Science.gov

Sample records for iv effects assessment

  1. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  2. Adsorption of fluoride on synthetic iron (III), zirconium(IV) and binary iron(III)-zirconium (IV) oxides: comparative assessment on pH effect and isotherm.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Krishna; Bandhopadhyay, Durjoy; Ghosh, Uday Chand

    2008-04-01

    Fluoride is an accumulative poison at high dose of intake for humans and animals. In the present study, the sorption of fluoride from aqueous solution has been investigated on synthetic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) and hydrous zirconium(IV)-iron(III) oxide (HZFO) by batch mode experiments. Both HFO and HZFO were crystalline and HZO was amorphous in nature. The parametes studied were the effect of pH and sorption equilibriums. The results showed increase in fluoride-sorption with increasing pH from nearly 2.0 to 5.0, 4.6 and 6.8 for HFO, HZO and HZFO, respectively. Analysis of temperature dependent sorption data obtained at equilibrium solution pH 6.8 (+/- 0.2) has been described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Redlich-Peterson isotherm model equations. The present sorption data fit, in general, found very well with the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson models; and the data fit for HZFO and HFO found to increase, but for HZO the data found to decrease with increasing temperature. The computed thermodynamic parameters such as deltaG0, delltaH0 and deltaS0 from the Langmuir equilibrium constant (b, L/Umg) values show that the fluoride-sorption on HZFO was more spontaneous and endothermic process compared to HFO. The deltaH0 value obtained for fluoride adsorption on HZO indicates exothermic nature. PMID:19295101

  3. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  4. Cognitive-enhancing effects of angiotensin IV

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin IV is a derivative of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and it has been shown to enhance acquisition, consolidation and recall in animal models of learning and memory when administered centrally or peripherally. Whether changes in angiotensin IV activity underlie the cognitive effects of those cardiovascular drugs designed to disrupt the peripheral renin-angiotensin system in humans remains undetermined, but angiotensin IV appears to be a worthy candidate for consideration in drug development programmes. The mechanism of action of angiotensin IV is still debated, although its AT4 receptor has been convincingly identified as being insulin-regulated amino peptidase, which is also known as oxytocinase and placental leucine aminopeptidase. It is speculated that angiotensin IV may interact with insulin-regulated amino peptidase to enhance neuronal glucose uptake, prevent metabolism of other neuroactive peptides, induce changes in extracellular matrix molecules, or induce release of acetylcholine and/or dopamine. All of these things may be responsible for the beneficial effects on cognition, but none of them are yet proven. Importantly, strain differences in murine responses to angiotensin IV suggest that some individuals may benefit from drugs targeted to the AT4 receptor whilst others may be refractory. At present it thus appears that those individuals with the poorest baseline cognition may receive greatest benefit, but possible genetic differences in responses to angiotensin IV cannot be ruled-out. PMID:19090988

  5. Projection models for health effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume IV. SPAHR user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the more advanced user of the SPAHR computer package the information required to create tailor-made programs for addressing specific issues not covered by the three interactive packages. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment.

  6. Genotoxicity hazard assessment of Caramel Colours III and IV.

    PubMed

    Brusick, D J; Jagannath, D R; Galloway, S M; Nestmann, E R

    1992-05-01

    Results from a battery of short-term tests in vitro and in vivo used to assess the genotoxicity of caramel colours are presented and discussed in relation to reports from the literature. No evidence of genotoxicity was found in the Salmonella plate incorporation test using five standard strains or in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene conversion assay using strain D4, either with or without S-9 for activation. A weak clastogenic effect for a sample of Caramel Colour III in CHO cells was abolished in the presence of S-9. Two samples of Caramel Colour IV were not clastogenic in CHO cells. Salmonella pre-incubation tests without S-9 also failed to reveal any mutagenic activity for any of the caramel colours tested. The Caramel Colour III sample that showed clastogenic activity in CHO cells in vitro did not induce micronuclei when evaluated in a mouse bone marrow assay. These results are in general agreement with reports in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of caramel colours, and support the conclusion that caramel colours do not pose a genotoxic hazard to humans. PMID:1644382

  7. WISC-IV GAI and CPI in Psychoeducational Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremner, Dawn; McTaggart, Breanne; Saklofske, Donald H.; Janzen, Troy

    2011-01-01

    The General Ability Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) are two index scores that can be calculated for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Canadian Edition (WISC-IV[superscript CDN]). The GAI comprises the verbal comprehension and perceptual reasoning subtests and reflects reasoning abilities. The CPI includes the…

  8. Objective assessment of image quality. IV. Application to adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Myers, Kyle J.; Devaney, Nicholas; Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The methodology of objective assessment, which defines image quality in terms of the performance of specific observers on specific tasks of interest, is extended to temporal sequences of images with random point spread functions and applied to adaptive imaging in astronomy. The tasks considered include both detection and estimation, and the observers are the optimal linear discriminant (Hotelling observer) and the optimal linear estimator (Wiener). A general theory of first- and second-order spatiotemporal statistics in adaptive optics is developed. It is shown that the covariance matrix can be rigorously decomposed into three terms representing the effect of measurement noise, random point spread function, and random nature of the astronomical scene. Figures of merit are developed, and computational methods are discussed. PMID:17106464

  9. WORKGROUP IV SYNOPSIS: REGULATORY ISSUES AND RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The discussions in this workgroup started with an identification and brief explanation of U.S. regulations pertaining to wetlands. The Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment Forum was then reviewed in relation to the unique aspects of conducting a wetland assessment. Assessment...

  10. Training in Structured Diagnostic Assessment Using DSM-IV Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponniah, Kathryn; Weissman, Myrna M.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Verdeli, Helen; Gameroff, Marc J.; Mufson, Laura; Fitterling, Heidi; Wickramaratne, Priya

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Determining a patient's psychiatric diagnosis is an important first step for the selection of empirically supported treatments and a critical component of evidence-based practice. Structured diagnostic assessment covers the range of psychiatric diagnoses and is usually more complete and accurate than unstructured assessment. Method: We…

  11. CART IV: improving automatic camouflage assessment with assistance methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2010-04-01

    In order to facilitate systematic, computer aided improvements of camouflage and concealment assessment methods, the software system CART (Camouflage Assessment in Real-Time) was built up for the camouflage assessment of objects in multispectral image sequences (see contributions to SPIE 2007, SPIE 2008 and SPIE 2009 [1], [2], [3]). It comprises a semi-automatic marking of target objects (ground truth generation) including their propagation over the image sequence and the evaluation via user-defined feature extractors. The conspicuity of camouflaged objects due to their movement can be assessed with a purpose-built processing method named MTI snail track algorithm. This paper presents the enhancements over the recent year and addresses procedures to assist the camouflage assessment of moving objects for image data material with strong noise or image artefacts. This extends the evaluation methods significantly to a broader application range. For example, some noisy infrared image data material can be evaluated for the first time by applying the presented methods which fathom the correlations between camouflage assessment, MTI (moving target indication) and dedicated noise filtering.

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RECENT ADVANCES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION, HELD AT PARIS (FRANCE) ON 24-28 JUNE 1974. VOLUME IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    ;Partial contents: The state of the art regarding the experimental investigations of the effects of pollutants; The assessment of environmental carcinogen risks in terms of life shortening; Pollutant-oriented integrated monitoring systems and lead exposure assessment; Intercompar...

  13. [Effective Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CPVE, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This bulletin deals with current assessment procedures for the Certificate of Pre-Vocational Education (CPVE) and discusses changes in CPVE assessment that are currently being considered by Great Britain's Further Education Unit. The first section discusses the reassessments of the CPVE profile's core competence statements and the CPVE preparatory…

  14. IV antibiotic therapy in the community: clinically effective and cost effective.

    PubMed

    Barker, Annie; Lyden-Rodgers, Mary

    This article discusses how the introduction of new ways of working has resulted in a more cost-effective service for the delivery of intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy in a community setting. When community IV therapy was originally initiated in the trust, the system involved two nurses to check calculations and oversee the administration of IV antibiotic therapy. However, as the demand for IV therapy escalated, and with some patients requiring multiple visits, pressures on community nursing teams created challenges relating to capacity and demand. This service improvement project involved two phases. Phase one examined patient safety and the administration of IV antibiotics by one nurse. Phase two reviewed the administration of IV antibiotic via a timed bolus route. Following the analysis, the implementation of these initiatives demonstrated maximisation of resources, a release of nurses' time to care and improvements to the patient experience. PMID:27145545

  15. Overview of BioCreAtIvE: critical assessment of information extraction for biology

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Lynette; Yeh, Alexander; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-01-01

    Background The goal of the first BioCreAtIvE challenge (Critical Assessment of Information Extraction in Biology) was to provide a set of common evaluation tasks to assess the state of the art for text mining applied to biological problems. The results were presented in a workshop held in Granada, Spain March 28–31, 2004. The articles collected in this BMC Bioinformatics supplement entitled "A critical assessment of text mining methods in molecular biology" describe the BioCreAtIvE tasks, systems, results and their independent evaluation. Results BioCreAtIvE focused on two tasks. The first dealt with extraction of gene or protein names from text, and their mapping into standardized gene identifiers for three model organism databases (fly, mouse, yeast). The second task addressed issues of functional annotation, requiring systems to identify specific text passages that supported Gene Ontology annotations for specific proteins, given full text articles. Conclusion The first BioCreAtIvE assessment achieved a high level of international participation (27 groups from 10 countries). The assessment provided state-of-the-art performance results for a basic task (gene name finding and normalization), where the best systems achieved a balanced 80% precision / recall or better, which potentially makes them suitable for real applications in biology. The results for the advanced task (functional annotation from free text) were significantly lower, demonstrating the current limitations of text-mining approaches where knowledge extrapolation and interpretation are required. In addition, an important contribution of BioCreAtIvE has been the creation and release of training and test data sets for both tasks. There are 22 articles in this special issue, including six that provide analyses of results or data quality for the data sets, including a novel inter-annotator consistency assessment for the test set used in task 2. PMID:15960821

  16. Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104): Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Meyers, Dave; Bateman, Andrea; Bluer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This document supports the report "Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104)". The first section outlines the methodology used to undertake the research and covers the design of the research, sample details, data collection processes and the strategy for data analysis and reporting. The…

  17. Comparing Personality Disorder Models: Cross-Method Assessment of the FFM and DSM-IV-TR

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Douglas B.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) defines personality disorders as categorical entities that are distinct from each other and from normal personality traits. However, many scientists now believe that personality disorders are best conceptualized using a dimensional model of traits that span normal and abnormal personality, such as the Five-Factor Model (FFM). However, if the FFM or any dimensional model is to be considered as a credible alternative to the current model, it must first demonstrate an increment in the validity of the assessment offered within a clinical setting. Thus, the current study extended previous research by comparing the convergent and discriminant validity of the current DSM-IV-TR model to the FFM across four assessment methodologies. Eighty-eight individuals receiving ongoing psychotherapy were assessed for the FFM and the DSM-IV-TR personality disorders using self-report, informant report, structured interview, and therapist ratings. The results indicated that the FFM had an appreciable advantage over the DSM-IV-TR in terms of discriminant validity and, at the domain level, convergent validity. Implications of the findings and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:21158596

  18. Practitioner Experiences and Expectations with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104): A Discussion of the Issues. Discussion Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn

    2009-01-01

    The Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104) has become the standard teaching qualification in the vocational education and training (VET) sector. Therefore the extent to which it provides competency in training and assessment, arguably the key element of being an effective teacher, is a fundamental issue. The author investigates the…

  19. Gravitational effects from a series of IVS R&D VLBI-sessions with observations close to the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, R.; Soja, B.; Schuh, H.

    2015-08-01

    In 2011 and 2012 the IVS observed twelve VLBI research and development (R&D) sessions that include successful observations as angularly close as 3.9° from the heliocenter. Among others, one purpose of these IVS-R&D sessions was to achieve an improvement in the determination of the PPN parameter γ . Besides, by analyzing this specific set of IVS sessions, it was for the first time possible to measure the dispersive effect of the Solar corona with VLBI (Soja et al., 2014). In this work we assess the formal error of the γ-parameter and the contributions of the various terms to the partial derivative of the γ-parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the size of the gravitational delays caused by: (i) Solar monopole field at rest and with approximately linear translation, (ii) rotation of the Solar monopole field, (iii) Solar gravitational field quadrupole expansion, and (iv) Solar higher order term.

  20. Amidase activity in soils. IV. Effects of trace elements and pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T., Jr.; Tabatabai, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    Amidase was recently detected in soils, and this study was carried out to assess the effects of 21 trace elements, 12 herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 2 insecticides on the activity of this enzyme. Results showed that most of the trace elements and pesticides studied inhibited amidase activity in soils. The degree of inhibition varied among the soils used. When the trace elements were compared by using 5 ..mu..mol/g of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils showed that Ag(I), Hg(I), As(III), and Se(IV) were the most effective inhibitors, but only Ag(I) and As(III) showed average inhibition > 50%. The least effective inhibitors (average inhibition < 3%) included Cu(I), Ba(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), Ti(IV), V(IV), As(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI). Other elements that inhibited amidase activity in soils were Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), Sn(II), Zn(II), B(III), and Cr(III). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that As(III) was a competitive inhibitor of amidase, whereas Ag(I), Hg(II), and Se(IV) were noncompetitive inhibitors. When the pesticides studied were compared by using 10 ..mu..g of active ingredient per gram of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils ranged from 2% with dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, and captan to 10% with butylate. Other pesticides that inhibited amidase activity in soils were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, paraquat, trifluralin, maneb, diazinon, and malathion. The inhibition of amidase by diazinon, alachlor, and butylate followed noncompetitive kinetics.

