, are described. The actual strategy for controlling the irradiation results to fulfil these requirements are presented, together with the choice of relevant parameters from the viewpoint of the irradiation company. The set of process parameters monitored, using statistical process control (SPC) techniques, includes beam current and energy, conveyor speed and irradiation geometry. The results are highlighted and show the successful co-operation in this business. Watching this process vice versa, an idea is presented and discussed to develop the possibilities of a highly sensitive dose detection device by using modified diodes, which could function as accurate yet cheap and easy-to-use detectors as routine dosimeters for irradiation institutes.

  15. Theory of quantum control of spin-photon dynamics and spin decoherence in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wang

    Single electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and single photon wavepacket propagating in an optical waveguide are investigated as carriers of quantum bit (qubit) for information processing. Cavity quantum electrodynamics of the coupled system composed of charged QD, microcavity and waveguide provides a quantum interface for the interplay of stationary spin qubits and flying photon qubits via cavity assisted optical control. This interface forms the basis for a wide range of essential functions of a quantum network, including transferring, swapping, and entangling qubits at distributed quantum nodes as well as a deterministic source and an efficient detector of a single photon wavepacket with arbitrarily specified shape. The cavity assisted optical process also made possible ultrafast initialization and QND readout of the spin qubit in QD. In addition, the strong optical nonlinearity of dot-cavity-waveguide coupled system enables phase gate and entanglement operation for flying single photon qubits in waveguides. The coherence of the electron spin is the wellspring of these quantum applications being investigated. At low temperature and strong magnetic field, the dominant cause of electron spin decoherence is the coupling with the interacting lattice nuclear spins. We present a quantum solution to the coupled dynamics of the electron with the nuclear spin bath. The decoherence is treated in terms of quantum entanglement of the electron with the nuclear pair-flip excitations driven by the various nuclear interactions. A novel nuclear interaction, mediated by virtue spin-flips of the single electron, plays an important role in single spin free-induction decay (FID). The spin echo not only refocuses the dephasing by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble dynamics but also eliminates the decoherence by electron-mediated nuclear interaction. Thus, the decoherence times for single spin FID and ensemble spin echo are significantly different. The quantum theory of

  16. Controlling factors of Ca isotope fractionation in scleractinian corals evaluated by temperature, pH and light controlled culture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Mayuri; Gussone, Nikolaus; Koga, Yasuko; Iwase, Akihiro; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sakai, Kazuhiko; Kawahata, Hodaka

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the 44Ca/40Ca ratios of Porites australiensis grown under three different culture experiments composed of temperature, pH and light controlled culture experiments are measured. The temperature dependent isotope fractionation of 0.02‰/°C deduced from this study is similar to inorganic aragonite, but the degree of isotope fractionation is about +0.4‰ offset in corals. These observations agree with earlier results on different coral species, suggesting Ca isotope fractionation during Ca transmembrane transport in corals. While in cultured corals a significant temperature dependence of δ44Ca is observed, the relationships between calcium isotope fractionation and pH as well as light intensity are negligible. Therefore variation of δ44Ca in Porites corals is mainly controlled by temperature. A combination of δ44Ca and Sr/Ca of corals in temperature controlled experiments cannot be explained by Rayleigh type fractionation directly from a fluid, which is seawater-like in terms of δ44Ca and Sr/Ca. Through coral-specific biomineralization processes, overall mean δ44Ca of scleractinian corals including previous studies are different from biogenic aragonites secreted by sclerosponges and pteropods, but are comparable with those of bivalves as well as calcitic coccolithophores and foraminifers. These findings are important for better understanding biomineralization in corals and in order to constrain the Ca isotopic composition of oceanic Ca sinks in response to climate changes and associated with shifts of calcite and aragonite seas.

  17. Current-voltage characteristics of organic semiconductors: Interfacial control between organic layers and electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takeshi

    2007-12-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of organic molecular glasses and solution processable materials embedded between two electrodes were studied to find materials possessing high charge-carrier mobilities and to design organic memory devices. The comparison studies between TOF, FET and SCLC measurements confirm the validity of using analyses of I-V characteristics to determine the mobility of organic semiconductors. Hexaazatrinaphthylene derivatives tri-substituted by electron withdrawing groups were characterized as potential electron transporting molecular glasses. The presence of two isomers has important implications for film morphology and effective mobility. The statistical isomer mixture of hexaazatrinaphthylene derivatized with pentafluoro-phenylmethyl ester is able to form amorphous films, and electron mobilities with the range of 10--2 cm2/Vs are observed in their I-V characteristics. Single-layer organic memory devices consisting of a polymer layer embedded between an Al electrode and ITO modified with Ag nanodots (Ag-NDs) prepared by a solution-based surface assembly demonstrated a potential capability as nonvolatile organic memory device with high ON/OFF switching ratios of 10 4. This level of performance could be achieved by modifying the ITO electrodes with some Ag-NDs that act as trapping sites, reducing the current in the OFF state. Based upon the observed electrical characteristics, the currents of the low-resistance state can be attributed to a tunneling through low-resistance pathways of metal particles originating from the metal top electrode in the organic layer and that the high-resistance state is controlled by charge trapping by the metal particles including Ag-NDs. In an alternative approach, complex films of AgNO3: hexaazatrinaphthylene derivatives were studied as the active layers for all-solution processed and air-stable organic memory devices. Rewritable memory effects were observed in the devices comprised of a thin polymer

  18. Optimal quantum control via numerical pulse shape optimization for two exciton qubits confined to semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Shi Yang, Hong Yi; Hall, Kimberley

    2015-03-01

    Optimal quantum control (OQC), which iteratively optimizes the control Hamiltonian to achieve a target quantum state, is a versatile approach for manipulating quantum systems. For optically-active transitions, OQC can be implemented using femtosecond pulse shaping which provides control over the amplitude and/or phase of the electric field. Optical pulse shaping has been employed to optimize physical processes such as nonlinear optical signals, photosynthesis, and has recently been applied to optimizing single-qubit gates in multiple semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, we examine the use of numerical pulse shape optimization for optimal quantum control of multiple qubits confined to quantum dots as a function of their electronic structure parameters. The numerically optimized pulse shapes were found to produce high fidelity quantum gates for a range of transition frequencies, dipole moments, and arbitrary initial and final states. This work enhances the potential for scalability by reducing the laser resources required to control multiple qubits.

  19. Experimental identification of mechanisms controlling calcium isotopic fractionations by the vegetation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobert, Florian; Schimtt, Anne-Désirée.; Bourgeade, Pascale; Stille, Peter; Chabaux, François; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Jaegler, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    This study aims to better understand the role of vegetation on the Ca cycle at the level of the critical zone of the Earth, in order to specify the mechanisms controlling the Ca absorption by plants at the rock/plant interface. To do this, we performed experiments using hydroponic plant cultures in a way that we could control the co-occuring geochemical and physiological process and determine the impact of the nutritive solution on the Ca cycle within plants. A dicotyledon and calcicole plant with rapid growth, the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), has been chosen to have access to one complete growth cycle. Several experiments have been conducted with two Ca concentrations, 6 (L) and 60 (H) ppm and two pH values (4 and 6) in the nutritive solution, for which the Ca concentration was maintained constant, so its Ca content is considered as infinite. A second experiment (non infinite L6) allowed Ca depletion in the solution through time; therefore, response effects on the Ca isotopic signatures in the plant organs and in the nutritive solution were observed. We determined Ca concentrations and isotopic ratios in the nutritive solution and in different organs (main roots, secondary roots, old and young stems, old and young leaves and fruits) at two different growth stages (10 days and 6 weeks). Preliminary results show that: (1) the roots (main and secondary) were enriched in the light isotope (40Ca) compared to the nutritive solution, and leaves were enriched in the heavy isotope (44Ca) compared to stems. These results are in accord with previously published field studies (Wigand et al., 2005; Page et al., 2008; Cenki-Tok et al., 2009; Holmden and Bélanger, 2010). Leaves and secondary roots were however enriched in the heavy isotope (44Ca) compared to bean pods, stems and main roots. These results could be related to kinetic fractionation processes occurring either during the Ca root uptake, or during the Ca transport within the plant, or physiological mechanisms

  20. Structurally controllable spin spatial splitter in a hybrid ferromagnet and semiconductor nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Mao-Wang Cao, Xue-Li; Huang, Xin-Hong; Jiang, Ya-Qing; Li, Shuai

    2014-05-07

    We theoretically investigate modulation of a tunable δ-potential to the lateral displacement of electrons across a magnetically modulated semiconductor nanostructure. Experimentally, this nanostructure can be produced by depositing a nanosized ferromagnetic stripe with in-plane magnetization on top of a semiconductor heterostructure, while the δ-potential can be realized by means of the atomic layer doping technique. Theoretical analysis reveals that this δ-doping can break the intrinsic symmetry in nanostructure and a considerable spin polarization in the lateral displacement will appear. Numerical calculations demonstrate that both magnitude and sign of spin polarization can be manipulated by changing the height and/or position of the δ-doping, giving rise to a structurally tunable spin spatial splitter.

  1. Using a Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition to Control Optical Transmission through Subwavelength Hole Arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Donev, E. U.; Suh, J. Y.; Lopez, R.; Feldman, L. C.; Haglund, R. F.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple configuration in which the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength hole arrays in noble-metal films can be switched by the semiconductor-to-metal transition in an underlying thin film of vanadium dioxide. In these experiments, the transition is brought about by thermal heating of the bilayer film. The surprising reverse hysteretic behavior of the transmission through the subwavelength holes in the vanadium oxide suggest that this modulation is accomplished by a dielectric-matching condition rather than plasmon coupling through the bilayer film. The results of this switching, including the wavelength dependence, are qualitatively reproduced by a transfer matrix model.more » The prospects for effecting a similar modulation on a much faster time scale by using ultrafast laser pulses to trigger the semiconductor-to-metal transition are also discussed.« less

  2. Strain-based control of crystal anisotropy for perovskite oxides on semiconductor-based material

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A crystalline structure and a semiconductor device includes a substrate of a semiconductor-based material and a thin film of an anisotropic crystalline material epitaxially arranged upon the surface of the substrate so that the thin film couples to the underlying substrate and so that the geometries of substantially all of the unit cells of the thin film are arranged in a predisposed orientation relative to the substrate surface. The predisposition of the geometries of the unit cells of the thin film is responsible for a predisposed orientation of a directional-dependent quality, such as the dipole moment, of the unit cells. The predisposed orientation of the unit cell geometries are influenced by either a stressed or strained condition of the lattice at the interface between the thin film material and the substrate surface.

  3. Analysis of stable isotopes in fish mucus during a controlled diet switch

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used a controlled diet switch in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center to study the time rates of changes in stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (13C and 15N) in epidermal mucus, a rapidly responding “tissue.” Because of the ra...

  4. Stable isotope analysis of fish mucus during a controlled diet switch

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used a controlled diet switch in steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at the Oregon Hatchery Research Center to study the time rates of changes in stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen (13C and 15N) in epidermal mucus, a rapidly responding “tissue.” Because of the ra...

  5. Evaluation of carbon isotope flux partitioning theory under simplified and controlled environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of the photosynthetic (Fp) and respiratory (Fr) fluxes of net CO2 exchange (Fn)remains a necessary step toward understanding the biological and physical controls on carbon cycling between the soil, biomass, and atmosphere. Despite recent advancements in stable carbon isotope partitioning ...

  6. Isotopic Controls of Rainwater and Water Vapor on Mangrove Leaf Water and Lipid Biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, N.; Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of sedimentary mangrove lipid biomarkers can be used as a proxy of past salinity and water isotopes. This approach is based on the observation that apparent 2H/1H fractionation between surface water and mangrove lipids increases with surface water salinity in six species of mangroves with different salt management strategies growing at sites spanning a range of relative humidities throughout Australia and Micronesia. In order to more robustly apply mangrove lipid δ2H as a paleoclimate proxy, we investigated the cause of the correlation between apparent 2H fractionation and salinity. We present results from two related experiments that assessed controls on isotopes of mangrove leaf water, the direct source of hydrogen in lipids: (1) Measurements of natural δ2H in precipitation, surface water, and mangrove tissue water from a series of lakes with varying salinity and water isotope composition in Palau, and (2) measurements of mangrove tissue water and treatment water from a controlled simulation in which mangroves were treated with artificial rain of varying isotopic composition. Rainwater 2H/1H fluctuations of 30‰ over a one-month period explain up to 65% of the variance in leaf water δ2H for Bruguiera gymnorhiza mangroves from Palau despite lake water isotope differences among sites of up to 35‰. This indicates that in humid tropical settings, leaf water isotopes are more closely related to those of precipitation and water vapor than to those of lake surface water, explaining the observed change in apparent fractionation in B. gymnorhiza lipids with salinity. The relationship between leaf water and rainwater isotopes may be due to either equilibration of leaf water with water vapor in the nearly saturated air or direct foliar uptake of rain and/or dew. Foliar uptake is an important water source for many plants, but has not been documented in mangroves. We tested the capacity for mangroves to perform this function by

  7. What processes control the oxygen isotopes of soil bio-available phosphate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Avner; Angert, Alon

    2015-06-01

    The biological availability of phosphorus (P) is considered to be the limiting factor for plant growth in many natural and agricultural soils. Recent studies demonstrated that valuable information on soil P dynamics can be gained from the stable oxygen isotopes of soil phosphate (δ18OP). However, to interpret this information correctly, our understanding of the processes that controls soil phosphate δ18OP values needs to be improved since most of the current data is based primarily on laboratory studies of pure microbial cultures and enzymatic assays and may not be relevant to soils. Here we designed a series of controlled soil incubation experiments to study the actual isotopic effects induced by abiotic reactions, biological uptake, microbial turnover and organic-P mineralization on soil phosphate δ18OP values. We used this data to estimate the role of these processes in mediating soil P availability. Our study was conducted on Mediterranean soils sampled from the same site during winter, spring and summer. The soils were incubated with various mineral and organic-P compounds and their bioavailable phosphate concentrations and δ18OP values were measured. We confirmed that the role of abiotic reactions on phosphate δ18OP values was negligible and that the δ18OP values of the added phosphate were rapidly driven towards isotopic equilibrium with soil water. We suggest this process was mediated by rapid microbial phosphate turnover. Yet, we did not detect the expected isotopic enrichment effect associated with phosphate biological uptake. In another set of incubation experiments we demonstrated that mineralization of phosphate from organic compounds, such as phospho-mono-ester (PME) and phosphor-di-ester (PDE), produced an offset from isotopic equilibrium, as a result of the strong isotopic fractionation associated with the mineralization process. However, the δ18OP values recorded by the mineralized phosphate were gradually driven back towards isotopic

  8. Intercolony variability of skeletal oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of corals: temperature-controlled tank experiment and field observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A.; Omata, T.; Kawahata, H.

    2005-12-01

    We conducted tank experiments in which we grew Porites spp. colonies in thermostated seawater at five temperature settings under moderate light intensity. A skeletal isotope microprofiling technique applied along the major growth axis of each colony revealed that the oxygen isotope ratios of newly deposited skeleton in most colonies remained almost constant during tank incubation. However, the oxygen isotope ratios displayed a surprisingly large intercolony variability (~1‰ at each temperature setting) although the mean slope obtained for the temperature - skeletal oxygen isotope ratio relationship was close to previous results. The variations in the oxygen isotope ratios were apparently caused by kinetic isotope effects related to variations in the skeletal growth rate rather than by species-specific variability or genetic differences within species. Carbon isotope ratios showed significantly inverse correlation with linear growth rates, suggesting a kinetic isotope control at low growth rates. We also examined oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of Porites corals collected from coral reefs of southern Ryukyu Islands, Japan. In shallow faster-growing corals, oxygen and carbon isotope ratios showed out-of-phase annual fluctuations. In contrast, in deep slower growing corals (mean annual linear extension < 4.8 mm yr1), oxygen and carbon isotope fluctuations were in phase, which has been identified as a pattern influenced by kinetic isotope effects. The slower growing corals were strongly influenced, and the faster growing corals weakly influenced, by kinetic isotope effects over metabolic isotope effects. Growth-rate-related kinetic isotope effects found in both the cultured corals and the deep slower-growing corals may be, at least partly, attributed to low light condition.

  9. Controls on the distribution and isotopic composition of helium in deep ground-water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, X.; Fritzel, T.L.B.; Quinodoz, H.A.M.; Bethke, C.M.; Torgersen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic composition of helium in sedimentary basins can be used to interpret the ages of very old ground waters. The piston-flow model commonly used in such interpretation, how ever, does not account for several important factors and as such works well only in very simple flow regimes. In this study of helium transport in a hypothetical sedimentary basin, we develop a numerical model that accounts for the magnitude and distribution of the basal helium flux, hydrodynamic dispersion, and complexities in flow regimes such as subregional flow cells. The modeling shows that these factors exert strong controls on the helium distribution and isotopic composition. The simulations may provide a basis for more accurate interpretations of observed helium concentrations and isotopic ratios in sedimentary basins.

