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Sample records for isotropic homogeneous turbulence

  1. Studies of Shock Wave Interactions with Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briassulis, G.; Agui, J.; Watkins, C. B.; Andreopoulos, Y.

    1998-01-01

    A nearly homogeneous nearly isotropic compressible turbulent flow interacting with a normal shock wave has been studied experimentally in a large shock tube facility. Spatial resolution of the order of 8 Kolmogorov viscous length scales was achieved in the measurements of turbulence. A variety of turbulence generating grids provide a wide range of turbulence scales. Integral length scales were found to substantially decrease through the interaction with the shock wave in all investigated cases with flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 and shock Mach numbers from 1.2 to 1.6. The outcome of the interaction depends strongly on the state of compressibility of the incoming turbulence. The length scales in the lateral direction are amplified at small Mach numbers and attenuated at large Mach numbers. Even at large Mach numbers amplification of lateral length scales has been observed in the case of fine grids. In addition to the interaction with the shock the present work has documented substantial compressibility effects in the incoming homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. The decay of Mach number fluctuations was found to follow a power law similar to that describing the decay of incompressible isotropic turbulence. It was found that the decay coefficient and the decay exponent decrease with increasing Mach number while the virtual origin increases with increasing Mach number. A mechanism possibly responsible for these effects appears to be the inherently low growth rate of compressible shear layers emanating from the cylindrical rods of the grid.

  2. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  3. Subfilter scalar-flux vector orientation in homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Verma, Siddhartha; Blanquart, G

    2014-06-01

    The geometric orientation of the subfilter-scale scalar-flux vector is examined in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Vector orientation is determined using the eigenframe of the resolved strain-rate tensor. The Schmidt number is kept sufficiently large so as to leave the velocity field, and hence the strain-rate tensor, unaltered by filtering in the viscous-convective subrange. Strong preferential alignment is observed for the case of Gaussian and box filters, whereas the sharp-spectral filter leads to close to a random orientation. The orientation angle obtained with the Gaussian and box filters is largely independent of the filter width and the Schmidt number. It is shown that the alignment direction observed numerically using these two filters is predicted very well by the tensor-diffusivity model. Moreover, preferred alignment of the scalar gradient vector in the eigenframe is shown to mitigate any probable issues of negative diffusivity in the tensor-diffusivity model. Consequentially, the model might not suffer from solution instability when used for large eddy simulations of scalar transport in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Further a priori tests indicate poor alignment of the Smagorinsky and stretched vortex model predictions with the exact subfilter flux. Finally, strong filter dependence of subfilter scalar-flux orientation suggests that explicit filtering may be preferable to implicit filtering in large eddy simulations. PMID:25019887

  4. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  5. Pressure and higher-order spectra for homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The spectra of the pressure, and other higher-order quantities including the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative are computed using data obtained from direct numerical simulation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence at Taylor-Reynolds numbers R(sub lambda) in the range 38 - 170. For the pressure spectra we find reasonable collapse in the dissipation range (of the velocity spectrum) when scaled in Kolmogorov variables and some evidence, which is not conclusive, for the existence of a k(exp -7/3) inertial range where k = absolute value of K, is the modulus of the wavenumber. The power spectra of the dissipation, the enstrophy, and the square of the longitudinal velocity derivative separate in the dissipation range, but appear to converge together in the short inertial range of the simulations. A least-squares curve-fit in the dissipation range for one value of R(sub lambda) = 96 gives a form for the spectrum of the dissipation as k(exp 0)exp(-Ck eta), for k(eta) greater than 0.2, where eta is the Kolmogorov length and C is approximately equal to 2.5.

  6. The structure of intense vorticity in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.; Wray, A. A.; Saffman, P. G.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of the intense vorticity regions is studied in numerically simulated homogeneous, isotropic, equilibrium turbulent flow fields at four different Reynolds numbers in the range Re(sub lambda) = 36-171. In accordance with previous investigators, this vorticity is found to be organized in coherent, cylindrical or ribbon-like, vortices ('worms'). A statistical study suggests that they are just especially intense features of the background, O(omega'), vorticity. Their radii scale with the Kolmogorov microscale and their lengths with the integral scale of the flow. An interesting observation is that the Reynolds number based on the circulation of the intense vortices, gamma/nu, increases monotonically with Re(sub lambda), raising the question of the stability of the structures in the limit of Re(sub lambda) approaching infinity. One and two-dimensional statistics of vorticity and strain are presented; they are non-gaussian, and the behavior of their tails depends strongly on the Reynolds number. There is no evidence of convergence to a limiting distribution in our range of Re(sub lambda), even though the energy spectra and the energy dissipation rate show good asymptotic properties in the higher Reynolds number cases. Evidence is presented to show that worms are natural features of the flow and that they do not depend on the particular forcing scheme.

  7. Bulk viscosity effect on freely decaying compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shaowu; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Despite growing interests in compressible turbulence, the effect of bulk viscosity has been long ignored. For certain gases, the bulk viscosity may be 1000 times greater than the shear viscosity and thus modify energy transfer and dissipation mechanisms. In this study, we use direct numerical simulations to investigate the role of bulk viscosity on decaying isotropic compressible turbulence. Our results show that bulk viscosity exhibits a negligible decrease on enstrophy, but moderate and significant increases on the turbulent kinetic energy and Taylor-scale Reynolds number, respectively. A Helmholtz decomposition of the velocity field indicates that the bulk viscosity has a negligible effect on the solenoidal part, but exhibits a cross-scale effect on the dilatational component.

  8. Streamlines in stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and fractal-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschung, J.; Peters, N.; Laizet, S.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    We compare streamline statistics in stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulence generated by a fractal square grid. We examine streamline segments characterised by the velocity difference {{Δ }}u and the distance l between extremum points. We find close agreement between the stationary homogeneous isotropic turbulence and the decay region of the fractal-generated turbulence as well as the production region of the fractal flow for small segments. The statistics of larger segments are very similar for the isotropic turbulence and the decay region, but differ for the production region. Specifically, we examine the first, second and third conditional mean < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> . Noticeably, non-vanishing < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> for n=1,3 are due to an asymmetry of positive and negative segments, i.e. those for which {{Δ }}u\\gt 0 and {{Δ }}u\\lt 0, respectively. This asymmetry is not only kinematic, but is also due to dissipative effects and therefore < {[{{Δ }}u]}n| l> contains cascade information.

  9. Statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotoh, T.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The statistics of pressure and pressure gradient in stationary isotropic turbulence are measured within direct numerical simulations at low to moderate Reynolds numbers. It is found that the one-point pdf of the pressure is highly skewed and that the pdf of the pressure gradient is of stretched exponential form. The power spectrum of the pressure P(k) is found to be larger than the corresponding spectrum P(sub G)(k) computed from a Gaussian velocity field having the same energy spectrum as that of the DNS field. The ratio P(k)/P(sub G)(k), a measure of the pressure-field intermittence, grows with wavenumber and Reynolds number as -R(sub lambda)(exp 1/2)log(k/k(sub d)) for k less than k(sub d)/2 where k(sub d) is the Kolmogorov wavenumber. The Lagrangian correlations of pressure gradient and velocity are compared and the Lagrangian time scale of the pressure gradient is observed to be much shorter than that of the velocity.

  10. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  11. Theoretical and computational studies of isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  12. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Isotropic Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jiau

    Numerical simulations are presented for viscous incompressible homogeneous turbulent flows with periodic boundary conditions. Our numerical method is based on the spectral Fourier method. Rogallo's code is modified and extended to trace fluid particles and simulate the evolution of material line elements. The first part of the thesis is about modifying and applying the code to simulate a passive vector field convected and stretched by the so-called ABC flows in the presence of viscosity. The correlation of the geometry of the physical structures of the passive vector with the external straining is investigated. It is observed that most amplifications either occur in the neighborhoods of local unstable manifolds of the stagnation points of the ABC flows, if they exist, especially those with only one positive eigenvalue, or they are confined within the chaotic regions of the ABC flows if there is no stagnation point. The second part of the thesis is an investigation of the power-law energy decay of turbulence. Two decay exponents, 1.24 and 1.54, are measured from simulations. A new similarity form for the double and triple velocity autocorrelation functions using the Taylor microscale as the scaling, consistent with the Karman-Howarth equation and a power-law energy decay, is proposed and compared with numerical results. The proposed similarity form seems applicable at small to intermediate Reynolds number. For flows with very large Reynolds number, an expansion form of energy spectrum is proposed instead. The third part of the thesis is a presentation of the Lagrangian data collected by tracking fluid particles in decaying turbulent flows. The mean growth rates of the magnitudes of material line elements, that of the vorticity due to nonlinear forces, and the mean principal rates of strain tensors are found to be proportional to the square root of the mean enstrophy. The proportional coefficients remain constant during the decay. The mean angles between material

  13. Local energy transfer and nonlocal interactions in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaradzki, J. Andrzej; Rogallo, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed computations were made of energy transfer among the scales of motion in incompressible turbulent fields at low Reynolds numbers, generated by direct numerical simulations. It was observed that, although the transfer resulted from triad interactions that were nonlocal in k space, the energy always transferred locally. The energy transfer calculated from the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) theory of turbulence at low Reynolds numbers is in excellent agreement with the results of the numerical simulations. At high Reynolds numbers, the EDQNM theory predicts the same transfer mechanism in the inertial range that is observed at low Reynolds numbers.

  14. Settling of almost neutrally buoyant particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Settling of particles in a turbulent flow occurs in various industrial and natural phenomena, examples are clouds and waste water treatment. It is well known that turbulence can enhance the settling velocity of particles. Many studies have been done, numerically and experimentally to investigate this behavior for the case of ``heavy'' particles, with particle to fluid density ratios above 100. Here we investigate the case of almost neutrally buoyant particles, i.e. density ratios between 1 and 100. In the case of light particles the Maxey-Riley equations cannot be simplified to only the Stokes drag and gravity force as pressure gradient, added mass and Basset history force are important as well. We investigate the influence of these forces on the settling velocity of particles and show that the extra forces can both increase or decrease the settling velocity, depending on the combination of the Stokes number and gravity applied.

  15. Grid-generated isotropic homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to an empirical formula for the longitudinal correlation function for grid-generated incompressible fluid turbulence at Reynolds numbers above 12,800. The formula, which relates the longitudinal correlation function to the inverse cube of a dimensionless geometrical ratio, is shown to minimize the global correlation integrals into which the two-point velocity correlation tensor has been substituted subject to a global constraint on the Sobolev concomitent of the longitudinal correlation function. Furthermore, the energy spectrum function associated with the empirical formula is shown to satisfy a tertiary Helmholtz-type linear condition throughout the initial period of decay.

  16. Mixing of a passive scalar in isotropic and sheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirani, E.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to calculate the velocity and scalar fields, the three dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion and the diffusion equation were solved numerically. The following cases were treated: isotropic, homogeneous turbulence with decay of a passive scalar; and homogeneous turbulent shear flow with a passive scalar whose mean varies linearly in the spanwise direction. The solutions were obtained at relatively low Reynolds numbers so that all of the turbulent scales could be resolved without modeling. Turbulent statistics such as integral length scales, Taylor microscales, Kolmogorov length scale, one- and two-point correlations of velocity-velocity and velocity-scalar, turbulent Prandtl/Schmidt number, r.m.s. values of velocities, the scalar quantity and pressure, skewness, decay rates, and decay exponents were calculated. The results are compared with the available expermental results, and good agreement is obtained.

  17. New forcing scheme to sustain particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallouppas, G.; George, W. K.; van Wachem, B. G. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper evaluates the effect of forcing to sustain turbulence on the transfer function of the fluid with particles suspended in a homogeneous and isotropic flow. As mentioned by Lucci et al. ["Modulation of isotropic turbulence by particles of Taylor length-scale size," J. Fluid Mech. 650, 5-55 (2010), 10.1017/S0022112009994022], there are three limitations of forcing particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence: (a) large fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the kinetic energy are created when forcing is active at low wavenumbers, (b) the redistribution of energy is affected when forcing is performed over all wavenumbers, and (c) the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid due to the triadic interactions is affected when forcing is active over a wavenumber range. These limitations make the interpretation of the effects of particles on the energy spectrum of the fluid difficult. A new forcing scheme in physical space has been designed which avoids these limitations in wavenumber space, so the spectral effects of particles can be evaluated. The performance of this forcing scheme is tested using Direct Numerical Simulations. It is shown that the nonlinear transfer function of the fluid with the current forcing scheme is only affected at the wavenumbers it is acting, consistent with the theory. Even so, the spatial coherence and phase spectra between the two-way coupling and the fluid computed from the simulations show that the new forcing scheme is only moderately correlated even for the forced wavenumbers, with correlation coefficient typically about 10%.

  18. Suppression of self-organized structure coarsening in homogenous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei

    2014-11-01

    Self-organized structure by spinodal decomposition is often seen in quenched binary mixture. Complex network structure is formed through coarsening process of self-organized structure when the phase separation due to spinodal decomposition proceeds. The phase separation governed by the Cahn-Hilliard equation have been well investigated for stationary fluid in previous studies, however, the turbulent effect on the formation of structures was not fully discussed. In this study, we carried out a numerical simulation for homogenous isotropic turbulence with phase separation, the relation between turbulent vortex formation and self-organized structure coarsening. The governing equations are incompressible Navier-Stokes equation considering phase separation force and Cahn-Hilliard equation with the chemical potential based on the Landau-Ginzburg free energy. From the identification and visualization of turbulent structures, it was found that the local entrainment of small eddy structure suppressed the coarsening process of self-organized structure. The energy used in phase separation was related to the initial process of vortex sheet-tube transition in turbulent flow, and the energy cascade from large turbulent structure to small eddy was different from that without phase separation.

  19. On the decay of homogeneous nearly isotropic turbulence behind active fractal grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thormann, Adrien; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    The study of decaying isotropic turbulent flow is an important point of reference for turbulence theories and numerical simulations. For the past several decades, most experimental results appear to favor power-law decay with exponents between -1.2 and -1.4, approximately. More recently, fractal-generated turbulence (Hurst & Vassilicos, PoF 2007, and subsequent papers) using multi-scale passive grids suggest possible faster decay, and non-trivial behavior especially near the grid, where the mean velocity is spatially evolving. In order to generate spatially homogeneous flow using multi-scale injection of kinetic energy at high Reynolds numbers, we use a new type of active-grid consisting of winglets with various fractal shapes. We test space-filling fractal shaped winglets as well as Sierpisky-carpet and Apollonian packing type fractal shapes. Data are acquired using X-wire thermal anemometry. Tests of homogeneity of mean flow and turbulence intensity will be presented as well as decay of kinetic energy and spectral characteristics of the flow. This research is supported by NSF-CBET-1033942. The assistance of Ms. Imbi Salasoo and Mr. Nathan Greene in designing and building the fractal winglets is much appreciated. The authors also thank Mr. Vince Rolin for his assistance with the active grid.

  20. Creating Only Isotropic Homogeneous Turbulence in Liquid Helium near Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihas, G. G.; Thompson, K. J.; Labbe, G.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2012-02-01

    Flow through a grid is a standard method to produce isotropic, homogeneous turbulence for laboratory study. This technique has been used to generate quantum turbulence (QT) above 1 K in superfluid heliumootnotetextS. R. Stalp, L. Skrbek, and R. J. Donnelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4831 (1999). where QT seems to mimic classical turbulence. Efforts have been made recentlyootnotetextG. G. Ihas, G. Labbe, S-c. Liu, and K. J. Thompson, J. Low Temp. Phys. 150, 384 (2008). to make similar measurements near absolute zero, where there is an almost total absence of normal fluid and hence classical viscosity. This presents the difficulty that most motive force devices produce heat which overwhelms the phenomena being investigated. The process of designing and implimenting a ``dissipation-free'' motor for pulling a grid through superfluid helium at millikelvin temperatures has resulted in the development of new techniques which have broad application in low temperature research. Some of these, such as Meissner-affect magnetic drives, capacitive and inductive position sensors, and magnetic centering devices will be described. Heating results for devices which can move in a controlled fashion from very low speed up to 10 cm/s will be presented. Acknowledgement: We thank W.F. Vinen for many useful discussions.

  1. Experimental Exploration of Electrostatic Charge on Particle Pair Relative Velocity in Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Adam; Dou, Zhongwang; Tripathi, Anjan; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Study of droplet collision and cloud formation should consider the effects of both turbulence and electrostatic charge on particle dynamics. We present the first experimental observation of radial relative velocity (RV) of charged particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT). Charges on particles were generated through triboelectric effect between the inner wall of the chamber and the particles. To measure charge distribution, a particle-laden head-on impinging flow mimicking our HIT chamber conditions was built and holographic particle tracking was applied to quantify particle charges by measuring their displacements in an electric field. Particles were observed to have opposite charges. Next, in our HIT chamber, we measured particle RV by a novel 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry technique with and without charges on particles, wherein charges were neutralized by coating the interior of the HIT chamber with conductive carbon paint. We compared RV under the same turbulence conditions between charged particles and neutral particles and observed that when particles were oppositely charged, their mean inward RV increased at small separation distances. This result is consistent with recent theory and simulations (Lu and Shaw, Physics of Fluids, 2015). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through a Collaborative Research Grant CBET-0967407.

  2. Coherent vortex extraction in homogeneous isotropic turbulence using wavelets: orthogonal versus biorthogonal decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Roussel, Olivier; Schneider, Kai

    2004-11-01

    We compare the extraction of coherent vortices in 3D homogeneous isotropic turbulence computed by DNS using either orthogonal or biorthogonal wavelets. The method is based on a wavelet decomposition of the vorticity field and a subsequent thresholding of the wavelet coefficients (PRL, 87(5), 2001, Phys. Fluids 15(10), 2003). The coherent vorticity is reconstructed from few strong wavelet coefficients while the incoherent vorticity is reconstructed from the remaining weak coefficients. In the orthogonal case the choice of the threshold is motivated from statistical denoising theory and has no adjustable parameters. Using 3% of the coefficients we show that both decompositions extract the coherent vortices out of the turbulent flow. They contain 99.6% of the energy and retain 74% and 68% of the enstrophy in the orthogonal and biorthogonal case, respectively. Concerning the incoherent background flow, it is structureless and decorrelated for the orthogonal decomposition, with a Gaussian velocity PDF. In contrast, the biorthogonal decomposition yields a background flow which exhibits quasi-2D sheet-like structures with an exponetial velocity PDF instead. In conclusion, modeling the incoherent background flow might be more difficult using biorthogonal wavelets for the CVS (Coherent Vortex Simulation, cf. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 66(4), 2001).

  3. Parametric Study of Decay of Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence Using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Rubinstein, Robert; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zang, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed with both low-order and high-order spatial discretization schemes. The turbulent Mach and Reynolds numbers for the simulations are 0.2 and 250, respectively. For the low-order schemes we use either second-order central or third-order upwind biased differencing. For higher order approximations we apply weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes, both with linear and nonlinear weights. There are two objectives in this preliminary effort to investigate possible schemes for large eddy simulation (LES). One is to explore the capability of a widely used low-order computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to perform LES computations. The other is to determine the effect of higher order accuracy (fifth, seventh, and ninth order) achieved with high-order upwind biased WENO-based schemes. Turbulence statistics, such as kinetic energy, dissipation, and skewness, along with the energy spectra from simulations of the decaying turbulence problem are used to assess and compare the various numerical schemes. In addition, results from the best performing schemes are compared with those from a spectral scheme. The effects of grid density, ranging from 32 cubed to 192 cubed, on the computations are also examined. The fifth-order WENO-based scheme is found to be too dissipative, especially on the coarser grids. However, with the seventh-order and ninth-order WENO-based schemes we observe a significant improvement in accuracy relative to the lower order LES schemes, as revealed by the computed peak in the energy dissipation and by the energy spectrum.

  4. Inertial Particle Relative Velocity in a High-Reynolds-Number Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary; Liang, Zach; Cao, Lujie; Ireland, Peter; Collins, Lance; Meng, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Particle-pair radial relative velocity (RV) in turbulence plays a critical role in droplet collision and cloud formation. Both simulations and experiments are performed to better understand RV of inertial particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT). However, past experimental measurement of particle RV statistics exhibited large deviations from DNS results (de Jong et al., 2010). In the current study, we identified intrinsic limitations in our previous study and devised a 4-frame particle tracking velocimetry technique to measure particle RV. In a second-generation, enclosed, fan-driven HIT chamber, both tracer and inertial particles were studied at R_ λ of 366. The experimentally measured RV statistics were compared with DNS with excellent agreement. Additionally, for both kinds of particles, the mean inward RV vs. particle separation distance r also matched very well with DNS, but at near-zero r, experimental values were slightly higher. To investigate the cause of this discrepancy, we compared DNS of both mono- and tri-dispersed particles. We found that the tri-dispersed particles exhibited higher mean inward RV at small r than any mono-dispersed particles. This suggests that the increase of mean inward RV in the experiment could be due to the Stokes number (St) distribution present in the particles, while DNS employed single St values. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation through a Collaborative Research Grant CBET-0967407.

  5. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  6. Collision statistics of inertial particles in two-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with an inverse cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Ryo; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the collision statistics of inertial particles in inverse-cascading 2D homogeneous isotropic turbulence by means of a direct numerical simulation (DNS). A collision kernel model for particles with small Stokes number (St) in 2D flows is proposed based on the model of Saffman & Turner (1956) (ST56 model). The DNS results agree with this 2D version of the ST56 model for St < 0.1. It is then confirmed that our DNS results satisfy the 2D version of the spherical formulation of the collision kernel. The fact that the flatness factor stays around 3 in our 2D flow confirms that the present 2D turbulent flow is nearly intermittency-free. Collision statistics for St = 0.1, 0.4 and 0.6, i.e. for St <1, are obtained from the present 2D DNS and compared with those obtained from the three-dimensional (3D) DNS of Onishi et al. (2013). We have observed that the 3D radial distribution function at contact (g(R), the so-called clustering effect) decreases for St = 0.4 and 0.6 with increasing Reynolds number, while the 2D g(R) does not show a significant dependence on Reynolds number. This observation supports the view that the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R) observed in three dimensions is due to internal intermittency of the 3D turbulence. We have further investigated the local St, which is a function of the local flow strain rates, and proposed a plausible mechanism that can explain the Reynolds-number dependence of g(R).

  7. The length distribution of streamline segments in homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, P.; Gampert, M.; Peters, N.

    2012-04-01

    by Schaefer et al. ["Fast and slow changes of the length of gradient trajectories in homogenous shear turbulence," in Advances in Turbulence XII, edited by B. Eckhardt (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2009), pp. 565-572] we will refer to the morphological part of the evolution of streamline segments as slow changes while the topological part of the evolution is referred to as fast changes. This separation yields a transport equation for the probability density function (pdf) P(l) of the arclength l of streamline segments in which the slow changes translate into a convection and a diffusion term when terms up to second order are included and the fast changes yield integral terms. The overall temporal evolution (morphological and topological) of the arclength l of streamline segments is analyzed and associated with the motion of the above isosurface. This motion is diffusion controlled for small segments, while large segments are mainly subject to strain and pressure fluctuations. The convection velocity corresponds to the first order jump moment, while the diffusion term includes the second order jump moment. It is concluded, both theoretically and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence at two different Reynolds numbers, that the normalized first order jump moment is quasi-universal, while the second order one is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the Taylor based Reynolds number Re_{λ }^{-1/2}. Its inclusion thus represents a small correction in the limit of large Reynolds numbers. Numerical solutions of the pdf equation yield a good agreement with the pdf obtained from the DNS data. The interplay of viscous drift acting on small segments and linear strain acting on large segments yield, as it has already been concluded for dissipation elements, that the mean length of streamline segments should scale with Taylor microscale.

  8. Laboratory Study of Homogeneous and Isotropic Turbulence at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecenak, Zachary; Dou, Zhongwang; Yang, Fan; Cao, Lujie; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2013-11-01

    To study particle dynamics modified by isotropic turbulence at high Reynolds numbers and provide experimental data for DNS validation, we have developed a soccer-ball-shaped truncated icosahedron turbulence chamber with 20 adjoining hexagon surfaces, 12 pentagon surfaces and twenty symettrically displaced fans, which form an enclosed chamber of 1m diameter. We use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique to characterize the base turbulent flow, using different PIV set ups to capture various characteristic scales of turbulence. Results show that the stationary isotropic turbulence field is a spherical domain with diameter of 40 mm with quasi-zero mean velocities. The maximum rms velocity is ~1.5 m/s, corresponding to a Taylor microscale Re of 450. We extract from the PIV velocity field the whole set of turbulent flow parameters including: turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent intensity, kinetic energy dissipation rate, large eddy length and time scales, the Kolmogorov length, time and velocity scales, Taylor microscale and Re, which are critical to the study of inter-particle statistics modified by turbulence. This research is funded by an NSF grant CBET-0967407.