  1. Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples around nuclear power plant IV in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2008-09-01

    Activity concentrations and distributions of natural and man-made radionuclides in soil samples collected around nuclear power plant IV, Taiwan, were investigated for five years to assess the environmental radioactivity and characterisation of radiological hazard prior to commercial operation. The activity concentrations of radionuclides were determined via gamma-ray spectrometry using an HPGe detector. Data obtained show that the average concentrations of the (238)U and (232)Th series, and (40)K, were within world median ranges in the UNSCEAR report. The (137)Cs ranged from 2.46 +/- 0.55 to 12.13 +/- 1.31 Bq kg(-1). The terrestrial absorbed dose rate estimated by soil activity and directly measured with a thermoluminescence dosemeter (excluding cosmic rays), and the annual effective doses, were 45.63, 57.34 nGy h(-1) and 57.19 microSv, respectively. Experimental results were compared with international recommended values. Since the soil in this area is an important building material, the mean radium equivalent activity, external and inhalation hazard indices and the representative level index using various models given in the literature for the study area were 98.18 Bq kg(-1), 0.27, 0.34 and 0.73, respectively, which were below the recommended limits. Analytical results demonstrate that no radiological anomaly exists. The baseline data will prove useful and important in estimating the collective dose near the new nuclear power plant under construction in Taiwan. PMID:18714131

  2. High Temperature Irradiation Effects in Selected Generation IV Structural Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; McClintock, David A; Hoelzer, David T; Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Generation IV Materials Program cross-cutting task, irradiation and testing were carried out to address the issue of high temperature irradiation effects with selected current and potential candidate metallic alloys. The materials tested were (1) a high-nickel iron-base alloy (Alloy 800H); (2) a nickel-base alloy (Alloy 617); (3) two advanced nano-structured ferritic alloys (designated 14YWT and 14WT); and (4) a commercial ferritic-martensitic steel (annealed 9Cr-1MoV). Small tensile specimens were irradiated in rabbit capsules in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor at temperatures from about 550 to 700 C and to irradiation doses in the range 1.2 to 1.6 dpa. The Alloy 800H and Alloy 617 exhibited significant hardening after irradiation at 580 C; some hardening occurred at 660 C as well, but the 800H showed extremely low tensile elongations when tested at 700 C. Notably, the grain boundary engineered 800H exhibited even greater hardening at 580 C and retained a high amount of ductility. Irradiation effects on the two nano-structured ferritic alloys and the annealed 9Cr-1MoV were relatively slight at this low dose.

  3. The C IV doublet ratio intensity effect in symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Fahey, M.; Kafatos, M.; Viotti, R.; Cassatella, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution UV spectra in the 1200-2000 wavelength range of the symbiotic variable R Aqr and its nebular jet were obtained in July 1987 with the IUE. The line profile structure of the C IV 1548, 1550 doublet in the jet indicates multicomponent velocity structure from an optically thin emitting gas. The C IV doublet profiles in the compact H II region engulfing the Mira and hot companion binary also suggest multicomponent structure with radial velocities up to about -100 km/s. The value of the doublet intensity ratio in the R Aqr H II region has been observed in other similar symbiotic stars, such as RX Pup. It is suggested that the anomalous behavior of the C IV doublet intensities may be useful for studying the spatial structure and temporal nature of winds in symbiotic stars.

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Standard Care With IV Thrombolysis Versus Without IV Thrombolysis for Mild Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jay Chol; Jang, Min Uk; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong‐Moo; Ko, Youngchai; Lee, Soo‐Joo; Cha, Jae‐Kwan; Kim, Dae‐Hyun; Park, Sang Soon; Park, Tai Hwan; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Jun; Kim, Joon‐Tae; Cho, Ki‐Hyun; Yu, Kyung‐Ho; Oh, Mi‐Sun; Lee, Byung‐Chul; Cho, Yong‐Jin; Kim, Dong‐Eog; Lee, Ji Sung; Lee, Juneyoung; Gorelick, Philip B.; Bae, Hee‐Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background One third of patients presenting with initially mild strokes have unfavorable outcomes, and the efficacy of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) in this population has not been proven. This study aimed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of standard care with IVT versus without IVT in mild stroke patients. Methods and Results Using a multicenter stroke registry database, we identified patients with acute ischemic stroke who presented within 4.5 hours of symptom onset and had initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores ≤5. Multivariable logistic analysis and propensity score matching were used to adjust for baseline imbalances between the patients who did and did not receive IVT. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% CIs of IVT were estimated for 3‐month modified Rankin Scale scores of 0 to 1 and symptomatic. Of 13 117 patients with stroke who were hospitalized between April 2008 and May 2012, 1386 met the eligibility criteria, and 194 (14.0%) were treated with IVT. For a modified Rankin Scale of 0 to 1 at 3 months, the adjusted odds ratios were 1.96 (95% CI, 1.28 to 3.00; P=0.002) by multivariable logistic analysis and 1.68 (1.10 to 2.56; P=0.02) by propensity score matching analysis, respectively. There was a statistically nonsignificant excess of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation (odds ratios=3.76 [0.95 to 16.42; P=0.06] and 4.81 [0.84 to 49.34; P=0.09]), respectively. Conclusions In this observational registry‐based study, standard care with IVT is more effective than not receiving IVT in mild ischemic stroke patients, and there is a statistically nonsignificant risk of symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation. PMID:25628404

  5. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  6. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  7. Assessing Intellectual Functioning in Young Adolescents: How Do the WISC-IV and SB5 Compare?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kimberley; Gilmore, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) and the Stanford-Binet--Fifth Edition (SB5) are two of the most commonly used intelligence tests for children and adolescents. No comparative studies of the WISC-IV and SB5 have yet been published. In the current study the WISC-IV and SB5 were administered in counterbalanced…

  8. Assessment methodology development for proliferation resistance and physical protection of generation IV systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roglans, J.; Peterson, P. F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of California Berkeley

    2003-01-01

    One of the technology goals set for future Generation IV nuclear energy systems is to be 'a very unattractive and least desirable route' for proliferation, and to provide increased physical protection against theft or sabotage. To evaluate system performance for this goal, an international Expert Group has been formed and has adopted an evaluation method that involves three elements: (1) a process to systematically identify the range of potential security challenges that could face the system-a 'threat space' that includes State diversion or undeclared production of materials for nuclear explosives (proliferation resistance), and non-State theft or radiological sabotage (physical protection robustness); (2) methods for evaluating the system response to these challenges, at a level of detail appropriate to the stage of system or facility design; and (3) a set of measures of system performance that allow assessment and comparison of how well facilities systems meet the goal of providing a 'very unattractive and least desirable route.'

  9. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  10. Genetic effects of XRCC4 and ligase IV genes on human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Keping; Qin, Juan; Zhao, Yumei; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-28

    Ligase IV and XRCC4 genes, important molecules in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, may play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. To detect their effects on the risk of human glioma, their gene expression differences between 110 human glioma tissues and 50 healthy brain tissues were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, two tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ligase IV and four SNPs in XRCC4 genes were genotyped in 317 glioma patients and 352 healthy controls. The association of glioma and ligase IV/XRCC4 was evaluated using methods for SNP, haplotype, and gene-gene interaction analysis. Compared with those in normal brain tissues, the relative gene expression levels of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly downregulated in glioma tissue (P=0.0017 and 0.0006, respectively). Single SNP analysis indicated that only rs10131 in ligase IV remained significantly associated with glioma (P=0.0036) after 10 000 permutation tests. Haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype profiles of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly different between glioma patients and healthy controls (P=0.004 and 3.13E-6, respectively). Finally, the gene-gene interaction analysis suggested that the three-locus model (rs1805388, rs10131, and rs2075685) was the best model for ligase IV and XRCC4 to have interaction effects on the risk of glioma. In conclusion, both ligase IV and XRCC4 may act in concert to modulate the development of glioma. PMID:27508978

  11. Effect of Protein SV-IV on Experimental Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Romano-Carratelli, Caterina; Bentivoglio, Concetta; Nuzzo, Immacolata; Benedetto, Nunzia; Buommino, Elisabetta; Cozzolino, Anna; Cartenì, Maria; Morelli, Francesco; Costanza, Maria Rosaria; Metafora, Biancamaria; Metafora, Vittoria; Metafora, Salvatore

    2002-01-01

    Seminal vesicle protein IV (SV-IV) is a secretory anti-inflammatory, procoagulant, and immunomodulatory protein produced in large amounts by the seminal vesicle epithelium of the rat under the strict transcriptional control of androgen. In particular, this protein was shown to possess the ability to markedly inhibit in vivo the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of mice to nonbacterial cellular antigens (sheep erythrocytes and spermatozoa). We report data that demonstrate that in mice treated with SV-IV and infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, SV-IV is able to downregulate some important immunological and biochemical parameters that serovar Typhimurium normally upregulates in these animals. This event did not correlate with a lower bacterial burden but was associated with a markedly increased one (300%). Furthermore, the treatment of mice with SV-IV alone also produced a significant increase in the rate of mortality among serovar Typhimurium-infected animals. The mechanism underlying these phenomena was investigated, and the strong immunosuppression produced by SV-IV in serovar Typhimurium-infected mice was suggested to be the basis for the increased rate of mortality. The SV-IV-mediated immunosuppression was characterized by a decrease in the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, altered lymphocyte-macrophage interaction, downregulation of cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression, inhibition of macrophage phagocytosis and intracellular killing activities, and absence of apoptosis in the splenocyte population of SV-IV- and serovar Typhimurium-treated mice. The immunosuppressive activity of SV-IV was specific and was not due to aspecific cytotoxic effects. SV-IV-specific receptors (Kd = 10−8 M) occurring on the macrophage and lymphocyte plasma membranes may be involved in the molecular mechanism underlying the SV-IV-mediated immunosuppression. Some results obtained by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2

  12. Effective Elocution. Communication IV: Teaching Speaking Skills in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corpening, Dodie K.

    1985-01-01

    Activities are presented to help gifted students overcome the fear of public speaking. Activities include exercises to improve confidence and understand the principles of effective public speaking. (CL)

  13. Effect of the mobility on (I-V) characteristics of the MOSFET

    SciTech Connect

    Benzaoui, Ouassila; Azizi, Cherifa

    2013-12-16

    MOSFET Transistor was the subject of many studies and research works (electronics, data-processing, telecommunications...) in order to exploit its interesting and promising characteristics. The aim of this contribution is devoted to the effect of the mobility on the static characteristics I-V of the MOSFET. The study enables us to calculate the drain current as function of bias in both linear and saturated modes; this effect is evaluated using a numerical simulation program. The influence of mobility was studied. Obtained results allow us to determine the mobility law in the MOSFET which gives optimal (I-V) characteristics of the component.

  14. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-05-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR&PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic

  15. I-V Characteristics of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    1999-01-01

    There are many possible uses for ferroelectric field effect transistors.To understand their application, a fundamental knowledge of their basic characteristics must first be found. In this research, the current and voltage characteristics of a field effect transistor are described. The effective gate capacitance and charge are derived from experimental data on an actual FFET. The general equation for a MOSFET is used to derive the internal characteristics of the transistor: This equation is modified slightly to describe the FFET characteristics. Experimental data derived from a Radiant Technologies FFET is used to calculate the internal transistor characteristics using fundamental MOSFET equations. The drain current was measured under several different gate and drain voltages and with different initial polarizations on the ferroelectric material in the transistor. Two different polarization conditions were used. One with the gate ferroelectric material polarized with a +9.0 volt write pulse and one with a -9.0 volt pulse.

  16. Protective Effects of Astragaloside IV on db/db Mice with Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pingan; Zhao, Chen; Huang, Qiong; Zhang, Rihua; Fang, Yuan; Song, Qinglu; Yuan, Dongqing; Xie, Ping; Liu, Yun; Liu, Qinghuai

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common diabetic eye disease which is well-known as the result of microvascular retinal changes. Although the potential biological functions of astragaloside IV (AS IV) have long been described in traditional system of medicine, its protective effect on DR remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the function and mechanism of AS IV on type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Methods Db/db mice were treated with AS IV (4.5 mg/kg or 9 mg/kg) or physiological saline by oral gavage for 20 weeks along with db/m mice. In each group, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function was measured by pattern electroretinogram (ERG) and apoptosis was determined by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Blood and retina aldose reductase (AR) activity were quantified by chemiluminescence analysis. The expressions of phosporylated-ERK1/2, NF-κB were determined by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of related downstream proteins were quantified by Label-based Mouse Antibody Array. Results Administration of AS IV significantly improved the amplitude in pattern ERG and reduced the apoptosis of RGCs.in db/db mice. Furthermore, downregulation of AR activity, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, NF-κB and related cytokine were observed in AS IV treatment group. Conclusions Our study indicated that AS IV, as an inhibitor of AR, could prevent the activation of ERK1/2 phosporylation and NF-kB and further relieve the RGCs disfunction in db/db mice with DR. It has provided a basis for investigating the clinical efficacy of AR inhibitors in preventing DR. PMID:25411784

  17. REVIEWS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS: IV. CADMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a review of the scientific literature on the biological and environmental effects of cadmium. Included in the review are a general summary and a comprehensive discussion of the following topics as related to cadmium and specific cadmium compounds: physical and chemi...