  10. Exceptional Isotopic Variability in Stream Waters of the Central Andes: Large-Scale or Local Controls?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, R. P.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.; Jeffery, M. L.; Pillco Zola, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern precipitation on the Altiplano in central South America shows large seasonal and interannual variability and is dominated by seasonal convection during austral summer. The stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen in precipitation and surface waters may be useful in diagnosing atmospheric processes over the Altiplano as they reflect the atmospheric history of the water vapor forming precipitation. Few data exist about the spatial and temporal isotopic variability of precipitation or surface water in the region, however, and therefore, the controls governing isotope distribution over the Altiplano are poorly understood. Samples of stream water were collected from small catchments on the Altiplano and along two elevation transects on the eastern cordillera of the Andes (at 17°30' and 21°15'S) between April 2009 and April 2012. As precipitation over the Altiplano is highly seasonal and the environment is otherwise arid, the isotopic signature of these streams is thought integrate the composition of rainy season precipitation. We limit our analysis to ephemeral streams with no groundwater component. Sampled waters show high spatial and interannual isotopic variability. As expected, stream water becomes increasingly depleted with increased elevation along a transect, but the isotopic lapse rates along the two transects are different and show high interannual variability. The average isotopic lapse rate for the northern transect was 1.09‰/km, but varied from 0.79‰/km in 2010 to 1.36‰/km in 2011 (only collected 2010-2012), while the average isotopic lapse rate for the southern transect was 1.74‰/km and varied between 1.50‰/km in 2010 and 1.92‰/km in 2009. Across the Altiplano itself, stream water varies by over 10‰ (δ18O) within a single season (2011), and by over 13‰ across the entire collection period. The high spatial variability of the stream water isotopic composition on the Altiplano suggests that simple Rayleigh fractionation is

  11. Magnetic anisotropy control in Ga1-x Mnx As magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagraczyński, S.; Jasiukiewicz, C.; Dugaev, V. K.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-08-01

    Using the six-band Kane model of the electron energy spectrum in the valence band of GaMnAs magnetic semiconductor we investigate the dependence of the crystalline magnetic anisotropy on the magnitude of magnetization and on the doping with holes. Our main focus is on the difference between two possible models related to the constraint on the total hole number or on the chemical potential. Our results show that the theoretical results for magnetic anisotropy can change dramatically with the use of different constraints.

  12. Longitudinal-mode control in integrated semiconductor laser phased arrays by phase velocity matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The spectrum of semiconductor-laser arrays with separate contacts is investigated. It is demonstrated that the individual laser currents can be selected such that the array operates in a single longitudinal mode, in contrast to the multimode nature of its individual constituents. Moreover, it is possible to tune the lasing frequency by varying the laser currents. Wavelength tuning range of about 50 A, with tuning rate of about 5 A per milliampere, is demonstrated. It is suggested that these spectral features, characteristic of lasers which are coupled in parallel, result from the strong frequency dependence of their spatial mode pattern near the phase-matching frequency of their coupled waveguides.

  13. Redox-variability and controls in subduction zones from an iron-isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, O.; Sossi, P. A.; Bénard, A.; Wille, M.; Vroon, P. Z.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    An ongoing controversy in mantle geochemistry concerns the oxidation state of the sources of island arc lavas (IAL). Three key factors control oxidation-reduction (redox) of IAL sources: (i) metasomatism of the mantle wedge by fluids and/or melts, liberated from the underlying subducted slab; (ii) the oxidation state of the wedge prior to melting and metasomatism; and (iii) the loss of melt from IAL sources. Subsequently, magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallisation, possible crustal contamination and degassing of melts en route to and at the surface can further modify the redox states of IAL. The remote nature of sub-arc processes and the complex interplay between them render direct investigations difficult. However, a possible gauge for redox-controlled, high-temperature pre-eruptive differentiation conditions is variations in stable Fe isotope compositions (expressed here as δ57Fe) in erupting IAL because Fe isotopes can preserve a record of sub-surface mass transfer reactions involving the major element Fe. Here we report Fe isotope compositions of bulk IAL along the active Banda arc, Indonesia, which is well known for a prominent subducted sediment input. In conjunction with other arc rocks, δ57Fe in erupted Banda IAL indicates that fractional crystallisation and possibly crustal contamination primarily control their Fe isotope signatures. When corrected for fractional crystallisation and filtered for contamination, arc magmas that had variable sediment melt contributions in their sources show no resolvable co-variation of δ57Fe with radiogenic isotope tracers. This indicates that crustal recycling in the form of subducted sediment does not alter the Fe isotope character of arc lavas, in agreement with mass balance estimates. Primitive sources of IAL, however, are clearly isotopically lighter than those sourced beneath mid-ocean ridges, indicating either preferential Fe3+-depletion in the mantle wedge by prior, δ57Fe-heavy melt extraction, and

  14. Control of ferromagnetism by manipulating the carrier wavefunction in ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc Anh, Le; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated the control of ferromagnetism in a surface quantum well containing a 5 nm-thick n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (FMS) (In,Fe)As layer sandwiched between two InAs layers, by manipulating the carrier wavefunction. The Curie temperature (TC) of the (In,Fe)As layer was effectively changed by up to 12 K (ΔTC/TC = 55%). Our calculation using the mean-field Zener theory reveals an unexpectedly large s-d exchange interaction in (In,Fe)As. Our results establish an effective way to control the ferromagnetism in quantum heterostructures of n-type FMSs, as well as require reconsideration on the current understanding of the s-d exchange interaction in narrow gap FMSs.

  15. Control of ferromagnetism by manipulating the carrier wavefunction in ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Duc Anh, Le; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-01-27

    We demonstrated the control of ferromagnetism in a surface quantum well containing a 5 nm-thick n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (FMS) (In,Fe)As layer sandwiched between two InAs layers, by manipulating the carrier wavefunction. The Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of the (In,Fe)As layer was effectively changed by up to 12 K (ΔT{sub C}/T{sub C} = 55%). Our calculation using the mean-field Zener theory reveals an unexpectedly large s-d exchange interaction in (In,Fe)As. Our results establish an effective way to control the ferromagnetism in quantum heterostructures of n-type FMSs, as well as require reconsideration on the current understanding of the s-d exchange interaction in narrow gap FMSs.

  16. Ultrafast Control of Magnetism in Ferromagnetic Semiconductors via Photoexcited Transient Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Cotoros, Ingrid A.

    2008-12-01

    The field of spintronics offers perspectives for seamless integration of coupled and inter-tunable electrical and magnetic properties in a single device. For integration of the spin degree of freedom with current electronic technology, new semiconductors are needed that show electrically-tunable magnetic properties at room temperature and above. Dilute magnetic semiconductors derived from III-V compounds, like GaMnAs and InMnAs, show coupled and tunable magnetic, transport, and optical properties, due to the fact that their ferromagnetism is hole-mediated. These unconventional materials are ideal systems for manipulating the magnetic order by changing the carrier polarization, population density, and energy band distribution of the complementary subsystem of holes. This is the main theme we cover in this thesis. In particular, we develop a unique setup by use of ultraviolet pump, near-infrared probe femtosecond laser pulses, that allows for magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy experiments. We photo-excite transient carriers in our samples, and measure the induced transient magnetization dynamics. One set of experiments performed allowed us to observe for the first time enhancement of the ferromagnetic order in GaMnAs, on an ultrafast time scale of hundreds of picoseconds. The corresponding transient increase of Curie temperature (Tc, the temperature above which a ferromagnetic material loses its permanent magnetism) of about 1 K for our experimental conditions is a very promising result for potential spintronics applications, especially since it is seconded by observation of an ultrafast ferromagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition above Tc. In a different set of experiments, we "write" the magnetization in a particular orientation in the sample plane. Using an ultrafast scheme, we alter the distribution of holes in the system and detect signatures of the particular memory state in the subsequent magnetization dynamics, with unprecedented hundreds of

  17. Reply to comment on "Molecular controls on Cu and Zn isotopic fractionation in Fe-Mn crusts"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, David M.; Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek

    2015-02-01

    In our paper "Molecular controls on Cu and Zn isotopic fractionation in Fe-Mn crusts", we present an explanation for the observed isotopic fractionations of Cu and Zn in seawater. We hypothesise that the isotopic fractionation of Cu and Zn is driven by the scavenging of these metals by particulate Fe-Mn oxides as reflected in the isotopic composition of Zn and Cu in marine ferromanganese crusts. Zn sorbed to ferromanganese crusts is isotopically heavier than dissolved Zn in seawater by 0.5‰. EXAFS spectra show that Zn in ferromanganese crusts is sorbed to birnessite and in tetrahedral coordination. Dissolved inorganic Zn in seawater, however, is primarily octahedrally coordinated as Zn(H2O)+26. The difference in the Zn coordination environment gives a qualitative explanation for the sorption (scavenging) of isotopically heavy Zn by ferromanganese crusts (predominantly birnessite).

  18. Understanding key drivers controlling daily stable isotope variations in precipitation of Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Welsh, Kristin; Birkel, Christian; Esquivel-Hernández, Germain; Corrales-Salazar, Jose; Boll, Jan; Brooks, Erin; Roupsard, Olivier; Katchan, Irina; Arce-Mesén, Rafael; Soulsby, Chris; Araguás-Araguás, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Costa Rica is located on the Central American Isthmus, which receives direct moisture inputs from the Caribbean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. The relatively narrow, but high relief Central American land bridge is characterized by unique mountainous and lowland microclimates. However, only limited knowledge exists about the impact of relief and regional atmospheric circulation patterns on precipitation origin, transport, and isotopic composition in this tropical region. Therefore, the main scope of this study is to identify the key drivers controlling variations in meteoric waters of Costa Rica using stable isotopes based on daily sample collection for the year 2013. The monitoring sites comprise three strategic locations across Costa Rica: Heredia (Central Valley), Turrialba (Caribbean slope), and Caño Seco (South Pacific slope). Sporadic dry season rain is mostly related to isolated enriched events ranging from -5.8‰ d18O up to -0.9‰ d18O. By mid-May, the Intertropical Convergence Zone reaches Costa Rica resulting in a notable depletion in isotope ratios (up to -18.5‰ d18O). HYSPLIT back air mass trajectories indicate the strong influence on the origin and transport of precipitation of two main moisture transport mechanisms, the Caribbean Low Level Jet and the Colombian Low Level Jet as well as localized convection events. Multiple linear regression models constructed based on Random Forests of surface meteorological information and atmospheric sounding profiles suggest that Lifted Condensation Level and surface relative humidity are the main factors controlling isotopic variations. These findings diverge from the recognized 'amount effect' in monthly composite samples across the tropics. Understanding of stable isotope dynamics in tropical precipitation can be used to enhance catchment and groundwater modeling efforts in ungauged basins where scarcity of long-term monitoring data drastically limit current and future water resources management.

  19. Enhanced mobility in organic field-effect transistors due to semiconductor/dielectric interface control and very thin single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ji; Yu, Peng; Atika Arabi, Syeda; Wang, Jiawei; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    A perfect organic crystal while keeping high quality semiconductor/dielectric interface with minimal defects and disorder is crucial for the realization of high performance organic single crystal field-effect transistors (OSCFETs). However, in most reported OSCFET devices, the crystal transfer processes is extensively used. Therefore, the semiconductor/dielectric interface is inevitably damaged. Carrier traps and scattering centers are brought into the conduction channel, so that the intrinsic high mobility of OSCFET devices is entirely disguised. Here, very thin pentacene single crystal is grown directly on bare SiO2 by developing a ‘seed-controlled’ pentacene single crystal method. The interface quality is controlled by an in situ fabrication of OSCFETs. The interface is kept intact without any transfer process. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the influence of crystal thickness on device performance. With a pristine interface and very thin crystal, we have achieved the highest mobility: 5.7 cm2 V‑1 s‑1—more than twice the highest ever reported pentacene OSCFET mobility on bare SiO2. This study may provide a universal route for the use of small organic molecules to achieve high performance in lamellar single crystal field-effect devices.

  20. Electrical Control of near-Field Energy Transfer between Quantum Dots and Two-Dimensional Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Dhiraj; Klots, Andrey R; Newaz, A K M; Niezgoda, J Scott; Orfield, Noah J; Escobar, Carlos A; Wynn, Alex; Efimov, Anatoly; Jennings, G Kane; Rosenthal, Sandra J; Bolotin, Kirill I

    2015-07-01

    We investigate near-field energy transfer between chemically synthesized quantum dots (QDs) and two-dimensional semiconductors. We fabricate devices in which electrostatically gated semiconducting monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is placed atop a homogeneous self-assembled layer of core-shell CdSSe QDs. We demonstrate efficient nonradiative Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) from QDs into MoS2 and prove that modest gate-induced variation in the excitonic absorption of MoS2 leads to large (∼500%) changes in the FRET rate. This in turn allows for up to ∼75% electrical modulation of QD photoluminescence intensity. The hybrid QD/MoS2 devices operate within a small voltage range, allow for continuous modification of the QD photoluminescence intensity, and can be used for selective tuning of QDs emitting in the visible-IR range. PMID:26027714

  1. Aspects regarding at 13C isotope separation column control using Petri nets system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boca, M. L.; Ciortea, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is intended to show that Petri nets can be also applicable in the chemical industry. It used linear programming, modeling underlying Petri nets, especially discrete event systems for isotopic separation, the purpose of considering and control events in real-time through graphical representations. In this paper it is simulate the control of 13C Isotope Separation column using Petri nets. The major problem with 13C comes from the difficulty of obtaining it and raising its natural fraction. Carbon isotopes can be obtained using many methods, one of them being the cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide. Some few aspects regarding operating conditions and the construction of such cryogenic plants are known today, and even less information are available as far as the separation process modeling and control are concerned. In fact, the efficient control of the carbon monoxide distillation process represents a necessity for large-scale 13C production. Referring to a classic distillation process, some models for carbon isotope separation have been proposed, some based on mass, component and energy balance equations, some on the nonlinear wave theory or the Cohen equations. For modeling the system it was used Petri nets because in this case it is deal with discrete event systems. In use of the non-timed and with auxiliary times Petri model, the transport stream was divided into sections and these sections will be analyzed successively. Because of the complexity of the system and the large amount of calculations required it was not possible to analyze the system as a unitary whole. A first attempt to model the system as a unitary whole led to the blocking of the model during simulation, because of the large processing times.

  2. Abiotic, biotic, and evolutionary control of the distribution of C and N isotopes in food webs.

    PubMed

    Laiolo, Paola; Illera, Juan Carlos; Meléndez, Leandro; Segura, Amalia; Obeso, José Ramón

    2015-02-01

    Ecosystem functioning depends on nutrient cycles and their responses to abiotic and biotic determinants, with the influence of evolutionary legacies being generally overlooked in ecosystem ecology. Along a broad elevation gradient characterized by shifting climatic and grazing environments, we addressed clines of plant N and C∶N content and of δ(13)C and δ(15)N in producers (herbs) and in primary (grasshoppers) and secondary (birds) consumers, both within and between species in phylogenetically controlled scenarios. We found parallel and significant intra- and interspecific trends of isotopic variation with elevation in the three groups. In primary producers, nutrient and isotope distributions had a detectable phylogenetic signal that constrained their variation along the environmental gradient. The influence of the environment could not be ascribed to any single factor, and both grazing and climate had an effect on leaf stoichiometry and, thus, on the resources available to consumers. Trends in consumers matched those in plants but often became nonsignificant after controlling for isotopic values of their direct resources, revealing direct bottom-up control and little phylogenetic dependence. By integrating ecosystem and mechanistic perspectives, we found that nutrient dynamics in food webs are governed at the base by the complex interaction between local determinants and evolutionary factors. PMID:25616137

  3. Adhesiveless Transfer Printing of Ultrathin Microscale Semiconductor Materials by Controlling the Bending Radius of an Elastomeric Stamp.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungbum; Kim, Namyun; Song, Kwangsun; Lee, Jongho

    2016-08-01

    High-performance electronic devices integrated onto unconventional substrates provide opportunities for use in diverse applications, such as wearable or implantable forms of electronic devices. However, the interlayer adhesives between the electronic devices and substrates often limit processing temperature or cause electrical or thermal resistance at the interface. This paper introduces a very simple but effective transfer printing method that does not require an interlayer adhesive. Controlling the bending radius of a simple flat stamp enables picking up or printing of microscale semiconductor materials onto rigid, curvilinear, or flexible surfaces without the aid of a liquid adhesive. Theoretical and experimental studies reveal the underlying mechanism of the suggested approach. Adhesiveless printing of thin Si plates onto diverse substrates demonstrates the capability of this method. PMID:27458878

  4. Rapid synthesis and size control of CuInS2 semi-conductor nanoparticles using microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Joseph S.; Shurdha, Endrit; Wang, Chong M.; Lau, Lisa D.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.

    2008-04-01

    The properties of CuInS2 semi-conductor nanoparticles make them attractive materials for use in next-generation photovoltaics. We have prepared CuInS2 nanoparticles from single source precursors via microwave irradiation. Microwave irradiation methods have allowed us to increase the efficiency of preparation of these materials by providing uniform heating and rapid reaction times. The synergistic effect of varying thiol capping ligand concentrations as well as reaction temperatures and times resulted in fine control of nanoparticle growth in the 3–5 nm size range. Investigation of the photophysical properties of the colloidal nanoparticles were performed using electronic absorption and luminescence emission spectroscopy. Qualitative nanoparticles sizes were determined from the photoluminescence (PLE) data and compared to HRTEM images.