  9. The rotation and translation of non-spherical particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byron, Margaret

    The motion of particles suspended in environmental turbulence is relevant to many scientific fields, from sediment transport to biological interactions to underwater robotics. At very small scales and simple shapes, we are able to completely mathematically describe the motion of inertial particles; however, the motion of large aspherical particles is significantly more complex, and current computational models are inadequate for large or highly-resolved domains. Therefore, we seek to experimentally investigate the coupling between freely suspended particles and ambient turbulence. A better understanding of this coupling will inform not only engineering and physics, but the interactions between small aquatic organisms and their environments. In the following pages, we explore the roles of shape and buoyancy on the motion of passive particles in turbulence, and allow these particles to serve as models for meso-scale aquatic organisms. We fabricate cylindrical and spheroidal particles and suspend them in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence that is generated via randomly-actuated jet arrays. The particles are fabricated with agarose hydrogel, which is refractive-index-matched to the surrounding fluid (water). Both the fluid and the particle are seeded with passive tracers, allowing us to perform Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) simultaneously on the particle and fluid phase. To investigate the effects of shape, particles are fabricated at varying aspect ratios; to investigate the effects of buoyancy, particles are fabricated at varying specific gravities. Each particle type is freely suspended at a volume fraction of F=0.1%, for which four-way coupling interactions are negligible. The suspended particles are imaged together with the surrounding fluid and analyzed using stereoscopic PIV, which yields three velocity components in a two-dimensional measurement plane. Using image thresholding, the results are separated into simultaneous fluid-phase and solid-phase velocity

  10. A priori study of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in isotropic homogeneous turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    We perform a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a passive scalar that is forced by mean gradient. The DNS data are used to study the properties of subgrid-scale flux of a passive scalar in the framework of large eddy simulation (LES), such as alignment trends between the flux, resolved, and subgrid-scale flow structures. It is shown that the direction of the flux is strongly coupled with the subgrid-scale stress axes rather than the resolved flow quantities such as strain, vorticity, or scalar gradient. We derive an approximate transport equation for the subgrid-scale flux of a scalar and look at the relative importance of the terms in the transport equation. A particular form of LES tensor-viscosity model for the scalar flux is investigated, which includes the subgrid-scale stress. Effect of different models for the subgrid-scale stress on the model for the subgrid-scale flux is studied.

  11. Structure transitions induced by the Hall term in homogeneous and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2014-07-01

    Hall effects on local structures in homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are studied numerically. The transition of vortices from sheet-like to tubular structures induced by the Hall term is found, while the kinetic energy spectrum does not distinguish the two types of structures. It is shown by the use of the sharp low-pass filter that the transition occurs not only in the scales smaller than the ion skin depth but also in a larger scale. The transition is related with the forward energy transfer in the spectral space. Analyses by the use of the sharp low-pass filter show that the nonlinear energy transfer associated with the Hall term is dominated by the forward transfer and relatively local in the wave number space. A projection of the simulation data to a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model shows that the high wave number component of the Hall term may possibly be replaced by the model effectively.

  12. Structure transitions induced by the Hall term in homogeneous and isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2014-07-15

    Hall effects on local structures in homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are studied numerically. The transition of vortices from sheet-like to tubular structures induced by the Hall term is found, while the kinetic energy spectrum does not distinguish the two types of structures. It is shown by the use of the sharp low-pass filter that the transition occurs not only in the scales smaller than the ion skin depth but also in a larger scale. The transition is related with the forward energy transfer in the spectral space. Analyses by the use of the sharp low-pass filter show that the nonlinear energy transfer associated with the Hall term is dominated by the forward transfer and relatively local in the wave number space. A projection of the simulation data to a Smagorinsky-type sub-grid-scale model shows that the high wave number component of the Hall term may possibly be replaced by the model effectively.

  13. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; de Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles confined within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogenous isotropic turbulent velocity field. Particles can freely move horizontally as fluid tracers but are vertically confined around a given horizontal plane via a simple linear restoring force. The present model may be considered as the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy or other mechanisms, are capable to maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer somewhere below the free surface of oceans or lakes. In the model varying the strength of the restoring force can control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. Whenever some confinement is present, particle trajectories deviate from fluid tracers and experience an effectively compressible velocity field. We report a quantification of this effective compressibility as well as a quantification of preferential concentration of tracer particles in terms of the correlation dimension. We found that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale, that maximizes the clustering of the particles. This work is part of the research programmes 11PR2841 and FP112 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The work was partially funded by ERC Grant No 339032.

  14. PIV measurement of high-Reynolds-number homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in an enclosed flow apparatus with fan agitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhongwang; Pecenak, Zachary K.; Cao, Lujie; Woodward, Scott H.; Liang, Zach; Meng, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Enclosed flow apparatuses with negligible mean flow are emerging as alternatives to wind tunnels for laboratory studies of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (HIT) with or without aerosol particles, especially in experimental validation of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). It is desired that these flow apparatuses generate HIT at high Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers ({{R}λ} ) and enable accurate measurement of turbulence parameters including kinetic energy dissipation rate and thereby {{R}λ} . We have designed an enclosed, fan-driven, highly symmetric truncated-icosahedron ‘soccer ball’ airflow apparatus that enables particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) and other whole-field flow measurement techniques. To minimize gravity effect on inertial particles and improve isotropy, we chose fans instead of synthetic jets as flow actuators. We developed explicit relations between {{R}λ} and physical as well as operational parameters of enclosed HIT chambers. To experimentally characterize turbulence in this near-zero-mean flow chamber, we devised a new two-scale PIV approach utilizing two independent PIV systems to obtain both high resolution and large field of view. Velocity measurement results show that turbulence in the apparatus achieved high homogeneity and isotropy in a large central region (48 mm diameter) of the chamber. From PIV-measured velocity fields, we obtained turbulence dissipation rates and thereby {{R}λ} by using the second-order velocity structure function. A maximum {{R}λ} of 384 was achieved. Furthermore, experiments confirmed that the root mean square (RMS) velocity increases linearly with fan speed, and {{R}λ} increases with the square root of fan speed. Characterizing turbulence in such apparatus paves the way for further investigation of particle dynamics in particle-laden homogeneous and isotropic turbulence.

  15. Experimental Study of Homogeneous Isotropic Slowly-Decaying Turbulence in Giant Grid-Wind Tunnel Set Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Bourgoin, Mickael; Eswirp Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present preliminary results from a recent grid turbulence experiment conducted at the ONERA wind tunnel in Modane, France. The ESWIRP Collaboration was conceived to probe the smallest scales of a canonical turbulent flow with very high Reynolds numbers. To achieve this, the largest scales of the turbulence need to be extremely big so that, even with the large separation of scales, the smallest scales would be well above the spatial and temporal resolution of the instruments. The ONERA wind tunnel in Modane (8 m -diameter test section) was chosen as a limit of the biggest large scales achievable in a laboratory setting. A giant inflatable grid (M = 0.8 m) was conceived to induce slowly-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence in a large region of the test section, with minimal structural risk. An international team or researchers collected hot wire anemometry, ultrasound anemometry, resonant cantilever anemometry, fast pitot tube anemometry, cold wire thermometry and high-speed particle tracking data of this canonical turbulent flow. While analysis of this large database, which will become publicly available over the next 2 years, has only started, the Taylor-scale Reynolds number is estimated to be between 400 and 800, with Kolmogorov scales as large as a few mm . The ESWIRP Collaboration is formed by an international team of scientists to investigate experimentally the smallest scales of turbulence. It was funded by the European Union to take advantage of the largest wind tunnel in Europe for fundamental research.

  16. A unified sweep-stick mechanism to explain particle clustering in two- and three-dimensional homogeneous, isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, S. W.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2009-11-01

    Our work focuses on the sweep-stick mechanism of particle clustering in turbulent flows introduced by Chen et al. [L. Chen, S. Goto, and J. C. Vassilicos, "Turbulent clustering of stagnation points and inertial particles," J. Fluid Mech. 553, 143 (2006)] for two-dimensional (2D) inverse cascading homogeneous, isotropic turbulence (HIT), whereby heavy particles cluster in a way that mimics the clustering of zero-acceleration points. We extend this phenomenology to three-dimensional (3D) HIT, where it was previously reported that zero-acceleration points were extremely rare. Having obtained a unified mechanism we quantify the Stokes number dependency of the probability of the heavy particles to be at zero-acceleration points and show that in the inertial range of Stokes numbers, the sweep-stick mechanism is dominant over the conventionally proposed mechanism of heavy particles being centrifuged from high vorticity regions to high strain regions. Finally, having a clustering coincidence between particles and zero-acceleration points, both in 2D and 3D HIT, motivates us to demonstrate the sweep and stick parts of the mechanism in both dimensions. The sweeping of regions of low acceleration regions by the local fluid velocity in both flows is demonstrated by introducing a velocity of the acceleration field. Finally, the stick part is demonstrated by showing that heavy particles statistically move with the same velocity as zero-acceleration points, while moving away from any nonzero-acceleration region, irrespective of their Stokes number. These results explain the clustering of inertial particles given the clustering of zero-acceleration points.

  17. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  18. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  19. Scale-wise coherent vorticity extraction for conditional statistical modeling of homogeneous isotropic two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen van yen, Romain; Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai

    2012-02-01

    Classical statistical theories of turbulence have shown their limitations, in that they cannot predict much more than the energy spectrum in an idealized setting of statistical homogeneity and stationarity. We explore the applicability of a conditional statistical modeling approach: can we sort out what part of the information should be kept, and what part should be modeled statistically, or, in other words, “dissipated”? Our mathematical framework is the initial value problem for the two-dimensional (2D) Euler equations, which we approximate numerically by solving the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in the vanishing viscosity limit. In order to obtain a good approximation of the inviscid dynamics, we use a spectral method and a resolution going up to 8192 2. We introduce a macroscopic concept of dissipation, relying on a split of the flow between coherent and incoherent contributions: the coherent flow is constructed from the large wavelet coefficients of the vorticity field, and the incoherent flow from the small ones. In previous work, a unique threshold was applied to all wavelet coefficients, while here we also consider the effect of a scale by scale thresholding algorithm, called scale-wise coherent vorticity extraction. We study the statistical properties of the coherent and incoherent vorticity fields, and the transfers of enstrophy between them, and then use these results to propose, within a maximum entropy framework, a simple model for the incoherent vorticity. In the framework of this model, we show that the flow velocity can be predicted accurately in the L2 norm for about 10 eddy turnover times.

  20. Spherical cloaking with homogeneous isotropic multilayered structures.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hu, Li; Xu, Xiaofei; Feng, Yijun

    2009-04-01

    We propose a practical realization of electromagnetic spherical cloaking by layered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials. By mimicking the classic anisotropic cloak by many alternating thin layers of isotropic dielectrics, the permittivity and permeability in each isotropic layer can be properly determined by effective medium theory in order to achieve invisibility. The model greatly facilitates modeling by Mie theory and realization by multilayer coating of dielectrics. Eigenmode analysis is also presented to provide insights of the discretization in multilayers. PMID:19518392

  1. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  2. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  3. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  4. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  5. Local structures of homogeneous Hall MHD turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Araki, K.

    2011-12-01

    Local structures of decaying homogeneous and isotropic Hall MHD turbulence are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. Regions of strong vorticity and strong current density in Hall MHD turbulence are compared to those of single-fluid MHD turbulence. An analysis by the use of a low-pass filter reveals that the introduction of the Hall term can modify not only small-scale structures of the current density but also structures of the vorticity field, especially at the scales smaller than the ion skin depth.

  6. Turbulence in homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain

    1996-11-01

    Homogeneous shear flows with an imposed mean velocity U=Syx̂ are studied in a period box of size Lx×Ly×Lz, in the statistically stationary turbulent state. In contrast with unbounded shear flows, the finite size of the system constrains the large-scale dynamics. The Reynolds number, defined by Re≡SL2y/ν varies in the range 2600⩽Re⩽11300. The total kinetic energy and enstrophy in the volume of numerical integration have large peaks, resulting in fluctuations of kinetic energy of order 30%-50%. The mechanism leading to these fluctuations is very reminiscent of the ``streaks'' responsible for the violent bursts observed in turbulent boundary layers. The large scale anisotropy of the flow, characterized by the two-point correlation tensor depends on the aspect ratio of the system. The probability distribution functions (PDF) of the components of the velocity are found to be close to Gaussian. The physics of the Reynolds stress tensor, uv, is very similar to what is found experimentally in wall bounded shear flows. The study of the two-point correlation tensor of the vorticity <ωiωj> suggests that the small scales become isotropic when the Reynolds number increases, as observed in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers. However, the skewness of the z component of vorticity is independent of the Reynolds number in this range, suggesting that some small scale anisotropy remains even at very high Reynolds numbers. An analogy is drawn with the problem of turbulent mixing, where a similar anisotropy is observed.

  7. DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Nathan; Taylor, Ellen; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We discuss DNS of Shock / Isotropic Turbulence Interactions (SITI). We vary the incoming turbulence Mach number up to 0.8 and the convective Mach number up to 5 in order to determine their effects on the interaction. These cases are challenging due to the presence of shocklets in the incoming turbulence as well as significant motion of the main shock. Shock-capturing must be used at all points while still maintaining low enough numerical dissipation to preserve the turbulent fluctuations. We use the linearly- and nonlinearly-optimized Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) method[1,2]. Particular attention is paid to the inflow boundary condition, where we find the use of snapshots of "frozen" turbulence from decaying isotropic box simulations to be unsatisfactory. We instead use time-varying inflow data generated by a separate forced isotropic turbulence simulation with a specified convection speed. This allows us to access flow conditions where the assumptions of Taylor's Hypothesis are not met. 1.) Mart'in, M.P., Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Weirs, V.G., JCP 220(1) 270-89, 2006. 2.) Taylor, E.M., Wu, M., and Mart'in, M.P., JCP 223(1) 384-97, 2007.

  8. Simulation and Modeling of Homogeneous, Compressed Turbulence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chung-Teh

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression has been simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were carried out on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second -order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one -dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. It was found that the ratio of the turbulence time scale to the mean-flow time scale is an important parameter in these flows. When this ratio is large, the flow is immediately affected by the mean strain in a manner similar to that predicted by rapid distortion theory. When this ratio is small, the flow retains the character of decaying isotropic turbulence initially; only after the strain has been applied for a long period does the flow accumulate a significant reflection of the effect of mean strain. In these flows, the Kolmogorov length scale decreases rapidly with increasing total strain, due to the density increase that accompanies compression. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point-closure, two-equation turbulence models. The two-equation models perform well only when the compression rate is small compared to the eddy turn-over rate. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  9. Charge pariticle transport in the non-isotropic turbulences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, P.; Jokipii, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The scattering and diffusion of energetic charged particles is not only important for understanding phenomena such as diffusive shock acceleration but it also is a natural probe of the statistical characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Although Parker's transport equation (Parker 1965) allows us to describe the propagation of charged particles, the transport coefficients needed in the equation must be determined. Using Quasi-Linear Theory (QLT, e.g. Jokipii (1966)), one finds that coefficients can be related to the correlation function or power spectrum of homogeneous magnetic turbulence. However, different turbulence models will generally have a different influence on particle's scattering and diffusion. Among those models developed in MHD Turbulence, such as isotropic, Slab plus 2D (Tu & Marsch 1993; Gray et al 1996; Bieber et al 1996), etc. Here, using test-particle orbit simulations to calculate the transport coefficients, we study particle transport in synthesized asymmetric turbulence using the form first proposed by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995). We developed and introduce a systematic method to synthesize scale-dependent non-isotropic magnetic turbulences. We also developed and introduce a method to synthesize the 3d turbulent magnetic field from the observed solar wind time series dataset. We present the comparison of their effects on charge particle transport with previous theories and models.

  10. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-05-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  11. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  12. Turbulent energy flux generated by shock/homogeneous-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Krishnendu; Quadros, Russell; Larsson, Johan

    2015-11-01

    High-speed turbulent flows with shock waves are characterized by high localized surface heat transfer rates. Computational predictions are often inaccurate due to the limitations in modeling of the unclosed turbulent energy flux in the highly non-equilibrium regions of shock interaction. In this paper, we investigate the turbulent energy flux generated when homogeneous isotropic turbulence passes through a nominally normal shock wave. We use linear interaction analysis where the incoming turbulence is idealized as being composed of a collection of two-dimensional planar vorticity waves, and the shock wave is taken to be a discontinuity. The nature of the post-shock turbulent energy flux is predicted to be strongly dependent on the incidence angle of the incoming waves. The energy flux correlation is also decomposed into its vortical, entropy and acoustic contributions to understand its rapid non-monotonic variation behind the shock. Three-dimensional statistics, calculated by integrating two-dimensional results over a prescribed upstream energy spectrum, are compared with available direct numerical simulation data. A detailed budget of the governing equation is also considered in order to gain insight into the underlying physics.

  13. Adaptive waveguide bends with homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Tiancheng; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Tang, Xiaohong

    2011-01-15

    We propose a method for adaptive waveguide bends using homogeneous, nonmagnetic, and isotropic materials, which simplifies the parameters of the bends to the utmost extent. The proposed bend has an adaptive and compact shape because of all the flat boundaries. The nonmagnetic property is realized by selecting OB'/OC = 0.5. Only two nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics are needed throughout, and the transmission is not sensitive to nonmagnetic isotropic dielectrics. Results validate and illustrate these functionalities, which make the bend much easier to fabricate and apply, owing to its simple parameters, compact shape, and versatility in connecting different waveguides. PMID:21263493

  14. Mixing and chemical reaction in sheared and nonsheared homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Andy D.; Hill, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations were made to examine the local structure of the reaction zone for a moderately fast reaction between unmixed species in decaying, homogeneous turbulence and in a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. Pseudospectral techniques were used in domains of 64 exp 3 and higher wavenumbers. A finite-rate, single step reaction between non-premixed reactants was considered, and in one case temperature-dependent Arrhenius kinetics was assumed. Locally intense reaction rates that tend to persist throughout the simulations occur in locations where the reactant concentration gradients are large and are amplified by the local rate of strain. The reaction zones are more organized in the case of a uniform mean shear than in isotropic turbulence, and regions of intense reaction rate appear to be associated with vortex structures such as horseshoe vortices and fingers seen in mixing layers. Concentration gradients tend to align with the direction of the most compressive principal strain rate, more so in the isotropic case.

  15. The signature of initial production mechanisms in isotropic turbulence decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In the present work the quantification of the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms in homogeneous isotropic turbulence decay is addressed. The analysis is developed through the use of theoretical tools as well as numerical calculations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian (EDQNM) model. In both cases a modified Lin equation is used, which accounts for production mechanisms as proposed by Meldi, Lejemble, and Sagaut ["On the emergence of non-classical decay regimes in multiscale/fractal generated isotropic turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 756, 816-843 (2014)]. The approaches used show that an exponential decay law can be observed if the intensity of the forcing is strong enough to drive the turbulence dynamics, before a power-law decay is eventually attained. The EDQNM numerical results indicate that the exponential regime can persist for long evolution times, longer than the observation time in grid turbulence experiments. A rigorous investigation of the self-similar behavior of the pressure spectrum has been performed by a comprehensive comparison of EDQNM data with direct numerical simulation (DNS)/experiments in the literature. While DNS and free decay EDQNM simulations suggest the need of a very high Reλ threshold in order to observe a clear -7/3 slope of the pressure inertial range, experimental data and forced EDQNM calculations indicate a significantly lower value. This observation suggests that the time-lasting effects of production mechanisms, which cannot be excluded in experiments, play a role in the lack of general agreement with classical numerical approaches. These results reinforce the urge to evolve the numerical simulation state of the art towards the prediction of realistic physical states.

  16. Turbulence generation in homogeneous dilute particle- laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jeng-Horng

    Homogeneous turbulence generated by the motion of particles in dispersed multiphase flows was studied both theoretically and experimentally, motivated by applications to sprays, particle-laden jets, bubble plumes and rainstorms, among others. The experiments involved uniform fluxes of monodisperse spherical particles falling through a slow upflow of air. Particle fluxes and phase velocities were measured by sampling and phase-discriminating laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), respectively. Measured particle velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities and probability density functions (PDF's). Measured continuous-phase velocities included mean and fluctuating streamwise and cross-stream velocities, PDF's and the higher moments of velocity fluctuations such as skewness and kurtosis, energy spectra of velocity fluctuations and integral length scales based on streamwise velocity fluctuations. Continuous-phase velocity measurements included conditional averages for particle wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region surrounding these disturbances as well as overall flow properties. Present and earlier results in the literature provided particle Reynolds numbers of 38-990, particle volume fractions less than 0.01% and turbulence intensities (normalized by mean particle relative velocities) of 0.1-10.0%. Theory included characterization of particle wake disturbances as laminar-like turbulent wakes observed for intermediate particle Reynolds numbers in turbulent environments, characterization of the turbulent inter-wake region by analogy to grid-generated isotropic turbulence, and estimation of overall flow properties by conditional averaging of the properties of the wake disturbances and the turbulent inter-wake region. Present measurements showed that particle wake disturbances during turbulence generation were properly characterized by the properties of laminar-like turbulent wakes. The turbulent inter-wake region was

  17. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  18. Fully developed isotropic turbulence: Symmetries and exact identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Léonie; Delamotte, Bertrand; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2015-05-01

    We consider the regime of fully developed isotropic and homogeneous turbulence of the Navier-Stokes equation with a stochastic forcing. We present two gauge symmetries of the corresponding Navier-Stokes field theory and derive the associated general Ward identities. Furthermore, by introducing a local source bilinear in the velocity field, we show that these symmetries entail an infinite set of exact and local relations between correlation functions. They include in particular the Kármán-Howarth relation and another exact relation for a pressure-velocity correlation function recently derived in G. Falkovich, I. Fouxon, and Y. Oz [J. Fluid Mech. 644, 465 (2010)], 10.1017/S0022112009993429 that we further generalize.

  19. Stress waves in transversely isotropic media: The homogeneous problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marques, E. R. C.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneous problem of stress wave propagation in unbounded transversely isotropic media is analyzed. By adopting plane wave solutions, the conditions for the existence of the solution are established in terms of phase velocities and directions of particle displacements. Dispersion relations and group velocities are derived from the phase velocity expressions. The deviation angles (e.g., angles between the normals to the adopted plane waves and the actual directions of their propagation) are numerically determined for a specific fiber-glass epoxy composite. A graphical method is introduced for the construction of the wave surfaces using magnitudes of phase velocities and deviation angles. The results for the case of isotropic media are shown to be contained in the solutions for the transversely isotropic media.

  20. Coherent Vortex Simulations of 3D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Daniel E.; Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Kevlahan, Nicholas K.-R.

    2006-11-01

    This is the first of three talks on the wavelet filter based dynamically adaptive eddy capturing computational methodology that unifies variable fidelity simulation approaches such as wavelet-based DNS, Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS), and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulation. The commonality of these approaches is their ability to identify and ``track" on an adaptive mesh energetic coherent vortical structures. In CVS the velocity field is decomposed into two orthogonal parts: a coherent, inhomogeneous, non-Gaussian component and an incoherent, homogeneous, Gaussian component. This separation of coherent and incoherent components is achieved by wavelet thresholding which can be viewed as a non-linear filter that depends on each flow realization. The essence of the CVS approach is to solve for the coherent non-Gaussian component of a turbulent flow field. It has been shown previously that second generation bi-orthogonal wavelet threshold filtering is able to decompose a turbulent velocity field such that the total resulting SGS dissipation is approximately zero. This physically allows a CVS simulation to recover low order statistics with no SGS model. In this work CVS simulations of decaying incompressible 3D isotropic turbulence are compared to DNS results. -6pt

  1. Sudden relaminarisation and lifetimes in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Morozov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an unexpected connection between isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows. We perform direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence forced at large scales at moderate Reynolds numbers and observe sudden transitions from chaotic dynamics to a spatially simple flow, analogous to the laminar state in wall bounded shear flows. We find that the survival probabilities of turbulence are exponential and the typical lifetimes increase super-exponentially with the Reynolds number, similar to results on relaminarisation of localised turbulence in pipe and plane Couette flow. Results from simulations subjecting the observed large-scale flow to random perturbations of variable amplitude demonstrate that it is a linearly stable simple exact solution that can be destabilised by a finite-amplitude perturbation, like the Hagen-Poiseuille profile in pipe flow. Our results suggest that both isotropic turbulence and wall-bounded shear flows qualitatively share the same phase-space dynamics.

  2. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup - alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state towards which a complete self-preseving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  3. The energy decay in self-preserving isotropic turbulence revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Bernard, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    The assumption of self-preservation allows for an analytical determination of the energy decay in isotropic turbulence. Here, the self-preserving isotropic decay problem is analyzed, yielding a more complete picture of self-serving isotropic turbulence. It is proven rigorously that complete self-serving isotropic turbulence admits two general types of asymptotic solutions: one where the turbulent kinetic energy K approximately t (exp -1) and one where K approximately t (sup alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) and where K approximately t (sup -alpha) with an exponent alpha greater than 1 that is determined explicitly by the initial conditions. By a fixed point analysis and numerical integration of the exact one-point equations, it is demonstrated that the K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotically consistent high Reynolds number solution; the K approximately 1 (sup -alpha) decay law is only achieved in the limit as t yields infinity and the turbulence Reynolds number vanishes. Arguments are provided which indicate that a K approximately t (exp -1) power law decay is the asymptotic state toward which a complete self-preserving isotropic turbulence is driven at high Reynolds numbers in order to resolve the imbalance between vortex stretching and viscous diffusion.

  4. Determining the alpha dynamo parameter in incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Goldstein, M. L.; Lantz, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Alpha, an important parameter in dynamo theory, is proportional to either the kinetic, current, magnetic, or velocity helicity of the fluctuating magnetic field and fluctuating velocity field. The particular helicity to which alpha is proportional depends on the assumptions used in deriving the first order smoothed equations that describe the alpha effect. In two cases, when alpha is proportional to either the magnetic helicity or velocity helicity, alpha is determined experimentally from two point measurements of the fluctuating fields in incompressible, homogeneous turbulence having arbitrary symmetry. For the other two possibilities, alpha is determined if the turbulence is isotropic.

  5. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsberg, M. A. T.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity.

  6. Symmetry Breaking Drift of Particles Settling in Homogeneous Shear Turbulence.

    PubMed

    van Hinsberg, M A T; Clercx, H J H; Toschi, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of shear on the gravitational settling of heavy inertial particles in homogeneous shear turbulence (HST). In addition to the well-known enhanced settling velocity, observed for heavy inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), a horizontal drift velocity is also observed in the shearing direction due to the presence of a nonzero mean vorticity (introducing symmetry breaking due to the mean shear). This drift velocity is due to the combination of shear, gravity, and turbulence, and all three of these elements are needed for this effect to occur. We extend the mechanism responsible for the enhanced settling velocity in HIT to the case of HST. Two separate regimes are observed, characterized by positive or negative drift velocity, depending on the particle settling velocity. PMID:27541467

  7. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Kaya, B.S.; Godt, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Basak Sener; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs.