  18. Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook. Volume IV: Project Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotton, Kathleen J.; And Others

    This directory is a compendium of 108 outstanding Education Consolidation Improvement Act Chapter 1 compensatory education projects selected for recognition by the United States Department of Education in 1987. It is the fourth volume in the "Effective Compensatory Education Sourcebook" series. Volume 1 consists of a review of the literature on…

  19. Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitor delays tolerance to anxiolytic effect of ethanol and withdrawal-induced anxiety in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajaykumar N; Pise, Ashish; Sharma, Jay N; Shukla, Praveen

    2015-06-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is an enzyme responsible for the metabolism of endogenous gut-derived hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DPP-IV is known for its role in energy homeostasis and pharmacological blockade of this enzyme is a recently approved clinical strategy for the management of type II diabetes. Accumulating evidences suggest that enzyme DPP-IV can affect spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) functions. However, little is known about the role of this enzyme in ethanol-mediated neurobehavioral complications. The objective of the present study was to examine the impact of DPP-IV inhibitor, sitagliptin on the development of tolerance to anxiolytic effect of ethanol and anxiety associated with ethanol withdrawal in rats. A dose-response study revealed that sitaglitpin (20 mg/kg, p.o.) per se exhibit anxiolytic effect in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test in rats. Tolerance to anxiolytic effect of ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.; 8 % w/v) was observed from 7(th) day of ethanol-diet (6 % v/v) consumption. In contrast, tolerance to anxiolytic effect of ethanol was delayed in rats that were treated daily with sitagliptin (20 mg/kg, p.o.) as tolerance was observed from 13(th)day since commencement of ethanol-diet consumption. Discontinuation of rats from ethanol-diet after 15-days of ethanol consumption resulted in withdrawal anxiety between 8 h and 12 h post-abstinence. However, rats on 15-day ethanol-diet with concomitant sitagliptin (20 mg/kg, p.o.) treatment exhibited delay in appearance (24 h post-withdrawal) of withdrawal anxiety. In summary, DPP-IV inhibitors may prove as an attractive research strategy against ethanol tolerance and dependence. PMID:25129124

  20. Gaussian Weighted Trajectory Method. IV. No Rainbow Effect in Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Gaussian weighted trajectory method (GWTM) is a practical implementation of classical S matrix theory (CSMT) in the random phase approximation, CSMT being the first and simplest semi-classical approach of molecular collisions, developped in the early seventies. Though very close in spirit to the purely classical description, GWTM accounts to some extent for the quantization of the different degrees-of-freedom involved in the processes. While CSMT may give diverging final state distributions, in relation to the rainbow effect of elastic scattering theory, GWTM has never led to such a mathematical catastrophe. The goal of the present note is to explain this finding.

  1. [Effects of fuel properties on the performance of a typical Euro IV diesel engine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-miao; Wang, Jian-xin; Shuai, Shi-jin

    2008-09-01

    With the purpose of establishing diesel fuel standard for China National 4th Emission Standard, as one part of Beijing "Auto-Oil" programme, engine performance test has been done on a typical Euro IV diesel engine using eight diesel fuels with different fuel properties. Test results show that, fuel properties has little effect on power, fuel consumption, and in-cylinder combustion process of tested Euro IV diesel engine; sulfate in PM and gaseous SO2 emissions increase linearly with diesel sulfur content increase; cetane number increase cause BSFC and PM reduce and NOx increase; T90 decrease cause NOx reduce while PM shows trend of reduce. Prediction equations of tested Euro IV diesel engine's ESC cycle NOx and PM emissions before SCR response to diesel fuel sulfur content, cetane number, T90 and aromatics have been obtained using linear regression method on the base of test results. PMID:19068662

  2. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  3. Gastroprotective Effects of Astragaloside IV against Acute Gastric Lesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shuai; Yang, Guang; Li, Winny; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Hailong; Li, Jian; Zhang, Minzhou

    2016-01-01

    Background Protection of the gastric mucosa from acute lesions induced by various irritants is a pertinent issue in the field of critical care medicine. In this study, we investigated the gastroprotective effects of astragaloside IV on acute gastric lesions in rats under stressful conditions. Methods Rats were randomized into six groups. Group 1 and 2 received 10% Tween 80 (vehicle). Group 3 received 20 mg/kg of omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Groups 4, 5 and 6 received astragaloside IV at concentration of 1, 10, and 50 mg/kg, respectively. As a means to induce gastric lesions, Groups 2–6 were subjected to water immersion and restraint stress for 12 hours after treatment. Results Our present studies show that compared to rats in group 2, treatment with 1 to 50 mg/kg astragaloside IV significantly decreased the size of gastric lesions, MDA, TNFα and MCP1 levels, in addition to normalizing gastric pH, gastric mucus and SOD levels (P<0.05). Histomorphological examination confirmed that treatment with astragaloside IV elicited a dosage-dependent protective effect on the gastric mucosa. Furthermore, pretreatment with astragaloside IV resulted in significant elevations in HSP70 and reduction in Bax, along with over-expression of PLCγ response level, which was further confirmed via immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusions The acute gastric lesions induced are attenuated by pretreatment with astragaloside IV which is possibly due to the enhancing of the expression of HSP70 with concomitant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic capacity. PMID:26845156

  4. Effects of astragaloside IV on eosinophil activation induced by house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Desheng; Wang, Yuwei; Du, Qiang; Cai, Jiankang

    2012-07-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV) has been noted for its reduction of eosinophilic airway inflammation in a murine model of chronic asthma. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this anti-inflammatory phenomenon, the effect of AS-IV on human blood eosinophils was studied in vitro. Eosinophils were isolated from the blood of patients with mild atopic asthma, preincubated with AS-IV for 1 h and stimulated in the presence or absence of the house dust mite allergen Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 1 for 4 h. The survival of the eosinophils at 48 h was investigated using trypan blue and the surface expression of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by the eosinophils was analyzed using flow cytometry. The secretion of cytokines in the supernatants and the chemotaxis of the eosinophils were measured by ELISA and the transwell system, respectively. Der p 1 was found to prolong the survival of the eosinophils. Similarly, the expression of CCR3 and ICAM-1, secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-5, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and transmigration of the eosinophils were increased in the presence of Der p 1. However, these inductive effects on the eosinophils were significantly inhibited by AS-IV (50 µg/ml). These findings suggest that AS-IV modulates eosinophil activation and trafficking in response to Der p 1 and may therefore be a useful therapeutic option in eosinophilic asthma. PMID:22505212

  5. Rationale for the Prevention of Syncope Trial IV: Assessment of Midodrine

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Satish R; Faris, Peter D; McRae, Maureen; Sheldon, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Background Vasovagal syncope is a common problem associated with a poor quality of life, which improves when the frequency of syncope is reduced. Effective pharmacological therapies for vasovagal syncope have been elusive. Midodrine is a pro-drug whose primary metabolite is an alpha-1 adrenoreceptor agonist. Small studies have suggested that it may be beneficial in syncope, but all have had significant methodological limitations. A placebo-controlled clinical trial of midodrine for the prevention of vasovagal syncope is needed. Structure of study The Prevention of Syncope Trial IV (POST 4) is a multicenter, international, randomized, placebo-controlled study of midodrine in the prevention of vasovagal syncope. The primary endpoint is the time to first recurrence of syncope. Patients will be randomized 1:1 to receive midodrine 10–30 mg/day or matching placebo, and followed for 1 year. Secondary endpoints include syncope frequency, presyncope, and quality of life. Primary analysis will be performed with an intention to treat approach, with a secondary on-treatment analysis. Power calculations A total sample size of 112, split equally between the two groups achieves 85% power to detect a 50% relative risk reduction when the event rates are 55% and 27.5% in the placebo and midodrine arms. Allowing for 20% dropout, we propose to enroll 140 patients. Registration POST 4 is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01456481). Implications This study will be the first adequately powered trial to determine whether midodrine is effective in preventing vasovagal syncope. If it is effective, then midodrine may become the first line pharmacological therapy for this condition. PMID:22610268

  6. Assessing peer review in the quest for improved medical services and the implications for education in quality assessment: Part IV.

    PubMed

    Hershey, N

    1990-11-01

    Three court decisions reviewing medical peer review conducted in hospitals were discussed at length in part III of this article. In their opinions the courts gave at least tacit approval to the procedures followed in the hospitals, and they accepted that an evidentiary basis for adverse action against the physicians was present. But not all medical peer review in hospitals resulting in adverse actions is found satisfactory when challenged in court, and the most prominent litigation in the decade of the 1980s concerning medical peer review, Patrick v. Burget (1), is testimony to the potential for its perversion. Part II adverted to the potential for bias or lack of objectivity in assessing physician performance. Part I mentioned the problem of bias in the context of peer review of articles for publication and of research grant proposals. The objectives of Part IV are: (1) to examine the concern about bias in medical peer review and to indicate how it may be lessened, if not eliminated; (2) to address further the difficulty created by the relative lack of valid criteria to employ in medical peer review; (3) to review the extent of protection from liability afforded to participants in medical peer review; and (4) to describe the changes that should be anticipated in review of medical services in the future. Before addressing these subjects it is essential to remind the reader that medical peer review is not conducted primarily for disciplinary purposes; rather, its purpose is to evaluate the quality of care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2136677

  7. Tin Whisker Risk Assessment of TDRSS IV Transponder Units 101 and 102

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellitti, Ron; Royse, Jeff; Jackson, Steve

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the plating requirements for the electrical and mechanical parts used in the TDRSS IV transponder manufactured by MOTOROLA, INC., SSG, SSSD. The intent of this report is to identify any electrical, electromechanical or mechanical part that does not have adequate requirements to prevent the use of a pure tin finish.

  8. Short form of Spanish version of the WISC-IV for intelligence assessment in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Dasi, Carmen; Soler, Maria J; Bellver, Vicente; Ruiz, Juan C

    2014-12-01

    In educational settings, quick assessments of intelligence are often required to screen children with potential special needs. The WISC-IV is administered individually and takes between one and two hours to complete. Given its widespread use in Spain, a short-form of the Spanish version is likely to be of use to professionals. The goal of this research was to develop a short form of the WISC-IV that can be performed in approximately half an hour. Data obtained in 100 elementary school children were analyzed following the criteria of Resnick and Entin (1971) . The results showed that the most accurate estimation of intelligence was achieved with a combination of the Vocabulary, Block Design, Letter-Number Sequencing, and Coding subtests. PMID:25539178

  9. Effect of astragaloside IV against rat myocardial cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress via mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Guan, Feng-Ying; Yang, Shi-Jie; Liu, Jinxiang; Yang, Si-Rui

    2015-07-01

    Astragaloside is one of the most common traditional Chinese medicines and is derived from Astragalus membranaceus. Astragaloside IV (AsIV) is a monomer located in an extract of astragaloside. The current study investigated the protective effects of AsIV against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in cardiocytes and elucidated the mechanisms responsible for this protective effect. Cultured neonatal rat cardiocytes were divided into five experimental groups as follows: i) Dimethyl sulfoxide; ii) H2O2; iii) AsIV+H2O2; iv) AsIV+H2O2+5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD); and v) nicorandil+H2O2. Cardiocyte survival was analyzed using an MTT assay. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also assessed to evaluate the viability of the cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining. The apoptotic rate was measured by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular calcium were observed using a laser confocal microscopy system. The results indicated that AsIV promoted the survival of cardiocytes (P<0.05), attenuated LDH release (P<0.05), ROS production (P<0.01) and apoptosis (P<0.01), stabilized the ΔΨm and reduced intracellular calcium overload (P<0.01) compared with the H2O2 group. The mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) inhibitor 5-HD was observed to partially reverse the protective effect of AsIV. Following treatment with 5-HD, the survival of cardiocytes was reduced (P<0.05), LDH release (P<0.01) and ROS production (P<0.05) were stimulated, ΔΨm and intracellular calcium change were increased (P<0.01) and apoptosis was increased (P<0.01) compared with the AsIV+H2O2 group. Thus, AsIV has potential for use in the suppression of apoptosis resulting from H2O2 exposure, and mitoKATP activation may underlie this protective mechanism. PMID:25739067

  10. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gougar, Hans David

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  11. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions

  12. Nonlinear effects and Joule heating in I-V curves in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercone, Silvana; Frésard, Raymond; Caignaert, Vincent; Martin, Christine; Saurel, Damien; Simon, Charles; André, Gilles; Monod, Philippe; Fauth, François

    2005-07-01

    We study the influence of the Joule effect on the nonlinear behavior of the transport I-V curves in polycrystalline samples of the manganite Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3 by using the crystalline unit-cell parameters as an internal thermometer in x-ray and neutron diffractions. We develop a simple analytical model to estimate the temperature profile in the samples. Under the actual experimental conditions we show that the internal temperature gradient or the difference between the temperature of the sample and that of the thermal bath is at the origin of the nonlinearity observed in the I-V curves. Consequences on other compounds with colossal magnetoresistance are also discussed.