  5. Semiconductor-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide nanostructures on silicon substrate: Applications for thermal control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahu, G. L.; Li Voti, R.; Larciprete, M. C.; Belardini, A.; Mura, F.; Fratoddi, I.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a detailed infrared study of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) in a vanadium dioxide (VO2) film deposited on silicon wafer. The VO2 phase transition is studied in the mid-infrared (MIR) region by analyzing the transmittance and the reflectance measurements, and the calculated emissivity. The temperature behaviour of the emissivity during the SMT put into evidence the phenomenon of the anomalous absorption in VO2 which has been explained by applying the Maxwell Garnett effective medium approximation theory, together with a strong hysteresis phenomenon, both useful to design tunable thermal devices to be applied for the thermal control of spacecraft. We have also applied the photothermal radiometry in order to study the changes in the modulated emissivity induced by laser. Experimental results show how the use of these techniques represent a good tool for a quantitative measurement of the optothermal properties of vanadium dioxide based structures.

  6. Semiconductor-metal phase transition of vanadium dioxide nanostructures on silicon substrate: Applications for thermal control of spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Leahu, G. L. Li Voti, R. Larciprete, M. C. Belardini, A. Mura, F. Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Fratoddi, I.

    2014-06-19

    We present a detailed infrared study of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) in a vanadium dioxide (VO2) film deposited on silicon wafer. The VO2 phase transition is studied in the mid-infrared (MIR) region by analyzing the transmittance and the reflectance measurements, and the calculated emissivity. The temperature behaviour of the emissivity during the SMT put into evidence the phenomenon of the anomalous absorption in VO2 which has been explained by applying the Maxwell Garnett effective medium approximation theory, together with a strong hysteresis phenomenon, both useful to design tunable thermal devices to be applied for the thermal control of spacecraft. We have also applied the photothermal radiometry in order to study the changes in the modulated emissivity induced by laser. Experimental results show how the use of these techniques represent a good tool for a quantitative measurement of the optothermal properties of vanadium dioxide based structures.

  7. Geological controls on isotopic signatures of streamflow: results from a nested catchment experiment in Luxembourg (Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Laurent; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Hissler, Christophe; Martinez-Carreras, Nuria; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; François Iffly, Jean; Barnich, François; Stewart, Mike K.

    2014-05-01

    Controls of geology and topography on hydrological metrics, like summer low flow (Grant and Tague, 2004) or dynamic storage (Sayama et al., 2011), have been identified in nested catchment experiments. However, most tracer-based studies on streamflow generation have been carried out in small (10 km2) homogenous catchments (Klaus and McDonnell, 2013). The controlling effects of catchment physiography on how catchments store and release water, and how this eventually controls stream isotope behaviour over a large range of scale are poorly understood. Here, we present results from a nested catchment analysis in the Alzette River basin (Luxembourg, Europe). Our hydro-climatological network consists of 16 recording streamgauges and 21 pluviographs. Catchment areas range from 0.47 to 285 km2, with clean and mixed combinations of distinct geologies ranging from schists to marls, sandstone, dolomite and limestone. Our objective was to identify geological controls on (i) winter runoff ratios, (ii) maximum storage and (iii) isotopic signatures in streamflow. For each catchment we determined average runoff ratios from winter season precipitation-discharge double-mass curves. Maximum catchment storage was based on the dynamic storage change approach of Sayama et al. (2011). Changes in isotopic signatures of streamflow were documented along individual catchment flow duration curves. We found strong correlations between average winter runoff ratios, maximum storage and the prevailing geological settings. Catchments with impermeable bedrock (e.g. marls or schists) were characterised by small storage potential and high average filling ratios. As a consequence, these catchments also exhibited the highest average runoff ratios. In catchments underlain by permeable bedrock (e.g. sandstone), storage potential was significantly higher and runoff ratios were considerably smaller. The isotopic signatures of streamflow showed large differences between catchments. In catchments dominated by

  8. Controlled metal-semiconductor sintering/alloying by one-directional reverse illumination

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1993-01-01

    Metal strips deposited on a top surface of a semiconductor substrate are sintered at one temperature simultaneously with alloying a metal layer on the bottom surface at a second, higher temperature. This simultaneous sintering of metal strips and alloying a metal layer on opposite surfaces of the substrate at different temperatures is accomplished by directing infrared radiation through the top surface to the interface of the bottom surface with the metal layer where the radiation is absorbed to create a primary hot zone with a temperature high enough to melt and alloy the metal layer with the bottom surface of the substrate. Secondary heat effects, including heat conducted through the substrate from the primary hot zone and heat created by infrared radiation reflected from the metal layer to the metal strips, as well as heat created from some primary absorption by the metal strips, combine to create secondary hot zones at the interfaces of the metal strips with the top surface of the substrate. These secondary hot zones are not as hot as the primary hot zone, but they are hot enough to sinter the metal strips to the substrate.

  9. Solubility control in dilute magnetic semiconductors by using the co-doping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori; Fujii, Hitoshi; Bergqvist, Lars; Dederichs, Peter H.; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    To overcome low solubility limit of magnetic impurities in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we propose a co-doping method to increase solubility of magnetic impurities in DMS [1]. We calculate electronic structure of (Ga, Mn)As, (Ga, Mn)N, (Ga, Cr)N and (Zn, Cr)Te with interstitial impurities, such as Li, Na and Cu, from first-principles by using the Korringa-Kohn- Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. From the total energy results, it is shown that the mixing energy of magnetic impurity becomes negative and the solubility of magnetic impurities is strongly enhanced under the existence of interstitials [1]. In general, the co-dopants compensate hole carriers, thus the system becomes paramagnetic. However, owing to the large diffusivity of these interstitial impurities, we can anneal out the co-dopants after the crystal growth to recover the ferromagnetism. As an example, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for the diffusion of interstitial co-dopants in DMS will be shown. [1] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46 L1120 (2007)

  10. Ligand-Mediated Control of the Confinement Potential in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Victor

    This thesis describes the mechanisms by which organic surfactants, particularly thiophenols and phenyldithiocarbamates, reduce the confinement potential experienced by the exciton of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The reduction of the confinement potential is enabled by the creation of interfacial electronic states near the band edge of the QD upon ligand adsorption. In the case of thiophenols, we find that this ligand adsorbs in two distinct binding modes, (i) a tightly bound mode capable of exciton delocalization, and (ii) a more weakly bound mode that has no discernable effect on exciton confinement. Both the adsorption constant and reduction in confinement potential are tunable by para substitution and are generally anticorrelated. For tightly bound thiophenols and other moderately delocalizing ligands, the degree of delocalization induced in the QD is approximately linearly proportional to the fractional surface area occupied by the ligand for all sizes of QDs. In the case of phenyldithiocarbamates, the reduction in the confinement potential is much greater, and ligand adjacency must be accounted for to model exciton delocalization. We find that at high surface coverages, exciton delocalization by phenyldithiocarbamates and other highly delocalizing ligands is dominated by ligand packing effects. Finally, we construct a database of electronic structure calculations on organic molecules and propose an algorithm that combines experimental and computational screening to find novel delocalizing ligands.

  11. Electric-field control of a hydrogenic donor's spin in a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Amrit; Pryor, Craig E.; Flatté, Michael E.

    2009-03-01

    The orbital wave function of an electron bound to a single donor in a semiconductor can be modulated by an applied AC electric field, which affects the electron spin dynamics via the spin-orbit interaction. Numerical calculations of the spin dynamics of a single hydrogenic donor (Si) using a real-space multi-band k.p formalism show that in addition to breaking the high symmetry of the hydrogenic donor state, the g-tensor has a strong nonlinear dependence on the applied fields. By explicitly integrating the time dependent Schr"odinger equation it is seen that Rabi oscillations can be obtained for electric fields modulated at sub-harmonics of the Larmor frequency. The Rabi frequencies obtained from sub-harmonic modulation depend on the magnitudes of the AC and DC components of the electric field. For a purely AC field, the highest Rabi frequency is obtained when E is driven at the 2nd sub-harmonic of the Larmor frequency. Apart from suggesting ways to measure g-tensor anisotropies and nonlinearities, these results also suggest the possibility of direct frequency domain measurements of Rabi frequencies.

  12. Silver Nanoshell Plasmonically Controlled Emission of Semiconductor Quantum Dots in the Strong Coupling Regime.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Yuan, Meng; Gao, Yuhan; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Deren

    2016-04-26

    Strong coupling between semiconductor excitons and localized surface plasmons (LSPs) giving rise to hybridized plexciton states in which energy is coherently and reversibly exchanged between the components is vital, especially in the area of quantum information processing from fundamental and practical points of view. Here, in photoluminescence spectra, rather than from common extinction or reflection measurements, we report on the direct observation of Rabi splitting of approximately 160 meV as an indication of strong coupling between excited states of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and LSP modes of silver nanoshells under nonresonant nanosecond pulsed laser excitation at room temperature. The strong coupling manifests itself as an anticrossing-like behavior of the two newly formed polaritons when tuning the silver nanoshell plasmon energies across the exciton line of the QDs. Further analysis substantiates the essentiality of high pump energy and collective strong coupling of many QDs with the radiative dipole mode of the metallic nanoparticles for the realization of strong coupling. Our finding opens up interesting directions for the investigation of strong coupling between LSPs and excitons from the perspective of radiative recombination under easily accessible experimental conditions. PMID:26972554

  13. Atmospheric control on isotopic composition and d-excess in water vapor over ocean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Naixin

    For decades, stable isotopes of water have been used as proxies to infer the variation of the hydrological cycle. However, it is still not clear how various atmospheric processes quantitatively control kinetic fractionation during evaporation over the ocean. Understanding kinetic fractionation is important in that the interpretation of the isotopic composition record preserved in ice cores and precipitation relies in part on the isotopic information at the moisture source. In addition, the isotopic composition of vapor contains information about variation of atmospheric processes such as turbulence and change in moisture source region which is useful for studying meteorological processes and climate change. In this study the isotopic composition of water vapor in the marine boundary layer (MBL) over the ocean was investigated using a combination of a newly developed marine boundary layer (MBL) model and observational data. The new model has a more realistic MBL structure than previous models and includes new features such as vertical advection of air and diffusion coefficients that vary continuously in the vertical direction. A robust linear relationship between deltaD and delta18O was found in observational oceanic water vapor data and the model can well capture the characteristics of this relationship. The individual role of atmospheric processes or variables on deltaD, delta18O and d-excess was quantitatively investigated and an overview of the combined effect of all the meteorological processes is provided. In particular, we emphasize that the properties of subsiding air (such as its mixing ratio and isotopic values) are crucial to the isotopic composition of surface water vapor. Relative humidity has been used to represent the moisture deficit that drives evaporative isotopic fluxes, however, we argue that it has serious limitations in explaining d-excess variation as latitude varies. We introduce a new quantity Gd=SST-Td, the difference between the sea

  14. Factors controlling the temporal variability of ecosystem respiration and its carbon isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbinder, J.; Griffis, T. J.; Baker, J. M.; Erickson, M.; Billmark, K.; Smith, J.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem respiration (FR ) is the major pathway for carbon loss from terrestrial ecosystems. Stable carbon isotope analyses have been used to improve our understanding of the processes controlling ecosystem respiration. In particular, 13CO2 has been used to partition the autotrophic (Fa) and heterotrophic (Fh) contributions to FR. Further, there has been some concern in the literature regarding the temporal variability of the isotopic composition of ecosystem respiration (δR) and its potential influence on ecosystem flux partitioning based on isotope methods. In this study, we used an automated chamber and tunable diode laser system to measure soil respiration (FRs) and its isotopic composition (δRs) in an agricultural ecosystem under a C3/C4 crop rotation. Further, we used the same chamber-TDL system in a climate controlled greenhouse facility with C3/C4 treatments to examine the main factors causing variability in δRs and δR. The chamber data revealed strong diurnal patterns in the isotopic composition of Fh in the agricultural soil plots before crop emergence and in the greenhouse experiments involving bare soils. The diurnal pattern consisted of a sharp enrichment of up to 6‰ from 0700 to 1200 hr followed by a gradual depletion throughout the afternoon and evening. The diurnal signals of FR and soil temperature closely resembled the diurnal signal of δh, but consistently lagged δh by 3 to 4 hours. During peak corn growth, diurnal variation in δRs was strongly influenced by the isotopic composition of root respiration (δas), which enriched nighttime δRs by as much as 7‰ and daytime δRs by as much as 3‰. Chamber and flux-gradient data also indicated considerable seasonal variation in δR during corn growing seasons, ranging from -25‰ at the time of planting to -11‰ during peak growth. Less variation in δR was observed during soybean seasons, with values ranging from -26 to -21‰. Major shifts in δR during corn seasons were consistently

  15. Edge-Controlled Mechanical Failure of Si and SiC Semiconductor Chips

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Jadaan, Osama M.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip

    2010-01-01

    Silicon (Si) and silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor chips are subjected to thermal gradients during service, have coefficient of thermal expansion mismatches with the constituents they are attached to, and are therefore subjected to thermomechanical tensile stresses that can initiate their fracture. Because of inherent brittleness, their probabilistic (Weibull) tensile failure strength was examined to understand sustainable tensile stresses and any exhibition of strength-size-scaling. Failure stress testing of entire (10-mm-square) chips was conducted using uniaxial flexure (3-point-bending) and biaxial flexure (anticlastic bending). The advantage of the anticlastic bend test is all eight primary edges are subjected to identical sinusoidal stress distribution so tensile failure stress is concurrently sensitive to edge-state quality, surface-state quality, crystallographic orientation, and any strength anisotropies of any of those. Tensile stress tolerance of both Si and SiC chips was limited by extrinsic strength-limiting flaws located at their edges and on lapped surfaces too in the case of the Si. Both materials exhibited strength-size scaling; namely, a larger chip is likely to fail at a lower tensile stress. The anticlastic bend test method was effective for evaluating edge failure stress provided surface-type strength-limiting flaws were not dominant. Edge-strength anisotropy (i.e., crystallographic orientation dependence) was observed with both the Si and SiC chips. Surface-strength anisotropy also occurred with Si chips because one side was lapped and the other polished. Lastly, the SiC chips failed at much higher tensile stresses than Si chips; however, that strength difference could be a ramification of differences in edge-slicing quality and not necessarily from intrinsic material differences.

  16. Symmetry breaking in semiconductor nanocrystals via kinetic-controlled surface diffusion: a strategy for manipulating the junction structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xixi; Liu, Maochang; Chen, Yubin; Fu, Wenlong; Wang, Bin; Guo, Liejin

    2016-09-21

    The synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals is usually limited to high-level symmetry, as constrained by the inherent, for example, face-centered cubic or hexagonal close-packed lattices of the crystals. Herein, we report a robust approach for breaking the symmetry of the CdS lattice and obtaining high-quality CdS ultrathin monopods, bipods, tripods, and tetrapods. The success relies on manipulating reaction kinetics by dropwise addition of a precursor solution, which permits deterministic control over the number of CdS monomers in the reaction solution. With rapid monomer supply by fast precursor injection, growth was restricted to only one {111} facet of the nascent CdS tetrahedron to produce an asymmetric ultrathin monopod (a zinc-blende tip with a wurtzite arm). Otherwise, growth monomers could access adjacent {111} facets through surface diffusion and thus lead to the switch of the growth pattern from asymmetric to symmetric to generate an ultrathin multipod (a zinc-blende tip/core with multi-wurtzite arms). These symmetry-controlled photocatalysts were characterized by a fine-tuned zinc blende-wurtzite intergrowth type-II homojunction. After evaluating their structure-dependent solar-hydrogen-production properties, the CdS ultrathin monopod with an appropriate length for controllable charge transportation showed the highest photocatalytic activity. PMID:27539367

  17. Understanding climatic controls on Svalbard water vapour and precipitation isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, Valérie; Steen-Larsen, Hans-Christian; Zanetti, Nathalie; Cattani, Olivier; Maturilli, Marion; Debatin, Siegrid; Terzer, Stefan; Bonne, Jean-Louis; Schneider, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the meteorological and climatic controls on the isotopic composition of vapour and precipitation at Ny Alesund, Svalbard. This is based on the IAEA database of monthly precipitation isotopic composition data spanning 1993-2012 as well as new measurements performed using a PICARRO CRDS analyzer deployed since June 2014 at Ny Alesund. The precipitation data depict a strong decoupling between oxygen 18 and temperature at the seasonal scale and for monthly anomalies. While a relationship is observed between winter precipitation isotopic composition and temperature, this disappears during summer, at the inter-annual scale. Moreover, the deuterium versus oxygen 18 relationship depicts different meteoric water lines in winter and summer, consistent with the strong seasonal cycle of deuterium excess, and indicating shifts in moisture origin. The continuous water vapour data (investigated from July to December 2014 so far) show in contrast a tight relationship between hourly oxygen 18 data and surface temperature and humidity, as well as strong antiphase between deuterium excess and oxygen 18. No significant diurnal variability is observed. We show how precipitation intermittency strongly alters the sampling provided by precipitation data and distorts the relationship with local temperature. The surface vapour deuterium data are compared with FTIR retrievals. The importance of changes in air mass origins is also assessed by comparison with moisture backtrajectories.