  9. Laws for third-order moments in homogeneous anisotropic incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.

    It is known that Kolmogorov's four-fifths law for statistically homogeneous and isotropic turbulence can be generalized to anisotropic turbulence. This fundamental result for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence says that in the inertial range the divergence of the vector third-order moment |v(r) is constant and is equal to -4, where is the dissipation rate of the turbulence. This law can be extended to incompressible magnetohydrodyamic (MHD) turbulence where statistical isotropy is often not valid due, for example, to the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. Laws for anisotropic incompressible MHD turbulence were first derived by Politano and Pouquet. In this paper, the laws for vector third-order moments in homogeneous non-isotropic incompressible MHD turbulence are derived by a technique due to Frisch that clarifies the relationship between the energy flux in Fourier space and the vector third-order moments in physical space. This derivation is different from the original derivation of Politano and Pouquet which is based on the Kn-Howarth equation, and provides some new physical insights. Separate laws are derived for the cascades of energy, cross-helicity and magnetic-helicity, the three ideal invariants of incompressible MHD for flows in three dimensions. These laws are of fundamental importance in the theory of MHD turbulence where non-isotropic turbulence is much more prevalent than isotropic turbulence.

  10. Diffusion of Heat from a Line Source in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uberoi, Mahinder S; Corrsin, Stanley

    1953-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been made of some features of the turbulent heat diffusion behind a line heated wire stretched perpendicular to a flowing isotropic turbulence. The mean temperature distributions have been measured with systematic variations in wind speed, size of turbulence-producing grid, and downstream location of heat source. The nature of the temperature fluctuation field has been studied. A comparison of Lagrangian and Eulerian analyses for diffusion in a nondecaying turbulence yields an expression for turbulent-heat-transfer coefficient in terms of turbulence velocity and a Lagrangian "scale." the ratio of Eulerian to Lagrangian microscale has been determined theoretically by generalization of a result of Heisenberg and with arbitrary constants taken from independent sources, shows rough agreement with experimental results. A convenient form has been deduced for the criterion of interchangeability of instantaneous space and time derivatives in a flowing turbulence.

  11. Inverse energy cascade in three-dimensional isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Biferale, Luca; Musacchio, Stefano; Toschi, Federico

    2012-04-20

    We study the statistical properties of homogeneous and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) turbulent flows. By introducing a novel way to make numerical investigations of Navier-Stokes equations, we show that all 3D flows in nature possess a subset of nonlinear evolution leading to a reverse energy transfer: from small to large scales. Up to now, such an inverse cascade was only observed in flows under strong rotation and in quasi-two-dimensional geometries under strong confinement. We show here that energy flux is always reversed when mirror symmetry is broken, leading to a distribution of helicity in the system with a well-defined sign at all wave numbers. Our findings broaden the range of flows where the inverse energy cascade may be detected and rationalize the role played by helicity in the energy transfer process, showing that both 2D and 3D properties naturally coexist in all flows in nature. The unconventional numerical methodology here proposed, based on a Galerkin decimation of helical Fourier modes, paves the road for future studies on the influence of helicity on small-scale intermittency and the nature of the nonlinear interaction in magnetohydrodynamics. PMID:22680722

  12. The structure of correlation tensors in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Smith, C.

    1980-01-01

    The study of turbulence with spatially homogeneous but anisotropic statistical properties has applications in space physics and laboratory plasma physics. The first step in the systematic study of such fluctuations is the elucidation of the kinematic properties of the relevant statistical objects, which are the correlation tensors. The theory of isotropic tensors, developed by Robertson, Chandrasekhar and others, is reviewed and extended to cover the general case of turbulence with a pseudo-vector preferred direction, without assuming mirror reflection invariance. Attention is focused on two point correlation functions and it is shown that the form of the decomposition into proper and pseudo-tensor contributions is restricted by the homogeneity requirement. It is also shown that the vector and pseudo-vector preferred direction cases yield different results. An explicit form of the two point correlation tensor is presented which is appropriate for analyzing interplanetary magnetic fluctuations. A procedure for determining the magnetic helicity from experimental data is presented.

  13. Experimental study of premixed flames in intense isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

    1994-04-01

    A methodology for investigating premixed turbulent flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. The burner uses a turbulence generator developed by Videto and Santavicca and the flame is stabilized by weak-swirl generated by air injectors. This set-up produces stable premixed turbulent flames under a wide range of mixture conditions and turbulence intensities. The experiments are designed to investigate systematically the changes in flame structures for conditions which can be classified as wrinkled laminar flames, corrugated flames and flames with distributed reaction zones. Laser Doppler anemometry and Rayleigh scattering techniques are used to determine the turbulence and scalar statistics. In the intense turbulence, the flames are found to produce very little changes in the mean and rams velocities. Their flame speed increase linearly with turbulence intensity as for wrinkled laminar flames. The Rayleigh scattering pdfs for flames within the distributed reaction zone regime are distinctly bimodal. The probabilities of the reacting states (i.e. contributions from within the reaction zone) is not higher than those of wrinkled laminar flame. These results show that there is no drastic changes in flame structures at Karlovitz number close to unity. This suggest that the Klimov-Williams criterion under-predicts the resilience of wrinkled flamelets to intense turbulence.

  14. Computation of the sound generated by isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic radiation from isotropic turbulence is computed numerically. A hybrid direct numerical simulation approach which combines direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the turbulent flow with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. It is demonstrated that the hybrid DNS method is a feasible approach to the computation of sound generated by turbulent flows. The acoustic efficiency in the simulation of isotropic turbulence appears to be substantially less than that in subsonic jet experiments. The dominant frequency of the computed acoustic pressure is found to be somewhat larger than the dominant frequency of the energy-containing scales of motion. The acoustic power in the simulations is proportional to epsilon (M(sub t))(exp 5) where epsilon is the turbulent dissipation rate and M(sub t) is the turbulent Mach number. This is in agreement with the analytical result of Proudman (1952), but the constant of proportionality is smaller than the analytical result. Two different methods of computing the acoustic power from the DNS data bases yielded consistent results.

  15. Short-time evolution of Lagrangian velocity gradient correlations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Bos, W. J. T.; Jin, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    We show by direct numerical simulation (DNS) that the Lagrangian cross correlation of velocity gradients in homogeneous isotropic turbulence increases at short times, whereas its auto-correlation decreases. Kinematic considerations allow to show that two invariants of the turbulent velocity field determine the short-time velocity gradient correlations. In order to get a more intuitive understanding of the dynamics for longer times, heuristic models are proposed involving the combined action of local shear and rotation. These models quantitatively reproduce the effects and disentangle the different physical mechanisms leading to the observations in the DNS.

  16. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, such as those found in the space environment or in plasma confinement devices, are often modeled as electrically conducting fluids. When fluids and plasmas are energetically stirred, regions of highly nonlinear, chaotic behavior known as turbulence arise. Understanding the fundamental nature of turbulence is a long-standing theoretical challenge. The present work describes a statistical theory concerning a certain class of nonlinear, finite dimensional, dynamical models of turbulence. These models arise when the partial differential equations describing incompressible, ideal (i.e., nondissipative) homogeneous fluid and magnetofluid (i.e., plasma) turbulence are Fourier transformed into a very large set of ordinary differential equations. These equations define a divergenceless flow in a high-dimensional phase space, which allows for the existence of a Liouville theorem, guaranteeing a distribution function based on constants of the motion (integral invariants). The novelty of these particular dynamical systems is that there are integral invariants other than the energy, and that some of these invariants behave like pseudoscalars under two of the discrete symmetry transformations of physics, parity, and charge conjugation. In this work the 'rugged invariants' of ideal homogeneous turbulence are shown to be the only significant scalar and pseudoscalar invariants. The discovery that pseudoscalar invariants cause symmetries of the original equations to be dynamically broken and induce a nonergodic structure on the associated phase space is the primary result presented here. Applicability of this result to dissipative turbulence is also discussed.

  17. Computation of large-scale statistics in decaying isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasnov, Jeffrey R.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of decaying isotropic turbulence to test the prediction of self-similar decay of the energy spectrum and to compute the decay exponents of the kinetic energy. In general, good agreement between the simulation results and the assumption of self-similarity were obtained. However, the statistics of the simulations were insufficient to compute the value of gamma which corrects the decay exponent when the spectrum follows a k(exp 4) wave number behavior near k = 0. To obtain good statistics, it was found necessary to average over a large ensemble of turbulent flows.

  18. A non-isotropic multiple-scale turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed non-isotropic multiple scale turbulence model (MS/ASM) is described for complex flow calculations. This model focuses on the direct modeling of Reynolds stresses and utilizes split-spectrum concepts for modeling multiple scale effects in turbulence. Validation studies on free shear flows, rotating flows and recirculating flows show that the current model perform significantly better than the single scale k-epsilon model. The present model is relatively inexpensive in terms of CPU time which makes it suitable for broad engineering flow applications.

  19. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.

  20. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  1. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum. PMID:26684120

  2. Hindered Energy Cascade in Highly Helical Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Rodion; Golbraikh, Ephim; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest, for the first time, a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore, the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of nonlinear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in our model is injected at a certain large scale only, whereas the source of helicity is distributed over all scales. In particular, we found that the helical bottleneck effect can appear in the inertial interval of the energy spectrum.

  3. Interaction of a converging spherical shock wave with isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagatwala, Ankit; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2012-08-01

    Simulations of converging spherical shock waves propagating through a region of compressible isotropic turbulence are carried out. Both converging and reflected phases of the shock are studied. Effect of the reflected phase of the shock is found to be quite different from the expanding shock in the Taylor blast wave-turbulence interaction problem. Vorticity and turbulent kinetic energy are amplified due to passage of the shock. Similar to the latter problem, the vorticity-dilatation term is primarily responsible for the observed behavior. This is confirmed through Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics. Transverse vorticity amplification is compared with linear planar shock-turbulence theory. The smallest eddies, represented by the Kolmogorov scale, decrease in size after passing through the converging shock and this is shown to be related to a decrease in kinematic viscosity and increase in dissipation behind the converging shock. Distortion of the shock due to turbulence is also investigated and quantified. Turbulence also affects maximum compression achieved at the point of shock reflection, when the shock radius is at a minimum. This decrease in compression is quantified by comparing with pure shock simulations.

  4. Fully developed isotropic turbulence: Nonperturbative renormalization group formalism and fixed-point solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canet, Léonie; Delamotte, Bertrand; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the regime of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the presence of a stochastic forcing, using the nonperturbative (functional) renormalization group (NPRG). Within a simple approximation based on symmetries, we obtain the fixed-point solution of the NPRG flow equations that corresponds to fully developed turbulence both in d =2 and 3 dimensions. Deviations to the dimensional scalings (Kolmogorov in d =3 or Kraichnan-Batchelor in d =2 ) are found for the two-point functions. To further analyze these deviations, we derive exact flow equations in the large wave-number limit, and show that the fixed point does not entail the usual scale invariance, thereby identifying the mechanism for the emergence of intermittency within the NPRG framework. The purpose of this work is to provide a detailed basis for NPRG studies of NS turbulence; the determination of the ensuing intermittency exponents is left for future work.

  5. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  6. Analysis of homogeneous turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mahalingam, S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Full turbulence simulations at low Reynolds numbers were made for the single-step, irreversible, bimolecular reaction between non-premixed reactants in isochoric, decaying homogeneous turbulence. Various initial conditions for the scalar field were used in the simulations to control the initial scalar dissipation length scale, and simulations were also made for temperature-dependent reaction rates and for non-stoichiometric and unequal diffusivity conditions. Joint probability density functions (pdf's), conditional pdf's, and various statistical quantities appearing in the moment equations were computed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that compressive strain-rate correlates better than other dynamical quantities with local reaction rate, and the locations of peak reaction rates seem to be insensitive to the scalar field initial conditions.

  7. Large Deviation Statistics of Vorticity Stretching in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A key feature of 3D fluid turbulence is the stretching/re-alignment of vorticity by the action of the strain-rate. It is shown using the cumulant-generating function that cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence behaves statistically like a sum of i.i.d. variables. The Cramer function for vorticity stretching is computed from the JHTDB isotropic DNS (Reλ = 430) and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain-rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramer functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of largest FTLE. A model Fokker-Planck equation is constructed by approximating the viscous destruction of vorticity with a deterministic non-linear relaxation law matching conditional statistics, while the fluctuations in vorticity stretching are modelled by stochastic noise matching the statistics encoded in the Cramer function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude PDF, with good agreement for the exponent but significant error (30-40%) in the pre-factor. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825) and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530.

  8. Taylor length-scale size particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco

    The present study investigates the two-way coupling effects of finite-size solid spherical particles on decaying isotropic turbulence using an immersed boundary method. The conventional point particle assumption is valid only in the case of particles with a diameter, dp, much smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale, eta. In a simulation with particles of diameter dp > eta the flow around each particle needs to be resolved. In this study, we use a method similar to that of Uhlmann(2005) [55] that adapts the Immersed Boundary(IB) Method developed by Peskin [38] to simulate the flow around suspended spherical solid particles. The main idea of the method is to distribute a number of Lagrangian points uniformly over the surface of the particle. A force is applied at each Lagrangian point to represent the momentum exchange between the particle and the surrounding fluid. An analytic three-point delta function is used to distribute the force to the Eulerian grid points saddling the spherical surface to satisfy the no-slip condition at each Lagrangian point. Decaying turbulence is simulated in a periodic box with a uniform mesh of up to (512)3 grid points and an initial microscale Reynolds number of up to Relambda0 = 110. We compare the single phase flow (SPF) with particle-laden flows with particles of different diameters. The density of the particle varies from 2.56 to 10 times that of the fluid. The effects of the particles on the temporal development of turbulence kinetic energy E(t), its dissipation rate epsilon( t), its two-way coupling rate of change Ψp( t) and frequency spectra E(o) are discussed. In this study, in contrast to particles with dp < eta [15], particles with dp > eta always increase the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy, epsilon( t). In addition, Ψp(t) is always positive, whereas it can be positive or negative for particles with dp < eta. The balance between these two effects caused E(t) to be smaller than that of the single-phase flow

  9. CVS Decomposition of 3D Homogeneous Turbulence Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farge, Marie; Schneider, Kai; Pellegrino, Giulio; Wray, A. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper compares the filtering used in Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) decomposition with an orthogonal wavelet basis, with the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) or Fourier filtering. Both methods are applied to a field of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of 3D forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence at microscale Reynolds number R(sub lambda) = 168. We show that, with only 3%N retained modes, CVS filtering separates the coherent vortex tubes from the incoherent background flow. The latter is structureless, has an equipartition energy spectrum, and has a Gaussian velocity probability distribution function (PDF) and an exponential vorticity PDF. On the other hand, the Fourier basis does not extract the coherent vortex tubes cleanly and leaves organized structures in the residual high wavenumber modes whose PDFs are stretched exponentials for both the velocity and the vorticity.

  10. Local topology of energy transport in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschung, Jonas; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-11-01

    Similar to the velocity vector field, whose tangent (stream) lines represent how fluid volume (or mass in constant density flows) is transported in the flow, it is of interest to consider the vector field corresponding to the transport of mechanical energy (Meyers & Meneveau, 2012). The transport includes advection and viscous diffusion. In order to characterize the local topology of this vector field in turbulence, we examine statistical properties of its gradient field. This energy transport field is not divergence-free, due to dissipation and unsteady changes of kinetic energy. Therefore, the first invariant (the trace) of its gradient tensor is not zero, as in compressible flow. The three invariants PE, QE and RE of the energy transport gradient tensor are analyzed using concepts developed earlier for analysis of compressible flows. Data from DNS of isotropic turbulence is used, from the JHU database (Li et al. 2008, JoT), as well as other sources. Contracting node-like topology occurs very frequently, consistent with the dissipative nature of fluid turbulence. Further topological properties are established based on conditional PDFs of the invariants, and flow visualizations are used to develop insights into the local structure of the energy transport vector field. This work is supported by project CMMI-0941530. The authors also thank Prof. J. Meyers, Prof. N. Peters and Mr. P. Schaefer for interesting discussions on this topic.

  11. Homogenous isotropic invisible cloak based on geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Zhou, Ji; Kang, Lei

    2008-10-27

    Invisible cloak derived from the coordinate transformation requires its constitutive material to be anisotropic. In this work, we present a cloak of graded-index isotropic material based on the geometrical optics theory. The cloak is realized by concentric multilayered structure with designed refractive index to achieve the low-scattering and smooth power-flow. Full-wave simulations on such a design of a cylindrical cloak are performed to demonstrate the cloaking ability to incident wave of any polarization. Using normal nature material with isotropy and low absorption, the cloak shows light on a practical path to stealth technology, especially that in the optical range. PMID:18958058

  12. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  13. Dynamics of Aerosol Particles in Stationary, Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Lance R.; Meng, Hui

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study of the dynamics of sub-Kolmogorov-size aerosol particles in stationary isotropic turbulence has been performed. The study combined direct numerical simulations (DNS; directed by Prof. Collins) and high-resolution experimental measurements (directed by Prof. Meng) under conditions of nearly perfect geometric and parametric overlap. The goal was to measure the accumulation of particles in low-vorticity regions of the flow that arises from the effect commonly referred to as preferential concentration. The grant technically was initiated on June 13, 2000; however, funding was not available until July 11, 2000. The grant was originally awarded to Penn State University (numerical simulations) and SUNY-Buffalo (experiments); however, Prof. Collins effort was moved to Cornell University on January 2002 when he joined that university. He completed the study there. A list of the specific tasks that were completed under this study is presented.

  14. Model for drop coalescence in a locally isotropic turbulent flow field.

    PubMed

    Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2004-04-01

    The proposed model views drop coalescence in a turbulent flow field as a two-step process consisting of formation of a doublet due to drop collisions followed by coalescence of the individual droplets in a doublet due to the drainage of the intervening film of continuous phase under the action of colloidal (van der Waals and electrostatic) and random turbulent forces. The turbulent flow field was assumed to be locally isotropic. A first-passage-time analysis was employed for the random process of intervening continuous-phase film thickness between the two drops of a doublet in order to evaluate the first two moments of coalescence-time distribution of the doublet. The average drop coalescence time of the doublet was dependent on the barrier for coalescence due to the net repulsive force (net effect of colloidal repulsive and turbulent attractive forces). The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to be smaller for larger turbulent energy dissipation rates, smaller surface potentials, larger drop sizes, larger ionic strengths, and larger drop size ratios of unequal-sized drop pairs. The predicted average drop coalescence time was found to decrease whenever the ratio of average turbulent force to repulsive force barrier became larger. The calculated coalescence-time distribution was broader, with a higher standard deviation, at lower energy dissipation rates, higher surface potentials, smaller drop sizes, and smaller size ratios of unequal drop pairs. The model predictions of average coalescence-rate constants for tetradecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in a high-pressure homogenizer agreed fairly well with the inferred experimental values as reported by Narsimhan and Goel (J. Colloid Interface Sci. 238 (2001) 420-432) at different homogenizer pressures and SDS concentrations. PMID:14985038

  15. Interaction of weakly compressible isotropic turbulence with planar expansion waves: Flow anisotropy and vorticity alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xanthos, Savvas; Gong, Minwei; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2010-01-01

    Further analysis of the experimental data of the velocity gradient tensor first published by Xanthos et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 584, 301 (2007)] has been carried out and new results are reported here to provide additional insights on the effects of expansion waves interacting with isotropic turbulence. The flow field was generated by the reflection of an incoming shock wave at the open end of a large scale shock tube facility which interacted with the induced flow behind the incident shock wave which passed through a turbulence generating grid. In the present configuration the interaction is free from streamline curvature effects, which cause additional effects on turbulence. The strength of the applied expansive straining was 240 s-1. Rectangular pattern grids of different mesh sizes were used to generate isotropic and homogeneous turbulence with turbulent Reynolds number Reλ based on Taylor's microscale between 450 and 488. Lateral vorticity fluctuations and fluctuations of enstrophy and all stretching vector components are drastically reduced during the interaction. Residual attenuation in the postinteraction flow field was found only in the lateral vorticity fluctuations and in the longitudinal stretching term S11Ω1. Helicity and the helicity angle were computed from the data and the orientation angle of the vorticity vector in reference to the velocity vector was determined. Large fluctuations of the helicity angle were observed which extend from 0° to 180° with most probable values close to 30° and 130° and a mean value of 85°. Rotational dissipation rate was found to be high at these angles. The time-dependent signals of enstrophy, vortex stretching/tilting vector, and dissipation rate were found to exhibit a rather strong intermittent behavior which is characterized by high amplitude bursts followed by low level activities. It was found that the observed strong dissipative events are mostly associated with strong activities in the longitudinal stretching

  16. DNS of fully resolved spherical particles dispersed in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Francesco; Ferrante, Antonino; Elghobashi, Said

    2008-11-01

    Our DNS study concerns the interactions between decaying isotropic turbulence and solid spherical particles with diameter, d, larger than the Kolmogorov length scale, η. We employ an Immersed Boundary method similar to that of Uhlmann (JCP, 2005) to resolve the flow around 6400 spherical particles with a volume fraction of φv=0.1. The monosize particles have a diameter, d = 16 ηo. Our simulations, with 256^3 mesh points and Reλ0= 75, cover a range of 38 <=τp/τKo<=149, for the ratio of the particle response time to the initial Kolmogorov time scale. A Lagrangian approach is used to compute the frequency spectrum of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) of the fluid phase. The effects of varying τp/τKo on the spectrum and the decay rate of TKE are discussed. The effects of the formation of the particle boundary layer on the viscous dissipation rate of TKE are also discussed.

  17. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  18. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-01

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone. PMID:23006164

  19. Turbulent Diffusion in Non-Homogeneous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Redondo, J. M.; Mahjoub, O. B.; Sekula, E.

    2012-04-01

    Many experimental studies have been devoted to the understanding of non-homogeneous turbulent dynamics. Activity in this area intensified when the basic Kolmogorov self-similar theory was extended to two-dimensional or quasi 2D turbulent flows such as those appearing in the environment, that seem to control mixing [1,2]. The statistical description and the dynamics of these geophysical flows depend strongly on the distribution of long lived organized (coherent) structures. These flows show a complex topology, but may be subdivided in terms of strongly elliptical domains (high vorticity regions), strong hyperbolic domains (deformation cells with high energy condensations) and the background turbulent field of moderate elliptic and hyperbolic characteristics. It is of fundamental importance to investigate the different influence of these topological diverse regions. Relevant geometrical information of different areas is also given by the maximum fractal dimension, which is related to the energy spectrum of the flow. Using all the available information it is possible to investigate the spatial variability of the horizontal eddy diffusivity K(x,y). This information would be very important when trying to model numerically the behaviour in time of the oil spills [3,4] There is a strong dependence of horizontal eddy diffusivities with the Wave Reynolds number as well as with the wind stress measured as the friction velocity from wind profiles measured at the coastline. Natural sea surface oily slicks of diverse origin (plankton, algae or natural emissions and seeps of oil) form complicated structures in the sea surface due to the effects of both multiscale turbulence and Langmuir circulation. It is then possible to use the topological and scaling analysis to discriminate the different physical sea surface processes. We can relate higher orden moments of the Lagrangian velocity to effective diffusivity in spite of the need to calibrate the different regions determining the

  20. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation.

  1. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Sambles, J. R.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation. PMID:27492929

  2. Omnidirectional surface wave cloak using an isotropic homogeneous dielectric coating.

    PubMed

    Mitchell-Thomas, R C; Quevedo-Teruel, O; Sambles, J R; Hibbins, A P

    2016-01-01

    The field of transformation optics owes a lot of its fame to the concept of cloaking. While some experimental progress has been made towards free-space cloaking in three dimensions, the material properties required are inherently extremely difficult to achieve. The approximations that then have to be made to allow fabrication produce unsatisfactory device performance. In contrast, when surface wave systems are the focus, it has been shown that a route distinct from those used to design free-space cloaks can be taken. This results in very simple solutions that take advantage of the ability to incorporate surface curvature. Here, we provide a demonstration in the microwave regime of cloaking a bump in a surface. The distortion of the shape of the surface wave fronts due to the curvature is corrected with a suitable refractive index profile. The surface wave cloak is fabricated from a metallic backed homogeneous dielectric waveguide of varying thickness, and exhibits omnidirectional operation. PMID:27492929

  3. Symmetries and the approach to statistical equilibrium in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Timothy T.; Zemach, Charles

    1998-11-01

    The relaxation in time of an arbitrary isotropic turbulent state to a state of statistical equilibrium is identified as a transition to a state which is invariant under a symmetry group. We deduce the allowed self-similar forms and time-decay laws for equilibrium states by applying Lie-group methods (a) to a family of scaling symmetries, for the limit of high Reynolds number, as well as (b) to a unique scaling symmetry, for nonzero viscosity or nonzero hyperviscosity. This explains why a diverse collection of turbulence models, going back half a century, arrived at the same time-decay laws, either through derivations embedded in the mechanics of a particular model, or through numerical computation. Because the models treat the same dynamical variables having the same physical dimensions, they are subject to the same scaling invariances and hence to the same time-decay laws, independent of the eccentricities of their different formulations. We show in turn, by physical argument, by an explicitly solvable analytical model, and by numerical computation in more sophisticated models, that the physical mechanism which drives (this is distinct from the mathematical circumstance which allows) the relaxation to equilibrium is the cascade of turbulence energy toward higher wave numbers, with the rate of cascade approaching zero in the low wave-number limit and approaching infinity in the high wave-number limit. Only the low-wave-number properties of the initial state can influence the equilibrium state. This supplies the physical basis, beyond simple dimensional analysis, for quantitative estimates of relaxation times. These relaxation times are estimated to be as large as hundreds or more times the initial dominant-eddy cycle times, and are determined by the large-eddy cycle times. This mode of analysis, applied to a viscous turbulent system in a wind tunnel with typical initial laboratory parameters, shows that the time necessary to reach the final stage of decay is

  4. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  5. ISOTROPICALLY DRIVEN VERSUS OUTFLOW DRIVEN TURBULENCE: OBSERVATIONAL CONSEQUENCES FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Jonathan J.; Frank, Adam; Blackman, Eric G.