  13. Low levels of DNA ligases III and IV sufficient for effective NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Windhofer, Frank; Wu, Wenqi; Iliakis, George

    2007-11-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes rejoin double strand breaks (DSBs) in their DNA predominantly by a non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway that utilizes the products of DNA-PKcs, Ku, LIG4, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos, Artemis as well as DNA polymerase lambda (termed D-NHEJ). Mutants with defects in these proteins remove a large proportion of DSBs from their genome utilizing an alternative pathway of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ). While D-NHEJ relies exclusively on DNA ligase IV, recent work points to DNA ligase III as a component of B-NHEJ. Here, we use RNA interference (RNAi) to further investigate the activity requirements for DNA ligase III and IV in the pathways of NHEJ. We report that 70-80% knock down of LIG3 expression has no detectable effect on DSB rejoining, either in D-NHEJ proficient cells, or in cells where D-NHEJ has been chemically or genetically compromised. Surprisingly, also LIG4 knock down has no effect on repair proficient cells, but inhibits DSB rejoining in a radiosensitive cell line with a hypomorphic LIG4 mutation that severely compromises its activity. The results suggest that complete coverage for D-NHEJ or B-NHEJ is afforded by very low ligase levels and demonstrate residual end joining by DNA ligase IV in cells of patients with mutations in LIG4. PMID:17492771

  14. In vitro oxidation of i.v. lipid emulsions in different all-in-one admixture bags assessed by an iodometric assay and gas-liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Steger, P J; Mühlebach, S F

    1997-02-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (FAs) of intravenous (IV) lipid emulsions can peroxidize to potentially harmful lipid hydroperoxides. In order to assess in vitro peroxidation of IV fat emulsions in all-in-one (AIO) admixture bags, an iodometric titration to determine lipid hydroperoxide content expressed by the peroxide value (PV) and a gas-liquid chromatographic (GLC) assay to determine changes of the FA pattern were established. A long-chain triglyceride (LCT) and medium-chain triglyceride-LCT emulsion were compared for the PV and the pH during storage at room temperature and daylight in AIO bags made of ethylvinylacetate (EVA) and polypropylene:polyamide 7:3 (V90). In contrast to storage in glass bottles, significant peroxidation was detected in both emulsions with 0.5-3.4 mmol peroxides/L after 28 d (150 times the control PV). A pH drop of at least 0.3 (EVA) and 1.2 (V90) units was measured. Initial PVs and peroxidation kinetics of the emulsions were different; V90 material showed better barrier properties against oxygen. PV was increased by higher temperature and light exposure. The FA pattern of an LCT emulsion with a PV > 6 (storage: 40 degrees C in a dark room for 28 d in AIO bags) assayed by GLC remained unchanged. The iodometric peroxide and the GLC assay were reproducible and easy to handle. Only the iodometric method was sensitive enough to detect peroxidation effects (detection limit: 0.02 mmol peroxides/L). IV fat emulsions can be checked for lipid hydroperoxide content with the rapid iodometric assay to guarantee optimal quality of IV lipids used for AIO admixtures. To prevent peroxidation, lipids in AIO bags should be stored light-protected in a refrigerator an oxygen-tight overwrap is mandatory for extended periods. PMID:9106791

  15. Evaluation of Operation and Effects of Title IV Expenditures in Utah. Final Report, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasatch Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Logan, UT.

    Summarizing the second year of a 3-year evaluation project, this nine-chapter report focuses on three Utah programs under Title IV of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The first program, Title IV-Part B (IV-B), provides funds for local education agency (LEA) purchases of educational materials and equipment; the second, Title IV-Part C…

  16. Effect of stent surface-scattering properties on IV-OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Sahar; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Feldman, Marc D.; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.

    2012-02-01

    Effect of stent surface-scattering properties on the appearance of stent struts in IV-OCT images was examined by simulation of light-stent interaction by an optical design software package. A phantom blood vessel was constructed from a mix of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and titanium dioxide to simulate the elastic and optical scattering properties of the arterial wall. A Cordis CYPHER® sirolimus-eluting stent was deployed within the phantom vessel and high resolution Micro-CT images of the stent strut were recorded to create a three-dimensional representation that was imported into software. A Gaussian surface-scattering model (bi-directional scattering distribution function) was assumed for the strut. Simulation of IV-OCT catheter and reflection of light from the stent strut was implemented for different surface scattering properties. A model of IV-OCT catheter was defined in the optical model and the rotation of the light beam over the stent strut was simulated. The measured parameters included: fraction of the reflected rays returning to the catheter and coordinate locations on the stent struts of returned rays. The results indicate that when the surface scattering of the strut increases, reflectivity is higher, while the angular spread of the light beam that is reflected back to the catheter is wider.

  17. Dose-Dependent Bidirectional Effect of Angiotensin IV on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm via Variable Angiotensin Receptor Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Meng, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV), as an effector peptide of the rennin-angiotensin system, possesses many biological properties yet not completely known. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of Ang IV in the development of Ang II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. We used Ang II infusion to induce AAA, and animals were treated with Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus no treatment, Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus low-, medium-, and high-dose Ang IV (0.72, 1.44, and 2.88 mg/kg per day, respectively). The incidence of AAA was 87.5%, 66.7%, 37.5%, and 83.3% in the no treatment, the low-, medium-, or high-dose Ang IV group, respectively. Compared with the no treatment group, medium-dose Ang IV treatment markedly reduced macrophage infiltration; levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, interleukin 6, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1; the expression and activity of metalloproteinases 2 and 9; but increased smooth muscle cells, and collagen content in AAA. However, high-dose Ang IV treatment did not have obvious protective effect. The beneficial effect of medium-dose Ang IV may be contributed to the stimulation of type 4 angiotensin receptor (AT4R) and AT2R with suppression of AT1R, activation of Akt, and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, as these beneficial effects were largely reversed by cotreatment with the AT4R antagonist divalinal-Ang IV in Ang II-infused mice or with the Akt inhibitor A6730 in Ang II-stimulated human smooth muscle cells. Therefore, medium dose of Ang IV may provide a novel and promising approach to the treatment of AAA. PMID:26238445

  18. Effects of monocyte-endothelium interactions on the expression of type IV collagenases in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    LI, YONG-QIN; LIU, RUI; XUE, JIA-HONG; ZHANG, YAN; GAO, DENG-FENG; WU, XIAO-SAN; WANG, CONG-XIA; YANG, YU-BAI

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells is one of the early stages in the development of atherosclerosis. The expression of type IV collagenases, which include matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, in monocytes is hypothesized to play an important role in monocyte infiltration and transformation into foam cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of monocyte-endothelium interactions on the expression levels of type IV collagenases and their specific inhibitors in monocytes, and to investigate the roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β in this process. Monocytes were single-cultured or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The expression of the type IV collagenases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their specific inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2, in monocytes was determined by immunohistochemistry followed by image analysis. The expression levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were found to be low in the single-culture monocytes, but increased significantly when the monocytes and endothelial cells were co-cultured. However, treatment with monoclonal TNF-α or IL-1β antibodies partially inhibited the upregulated expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the co-cultured monocytes. Expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 was observed in the single monocyte culture, and a small increase in the expression levels was observed when the monocytes were co-cultured with endothelial cells. Therefore, monocyte-endothlium interactions were shown to increase the expression of type IV collagenases in monocytes, resulting in the loss of balance between MMP-2 and -9 with TIMP-1 and -2. In addition, TNF-α and IL-1β were demonstrated to play important roles in this process. PMID:25574228

  19. Phase IV: Educational Needs Assessment For Washington State Students. March 1973. (Summary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouillet, Frank B.

    The results of the Washington Elementary Educational Assessment Project (WEEAP) are presented in this report. The purposes of the Assessment project were (1) to assess the reading and mathematics achievement in Washington elementary schools by sampling fourth and sixth grade students in randomly selected school buildings; (2) to identify…

  20. Therapeutic effects of the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor, sitagliptin, on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in FLS-ob/ob male mice.

    PubMed

    Onoyama, Takumi; Koda, Masahiko; Okamoto, Toshiaki; Kishina, Manabu; Matono, Tomomitsu; Sugihara, Takaaki; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2015-11-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation and varying degrees of fibrosis. The dipeptidyl peptidase‑IV enzyme is important in glucose metabolism, as well as lipid accumulation, extracellular matrix metabolism and immune stimulation. Furthermore, the enzyme activity of dipeptidyl peptidase‑IV is known to be increased in non‑alcoholic steatohepatitis. Therefore, dipeptidyl peptidase‑IV inhibitors are potential therapeutic agents for non‑alcoholic steatohepatitis. The present study assessed the therapeutic effects of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase‑IV inhibitor, on non‑alcoholic steatohepatitis using fatty liver Shionogi‑ob/ob male mice. Sitagliptin (2 mg/kg/day; n=10) or placebo (control; n=10) was orally administered to fatty liver Shionogi‑ob/ob mice for 12 weeks, and hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress were assessed in comparison with the controls. Sitagliptin administration reduced body weight and blood glucose levels, and improved hepatic fibrosis. It also inhibited the gene expression levels of fatty acid synthase, transforming growth factor‑β1, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases‑1, procollagen‑type 1, tumor necrosis factor‑α, monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 and enhanced peroxisome proliferator activated receptor‑α. Furthermore, a marked attenuation of hepatic stellate cell activation and Kupffer cells was observed in the sitagliptin group. A decrease in oxidative stress and apoptosis was also observed. Sitagliptin attenuated the progression of hepatic fibrosis by improving lipid metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26397061

  1. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

  2. Biokinetics and effects of titania nano-material after inhalation and i.v. injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Fabian, Eric; Ma-Hock, Lan; Wiench, Karin; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2009-05-01

    Within NanoSafe2 we developed a special inhalation model to investigate deposition of inhaled particles in the lung and the further distribution in the body after. Concurrently, the effects of the inhaled materials in the lung were examined. The results for nano-Titania were compared to results from inhalation studies with micron-sized (non-nano) Titania particles and to quartz particles (DQ12, known to be potent lung toxicants). To build a PBPK model for nano-Titania the tissue distribution of the material was also examined following intravenous (i.v.) administration.

  3. Irradiation effects in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys for Gen. IV nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Naoko; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kondo, Sosuke; Hashitomi, Okinobu; Kimura, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    Oxide particle dispersion strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys are irradiated by using simulation technique (Fe/He dual-ion irradiation) to investigate the reliability to Gen. IV high-temperature reactors. The fine oxide particles with less than 10 nm in average size and approximately 8.0 × 1022 m-3 in number density remained after 101 dpa irradiation. The tiny helium bubbles were inside grains, not at grain-boundaries; it is advantageous effect of oxide particles which trap the helium atoms at the particle-matrix interface. Ni-base ODS alloys demonstrated their great ability to overcome He embrittlement.

  4. Assessment of feasibility and efficacy of Class IV laser therapy for postoperative pain relief in off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Karlekar, Anil; Bharati, Saswata; Saxena, Ravindra; Mehta, Kanchan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laser therapy, for its established analgesic properties with minimal side effects, has been used for the treatment of chronic pain. However, it has not been used for the treatment of acute postoperative pain. This pilot study was designed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of Class IV laser on postoperative pain relief following off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG) surgery, as a component of multimodal analgesia (MMA) technique. Methods: This open observational prospective study comprised of 100 adult patients (84 male, 16 female) who underwent OPCABG through sternotomy. For postoperative analgesia, they were subjected to laser therapy subjected to laser therapy in addition to the standard institutional pain management protocol comprising of IV infusion/bolus of tramadol and paracetamol and fentanyl bolus as rescue analgesic. Pain intensity was measured by Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). The laser therapy was scheduled as once a day regime for three consecutive postoperative days (PODs) starting on POD 1, 30 min following tracheal extubation. The subsequent laser applications were also scheduled at the same time of the day as on day 1 if VRS was ≥5. 10 W Class IV laser was applied over 150 cm2 sternal wound area for 150 s. VRS was used to assess pain severity and was recorded for statistical analysis using Friedman Test. Results: The mean (standard deviation [SD]) VRS of all the 100 patients just before application of the first dose of laser was 7.31 (0.94) while on MMT; the same fell to 4.0 (1.279) and 3.40 (2.697) at 1 h and 24 h respectively following first dose of laser. The change of VRS over first 24 h among all the 100 patients was statistically significant (P = 0.000). Laser was re-applied in 40 patients whose VRS was ≥5 (mean [SD] – 6.38 [0.868]) at 24th h. After receiving the 2nd dose of laser the VRS scores fell significantly (P = 0.000) and became 0 at 54th h. No patients required 3rd dose of the laser. No patient required

  5. Protective Effect of Astragaloside IV Against Paraquat-Induced Lung Injury in Mice by Suppressing Rho Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Ruoning; Jiang, Wenjiao; Wang, Huimin; Xu, Ang; Lu, Guo; Ren, Yi; Xu, Yangmei; Song, Yangyang; Yong, Shoulei; Ji, Hui; Ma, Zhanqiang

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of astragaloside IV (AS IV) against paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary injury in vivo. Fifty BALB/C mice were randomized into five groups: (1) control, (2) PQ, (3) PQ + dexamethasone (Dex, 5 mg/kg), (4) PQ + AS IV (50 mg/kg), and (5) PQ + AS IV (100 mg/kg). A single dose of PQ (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was intraperitoneally given to induced acute lung injury. Then, mice were treated with AS IV (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally) for 5 days. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized; then, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected for histological observation, biochemical assay, and Western blot analysis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in lung tissues, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in BALF were determined. Histological examination indicated that AS IV attenuated lung damage caused by PQ. Biochemical results showed that AS IV treatment significantly reduced the levels of MDA, MPO, and inflammatory cytokines while increased the levels of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px compared with those in PQ group. Western blot results revealed that AS IV attenuated the Txnip/Trx expressions and inhibited Rho/ROCK/nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in PQ-challenged mice. These findings suggested the protective effect of AS IV as a natural product on PQ-induced pulmonary injury. PMID:26452991

  6. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE SERVICE HISTORY AND CORROSION SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TYPE IV WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B

    2008-09-18

    Type IV waste tanks were designed and built to store waste that does not require auxiliary cooling. Each Type IV tank is a single-shell tank constructed of a steel-lined pre-stressed concrete tank in the form of a vertical cylinder with a concrete domed roof. There are four such tanks in F-area, Tanks 17-20F, and four in H-Area, Tanks 21-24H. Leak sites were discovered in the liners for Tanks 19 and 20F in the 1980's. Although these leaks were visually observed, the investigation to determine the mechanism by which the leaks had occurred was not completed at that time. Therefore, a concern was raised that the same mechanism which caused the leak sites in the Tanks in F-area may also be operable in the H-Area tanks. Data from the construction of the tanks (i.e., certified mill test reports for the steel, no stress-relief), the service history (i.e., waste sample data, temperature data), laboratory tests on actual wastes and simulants (i.e., electrochemical testing), and the results of the visual inspections were reviewed. The following observations and conclusions were made: (1) Comparison of the compositional and microstructural features indicate that the A212 material utilized for construction of the H-Area tanks are far more resistant to SCC than the A285 materials used for construction of the F-Area tanks. (2) A review of the materials of construction, temperature history, service histories concluded that F-Area tanks likely failed by caustic stress corrosion cracking. (3) The environment in the F-Area tanks was more aggressive than that experienced by the H-Area tanks. (4) Based on a review of the service history, the H-Area tanks have not been exposed to an environment that would render the tanks susceptible to either nitrate stress corrosion cracking (i.e., the cause of failures in the Type I and II tanks) or caustic stress corrosion cracking. (5) Due to the very dilute and uninhibited solutions that have been stored in Tank 23H, vapor space corrosion has

  7. Gestalt Effect of Self Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Defining self assessment as the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgements about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards, this paper seeks to highlight the gestalt effect of self assessment. The total effect of self assessment on the learner is greater than…

  8. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume IV: coal prefeasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The study assesses the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of diversification from oil to coal for generating electric power for the Jamaican Public Service Company (JPS) and the bauxite/alumina industry.