  18. Importance of Electrokinetic Phenomena in Contamination Control during Semiconductor Wet Processing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Der-E.

    The adsorption of metanil yellow (3- {{4-(phenylamino) phenyl }azo} benzene sulfonate) and colloidal silica on a commercially available, positively charge-modified nylon 66 membrane (N66 Posidyne) with an isoelectric point (IEP) of 7.6 was investigated. Challenge testing of N66 Posidyne with a 2.3 ppm colloidal silica dispersion has shown that the membrane adsorbed 0.015 mug of colloidal silica per cm ^2. At a pH of 5.1, the adsorption of metanil yellow was found to increase with its solution concentration and reached a saturation value of 2.2 times 10^{14} ions/cm ^2 at a solution concentration of 1.49 times 10^{ -5}M. A technique to incorporate positively charged groups onto the surface of microporous polypropylene and polyvinylidene fluoride membrane filters for the filtration of liquids used in the semiconductor industry has been developed using gamma-irradiation. The electrical characteristics of prepared membranes were measured by streaming potential and dye challenge tests. The compatibility of these charge-modified membranes with ultrapure water was investigated. Results show that these charge-modified membranes are characterized by a positive zeta potential in the pH range from 4 to 9.3. From the dye challenge tests at a pH of 5.0, the density of positively charged sites on charge-modified membranes was calculated to be approximately five times larger than that of unmodified membranes. The modified membranes released less than 1 ppb of total organic carbon (TOC) into ultrapure water and thus appear to have potential for use in DI water system. The electrokinetic characteristics of silicon, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride wafers subjected to different cleaning procedures were measured using a streaming potential technique. A streaming potential cell for handling 5^{''} wafers was designed and fabricated to make these measurements. The isoelectric point of silicon, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride was dependent on the cleaning method. Polystyrene

  19. Semiconductor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C. (Inventor); Lagowski, Jacek (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor sensor adapted to detect with a high degree of sensitivity small magnitudes of a mechanical force, presence of traces of a gas or light. The sensor includes a high energy gap (i.e., .about. 1.0 electron volts) semiconductor wafer. Mechanical force is measured by employing a non-centrosymmetric material for the semiconductor. Distortion of the semiconductor by the force creates a contact potential difference (cpd) at the semiconductor surface, and this cpd is determined to give a measure of the force. When such a semiconductor is subjected to illumination with an energy less than the energy gap of the semiconductors, such illumination also creates a cpd at the surface. Detection of this cpd is employed to sense the illumination itself or, in a variation of the system, to detect a gas. When either a gas or light is to be detected and a crystal of a non-centrosymmetric material is employed, the presence of gas or light, in appropriate circumstances, results in a strain within the crystal which distorts the same and the distortion provides a mechanism for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the gas or the light, as the case may be.

  20. Semiconductor photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Semiconductor photoelectrochemical reactions are investigated. A model of the charge transport processes in the semiconductor, based on semiconductor device theory, is presented. It incorporates the nonlinear processes characterizing the diffusion and reaction of charge carriers in the semiconductor. The model is used to study conditions limiting useful energy conversion, specifically the saturation of current flow due to high light intensity. Numerical results describing charge distributions in the semiconductor and its effects on the electrolyte are obtained. Experimental results include: an estimate rate at which a semiconductor photoelectrode is capable of converting electromagnetic energy into chemical energy; the effect of cell temperature on the efficiency; a method for determining the point of zero zeta potential for macroscopic semiconductor samples; a technique using platinized titanium dioxide powders and ultraviolet radiation to produce chlorine, bromine, and iodine from solutions containing their respective ions; the photoelectrochemical properties of a class of layered compounds called transition metal thiophosphates; and a technique used to produce high conversion efficiency from laser radiation to chemical energy.

  1. Spin-valley qubit in nanostructures of monolayer semiconductors: Optical control and hyperfine interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Tong, Qingjun; Liu, Gui-Bin; Yu, Hongyi; Yao, Wang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the optical control possibilities of spin-valley qubit carried by single electrons localized in nanostructures of monolayer TMDs, including small quantum dots formed by lateral heterojunction and charged impurities. The quantum controls are discussed when the confinement induces valley hybridization and when the valley hybridization is absent. We show that the bulk valley and spin optical selection rules can be inherited in different forms in the two scenarios, both of which allow the definition of spin-valley qubit with desired optical controllability. We also investigate nuclear spin-induced decoherence and quantum control of electron-nuclear spin entanglement via intervalley terms of the hyperfine interaction. Optically controlled two-qubit operations in a single quantum dot are discussed.

  2. Dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions: what can we learn from biological and isotopic tracers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Klaus, J.; Wetzel, C. E.; Stewart, M. K.; McDonnell, J.; Martinez Carreras, N.

    2014-12-01

    One emerging and important control on catchment hydrological functions of water storage, mixing and release is bedrock geology. Until today, catchment-based work has been limited by small ranges of rock types in adjacent basins. Moreover, conventional hydrological tracer approaches suffer from limitations inherent to the large storages related to certain bedrock types (e.g. the damping of stable isotope tracer signatures in deep storage catchments and obliteration of output signals at larger spatial scales). Here, we show how a multi-tracer approach, based on terrestrial diatoms and different stable and radioactive isotopic tracers can help refining our understanding of the dominant controls on catchment hydrological functions, especially the role of bedrock geology. We present new data and results from a nested catchment set-up, located in the Alzette River basin in Luxembourg (Europe). These 16 catchments (with sizes ranging from 0.47 to 285 km2) are characterized by clean and mixed assemblages of geology and land use. We have monitored these systems since 2002, including meteorological variables (precipitation, air temperature, etc.), as well as 15 minute discharge. Additional parameters have been monitored bi-weekly and at the event time scale, including geochemical and isotopic (3H, D, 18O) tracers, as well as terrestrial diatom communities in streamwater. Our results show that water balance derived dynamic storage significantly differs across the 16 catchments and scales. Catchment mixing potential inferred from standard deviations in stream baseflow ∂D (as a proxy for the damping of isotopic signatures in precipitation), as well as tritium-derived baseflow transit times, both exhibit a significant spatial variability, but strong correlation to bedrock pemeability. Terrestrial diatom assemblages in streamwater, as a proxy for rapid flow pathway connectedness to the stream network, are highly variable across the study catchments but also show strong

  3. Extraction of gadolinium from high flux isotope reactor control plates. [Alternative method

    SciTech Connect

    Kohring, M.W.

    1987-04-01

    Gadolinium-153 is an important radioisotope used in the diagnosis of various bone disorders. Recent medical and technical developments in the detection and cure of osteoporosis, a bone disease affecting an estimated 50 million people, have greatly increased the demand for this isotope. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has produced /sup 153/Gd since 1980 primarily through the irradiation of a natural europium-oxide powder followed by the chemical separation of the gadolinium fraction from the europium material. Due to the higher demand for /sup 153/Gd, an alternative production method to supplement this process has been investigated. This process involves the extraction of gadolinium from the europium-bearing region of highly radioactive, spent control plates used at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) with a subsequent re-irradiation of the extracted material for the production of the /sup 153/Gd. Based on the results of experimental and calculational analyses, up to 25 grams of valuable gadolinium (greater than or equal to60% enriched in /sup 152/Gd) resides in the europium-bearing region of the HFIR control components of which 70% is recoverable. At a specific activity yield of 40 curies of /sup 153/Gd for each gram of gadolinium re-irradiated, 700 one-curie sources can be produced from each control plate assayed.

  4. Adsorption-controlled growth of BiFeO3 by MBE and integration with wide band gap semiconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Uecker, Reinhard , Germany); Doolittle, W. Alan; Reiche, P. , Germany); Liu, Zi-Kui; Bernhagen, Margitta , Germany); Tian, Wei; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2008-08-01

    BiFeO3 thin films have been deposited on (101) DyScO3, (0001) AlGaN/GaN, and (0001) SiC single crystal substrates by reactive molecular-beam epitaxy in an adsorption-controlled growth regime. This is achieved by supplying a bismuth over-pressure and utilizing the differential vapor pressures between bismuth oxides and BiFeO3 to control stoichiometry. Four-circle x-ray diffraction reveals phase-pure, epitaxial films with rocking curve full width at half maximum values as narrow as 7.2 arc seconds. Epitaxial growth of (0001)-oriented BiFeO3 thin films on (0001) GaN, including AlGaN HEMT structures, and (0001) SiC has been realized utilizing intervening epitaxial (111) SrTiO3/(100) TiO2 buffer layers. The epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films have two in-plane orientations: [1120] BiFeO3 [1120] GaN (SiC) plus a twin variant related by a 180{sup o} in-plane rotation. This epitaxial integration of the ferroelectric with the highest known polarization, BiFeO3, with wide band gap semiconductors is an important step toward novel field-effect devices.

  5. Controlling chaotic oscillation modes in visible semiconductor lasers by external light input and its applications to novel optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Kouta; Fujita, Masato; Sasaki, Wakao

    2000-11-01

    We have demonstrated a simple method for controlling the nonlinear oscillations using only semiconductor lasers and photodetectors. An electro-optical NDFS (nonlinear delayed feedback system) has been composed by making use of this method. With this system, multi-stable oscillations and chaotic transitions with various patterns have been observed. In addition, some characteristic routing sequences form period-doubling bifurcation to chaos have been reproducibly observed when some external modulations with acoustic frequencies are applied to the NDFS. In this case, we have proved that the harmonic numbers of the multi- stable oscillation modes to appear as system output are to be controlled in terms of timing (phase) as well as frequencies of external input signals at the moment they are applied. And we have also confirmed such remarkable transition behaviors of the multi-stable oscillation modes by numerical analysis based on nonlinear delayed differential equations describing our NDFS. Consequently, we have demonstrated that the oscillation harmonic numbers can be directly chosen from the 1st order up to the 9th by setting the frequencies of the external input signals to be their characteristic values specifying the desired harmonic numbers to appear for output and also by setting the timing of input signals with respect to the phase of original waveform of the oscillating modes. Thus, our system is expected to be a potential for something novel, intelligent communication technique based on chaos.

  6. New developments in power semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  7. Identifying Controls on the Stable Water Isotope Composition of Precipitation in the Southwestern Yukon Using GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R.; Moore, K.

    2007-12-01

    The goal of our work is to better understand what controls the stable water isotope (SWI) composition of precipitation in the southwestern Yukon, and in particular, to better-interpret the SWI signal from the Mount Logan ice core. To this end, we are conducting experiments with the GISS ModelE general circulation model, which is equipped with SWI diagnostics. One feature of interest in the Mt. Logan ice core record is a significant drop in d18O in the 1850's towards more depleted values. The current explanation for this shift is a transition in the North Pacific circulation towards a deeper Aleutian Low, with the stronger meridional flow bringing moisture from more southerly sources. Because of their greater arrival times, these air masses would have undergone a greater isotopic depletion than moisture from closer, colder sources under a more zonal flow regime. Although physically plausible, it is possible that the d18O drop caused by this proposed shift in circulation might be offset by warmer source evaporation conditions and integrated air mass trajectories, both of which would be associated with less depleted precipitation. To test the physical plausibility of the meridional hypothesis, we conducted numerical experiments with the NASA GISS ModelE isotopically-equipped general circulation model. In the Yukon, SWI variability is influenced, via the regional temperature, by the Pacific North America pattern and ENSO. We found that positive d18O anomalies in the SW Yukon region were in fact associated with a deeper Aleutian Low; it would appear that the effect of a longer transit time is offset by a warmer moisture transport pathway, in disagreement with the current moisture shift explanation. Our results are in agreement, however, with recent tree-ring reconstructions of the North Pacific Index, which suggest an 1850's shift towards a weaker Aleutian Low. We also found that the degree of Pacific control on the SW Yukon isotope signal is highly dependant on

  8. Elemental and Isotopic Incorporation into the Aragonitic Shells of Arctica Islandica: Insights from Temperature Controlled Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanamaker, A. D.; Gillikin, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    The long-lived ocean quahog, Arctica islandica, is a fairly well developed and tested marine proxy archive, however, the utility of elemental ratios in A. islandica shell material as environmental proxies remains questionable. To further evaluate the influence of seawater temperature on elemental and isotopic incorporation during biomineralization, A. islandica shells were grown at constant temperatures under two regimes during a 16-week period from March 27 to July 21, 2011. Seawater from the Darling Marine Center in Walpole, Maine was pumped into temperature and flow controlled tanks that were exposed to ambient food and salinity conditions. A total of 20 individual juvenile clams with an average shell height of 36 mm were stained with calcein (a commonly used biomarker) and cultured at 10.3 ± 0.3 °C for six weeks. After this, shell heights were measured and the clams were again stained with calcein and cultured at 15.0 ± 0.4 °C for an additional 9.5 weeks. The average shell growth during the first phase of the experiment was 2.4 mm with a linear extension rate of 0.40 mm/week. The average shell growth during the second phase of the experiment was 3.2 mm with an extension rate of 0.34 mm/week. Average salinity values were 30.2 ± 0.7 and 30.7 ±0.7 in the first and second phases of the experiment, respectively. Oxygen isotopes from the cultured seawater were collected throughout the experiment and provide the basis for establishing if shells grew in oxygen isotopic equilibrium. Elemental ratios (primarily Ba/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) in the aragonitic shells were determined via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), while stable oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Continuous sampling within and across the temperature conditions (from 10 °C to 15 °C) coupled with the calcein markings provides the ability to place each sample into a precise temporal framework. The

  9. pH control on oxygen isotopic composition of symbiotic corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollion-Bard, Claire; Chaussidon, Marc; France-Lanord, Christian

    2003-10-01

    Boron, carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined at the micrometre scale by high-resolution ion microprobe in a sample of modern coral (massive hermatypic coral, Porites lutea). The ion probe data show for B and O much larger isotopic variations at the micrometre scale than those measured at the millimetre scale by conventional techniques: δ 18O PDB values range from -10.6±0.9‰ to -0.2±0.5‰ and δ 11B values range from +18.6±1.5‰ to +30.6±1.6‰. By contrast, δ 13C values show the same range of variations, from -4.6±0.65‰ to -2.2±0.67‰ at the micrometre and millimetre scales. The range of δ 11B values indicates that significant pH variations, from ≈7.1 to ≈9.0, are present at the sites of calcification. The largest δ 18O variations correspond to the highest δ 11B values, i.e. to the highest pHs. This measurement of pH allows modelling the oxygen isotopic fractionation occurring during aragonite precipitation. Taking into account the rate of O isotopic equilibrium between dissolved carbonate species (H 2CO 3, HCO 3- and CO 32-) and water via the two reactions of hydration and hydroxylation, the full range of δ 18O values measured at the micrometre scale can be modelled for residence times of dissolved carbonates in the calcifying fluid ranging between ≈1 h and at maximum ≈12 h. The pH controls the δ 18O of the growing carbonate through the relative fractions of dissolved carbonate species and through the kinetics of their isotopic equilibration with water via hydration and hydroxylation. The so-called 'vital effect' systematically observed for δ 18O in corals can thus be understood as representing an average of rapid pH variations due to coral biology during coral growth. Selectively measuring δ 18O values in the zones of coral skeletons that have low δ 11B values (i.e. formed at low pH) should significantly improve the quality of palaeoclimatic reconstructions based on δ 18O values.