    2010-10-10

    Feedback from protostellar outflows can influence the nature of turbulence in star-forming regions even if they are not the primary source of velocity dispersion for all scales of molecular clouds. For the rate and power expected in star-forming regions, we previously (Carroll et al.) demonstrated that outflows could drive supersonic turbulence at levels consistent with the scaling relations from Matzner although with a steeper velocity power spectrum than expected for an isotropically driven supersonic turbulent cascade. Here, we perform higher resolution simulations and combine simulations of outflow driven turbulence with those of isotropically forced turbulence. We find that the presence of outflows within an ambient isotropically driven turbulent environment produces a knee in the velocity power spectrum at the outflow scale and a steeper slope at sub-outflow scales than for a purely isotropically forced case. We also find that the presence of outflows flattens the density spectrum at large scales effectively reducing the formation of large-scale turbulent density structures. These effects are qualitatively independent of resolution. We have also carried out Principal Component Analysis (PCA) for synthetic data from our simulations. We find that PCA as a tool for identifying the driving scale of turbulence has a misleading bias toward low amplitude large-scale velocity structures even when they are not necessarily the dominant energy containing scales. This bias is absent for isotropically forced turbulence but manifests strongly for collimated outflow driven turbulence.

  6. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, W. D.; Berera, A.; Yoffe, S. R.; Linkmann, M. F.

    2015-04-01

    A model for the Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate Cɛ was derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in Cɛ=Cɛ ,∞+C /RL+O (1 /RL2) , where RL is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and Cɛ ,∞ arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. This theoretical work was supplemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to RL=5875 (Rλ=435 ), which were used to establish that the decay of dimensionless dissipation with increasing Reynolds number took the form of a power law RLn with exponent value n =-1.000 ±0.009 and that this decay of Cɛ was actually due to the increase in the Taylor surrogate U3/L . The model equation was fitted to data from the DNS, which resulted in the value C =18.9 ±1.3 and in an asymptotic value for Cɛ in the infinite Reynolds-number limit of Cɛ ,∞=0.468 ±0.006 .

  7. Energy transfer and dissipation in forced isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    McComb, W D; Berera, A; Yoffe, S R; Linkmann, M F

    2015-04-01

    A model for the Reynolds-number dependence of the dimensionless dissipation rate C(ɛ) was derived from the dimensionless Kármán-Howarth equation, resulting in C(ɛ)=C(ɛ,∞)+C/R(L)+O(1/R(L)(2)), where R(L) is the integral scale Reynolds number. The coefficients C and C(ɛ,∞) arise from asymptotic expansions of the dimensionless second- and third-order structure functions. This theoretical work was supplemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced isotropic turbulence for integral scale Reynolds numbers up to R(L)=5875 (R(λ)=435), which were used to establish that the decay of dimensionless dissipation with increasing Reynolds number took the form of a power law R(L)(n) with exponent value n=-1.000±0.009 and that this decay of C(ɛ) was actually due to the increase in the Taylor surrogate U(3)/L. The model equation was fitted to data from the DNS, which resulted in the value C=18.9±1.3 and in an asymptotic value for C(ɛ) in the infinite Reynolds-number limit of C(ɛ,∞)=0.468±0.006. PMID:25974586

  8. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation is found to be dominated by relatively non-local interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg, Obukhov, and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  9. Testing a similarity theory for isotropic turbulence on DNS data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melander, Mogens; Fabijonas, Bruce

    2006-11-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we consider the issue of self-similarity in 3D incompressible isotropic turbulence. The starting point for our investigation is a similarity theory we have developed on the basis of high Reynolds number shell model calculations. Like Kolmogorov's 1941 theory, our theory calls for similarity across all scales in the inertial range. Unlike K41, our theory does not fail on account of intermittency, but is developed to blossom in that environment. To observe self-similarity, it is essential that the correct variables are used, otherwise one sees only intermittency. The correct variables are reasonably easy to spot for the shell model, but they are more difficult to identify for the full Navier-Stokes equations. Moreover, one has to overcome the fact that the DNS has lower Reynolds numbers than in the shell model simulations so that the inertial range is shorter. Using the technique ESS, we clear this obstacle with only a minor modification to the theory. The DNS data then collapse on the theoretical pdf at all scales.

  10. Passive scalar convective-diffusive subrange for low Prandtl numbers in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, A.; Gomez, T.

    2015-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we study the behavior of a strongly diffusive passive scalar field T submitted to a freely decaying, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian simulations. We present a new subrange located between the k-17 /3 inertial-diffusive subrange and the Kolmogorov wave number kη. This subrange is generated by small-scale convection linked to kη that balances diffusion effects. Thus, we build a typical length scale kCD -1 based on convection and diffusion and give an expression for the shape of the passive scalar spectrum in this subrange ET˜√{Pr}k-11 /3 using physical arguments. This result unifies two different theories coming from Batchelor [G. K. Batchelor, J. Fluid. Mech. 5, 113 (1959), 10.1017/S002211205900009X] and Chasnov [J. Chasnov et al., Phys. Fluids A 1, 1698 (1989), 10.1063/1.857535] and explains results previously obtained experimentally.

  11. Homogenization of quasi-isotropic metamaterials composed by dense arrays of magnetodielectric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing-Xiang; Alù, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we discuss the homogenization of a metamaterial geometry composed of periodic arrays of densely packed subwavelength magnetodielectric spheres, in order to study whether a local quasi-isotropic homogenization model may accurately describe its wave interaction in its negative-index or zero-index operation. We analyze and compare the electromagnetic response of these arrays with their retrieved metamaterial model, for frequency regimes in which positive or negative values of effective index of refraction are expected. We pay special attention to the effects of array truncation and complex forms of excitation, showing that it is possible to realize quasi-isotropic negative-index or zero-index metamaterials with negligible spatial dispersion effects in certain frequency bands. We then apply these concepts to specific configurations of interest for metamaterial devices, showing that, despite their finite size and complex operation, their response is consistent with the one associated with their homogenized local description.

  12. Homogeneous turbulence subjected to mean flow with elliptic streamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, G. A.; Shariff, K.

    1994-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations are performed for homogeneous turbulence with a mean flow having elliptic streamlines. This flow combines the effects of rotation and strain on the turbulence. Qualitative comparisons are made with linear theory for cases with high Rossby number. The nonlinear transfer process is monitored using a generalized skewness. In general, rotation turns off the nonlinear cascade; however, for moderate ellipticities and rotation rates the nonlinear cascade is turned off and then reestablished. Turbulence statistics of interest in turbulence modeling are calculated, including full Reynolds stress budgets.

  13. Repeated cascade theory of homogeneous turbulence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of turbulent spectrum engenders two coupled hierarchies: one originates from the development of stress, leading to a transfer function, and the other from the development of an eddy viscosity. In order to incorporate physical roles among scales, the turbulent velocity fluctuation is decomposed into a series of ranks in the increasing order of randomness, contributing successively to energy or stress, eddy viscosity, relaxation frequency, and higher-rank frequencies in the memory chain. As a result, the first hierarchy mentioned above becomes closed at the quadrupole correlation. The second hierarchy governs the eddy viscosities of different ranks, related to relaxation frequencies of such ranks, in the form of a memory chain. It is cut off by an implicit viscous mechanism. For zero wind gradient, the spectrum in the inertial subrange recovers the Kolmogoroff k to the minus 5/3 law with a numerical constant 1.58, in good agreement with experiments. For a strong wind gradient, the spectrum in the production subrange has a k to the minus 1 law.

  14. Broken Ergodicity in Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence has many of the same qualitative features as three-dimensional (3-D) homogeneous MHD turbulence.The se features include several ideal invariants, along with the phenomenon of broken ergodicity. Broken ergodicity appears when certain modes act like random variables with mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, indicating a coherent structure or dynamo.Recently, the origin of broken ergodicity in 3-D MHD turbulence that is manifest in the lowest wavenumbers was explained. Here, a detailed description of the origins of broken ergodicity in 2-D MHD turbulence is presented. It will be seen that broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D MHD turbulence can be manifest in the lowest wavenumbers of a finite numerical model for certain initial conditions or in the highest wavenumbers for another set of initial conditions.T he origins of broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D homogeneous MHD turbulence are found through an eigen analysis of the covariance matrices of the modal probability density functions.It will also be shown that when the lowest wavenumber magnetic field becomes quasi-stationary, the higher wavenumber modes can propagate as Alfven waves on these almost static large-scale magnetic structures

  15. Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics obtained from direct numerical simulations of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Eaton, John K.

    1991-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to study dispersion in decaying isotropic turbulence and homogeneous shear flow. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian data are presented allowing direct comparison, but at fairly low Reynolds number. The quantities presented include properties of the dispersion tensor, isoprobability contours of particle displacement, Lagrangian and Eulerian velocity autocorrelations and time scale ratios, and the eddy diffusivity tensor. The Lagrangian time microscale is found to be consistently larger than the Eulerian microscale, presumably due to the advection of the small scales by the large scales in the Eulerian reference frame.

  16. Non-isotropic turbulence effects on spray combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Chen, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model for the prediction of local properties of statistically stationary spray-combusting flows is evaluated by comparison with experimental data. To appraise the relative performance of turbulence models, computations were carried out by the k-epsilon model and the algebraic stress model. The present numerical results show the qualitative agreement with experimental data. In terms of overall local flow properties, the algebraic stress model improves a degree of conformity to the experimental data due to its ability to introduce the nonisotropic turbulence effects. Two swirl numbers are considered to investigate the influence of swirl on the droplet evaporation and trajectories, and the effects of droplet/turbulence interactions in flow properties. It is found that the large swirl produces a higher evaporationn rate, and more intensive turbulent mixing and burning. The discrepancies observed in the results are attributed mainly to uncertainties in the initial spray size and velocity distributions, the droplet/wall impingement interaction, the combustion model with the fast chemistry and the turbulence models dealing with the strong streamline curvature and complex interactions between the dispersed droplets and the continuous gas-phase flows.

  17. Network Structure of Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Kunihiko; Nair, Aditya; Brunton, Steven

    2015-11-01

    The network structure of two-dimensional incompressible homogeneous turbulence is characterized by highlighting the vortical interactions in the flow field. By analyzing the degree distribution of the turbulence network, it is observed that turbulence has an underlying scale-free network that describes how vortical structures are interconnected. In the network-theoretic framework, we can identify strong vortices that serve as hubs that are strongly connected to other vortical hubs. Smaller and weaker eddies are found to be predominantly influenced by the neighboring hubs. These observations complement previous knowledge of turbulence based on vortex dynamics. The time evolution of the fluid flow network shows that the scale-free property is achieved when turbulence is sustained but is not observed when the flow reaches a laminar regime through dissipation. The finding that turbulence has a scale-free interaction network enables us to identify the type of perturbations that turbulence is resilient against. These insights from network analysis enable us to examine how the behavior of turbulent flows can be modified. This work was supported by the US Army Research Office (Grant W911NF-14-1-0386) and the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0183).

  18. Cross-helicity in rotating homogeneous shear-stratified turbulence.

    PubMed

    Pieri, A B; Godeferd, F S; Cambon, C; Dubrulle, B; Thalabard, S

    2014-03-21

    We consider homogeneous shear-stratified turbulence in a rotating frame, that exhibits complex nonlinear dynamics. Since the analysis of relative orientation between coupled fluctuating fields helps us to understand turbulence dynamics, we focus on the alignment properties of both the velocity and gravity fields with the potential vorticity gradient. With the help of statistical mechanics, we define a vector field which plays a role in the analogous so-called cross-helicity in magnetohydrodynamics. High-resolution direct numerical simulations of developed homogeneous baroclinic turbulence are performed, and a detailed analysis of probability density functions for cross-helicity is provided. A net preference for positive cross-helicity is shown to be related to a new alignment mechanism. We argue that the analysis of cross-helicity is crucial for understanding the dynamics of buoyancy driven flows. PMID:24702376

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  20. Sweeping and straining effects in sound generation by high Reynolds number isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Rubinstein, Robert

    1995-01-01

    The sound radiated by isotropic turbulence is computed using inertial range scaling expressions for the relevant two time and two point correlations. The result depends on whether the decay of Eulerian time correlations is dominated by large scale sweeping or by local straining: the straining hypothesis leads to an expression for total acoustic power, whereas the sweeping hypothesis leads to a more recent result.

  1. Energy transfer in isotropic turbulence at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domaradzki, J. A.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Detailed measurements were made of energy transfer among the scales of motion in incompressible turbulent fields at low Reynolds numbers generated by direct numerical simulation. It was observed that although the transfer resulted from triad interactions that were non-local in k space, the energy always transferred locally. The results are consistent with the notion of non-uniform advection of small weak eddies by larger and stronger ones, similar to transfer processes in the far dissipation range at high Reynolds numbers.

  2. Suppression of turbulent energy cascade due to phase separation in homogenous binary mixture fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei; Okamoto, Sachiya

    2015-11-01

    When a multi-component fluid mixture becomes themophysically unstable state by quenching from well-melting condition, phase separation due to spinodal decomposition occurs, and a self-organized structure is formed. During phase separation, free energy is consumed for the structure formation. In our previous report, the phase separation in homogenous turbulence was numerically simulated and the coarsening process of phase separation was discussed. In this study, we extended our numerical model to a high Schmidt number fluid corresponding to actual polymer solution. The governing equations were continuity, Navier-Stokes, and Chan-Hiliard equations as same as our previous report. The flow filed was an isotropic homogenous turbulence, and the dimensionless parameters in the Chan-Hilliard equation were estimated based on the thermophysical condition of binary mixture. From the numerical results, it was found that turbulent energy cascade was drastically suppressed in the inertial subrange by phase separation for the high Schmidt number flow. By using the identification of turbulent and phase separation structure, we discussed the relation between total energy balance and the structures formation processes. This study is financially supported by the Grand-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (No. T26820045) from the Ministry of Education, Cul-ture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  3. Spectral multigrid methods for the solution of homogeneous turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, G.; Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    New three-dimensional spectral multigrid algorithms are analyzed and implemented to solve the variable coefficient Helmholtz equation. Periodicity is assumed in all three directions which leads to a Fourier collocation representation. Convergence rates are theoretically predicted and confirmed through numerical tests. Residual averaging results in a spectral radius of 0.2 for the variable coefficient Poisson equation. In general, non-stationary Richardson must be used for the Helmholtz equation. The algorithms developed are applied to the large-eddy simulation of incompressible isotropic turbulence.

  4. Decay Power Law in, High Intensity, Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Timothy; Puga, Alejandro; Larue, John

    2014-11-01

    In the study reported here, isotropy is determined using the measure proposed by George (1992), where isotropy corresponds to those downstream positions where the product of the Taylor Reynolds number and the skewness of the velocity derivative is a constant. Straight forward approach can be used which is based on the observation of Batchelor (1953), that the square of the Talor micorscale is linearly related to downstream distance relative to the virtual origin. The fact that the decay of downstream velocity variance is described by a power law is shown to imply power law behavior for various other parameters such as the dissipation, the integral length scale, the Taylor microscale, the Kolmogorov microscale and the Taylor Reynolds number and that there is an algebraic relationship between the various power law exponents. Results are presented for mean velocities of 6 and 8 m/s for the downstream decay of the parameters listed in the preceding. The corresponding values of the Taylor Reynolds number at the start of the isotropic region are 290 and 400, and the variance decay exponent and virtual origin are found to be respectively -1.707 and -1.298 and -27.95 and -5.757. The exponents in the decay law for the other parameters are found to be within +/- 3% of the expected values. University of California Irvine Research Funds.

  5. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence and heated jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our understanding of aerodynamic noise has its foundations in the work of Sir James Lighthill (1952), which was the first major advance in acoustics since the pioneering work of Lord Rayleigh in the last century. The combination of Lighthill's theory of aerodynamic noise as applied to turbulent flows and the experimental growing database from the early 1950's was quickly exploited by various jet propulsion engine designers in reducing the noise of jet engines at takeoff and landing to levels marginally acceptable to communities living in the neighborhoods of airports. The success in this noise containment led to the rapid growth of fast economical subsonic civil transport aircraft worldwide throughout the 1960's and has continued to the present day. One important factor in this success story has been the improvements in the engine cycle that have led to both reductions in specific fuel consumption and noise. The second is the introduction of Noise Certification, which specifies the maximum noise levels at takeoff and landing that all aircraft must meet before they can be entered on the Civil Aircraft Register. The growing interest in the development of a new supersonic civil transport to replace 'Concorde' in the early years of the next century has led to a resurgence of interest in the more challenging problem of predicting the noise of hot supersonic jets and developing means of aircraft noise reduction at takeoff and landing to meet the standards now accepted for subsonic Noise Certification. The prediction of aircraft noise to the accuracy required to meet Noise Certification requirements has necessitated reliance upon experimental measurements and empirically derived laws based on the available experimental data bases. These laws have their foundation in the results from Lighthill's theory, but in the case of jet noise, where the noise is generated in the turbulent mixing region with the external ambient fluid, the complexity of the turbulent motion has

  6. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  7. Optical propagation through a homogeneous turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truman, C. Randall; Lee, Moon J.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of organized turbulent structures on the propagation of an optical beam in a homogeneous shear flow were studied. A passive-scalar field in a computed turbulent shear flow is used to represent index-of-refraction fluctuations, and phase errors induced in a coherent optical beam by turbulent fluctuations are computed. The organized vortical structures produce a scalar distribution with elongated regions of intense fluctuations which have an inclination with respect to the mean flow similar to that of the characteristic hairpin eddies. It is found that r.m.s. phase error is minimized by propagating approximately normal to the inclined vortical structures. Two-point correlations of vorticity and scalar fluctuation suggest that the regions of intense scalar fluctuation are produced primarily by the hairpin eddies.

  8. Optimal thermalization in a shell model of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalabard, Simon; Turkington, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the turbulence-induced dissipation of the large scales in a statistically homogeneous flow using an ‘optimal closure,’ which one of us (BT) has recently exposed in the context of Hamiltonian dynamics. This statistical closure employs a Gaussian model for the turbulent scales, with corresponding vanishing third cumulant, and yet it captures an intrinsic damping. The key to this apparent paradox lies in a clear distinction between true ensemble averages and their proxies, most easily grasped when one works directly with the Liouville equation rather than the cumulant hierarchy. We focus on a simple problem for which the optimal closure can be fully and exactly worked out: the relaxation arbitrarily far-from-equilibrium of a single energy shell towards Gibbs equilibrium in an inviscid shell model of 3D turbulence. The predictions of the optimal closure are validated against DNS and contrasted with those derived from EDQNM closure.

  9. The solution of the transfer equation in a homogeneous isotropically scattering plane-parallel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutily, B.; Bergeat, J.

    1994-12-01

    The exact solution of the transfer equation (TE) in a homogeneous plane-parallel medium of any optical extent (i.e., infinite, semi-infinite, or finite) is derived in the case of isotropic local scattering. The sources are not necessarily isotropic. We start from our recent study of the Schwarzschild-Milne (SM) integral equation as derived from the TE with appropriate boundary conditions. Using the Laplace transform on the range of the optical depth variable, the solution of the TE is obtained as the transform, by an introduced logical-operator, of the solution of the SM equation. The latter is then expressed in terms of the sources by means of the Green distribution of the SM equation. We are thus led to calculate the transform of this distribution by the logical-operator, which is a fundamental auxiliary function of plane-parallel media. This transform, namely Gamma, is thoroughly studied in the present article. The transform of the Gamma-function by the logical-operator, i.e., the bi-transform of the Green distribution, yields the solution of the TE in terms of the specified sources. It is thus the Green function of the problem. This function is studied in detail hereafter and written in terms of the Gamma-function by means of simple algebraic formulae. Analytical and numerical studies of the auxiliary functions introduced here and in a former article are required before a numerical evaluation of our solution can be obtained.

  10. Infinity of geodesics in a homogeneous and isotropic expanding space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adda, Fayçal Ben; Porchon, Hélène

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we construct a discrete simulation of an expanding homogeneous and isotropic space-time that expands via expansion of its basic elements to figure out properties and characteristics of such a space-time and derive conclusions. We prove that in such an expanding space-time, the geodesics are curved and more precisely, they fluctuate on the boundaries of the expanding basic elements. The non-existence of privileged expansion direction leads to the existence of an infinity of fluctuating geodesics between any two locations in this space-time, that provides a prediction of polarization in geometric optics, and a prediction of an earlier acceleration of the expansion as for the cosmic inflation model. This simulation is a case study and an example of space-time with variable topology using the principle of variation of topology via a transformation that creates holes.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of cell membrane by a highly homogeneous and isotropic silver nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Dochshanov, Alden; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in confocal microscopy, but requires engineering plasmonic architectures with a spatially invariant SERS enhancement factor G(x, y) = G. To this end, we exploit a self-assembled isotropic nanostructure with characteristics of homogeneity typical of the so-called near-hyperuniform disorder. The resulting highly dense, homogeneous and isotropic random pattern consists of clusters of silver nanoparticles with limited size dispersion. This nanostructure brings together several advantages: very large hot spot density (~104 μm-2), superior spatial reproducibility (SD < 1% over 2500 μm2) and single-molecule sensitivity (Gav ~ 109), all on a centimeter scale transparent active area. We are able to reconstruct the label-free SERS-based chemical map of live cell membranes with confocal resolution. In particular, SERS imaging is here demonstrated on red blood cells in vitro in order to use the Raman-resonant heme of the cell as a contrast medium to prove spectroscopic detection of membrane molecules. Numerical simulations also clarify the SERS characteristics of the substrate in terms of electromagnetic enhancement and distance sensitivity range consistently with the experiments. The large SERS-active area is intended for multi-cellular imaging on the same substrate, which is important for spectroscopic comparative analysis of complex organisms like cells. This opens new routes for in situ quantitative surface analysis and dynamic probing of living cells exposed to membrane-targeting drugs.Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman

  12. Spectral expansions of homogeneous and isotropic tensor-valued random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Anatoliy; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We establish spectral expansions of tensor-valued homogeneous and isotropic random fields in terms of stochastic integrals with respect to orthogonal scattered random measures previously known only for the case of tensor rank 0. The fields under consideration take values in the 3-dimensional Euclidean space {E^3} and in the space {S^2(E^3)} of symmetric rank 2 tensors over {E^3}. We find a link between the theory of random fields and the theory of finite-dimensional convex compact sets. These random fields furnish stepping-stone for models of rank 1 and rank 2 tensor-valued fields in continuum physics, such as displacement, velocity, stress, strain, providing appropriate conditions (such as the governing equation or positive-definiteness) are imposed.

  13. Acoustic cloak with duplex communication ability constructed by multilayered homogeneous isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiaojun

    2012-12-01

    Based on the effective medium theory, we propose a practical implementation of a cylindrical acoustic cloak with a concentric alternating multilayered structure of homogeneous isotropic materials, which can perfectly mimic the ideal radius-dependent and anisotropic ordinary lens cloak. The proposal exhibits near-ideal cloaking performance such as low-scattering and shadow-reducing in a wide frequency range, thus it can hide an object from the detection of acoustic waves. The acoustic wave can pass through the cloaking shell with an unchanged wavefront shape, which endues the cloaked object with duplex communication ability. More simulations on the acoustic far-field scattering patterns and the total scattering cross-section are performed to investigate the layer number and the frequency dependence of the cloaking effect, and the results show that the thinner layers exhibit a better cloaking effect. The proposal may significantly facilitate the experimental demonstration of the acoustic cloak.

  14. Specific multiple-scattering process in acoustic cloak with multilayered homogeneous isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun

    2008-11-01

    It was qualitatively demonstrated through finite-element full-wave simulations that acoustic cloak can be constructed by using concentric multilayered structure with alternating homogeneous isotropic materials [Y. Cheng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 151913 (2008)]. Here we present a sequential in-depth analysis of the proposed cloak by means of the multiple-scattering algorithms. Calculated pressure fields demonstrate that the cloak possesses low-reflection and wavefront-bending properties. The scattering patterns further characterize the directional cloaking performance in the far field, which is consistent with the pressure fields. The mechanism of the cloaking is ascribed to a specific multiple-scattering process determined by the microscopic material distribution and structural details of the cloak. We also discuss the behavior of the multilayered cloak as a function of wavelength.