  9. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Four; Achieving Effective Communication. Segments I, II, III, & IV, Volume IV-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The fourth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on achieving effective communication and is divided into three separate documents. It is a self-instructional linear text with audiotape and intrinsically…

  10. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Four; Achieving Effective Communication. Segments IV, V, VI, & VII, Volume IV, Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The fourth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on achieving effective communication. It is a self-instructional tape script and intrinsically programed booklet. EM 010 427 and EM 010 428 are the first and…

  11. Temporal Lobe Reactions After Carbon Ion Radiation Therapy: Comparison of Relative Biological Effectiveness–Weighted Tolerance Doses Predicted by Local Effect Models I and IV

    SciTech Connect

    Gillmann, Clarissa; Jäkel, Oliver; Schlampp, Ingmar; Karger, Christian P.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted tolerance doses for temporal lobe reactions after carbon ion radiation therapy using 2 different versions of the local effect model (LEM I vs LEM IV) for the same patient collective under identical conditions. Methods and Materials: In a previous study, 59 patients were investigated, of whom 10 experienced temporal lobe reactions (TLR) after carbon ion radiation therapy for low-grade skull-base chordoma and chondrosarcoma at Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany in 2002 and 2003. TLR were detected as visible contrast enhancements on T1-weighted MRI images within a median follow-up time of 2.5 years. Although the derived RBE-weighted temporal lobe doses were based on the clinically applied LEM I, we have now recalculated the RBE-weighted dose distributions using LEM IV and derived dose-response curves with Dmax,V-1 cm³ (the RBE-weighted maximum dose in the remaining temporal lobe volume, excluding the volume of 1 cm³ with the highest dose) as an independent dosimetric variable. The resulting RBE-weighted tolerance doses were compared with those of the previous study to assess the clinical impact of LEM IV relative to LEM I. Results: The dose-response curve of LEM IV is shifted toward higher values compared to that of LEM I. The RBE-weighted tolerance dose for a 5% complication probability (TD{sub 5}) increases from 68.8 ± 3.3 to 78.3 ± 4.3 Gy (RBE) for LEM IV as compared to LEM I. Conclusions: LEM IV predicts a clinically significant increase of the RBE-weighted tolerance doses for the temporal lobe as compared to the currently applied LEM I. The limited available photon data do not allow a final conclusion as to whether RBE predictions of LEM I or LEM IV better fit better clinical experience in photon therapy. The decision about a future clinical application of LEM IV therefore requires additional analysis of temporal lobe reactions in a

  12. Effects of addition of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor to metformin on sirolimus-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Long; Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Jian; Chung, Byung Ha; Yang, Chul Woo

    2016-08-01

    The guideline for the management of new-onset diabetes after transplantation recommends metformin (MET) as a first-line drug, and addition of a second-line drug is needed to better control of hyperglycemia. We tested the effect of addition of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) inhibitor to MET on sirolimus (SRL)-induced diabetes mellitus (DM). In animal model of SRL-induced DM, MET treatment improved pancreatic islet function (blood glucose level and insulin secretion) and attenuated oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. Addition of a DPP IV inhibitor to MET improved these parameters more than MET alone. An in vitro study showed that SRL treatment increased pancreas beta cell death and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and pretreatment of ROS inhibitor, or p38MAPK inhibitor effectively decreased SRL-induced islet cell death. Exendin-4 (EXD), a substrate of DPP IV or MET significantly improved cell viability and decreased ROS production compared with SRL treatment, and combined treatment with the 2 drugs improved both parameters. At the subcellular level, impaired mitochondrial respiration by SRL were partially improved by MET or EXD and much improved further after addition of EXD to MET. Our data suggest that addition of a DPP IV inhibitor to MET decreases SRL-induced oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial respiration. This finding provides a rationale for the combined use of a DPP IV inhibitor and MET in treating SRL-induced DM. PMID:27059001

  13. Steps Toward Effective Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Carolyn O.

    1996-01-01

    Describes and defines the steps involved in measurement and evaluation: (1) determining an outcome; (2)defining scoring criteria; (3)establishing appropriate assessment tasks; and (4)creating opportunities for learning. Includes a flow chart for a design-down curriculum and an example of a vocal performance rating scale assessment. (MJP)

  14. Effect of Intravenous (IV) Assistive Device (VeinViewer) on IV Access Attempts, Procedural Time, and Patient and Nurse Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Lois; Hunt, Pauline; Ortega, Erin; Knowlton, Jessica; Briggs, Raymond; Hirokawa, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of VeinViewer for peripheral vascular accessing a pediatric hematology oncology clinic. After obtaining consent, 53 patients were randomly assigned to either the VeinViewer group (n = 27) or standard methods group (n = 26). Data on number of attempts, procedural time, access complications, and patient and nurse satisfaction were collected. Patients randomized to the VeinViewer group required significantly less time to access a vein as compared with the standard methods group (P ≤ .05). Additionally, these patients rated nurses as having significantly more skill than nurses who did not use VeinViewer (P ≤ .05) and assigned significantly higher scores for "overall experience"(P ≤ .05). Responses by nurses using VeinViewer overall saw the device in a positive light. PMID:26510643

  15. In vivo modulation of CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV) in the mouse: effects of polyreactive and monoreactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, N; Plant, C; Biancone, L; Bachovchin, W; McCluskey, R; Andres, G

    1996-10-15

    We previously reported that intravenous injections in rabbits or guinea pigs of divalent antibodies to purified protein or carbohydrate antigens located mainly on endothelial cells induce acute pulmonary edema, which is often lethal. Surviving animals develop resistance to the injurious effect of subsequent injection of antibodies (adaptation), associated with shedding of antigen-antibody complexes from endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated and compared in mice the effects of 3-day multiple injections of two different rabbit antibody (IgG) preparations against antigens expressed mainly at the surface of epithelial cells. The first preparation contained antibodies to a single transmembrane protein, CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPP IV]) (monoreactive anti-DPP IV IgG); the second contained antibodies against multiple antigens of the renal tubular brush border (BB), including DPP IV (polyreactive anti-BB IgG). Both IgG preparations caused loss of DPP IV from the organs studied, as shown by reduction in enzyme activity in tissue homogenates and by immunofluorescence microscopy, which showed loss of DPP IV from cell surface. However, the monoreactive anti-DPP IV IgG induced considerably greater reduction than polyreactive anti-BB IgG. Loss of DPP IV from the cell surface probably occurred by shedding of immune complexes into vascular and extravascular fluids, including bile and urine. The results may have relevance to hyperacute rejection of xenografts, as from pigs to primates. Since human natural antibodies that bind to porcine cells are polyreactive, a new prophylactic strategy for hyperacute rejection might be based on down-regulation of the major xenogeneic antigen, alpha-galactosyl, by injecting donor animals with monoreactive alpha-galactosyl antibodies before transplantation. PMID:8878393

  16. User assessment of Norditropin NordiFlex®, a new prefilled growth hormone pen: a Phase IV multicenter prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tauber, Maithé; Jaquet, Delphine; Jesuran-Perelroizen, Monique; Petrus, Marc; Bertrand, Anne Marie; Coutant, Regis

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim In growth disorders, ensuring long-term growth hormone therapy (GHT) remains a challenge that might compromise the clinical outcome. Consequently, strategies aiming at alleviating the burden of daily injection might improve the treatment benefit. The study reported here was performed to assess the ease of use of Norditropin NordiFlex® (Novo Nordisk, Princeton, NJ, USA) compared with that of the devices previously used in children treated with GHT with recombinant somatropin. Methods This Phase IV prospective, multicenter, open-label study was conducted in France. All patients received Norditropin NordiFlex for 6 weeks. Oral questionnaires were administered by the physician to the patients and/or the parents at inclusion and at the final visit. Results This study included 103 patients aged between 6 and 17 years. The patients assessed Norditropin NordiFlex as significantly easier to use than their previous device (median value = 7.5, P < 0.001). Almost three-quarters of patients (64.4%) preferred Norditropin NordiFlex to their previous device. Among physicians and nurses, 73% assessed Norditropin NordiFlex training as “very easy” and 26% as “easy.” Norditropin NordiFlex improved patient autonomy, with 41% of patients able to self-inject the treatment. Conclusion This study has shown that Norditropin NordiFlex is reliable, safe, and easy to use and most study patients preferred it to their previous device. These characteristics may improve the adherence to GHT. PMID:23737664

  17. Comparison of the effects of the oral anticancer platinum(IV) complexes oxoplatin and metabolite cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) on global gene expression of NCI-H526 cells

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Ulrike; Ulsperger, Ernst; Geissler, Klaus; Hamilton, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Platinum(IV) coordination complexes like oxoplatin (cis,cis,trans-diammine-dichlorido-dihydroxido-platinum[IV]) show high stability and therefore can be utilized orally for outpatient care. Although oxoplatin is capable of binding directly to DNA after prolonged incubation, platinum(IV) agents are considered to be largely inert prodrugs that are converted to highly cytotoxic platinum(II) compounds by reducing substances, enzymes, or microenviron-mental conditions. Reaction of oxoplatin with 0.1 M hydrogen chloride mimicking gastric acid yields cis-diammine-tetrachlorido-platinum(IV) (DATCP[IV]), which exhibits two-fold increased activity. The presence of chlorides as ligands in the axial position results in a high reduction potential that favors transformation to platinum(II) complexes. In this study, the intracellular effect of the highly reactive tetrachlorido derivative was investigated in comparison with an equipotent dose of cisplatin. Genome-wide expression profiling of NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer cells treated with these platinum species revealed clear differences in the expression pattern of affected genes and concerned cellular pathways between DATCP(IV) and cisplatin. Application of DATCP(IV) resulted in extensive downregulation of protein and ATP synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and glycolysis, in contrast to cisplatin, which preferentially targeted glutathione conjugation, pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, and the metabolism of amino acids and a range of carbohydrates. Thus, the oxoplatin metabolite DATCP(IV) constitutes a potent cytotoxic derivative that may be produced by gastric acid or acidic areas prevailing in larger solid tumors, depending on the respective pharmaceutical formulation of oxoplatin. Furthermore, DATCP(IV) exhibits intracellular effects that are clearly different from the expected reduced product cisplatin(II). In conclusion, activation of the platinum(IV) complex oxoplatin seems to involve the generation of a cytotoxic

  18. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  19. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    SciTech Connect

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as

  20. Protective effects of astragaloside IV against amyloid beta1-42 neurotoxicity by inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinru; Jia, Ning; Wang, Weixi; Jin, Hui; Xu, Jiehua; Hu, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Substantial evidence has indicated that the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening is involved in Aβ-induced neuronal death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active constituents of Astragalus membranaceus, has been reported as an effective anti-oxidant for treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms still need to be clarified. In this study, we investigated whether AS-IV could prevent Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity in SK-N-SH cells via inhibiting the mPTP opening. The results showed that pretreatment of AS-IV significantly increased the viability of neuronal cells, reduced apoptosis, decreased the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial superoxide in the presence of Aβ1-42. In addition, pretreatment of AS-IV inhibited the mPTP opening, rescued mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), enhanced ATP generation, improved the activity of cytochrome c oxidase and blocked cytochrome c release from mitochondria in Aβ1-42 rich milieu. Moreover, pretreatment of AS-IV reduced the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl-2 in an Aβ1-42 rich environment. These data indicate that AS-IV prevents Aβ1-42-induced SK-N-SH cell apoptosis via inhibiting the mPTP opening and ROS generation. These results provide novel insights of AS-IV for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:24905226

  1. Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part IV: energy conversion from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The study considers the feasibility of energy conversion from wastes. Specifically, the study analyzes the potential for energy recovery from urban wastes in Jamaica, with the Kingston area serving as a case study, and assesses the feasibility of building a prototype demonstration unit for energy recovery from solid wastes at the University of the West Indies (UWI)-Mona Campus. Steam-generating waterwall combustion, refuse-derived fuel systems, pyrolysis, anaerobic biological conversion (biogas), and gas recovery from landfills are discussed as alternative systems for energy recovery from urban wastes.