  10. Controls on Pore Fluid Mg Isotopic Composition in Carbonate-rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, P.; Fantle, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Mg isotopic composition (δ26MgDSM3) of pore fluids and bulk carbonates from ODP Sites 762B, 807A, and 806B are presented. The objective of this study is to elucidate the major controls on marine pore fluid δ26Mg, specifically the effect of authigenic clay precipitation in carbonate-rich sediments. Such studies are important for quantifying the leverage that exists in carbonate section to drive diagenetic alteration, and also for identifying geochemical reactions occurring in deep marine sediments that may impact the global geochemical cycles of elements such as Ca and Mg. The general pore fluid δ26Mg trend at each of the three sites is a systematic increase with depth. In the upper ~108 m sections of all three sites, the pore fluid δ26Mg gradually increases from the modern seawater value (-0.80 ± 0.04 ‰) to -0.54 ± 0.08 ‰ (807A and 806B) and -0.39± 0.04 ‰ (762B). Below ~110 mbsf at both 807A and 762B, pore fluid δ26Mg decreases noticeably by ~ 0.1‰, while pore fluids at 806B exhibit a continual, gradual increase in δ26Mg to -0.17‰ at 679.9 mbsf. Simple reactive transport modeling suggests that the general increase in pore fluid δ26Mg with depth is likely explained by diffusion and calcite recrystallization. However, diffusive communication with an isotopically distinct lower boundary alone cannot explain the observed shifts of -0.1‰ in pore fluid δ26Mg at depth, unless there is an increase in fractionation factor (from 0.9960 to 0.9995) associated with reaction between the sediment and pore fluid. Mineralogical evidence from Site 762B indicates that the Mg isotopic shift in the pore fluids occurs at a depth interval (between 106.8 mbsf and 135.3 mbsf) where clay (mainly illite and smectite) content increases from 3% to 11%, CaCO3 content decreases from 92% to 86%, and porosity decreases by ~20%. The isotopic and mineralogical data are consistent with the formation of secondary clays that preferentially sequesters isotopically heavy Mg

  11. Modulation of Defects in Semiconductors by Facile and Controllable Reduction: The Case of p-type CuCrO2 Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tengfei; Li, Xueyan; Bujoli-Doeuff, Martine; Gautron, Eric; Cario, Laurent; Jobic, Stéphane; Gautier, Romain

    2016-08-01

    Optical and electrical characteristics of solid materials are well-known to be intimately related to the presence of intrinsic or extrinsic defects. Hence, the control of defects in semiconductors is of great importance to achieve specific properties, for example, transparency and conductivity. Herein, a facile and controllable reduction method for modulating the defects is proposed and used for the case of p-type delafossite CuCrO2 nanoparticles. The optical absorption in the infrared region of the CuCrO2 material can then be fine-tuned via the continuous reduction of nonstoichiometric Cu(II), naturally stabilized in small amounts. This reduction modifies the concentration of positive charge carriers in the material, and thus the conductive and reflective properties, as well as the flat band potential. Indeed, this controllable reduction methodology provides a novel strategy to modulate the (opto-) electronic characteristics of semiconductors. PMID:27409456

  12. Dynamic nuclear polarization of {sup 29}Si nuclei in isotopically controlled phosphorus doped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Hiroshi; Itahashi, Tatsumasa; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Vlasenko, Marina P.

    2009-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of {sup 29}Si nuclei in isotopically controlled silicon single crystals with the {sup 29}Si isotope abundance f{sub 29Si} varied from 1.2% to 99.2% is reported. It was found that both the DNP enhancement and {sup 29}Si nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time under saturation of the electron paramagnetic resonance transitions of phosphorus donors increase with the decrease in the {sup 29}Si abundance. A remarkably large steady-state DNP enhancement, E{sup ss}=2680 which is comparable to the theoretical upper limit of 3310, has been achieved through the ''resolved'' solid effect that has been identified clearly in the f{sub 29Si}=1.2% sample. The DNP enhancement depends not only on the {sup 29}Si abundance but also on the electron spin-lattice relaxation time that can be controlled by temperature and/or illumination. The linewidth of {sup 29}Si NMR spectra after DNP shows a linear dependence on f{sub 29Si} for f{sub 29Si}{<=}10% and changes to a square-root dependence for f{sub 29Si}{>=}50%. Comparison of experimentally determined nuclear polarization time with nuclear spin diffusion coefficients indicates that the rate of DNP is limited by the polarization transfer rather than by spin diffusion.

  13. Identifying Hydrological Controls in the Lower Nelson River Basin utilizing Stable Water Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delavau, C. J.; Smith, A. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Koenig, K.

    2012-12-01

    period. Conversely, the main stem of the Burntwood River system shows increased variability relative to the Nelson River and overall is more depleted (average δ18O of -12.9‰ and a standard deviation of 0.75‰). Many of the headwater tributaries to the Nelson and Burntwood River systems such as Birchtree Brook, and the Minago, Gunisao, Grass, Odei, Footprint and Sapochi Rivers show large temporal and spatial variability due to relatively smaller drainage areas and differences in typology and connectivity. For this reason, further investigation into the correlation of land cover with isotopic composition is assessed for the aforementioned tributaries to better establish the hydrological controls (i.e., sources and sinks) for each sub-basin at the mesoscale. Results signify a strong relationship between percent wetland coverage and the slope of the Local Evaporation Line (SLEL) for headwater sub-basins (R2=0.99), indicating the likelihood of enhanced evaporative enrichment for sub-basins with increased wetland coverage. The collection of SWI's within the LNRB will help to develop a comprehensive understanding of water sources and cycling in this basin with the end goal of improving hydrological forecasting tools to predict, with improved certainty, future water availability for hydroelectric power production.

  14. Single longitudinal mode operation of semiconductor laser arrays with etalon control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is devised to obtain a single longitudinal output beam from high-power multilongitudinal mode diode laser arrays. Mode control is achieved by simply placing a thin etalon in front of the laser. The three-cavity laser formed by addition of the etalon favors a single longitudinal mode. This technique is applicable to both continuous wave and pulsed laser modes of operation. Experimental results demonstrating the technique along with future work and possible applications are discussed.

  15. Controls on calcium isotope fractionation in cultured planktic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinella siphonifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kısakürek, B.; Eisenhauer, A.; Böhm, F.; Hathorne, E. C.; Erez, J.

    2011-01-01

    Specimens of two species of planktic foraminifera, Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerinella siphonifera, were grown under controlled laboratory conditions at a range of temperatures (18-31 °C), salinities (32-44 psu) and pH levels (7.9-8.4). The shells were examined for their calcium isotope compositions (δ 44/40Ca) and strontium to calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Although the total variation in δ 44/40Ca (˜0.3‰) in the studied species is on the same order as the external reproducibility, the data set reveals some apparent trends that are controlled by more than one environmental parameter. There is a well-defined inverse linear relationship between δ 44/40Ca and Sr/Ca in all experiments, suggesting similar controls on these proxies in foraminiferal calcite independent of species. Analogous to recent results from inorganically precipitated calcite, we suggest that Ca isotope fractionation and Sr partitioning in planktic foraminifera are mainly controlled by precipitation kinetics. This postulation provides us with a unique tool to calculate precipitation rates and draws support from the observation that Sr/Ca ratios are positively correlated with average growth rates. At 25 °C water temperature, precipitation rates in G. siphonifera and G. ruber are calculated to be on the order of 2000 and 3000 μmol/m 2/h, respectively. The lower δ 44/40Ca observed at ⩾29 °C in both species is consistent with increased precipitation rates at high water temperatures. Salinity response of δ 44/40Ca (and Sr/Ca) in G. siphonifera implies that this species has the highest precipitation rates at the salinity of its natural habitat, whereas increasing salinities appear to trigger higher precipitation rates in G. ruber. Isotope effects that cannot be explained by precipitation rate in planktic foraminifera can be explained by a biological control, related to a vacuolar pathway for supply of

  16. Nonperturbative THz nonlinearities for many-body quantum control in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, C.; Maag, T.; Bayer, A.; Hohenleutner, M.; Baierl, S.; Bougeard, D.; Mootz, M.; Koch, S. W.; Kira, M.; Huber, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum computing and ultrafast quantum electronics constitute pivotal technologies of the 21st century and revolutionize the way we process information. Successful implementations require controlling superpositions of states and coherence in matter, and exploit nonlinear effects for elementary logic operations. In the THz frequency range between optics and electronics, solid state systems offer a rich spectrum of collective excitations such as excitons, phonons, magnons, or Landau electrons. Here, single-cycle THz transients of 8.7 kV/cm amplitude centered at 1 THz strongly excite inter-Landau-level transitions of magnetically biased GaAs quantum wells, facilitating coherent Landau ladder climbing by more than six rungs, population inversion, and coherent polarization control. Strong, highly nonlinear pump-probe and four- and six-wave mixing signals, entirely unexpected for this paragon of the harmonic oscillator, are revealed through two-time THz spectroscopy. In this scenario of nonperturbative polarization dynamics, our microscopic theory shows how the protective limits of Kohn's theorem are ultimately surpassed by dynamically enhanced Coulomb interactions, opening the door to exploiting many-body dynamics for nonlinear quantum control.

  17. Structure and method for controlling band offset and alignment at a crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor interface

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    2003-11-25

    A crystalline oxide-on-semiconductor structure and a process for constructing the structure involves a substrate of silicon, germanium or a silicon-germanium alloy and an epitaxial thin film overlying the surface of the substrate wherein the thin film consists of a first epitaxial stratum of single atomic plane layers of an alkaline earth oxide designated generally as (AO).sub.n and a second stratum of single unit cell layers of an oxide material designated as (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m so that the multilayer film arranged upon the substrate surface is designated (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m wherein n is an integer repeat of single atomic plane layers of the alkaline earth oxide AO and m is an integer repeat of single unit cell layers of the A'BO.sub.3 oxide material. Within the multilayer film, the values of n and m have been selected to provide the structure with a desired electrical structure at the substrate/thin film interface that can be optimized to control band offset and alignment.

  18. Controlling the onset of OB/OM in a semiconductor quantum well system in an inverted Y-type configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheli, Ali; Hamedi, H. R.; Sahrai, M.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) is numerically investigated in a four-level inverted Y-type semiconductor quantum well (SQW) structure immersed in a unidirectional ring cavity. In the four-level SQW system under consideration, a closed loop configuration is coupled to the upper level through a tunable probe field. We show that the OB threshold intensity can be controlled via the intensity of coupling fields which gives rise to the absorption variation of the probe field. In addition, due to the existence of the closed-loop configuration, the OB and OM behaviors of the proposed SQW medium are dependent on the relative phase of the applied fields. It is found that the OB can be switched to OM or vice versa by properly adjusting the relative phase of the applied fields. The results may provide new possibilities in real experiments for realizing an all-optical switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  19. Photosynthetic Carbon Isotope Fractionation of the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense: A Chemostat Investigation of Taxonomic and Physiological Controls on the Stable Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E.; Carter, S. J.; Pearson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretations of stable carbon isotope excursions in the sedimentary record are strengthened by laboratory culture studies investigating the photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (ɛp) of marine phytoplankton taxa with long geological records. These studies are essential for understanding organic matter δ13C signals in terms of environmental changes (e.g., atmospheric pCO2 and nutrient availability) or taxonomic changes (e.g., algal species succession and community composition). Dinoflagellates are among the most widespread and ecologically dominant primary producers in modern oceans and throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Compared to more recently evolved phytoplankton taxa, however, dinoflagellate carbon isotope fractionation has received relatively little mechanistic study. Several dilute batch culture experiments with dinoflagellates have investigated ɛp as a function of CO2 availability, but the influences of changing growth rates, nutrient limitation, pH, and irradiance require further systematic exploration. We investigated stable carbon isotope fractionation in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense under nitrate-limited conditions in a chemostat culture system in which full DIC system parameters, including the concentration and δ13C value of CO2, were determined. Growth rates were varied between experiments, and cells were grown under continuous light. Previously reported ɛp values for seven dinoflagellate species including A. tamarense ranged from approximately -1 to 14‰ in nutrient-replete batch culture studies ([CO2] = 0-50 µmol kg-1). In contrast, in chemostat conditions we measured ɛp values on the order of 20‰ ([CO2] = 20-30 µmol kg-1). These experiments provide an initial step toward understanding the physiological controls on ɛp in dinoflagellates and illuminating the role of algal taxonomy in shaping the Phanerozoic stable carbon isotope record.

  20. Elucidating the controls on the Mg isotopic composition of marine pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, P.; Fantle, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Sr and Mg isotopic composition of pore fluids and carbonates from the Neogene section of Ocean Drilling Project Site 806B are reported (87Sr/86Sr and δ26Mg, measured using a Thermo Scientific Neptune Plus multi-collector ICP-MS). Site 806B, located on the northern margin of the Ontong Java Plateau, hosts a thick (776 m cored, depth to basement ~ 1200 m), relatively continuous, carbonate-rich section (between 83 and 96% CaCO3). Our goal in the current study is to use the Sr and Mg isotope data of pore fluids and carbonates to address open questions regarding (1) the extent to which the pore fluid chemistry is overprinted by calcite recrystallization, (2) the effects of diagenesis on bulk carbonate chemistry, and (3) the likelihood of preserving secular seawater δ26Mg trends in pore fluids. Accordingly, the current study compares and contrasts the isotopic and elemental data between adjacent ODP Sites 806B and 807A, which have similar depositional histories, carbonate contents, and pore fluid chemistries. The measured 87Sr/86Sr ratios of pore fluids at 806B range smoothly from 0.70914 at 4.45 mbsf to 0.70851 at 509.3 mbsf, similar (though offset relative) to the bulk carbonate trend (0.70918 to 0.70877 between 1.11 and 501.94 mbsf). The δ26MgDSM3 of 806B pore fluids generally increases from -0.86‰ at 4.45 mbsf to -0.17‰ at 679.0 mbsf. The overall trend is consistent with previously collected δ26Mg data at 807A [1]; there is, however, a significant difference in pore fluid δ26Mg between the two sites at depths of 300 to 600 mbsf. At these depths, 806B pore fluid δ26Mg values are +0.2 to 0.3‰ relative to 807A at similar depths [1]. The application of a depositional reactive transport model to the Sr isotope data suggests that bulk carbonate recrystallization rates at 806B are similar to those at 807A (<2%/Ma) [2]. An iterative model construct is employed to evaluate the dominant controls on the δ26Mg of marine pore fluids; specifically the relative

  1. Transfer Printing of Semiconductor Nanowires with Lasing Emission for Controllable Nanophotonic Device Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Guilhabert, Benoit; Hurtado, Antonio; Jevtics, Dimitars; Gao, Qian; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Dawson, Martin D

    2016-04-26

    Accurate positioning and organization of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) with lasing emission at room temperature is achieved using a nanoscale transfer printing (TP) technique. The NWs retained their lasing emission after their transfer to targeted locations on different receiving substrates (e.g., polymers, silica, and metal surfaces). The NWs were also organized into complex spatial patterns, including 1D and 2D arrays, with a controlled number of elements and dimensions. The developed TP technique enables the fabrication of bespoke nanophotonic systems using NW lasers and other NW devices as building blocks. PMID:26974392

  2. Temperature and its control of isotope fractionation by a sulfate-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Olesen, Claus A.; Cox, Raymond P.

    2006-02-01

    A synthesis of previous results, which we dub the "standard model," provides a prediction as to how isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction should respond to physiological variables such as specific rate of sulfate reduction and environmental variables such as substrate availability and temperature. The standard model suggests that isotope fractionation should decrease with increasing specific rates of sulfate reduction (rate per cell). Furthermore, the standard model predicts that low fractionations should be found at both high and low temperatures whereas the highest fractionations should be found in the intermediate temperature range. These fractionation trends are controlled, as a function of temperature, by the balance between the transfer rates of sulfate into and out of the cell and the exchange between the sulfur pools internal to the organism. We test this standard model by conducting experiments on the growth physiology and isotope fractionation, as a function of temperature, by the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (DSMZ 642). Our results contrast with the "standard model" by showing a positive correlation between specific rates of sulfate reduction and fractionation. Also by contrast with the standard model, we found the highest fractionations at low and high temperatures and the lowest fractionations in the intermediate temperature range. We develop a fractionation model which can be used to explain both our results as well as the results of the "standard model." Differences in fractionation with temperature relate to differences in the specific temperature response of internal enzyme kinetics as well as the exchange rates of sulfate in and out of the cell. It is expected that the kinetics of these processes will show strain-specific differences.

  3. Climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotope composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinniker, D.; Tipple, B.; Pagani, M.