  15. Coherent Vortex Simulations of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Goldstein, Daniel E.; de Stefano, Giuliano

    2007-11-01

    This is the first of two talks on the wavelet based eddy capturing computational methodology that is capable of identifying and tracking on an adaptive mesh energetic coherent vortical structures in a turbulent flow field. This talk focuses on Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS) approach, where the velocity field is decomposed into two parts: a coherent, inhomogeneous, non-Gaussian component and an incoherent, homogeneous, Gaussian component. This separation of coherent and incoherent components is achieved by wavelet thresholding, which can be viewed as a non-linear filter that depends on each flow realization. The essence of the CVS approach is to solve for the coherent non-Gaussian component of a turbulent flow field. It has been shown previously that second generation bi-orthogonal wavelet threshold filtering is able to decompose a turbulent velocity field such that the total resulting SGS dissipation is approximately zero. The results of Coherent Vortex Simulations of linearly forced incompressible 3D homogeneous turbulence for different Reynolds numbers demonstrated that CVS with no SGS model is capable to recover not only low order statistics, but also energy and, more importantly, enstrophy spectra up to the dissipative wavenumber range.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of cell membrane by a highly homogeneous and isotropic silver nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Pesce, Giuseppe; Dochshanov, Alden; Sasso, Antonio

    2015-05-14

    Label-free chemical imaging of live cell membranes can shed light on the molecular basis of cell membrane functionalities and their alterations under membrane-related diseases. In principle, this can be done by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in confocal microscopy, but requires engineering plasmonic architectures with a spatially invariant SERS enhancement factor G(x, y) = G. To this end, we exploit a self-assembled isotropic nanostructure with characteristics of homogeneity typical of the so-called near-hyperuniform disorder. The resulting highly dense, homogeneous and isotropic random pattern consists of clusters of silver nanoparticles with limited size dispersion. This nanostructure brings together several advantages: very large hot spot density (∼10(4) μm(-2)), superior spatial reproducibility (SD < 1% over 2500 μm(2)) and single-molecule sensitivity (Gav ∼ 10(9)), all on a centimeter scale transparent active area. We are able to reconstruct the label-free SERS-based chemical map of live cell membranes with confocal resolution. In particular, SERS imaging is here demonstrated on red blood cells in vitro in order to use the Raman-resonant heme of the cell as a contrast medium to prove spectroscopic detection of membrane molecules. Numerical simulations also clarify the SERS characteristics of the substrate in terms of electromagnetic enhancement and distance sensitivity range consistently with the experiments. The large SERS-active area is intended for multi-cellular imaging on the same substrate, which is important for spectroscopic comparative analysis of complex organisms like cells. This opens new routes for in situ quantitative surface analysis and dynamic probing of living cells exposed to membrane-targeting drugs. PMID:25898990

  17. Total energy cascade and residual energy in MHD turbulence: homogeneous versus expanding (solar wind) turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grappin, Roland; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Verdini, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Standard phenomenologies of MHD turbulence generally neglect deviations from kinetic-magnetic energies equipartition. However, solar wind turbulence commonly shows a magnetic excess (or positive residual energy) in the inertial range, with a definite power-law. We report here direct MHD simulation results showing a magnetic excess, both in homogeneous and expanding turbulence, with the latter taking into account the radial flow (expanding box model or EBM). We show that the results on magnetic excess, both scaling laws and amplitude, can be interpreted as resulting from the competition between the nonlinear stretching of the magnetic field by the velocity field and the relaxation to equipartition by the linear propagation of Alfvén waves. We generalize in this way earlier results on homogeneous MHD turbulence.

  18. Broadband cloaking of bending waves via homogenization of multiply perforated radially symmetric and isotropic thin elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Guenneau, Sebastien; Enoch, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    A cylindrical cloak is designed to control the bending waves propagating in isotropic thin plates. This is achieved through homogenization of a multiply perforated coating of isotropic homogeneous elastic material, which greatly simplifies the design of the multilayered cloak we proposed [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.024301 103, 024301 (2009)]. We first derive the homogenized biharmonic equation, which involves an anisotropic Young's modulus and an isotropic mass density. We then numerically show that a clamped obstacle is cloaked over a finite range of frequencies for an acoustic source located a couple of wavelengths away from its surrounding cloak. The reduced backward and forward scattering is confirmed by both the profile of the total field computed along a line passing through the source and the center of the cloak (near field confirmation), and the computation of the scattered far field.

  19. Distortion of homogeneous turbulence by axisymmetric strain and dilatation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo

    1989-01-01

    Rapid distortion theory is applied to study distortion of homogeneous turbulence subject to two different axisymmetric strain modes: the axisymmetric contraction (AC, nozzle-type flow), and the axisymmetric expansion (AE, diffuser-type flow). The paper explores the differences in effects of the two axisymmetric strain modes on the anisotropy of correlations and structures of turbulence; examines the effect of dilatation on the distortion of turbulence; and provides a theoretical background for turbulence model development. It is found that velocity and vorticity fluctuations are enhanced more efficiently by contraction than by expansion; contraction produces much higher anisotropy in velocity and vorticity than expansion; root-mean-square pressure is slightly reduced during contraction, whereas it increases rapidly during expansion; and vortical structures of rodlike shape develop in a contraction flow, while disklike structures develop in an expansion flow. A simple model that reflects the dependence of turbulence evolution on structural parameters such as the Reynolds-stress anisotropy and total strain is proposed, and is shown to outperform all other models for all cases examined, regardless of the mean strain rate.

  20. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  1. Forcing homogeneous turbulence in direct numerical simulation of particulate flow with interface resolution and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouippe, Agathe; Uhlmann, Markus

    2015-12-01

    We consider the case of finite-size spherical particles which are settling under gravity in a homogeneous turbulent background flow. Turbulence is forced with the aid of the random forcing method of Eswaran and Pope ["An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence," Comput. Fluids 16(3), 257-278 (1988)], while the solid particles are represented with an immersed-boundary method. The forcing scheme is used to generate isotropic turbulence in vertically elongated boxes in order to warrant better decorrelation of the Lagrangian signals in the direction of gravity. Since only a limited number of Fourier modes are forced, it is possible to evaluate the forcing field directly in physical space, thereby avoiding full-size transforms. The budget of box-averaged kinetic energy is derived from the forced momentum equations. Medium-sized simulations for dilute suspensions at low Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ = 65, small density ratio ρp/ρf = 1.5, and for two Galileo numbers Ga = 0 and 120 are carried out over long time intervals in order to exclude the possibility of slow divergence. It is shown that the results at zero gravity are fully consistent with previous experimental measurements and available numerical reference data. Specific features of the finite-gravity case are discussed with respect to a reduction of the average settling velocity, the acceleration statistics, and the Lagrangian auto-correlations.

  2. Voigt waves in homogenized particulate composites based on isotropic dielectric components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2011-10-01

    Homogenized composite materials (HCMs) can support a singular form of optical propagation, known as Voigt wave propagation, while their component materials do not. In essence, Voigt waves represent coalescent degenerate eigenmodes of the corresponding propagation matrix. Crucially, the existence of Voigt waves stems from the non-Hermitian nature of this propagation matrix, which in turn is a manifestation of the dissipative nature of the HCM. This phenomenon was investigated for biaxial HCMs arising from nondissipative isotropic dielectric component materials. The biaxiality of these HCMs stems from the oriented spheroidal shapes of the particles which make up the component materials. An extended version of the Bruggeman homogenization formalism was used to investigate the influence of component particle orientations, shapes and sizes, as well as volume fractions of the component materials, upon Voigt wave propagation. Our numerical studies revealed that the directions in which Voigt waves propagate are highly sensitive to the orientations of the component particles and to the volume fractions of the component materials, but less sensitive to the shapes of the component particles and less sensitive still to the sizes of the component particles. Furthermore, whether or not an HCM supports Voigt wave propagation at all is critically dependent upon the sizes of the component particles and, in certain cases, upon the volume fractions of the component materials.

  3. How isotropic are turbulent flows generated by using periodic conditions in a cube?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Z. C.; Fang, L.; Fang, J.

    2016-03-01

    In numerical simulations, "isotropic" turbulent flows are always generated by using periodic conditions. We show that these periodic conditions mathematically lead to large-scale anisotropy which can be about 10% of the mean values, and thus prevent existing post-processing results from being accurate. A decomposition method by employing spherical harmonics is then proposed to distinguish this scale-dependent anisotropy effect from others and to minimize the related post-processing error.

  4. Asymptotic Sensitivity of Homogeneous Turbulent Shear Flow to the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaza, Juan; Warhaft, Zellman; Collins, Lance

    2007-11-01

    Our recent numerical studies of homogeneous turbulent shear flow suggest the dynamics of the large and small scales are sensitive to the initial value of the shear parameter. In particular for initial values of S^* = S k /ɛ>=10, we find that the asymptotic state of the turbulence depends upon this parameter. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) predicts the dependence of both large- and small-scale statistics on S^* reasonably well, but the theory is applicable only for relatively short times (S t < 2). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) has a somewhat longer window, but it too eventually fails when the integral length scale becomes too large. Motivated by this earlier work, we performed experimental measurements of large- and small-scale velocity statistics in homogeneous turbulent shear flow in a wind tunnel. We are able to vary the initial shear parameter over the relevant range and observe the aforementioned asymptotic statistics. The experimental results will be presented, including detailed comparisons with earlier DNS and RDT.

  5. Diffusion in grid turbulence of isotropic macro-particles using a Lagrangian stochastic method: Theory and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, A.; Moulin, F.; Violeau, D.; Astruc, D.

    2012-10-01

    The prediction of solid bodies transport (such as algae, debris, sediment grains, or corrosion deposits) is a necessary requirement in many industrial or environmental processes. The physical processes involved cover a wide range of processes, from tidal flow to turbulent eddies and particle drag. A stochastic model was therefore developed to link the different scales of the physical processes where it was assumed that the particles are dilute enough that they do not affect the flow or the motion of other particles while being large enough that each particle does not follow exactly the fluid motions (i.e., macro-particles). The stochastic model is built in such a way that it uses Reynolds-averaged fluid properties to predict trajectories of individual particles. This model was then tested using experimental measurements obtained for isotropic particles released in semi-homogeneous turbulence. The turbulent flow was generated using a pair of oscillating grids and was characterized using particle image velocimetry measurements. The trajectories of the particles were measured using a pair of high resolution cameras. The comparison between the experimental data and different numerical models gives satisfactory results.

  6. Experimental study of the structure of isotropic turbulence with intermediate range of Reynolds number. [sea-air interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, S. C.; Saad, A.

    1977-01-01

    The energetic isotropic turbulence generated by a waterfall of low head was found to be developed in part through the unstable two-phase flow of entrained air bubbles. The resulting turbulent field had a turbulent Reynolds number in excess of 20,000 and maintained a self-similar structure throughout the decay period studied. The present study may provide some insight into the structure of turbulence produced by breaking waves over the ocean.

  7. Solving dynamical equations in general homogeneous isotropic cosmologies with a scalaron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, A. T.

    2016-07-01

    We consider gauge-dependent dynamical equations describing homogeneous isotropic cosmologies coupled to a scalar field ψ (scalaron). For flat cosmologies (k = 0), we analyze the gauge-independent equation describing the differential χ(α) ≡ ψ (a) of the map of the metric a to the scalaron field ψ, which is the main mathematical characteristic of a cosmology and locally defines its portrait in the so-called a version. In the more customary ψ version, the similar equation for the differential of the inverse map bar χ (ψ ) ≡ χ ^{ - 1} (α ) is solved in an asymptotic approximation for arbitrary potentials v(ψ). In the flat case, bar χ (ψ ) and χ-1(α) satisfy first-order differential equations depending only on the logarithmic derivative of the potential, v(ψ)/v(ψ). If an analytic solution for one of the χ functions is known, then we can find all characteristics of the cosmological model. In the α version, the full dynamical system is explicitly integrable for k ≠ 0 with any potential v(α) ≡ v[ψ(α)] replacing v(ψ). Until one of the maps, which themselves depend on the potentials, is calculated, no sort of analytic relation between these potentials can be found. Nevertheless, such relations can be found in asymptotic regions or by perturbation theory. If instead of a potential we specify a cosmological portrait, then we can reconstruct the corresponding potential. The main subject here is the mathematical structure of isotropic cosmologies. We also briefly present basic applications to a more rigorous treatment of inflation models in the framework of the α version of the isotropic scalaron cosmology. In particular, we construct an inflationary perturbation expansion for χ. If the conditions for inflation to arise are satisfied, i.e., if v > 0, k = 0, χ2 < 6, and χ(α) satisfies a certain boundary condition as α→-∞, then the expansion is invariant under scaling the potential, and its first terms give the standard inflationary

  8. Numerical Experiments on Homogeneous Strained Turbulence Subjected to Coriolis Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, K.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulent flows with various combinations of strain-rate, rotation rate and coriolis force capture some important aspects of more complex flows with streamline curvature and rotation. Presently, a situation is considered in which as a box of turbulence rotates, strain axes rotate with it. This is to be contrasted with the elliptic streamline flow in which the strain axes are fixed in an inertial frame. The elliptic flow is known to exhibit (inviscid) growth of turbulent energy and one might expect even more rapid growth with the strain-axes following the box. Instead, it is found that the sign of the Reynolds shear stress is reversed leading to a negative production term for turbulent energy. Partial understanding of the phenomenon is obtained from a consideration of the rotation of inertial waves relative to the strain axes as well as the "pressure-less" RDT argument put forward by Cambon etal. [J. Fluid Mech, 278, 175]. Some comparisons with the predictions of second-order closure models will be presented.

  9. Pumping velocity in homogeneous helical turbulence with shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan; Käpylä, Petri J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2011-11-01

    Using different analytical methods (the quasilinear approach, the path-integral technique, and the tau-relaxation approximation) we develop a comprehensive mean-field theory for a pumping effect of the mean magnetic field in homogeneous nonrotating helical turbulence with imposed large-scale shear. The effective pumping velocity is proportional to the product of α effect and large-scale vorticity associated with the shear, and causes a separation of the toroidal and poloidal components of the mean magnetic field along the direction of the mean vorticity. We also perform direct numerical simulations of sheared turbulence in different ranges of hydrodynamic and magnetic Reynolds numbers and use a kinematic test-field method to determine the effective pumping velocity. The results of the numerical simulations are in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  10. The role of wall confinement on the decay rate of an initially isotropic turbulent field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Movahed, Pooya; Johnsen, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The problem of freely decaying isotropic turbulence has been the subject of intensive research during the past few decades due to its importance for modeling purposes. While isotropy and periodic boundary conditions assumptions simplify the analysis, large-scale anisotropy (e.g., caused by rotation, shear, acceleration or walls) is in practice present in most turbulent flows and affects flow dynamics across different scales, as well as the kinetic energy decay. We investigate the role of wall confinement and viscous dissipation on the decay rate of an initially isotropic field for confining volumes of different aspect ratios. We first generate an isotropic velocity field in a cube with periodic boundary conditions. Next, using this field, we change the boundary conditions to no-slip walls on all sides. These walls restrict the initial field to a confined geometry and also provide an additional viscous dissipation mechanism. The problem is considered for confining volumes of different aspect ratios by adjusting the initial field. The change in confining volume introduces an additional length scale to the problem. Direct numerical simulation of the proposed set-up is used to verify the scaling arguments for the decay rate of kinetic energy. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  11. On Lagrangian and Eulerian Acceleration in Rotating and Sheared Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Schneider, Kai; Bos, Wouter; Farge, Marie

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration properties of turbulence are of importance for problems ranging from fundamental theoretical considerations to modeling of dispersion processes. The acceleration statistics of rotating and sheared homogeneous turbulence are studied here using direct numerical simulations. The study focusses in particular on the influence of the Coriolis to shear rate ratio and also on the scale dependence of the statistics. The probability density functions (pdfs) of both Lagrangian and Eulerian acceleration show a strong and similar influence on the rotation ratio. The flatness further quantifies this influence and yields values close to three for strong rotation. For moderate and vanishing rotation, the flatness of the Eulerian acceleration is larger than that of the Lagrangian acceleration, contrary to previous results for isotropic turbulence. A wavelet-based scale-dependent analysis shows that the flatness of both Eulerian and Lagrangian acceleration increases as scale decreases. For strong rotation, the Eulerian acceleration is more intermittent than the Lagrangian acceleration, while the opposite result is obtained for moderate rotation.

  12. Scaling laws for homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Mhuiris, Nessan Macgiolla

    1988-01-01

    The scaling properties of plane homogeneous turbulent shear flows in a rotating frame are examined mathematically by a direct analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. It is proved that two such shear flows are dynamically similar if and only if their initial dimensionless energy spectrum E star (k star, 0), initial dimensionless shear rate SK sub 0/epsilon sub 0, initial Reynolds number K squared sub 0/nu epsilon sub 0, and the ration of the rotation rate to the shear rate omega/S are identical. Consequently, if universal equilibrium states exist, at high Reynolds numbers, they will only depend on the single parameter omega/S. The commonly assumed dependence of such equilibrium states on omega/S through the Richardson number Ri=-2(omega/S)(1-2 omega/S) is proven to be inconsistent with the full Navier-Stokes equations and to constitute no more than a weak approximation. To be more specific, Richardson number similarity is shown to only rigorously apply to certain low-order truncations of the Navier-Stokes equations (i.e., to certain second-order closure models) wherein closure is achieved at the second-moment level by assuming that the higher-order moments are a small perturbation of their isotropic states. The physical dependence of rotating turbulent shear flows on omega/S is discussed in detail along with the implications for turbulence modeling.

  13. Scale-by-scale energy fluxes in anisotropic non-homogeneous turbulence behind a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Portela, Felipe; Papadakis, George; Vassilicos, John Christos

    2015-11-01

    The turbulent wake behind a square section cylinder is studied by means of high resolution direct numerical simulations using an in-house finite volume code. The Reynolds number based on the cylinder side is 3900. Single- and two-point statistics are collected in the lee of the cylinder for over 30 shedding periods, allowing for an extensive description of the development of the turbulence. The power spectrum in the frequency domain of velocity fluctuations displays a near -5/3 power law in the near wake, where the turbulence is neither isotropic nor homogeneous. In the same region of the flow, two-point statistics reveal a direct cascade of fluctuating kinetic energy down the scales as a result of the combined effect of linear and non-linear interactions. For scales aligned with the mean flow the non-linear interactions dominate the cascade. Conversely, for scales normal to the mean flow the cascade is dominated by the linear interactions while the non-linear term is mostly responsible for redistributing energy to different orientations. The authors acknowledge support form the EU through the FP7 Marie Curie MULTISOLVE project (grant agreement No. 317269).

  14. On the dynamics of small-scale vorticity in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Wray, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    It was previously shown that the strong vorticity in isotropic turbulence is organized into tubular vortices ('worms') whose properties were characterized through the use of full numerical simulations at several Reynolds numbers. At the time most of the observations were kinematic, and several scaling laws were discovered for which there was no theoretical explanation. In the meantime, further analysis of the same fields yielded new information on the generation of the vortices, and it was realized that even if they had to be formed by stretching, they were at any given moment actually compressed at many points of their axes. This apparent contradiction was partially explained by postulating axial inertial waves induced by the nonuniformity of the vortex cores, which helped to 'spread' the axial strain and allowed the vortices to remain compact even if not uniformly stretched. The existence of such solutions was recently proved numerically. The present report discusses a set of new numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence, and a reanalysis of the old ones, in an effort to prove or disprove the presence of these waves in actual turbulent flows and to understand the dynamics, as opposed to the kinematics, of the vortices.

  15. The isotropic nature of the background turbulence spectra in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Marsch, E.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    At the high-frequency end of the inertial range, the solar wind turbulence power spectrum was recently found to be anisotropic with respect to the direction of local magnetic field, as an evidence for the presence of a "critical balance" style turbulence cascade. However, we find that the spectral anisotropy seems to result from intermittent structures. The following two independent studies corroborate this statement by showing that the power spectra of the background turbulence, in which there are no intermittent structures, have an isotropic nature. In Study 1, we remove the wavelet coefficients of the local intermittency with large partial variance increment (PVI), and find the spectral indices of the magnetic field are 1.63±0.02, independent of the angle θRB between the direction of the local background magnetic field and the radial direction. In Study 2, we make a statistical study on the magnetic field spectral indices obtained by using Fast Fourier Transform on 40 time series, in which no intermittent structures appear. We find that for the time series with 0o<θRB <6o, the probability distribution of the observed spectral indices peaks at -1.7, while the -2 index predicted by the "critical balance" theory rarely appears. For the time series with 84 o <θRB <90 o, the probability distribution of the indices peaks at -1.5. Considering the uncertainty of the statistics, these results show that the background-turbulence spectra are nearly isotropic with respect to θRB, which may be consistent with some explanations based on hydrodynamic turbulence theory.

  16. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  17. Relation of the fourth-order statistical invariants of velocity gradient tensor in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Fang, L; Zhang, Y J; Fang, J; Zhu, Y

    2016-08-01

    We show by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) that in different types of isotropic turbulence, the fourth-order statistical invariants have approximately a linear relation, which can be represented by a straight line in the phase plane, passing two extreme states: the Gaussian state and the restricted Euler state. Also, each DNS case corresponds to an equilibrium region that is roughly Reynolds-dependent. In addition, both the time reversal and the compressibility effect lead to nonequilibrium transition processes in this phase plane. This observation adds a new restriction on the mean-field theory. PMID:27627399

  18. Complete set of homogeneous isotropic analytic solutions in scalar-tensor cosmology with radiation and curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Chen, Shih-Hung; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2012-10-01

    We study a model of a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity, with a specific potential energy for the scalar field, and include curvature and radiation as two additional parameters. Our goal is to obtain analytically the complete set of configurations of a homogeneous and isotropic universe as a function of time. This leads to a geodesically complete description of the Universe, including the passage through the cosmological singularities, at the classical level. We give all the solutions analytically without any restrictions on the parameter space of the model or initial values of the fields. We find that for generic solutions the Universe goes through a singular (zero-size) bounce by entering a period of antigravity at each big crunch and exiting from it at the following big bang. This happens cyclically again and again without violating the null-energy condition. There is a special subset of geodesically complete nongeneric solutions which perform zero-size bounces without ever entering the antigravity regime in all cycles. For these, initial values of the fields are synchronized and quantized but the parameters of the model are not restricted. There is also a subset of spatial curvature-induced solutions that have finite-size bounces in the gravity regime and never enter the antigravity phase. These exist only within a small continuous domain of parameter space without fine-tuning the initial conditions. To obtain these results, we identified 25 regions of a 6-parameter space in which the complete set of analytic solutions are explicitly obtained.

  19. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Minimal deterministic Matlab program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, Pietro

    2010-10-01

    The homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation (HIBE) is a fundamental dynamic model for many applications in thermodynamics, econophysics and sociodynamics. Despite recent hardware improvements, the solution of the Boltzmann equation remains extremely challenging from the computational point of view, in particular by deterministic methods (free of stochastic noise). This work aims to improve a deterministic direct method recently proposed [V.V. Aristov, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001] for solving the HIBE with a generic collisional kernel and, in particular, for taking care of the late dynamics of the relaxation towards the equilibrium. Essentially (a) the original problem is reformulated in terms of particle kinetic energy (exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) the computation of the relaxation rates is improved by the DVM-like correction, where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model (ensuring that the macroscopic conservation laws are exactly satisfied). Both these corrections make possible to derive very accurate reference solutions for this test case. Moreover this work aims to distribute an open-source program (called HOMISBOLTZ), which can be redistributed and/or modified for dealing with different applications, under the terms of the GNU General Public License. The program has been purposely designed in order to be minimal, not only with regards to the reduced number of lines (less than 1000), but also with regards to the coding style (as simple as possible). Program summaryProgram title: HOMISBOLTZ Catalogue identifier: AEGN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23 340 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 635 236 Distribution format: tar

  20. Improved turbulence models based on large eddy simulation of homogeneous, incompressible turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardino, J.; Ferziger, J. H.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    The physical bases of large eddy simulation and subgrid modeling are studied. A subgrid scale similarity model is developed that can account for system rotation. Large eddy simulations of homogeneous shear flows with system rotation were carried out. Apparently contradictory experimental results were explained. The main effect of rotation is to increase the transverse length scales in the rotation direction, and thereby decrease the rates of dissipation. Experimental results are shown to be affected by conditions at the turbulence producing grid, which make the initial states a function of the rotation rate. A two equation model is proposed that accounts for effects of rotation and shows good agreement with experimental results. In addition, a Reynolds stress model is developed that represents the turbulence structure of homogeneous shear flows very well and can account also for the effects of system rotation.

  1. The upper atmosphere of Uranus - A critical test of isotropic turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. G.; Elliot, J. L.; Sicardy, B.; Nicholson, P.; Matthews, K.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of the August 15, 1980, Uranus occultation of KM 12, obtained from Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory, European Southern Observatory, and Cerro Las Campanas Observatory, are used to compare the atmospheric structure at points separated by approximately 140 km along the planetary limb. The results reveal striking, but by no means perfect correlation of the light curves, ruling out isotropic turbulence as the cause of the light curve spikes. The atmosphere is strongly layered, and any acceptable turbulence model must accommodate the axial ratios of greater than about 60 which are observed. The mean temperature of the atmosphere is 150 plus or minus 15 K for the region near number density 10 to the 14th per cu cm. Derived temperature variations of vertical scale approximately 130 km and amplitude plus or minus 5 K are in agreement for all stations, and correlated spikes correspond to low-amplitude temperature variations with a vertical scale of several kilometers.

  2. Thermoelectric effects in decaying homogeneous magneto-gas turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1991-01-01

    In the formulation of compressible MHD (i.e., magneto-gas dynamics), a 'generalized Ohm's law is required. In particular, an electron pressure term and a 'Hall effect' term may appear as non-negligible additions to the Ohm's law that is conventionally used for incompressible MHD. In 'high-beta' (i.e., relatively low magnetic energy) situations, the Hall term may be neglected (at least initially) but, as it turns out, the electron pressure term cannot be neglected. Here, three-dimensional, high-beta, homogeneous, decaying, magneto-gas turbulence is examined with regard to this additional term. Through numerical simulation, it is found that 'thermoelectric effects' are produced that significantly alter the evolution of the magnetic field and electric current strengths.

  3. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-03-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  4. Modulation of isotropic turbulence by deformable droplets of Taylor lengthscale size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effects of finite-size deformable droplets on decaying isotropic turbulence via direct numerical simulation (DNS). DNS is performed using the two-fluid pressure-correction method by Dodd and Ferrante [J. Comput. Phys. 273, 416 (2014)] coupled with the volume of fluid method by Baraldi et al. [Comput. & Fluids 96, 322 (2014)]. We fully-resolve the flow around and inside 3130 droplets of Taylor lengthscale size, resulting in a droplet volume fraction of 0.05. The initial Taylor lengthscale Reynolds number is Reλ0 = 75 , and the computational mesh has 10243 grid points. We analyze the effects on turbulence modulation of varying the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 <=μd /μc <= 100) and the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s velocity of turbulence (0 . 1 <=Werms <= 5). We discuss how varying these parameters affects the turbulence kinetic energy budget, and explain the physical mechanisms for such modulation. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Grant Number OCI-1054591.