  2. Assessment of water quality parameters of the Harike wetland in India, a Ramsar site, using IRS LISS IV satellite data.

    PubMed

    Mabwoga, Samson Okongo; Chawla, Amit; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar

    2010-11-01

    This study aims at the classification and water quality assessment of Harike wetland (Ramsar site) in India using satellite images from the Indian Remote Sensing satellite, Resourcesat (IRS P6). The Harike wetland is a converging zone of two rivers, Beas and Sutlej. The satellite images of IRS Linear Imaging Self Scanner (LISS) IV multispectral sensor with three bands (green, red, and near infrared (NIR)) and a spatial resolution of 5.8 m were classified using supervised image classification techniques. Field points for image classification and water sampling were recorded using a Garmin eTrex Global Positioning System. The water quality parameters assessed were dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, turbidity, total and suspended solids (SS), chemical oxygen demand, and Secchi disk transparency (SDT). Correlations were established between turbidity and SS, SS and SDT, and total solids and turbidity. Using reflectance values from the green, red, and NIR bands, we then plotted the water quality parameters with the mean digital number values from the satellite imagery. The NIR band correlated significantly with the water quality parameters, whereas, using SDT values, it was observed that the green and the red reflectance bands were able to distinguish the waters from the two rivers, which have different water qualities. PMID:19882220

  3. Axial Ligand Effects on the Geometric and Electronic Structures of Nonheme Oxoiron(IV) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy A.; Rohde, Jan-Uwe; Seo, Mi Sook; Sastri, Chivukula V.; DeHont, Raymond; Ohta, Takehiro; Kitagawa, Teizo; Münck, Eckard; Nam, Wonwoo; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    A series of complexes [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ (where X = OH−, CF3CO2−, N3−, NCS−, NCO−, and CN−) were obtained by treatment of the well characterized nonheme oxoiron(IV) complex [FeIV(O)(TMC)(NCMe)]2+ (TMC = tetramethylcyclam) with the appropriate NR4X salts. Because of the topology of the TMC macrocycle, the [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ series represents an extensive collection of S = 1 oxoiron(IV) complexes that only differ with respect to the ligand trans to the oxo unit. Electronic absorption, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption, resonance Raman, and Mössbauer data collected for these complexes conclusively demonstrate that the characteristic spectroscopic features of the S = 1 FeIV=O unit, namely i) the near-IR absorption properties, ii) X-ray absorption pre-edge intensities, and iii) quadrupole splitting parameters, are strongly dependent on the identity of the trans ligand. However, on the basis of EXAFS data, most [FeIV(O)(TMC)(X)]+ species have Fe=O bond lengths similar to that of [FeIV(O)(TMC)(NCMe)]2+ (1.66 ± 0.02 Å). The mechanisms by which the trans ligands perturb the FeIV=O unit were probed using density functional theory (DFT) computations, yielding geometric and electronic structures in good agreement with our experimental data. These calculations revealed that the trans ligands modulate the energies of the Fe=O σ- and π-antibonding molecular orbitals, causing the observed spectroscopic changes. Time-dependent DFT methods were used to aid in the assignment of the intense near-UV absorption bands found for the oxoiron(IV) complexes with trans N3−, NCS−, and NCO− ligands as X−-to-FeIV=O charge transfer transitions, thereby rationalizing the resonance enhancement of the ν(Fe=O) mode upon excitation of these chromophores. PMID:18712873

  4. Assessing School Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stephen; Freedman, David; Shavelson, Richard; Bolus, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) program measures value added in colleges and universities, by testing the ability of freshmen and seniors to think logically and write clearly. The program is popular enough that it has attracted critics. In this paper, we outline the methods used by the CLA to determine value added. We summarize the…

  5. Effective Campus Environmental Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappaport, Ann; Creighton, Sarah Hammond

    2003-01-01

    Examines environmental assessments as a decision-making tool, distinguishing broad-based, targeted, and goal-oriented efforts as the three types most commonly practiced on campuses. Discusses benefits and problems associated with these approaches and concludes that the goal-oriented approach is most likely to be successful. Describes Tufts…

  6. NON-EQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION EFFECTS ON THE DENSITY LINE RATIO DIAGNOSTICS OF O IV

    SciTech Connect

    Olluri, K.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.

    2013-04-10

    The dynamic timescales in the solar atmosphere are shorter than the ionization and recombination times of many ions used for line ratio diagnostics of the transition region and corona. The long ionization and recombination times for these ions imply that they can be found far from their equilibrium temperatures, and spectroscopic investigations require more care before being trusted in giving correct information on local quantities, such as density and temperature. By solving the full time-dependent rate equations for an oxygen model atom in the three-dimensional numerical model of the solar atmosphere generated by the Bifrost code, we are able to construct synthetic intensity maps and study the emergent emission. We investigate the method of electron density diagnostics through line ratio analysis of the O IV 140.1 nm to the 140.4 nm ratio, the assumptions made in carrying out the diagnostics, and the different interpretations of the electron density. The results show big discrepancies between emission in statistical equilibrium and emission where non-equilibrium (NEQ) ionization is treated. Deduced electron densities are up to an order of magnitude higher when NEQ effects are accounted for. The inferred electron density is found to be a weighted mean average electron density along the line of sight and has no relation to the temperature of emission. This study shows that numerical modeling is essential for electron density diagnostics and is a valuable tool when the ions used for such studies are expected to be out of ionization equilibrium. Though this study has been performed on the O IV ion, similar results are also expected for other transition region ions.

  7. Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104). A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Berwyn; Meyers, Dave; Bateman, Andrea; Bluer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104) is seen as the standard entry-level teaching qualification in the vocational education and training (VET) sector. The qualification is widely accepted and well supported as an essential requirement for VET practitioners. However, it has been criticised in relation to its ability to provide…

  8. Costs and Their Assessment to Users of a Medical Library, Part IV: Differences in the Use of a Health Science Library by Various User Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bres, E.; And Others

    Part IV is a summary analysis of sample and survey data collected to facilitate the structure of the cost assessment models and to find out which, if any, subgroups of HAM-TMC user population make more (or less) use of various library services. Sampling data were obtained from brief interviews and in-house files of various user institutions to…

  9. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Su; Wu, Hengfang; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  10. Beneficial effects of astragaloside IV against angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LU, YAO; LI, SU; WU, HENGFANG; BIAN, ZHIPING; XU, JINDAN; GU, CHUNRONG; CHEN, XIANGJIAN; YANG, DI

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent characteristic of the majority of cardiovascular diseases. Astragaloside IV (As-IV), the major active ingredient of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge. (a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), possesses antioxidant properties. The present study was carried out to examine whether As-IV can reverse Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cultured rat aortic VSMCs treated with Ang II (1 µM) for 24 h exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction, including a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCRs), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, as well as the disruption of mitochondrial structural integrity. Following treatment with Ang II, As-IV (50 µg/ml) was added to the culture medium followed by incubation for a further 24 h. The administration of As-IV significantly increased the mitochondrial OCRs, ATP production and the mtDNA levels, and reversed the mitochondrial morphological changes which occurred in the VSMCs. Treatment with As-IV also reversed the Ang II-induced increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the increase in NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase activity, as well as the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. Furthermore, treatment with As-IV led to an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), and in the protein expression of PGC-1α, parkin and dynamin 1-like protein 1 (Drp1) in the VSMCs. These results indicate that As-IV exerts beneficial effects on Ang II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat VSMCs and that these effects are mediated through the inhibition of ROS overproduction, as well as the promotion of mitochondrial autophagy and

  11. Planck early results. IV. First assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck HFI Core Team; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ansari, R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Banday, A. J.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bradshaw, T.; Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Camus, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Charra, J.; Charra, M.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, C.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Cressiot, C.; Crill, B. P.; Crook, M.; de Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Efstathiou, G.; Eng, P.; Filliard, C.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Fourmond, J.-J.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gispert, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Griffin, M.; Guyot, G.; Haissinski, J.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hills, R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Kaplan, J.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lami, P.; Lange, A. E.; Lasenby, A.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leriche, B.; Leroy, C.; Longval, Y.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maciaszek, T.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Mansoux, B.; Masi, S.; Matsumura, T.; McGehee, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mercier, C.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Mortlock, D.; Murphy, A.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Osborne, S.; Paine, C.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peacocke, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Pons, R.; Ponthieu, N.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Shellard, P.; Spencer, L.; Starck, J.-L.; Stassi, P.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Thum, C.; Torre, J.-P.; Touze, F.; Tristram, M.; van Leeuwen, F.; Vibert, L.; Vibert, D.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Woodcraft, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is designed to measure the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds in six ~30% bands centered at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz at an angular resolution of 10' (100 GHz), 7' (143 GHz), and 5' (217 GHz and higher). HFI has been operating flawlessly since launch on 14 May 2009, with the bolometers reaching 100 mK the first week of July. The settings of the readout electronics, including bolometer bias currents, that optimize HFI's noise performance on orbit are nearly the same as the ones chosen during ground testing. Observations of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn have confirmed that the optical beams and the time responses of the detection chains are in good agreement with the predictions of physical optics modeling and pre-launch measurements. The Detectors suffer from a high flux of cosmic rays due to historically low levels of solar activity. As a result of the redundancy of Planck's observation strategy, theremoval of a few percent of data contaminated by glitches does not significantly affect the instrumental sensitivity. The cosmic ray flux represents a significant and variable heat load on the sub-Kelvin stage. Temporal variation and the inhomogeneous distribution of the flux results in thermal fluctuations that are a probable source of low frequency noise. The removal of systematic effects in the time ordered data provides a signal with an average noise equivalent power that is 70% of the goal in the 0.6-2.5 Hz range. This is slightly higher than was achieved during the pre-launch characterization but better than predicted in the early phases of the project. The improvement over the goal is a result of the low level of instrumental background loading achieved by the optical and thermal design of the HFI. Corresponding author: J.-M. Lamarre, jean-michel.lamarre@obspm.fr

  12. The Effect of Self-Regulated Jigsaw IV on University Students' Academic Achievements and Attitudes towards English Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özdemir, Esin; Arslan, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of self-regulated jigsaw IV upon university students' learning a new grammar structure within EFL learning process and also their attitudes towards the English course. The research was carried out with 40 students studying in two different prep classes at Bulent Ecevit University Foreign Languages College in…

  13. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA: IV. DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS IN WELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA:
    IV. DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS IN WELLS

    Zhixiong Ning, B.S., Zhiyi Liu,B.S., Shiying Zhang, B.S., Chenglong Ma, B.S., Inner Mongolia Ba Men Anti-epidemic Station, Michael Ri...

  14. Assessing and Improving Institutional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    Information to promote assessment of organizational effectiveness in colleges and universities is presented, along with an exercise to rank the effectiveness of 10 institutions. The exercise uses three types of criteria to indicate effectiveness: subjective ratings, data about students and activities, and institutional capacity and financial…

  15. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ACRYLONITRILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  16. Health Effects Assessment for Bromomethane

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  17. Health Effects Assessment for Ammonia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  18. Assessments of astronaut effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Robert M.; Helmreich, Robert L.; Fogg, Louis; Mcfadden, Terry J.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and convergent validity of three methods of peer and supervisory ratings of the effectiveness of individual NASA astronauts and their relationships with flight assignments. These two techniques were found to be reliable and relatively convergent. Seniority and a peer-rated Performance and Competence factor proved to be most closely associated with flight assignments, while supervisor ratings and a peer-rated Group Living and Personality factor were found to be unrelated. Results have implications for the selection and training of astronauts.

  19. Effect of Astragaloside IV on Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Haiyan, Hu; Rensong, Yang; Guoqin, Jin; Xueli, Zhang; Huaying, Xia; Yanwu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the maintenance of renewal and replacement capabilities of endogenous progenitor cells or engrafted stem cells in a pathological environment remains elusive. To investigate the effect of astragaloside IV (ASI) on the proliferation and differentiation of the engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs), we cultured NSCs from the hippocampus of E14 rat embryos, treated the cells with ASI, and then transplanted the cells into the hippocampus of rat AD models. In vitro experimentation showed that 10−5 M ASI induced NSCs to differentiate into β-tubulin III+ and GFAP+ cells. NSCs transplantation into rat AD models resulted in improvements in learning and memory, especially in the ASI-treated groups. ASI treatment resulted in an increase in the number of β-tubulin III+ cells in the hippocampus. Further investigation showed that ASI inhibited PS1 expression in vitro and in vivo. The high-dose ASI downregulated the Notch intracellular domain, whereas the low-dose ASI increased Notch-1 and NICD. In conclusion, ASI treatment resulted in improvements in learning and memory of AD models by promoting NSC proliferation and differentiation partly through the Notch signal pathway. PMID:27034688

  20. Effect of anthropogenic organic complexants on the solubility of Ni, Th, U(IV) and U(VI).

    PubMed

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Edgar, M; Beattie, T; Warwick, P; Evans, N D M; Read, D

    2015-12-30

    The influence of anthropogenic organic complexants (citrate, EDTA and DTPA from 0.005 to 0.1M) on the solubility of nickel(II), thorium(IV) and uranium (U(IV) and U(VI)) has been studied. Experiments were carried out in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solutions, representing the high pH conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Results showed that Ni(II) solubility increased by 2-4 orders of magnitude in the presence of EDTA and DTPA and from 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in the case of citrate. Citrate had the greatest effect on the solubility of Th(IV) and U(IV)/(VI). XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the precipitates are largely amorphous; only in the case of Ni(II), is there some evidence of incipient crystallinity, in the form of Ni(OH)2 (theophrastite). A study of the effect of calcium suggests that U(VI) and Ni(II) may form metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by Ca(2+). Thermodynamic modelling underestimates the concentrations in solution in the presence of the ligands for all the elements considered here. Further investigation of the behaviour of organic ligands under hyperalkaline conditions is important because of the use of the thermodynamic constants in preparing the safety case for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:26253235

  1. NATIONAL COASTAL CONDITION REPORT IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Condition Report IV (NCCR IV) is the fourth in a series of environmental assessments of U.S. coastal waters and the Great Lakes. The report includes assessments of all the nation’s estuaries in the contiguous 48 states and Puerto Rico, south-eastern Alaska, ...