    2007-12-01

    Unique and abundant secondary metabolites found in waxes and resins of the Callitroid, Cupressoid, and Taxodioid clades of the Cupressaceae family can be identified and quantified in complex mixtures of sedimentary organic compounds. This unusual feature makes it possible to study relatively simple (taxon-specific) isotope systems back in time across the broad array of environments in which these conifers are found. Work on these systems can potentially provide both robust paleoenvironmental proxies (i.e. for source water δD and growing season relative humidity) and quantitative probes into the ecophysiology of these plants in modern and ancient environments. Our research focuses on three genera representing environmental end-members of Cupressaceae - Juniperus, Thuja, and Chamaecyparis - (1) across geographic and environmental gradients in the field, and (2) in specific Holocene and late Pleistocene environmental records. The latter research focuses on peat cores from New England and Oregon and fossil packrat middens from the southwestern United States. Modern transects highlight the sensitivity of Cupressaceae to climatic variables. These include both variables during growth (relative humidity, soil moisture, etc.) and variables affecting seasonal and diurnal growth rates (temperature, winter precipitation, insolation, microhabitat, etc.). Work on ancient records has demonstrated the sensitivity of these unique taxon-specific archives to both subtle and dramatic climate shifts during the Pleistocene and Holocene. This work will result in an improved understanding of climatic and physiological controls on the stable isotopic composition of modern and ancient Cupressaceae - and by extension, other arborescent gymnosperms and C3 plants - providing a framework for understanding more complexly sourced organic inputs to sediments, coals, and petroleum prior to the advent of C4 plants. This research also has direct implications for stratigraphic stable isotope studies

  4. Controlled Growth of Ultrathin Film of Organic Semiconductors by Balancing the Competitive Processes in Dip-Coating for Organic Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kunjie; Li, Hongwei; Li, Liqiang; Zhang, Suna; Chen, Xiaosong; Xu, Zeyang; Zhang, Xi; Hu, Wenping; Chi, Lifeng; Gao, Xike; Meng, Yancheng

    2016-06-28

    Ultrathin film with thickness below 15 nm of organic semiconductors provides excellent platform for some fundamental research and practical applications in the field of organic electronics. However, it is quite challenging to develop a general principle for the growth of uniform and continuous ultrathin film over large area. Dip-coating is a useful technique to prepare diverse structures of organic semiconductors, but the assembly of organic semiconductors in dip-coating is quite complicated, and there are no reports about the core rules for the growth of ultrathin film via dip-coating until now. In this work, we develop a general strategy for the growth of ultrathin film of organic semiconductor via dip-coating, which provides a relatively facile model to analyze the growth behavior. The balance between the three direct factors (nucleation rate, assembly rate, and recession rate) is the key to determine the growth of ultrathin film. Under the direction of this rule, ultrathin films of four organic semiconductors are obtained. The field-effect transistors constructed on the ultrathin film show good field-effect property. This work provides a general principle and systematic guideline to prepare ultrathin film of organic semiconductors via dip-coating, which would be highly meaningful for organic electronics as well as for the assembly of other materials via solution processes. PMID:27267545

  5. Occupational hazards control of hazardous substances in clean room of semiconductor manufacturing plant using CFD analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Zhou, Ya-Fei

    2015-02-01

    The manufacturing processes in chip industries are complex, and many kinds of raw materials and solvents of different nature are used, most of which are highly toxic and dangerous. During the machine preventive maintenance period, these toxic and harmful substances will escape from the sealed reaction chamber to the clean workshop environment and endanger the health of the workers on-site, resulting in occupational diseases. From the perspective of prevention, the spread and prediction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) that escaped from the metal-etching chamber during maintenance were studied in this article. The computational fluid dynamics technology was used for a three-dimensional numerical simulation of the indoor air velocity field and the HCl concentration field, and the simulation results were then compared with the on-site monitoring data to verify the correctness and feasibility. The occupational hazards and control measures were analyzed based on the numerical simulation, and the optimal control measure was obtained. In this article, using the method of ambient air to analyze the occupational exposure can provide a new idea to the field of occupational health research in the integrated circuit industry and had theoretical and practical significance. PMID:23293134

  6. Ferroelectric switching behavior in morphology controlled ferroelectric-semiconductor polymer blends for organic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eunhee; Su, Gregory; Kramer, Edward; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Memory is a fundamental component of all modern electronic systems. Organic ferroelectric memories are advantageous because they are thin and lightweight devices that can be made printable, foldable, and stretchable. Organic ferroelectric memories comprise a physical blend of an organic semiconducting polymer and an insulating ferroelectric polymer as the active layer in a thin film diode. Controlling the thin film morphology in these blends is important for electrical properties of the resulting device. We have found that when a semiconducting thiophene polymer with polar alkanoate side chains (P3EPT) is blended with well-studied ferroelectric polymer poly [(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene] P (VDF-TrFE), the resulting film has low surface roughness and more controllable domain sizes compared to the widely used poly (3-hexylthiophene). This difference allows more reliable study of the ferroelectric switching behavior in devices with domain size of about 100nm. The influence of the 3D composition measured by a combination of methods, including soft x-ray microscopy, on the electrical characteristics will be presented.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A low power automatic gain control loop for a receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guofeng, Li; Zhiqing, Geng; Nanjian, Wu

    2010-09-01

    This paper proposes a new structure to lower the power consumption of a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and keep the linearity of the VGA unchanged. The structure is used in a high rate amplitude-shift keying (ASK) based IF-stage. It includes an automatic gain control (AGC) loop and ASK demodulator. The AGC mainly consists of six-stage VGAs. The IF-stage is realized in 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The measurement results show that the power consumption of the whole system is very low. The system consumes 730 μA while operating at 1.8 V. The minimum ASK signal the system could detect is 0.7 mV (peak to peak amplitude).

  8. Electrical control of neutral and charged excitons in a monolayer semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Jason S.; Wu, Sanfeng; Yu, Hongyi; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Jones, Aaron M.; Aivazian, Grant; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G.; Xiao, Di; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2013-02-12

    Monolayer group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as semiconducting alternatives to graphene in which the true two-dimensionality is expected to illuminate new semiconducting physics. Here we investigate excitons and trions (their singly charged counterparts), which have thus far been challenging to generate and control in the ultimate two-dimensional limit. Utilizing high-quality monolayer molybdenum diselenide, we report the unambiguous observation and electrostatic tunability of charging effects in positively charged (X+), neutral (Xo) and negatively charged (X-) excitons in field-effect transistors via photoluminescence. The trion charging energy is large (30 meV), enhanced by strong confinement and heavy effective masses, whereas the linewidth is narrow (5 meV) at temperatures <55 K. This is greater spectral contrast than in any known quasi-two-dimensional system. We also find the charging energies for X+ and X- to be nearly identical implying the same effective mass for electrons and holes.

  9. Spin-glass behaviors in carrier polarity controlled Fe3-xTixO4 semiconductor thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamahara, H.; Seki, M.; Adachi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Nasu, H.; Horiba, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Tabata, H.

    2015-08-01

    Carrier-type control of spin-glass (cluster spin-glass) is studied in order to engineer basic magnetic semiconductor elements using the memory functions of spin-glass. A key of carrier-polarity control in magnetite is the valence engineering between Fe(II) and Fe(III) that is achieved by Ti(IV) substitution. Single phases of (001)-oriented Fe3-xTixO4 thin films have been obtained on spinel MgAl2O4 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Thermoelectric power measurements reveal that Ti-rich films (x = 0.8) show p-type conduction, while Ti-poor films (x = 0.6-0.75) show n-type conduction. The systematic Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) followed by Ti(IV) substitution in the octahedral sublattice is confirmed by the X-ray absorption spectra. All of the Fe3-xTixO4 films (x = 0.6-0.8) exhibit ferrimagnetism above room temperature. Next, the spin-glass behaviors of Ti-rich Fe2.2Ti0.8O4 film are studied, since this magnetically diluted system is expected to exhibit the spin-glass behaviors. The DC magnetization and AC susceptibility measurements for the Ti-rich Fe2.2Ti0.8O4 film reveal the presence of the spin glass phase. Thermal- and magnetic-field-history memory effects are observed and are attributed to the long time-decay nature of remanent magnetization. The detailed analysis of the time-dependent thermoremanent magnetization reveals the presence of the cluster spin glass state.

  10. Dopant and self-diffusion in extrinsic n-type silicon isotopically controlled heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes H.; Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Nicols, Sam P.; Beeman, Jeff W.; Hansen, John; Nylandsted-Larsen, Arme; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    We present experimental results of dopant- and self-diffusion in extrinsic silicon doped with As. Multilayers of isotopically controlled {sup 28}Si and natural silicon enable simultaneous analysis of {sup 30}Si diffusion into the {sup 28}Si enriched layers and dopant diffusion throughout the multilayer structure. In order to suppress transient enhanced self- and dopant diffusion caused by ion implantation, we adopted a special approach to dopant introduction. First, an amorphous 250-nm thick Si layer was deposited on top of the Si isotope heterostructure. Then the dopant ions were implanted to a depth such that all the radiation damage resided inside this amorphous cap layer. These samples were annealed for various times and temperatures to study the impact of As diffusion and doping on Si self-diffusion. The Si self-diffusion coefficient and the dopant diffusivity for various extrinsic n-type conditions were determined over a wide temperature range. We observed increased diffusivities that we attribute to the increase in the concentration of the native defect promoting the diffusion.

  11. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G; Kiselev, Andrey A; Fong, Bryan H; Holabird, Kevin S; Hazard, Thomas M; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E; Ross, Richard S; Gyure, Mark F; Hunter, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  12. Isotopically enhanced triple-quantum-dot qubit

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin; Ladd, Thaddeus D.; Smith, Aaron; Borselli, Matthew G.; Kiselev, Andrey A.; Fong, Bryan H.; Holabird, Kevin S.; Hazard, Thomas M.; Huang, Biqin; Deelman, Peter W.; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele E.; Ross, Richard S.; Gyure, Mark F.; Hunter, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Like modern microprocessors today, future processors of quantum information may be implemented using all-electrical control of silicon-based devices. A semiconductor spin qubit may be controlled without the use of magnetic fields by using three electrons in three tunnel-coupled quantum dots. Triple dots have previously been implemented in GaAs, but this material suffers from intrinsic nuclear magnetic noise. Reduction of this noise is possible by fabricating devices using isotopically purified silicon. We demonstrate universal coherent control of a triple-quantum-dot qubit implemented in an isotopically enhanced Si/SiGe heterostructure. Composite pulses are used to implement spin-echo type sequences, and differential charge sensing enables single-shot state readout. These experiments demonstrate sufficient control with sufficiently low noise to enable the long pulse sequences required for exchange-only two-qubit logic and randomized benchmarking. PMID:26601186

  13. Temporal Dynamics and Environmental Controls on Carbon Isotope Discrimination at the Canopy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, K. A.; Griffis, T. J.; Lee, X.; Welp, L. R.; Baker, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Much is currently known about 13C isotopic discrimination by C3 plants at the leaf scale. Multidisciplinary techniques from micrometeorology and the stable isotope community have exploited this knowledge to better understand the dynamic processes and environmental controls on atmosphere/biosphere exchange. Unfortunately, there remains a dearth of measurements relating carbon isotope discrimination at the canopy scale (Δcanopy) with the net carbon ecosystem flux. Our goals here are to evaluate temporal fluctuations in Δcanopy as a result of variable environmental conditions and to critically assess the efficacy of leaf-level assumptions applied at the canopy scale. At the University of Minnesota's Rosemount Research and Outreach Center (RROC), the exchange of 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopologues are continuously measured using tunable diode laser (TDL) and micrometeorological techniques (eddy covariance-TDL and gradient-TDL methods). We utilize these data in conjunction with eddy flux and ancillary meteorological measurements to estimate Δcanopy, a key parameter for understanding ecosystem carbon source/sink behavior. Traditionally, Δcanopy is estimated using stomatal conductance models and leaf level isotopic discrimination parameters. In this study, we similarly calculated Δcanopy (Big-Leaf approach), where stomatal conductance was obtained through inversion of the Penman-Monteith equation. Additionally, given the high resolution of eddy flux and isoflux measurements at the RROC site, we were able to calculate Δcanopy using an inverse flux approach. For this approach, we partitioned the net ecosystem flux using eddy covariance measurements and a nighttime temperature regression method, and then calculated Δcanopy from the isoflux mass balance. Both calculations of Δcanopy emphasized the diurnal, daily and seasonal variability of this important parameter. In particular, atypically hot weather strongly influenced canopy isotope discrimination. Trends in the two

  14. Prospects of lithium enrichment on 7Li isotope by method of controlled ions electro-migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Kalugin, M. M.; Gabrielyan, A. V.; Martoyan, A. G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a new electro-membrane method of enrichment of 7Li isotope. The data are presented on the importance and application fields regarding the use of 7Li isotopes. Existing methods and criteria of separation of lithium isotopes are discussed. The principle of new technology, regimes of enrichment experiments, and analysis details of obtained products are briefly described.

  15. Tropical West Pacific moisture dynamics and climate controls on rainfall isotopic ratios in southern Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Donaldi S.; Thompson, Lonnie G.; Setyadi, Gesang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the controls on stable isotopologues of tropical rainfall is critical for paleoclimatic reconstruction from tropical ice core records. The southern Papua region, Indonesia, has a unique climate regime that allows for the evaluation of the influence of precipitation and convective activity on seasonal rainfall δ18O. The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on interannual rainfall δ18O variation is also important for paleoclimate reconstruction. Here we present stable isotope analyses of 1332 rain samples collected daily during the period from January 2013 to February 2014 (ENSO-normal) and December 2014 to September 2015 (El Niño) at various elevation stations (9 to 3945 m above sea level) on the southern slope of the central mountain ranges in Papua. The results suggest an altitude effect with an isotopic lapse rate for δ18O (δD) of -2.4‰/km (-18.2‰/km). The temporal δ18O variability (daily to interannual) is controlled mostly by regional convective activity rather than local/regional precipitation amount. The intraseasonal δ18O variation resembles the Madden-Julian Oscillation cycle with major δ18O depletion events associated with active (wet) phases. Moisture origins, transport pathways, moisture convergence, and raindrop evaporation appear to have no significant seasonal effects on δ18O, leading to the conclusion that condensation temperature controls δ18O depletion associated with convective activity. Seasonal δ18O variation is likely associated with atmospheric temperature at the mean condensation level as indicated by the altitude of latent heat release in the troposphere. Rainfall δ18O (δD) is generally enriched by 1.6‰-2‰ (11‰-15‰) during El Niño than during ENSO-normal periods.

  16. Polarization Control via He-Ion Beam Induced Nanofabrication in Layered Ferroelectric Semiconductors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belianinov, Alex; Iberi, Vighter; Tselev, Alexander; Susner, Michael A.; McGuire, Michael A.; Joy, David; Jesse, Stephen; Rondinone, Adam J.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-02-23

    Rapid advanced in nanoscience rely on continuous improvements of matter manipulation at near atomic scales. Currently, well characterized, robust, resist-based lithography carries the brunt of the nanofabrication process. However, use of local electron, ion and physical probe methods is also expanding, driven largely by their ability to fabricate without the multi-step preparation processes that can result in contamination from resists and solvents. Furthermore, probe based methods extend beyond nanofabrication to nanomanipulation and imaging, vital ingredients to rapid transition to prototyping and testing of layered 2D heterostructured devices. In this work we demonstrate that helium ion interaction, in a Helium Ionmore » Microscope (HIM), with the surface of bulk copper indium thiophosphate CuMIIIP2X6 (M = Cr, In; X= S, Se), (CITP) results in the control of ferroelectric domains, and growth of cylindrical nanostructures with enhanced conductivity; with material volumes scaling with the dosage of the beam. The nanostructures are oxygen rich, sulfur poor, and with the copper concentration virtually unchanged as confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) imaging contrast as well as Scanning Microwave Microscopy (SMM) measurements suggest enhanced conductivity in the formed particle, whereas Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements indicate that the produced structures have lower dissipation and a lower Young s modulus.« less

  17. Controlled FRET efficiency in nano-bio hybrid materials made from semiconductor quantum dots and bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Le Cigne, Anthony; Sukhanova, Alyona; Saab, Marie-belle; Troyon, Michel; Molinari, Michael; Nabiev, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) and the photochromic protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) in its natural purple membrane (PM) has been modulated by independent tuning of the Förster radius, overlap integral of the donor emission spectrum and acceptor absorption spectrum, and the distance between the donor (QD) and acceptor (bR retinal). The results have shown that the observed energy transfer from QDs to bR corresponds to that predicted by a multiple-acceptors geometric model describing the FRET phenomenon for QDs quasi-epitaxied on a crystalline lattice of bR trimers. Linking of QDs and bR via streptavidin-biotin linkers of different lengths caused FRET with an efficiency reaching 82%, strongly exceeding the values predicted by the classical FRET theory. The data not only demonstrate the possibility of nano-bioengineering of efficient hybrid materials with controlled energy-transfer properties, but also emphasize the necessity to develop an advanced theory of nano-bio energy transfer that would explain experimental effects contradicting the existing theoretical models.

  18. Polarization Control via He-Ion Beam Induced Nanofabrication in Layered Ferroelectric Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Belianinov, Alex; Iberi, Vighter; Tselev, Alexander; Susner, Michael A; McGuire, Michael A; Joy, David; Jesse, Stephen; Rondinone, Adam J; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-03-23

    Rapid advances in nanoscience rely on continuous improvements of material manipulation at near-atomic scales. Currently, the workhorse of nanofabrication is resist-based lithography and its various derivatives. However, the use of local electron, ion, and physical probe methods is expanding, driven largely by the need for fabrication without the multistep preparation processes that can result in contamination from resists and solvents. Furthermore, probe-based methods extend beyond nanofabrication to nanomanipulation and to imaging which are all vital for a rapid transition to the prototyping and testing of devices. In this work we study helium ion interactions with the surface of bulk copper indium thiophosphate CuM(III)P2X6 (M = Cr, In; X= S, Se), a novel layered 2D material, with a Helium Ion Microscope (HIM). Using this technique, we are able to control ferrielectric domains and grow conical nanostructures with enhanced conductivity whose material volumes scale with the beam dosage. Compared to the copper indium thiophosphate (CITP) from which they grow, the nanostructures are oxygen rich, sulfur poor, and with virtually unchanged copper concentration as confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging contrast as well as scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) measurements suggest enhanced conductivity in the formed particles, whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements indicate that the produced structures have lower dissipation and are softer as compared to the CITP. PMID:26918591

  19. Electrical control of neutral and charged excitons in a monolayer semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jason S; Wu, Sanfeng; Yu, Hongyi; Ghimire, Nirmal J; Jones, Aaron M; Aivazian, Grant; Yan, Jiaqiang; Mandrus, David G; Xiao, Di; Yao, Wang; Xu, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    Monolayer group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as semiconducting alternatives to graphene in which the true two-dimensionality is expected to illuminate new semiconducting physics. Here we investigate excitons and trions (their singly charged counterparts), which have thus far been challenging to generate and control in the ultimate two-dimensional limit. Utilizing high-quality monolayer molybdenum diselenide, we report the unambiguous observation and electrostatic tunability of charging effects in positively charged (X(+)), neutral (X(o)) and negatively charged (X(-)) excitons in field-effect transistors via photoluminescence. The trion charging energy is large (30 meV), enhanced by strong confinement and heavy effective masses, whereas the linewidth is narrow (5 meV) at temperatures <55 K. This is greater spectral contrast than in any known quasi-two-dimensional system. We also find the charging energies for X(+) and X(-) to be nearly identical implying the same effective mass for electrons and holes. PMID:23403575

  20. Optical Control of Intersubband Absorption in a Multiple Quantum Well-Embedded Semiconductor Microcravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Optical intersubband response of a multiple quantum well (MQW)-embedded microcavity driven by a coherent pump field is studied theoretically. The n-type doped MQW structure with three subbands in the conduction band is sandwiched between a semi-infinite medium and a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). A strong pump field couples the two upper subbands and a weak field probes the two lower subbands. To describe the optical response of the MQW-embedded microcavity, we adopt a semi-classical nonlocal response theory. Taking into account the pump-probe interaction, we derive the probe-induced current density associated with intersubband transitions from the single-particle density-matrix formalism. By incorporating the current density into the Maxwell equation, we solve the probe local field exactly by means of Green's function technique and the transfer-matrix method. We obtain an exact expression for the probe absorption coefficient of the microcavity. For a GaAs/Al(sub x)Ga(sub 1-x)As MQW structure sandwiched between a GaAs/AlAs DBR and vacuum, we performed numerical calculations of the probe absorption spectra for different parameters such as pump intensity, pump detuning, and cavity length. We find that the probe spectrum is strongly dependent on these parameters. In particular, we find that the combination of the cavity effect and the Autler-Townes effect results in a triplet in the optical spectrum of the MQW system. The optical absorption peak value and its location can be feasibly controlled by varying the pump intensity and detuning.