  5. Zonal Flows from Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking of Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2013-10-01

    To study how zonal flows (ZF) arise, we examine one of the simplest possible models, the stochastically forced Hasegawa-Mima equation, which displays the bifurcation of steady ZFs from a state of homogeneous turbulence; thus a statistical treatment is required. Here an approach is adopted in which the ZFs are treated as mean fields that spontaneously break the background symmetry. The resulting inhomogeneous ensemble is treated self-consistently without assuming weak inhomogeneity. Closed statistical equations are obtained by ignoring the drift-wave self-interactions while fully retaining the drift-wave-ZF nonlinearities. We show that from the statistical point of view ZF generation can be understood as pattern formation. This leads to the surprising result that in a saturated turbulent state the ZF wavelength is not unique; a continuous band of ZF scales is allowed. Only those within a smaller sub-band are linearly stable. That stability is analyzed and the stability diagram in parameter space is calculated and successfully compared with simulations. The stability concept provides a way of interpreting the merging of zonal jets, a phenomenon commonly observed in observations and numerical studies. Work supported by U.S DOE Contract No DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  6. On the asymptotic similarity of rotating homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. D.; Chasnov, J. R.; Mansour, N. N.

    1994-01-01

    Asymptotic similarity states at large Reynolds numbers and small Rossby numbers in rotating homogeneous turbulence are investigated using the database obtained from large-eddy simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Previous work has shown that the turbulence kinetic energy and integral length scales are accurately described by simple scaling laws based on the low wavenumbers part of the three-dimensional energy spectrum. The primary interest of the present study is to search for spectrum similarity in the asymptotic state. Four independent energy spectra are defined. It is shown that rescaling of these energy spectra in the asymptotic regime will collapse three out of the four spectra. The spectrum which does not collapse is a function only of the vertical wavenumber and corresponds to two-component motions in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Detailed investigation of the cause of this anomalous behavior reveals the existence of a strong reverse cascade of energy from small-to-large scales of the two-dimensional, two-component motions. This feature of the rotating flow is presumably linked to the lack of a complete similarity state, though further study of this issue is required.

  7. Anisotropic Structure of Rotating Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Squires, Kyle D.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Large eddy simulation is used to investigate the development of anisotropies and the evolution towards a quasi two-dimensional state in rotating homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds number. The present study demonstrates the existence of two transitions in the development of anisotropy. The first transition marks the onset of anisotropy and occurs when a macro-Rossby number (based on a longitudinal integral lengthscale) has decreased to near unity while the second transition occurs when a micro-Rossby number (defined in this work as the ratio of the rms fluctuating vorticity to background vorticity) has decreased to unity. The anisotropy marked by the first transition corresponds to a reduction in dimensionality while the second transition corresponds to a polarization of the flow, i.e., relative dominance of the velocity components in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Polarization is reflected by emergence of anisotropy measures based on the two-dimensional component of the turbulence. Investigation of the vorticity structure shows that the second transition is also characterized by an increasing tendency for alignment between the fluctuating vorticity vector and the background angular velocity vector with a preference for corrotative vorticity.

  8. Magnetic Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Turbulence with Varying Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Subedi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Chuychai, P.; Rowlands, G.; Vyas, S.

    2016-08-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, the magnetic field line random walk (FLRW) plays an important role in guiding particle transport. The FLRW behavior is scaled by the Kubo number R=(b/{B}0)({{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0, and coherence scales parallel ({{\\ell }}\\parallel ) and perpendicular ({{\\ell }}\\perp ) to {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0. Here we use a nonperturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin’s hypothesis, together with direct computer simulations, to examine the R-scaling of the FLRW for varying B 0 with finite b and isotropic fluctuations with {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp =1, instead of the well-studied route of varying {{\\ell }}\\parallel /{{\\ell }}\\perp for b \\ll {B}0. The FLRW for isotropic magnetic fluctuations is also of astrophysical interest regarding transport processes in the interstellar medium. With a mean field, fluctuations may have variance anisotropy, so we consider limiting cases of isotropic variance and transverse variance (with b z = 0). We obtain analytic theories, and closed-form solutions for extreme cases. Padé approximants are provided to interpolate all versions of theory and simulations to any B 0. We demonstrate that, for isotropic turbulence, Corrsin-based theories generally work well, and with increasing R there is a transition from quasilinear to Bohm diffusion. This holds even with b z = 0, when different routes to R\\to ∞ are mathematically equivalent; in contrast with previous studies, we find that a Corrsin-based theory with random ballistic decorrelation works well even up to R = 400, where the effects of trapping are barely perceptible in simulation results.

  9. Effect of freestream isotropic turbulence on heat transfer from a sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Kottam, Kirit

    2008-07-01

    We consider direct numerical simulation (DNS) based on pseudospectral methods to study the heat transfer around a stationary sphere held at a constant temperature and subject to an ambient turbulent velocity and temperature condition. The sphere Reynolds number is in the range of 63-400, and the sphere diameter (d) varies from one to eight times the Kolmogorov scale (η). The ambient turbulent field is isotropic, and the Taylor microscale Reynolds number Rλ varies from 38 to 240. Results from two sets of DNS are presented. In the first set, the ambient velocity field is turbulent, but the ambient temperature is held constant. In the second set of simulations, both the ambient velocity and the temperature fields are turbulent. These two sets of simulations allow us to isolate the role of freestream velocity fluctuations and temperature fluctuations in modifying the mean and time-dependent heat transfer from the sphere. The mean Nusselt number is observed to be independent of Rλ. It is shown that the freestream turbulence does not have any significant effect on the mean Nusselt number, and the available correlations for a steady and uniform ambient can predict the mean Nusselt number under the turbulent ambient condition. The instantaneous Nusselt number, however, can differ significantly from the mean, and can be negative in case of large temperature fluctuation in the far field. The instantaneous Nusselt number obtained from the DNS is analyzed and compared with the analytical expression for the unsteady thermal response of a sphere. It is shown that the thermal added-mass effect is small for d /η≈1 but introduces spurious oscillation at higher d. The thermal history effect is shown to be insignificant for all d /η. Properties of the thermal wake in the presence of the turbulent velocity and temperature fields are studied. The mean thermal wake is observed to be shorter in streamwise direction and wider in crossflow direction in a turbulent ambient than that

  10. Composite surface-plasmon-polariton waves guided by a thin metal layer sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric material and a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple p- and s-polarized compound surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves at a fixed frequency can be guided by a structure consisting of a metal layer sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric (HID) material and a periodic multilayered isotropic dielectric (PMLID) material. For any thickness of the metal layer, at least one compound SPP wave must exist. It possesses the p-polarization state, and is strongly bound to the metal/HID interface when the metal thickness is large but to both metal/dielectric interfaces when the metal thickness is small. When the metal layer vanishes, this compound SPP wave transmutes into a Tamm wave. Additional compound SPP waves exist, depending on the thickness of the metal layer, the relative permittivity of the HID material, and the period and composition of the PMLID material. Some of these are p-polarized, the others are s-polarized. All of them differ in phase speed, attenuation rate, and field profile, even though all are excitable at the same frequency. The multiplicity and dependence of the number of compound SPP waves on the relative permittivity of the HID material when the metal layer is thin could be useful for optical sensing applications and intrachip plasmonic optical communication.

  11. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  12. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guangyuan Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  13. Relative dispersion in isotropic turbulence. Part 2. A new stochastic model with Reynolds-number dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgas, Michael S.; Yeung, P. K.

    2004-03-01

    A new model for Lagrangian particle-pair separation in turbulent flows is developed and compared with data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isotropic turbulence. The model formulation emphasizes (i) non-Gaussian behaviour in Eulerian and Lagrangian statistics, (ii) the occurrence of large separation velocities, (iii) the role of straining and streaming flow structure as recognized in kinematic simulations of turbulence, and (iv) the role of conditionally averaged accelerations in stochastic modelling of turbulent relative dispersion. Previous stochastic models of relative dispersion have produced unrealistic behaviour, particularly in the dissipation subrange where viscous effects are important, which have led to questions on the adequacy of stochastic modelling. However, this failure can now be recognized as inadequate detail in formulation, which is explained and rectified in this paper. The model is quasi-one-dimensional in nature, and is focused on the statistics of particle-pair separation distance and its rate of change, referred to as the separation speed. Detailed comparisons are presented at several Reynolds numbers using the DNS database reported in a companion paper (Part 1). Up to fourth-order moments for these quantities are examined, as well as the separation-distance probability density function, which is discussed in the context of recent claims of Richardson scaling in the literature. The model is able to account for the spatial representation of straining regions as well as incompressibility of the flow, and is shown to reproduce strong non-Gaussianity and intermittency in the Lagrangian separation statistics observed in DNS. Comparisons with recent physical experiments are also remarkably consistent. This work demonstrates that stochastic models when properly formulated are effective and efficient representations of the dispersion process and this general class of models therefore possess great utility for calculations of both one

  14. Pressure-strain-rate events in homogeneous turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, James G.; Lee, Moon J.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the intercomponent energy transfer processes by the pressure-strain-rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow is presented. Probability density functions (pdf's) and contour plots of the rapid and slow pressure-strain-rate show that the energy transfer processes are extremely peaky, with high-magnitude events dominating low-magnitude fluctuations, as reflected by very high flatness factors of the pressure-strain-rate. A concept of the energy transfer class was applied to investigate details of the direction as well as magnitude of the energy transfer processes. In incompressible flow, six disjoint energy transfer classes exist. Examination of contours in instantaneous fields, pdf's and weighted pdf's of the pressure-strain-rate indicates that in the low magnitude regions all six classes play an important role, but in the high magnitude regions four classes of transfer processes, dominate. The contribution to the average slow pressure-strain-rate from the high magnitude fluctuations is only 50 percent or less. The relative significance of high and low magnitude transfer events is discussed.

  15. Forward and backward in time dispersion of fluid and inertial particles in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate both theoretically and numerically the Forward-In-Time (FIT) and Backward-In-Time (BIT) dispersion of fluid and inertial particle-pairs in isotropic turbulence. Fluid particles are known to separate faster BIT than FIT in three-dimensional turbulence, and we find that inertial particles do the same. However, we find that the irreversibility in the inertial particle dispersion is in general much stronger than that for fluid particles. For example, the ratio of the BIT to FIT mean-square separation can be up to an order of magnitude larger for the inertial particles than for the fluid particles. We also find that for both the inertial and fluid particles, the irreversibility becomes stronger as the scale of their separation decreases. Regarding the physical mechanism for the irreversibility, we argue that whereas the irreversibility of fluid particle-pair dispersion can be understood in terms of a directional bias arising from the energy transfer process in turbulence, inertial particles experience an additional source of irreversibility arising from the non-local contribution to their velocity dynamics, a contribution that vanishes in the limit St → 0, where St is the particle Stokes number. For each given initial (final, in the BIT case) separation, r0, there is an optimum value of St for which the dispersion irreversibility is strongest, as such particles are optimally affected by both sources of irreversibility. We derive analytical expressions for the BIT, mean-square separation of inertial particles and compare the predictions with numerical data obtained from a Reλ ≈ 582 (where Reλ is the Taylor Reynolds number) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of particle-laden isotropic turbulent flow. The small-time theory, which in the dissipation range is valid for times ≤max[Stτη, τη] (where τη is the Kolmogorov time scale), is in excellent agreement with the DNS. The theory for long-times is in good agreement with the DNS

  16. Isotropic boundary adapted wavelets for coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farge, Marie; Sakurai, Teluo; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    We present a construction of isotropic boundary adapted wavelets, which are orthogonal and yield a multi-resolution analysis. We analyze DNS data of turbulent channel flow computed at a friction-velocity based Reynolds number of 395 and investigate the role of coherent vorticity. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to split the flow into two parts, coherent and incoherent vorticity. The statistics of the former, i.e., energy and enstrophy spectra, are close to the ones of the total flow, and moreover the nonlinear energy budgets are well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak wavelet coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., noise-like, background flow and exhibits an almost equi-distribution of energy.

  17. Passive scalar spectrum in isotropic turbulence: Prediction by the Lagrangian direct-interaction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Kida, Shigeo

    1999-07-01

    The Lagrangian direct-interaction approximation developed previously by the present authors [S. Kida and S. Goto, J. Fluid Mech. 345, 307 (1997)] is applied to a passive scalar field in isotropic turbulence. We examine the behavior of solutions to the resultant closure equations for the correlation function of the scalar field for arbitrary values of the Schmidt number, and show systematically that the solutions are completely consistent with the phenomenological theories on the scalar spectral function by Obukhov (1949), Corrsin (1951), Batchelor et al. (1959), and Batchelor (1959). The universal forms of the function in the statistically stationary state are obtained by solving the closure equations numerically in the whole wave number range for each case of moderate, extremely large, and small values of the Schmidt number.

  18. Calculations of longitudinal and transverse velocity structure functions using a vortex model of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    He, G.; Doolen, G.D.; Chen, S.

    1999-12-01

    The longitudinal structure function (LSF) and the transverse structure function (TSF) in isotropic turbulence are calculated using a vortex model. The vortex model is composed of the Rankine and Burgers vortices which have the exponential distributions in the vortex Reynolds number and vortex radii. This model exhibits a power law in the inertial range and satisfies the minimal condition of isotropy that the second-order exponent of the LSF in the inertial range is equal to that of the TSF. Also observed are differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions caused by intermittency. These differences are related to their scaling differences which have been previously observed in experiments and numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  20. Large fluctuations of the nonlinearities in isotropic turbulence. Anisotropic filtering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordella, D.; Di Savino, S.; Sitzia, L.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Navier-Stokes isotropic turbulent field numerically simulated in a box with a discretization of 10243 (Biferale et al., 2005), we show that the probability of having a stretching-tilting larger than a few times the local enstrophy is low. By using an anisotropic kind of filter in the Fourier space, where wavenumbers that have at least one component below a threshold or inside a range are removed, we analyze these survival statistics when the large, the small inertial or the small inertial and dissipation scales are filtered out. By considering a flow obtained by randomizing the phases of the Fourier modes, and applying our filtering techniques, we identified clearly the properties attributable to turbulence. It can be observed that, in the unfiltered isotropic Navier-Stokes field, the probability of the ratio (|ωṡ∇U|/|) being higher than a given threshold is higher than in the fields where the large scales were filtered out. At the same time, it is lower than in the fields where the small inertial and dissipation range of scales is filtered out. This is basically due to the suppression of compact structures in the ranges that have been filtered in different ways. The partial removal of the background of filaments and sheets does not have a first order effect on these statistics. These results are discussed in the light of a hypothesized relation between vortical filaments, sheets and blobs in physical space and in Fourier space. The study in fact can be viewed as a kind of test for this idea and tries to highlight its limits. We conclude that a qualitative relation in physical space and in Fourier space can be supposed to exist for blobs only. That is for the near isotropic structures which are sufficiently described by a single spatial scale and do not suffer from the disambiguation problem as filaments and sheets do. Information is also given on the filtering effect on statistics concerning the inclination of the strain rate tensor eigenvectors with

  1. Group analysis of the Fourier transform of the spatially homogeneous and isotropic Boltzmann equation with a source term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriyawichitseranee, A.; Grigoriev, Yu. N.; Meleshko, S. V.

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted to group analysis of the spatially homogeneous and isotropic Boltzmann equation with a source term. In fact, the Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation with respect to the molecular velocity variable is considered. Using a particular class of solutions, the determining equation for the admitted Lie group is reduced to a partial differential equation for the source function. The latter equation is analyzed by an algebraic method. A complete group classification of the Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation is given. All invariant solutions of this equation are also presented in the paper.

  2. Scattering reduction for an acoustic sensor using a multilayered shell comprising a pair of homogeneous isotropic single-negative media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Zhu, Xue-Feng; Liang, Bin; Li, Yong; Zou, Xin-Ye; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2012-07-01

    We have designed a cylindrical multilayered structure to reduce scattering for an acoustic sensor while allowing it to receive external information. The proposed structure consists of two alternately arranged complementary media with homogeneous isotropic single-negative parameters. Numerical results show that the acoustic scattering from the sensor is suppressed considerably when the number of bilayers is large enough and the thickness of each bilayer is much smaller than the incident wavelength. This may be particularly significant for practical applications where acoustic measurements would otherwise be disturbed by the insertion of sensors.

  3. On the mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Bragg, Andrew; Ireland, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of turbulence. By comparisons with DNS data we demonstrate that the mechanism in the theory of Zaichik et al. (Phys. Fluids 19, 113308, 2007) quantitatively describes the clustering of particles in the inertial range. We then analyze the theory for isotropic turbulence in the limit Reλ --> ∞ . For arbitrary St (Stokes number), there exists a separation in the inertial range beyond which Str << 1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover timescale at separation r. The inertial-range clustering in this limit can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor at that scale. At smaller separations, there may be transitions to Str ~ 1 , where a path history symmetry breaking effect dominates the clustering mechanism, and in some cases Str >> 1 , which implies ballistic behavior and a flat RDF. The scaling for each of these regimes is derived and compared to DNS, where applicable. Finally, we compare the results with the ``sweep-stick'' mechanism by Coleman and Vassilicos (Phys. Fluids 21, 113301, 2009) and discuss the similarities and differences between the two theories.

  4. Long-time behavior of material-surface curvature in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1992-01-01

    The behavior at large times of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. The main objectives are: to study the asymptotic behavior of the pdf curvature as a function of initial curvature and shape; and to establish whether the curvature of an initially plane material element goes to a stationary probability distribution. The evidence available in the literature about the asymptotic curvature-pdf of initially flat surfaces is ambiguous, and the conjecture is that it is quasi-stationary. In this work several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times the moments of the logarithm of curvature are independent of the initial pdf of curvature. This, it is argued, supports the view that the curvature attains a stationary distribution at long times. It is also shown that, irrespective of initial shape or curvature, the shape of any material element at long times is cylindrical with a high probability.

  5. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  6. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ1 : λ2 : λ3 is shown to be about 4:1:-5, compared to about 8:3:-11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume deformations. The results

  7. Large-deviation joint statistics of the finite-time Lyapunov spectrum in isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry L. Meneveau, Charles

    2015-08-15

    One of the hallmarks of turbulent flows is the chaotic behavior of fluid particle paths with exponentially growing separation among them while their distance does not exceed the viscous range. The maximal (positive) Lyapunov exponent represents the average strength of the exponential growth rate, while fluctuations in the rate of growth are characterized by the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLEs). In the last decade or so, the notion of Lagrangian coherent structures (which are often computed using FTLEs) has gained attention as a tool for visualizing coherent trajectory patterns in a flow and distinguishing regions of the flow with different mixing properties. A quantitative statistical characterization of FTLEs can be accomplished using the statistical theory of large deviations, based on the so-called Cramér function. To obtain the Cramér function from data, we use both the method based on measuring moments and measuring histograms and introduce a finite-size correction to the histogram-based method. We generalize the existing univariate formalism to the joint distributions of the two FTLEs needed to fully specify the Lyapunov spectrum in 3D flows. The joint Cramér function of turbulence is measured from two direct numerical simulation datasets of isotropic turbulence. Results are compared with joint statistics of FTLEs computed using only the symmetric part of the velocity gradient tensor, as well as with joint statistics of instantaneous strain-rate eigenvalues. When using only the strain contribution of the velocity gradient, the maximal FTLE nearly doubles in magnitude, highlighting the role of rotation in de-correlating the fluid deformations along particle paths. We also extend the large-deviation theory to study the statistics of the ratio of FTLEs. The most likely ratio of the FTLEs λ{sub 1} : λ{sub 2} : λ{sub 3} is shown to be about 4:1:−5, compared to about 8:3:−11 when using only the strain-rate tensor for calculating fluid volume

  8. Intensity and angle-of-arrival spectra of laser light propagating through axially homogeneous buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Shashikant S; Arakeri, Jaywant H

    2016-08-01

    Frequency spectra obtained from the measurements of light intensity and angle of arrival (AOA) of parallel laser light propagating through the axially homogeneous, axisymmetric buoyancy-driven turbulent flow at high Rayleigh numbers in a long (length-to-diameter ratio of about 10) vertical tube are reported. The flow is driven by an unstable density difference created across the tube ends using brine and fresh water. The highest Rayleigh number is about 8×109. The aim of the present work is to find whether the conventional Obukhov-Corrsin scaling or Bolgiano-Obukhov (BO) scaling is obtained for the intensity and AOA spectra in the case of light propagation in a buoyancy-driven turbulent medium. Theoretical relations for the frequency spectra of log amplitude and AOA fluctuations developed for homogeneous isotropic turbulent media are modified for the buoyancy-driven flow in the present case to obtain the asymptotic scalings for the high and low frequency ranges. For low frequencies, the spectra of intensity and vertical AOA fluctuations obtained from measurements follow BO scaling, while scaling for the spectra of horizontal AOA fluctuations shows a small departure from BO scaling. PMID:27505375

  9. Coherent vortex extraction in 3D homogeneous turbulence: comparison between orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelet decompositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, O.; Schneider, K.; Farge, M.

    A comparison between two different ways of extracting coherent vortices in three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulence is performed, using either orthogonal or biorthogonal wavelets. The method is based on a wavelet decomposition of the vorticity field and a subsequent thresholding of the wavelet coefficients. The coherent vorticity is reconstructed from a few strong wavelet coefficients, while the incoherent vorticity is reconstructed from the remaining weak coefficients. The choice of the threshold, which has no adjustable parameters, is motivated for the orthogonal case from the denoising theory. Using only 3 % of the coefficients we show that both decompositions, that is orthogonal and biorthogonal, extract the coherent vortices. They contain most of the energy (around 99 % in both cases) and retain 74 % and 68 % of the enstrophy in the orthogonal and biorthogonal cases, respectively. The incoherent background flow for the orthogonal decomposition, which corresponds to 97 % of the wavelet coefficients, is structureless, decorrelated, and has a Gaussian velocity probability distribution function (PDF). In contrast, for the biorthogonal decomposition, the background flow exhibits quasi-two-dimensional (2D) structures and yields an exponential velocity PDF. Moreover, the biorthogonal decomposition loses 3.7% of both enstrophy and helicity, while they are conserved by the orthogonal decomposition.

  10. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow - An alternative view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. S.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if a residual vortex stretching term is maintained in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are presented for a k-epsilon model modified to account for net vortex stretching.

  11. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introducesmore » a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.« less

  12. Magnetic Field Line Random Walk in Isotropic Turbulence with Zero Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonsrettee, W.; Subedi, P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Chuychai, P.

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, magnetic field lines often guide the motions of thermal and non-thermal particles. The field line random walk (FLRW) is typically considered to depend on the Kubo number R = (b/B 0)(l∥/l) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field B 0, and parallel and perpendicular coherence scales l∥ and l, respectively. Here we examine the FLRW when R → ∞ by taking B 0 → 0 for finite bz (fluctuation component along B 0), which differs from the well-studied route with bz = 0 or bz Lt B 0 as the turbulence becomes quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). Fluctuations with B 0 = 0 are typically isotropic, which serves as a reasonable model of interstellar turbulence. We use a non-perturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin's hypothesis to determine closed-form solutions for the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient for three versions of the theory, which are directly related to the k -1 or k -2 moment of the power spectrum. We test these theories by performing computer simulations of the FLRW, obtaining the ratio of diffusion coefficients for two different parameterizations of a field line. Comparing this with theoretical ratios, the random ballistic decorrelation version of the theory agrees well with the simulations. All results exhibit an analog to Bohm diffusion. In the quasi-2D limit, previous works have shown that Corrsin-based theories deviate substantially from simulation results, but here we find that as B 0 → 0, they remain in reasonable agreement. We conclude that their applicability is limited not by large R, but rather by quasi-two-dimensionality.

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD LINE RANDOM WALK IN ISOTROPIC TURBULENCE WITH ZERO MEAN FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsrettee, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Snodin, A. P.; Wongpan, P.; Subedi, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Chuychai, P. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th E-mail: pat.wongpan@postgrad.otago.ac.nz E-mail: prasub@udel.edu

    2015-01-01

    In astrophysical plasmas, magnetic field lines often guide the motions of thermal and non-thermal particles. The field line random walk (FLRW) is typically considered to depend on the Kubo number R = (b/B {sub 0})(ℓ{sub ∥}/ℓ ) for rms magnetic fluctuation b, large-scale mean field B {sub 0}, and parallel and perpendicular coherence scales ℓ{sub ∥} and ℓ , respectively. Here we examine the FLRW when R → ∞ by taking B {sub 0} → 0 for finite b{sub z} (fluctuation component along B {sub 0}), which differs from the well-studied route with b{sub z} = 0 or b{sub z} << B {sub 0} as the turbulence becomes quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D). Fluctuations with B {sub 0} = 0 are typically isotropic, which serves as a reasonable model of interstellar turbulence. We use a non-perturbative analytic framework based on Corrsin's hypothesis to determine closed-form solutions for the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient for three versions of the theory, which are directly related to the k {sup –1} or k {sup –2} moment of the power spectrum. We test these theories by performing computer simulations of the FLRW, obtaining the ratio of diffusion coefficients for two different parameterizations of a field line. Comparing this with theoretical ratios, the random ballistic decorrelation version of the theory agrees well with the simulations. All results exhibit an analog to Bohm diffusion. In the quasi-2D limit, previous works have shown that Corrsin-based theories deviate substantially from simulation results, but here we find that as B {sub 0} → 0, they remain in reasonable agreement. We conclude that their applicability is limited not by large R, but rather by quasi-two-dimensionality.

  14. A Stochastic Model for the Relative Motion of High Stokes Number Particles in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhariwal, Rohit; Rani, Sarma; Koch, Donald

    2014-11-01

    In the current study, a novel analytical closure for the diffusion current in the PDF equation is presented that is applicable to high-inertia particle pairs with Stokes numbers Str >> 1 . Here Str is a Stokes number based on the time-scale τr of eddies whose size scales with pair separation r. Using this closure, Langevin equations were solved to evolve particle-pair relative velocities and separations in stationary isotropic turbulence. The Langevin equation approach enables the simulation of the full PDF of pair relative motion, instead of only the first few moments of the PDF as is the case in a moments-based approach. Accordingly, PDFs Ω (U | r) and Ω (Ur | r) are computed for various separations r, where the former is the PDF of relative velocity U and the latter is the PDF of the radial component of relative velocity Ur, both conditioned upon the separation r. Consistent with the DNS study of Sundaram & Collins, the Langevin simulations capture the transition of Ω (U | r) from being Gaussian at integral-scale separations to an exponential PDF at Kolmogorov-scale separations. The radial distribution functions (RDFs) computed from these simulations also show reasonable quantitative agreement with those from the DNS of Fevrier et al.