  2. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Exerts Renoprotective Effects in Rats with Established Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Arruda-Junior, Daniel F; Martins, Flavia L; Dariolli, Rafael; Jensen, Leonardo; Antonio, Ednei L; Dos Santos, Leonardo; Tucci, Paulo J F; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2016-01-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models, suggesting that DPPIV may play a role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Renal dysfunction is one of the key features of HF, but it remains to be determined whether DPPIV inhibitors are capable of improving cardiorenal function after the onset of HF. Therefore, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that DPPIV inhibition by vildagliptin improves renal water and salt handling and exerts anti-proteinuric effects in rats with established HF. To this end, male Wistar rats were subjected to left ventricle (LV) radiofrequency ablation or sham operation. Six weeks after surgery, radiofrequency-ablated rats who developed HF were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 4 weeks with vildagliptin (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage. Echocardiography was performed before (pretreatment) and at the end of treatment (post-treatment) to evaluate cardiac function. The fractional area change (FAC) increased (34 ± 5 vs. 45 ± 3%, p < 0.05), and the isovolumic relaxation time decreased (33 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 1 ms; p < 0.05) in HF rats treated with vildagliptin (post-treatment vs. pretreatment). On the other hand, cardiac dysfunction deteriorated further in vehicle-treated HF rats. Renal function was impaired in vehicle-treated HF rats as evidenced by fluid retention, low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and high levels of urinary protein excretion. Vildagliptin treatment restored urinary flow, GFR, urinary sodium and urinary protein excretion to sham levels. Restoration of renal function in HF rats by DPPIV inhibition was associated with increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) serum concentration, reduced DPPIV activity and increased activity of protein kinase A in the renal cortex. Furthermore, the anti-proteinuric effect of vildagliptin treatment in rats with established HF was associated with

  3. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibition Exerts Renoprotective Effects in Rats with Established Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Arruda-Junior, Daniel F.; Martins, Flavia L.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jensen, Leonardo; Antonio, Ednei L.; dos Santos, Leonardo; Tucci, Paulo J. F.; Girardi, Adriana C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in humans and experimental heart failure (HF) models, suggesting that DPPIV may play a role in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Renal dysfunction is one of the key features of HF, but it remains to be determined whether DPPIV inhibitors are capable of improving cardiorenal function after the onset of HF. Therefore, the present study aimed to test the hypothesis that DPPIV inhibition by vildagliptin improves renal water and salt handling and exerts anti-proteinuric effects in rats with established HF. To this end, male Wistar rats were subjected to left ventricle (LV) radiofrequency ablation or sham operation. Six weeks after surgery, radiofrequency-ablated rats who developed HF were randomly divided into two groups and treated for 4 weeks with vildagliptin (120 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage. Echocardiography was performed before (pretreatment) and at the end of treatment (post-treatment) to evaluate cardiac function. The fractional area change (FAC) increased (34 ± 5 vs. 45 ± 3%, p < 0.05), and the isovolumic relaxation time decreased (33 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 1 ms; p < 0.05) in HF rats treated with vildagliptin (post-treatment vs. pretreatment). On the other hand, cardiac dysfunction deteriorated further in vehicle-treated HF rats. Renal function was impaired in vehicle-treated HF rats as evidenced by fluid retention, low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and high levels of urinary protein excretion. Vildagliptin treatment restored urinary flow, GFR, urinary sodium and urinary protein excretion to sham levels. Restoration of renal function in HF rats by DPPIV inhibition was associated with increased active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) serum concentration, reduced DPPIV activity and increased activity of protein kinase A in the renal cortex. Furthermore, the anti-proteinuric effect of vildagliptin treatment in rats with established HF was associated with

  4. Effects of Celangulin IV and V From Celastrus angulatus Maxim on Na+/K+-ATPase Activities of the Oriental Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dan; Feng, Mingxing; Ji, Yufei; Wu, Wenjun; Hu, Zhaonong

    2016-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (sodium pump) is an important target for the development of botanical pesticide as it is responsible for transforming chemical energy in ATP to osmotic work and maintaining electrochemical Na+ and K+ gradients across the cell membrane of most animal cells. Celangulin IV (C-IV) and V (C-V), which are isolated from the root bark of Celastrus angulatus, are the major active ingredients of this insecticidal plant. The activities of C-IV and C-V on Na+/K+-ATPase were investigated by ultramicro measuring method to evaluate the effects of C-IV and C-V on Na+/K+-ATPase activities of the brain from the fifth Mythimna separata larvae and to discuss the insecticidal mechanism of C-IV and C-V. Results indicate that inhibitory activities of Na+/K+-ATPase by C-IV and C-V possess an obvious concentration-dependent in vitro. Compared with C-IV, the inhibition of C-V on Na+/K+-ATPase was not striking. In vivo, at a concentration of 25 mg/liter, the inhibition ratio of C-IV on Na+/K+-ATPase activity from the brain in narcosis and recovery period was more remarkable than that of C-V. Furthermore, the insects were fed with different mixture ratios of C-IV and C-V. The inhibition extent of Na+/K+-ATPase activity was corresponded with the dose of C-IV. However, C-V had no notable effects. This finding may mean that the mechanism of action of C-IV and C-V on Na+/K+-ATPase were different. Na+/K -ATPase may be an action target of C-IV and C-V. PMID:27324586

  5. Effects of Celangulin IV and V From Celastrus angulatus Maxim on Na+/K+-ATPase Activities of the Oriental Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dan; Feng, Mingxing; Ji, Yufei; Wu, Wenjun; Hu, Zhaonong

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump) is an important target for the development of botanical pesticide as it is responsible for transforming chemical energy in ATP to osmotic work and maintaining electrochemical Na(+ )and K(+ )gradients across the cell membrane of most animal cells. Celangulin IV (C-IV) and V (C-V), which are isolated from the root bark of Celastrus angulatus, are the major active ingredients of this insecticidal plant. The activities of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were investigated by ultramicro measuring method to evaluate the effects of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities of the brain from the fifth Mythimna separata larvae and to discuss the insecticidal mechanism of C-IV and C-V. Results indicate that inhibitory activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase by C-IV and C-V possess an obvious concentration-dependent in vitro. Compared with C-IV, the inhibition of C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was not striking. In vivo, at a concentration of 25 mg/liter, the inhibition ratio of C-IV on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity from the brain in narcosis and recovery period was more remarkable than that of C-V. Furthermore, the insects were fed with different mixture ratios of C-IV and C-V. The inhibition extent of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was corresponded with the dose of C-IV. However, C-V had no notable effects. This finding may mean that the mechanism of action of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were different. Na(+)/K -ATPase may be an action target of C-IV and C-V. PMID:27324586

  6. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR ETHYLBENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  7. Health Effects Assessment for Naphthalene

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  8. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  9. Analgesia after Epidural Dexamethasone is Further Enhanced by IV Dipyrone, but Not IV Parecoxibe Following Minor Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Righeti, Claudia CF; Kitayama, Antonio T

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural administration of dexamethasone has been suggested for pain control after minor orthopedic surgery. This study was conducted to assess its efficacy after such surgery, combined or not to IV dipyrone, IV parecoxibe or their combination. Methods 91 patients were randomly assigned to seven groups. Patients were submitted to spinal bupivacaine anesthesia combined to epidural administration of either 10 ml saline or 10 mg dexamethasone diluted to 10-ml volume. Patients also received 10 ml IV saline or 1 gr dipyrone and/or 40 mg parecoxibe diluted to 10 ml with saline. Control group (CG) received epidural and IV saline. Dexamethasone group (DexG) received epidural dexamethasone and IV saline. Dipyrone group (DipG) received epidural saline and IV dipyrone. Dex-Dip G received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone. Parecoxibe group (ParG) received epidural saline and IV parecoxibe. Dex-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV parecoxibe. Finally, Dex-Dip-ParG received epidural dexamethasone and IV dipyrone plus IV parecoxibe. Results The CG expressed 4h of analgesia and sooner requested pain killer. DexG was similar to DipG or ParG or Dex-ParG (7-hours), and they requested less ketoprofen compared to the CG (P < 0.05). However, the Dex-DipG and the Dex-Dip-ParG resulted in longer time to demand pain killer (17-hours) and less ketoprofen consumption in 24-hours (P < 0.002). Adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusions The analgesia secondary to epidural dexamethasone was enhanced by IV dipyrone, while no effects were observed by the addition of IV parecoxibe. PMID:25317284

  10. Assessing Adhesion Forces of Type I and Type IV Pili of Xylella fastidiosa Bacteria by Use of a Microfluidic Flow Chamber▿ †

    PubMed Central

    De La Fuente, Leonardo; Montanes, Emilie; Meng, Yizhi; Li, Yaxin; Burr, Thomas J.; Hoch, H. C.; Wu, Mingming

    2007-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium responsible for Pierce's disease in grapevines, possesses both type I and type IV pili at the same cell pole. Type IV pili facilitate twitching motility, and type I pili are involved in biofilm development. The adhesiveness of the bacteria and the roles of the two pili types in attachment to a glass substratum were evaluated using a microfluidic flow chamber in conjunction with pilus-defective mutants. The average adhesion force necessary to detach wild-type X. fastidiosa cells was 147 ± 11 pN. Mutant cells possessing only type I pili required a force of 204 ± 22 pN for removal, whereas cells possessing only type IV pili required 119 ± 8 pN to dislodge these cells. The experimental results demonstrate that microfluidic flow chambers are useful and convenient tools for assessing the drag forces necessary for detaching bacterial cells and that with specific pilus mutants, the role of the pilus type can be further assessed. PMID:17293518

  11. Use of the Panic Attack Questionnaire-IV to assess non-clinical panic attacks and limited symptom panic attacks in student and community samples.

    PubMed

    Norton, Peter J; Zvolensky, Michael J; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O; Cox, Brian J; Norton, G Ron

    2008-10-01

    Since its development in the mid-1980s, the Panic Attack Questionnaire (PAQ) has been one of the more, if not the most, commonly used self-report tools for assessing panic attacks. The usage of the instrument, however, has come amid potential concerns that instructions and descriptions may lead to an over-estimate of the prevalence of panic attacks. Furthermore, the instrument has not been revised since 1992, despite changes in DSM-IV criteria and more recent developments in the understanding of panic attacks. As a result, this paper describes a revision of the PAQ to improve the instruction and descriptive set, and to fully assess features of panic derived from recent conceptualizations. Students meeting DSM-IV panic attack criteria and those endorsing panic attacks, but not meeting criteria, showed few differences with the exception that those not meeting DSM-IV criteria typically reported a longer onset-to-peak intensity time than did Panickers. Results were cross-validated and extended using an independent Community Sample. A full descriptive phenomenology of panic attacks is described, and future directions for studying panic attacks using the PAQ are presented. PMID:18243647

  12. Public Utility Commission Regulation and Cost-Effectiveness of Title IV: Lessons for CAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Sotkiewicz, Paul M.; Holt, Lynne

    2005-10-01

    There is growing evidence that the cost savings potential of the Title IV SO{sub 2} cap-and-trade program is not being reached. PUC regulatory treatment of compliance options appears to provide one explanation for this finding. That suggests that PUCs and utility companies should work together to develop incentive plans that will encourage cost-minimizing behavior for compliance with the EPA's recently issued Clean Air Interstate Rule.