  1. Processes controlling the chromium isotopic composition of river water: Constraints from basaltic river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Joan; Babechuk, Michael G.; Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Gaucher, Claudio; Frei, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report chromium (Cr) isotope compositions and concentrations (and additional geochemical and physicochemical data) of bedrock, soils and river waters from two geographically distinct basaltic river catchments, the Uruguay River catchment (Uruguay) and the Glenariff River catchment (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom), to investigate the processes that control Cr mobilisation and fractionation during weathering and riverine transport to the sea. Our results show that the Cr isotope compositions of soils are a function of the modal abundance and weathering rates of Cr-bearing minerals. The accumulation of weathering resistant Cr-spinels in the soils of Northern Ireland results in soils which are enriched in Cr and have δ53Cr values within the range of local bedrock (δ53Cr value of -0.21 ± 0.12‰, 2σ, n = 4). By contrast, the more easily weathered Cr-silicates in the bedrock of Uruguay results in greater Cr loss from the soil and a depletion in the heavy isotopes of Cr (with average δ53Cr value of -0.32 ± 0.04‰, 2σ, n = 4) relative to the local bedrock (δ53Cr value of -0.22 ± 0.08‰, 2σ, n = 4). The river waters in both catchments are predominantly enriched in the heavy 53Cr isotope relative to bedrock, although the range and average river water δ53Cr values differ significantly between each. The Uruguay rivers exhibit a restricted range in δ53Cr values, with a mean of +0.08 ± 0.06‰ (2σ, n = 5) that represents a positive fractionation of +0.2‰ relative to bedrock, and is best explained by the unidirectional formation of Cr(VI) during weathering that has not been significantly modified by back-reduction to Cr(III). By contrast, the Glenariff stream and river waters (Northern Ireland) exhibit a wide range in δ53Cr values from -0.17 ± 0.3‰ (2σ, n = 4) to +1.68 ± 0.3‰ (n = 1) that appears to reflect the variable redox conditions of the catchment. In general, the values with the lowest 53Cr enrichment have higher Cr concentrations, the lowest

  2. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  3. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; McKay, Christopher P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  4. Crystallographic control on the boron isotope paleo-pH proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noireaux, J.; Mavromatis, V.; Gaillardet, J.; Schott, J.; Montouillout, V.; Louvat, P.; Rollion-Bard, C.; Neuville, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    When using the boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of marine carbonates as a seawater pH proxy, it is assumed that only the tetrahedral borate ion is incorporated into the growing carbonate crystals and that no boron isotope fractionation occurs during uptake. However, the δ11B of the calcium carbonate from most modern foraminifera shells or corals skeletons is not the same as the δ11B of seawater borate, which depends on pH, an observation commonly attributed to vital effects. In this study, we combined previously published high-field 11B MAS NMR and new δ11B measurements on the same synthetic calcite and aragonite samples precipitated inorganically under controlled environments to avoid vital effects. Our results indicate that the main controlling factors of δ11B are the solution pH and the mineralogy of the precipitated carbonate mineral, whereas the aqueous boron concentration of the solution, CaCO3 precipitation rate and the presence or absence of growth seeds all appear to have negligible influence. In aragonite, the NMR data show that boron coordination is tetrahedral (BO4), in addition, its δ11B is equal to that of aqueous borate, thus confirming the paleo-pH hypothesis. In contrast, both trigonal BO3 and tetrahedral BO4 are present in calcite, and its δ11B values are higher than that of aqueous borate and are less sensitive to solution pH variations compared to δ11B in aragonite. These observations are interpreted in calcite as a reflection of the incorporation of decreasing amounts of boric acid with increasing pH. Moreover, the fraction of BO3 measured by NMR in calcite is higher than that inferred from δ11B which indicates a coordination change from BO4 to BO3 upon boron incorporation in the solid. Overall, this study shows that although the observed differences in δ11B between inorganic and biological aragonite are compatible with a pH increase at calcification sites, the B speciation and isotope composition of biological calcites call for a

  5. Climate controls on forest soil C isotope ratios in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Cooper, L.W.; Post, W.M. III; Hanson, P.J.

    2000-04-01

    A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combination with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. The authors hypothesize that, if other environmental factors are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.

  6. Climate controls on forest soil C isotope ratios in the southern Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T; Cooper, Lee W; Post, Wilfred M; Hanson, Paul J

    2000-04-01

    A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combination with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil (20 cm deep) is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. We hypothesize that, if other environmental factors (like soil moisture) are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.

  7. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Isotopic Yttrium-90-Labeled Rare Earth Fluoride Nanocrystals for Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paik, Taejong; Chacko, Ann-Marie; Mikitsh, John L; Friedberg, Joseph S; Pryma, Daniel A; Murray, Christopher B

    2015-09-22

    Isotopically labeled nanomaterials have recently attracted much attention in biomedical research, environmental health studies, and clinical medicine because radioactive probes allow the elucidation of in vitro and in vivo cellular transport mechanisms, as well as the unambiguous distribution and localization of nanomaterials in vivo. In addition, nanocrystal-based inorganic materials have a unique capability of customizing size, shape, and composition; with the potential to be designed as multimodal imaging probes. Size and shape of nanocrystals can directly influence interactions with biological systems, hence it is important to develop synthetic methods to design radiolabeled nanocrystals with precise control of size and shape. Here, we report size- and shape-controlled synthesis of rare earth fluoride nanocrystals doped with the β-emitting radioisotope yttrium-90 ((90)Y). Size and shape of nanocrystals are tailored via tight control of reaction parameters and the type of rare earth hosts (e.g., Gd or Y) employed. Radiolabeled nanocrystals are synthesized in high radiochemical yield and purity as well as excellent radiolabel stability in the face of surface modification with different polymeric ligands. We demonstrate the Cerenkov radioluminescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging capabilities of (90)Y-doped GdF3 nanoplates, which offer unique opportunities as a promising platform for multimodal imaging and targeted therapy. PMID:26257288

  8. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  9. Thermodynamic Control of the Isotope Composition of Divalent Metal Cations in Aqueous Solutions and in Carbonate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, J.; Mavromatis, V.; Pearce, C. R.; Fujii, T.; Oelkers, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    The very contrasting steric and electronic properties of divalent metals dramatically affect the reactivity and composition of their aqueous species and their partitioning between fluids and minerals. These contrasting properties result also in very distinct kinetic and thermodynamic trends of their isotopic composition in aqueous fluids and carbonate minerals. For example, if alkaline earths in calcite are all enriched in light isotopes, only Mg exhibits a decrease of its isotope fractionation with increasing calcite growth rate. Moreover, the Mg2+ aquo ion is the only alkaline earth ion whose isotopic composition is markedly affected by the presence in solution of inorganic ligands like bicarbonate, carbonate or sulfate. The distinct behavior of Mg stems from the reduced lability of water molecules in its coordination sphere and from the reduction of its aquo ion coordination sphere when it coordinates to HCO3- and CO32-. Ab initio calculations show that the preferred four hydration number of Mg in stable Mg bicarbonate and Mg carbonate monomers results in a strong enrichment in 26Mg of these species compared to Mg(H2O)62+ (i.e. 1000lnβ26/24MgCO3°-1000lnβ26/24Mg2+ = 5.16 ‰; Fujii, personal communication). The analysis of recent experiments on Mg isotope fractionation between carbonate crystals and solution using density functionnal theory estimation of lnβ values from Fujii i) confirm the marked impact of carbonate and bicarbonate ligands on the isotope composition of Mg in calcite and magnesite and ii) allow to reconcile First-principles and experimental estimates of equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation in carbonate crystals. Recent experiments also confirm that the strong affinity of Zn2+ or Cu2+ for RO- ligands results in a marked impact of fluid pH, ΣCO2(aq) and/or carboxylic ligands concentrations on the isotope composition of these metals in carbonate minerals. These observations provide new insights into the parameters controlling the isotope

  10. Factors controlling carbon isotopic composition of land snail shells estimated from lab culturing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Naizhong; Yamada, Keita; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2014-05-01

    Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of land snail shell carbonate is widely applied in reconstructing the C3/C4 vegetation distribution of paleo-environment, which is considered to reflect variations of some environmental parameters [1][2][3]. Land snail shell carbon has three potential sources: diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested carbonate (limestone) [4]. However, their relative contributions to shell carbonate have not been understood well yet [4][5][6][7][8]. More researches are necessary before we could apply this tool in paleo-environment reconstruction, especially inter-lab culturing experiment. A kind of land snail species, Acusta despecta sieboldiana, was collected at Yokohama, Japan and cultured under suitable environment to lay eggs. The second generations were growing up from eggs to adults around 6-12 months at the temperature of 20°, 25° and 30°, respectively. All of the snails at 25° and 30° and most of those at 20° were fed by cabbage (C3 plant) during their life span while others were fed by corn (C4 plant). To investigate the effect of ingested carbonate, some of them were fed by Ca3(PO4)2 powder while others were fed by CaCO3 powder. δ13C of shells were analyzed by an Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (Thermo Finnigan MAT 253); δ13C of food and snail tissue were measured by a Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (Picarro G1121-i). At the same time, δ13C of eggshell and new born snails were analyzed by a Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GasBench II). We confirmed that diet, atmospheric CO2 and ingested limestone could be important sources controlling shell δ13C values. And the temperature could affect shell carbonate δ13C values, too. A simple but credible frame was raised to discuss the mechanism of how each possible source and environmental parameter could affect shell carbonate δ13C values based on previous works [4][6][8] and this study. According to this frame and some reasonable assumptions, we have estimated the

  11. Controlling factors on a paleo-lake oxygen isotope record (Yammoûneh, Lebanon) since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develle, Anne-Lise; Herreros, Julien; Vidal, Laurence; Sursock, Alexandre; Gasse, Françoise

    2010-04-01

    Late Quaternary paleoclimatic changes in the Levant are difficult to extract from carbonate oxygen isotope records partly because the factors controlling the terrestrial δ 18O signals are not fully understood in this region characterized by sharp climatic gradients. Here, we address this purpose by presenting the first 14C-dated isotope record from the northern Levant. The record is based on oxygen isotopes from ostracod shells from lacustrine-palustrine deposits accumulated in a small karstic, hydrologically open basin (Yammoûneh), located on the eastern flank of Mount Lebanon. We have first constructed a composite isotopic record obtained from three different ostracod taxa. This yields an oxygen isotope record of ostracods (δ ost) related to the most widespread species ( Ilyocypris inermis), and converted to δ 18O values coeval with calcite precipitated in equilibrium (δ C) with the lake water (δ L). As with other records from the Mediterranean region, the Yammoûneh profile shows maximum and minimum δ C values during the LGM and the early Holocene, respectively, and a slight late Holocene increase. In order to discuss the potential causes of the observed δ 18O values fluctuations (e.g., changes in the isotopic composition of the moisture source, temperature, precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) balance, or atmospheric circulation), we tentatively reconstruct the lake water isotope composition by correcting the δ C values for lake water temperature using regional paleotemperature estimates. Inferred δ L values were then corrected for the isotopic composition of the Eastern Mediterranean sea surface water (the moisture source) derived from planktonic foraminifera δ 18O values corrected for alkenone-based sea surface temperature. Our study suggests that Holocene δ L fluctuations are primarily linked to changes in the sea surface water composition (source effect) amplified by enhanced inland rainfall during the early Holocene. During the LGM, low δ L

  12. Self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Nicols, Samuel P.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Hansen, John L.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    Isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures were used to measure the enhancement of self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped silicon. {sup 30}Si was used as a tracer through a multilayer structure of alternating natural Si and enriched {sup 28}Si layers. Low energy, high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) allowed for simultaneous measurement of self- and dopant diffusion profiles of samples annealed at temperatures between 850 C and 1100 C. A specially designed ion- implanted amorphous Si surface layer was used as a dopant source to suppress excess defects in the multilayer structure, thereby eliminating transient enhanced diffusion (TED) behavior. Self- and dopant diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, and native defect charge states were determined from computer-aided modeling, based on differential equations describing the diffusion processes. We present a quantitative description of B diffusion enhanced self-diffusion in silicon and conclude that the diffusion of both B and Si is mainly mediated by neutral and singly positively charged self-interstitials under p-type doping. No significant contribution of vacancies to either B or Si diffusion is observed.

  13. Soils and Springs - Controls on the Isotope Hydrology of 3 Appalachian Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, M. A.; Dewalle, D. R.; McGuire, K. J.; Gburek, W. J.

    2003-12-01

    Environmental isotopes, such as O-18 and D, have been used to study hydrological processes in a variety of settings. The seasonal variations of stream baseflow isotopic composition at a catchment outlet are often used to estimate the residence time of groundwater within a catchment. Residence time models can be improved with information related to the spatial variability of baseflow isotopic composition within a catchment. This study aimed to quantify the annual variations in O-18 composition of waters within several Appalachian watersheds representative of 3 common landscape types in central Pennsylvania: the Valley and Ridge-shale (Mahantango Creek); Valley and Ridge-carbonate (Buffalo Run); and Appalachian Plateau-sandstone (Benner Run). Bi-weekly precipitation, snowmelt, soil water, and baseflow isotopic composition data were collected for the 3 catchments over one year (May 1999-May 2000). Preliminary results suggest that soils at these sites can effectively damp seasonal precipitation O-18 signals by the time they reach depths of 1.62-2.85 meters in the subsurface. This suggests that seasonal isotopic composition variations in baseflow are due to waters that drain the shallower soils within these catchments. The presence of springs was found to exert an influence on baseflow isotopic composition within each of the catchments. Two watersheds contained diffuse-fed springs, which resulted in a damping of seasonal variability of baseflow isotopic composition downstream. The remaining watershed contained a conduit spring, draining carbonate bedrock. This spring discharge resulted in an increase in seasonal variability of baseflow isotopic composition downstream. The seasonal variability of baseflow isotopic composition observed at the catchment outlets was a result of the combination of several distinct water sources: slow-draining groundwater; fast-draining near-channel groundwater; and spring discharges. An improvement in modeling of residence times of these

  14. Semiconductor Cubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Through Goddard Space Flight Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory Small Business Innovation Research contracts, Irvine Sensors developed a three-dimensional memory system for a spaceborne data recorder and other applications for NASA. From these contracts, the company created the Memory Short Stack product, a patented technology for stacking integrated circuits that offers higher processing speeds and levels of integration, and lower power requirements. The product is a three-dimensional semiconductor package in which dozens of integrated circuits are stacked upon each other to form a cube. The technology is being used in various computer and telecommunications applications.