  15. Power and Nonpower Laws of Passive Scalar Moments Convected by Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    The scaling behavior of the moments of two passive scalars that are excited by two different methods and simultaneously convected by the same isotropic steady turbulence at Rλ=805 and Sc=0.72 is studied by using direct numerical simulation with N =40963 grid points. The passive scalar θ is excited by a random source that is Gaussian and white in time, and the passive scalar q is excited by the mean uniform scalar gradient. In the inertial convective range, the n th-order moments of the scalar increment δ θ (r ) do not obey a simple power law, but have the local scaling exponents ξnθ+βnlog (r /r*) with βn>0 . In contrast, the local scaling exponents of q have well-developed plateaus and saturate with increasing order. The power law of passive scalar moments is not trivial. The universality of passive scalars is found not in the moments, but in the normalized moments.

  16. Power and nonpower laws of passive scalar moments convected by isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-09-11

    The scaling behavior of the moments of two passive scalars that are excited by two different methods and simultaneously convected by the same isotropic steady turbulence at R_{λ}=805 and Sc=0.72 is studied by using direct numerical simulation with N=4096^{3} grid points. The passive scalar θ is excited by a random source that is Gaussian and white in time, and the passive scalar q is excited by the mean uniform scalar gradient. In the inertial convective range, the nth-order moments of the scalar increment δθ(r) do not obey a simple power law, but have the local scaling exponents ξ_{n}^{θ}+β_{n}log(r/r_{*}) with β_{n}>0. In contrast, the local scaling exponents of q have well-developed plateaus and saturate with increasing order. The power law of passive scalar moments is not trivial. The universality of passive scalars is found not in the moments, but in the normalized moments. PMID:26406833

  17. Analysis of isotropic turbulence using a public database and the Web service model, and applications to study subgrid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneveau, Charles; Yang, Yunke; Perlman, Eric; Wan, Minpin; Burns, Randal; Szalay, Alex; Chen, Shiyi; Eyink, Gregory

    2008-11-01

    A public database system archiving a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data set of isotropic, forced turbulence is used for studying basic turbulence dynamics. The data set consists of the DNS output on 1024-cubed spatial points and 1024 time-samples spanning about one large-scale turn-over timescale. This complete space-time history of turbulence is accessible to users remotely through an interface that is based on the Web-services model (see http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu). Users may write and execute analysis programs on their host computers, while the programs make subroutine-like calls that request desired parts of the data over the network. The architecture of the database is briefly explained, as are some of the new functions such as Lagrangian particle tracking and spatial box-filtering. These tools are used to evaluate and compare subgrid stresses and models.

  18. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part 1. Simulations without gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the statistics of both individual inertial particles and inertial particle pairs in direct numerical simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity. The effect of the Taylor microscale Reynolds number $R_\\lambda$ on the particle statistics is examined over the largest range to date (from $R_\\lambda = 88-597$). We first explore the effect of preferential sampling on the single-particle statistics, and use our understanding of preferential sampling to provide a physical explanation for many of the trends in the particle velocity gradients, kinetic energies, and accelerations at low $St$. As $St$ increases, inertial filtering effects become more important, causing the particle kinetic energies and accelerations to decrease. We then consider particle-pair statistics, and focus our attention on the relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs) of the particles. The relative velocity statistics indicate that preferential-sampling effects are important for $St \\lesssim 0.1$ and that path-history/non-local effects become increasingly important for $St \\gtrsim 0.2$. The lower-order relative velocity statistics are only weakly sensitive to changes in Reynolds number at low $St$. We find that the RDFs peak near $St$ of order unity, that they exhibit power-law scaling for low and intermediate $St$, and that they are largely independent of Reynolds number for low and intermediate $St$. We also observe that at large $St$, changes in the RDF are related to changes the scaling exponents of the relative velocity variances. The particle collision kernel is found to be largely insensitive to the flow Reynolds number, suggesting that relatively low-Reynolds-number simulations may be able to capture much of the relevant physics of droplet collisions and growth in the adiabatic cores of atmospheric clouds.

  19. Flow structure interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Andrew; Morvan, Thomas; Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Elvin, Niell

    2015-11-01

    In the present experimental work we consider the degree of distortion of isotropy and homogeneity of grid turbulence caused by the presence of a thin flexible cantilever beam immersed in the flow aligned in the longitudinal direction. Beams of various rigidities and lengths were used in the experiments. Piezoelectric patches were attached to the beams which provided an output voltage proportional to the strain and therefore proportional to the beam's deflection. The experiments were carried out in a large scale wind tunnel and hot-wires were used to measure turbulence intensity in the vicinity of the beams for various values of the ratio of aerodynamic loading to beam's rigidity. It was found that the flow field distortion depends on the rigidity of the beam. For very rigid beams this distortion is of the order of the boundary layer thickness developing over the beam while for very flexible beams the distorted region is of the order of the beam's tip deflection. Analysis of the time-dependent signals indicated some correlation between the frequency of beam's vibration and flow structures detected. Supported by NSF Grant: CBET #1033117.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Propane-Air Combustion with Non-Homogeneous Reactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, D.; Cuenot, B.; Poinsot, T.; Blint, R.

    1998-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent propane-air combustion have been performed including complex chemistry and realistic molecular transport. The aerothermochemical conditions simulated (reactant temperature and pressure, turbulence rms velocity and integral length scale) correspond to conditions at the time of ignition in an automotive gasoline direct-injection reciprocating IC engine at low speed and light load. Both stoichiometric homogeneous reactants and non-homogeneous reactants with fuel-based equivalence ratios ranging from zero to four have been simulated. In the case of non-homogeneous reactants, a primary premixed flame (defined based on disappearance of the propane fuel) is followed by a secondary heat-release zone that is dominated by CO kinetics and turbulent mixing. Beyond a few flame thicknesses behind the primary flame, any remaining fuel has been broken down into carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Quantitative information relevant for modeling turbulent flame propagation through nonhomogeneous reactants has been extracted.

  1. Intermittency in non-homogeneous Wake and Jet Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, O. B.; Sekula, E.; Redondo, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    The scale to scale transfer and the structure functions are calculated and from these the intermittency parametres [1[3]. The estimates of turbulent diffusivity could also be measured. Some two point correlations and time lag calculations are used to investigate the local mixedness [4,5] and the temporal and spatial integral length scales obtained from both Lagrangian and Eulerian correlations and functions. We compare these results with both theoretical and experimental ones in the Laboratory with a wind tunnel at the wake of a grid or cillinder with and withoutand a near Wall. The a theoretical description of how to simulate intermittency following the model of Babiano et al. (1996) and the role of locality in higher order exponents is applied to the different flows. The information about turbulent jets is needed in several configurations providing basic information about the turbulent free jet, the circular jet and the turbulent wall jet. The experimental measurements of turbulent velocity is based on Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter measurements of the jet centerline and off centered radial positions in the tank at several distances from the wall. Spectral and structure function analysis are useful to determine the flow mixing ability using also flow visualization [6,7]. Results of experiments include the velocity distribution, entrainment angle of the jets, jet and wake average and fluctuating velocity, PDF's, Skewness and Kurthosis, velocity and vorticity standard deviation, boundary layers function and turbulence intensity . Different range of Wake and Jet flows show a maximum of turbulent intensity at a certain distance from the wall as it breaks the flow simmetry and adds large scale vorticity in the different experiments, these efects are also believed to occur in Geo-Astrophysical flows. [1] Babiano, A. (2002), On Particle dispersion processes in two-dimensional turbulence. In Turbulent mixing in geophysical flows. Eds. Linden P.F. and Redondo J.M., p. 2

  2. Direct numerical simulation of statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence and its relation to other shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Statistically stationary and homogeneous shear turbulence (SS-HST) is investigated by means of a new direct numerical simulation code, spectral in the two horizontal directions and compact-finite-differences in the direction of the shear. No remeshing is used to impose the shear-periodic boundary condition. The influence of the geometry of the computational box is explored. Since HST has no characteristic outer length scale and tends to fill the computational domain, long-term simulations of HST are "minimal" in the sense of containing on average only a few large-scale structures. It is found that the main limit is the spanwise box width, Lz, which sets the length and velocity scales of the turbulence, and that the two other box dimensions should be sufficiently large (Lx ≳ 2Lz, Ly ≳ Lz) to prevent other directions to be constrained as well. It is also found that very long boxes, Lx ≳ 2Ly, couple with the passing period of the shear-periodic boundary condition, and develop strong unphysical linearized bursts. Within those limits, the flow shows interesting similarities and differences with other shear flows, and in particular with the logarithmic layer of wall-bounded turbulence. They are explored in some detail. They include a self-sustaining process for large-scale streaks and quasi-periodic bursting. The bursting time scale is approximately universal, ˜20S-1, and the availability of two different bursting systems allows the growth of the bursts to be related with some confidence to the shearing of initially isotropic turbulence. It is concluded that SS-HST, conducted within the proper computational parameters, is a very promising system to study shear turbulence in general.

  3. Analysis of subgrid models using direct and large-eddy simulations of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, S.; Yeung, P. K.

    1994-12-01

    Direct and large eddy simulations of forced and decaying isotropic turbulence have been performed using a pseudospectral and a finite-difference code. Subgrid models that include a one-equation subgrid kinetic energy model with and without a stochastic backscatter forcing term and a new scale similarity model have been analyzed in both Fourier space and physical space. The Fourier space analysis showed that the energy transfer across the cutoff wavenumber k(sub c) is dominated by local interaction. The correlation between the exact and the modeled (by a spectral eddy viscosity) nonlinear terms and the subgrid energy transfer in physical space was found to be quite low. In physical space, a similar correlation analysis was carried out using top hat filtering. Results show that the subgrid stress and the energy flux predicted by the subgrid models correlates very well with the exact data. The scale similarity model showed very high correlation for reasonable grid resolution. However, with decrease in grid resolution, the scale similarity model became more uncorrelated, when compared to the kinetic energy subgrid model. The subgrid models were then used for large-eddy simulations for a range of Reynolds number. It was determined that the dissipation was modeled poorly and that the correlation with the exact results was quite low for all the models. In general, for coarse grid resolution, the scale similarity model consistently showed very low correlation while the kinetic energy model showed a relatively higher correlation. These results suggest that to use the scale similarity model relatively fine grid resolution may be required, whereas, the kinetic energy model could be used even in coarse grid.

  4. Turbulent equipartition and homogenization of plasma angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, O D; Diamond, P H; Hahm, T S

    2008-04-01

    A physical model of turbulent equipartition (TEP) of plasma angular momentum is developed. We show that using a simple, model insensitive ansatz of conservation of total angular momentum, a TEP pinch of angular momentum can be obtained. We note that this term corresponds to a part of the pinch velocity previously calculated using quasilinear gyrokinetic theory. We observe that the nondiffusive TEP flux is inward, and therefore may explain the peakedness of the rotation profiles observed in certain experiments. Similar expressions for linear toroidal momentum and flow are computed and it is noted that there is an additional effect due the radial profile of moment of inertia density. PMID:18517961

  5. Scalar and tensor spherical harmonics expansion of the velocity correlation in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rubinstein, Robert; Kurien, Susan; Cambon, Claude

    2015-06-22

    The representation theory of the rotation group is applied to construct a series expansion of the correlation tensor in homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The resolution of angular dependence is the main analytical difficulty posed by anisotropic turbulence; representation theory parametrises this dependence by a tensor analogue of the standard spherical harmonics expansion of a scalar. As a result, the series expansion is formulated in terms of explicitly constructed tensor bases with scalar coefficients determined by angular moments of the correlation tensor.

  6. Algebraic Reynolds stress modeling of turbulence subject to rapid homogeneous and non-homogeneous compression or expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, I. A.; Wallin, S.; Brethouwer, G.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model (EARSM) by Grigoriev et al. ["A realizable explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model for compressible turbulent flow with significant mean dilatation," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105112 (2013)] and the related differential Reynolds stress model (DRSM) are used to investigate the influence of homogeneous shear and compression on the evolution of turbulence in the limit of rapid distortion theory (RDT). The DRSM predictions of the turbulence kinetic energy evolution are in reasonable agreement with RDT while the evolution of diagonal components of anisotropy correctly captures the essential features, which is not the case for standard compressible extensions of DRSMs. The EARSM is shown to give a realizable anisotropy tensor and a correct trend of the growth of turbulence kinetic energy K, which saturates at a power law growth versus compression ratio, as well as retaining a normalized strain in the RDT regime. In contrast, an eddy-viscosity model results in a rapid exponential growth of K and excludes both realizability and high magnitude of the strain rate. We illustrate the importance of using a proper algebraic treatment of EARSM in systems with high values of dilatation and vorticity but low shear. A homogeneously compressed and rotating gas cloud with cylindrical symmetry, related to astrophysical flows and swirling supercritical flows, was investigated too. We also outline the extension of DRSM and EARSM to include the effect of non-homogeneous density coupled with "local mean acceleration" which can be important for, e.g., stratified flows or flows with heat release. A fixed-point analysis of direct numerical simulation data of combustion in a wall-jet flow demonstrates that our model gives quantitatively correct predictions of both streamwise and cross-stream components of turbulent density flux as well as their influence on the anisotropies. In summary, we believe that our approach, based on a proper

  7. Critical assessment of Reynolds stress turbulence models using homogeneous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    In modeling the rapid part of the pressure correlation term in the Reynolds stress transport equations, extensive use has been made of its exact properties which were first suggested by Rotta. These, for example, have been employed in obtaining the widely used Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model. Some recent proposals have dropped one of these properties to obtain new models. We demonstrate, by computing some simple homogeneous flows, that doing so does not lead to any significant improvements over the LRR model and it is not the right direction in improving the performance of existing models. The reason for this, in our opinion, is that violation of one of the exact properties can not bring in any new physics into the model. We compute thirteen homogeneous flows using LRR (with a recalibrated rapid term constant), IP and SSG models. The flows computed include the flow through axisymmetric contraction; axisymmetric expansion; distortion by plane strain; and homogeneous shear flows with and without rotation. Results show that for most general representation for a model linear in the anisotropic tensor, performs either better or as good as the other two models of the same level.

  8. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow: An alternative view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Peter S.; Speziale, Charles G.

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if vortex stretching is accounted for in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are present for a k-epsilon model modified to account for vortex stretching. The calculations indicate an initial exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate for elapsed times that are as large as those considered in any of the previously conducted physical or numerical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. However, vortex stretching eventually takes over and forces a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium with bounded energy states. The validity of this result is further supported by an independent theoretical argument. It is concluded that the generally accepted structural equilibrium for homogeneous shear flow with unbounded component energies is in need of re-examination.

  9. Anisotropic structure of homogeneous turbulence subjected to uniform rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, C.; Mansour, N. N.; Squires, K. D.

    1994-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation results are used to investigate the development of anisotropies and the possible transition towards a quasi two-dimensional state in rotating turbulence at high Reynolds number. The present study demonstrates the existence of two transitions that are identified by two Rossby numbers. The first transition marks the onset of anisotropic effects and corresponds to a macro Rossby number Ro(sup L) (based on a longitudinal integral length scale) near unity. A second transition can be defined in terms of a lower bound of micro-Rossby number Ro(sup w) also near unity (defined in this work as the ratio of the rms fluctuating vorticity to background vorticity) and corresponds to a continued development of anisotropy but with an increasing emergence of those indicators based on the pure two-dimensional component of the flow, e.g., integral length scales measured along the rotation axis. Investigation of the vorticity structure shows that the second transition is also characterized by an increasing tendency for alignment between the fluctuating vorticity vector and the basic angular velocity vector with a preference for corotative vorticity.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of very large kinetic and magnetic Reynolds number isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a spectral subgrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T; Sagaut, P; Schilling, O; Zhou, Y

    2006-07-05

    A spectral subggrid-scale eddy viscosity and magnetic resisitivity model based on the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) spectral kinetic and magnetic energy transfer presented in [12] is used in large-eddy simulation (LES) of large kinetic and magnetic Reynold number magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The proposed model is assessed via a posteri tests on three-dimensional, incompressible, isotropic, non-helical, freely-decaying MHD turbulence at asymptotically large Reynolds numbers. Using LES with an initial condition characterized by an Alfv{acute e}n ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy {tau}{sub A} equal to unity, it is shown that at the kinetic energy spectrum E{sub K}(k) and magnetic energy spectrum E{sub M}(k) exhibit Kolmogorov -5/3 inertial subrange scalings in the LES, consistent with the EDQNM model.

  11. Is the Alfven-wave propagation effect important for energy decay in homogeneous MHD turbulence?

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Murshed; Gray, Perry C.; Pontius, Duane H. Jr.; Matthaeus, William H.; Oughton, Sean

    1996-07-20

    We investigate the role of three-point decorrelation due to Alfven wave propagation in three-dimensional incompressible homogeneous MHD turbulence. By comparing numerical simulations with theoretical expectations, we have studied how this effect influences the decay of turbulent energy caused by both an external mean magnetic field and the fluctuating turbulent field. Decay is initially suppressed by a mean magnetic field, as expected, but the effect soon saturates. The decay rate does not scale with mean magnetic field for higher values. The disagreement with theoretical predictions can be accounted for by anisotropic spectral transfer. Thus, phenomenological models for energy decay that include decorrelation due to Alfvenic propagation are not substantiated. This work complements our detailed study of various models of energy decay in homogeneous MHD [Hossain et al., 1995].

  12. A Lagrangian PDF Model for the Scalar Dissipation in Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.

    1996-11-01

    The scalar dissipation is a key quantity in the description of turbulent mixing. The spectral relaxation model (SRM) was developed to account for the effect of the evolution of the scalar spectrum on the mean scalar dissipation < ɛ_φ >, and it successfully predicts the observed (DNS, grid turbulence) dependence on Re, Sc (>= 1), and the initial scalar spectrum without recourse to fitting parameters. In this work, we present a Lagrangian PDF version (LSRM) for the PDF of ɛ_φ conditioned on the turbulent vortex stretching history of Kolmogorov-scale fluid particles. In homogeneous turbulence, the LSRM is coupled to a Lagrangian PDF model for the turbulent dissipation (ɛ) which strongly influences the statistics of ɛ_φ. Closure of scalar molecular dissipation term (< Γ nabla^2 φ | φ, ɛ^*_φ, ɛ^* >) is carried out using the Fokker-Planck model that was developed earlier for the joint scalar, scalar gradient PDF following fluid particles with the identical vortex stretching histories. Model predictions for inert scalar mixing in homogeneous turbulence with and without a uniform mean scalar gradient are compared to DNS data. In particular, the effect of the mean scalar gradient on the correlation between ɛ_φ and ɛ (i.e. local anisotropy) is examined, as well as the effect of the initial scalar spectrum and small-scale random vortex stretching on non-Gaussian behavior of the scalar PDF.

  13. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1992-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for non-equilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation, as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale. As with the earlier reported k-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is not achieved until the dimensionless time greater than 60, an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this non-equilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  14. Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow with bounded energy states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Abid, R.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds stress calculations of homogeneous turbulent shear flow are conducted with a second-order closure model modified to account for nonequilibrium vortex stretching in the dissipation rate transport equation as recently proposed by Bernard and Speziale (1992). As with the earlier reported K-epsilon model calculations incorporating this vortex stretching effect, a production-equals-dissipation equilibrium is obtained with bounded turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. However, this equilibrium is now not achieved until the dimensionless time St greater than 60 - an elapsed time that is at least twice as large as any of those considered in previous numerical and physical experiments on homogeneous shear flow. Direct quantitative comparisons between the model predictions and the results of experiments are quite favorable. In particular, it is shown that the inclusion of this nonequilibrium vortex stretching effect has the capability of explaining the significant range of production to dissipation ratios observed in experiments.

  15. Evaluation of Several Approximate Methods for Calculating the Symmetrical Bending-Moment Response of Flexible Airplanes to Isotropic Atmospheric Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Floyd V.; Yntema, Robert T.

    1959-01-01

    Several approximate procedures for calculating the bending-moment response of flexible airplanes to continuous isotropic turbulence are presented and evaluated. The modal methods (the mode-displacement and force-summation methods) and a matrix method (segmented-wing method) are considered. These approximate procedures are applied to a simplified airplane for which an exact solution to the equation of motion can be obtained. The simplified airplane consists of a uniform beam with a concentrated fuselage mass at the center. Airplane motions are limited to vertical rigid-body translation and symmetrical wing bending deflections. Output power spectra of wing bending moments based on the exact transfer-function solutions are used as a basis for the evaluation of the approximate methods. It is shown that the force-summation and the matrix methods give satisfactory accuracy and that the mode-displacement method gives unsatisfactory accuracy.

  16. The effect of the second turbulence scale equation on the prediction of rotated homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassinos, S. C.; Reynolds, W. C.; Langer, C. A.

    2002-11-01

    Reynolds-averaged two equation turbulence models carry transport equations for two turbulence scales. The kinetic energy (k) equation provides a solid foundation for the energy scale. The exact transport equation for the energy dissipation rate (ɛ) is not useful as the basis for the second scale because ɛ is determined by large-scale turbulent interactions not represented in this equation. The transport equation for the large-scale enstrophy does provide a solid basis for modeling the evolution of the large-scale enstrophy, which together with k determines the spectral energy transfer that ultimately leads to dissipation by the small-scale motions. Here we close this equation using the new structure tensors and use it with our structure-based turbulence models (SBM) for homogeneous turbulence that is strained and sheared in fixed or rotating frames. Model predictions are in excellent agreement with results from large-scale Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) that we are conducting for the ASCI program at Stanford. For shear in a rotating frame, of particular interest is the ratio of production over dissipation (P/ɛ) in the final equilibrium, and the dependence of this ratio on the ratio of frame rotation rate to shear rate (Ω^f/Γ). SBM predictions are in excellent agreement with DNS results; the traditional pair of the k and ɛ scale equations leads to wrong behavior for P/ɛ with Ω^f/Γ.

  17. Conductive and dielectric defects, and anisotropic and isotropic turbulence in liquid crystals: Electric power fluctuation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth-Katona, Tibor; Gleeson, James T.

    2004-01-01

    Fluctuations of the injected electric power during electroconvection (EHC) of liquid crystals are reported in both the conductive and the dielectric regime of convection. The amplitude and the frequency of the fluctuations, as well as the probability density functions have been compared in these two regimes and substantial differences have been found both in defect turbulence of EHC and at the DSM1→DSM2 transition.

  18. Universality at low Reynolds numbers and the emergence of intermittent behavior in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    2015-11-01

    Most approaches to understand turbulence have sought universal behavior believed to manifest at high Reynolds numbers (Rλ). However, recent theory and simulations suggest that universal characteristics, such as the non-trivial anomalous scaling exponents of moments of velocity gradients, emerge even at very low Rλ at which no inertial range exists. Furthermore, with decreasing Reynolds numbers, a transition occurs from fully intermittent turbulence to (approximately) Gaussian behavior at an apparently universal critical Rλ. A potential implication of these observations is that significant information concerning the inertial range (e.g. scaling exponents) is already manifest in the dissipation range at very low Rλ. Thus, high Rλ properties can be studied with well-resolved low-Rλ simulations instead of marginally resolved high-Reynolds flows. The focus of this talk is to explore signatures of universality at high-Reynolds numbers in the dissipation range of highly resolved DNS (kmax η ~ O (20)) for Rλ up to 90, and decaying simulations close to the critical Rλ. In addition to statistics of velocity gradients and dissipation we explore evidence of Beltramization as suggested in past theoretical work.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Homogeneous Turbulence Using Lagrangian-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohseni, Kamran; Shkoller, Steve; Kosovic, Branko; Marsden, Jerrold E.; Carati, Daniele; Wray, Alan; Rogallo, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Lagrangian-averaged Navier-Stokes (LANS) equations are numerically evaluated as a turbulence closure. They are derived from a novel Lagrangian averaging procedure on the space of all volume-preserving maps and can be viewed as a numerical algorithm which removes the energy content from the small scales (smaller than some a priori fixed spatial scale alpha) using a dispersive rather than dissipative mechanism, thus maintaining the crucial features of the large scale flow. We examine the modeling capabilities of the LANS equations for decaying homogeneous turbulence, ascertain their ability to track the energy spectrum of fully resolved direct numerical simulations (DNS), compare the relative energy decay rates, and compare LANS with well-accepted large eddy simulation (LES) models.

  20. An analysis of RNG based turbulence models for homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.; Fitzmaurice, Nessan

    1991-01-01

    In a recent paper, the authors compared the performance of a variety of turbulence models including the k-epsilon model and the second-order closure model based on Renormalization Group (RNG) Methods. The performance of these RNG models in homogeneous turbulent shear flow was found to be quite poor, apparently due to the value of the constant C(sub epsilon1) in the modeled dissipation rate equation which was substantially lower than its traditional value. However, recently a correction has been made in the RNG based calculation of C(sub epsilon1). It is shown that with the new value of C(sub epsilon1), the performance of the RNG k-epsilon model is substantially improved. On the other hand, while the predictions of the revised RNG second-order closure model are better, some lingering problems still remain which can be easily remedied by the addition of higher order terms.

  1. Local structure of intercomponent energy transfer in homogeneous turbulent shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, James G.; Lee, Moon J.

    1987-01-01

    Intercomponent energy transfer by pressure-strain-rate was investigated for homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The rapid and slow parts of turbulent pressure (decomposed according to the influence of the mean deformation rate) are found to be uncorrelated; this finding provides strong justification for current modeling procedure in which the pressure-strain-rate term is split into the corresponding parts. Issues pertinent to scales involved in the intercomponent energy transfer are addressed in comparison with those for the Reynolds-stress and vorticity fields. A physical picture of the energy transfer process is described from a detailed study of instantaneous events of high transfer regions. It was found that the most significant intercomponent energy transfer events are highly localized in space and are imbedded within a region of concentrated vorticity.

  2. Navier-Stokes Simulation of Homogeneous Turbulence on the CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.; Rogallo, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code which solves the Navier-Stokes equations for three dimensional, time-dependent, homogenous turbulence has been written for the CYBER 205. The code has options for both 64-bit and 32-bit arithmetic. With 32-bit computation, mesh sizes up to 64 (3) are contained within core of a 2 million 64-bit word memory. Computer speed timing runs were made for various vector lengths up to 6144. With this code, speeds a little over 100 Mflops have been achieved on a 2-pipe CYBER 205. Several problems encountered in the coding are discussed.

  3. Homogeneous shear turbulence – bypass concept via interplay of linear transient growth and nonlinear transverse cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatsashvili, George; Dong, Siwei; Khujadze, George; Chagelishvili, George; Jiménez, Javier; Foysi, Holger

    2016-04-01

    We performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence to study the mechanism of the self-sustenance of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable (constant) shear flows. For this purpose, we analyzed the turbulence dynamics in Fourier/wavenumber/spectral space based on the simulation data for the domain aspect ratio 1 : 1 : 1. Specifically, we examined the interplay of linear transient growth of Fourier harmonics and nonlinear processes. The transient growth of harmonics is strongly anisotropic in spectral space. This, in turn, leads to anisotropy of nonlinear processes in spectral space and, as a result, the main nonlinear process appears to be not a direct/inverse, but rather a transverse/angular redistribution of harmonics in Fourier space referred to as the nonlinear transverse cascade. It is demonstrated that the turbulence is sustained by the interplay of the linear transient, or nonmodal growth and the transverse cascade. This course of events reliably exemplifies the wellknown bypass scenario of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable shear flows. These processes mainly operate at large length scales, comparable to the box size. Consequently, the central, small wavenumber area of Fourier space (the size of which is determined below) is crucial in the self-sustenance and is labeled the vital area. Outside the vital area, the transient growth and the transverse cascade are of secondary importance - Fourier harmonics are transferred to dissipative scales by the nonlinear direct cascade. The number of harmonics actively participating in the self-sustaining process (i.e., the harmonics whose energies grow more than 10% of the maximum spectral energy at least once during evolution) is quite large - it is equal to 36 for the considered box aspect ratio - and obviously cannot be described by low-order models.

  4. Mirroring in the Fokker-Planck coefficient for cosmic-ray pitch-angle scattering in homogeneous magnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Klimas, A. J.; Sandri, G.

    1975-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch-angle scattering, appropriate for cosmic rays in homogeneous stationary magnetic turbulence is computed without making any specific assumptions concerning the statistical symmetries of the random field. The Fokker-Planck coefficient obtained can be used to compute the parallel diffusion coefficient for high-energy cosmic rays propagating in the presence of strong turbulence, or for low-energy cosmic rays in the presence of weak turbulence. Because of the generality of magnetic turbulence allowed for in the analysis, special interplanetary magnetic field features, such as discontinuities or particular wave modes, can be included rigorously.

  5. The effect of Reynolds number on inertial particle dynamics in isotropic turbulence. Part 2. Simulations with gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter J.; Bragg, Andrew D.; Collins, Lance R.

    2016-06-01

    In Part I of this study, we analyzed the motion of inertial particles in isotropic turbulence in the absence of gravity using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, in Part II, we introduce gravity and study its effect over a wide range of flow Reynolds numbers, Froude numbers, and particle Stokes numbers. We see that gravity causes particles to sample the flow more uniformly and reduces the time particles can spend interacting with the underlying turbulence. We also find that gravity tends to increase inertial particle accelerations, and we introduce a model to explain that effect. We then analyze the particle relative velocities and radial distribution functions (RDFs), which are generally seen to be independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate Kolmogorov-scale Stokes numbers $St$. We see that gravity causes particle relative velocities to decrease, and that the relative velocities have higher scaling exponents with gravity. We observe that gravity has a non-trivial effect on clustering, acting to decrease clustering at low $St$ and to increase clustering at high $St$. By considering the effect of gravity on the clustering mechanisms described in the theory of Zaichik & Alipchenkov (New J. Phys., 11:103018, 2009), we provide an explanation for this non-trivial effect of gravity. We also show that when the effects of gravity are accounted for in the theory of Zaichik & Alipchenkov, the results compare favorably with DNS. The relative velocities and RDFs exhibit considerable anisotropy at small separations, and this anisotropy is quantified using spherical harmonic functions. We use the relative velocities and the RDFs to compute the particle collision kernels, and find that the collision kernel remains as it was for the case without gravity, namely nearly independent of Reynolds number for low and moderate $St$.

  6. Rotational motion of elongated particles in isotropic turbulent flow: statistical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge; Variano, Evan

    2014-11-01

    We consider the rotational motion of non-spherical particles in turbulent flow, comparing the statistics of particles' angular velocity to the corresponding quantities computed in the fluid phase. We use numerical (DNS) and laboratory measurements for particles that are both larger and smaller than the Kolmogorov lengthscale. The particles are spheroids or rods, with aspect ratios between 1 and 10. We will discuss the subtleties of defining a meaningful Stokes number for these particles, focusing on the effect of asphericity and the fact that our interest is in rotation and not translation. Comparing the probability density function of angular velocity between fluid and particle phase indicates that the angular velocity of particles has a narrower distribution than that of the fluid phase, and that. particles do respond to extreme events in the fluid phase. The first four moments of the PDFs are analyzed, and these show that the ``filtering'' effect is very similar between DNS and lab experiments, despite differences in particle sizes and mass. We propose a nondimensional curve for predicting the magnitude of the filtering effect, and discuss the implications of this curve for the definition of Stokes number, as discussed earlier. This work has been supported by grants from the Peder Sather Center for Advanced Study at UC Berkeley and from the Research Council of Norway (Contract No. 213917/F20).

  7. Clustering and relative velocity of heavy particles under gravitational settling in isotropic turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guodong; He, Guo-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Clustering and intermittency in radial relative velocity (RRV) of heavy particles of same size settling in turbulent flows can be remarkably changed due to gravity. Clustering is monotonically reduced at Stokes number less than 1 under gravity due to the disability of the centrifugal mechanism, however it is non-monotonically enhanced at Stokes number greater than 1 due to the multiplicative amplification in the case that the proposed effective Kubo number is less than 1. Although gravity causes monotonical reduction in the rms of RRV of particles at a given Stokes number with decreasing Froude number, the variation tendency in the tails of standardized PDF of RRV versus Froude number is obviously different: the tails become narrower at a small Stokes number, while they become broader at a large Stokes number. The mechanism of this variation stems from the compromise between the following two competing factors. The mitigation of correlation of particle positions and the regions of high strain rate which are more intermittent reduces the intermittency in RRV at small Stokes numbers, while the significant reduction in the backward-in-time relative separations will make particle pairs see small-scale structures, leading to a higher intermittency in RRV at large Stokes numbers. NSAF of China (grant number U1230126); NSFC (grant numbers 11072247 and 11232011).

  8. Similarities between statistically-stationary homogeneous shear turbulence and the logarithmic layer in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Siwei; Sekimoto, Atsushi; Jiménez, Javier

    2013-11-01

    The rough independence of the logarithmic layer (LL) of wall-bounded turbulence from the details of the buffer and outer layers, suggests that the interaction of the turbulent fluctuations with the mean shear may be mimicked by statistically-stationary homogeneous shear turbulence (SS-HST) in a finite box. We study SS-HST in boxes for which the statistics best agree with those of the LL. Both flows share similar Corrsin shear parameters, and Reynolds-stress and vorticity anisotropies. Two-point correlation functions show that u and w are constrained by the simulation box and are respectively shorter and narrower for SS-HST than for the LL, but v and the vorticity are roughly of the same size in both flows when Reλ is similar. The transient bursting of v in both flows is quite similar to the linear Orr mechanism, with time scales that are of the same order in both flows. In both cases, a streamwise velocity streak forms and breaks down quasi periodically, and the break down is accompanied by an enhanced flux of momentum, in the form of large-scale ejections and sweeps. Funded by the ERC Multiflow program and CSC.

  9. Early turbulent mixing as the origin of chemical homogeneity in open star clusters.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-09-25

    The abundances of elements in stars are critical clues to stars' origins. Observed star-to-star variations in logarithmic abundance within an open star cluster--a gravitationally bound ensemble of stars in the Galactic plane--are typically only about 0.01 to 0.05 over many elements, which is noticeably smaller than the variation of about 0.06 to 0.3 seen in the interstellar medium from which the stars form. It is unknown why star clusters are so homogenous, and whether homogeneity should also prevail in regions of lower star formation efficiency that do not produce bound clusters. Here we report simulations that trace the mixing of chemical elements as star-forming clouds assemble and collapse. We show that turbulent mixing during cloud assembly naturally produces a stellar abundance scatter at least five times smaller than that in the gas, which is sufficient to explain the observed chemical homogeneity of stars. Moreover, mixing occurs very early, so that regions with star formation efficiencies of about 10 per cent are nearly as well mixed as those with formation efficiencies of about 50 per cent. This implies that even regions that do not form bound clusters are likely to be well mixed, and improves the prospects of using 'chemical tagging' to reconstruct (via their unique chemical signatures, or tags) star clusters whose constituent stars have become unbound from one another and spread across the Galactic disk. PMID:25174709

  10. First-order reactant in homogeneous turbulence before the final period of decay. [contaminant fluctuations in chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, P.; Patel, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for studying theoretically the concentration fluctuations of a dilute contaminate undergoing a first-order chemical reaction. The method is based on Deissler's (1958) theory for homogeneous turbulence for times before the final period, and it follows the approach used by Loeffler and Deissler (1961) to study temperature fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence. Four-point correlation equations are obtained; it is assumed that terms containing fifth-order correlation are very small in comparison with those containing fourth-order correlations, and can therefore be neglected. A spectrum equation is obtained in a form which can be solved numerically, yielding the decay law for the concentration fluctuations in homogeneous turbulence for the period much before the final period of decay.

  11. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  12. Two regimes of flux scaling in axially homogeneous turbulent convection in vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-08-01

    From experiments of axially homogeneous turbulent convection in a vertical tube using heat (Prandtl number Pr≃6 ) and brine (Pr≃600 ) we show that at sufficiently high Rayleigh numbers (Rag), the Nusselt number Nug˜(RagPr)1/2, which corresponds to the so-called ultimate regime scaling. In heat experiments below certain Rag,however,there is transition to a new regime, Nug˜(RagPr)0.3. This transition also seems to exist in earlier reported data for Pr=1 and Pr≃600 , at different Rag. However, the transition occurs at a single Grashof number, Grgc≃1.6 ×105 , and unified flux scalings for Pr≥1 , Nug/Pr˜Grg0.3, and Nug/Pr˜Grg1/2 can be given for the two regimes.

  13. Numerical simulation of a compressible homogeneous, turbulent shear flow. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiereisen, W. J.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A direct, low Reynolds number, numerical simulation was performed on a homogeneous turbulent shear flow. The full compressible Navier-Stokes equations were used in a simulation on the ILLIAC IV computer with a 64,000 mesh. The flow fields generated by the code are used as an experimental data base, to examine the behavior of the Reynols stresses in this simple, compressible flow. The variation of the structure of the stresses and their dynamic equations as the character of the flow changed is emphasized. The structure of the tress tensor is more heavily dependent on the shear number and less on the fluctuating Mach number. The pressure-strain correlation tensor in the dynamic uations is directly calculated in this simulation. These correlations are decomposed into several parts, as contrasted with the traditional incompressible decomposition into two parts. The performance of existing models for the conventional terms is examined, and a model is proposed for the 'mean fluctuating' part.

  14. Application of group analysis to the spatially homogeneous and isotropic Boltzmann equation with source using its Fourier image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, Yurii N.; Meleshko, Sergey V.; Suriyawichitseranee, Amornrat

    2015-06-01

    Group analysis of the spatially homogeneous and molecular energy dependent Boltzmann equations with source term is carried out. The Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation with respect to the molecular velocity variable is considered. The correspondent determining equation of the admitted Lie group is reduced to a partial differential equation for the admitted source. The latter equation is analyzed by an algebraic method. A complete group classification of the Fourier transform of the Boltzmann equation with respect to a source function is given. The representation of invariant solutions and corresponding reduced equations for all obtained source functions are also presented.

  15. Reactant conversion in homogeneous turbulence: Mathematical modeling, computational validations and practical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madnia, C. K.; Frankel, S. H.; Givi, P.

    1992-01-01

    Closed form analytical expressions are obtained for predicting the limited rate of reactant conversion in a binary reaction of the type F + rO yields (1 + r) Product in unpremixed homogeneous turbulence. These relations are obtained by means of a single point Probability Density Function (PDF) method based on the Amplitude Mapping Closure. It is demonstrated that with this model, the maximum rate of the reactants' decay can be conveniently expressed in terms of definite integrals of the Parabolic Cylinder Functions. For the cases with complete initial segregation, it is shown that the results agree very closely with those predicted by employing a Beta density of the first kind for an appropriately defined Shvab-Zeldovich scalar variable. With this assumption, the final results can also be expressed in terms of closed form analytical expressions which are based on the Incomplete Beta Functions. With both models, the dependence of the results on the stoichiometric coefficient and the equivalence ratio can be expressed in an explicit manner. For a stoichiometric mixture, the analytical results simplify significantly. In the mapping closure, these results are expressed in terms of simple trigonometric functions. For the Beta density model, they are in the form of Gamma Functions. In all the cases considered, the results are shown to agree well with data generated by Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). Due to the simplicity of these expressions and because of nice mathematical features of the Parabolic Cylinder and the Incomplete Beta Functions, these models are recommended for estimating the limiting rate of reactant conversion in homogeneous reacting flows. These results also provide useful insights in assessing the extent of validity of turbulence closures in the modeling of unpremixed reacting flows. Some discussions are provided on the extension of the model for treating more complicated reacting systems including realistic kinetics schemes and multi-scalar mixing

  16. Compound surface-plasmon-polariton waves guided by a thin metal layer sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric material and a structurally chiral material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-03-01

    Multiple compound surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves can be guided by a structure consisting of a sufficiently thick layer of metal sandwiched between a homogeneous isotropic dielectric (HID) material and a dielectric structurally chiral material (SCM). The compound SPP waves are strongly bound to both metal/dielectric interfaces when the thickness of the metal layer is comparable to the skin depth but just to one of the two interfaces when the thickness is much larger. The compound SPP waves differ in phase speed, attenuation rate, and field profile, even though all are excitable at the same frequency. Some compound SPP waves are not greatly affected by the choice of the direction of propagation in the transverse plane but others are, depending on metal thickness. For fixed metal thickness, the number of compound SPP waves depends on the relative permittivity of the HID material, which can be useful for sensing applications.

  17. A critical comparison of second order closures with direct numerical simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, several second order closure models have been proposed for closing the second moment equations, in which the velocity-pressure gradient (and scalar-pressure gradient) tensor and the dissipation rate tensor are two of the most important terms. In the literature, these correlation tensors are usually decomposed into a so called rapid term and a return-to-isotropy term. Models of these terms have been used in global flow calculations together with other modeled terms. However, their individual behavior in different flows have not been fully examined because they are un-measurable in the laboratory. Recently, the development of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulence has given us the opportunity to do this kind of study. With the direct numerical simulation, we may use the solution to exactly calculate the values of these correlation terms and then directly compare them with the values from their modeled formulations (models). Here, we make direct comparisons of five representative rapid models and eight return-to-isotropy models using the DNS data of forty five homogeneous flows which were done by Rogers et al. (1986) and Lee et al. (1985). The purpose of these direct comparisons is to explore the performance of these models in different flows and identify the ones which give the best performance. The modeling procedure, model constraints, and the various evaluated models are described. The detailed results of the direct comparisons are discussed, and a few concluding remarks on turbulence models are given.

  18. All-speed Roe scheme for the large eddy simulation of homogeneous decaying turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue-song; Li, Xin-liang

    2016-01-01

    As a type of shock-capturing scheme, the traditional Roe scheme fails in large eddy simulation (LES) because it cannot reproduce important turbulent characteristics, such as the famous k-5/3 spectral law, as a consequence of the large numerical dissipation. In this work, the Roe scheme is divided into five parts, namely, ξ, δUp, δpp, δUu, and δpu, which denote basic upwind dissipation, pressure difference-driven modification of interface fluxes, pressure difference-driven modification of pressure, velocity difference-driven modification of interface fluxes, and velocity difference-driven modification of pressure, respectively. Then, the role of each part in the LES of homogeneous decaying turbulence with a low Mach number is investigated. Results show that the parts δUu, δpp, and δUp have little effect on LES. Such minimal effect is integral to computational stability, especially for δUp. The large numerical dissipation is due to ξ and δpu, each of which features a larger dissipation than the sub-grid scale model. On the basis of these conditions, an improved all-speed Roe scheme for LES is proposed. This scheme can provide satisfactory LES results even for coarse grid resolutions with usually adopted second-order reconstructions for the finite volume method.

  19. Intermittency and geometrical statistics of three-dimensional homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: A wavelet viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Okamoto, Naoya; Kawahara, Yasuhiro; Farge, Marie

    2011-09-01

    Scale-dependent and geometrical statistics of three-dimensional incompressible homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic turbulence without mean magnetic field are examined by means of the orthogonal wavelet decomposition. The flow is computed by direct numerical simulation with a Fourier spectral method at resolution 5123 and a unit magnetic Prandtl number. Scale-dependent second and higher order statistics of the velocity and magnetic fields allow to quantify their intermittency in terms of spatial fluctuations of the energy spectra, the flatness, and the probability distribution functions at different scales. Different scale-dependent relative helicities, e.g., kinetic, cross, and magnetic relative helicities, yield geometrical information on alignment between the different scale-dependent fields. At each scale, the alignment between the velocity and magnetic field is found to be more pronounced than the other alignments considered here, i.e., the scale-dependent alignment between the velocity and vorticity, the scale-dependent alignment between the magnetic field and its vector potential, and the scale-dependent alignment between the magnetic field and the current density. Finally, statistical scale-dependent analyses of both Eulerian and Lagrangian accelerations and the corresponding time-derivatives of the magnetic field are performed. It is found that the Lagrangian acceleration does not exhibit substantially stronger intermittency compared to the Eulerian acceleration, in contrast to hydrodynamic turbulence where the Lagrangian acceleration shows much stronger intermittency than the Eulerian acceleration. The Eulerian time-derivative of the magnetic field is more intermittent than the Lagrangian time-derivative of the magnetic field.

  20. Mirroring within the Fokker-Planck formulation of cosmic ray pitch angle scattering in homogeneous magnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Klimas, A. J.; Sandri, G.

    1974-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck coefficient for pitch angle scattering, appropriate for cosmic rays in homogeneous, stationary, magnetic turbulence, is computed from first principles. No assumptions are made concerning any special statistical symmetries the random field may have. This result can be used to compute the parallel diffusion coefficient for high energy cosmic rays moving in strong turbulence, or low energy cosmic rays moving in weak turbulence. Becuase of the generality of the magnetic turbulence which is allowed in this calculation, special interplanetary magnetic field features such as discontinuities, or particular wave modes, can be included rigorously. The reduction of this results to previously available expressions for the pitch angle scattering coefficient in random field models with special symmetries is discussed. The general existance of a Dirac delta function in the pitch angle scattering coefficient is demonstrated. It is proved that this delta function is the Fokker-Planck prediction for pitch angle scattering due to mirroring in the magnetic field.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of horizontal round turbulent forced plume in a static homogeneous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcaid, Aicha; Le Palec, Georges; Draoui, Abdeslam

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates a numerical and experimental study about horizontal round turbulent forced plume injected into a static homogeneous environment. Helium-air plume is an example of non-Boussinesq forced plume in which a low-density binary gas mixture is injected into a high density ambient of air. Since the domain temperature is assumed to be constant, the density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only. Numerical model is based on the finite volume method and reports on an application of standard k-ɛ model for steady flow with densimetric Froude numbers of 30-300 and Reynolds numbers of 2000-6000. The basic features of the model are: the conservation of mass, momentum and concentration. The boundaries of plume body, the centerline trajectory, the radius plume and the centerline mixture density are determined. It is found that the plume spreading and behavior depend on the ratio between buoyancy flux and momentum, i.e. Froude number. Laboratory experiments have been conducted for photographic observations of plumes trajectories for different mixture (helium-air) densities with different velocities and injection nozzle diameters. Numerical results are described and compared with the experiments and good agreement has been achieved.

  2. Finite element model predictions of static deformation from dislocation sources in a subduction zone: Sensitivities to homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid, and half-space assumptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Dislocation models can simulate static deformation caused by slip along a fault. These models usually take the form of a dislocation embedded in a homogeneous, isotropic, Poisson-solid half-space (HIPSHS). However, the widely accepted HIPSHS assumptions poorly approximate subduction zone systems of converging oceanic and continental crust. This study uses three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs) that allow for any combination (including none) of the HIPSHS assumptions to compute synthetic Green's functions for displacement. Using the 1995 Mw = 8.0 Jalisco-Colima, Mexico, subduction zone earthquake and associated measurements from a nearby GPS array as an example, FEM-generated synthetic Green's functions are combined with standard linear inverse methods to estimate dislocation distributions along the subduction interface. Loading a forward HIPSHS model with dislocation distributions, estimated from FEMs that sequentially relax the HIPSHS assumptions, yields the sensitivity of predicted displacements to each of the HIPSHS assumptions. For the subduction zone models tested and the specific field situation considered, sensitivities to the individual Poisson-solid, isotropy, and homogeneity assumptions can be substantially greater than GPS. measurement uncertainties. Forward modeling quantifies stress coupling between the Mw = 8.0 earthquake and a nearby Mw = 6.3 earthquake that occurred 63 days later. Coulomb stress changes predicted from static HIPSHS models cannot account for the 63-day lag time between events. Alternatively, an FEM that includes a poroelastic oceanic crust, which allows for postseismic pore fluid pressure recovery, can account for the lag time. The pore fluid pressure recovery rate puts an upper limit of 10-17 m2 on the bulk permeability of the oceanic crust. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Cascade modeling of single and two-phase turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnov, Igor A.

    The analysis of turbulent two-phase flows requires closure models in order to perform reliable computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CFMD) analyses. A turbulence cascade model, which tracks the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the various eddy sizes, has been developed for the analysis of the single and bubbly two-phase turbulence. Various flows are considered including the decay of isotropic grid-induced turbulence, uniform shear flow and turbulent channel flow. The model has been developed using a "building block" approach by moving from modeling of simpler turbulent flows (i.e., homogeneous, isotropic decay) to more involved turbulent flows (i.e., non-homogeneous channel flow). The spectral cascade-transport model's performance has been assessed against a number of experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) results.

  4. Homogeneous and isotropic big rips?

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the way big rips are approached in a fully inhomogeneous description of the space-time geometry. If the pressure and energy densities are connected by a (supernegative) barotropic index, the spatial gradients and the anisotropic expansion decay as the big rip is approached. This behavior is contrasted with the usual big-bang singularities. A similar analysis is performed in the case of sudden (quiescent) singularities and it is argued that the spatial gradients may well be non-negligible in the vicinity of pressure singularities.

  5. Rapid distortion analysis and direct simulation of compressible homogeneous turbulence at finite Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, C.; Coleman, G. N.; Mansour, N. N.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of rapid mean compression on compressible turbulence at a range of turbulent Mach numbers is investigated. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) and direct numerical simulation results for the case of axial (one-dimensional) compression are used to illustrate the existence of two distinct rapid compression regimes. These regimes are set by the relationships between the timescales of the mean distortion, the turbulence, and the speed of sound. A general RDT formulation is developed and is proposed as a means of improving turbulence models for compressible flows.

  6. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  7. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  8. Gaussian Multiplicative Chaos for Symmetric Isotropic Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevillard, Laurent; Rhodes, Rémi; Vargas, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    Motivated by isotropic fully developed turbulence, we define a theory of symmetric matrix valued isotropic Gaussian multiplicative chaos. Our construction extends the scalar theory developed by J.P. Kahane in 1985.

  9. A nonlinear theory of cosmic ray pitch angle diffusion in homogeneous magnetostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma strong turbulence, weak coupling, theory is applied to the problem of cosmic ray pitch angle scattering in magnetostatic turbulence. The theory used is a rigorous generalization of Weinstock's resonance-broadening theory and contains no ad hoc approximations. A detailed calculation is presented for a model of slab turbulence with an exponential correlation function. The results agree well with numerical simulations. The rigidity dependence of the pitch angle scattering coefficient differs from that found by previous researchers. The differences result from an inadequate treatment of particle trajectories near 90 deg pitch angle in earlier work.

  10. Computational Complexity of Coherent Vortex and Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations of Three-Dimensional Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza; Vezolainen, Alexei; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2011-11-01

    With the recent development of parallel adaptive wavelet collocation method, adaptive numerical simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows have become feasible. The integration of turbulence modeling of different fidelity with adaptive wavelet methods results in a hierarchical approach for modeling and simulating turbulent flows in which all or most energetic parts of coherent eddies are dynamically resolved on self-adaptive computational grids, while modeling the effect of the unresolved incoherent or less energetic modes. This talk is the first attempt to estimate how spatial modes of both Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS) and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES) scale with Reynolds number. The computational complexity studies for both CVS and SCALES of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence are performed at effective non-adaptive resolutions of 2563, 5123, 10243, and 20483 corresponding to approximate Reλ of 70, 120, 190, 320. The details of the simulations are discussed and the results of compression achieved by CVS and SCALES as well as scalability studies of the parallel algorithm for the aforementioned Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers are presented. This work was supported by NSF under grant No. CBET-0756046.