  15. Key drivers controlling stable isotope variations in daily precipitation of Costa Rica: Caribbean Sea versus Eastern Pacific Ocean moisture sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Murillo, R.; Birkel, C.; Welsh, K.; Esquivel-Hernández, G.; Corrales-Salazar, J.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Roupsard, O.; Sáenz-Rosales, O.; Katchan, I.; Arce-Mesén, R.; Soulsby, C.; Araguás-Araguás, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Costa Rica is located on the Central American Isthmus, which receives moisture inputs directly from the Caribbean Sea and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This location includes unique mountainous and lowland microclimates, but only limited knowledge exists about the impact of relief and regional atmospheric circulation patterns on precipitation origin, transport, and isotopic composition. Therefore, the main scope of this project is to identify the key drivers controlling stable isotope variations in daily-scale precipitation of Costa Rica. The monitoring sites comprise three strategic locations across Costa Rica: Heredia (Central Valley), Turrialba (Caribbean slope), and Caño Seco (South Pacific slope). Sporadic dry season rain is mostly related to isolated enriched events ranging from -5.8‰ to -0.9‰ δ18O. By mid-May, the Intertropical Convergence Zone reaches Costa Rica resulting in a notable depletion in isotope ratios (up to -18.5‰ δ18O). HYSPLIT air mass back trajectories indicate the strong influence on the origin and transport of precipitation of three main moisture transport mechanisms, the Caribbean Low Level Jet, the Colombian Low Level Jet, and localized convection events. Multiple linear regression models constructed based on Random Forests of surface meteorological information and atmospheric sounding profiles suggest that lifted condensation level and surface relative humidity are the main factors controlling isotopic variations. These findings diverge from the recognized 'amount effect' in monthly composite samples across the tropics. Understanding of stable isotope dynamics in tropical precipitation can be used to a) enhance groundwater modeling efforts in ungauged basins where scarcity of long-term monitoring data drastically limit current and future water resources management, b) improve the re-construction of paleoclimatic records in the Central American land bridge, c) calibrate and validate regional circulation models.

  16. Film diffusion-controlled kinetics of isotopic exchange in a finite bath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, F.N.

    1982-07-01

    This paper examines an isotopic exchange process in which the spherical ion-exchange resins are immersed in an agitated solution of finite volume. It assumes an unstirred liquid film of thickness b-a, a nonlinear concentration profile described by Fick's second law, a concentration of radioactive isotopes in a bulk solution that varies with time, and a constant diffusion coefficient in the liquid film. A rate equation, a diffusion equation, and Laplace transforms along with plots of logs are presented.

  17. Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Skulan, J.; DePaolo, D.J.; Owens, T.L. |

    1997-06-01

    Measurements of {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca, expressed as {delta}{sup 44}Ca, were made on igneous rocks and on shell and bone material from modern organisms to investigate the magnitude and origins of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. The results document a span of 4{per_thousand} in {delta}{sup 44}Ca, measured with the double spike technique to a precision of {+-}0.15{per_thousand}. Volcanic rocks, including basalt and rhyolite, show little variability and cluster near {delta}{sup 44}Ca = 0 {+-}0.2. Systematic analysis of biological samples indicates that biological processing of calcium discriminates against heavy isotopes, and that biological fractionation is the primary generator of calcium isotopic fractionation in nature. Preliminary data suggest that calcium becomes isotopically lighter as it moves through food chains. Calcium carbonate shells of marine microorganisms and deep-sea carbonate ooze have {delta}{sup 44}Ca about 1.0{per_thousand}, lower than seawater; this fractionation causes seawater to be enriched in heavy calcium ({delta}{sup 44}Ca = +0.9) relative to igneous rocks. Marine organisms consequently are isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts at similar trophic level. The calcium isotopic composition of living and fossil organisms may record information on diet and environment. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Novel, band-controlled metal oxide compositions for semiconductor-mediated photocatalytic splitting of water to produce H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Narendra M.

    2013-02-05

    Semiconductor-mediated photo-catalytic dissociation of water offers a unique opportunity for the production of H{sub 2}, a sustainable source of energy. More efficient and chemically stable photo-catalysts, however, remain a vital requirement for commercial viability of this process. The recent research in my group has focused on the synthesis of several new metal oxide (MO) photo-catalysts, such as: LaInO{sub 3}, GaFeO{sub 3}, InVO{sub 4}, In{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} and nanotubular TiO{sub 2}. These samples of controlled grain morphology have been synthesized by using different synthesis protocols and with and without coating of a noble metal co-catalyst. The doping of an impurity, either at cationic or at anionic lattice site, has helped in the tailoring of band structure and making these oxides visible-light-sensitive. Our study has revealed that the surface characteristics, grain morphology, band structure, and doping-induced lattice imperfections control the photo-physical properties and overall photo-catalytic water splitting activity of these metal/MO composites [1-6]. We have demonstrated that, besides promoting certain charge-transfer steps, metal-semiconductor interfaces influence the adsorption of water molecules and their subsequent interaction with photo-generated electron-hole pair at the catalyst surface. The role played by the above-mentioned micro-structural properties in photo-catalytic water splitting process will be discussed.

  19. Enhanced mobility in organic field-effect transistors due to semiconductor/dielectric iInterface control and very thin single crystal.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ji; Yu, Peng; Arabi, Syeda Atika; Wang, Jiawei; He, Jun; Jiang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    A perfect organic crystal while keeping high quality semiconductor/dielectric interface with minimal defects and disorder is crucial for the realization of high performance organic single crystal field-effect transistors (OSCFETs). However, in most reported OSCFET devices, the crystal transfer processes is extensively used. Therefore, the semiconductor/dielectric interface is inevitably damaged. Carrier traps and scattering centers are brought into the conduction channel, so that the intrinsic high mobility of OSCFET devices is entirely disguised. Here, very thin pentacene single crystal is grown directly on bare SiO2 by developing a 'seed-controlled' pentacene single crystal method. The interface quality is controlled by an in situ fabrication of OSCFETs. The interface is kept intact without any transfer process. Furthermore, we quantitatively analyze the influence of crystal thickness on device performance. With a pristine interface and very thin crystal, we have achieved the highest mobility: 5.7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)-more than twice the highest ever reported pentacene OSCFET mobility on bare SiO2. This study may provide a universal route for the use of small organic molecules to achieve high performance in lamellar single crystal field-effect devices. PMID:27211506

  20. Riverine Li isotope fractionation in the Amazon River basin controlled by the weathering regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, Mathieu; Gaillardet, Jerome; Bouchez, Julien; Calmels, Damien; Louvat, Pascale; Dosseto, Anthony; Gorge, Caroline; Alanoca, Lucia; Maurice, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    We report Li isotope composition (δ7Li) of river-borne dissolved and solid material in the largest River system on Earth, the Amazon River basin, to characterize Li isotope fractionation at a continental scale. The δ7Li in the dissolved load (+1.2‰ to +32‰) is fractionated toward heavy values compared to the inferred bedrock (-1‰ to 5‰) and the suspended sediments (-6.8‰ to -0.5‰) as a result of the preferential incorporation of 6Li into secondary minerals during weathering. Despite having very contrasted weathering and erosion regimes, both Andean headwaters and lowland rivers share similar ranges of dissolved δ7Li (+1.2‰ to +18‰). Correlations between dissolved δ7Li and Li/Na and Li/Mg ratios suggest that the proportion of Li incorporated in secondary minerals during weathering act as the main control on the δ7Lidiss across the entire Amazon basin. A "batch" steady-state fractionation model for Andean and lowland rivers satisfactorily reproduces these variations, with a fractionation factor between weathering products and dissolved load (αsec-dis) of 0.983 ± 0.002. Two types of supply-limited weathering regimes can be identified for the lowlands: "clearwaters" with dominant incorporation of Li in secondary minerals, and "black waters" (e.g., Rio Negro) where dissolution of secondary minerals enhanced by organic matter produces low δ7Li. Apart from the black waters, the δ7Li of Andean and lowland rivers is negatively correlated to the denudation rates with the lowest δ7Li corresponding to the rivers having the highest denudation rates. In contrast, the main tributaries draining both the Andes and the lowlands have higher δ7Li compared to other rivers. We propose that part of the dissolved Li derived from weathering in the Andes is re-incorporated in sediments during transfer of water and sediments in floodplains and that this results in an increase of the dissolved δ7Li along the course of these rivers. Unlike other rivers, the

  1. Stable isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction is controlled by reoxidation of intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalo, Muna; Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Stichler, Willibald; Einsiedl, Florian

    2007-09-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction is one of the most important respiration processes in anoxic habitats and is often assessed by analyzing the results of stable isotope fractionation. However, stable isotope fractionation is supposed to be influenced by the reduction rate and other parameters, such as temperature. We studied here the mechanistic basics of observed differences in stable isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction. Batch experiments with four sulfate-reducing strains ( Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfobacca acetoxidans, Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans, and strain TRM1) were performed. These microorganisms metabolize different carbon sources (lactate, acetate, formate, and toluene) and showed broad variations in their sulfur isotope enrichment factors. We performed a series of experiments on isotope exchange of 18O between residual sulfate and ambient water. Batch experiments were conducted with 18O-enriched (δ 18O water = +700‰) and depleted water (δ 18O water = -40‰), respectively, and the stable 18O isotope shift in the residual sulfate was followed. For Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans, which are both characterized by low sulfur isotope fractionation ( ɛS > -13.2‰), δ 18O values in the remaining sulfate increased by only 50‰ during growth when 18O-enriched water was used for the growth medium. In contrast, with Desulfobacca acetoxidans and strain TRM1 ( ɛS < -22.7‰) the residual sulfate showed an increase of the sulfate δ 18O close to the values of the enriched water of +700‰. In the experiments with δ 18O-depleted water, the oxygen isotope values in the residual sulfate stayed fairly constant for strains Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfobacca acetoxidans and Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans. However, strain TRM1, which exhibits the lowest sulfur isotope fractionation factor ( ɛS < -38.7‰) showed slightly decreasing δ 18O values. Our results give strong evidence that

  2. Climatic Controls on the Stable Isotopic Composition of Precipitation in Northeast Asia : applicability to groundwater recharge study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Wenner, D. B.; Grunstein, A. J.; Choi, M.; Woo, N.

    2001-05-01

    Based on the data available from the IAEA/WMO Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP), spatial and temporal variability of oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of precipitation is reviewed for 9 selected sites in the Northeast Asia. These sites include Pohang (Korea), Tokyo and Ryori (Japan) and Shijiazhuang, Baotou, Tianjin, Wulumuqi, Zhangye and Qiqihar (China). The temperature is the main factor controlling the stable isotope composition of precipitation in the northwestern (inner continental) region of the study area, whereas the amount effect for summer rains is overshadowing the temperature effect in the southeastern (coastal) region. The IAEA/WMO data set reveals that many sites in Northeast Asia show a distinct winter-summer cyclic pattern in deuterium excess values that appears to reflect different climatic conditions. To further understand this pattern, stable isotopic data were obtained for individual rainfall events over a two-year period at Cheju Island, Korea. The d18- and dD- values of precipitation at Cheju Island are not dependent upon temperature. However, the deuterium excess values, which range from 3.0 to 40.6 per mil show a distinct seasonal variation with higher d-values in winter (> ~15 per mil) and lower values in summer (~10 permil). Such a seasonal variation appears to be closely related to different air masses affecting the island during different seasons: cold-dry continental polar air mass in winter and hot-humid maritime tropical air mass in summer. Such stable isotopic characteristics in Northeast Asia could potentially provide a means for evaluating the relative contribution of summer and winter precipitation to groundwater recharge.

  3. Stable isotope ratio measurements of royal jelly samples for controlling production procedures: impact of sugar feeding.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Gaëlle; Wytrychowski, Marine; Batteau, Magali; Guibert, Sylvie; Casabianca, Hervé

    2011-07-30

    The carbon and nitrogen stable ratios of royal jelly (RJ) samples from various origins are determined using an elemental analyser linked online to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to evaluate authenticity and adulteration. The (13)C/(12)C and (15)N/(14)N stable isotope ratios are measured in more than 500 RJs (domestic, imported and derived from feeding experiments) in order to obtain isotopic measurements that take into account seasonal, botanical and geographical effects. Authenticity intervals are established for traditional beekeeping practices, without feeding, in the range -22.48 to -27.90‰ for δ(13)C. For these samples, the δ(15)N values range from -1.58 to 7.98‰, depending on the plant sources of pollen and nectar. The δ(13)C values of the commercial samples vary from -18.54 to -26.58‰. High δ(13)C values are typical of sugar cane or corn syrups which have distinctive isotopic (13)C signatures because both plants use the C4 photosynthetic cycle, in contrast to most RJs which are derived from C3 plants. These differences in the (13)C-isotopic composition allow the detection of the addition of such sugars. RJs from traditional sources and from industrial production by sugar feeding are thus successfully distinguished. PMID:21698675

  4. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    PubMed

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying. PMID:17386484

  5. Control of oenological products: discrimination between different botanical sources of L-tartaric acid by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreno Rojas, Jose Manuel; Cosofret, Sorin; Reniero, Fabiano; Guillou, Claude; Serra, Francesca

    2007-01-01

    Following previous studies on counterfeit of wines with synthetic ingredients, the possibility of frauds by natural external L-tartaric acid has also been investigated. The aim of this research was to map the stable isotope ratios of L-tartaric acid coming from botanical species containing large amounts of this compound: grape and tamarind. Samples of L-tartaric acid were extracted from the pulp of tamarind fruits originating from several countries and from grape must. delta(13)C and delta(18)O were measured for all samples. Additional delta(2)H measurements were performed as a complementary analysis to help discrimination of the botanical origin. Different isotopic patterns were observed for the different botanical origins. The multivariate statistical analysis of the data shows clear discrimination among the different botanical and synthetic sources. This approach could be a complementary tool for the control of L-tartaric acid used in oenology. PMID:17610238

  6. Control of ambient pH on growth and stable isotopes in phytoplanktonic calcifying algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, Michaël.

    2015-08-01

    The present work examines the relationship between pH-induced changes in growth and stable isotopic composition of coccolith calcite in two coccolithophore species with a geological perspective. These species (Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Coccolithus pelagicus) with differing physiologies and vital effects possess a growth optimum corresponding to average pH of surface seawater in the geological period during their first known occurrence. The "ancestral" C. pelagicus has much wider pH tolerance in terms of growth rates than the more recently evolved G. oceanica. Diminished growth rates are explained by the challenge of proton translocation into the extracellular environment at low pH and enhanced aqueous CO2 limitation at high pH. Reducing the cell dynamics in this way leads to a lower degree of oxygen isotopic disequilibrium in G. oceanica. In contrast, the slower growing species C. pelagicus, which typically precipitates near-equilibrium calcite, does not show any modulation of oxygen isotope signals with changing pH. Overall, carbon and oxygen isotope compositions are best explained by the degree of utilization of the internal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool and the dynamics of isotopic reequilibration inside the cell. Thus, the "carbonate ion effect" may not apply to coccolithophores. This difference with foraminifera can be traced to different modes of DIC incorporation into these two distinct biomineralizing organisms. From a geological perspective, these findings have implications for refining the use of oxygen isotopes to infer more reliable sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from fossil carbonates and contribute to a better understanding of how climate-relevant parameters are recorded in the sedimentary archive.

  7. Controlled growth of high-density CdS and CdSe nanorod arrays on selective facets of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Junze; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhu, Yihan; Han, Yu; Zhang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The rational synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional nanostructures with specific compositions, morphologies and functionalities is important for applications in a variety of fields ranging from energy conversion and electronics to biotechnology. Here, we report a seeded growth approach for the controlled epitaxial growth of three types of hierarchical one-dimensional (1D)/two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures, where nanorod arrays of II-VI semiconductor CdS or CdSe are grown on the selective facets of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates, either on the two basal facets of the nanoplate, or on one basal facet, or on the two basal facets and six side facets. The seed engineering of 2D hexagonal-shaped nanoplates is the key factor for growth of the three resulting types of 1D/2D nanostructures. The wurtzite- and zinc-blende-type polymorphs of semiconductors are used to determine the facet-selective epitaxial growth of 1D nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of different hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. PMID:27102681

  8. Controlled growth of high-density CdS and CdSe nanorod arrays on selective facets of two-dimensional semiconductor nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Chen, Junze; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhu, Yihan; Han, Yu; Zhang, Hua

    2016-05-01

    The rational synthesis of hierarchical three-dimensional nanostructures with specific compositions, morphologies and functionalities is important for applications in a variety of fields ranging from energy conversion and electronics to biotechnology. Here, we report a seeded growth approach for the controlled epitaxial growth of three types of hierarchical one-dimensional (1D)/two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures, where nanorod arrays of II–VI semiconductor CdS or CdSe are grown on the selective facets of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates, either on the two basal facets of the nanoplate, or on one basal facet, or on the two basal facets and six side facets. The seed engineering of 2D hexagonal-shaped nanoplates is the key factor for growth of the three resulting types of 1D/2D nanostructures. The wurtzite- and zinc-blende-type polymorphs of semiconductors are used to determine the facet-selective epitaxial growth of 1D nanorod arrays, resulting in the formation of different hierarchical three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures.

  9. A top-gate GaN nanowire metal-semiconductor field effect transistor with improved channel electrostatic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gačević, Ž.; López-Romero, D.; Juan Mangas, T.; Calleja, E.

    2016-01-01

    A uniformly n-type doped GaN:Si nanowire (NW), with a diameter of d = 90 nm and a length of 1.2 μm, is processed into a metal-semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET) with a semi-cylindrical top Ti/Au Schottky gate. The FET is in a normally-ON mode, with the threshold at -0.7 V and transconductance of gm ˜ 2 μS (the transconductance normalized with NW diameter gm/d > 22 mS/mm). It enters the saturation mode at VDS ˜ 4.5 V, with the maximum measured drain current IDS = 5.0 μA and the current density exceeding JDS > 78 kA/cm2.

  10. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.