  13. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  14. Longitudinal analysis of deciduous tooth emergence: IV. Covariate effects in Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Holman, Darryl J; Yamaguchi, Kyoko

    2005-03-01

    Emergence of the deciduous teeth is generally considered to be robust to moderate environmental insults, malnutrition, and disease. Consequently, deciduous tooth emergence has been used to assess growth and development and for age estimation in children. In this paper, we examine the way in which nutritional status and other covariates affect deciduous tooth emergence in a sample of 114 Japanese children born in Tokyo in 1914 and 1924. Parametric survival analysis was used to quantify the effects of nutritional status, breastfeeding behavior, and sex on the hazard of deciduous tooth emergence. Children of poor nutritional status exhibited significantly delayed emergence of all deciduous teeth, with effects that ranged from 14-29% increases in mean emergence times. Children of medium nutritional status exhibited increases in mean emergence times of 5-9% for the canines and lower molars, and 13-17% for the incisors. Partial breastfeeding had no effect on tooth emergence, but children who were not breastfed at all showed delayed emergence of the upper incisors. No significant sex differences in emergence were found. The findings contradict the idea that moderate malnutrition has little effect on deciduous tooth emergence. Furthermore, nutritional differences may account for some of the observed differences among populations in the timing of tooth emergence. PMID:15386238

  15. In Vitro Effect of Aqueous Extract and Fraction IV Portion of Ximenia americana Stem Bark on Trypanosoma congolense DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maikai, Victor Ambrose; Maikai, Beatty Viv; Kobo, Patricia Ishyaku

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomosis is a debilitating disease affecting mainly livestock and humans in tropical Africa. Chemically synthesized drugs and medicinal plants have been used in the treatment and control of this disease. In this study, the in vitro effect of aqueous extracts and fraction IV extract of Ximenia americana stem bark on Trypanosoma congolense DNA was investigated. The extracts were incubated with the parasites in vitro at 300 mg/mL aqueous extract and 25 mg/mL fraction IV portion for 30, 60, and 120 mins. The DNA of the trypanosomes was isolated and digested using ECOR1 enzyme and subsequently PCR was carried out. Results showed that aqueous extract and fraction IV portion immobilized 55% and 90% of the trypanosomes after 30-minute incubation. Subsequent isolation of the parasite DNA and agarose gel electrophoresis did not reveal that cell death was as a result of DNA fragmentation. This suggests that cell death was by another mechanism of action. PMID:24587898

  16. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. IV. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): understanding a complex problem.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, M M; George, J D; Gold, K W; Cibulas, W; DeRosa, C T

    1996-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of chemicals that are formed during the incomplete burning of coal, oil, gas, wood, garbage, or other organic substances, such as tobacco and charbroiled meat. There are more than 100 PAHs. PAHs generally occur as complex mixtures (for example, as part of products such as soot), not as single compounds. PAHs are found throughout the environment in the air, water, and soil. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals, including PAHs (ATSDR, 1995), found at facilities on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) and which pose the most significant potential threat to human health, as determined by ATSDR and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These profiles include information on health effects of chemicals from different routes and durations of exposure, their potential for exposure, regulations and advisories, and the adequacy of the existing database. Assessing the health effects of PAHs is a major challenge because environmental exposures to these chemicals are usually to complex mixtures of PAHs with other chemicals. The biological consequences of human exposure to mixtures of PAHs depend on the toxicity, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic, of the individual components of the mixture, the types of interactions among them, and confounding factors that are not thoroughly understood. Also identified are components of exposure and health effects research needed on PAHs that will allow estimation of realistic human health risks posed by exposures to PAHs. The exposure assessment component of research should focus on (1) development of reliable analytical methods for the determination of bioavailable PAHs following ingestion, (2) estimation of bioavailable PAHs from environmental media, particularly the determination of particle-bound PAHs, (3

  17. Effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on platinum resistance in stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanlin; Lee, Maria; Kim, Hee Seung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-09-01

    It remains controversial whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking surgery (IDS) induces chemoresistance in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) compared with primary debulking surgery (PDS). The aim of this study was to compare platinum-resistant recurrence following treatment with NACT-IDS or PDS in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 341 patients who underwent PDS or NACT-IDS for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIC or IV EOC between March 1990 and December 2010. Risk factors of platinum resistance, including NACT, postoperative residual tumor size, and various clinicopathological factors, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression modeling to measure overall survival (OS).Of 341 patients, 58 (17.0%) underwent NACT-IDS and 283 (83.0%) were treated with PDS. Twenty-nine (50.0%) patients developed platinum-resistant disease at first relapse after NACT-IDS and 99 (35.0%) patients recurred after PDS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, NACT-IDS and postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm were risk factors for platinum-resistant recurrence (adjusted odds ratios 2.950 and 2.915; 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 1.572-5.537 and 1.780-4.771, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively). Postoperative residual tumor mass >1 cm and platinum-resistant disease were significantly correlated with shorter OS (adjusted hazard ratios 1.579 and 4.078; 95% CI 1.193-2.089 and 3.074-5.412, P = 0.001 and 0.000, respectively), whereas NACT-IDS did not extend OS.NACT-IDS increases the risk of platinum-resistant recurrence in patients with stage IIIC and IV EOC. PMID:27603388

  18. Workshop on perinatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds. IV. Neurobehavioral effects.

    PubMed Central

    Golub, M S; Jacobson, S W

    1995-01-01

    Nine participants outlined findings in the area of neurobehavioral effects of dioxin-like compounds and presented plans for new studies. Neurobehavioral effects are among the most sensitive and well studied toxicity end points for this class of compounds. A focus of the workshop was presentation of designs for major new studies in human populations outside the United States that are intended to extend and clarify the results of two previous large-scale studies in populations in Michigan and North Carolina. Improved methods for exposure assessment and more focused approaches to understanding specific neurobehavioral deficits were highlighted. Animal studies and in vitro mechanistic studies are emphasizing the importance of alterations in neurotransmitter systems and thyroid function that may underlie behavioral dysfunction. There is continuing improvement in analytical and study design methods to identify the most active congeners of PCB mixtures in the environment. These diverse studies will contribute to effective response of public health and regulatory groups to this continuing problem. PMID:7614939

  19. IVS Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    International VLBI Service (IVS) is an international collaboration of organizations which operate or support Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) components. The goals are: To provide a service to support geodetic, geophysical and astrometric research and operational activities. To promote research and development activities in all aspects of the geodetic and astrometric VLBI technique. To interact with the community of users of VLBI products and to integrate VLBI into a global Earth observing system.

  20. Estimation of the isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity of group IV and group III-V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, D. T.; Heremans, J. P.; Slack, G. A.

    2002-11-01

    The isotope effect on the lattice thermal conductivity for group IV and group III-V semiconductors is calculated using the Debye-Callaway model modified to include both transverse and longitudinal phonon modes explicitly. The frequency and temperature dependences of the normal and umklapp phonon-scattering rates are kept the same for all compounds. The model requires as adjustable parameters only the longitudinal and transverse phonon Grüneisen constants and the effective sample diameter. The model can quantitatively account for the observed isotope effect in diamond and germanium but not in silicon. The magnitude of the isotope effect is predicted for silicon carbide, boron nitride, and gallium nitride. In the case of boron nitride the predicted increase in the room-temperature thermal conductivity with isotopic enrichment is in excess of 100%. Finally, a more general method of estimating normal phonon-scattering rate coefficients for other types of solids is presented.

  1. A Proposal for a Dimensional Classification System Based on the Shared Features of the DSM-IV Anxiety and Mood Disorders: Implications for Assessment and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy A.; Barlow, David H.

    2010-01-01

    A wealth of evidence attests to the extensive current and lifetime diagnostic comorbidity of the DSM-IV anxiety and mood disorders. Research has shown that the considerable cross-sectional covariation of DSM-IV emotional disorders is accounted for by common higher-order dimensions such as neuroticism/behavioral inhibition (N/BI) and low positive affect/behavioral activation. Longitudinal studies have indicated that the temporal covariation of these disorders can be explained by changes in N/BI and in some cases, initial levels of N/BI are predictive of the temporal course of emotional disorders. Moreover, the marked phenotypal overlap of the DSM-IV anxiety and mood disorder constructs is a frequent source of diagnostic unreliability (e.g., temporal overlap in the shared features of generalized anxiety disorder and mood disorders, situation specificity of panic attacks in panic disorder and specific phobia). Although dimensional approaches have been considered as a method to address the drawbacks associated with the extant prototypical nosology (e.g., inadequate assessment of individual differences in disorder severity), these proposals do not reconcile key problems in current classification such as modest reliability and high comorbidity. The current paper considers an alternative approach that emphasizes empirically supported common dimensions of emotional disorders over disorder-specific criteria sets. The selection and assessment of these dimensions are discussed along with how these methods could be implemented to promote more reliable and valid diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. For instance, the advantages of this classification system are discussed in context of current transdiagnostic treatment protocols that are efficaciously applied to a variety of disorders by targeting their shared features. PMID:19719339

  2. Characteristics of a cluster-randomized phase IV human papillomavirus vaccination effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Matti; Apter, Dan; Baussano, Iacopo; Eriksson, Tiina; Natunen, Kari; Paavonen, Jorma; Vänskä, Simopekka; Bi, Dan; David, Marie-Pierre; Datta, Sanjoy; Struyf, Frank; Jenkins, David; Pukkala, Eero; Garnett, Geoff; Dubin, Gary

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine formulated with an AS04 adjuvant is very efficacious against hrHPV associated precancers but the herd effects of different vaccination scenarios are not known. Our cluster randomized trial (NCT00534638) assesses the overall and herd effects of vaccinating girls vs. girls and boys. In two school-years (2007-2008 and 2008-2009) we invited 80,272 1992-1995 born early adolescents to a CRT in 33 communities a priori stratified by low, intermediate and high HPV-16/18 seroprevalence. In 11 Arm A communities 90% of participating girls and boys were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine, in 11 Arm B communities 90% of girls were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine - boys were assigned to receive hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccine, and in 11 Arm C communities all were assigned to receive HBV-vaccine. Prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls is studied at age 18.5 years. Recruitment resulted in equal enrolment of four birth cohorts (born 1992-1995) comprising altogether 32,175 (40% response) early adolescents: 20,514 girls (50.5-53.0% response by arm) and 11,661 boys (21.9-31.6%% response by arm). At the age of 15 years, 79.3% of the vaccinees completed a questionnaire. Among them >98% were living at, and during the week-ends 1.3-1.6% stayed outside, the study site communities. Smoking habit and alcohol consumption were similar in the different trial arms, also mean-age of menarche (12.4 years) and 1st ejaculation (12.6 years), and sexual behaviour (among those <25%, who had had sexual debut) did not differ by arm: mean-age at the sexual debut 14.3 and 14.4 in girls and boys, and proportions of those with multiple (≥5) life-time sexual partners (6.5-7.5%) at the age of 15 years. Uniform residential, life-style and sexual behaviour characteristics indicate successful randomization/enrolment of the CRT. Our CRT will verify modelled

  3. Effect of phase transition on quantum transport in group-IV two-dimensional U-shape device

    SciTech Connect

    Sadi, Mohammad Abdullah; Gupta, Gaurav Liang, Gengchiau

    2014-10-21

    The effect of phase-transition from the quantum-spin-hall to the band-insulator phase on the transport through a three-terminal U-shape spin-separator has been computationally investigated via non-equilibrium green function formalism. Two-dimensional group-IV elements have been comprehensively appraised as the device material. The device separates the unpolarized current injected at the source-terminal into nearly 100% spin-polarized currents of the opposite polarities at the two drain terminals. The phase-transition activated by the electric-field orthogonal to the device is shown to extensively influence the current magnitude and its spin-polarization, and the effect is stronger for materials with smaller intrinsic spin-orbit coupling. Moreover, the device length and the area under field are shown to critically affect the device characteristics on phase change. It is shown that the same device can be operated as a spin-filter by inducing phase-transition selectively in the channel. The results are important for designing spin-devices from Group-IV monolayers.

  4. A Model for Assessing Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the author proposes a model for assessing institutional effectiveness. The Volkwein model for assessing institutional effectiveness consists of five parts that summarize the steps for assessing institutions, programs, faculty, and students. The first step in the model distinguishes the dual purposes of institutional effectiveness:…

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Personalized Therapy for First-Line Treatment of Stage IV and Recurrent Incurable Adenocarcinoma of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Handorf, Elizabeth A.; McElligott, Sean; Vachani, Anil; Langer, Corey J.; Bristol Demeter, Mirar; Armstrong, Katrina; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation–positive stage IV adenocarcinoma have improved survival with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatments, but the cost effectiveness of personalized first-line therapy using EGFR mutation testing is unknown. Methods: We created a decision analytic model comparing the costs and effects of platinum combination chemotherapy with personalized therapy in which patients with EGFR mutation–positive tumors were treated with erlotinib. We used two testing strategies: testing only those with tissue available and performing a repeat biopsy if tissue was not available versus three nontargeted chemotherapy regimens (ie, carboplatin and paclitaxel; carboplatin and pemetrexed; and carboplatin, pemetrexed, and bevacizumab). Results: Compared with a carboplatin plus paclitaxel regimen, targeted therapy based on testing available tissue yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $110,644 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), and the rebiopsy strategy yielded an ICER of $122,219 per QALY. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed substantial uncertainty around these point estimates. With a willingness to pay of $100,000 per QALY, the testing strategy was cost effective 58% of the time, and the rebiopsy strategy was cost effective 54% of the time. Personalized therapy with an EGFR TKI was more favorable when the nontargeted chemotherapy regimen was more expensive. Compared with carboplatin, pemetrexed, and bevacizumab, ICERs were $25,547 per QALY for the testing strategy and $44,036 per QALY for the rebiopsy strategy. Conclusion: Although specific clinical circumstances should guide therapy, our cost-effectiveness analysis supports the strategy of testing for EGFR mutations in patients with stage IV or recurrent adenocarcinoma of the lung, rebiopsying patients if insufficient tissue is available for testing, and treating patients with EGFR mutations with erlotinib as first-line therapy. PMID

  6. A GGA+U approach to effective electronic correlations in thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Hackett, John C.

    2012-09-01

    High-valent oxo-metal complexes exhibit correlated electronic behavior on dense, low-lying electronic state manifolds, presenting challenging systems for electronic structure methods. Among these species, the iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin denoted Compound I occupies a privileged position, serving a broad spectrum of catalytic roles. The most reactive members of this family bear a thiolate axial ligand, exhibiting high activity toward molecular oxygen activation and substrate oxidation. The default approach to such systems has entailed the use of hybrid density functionals or multi-configurational/multireference methods to treat electronic correlation. An alternative approach is presented based on the GGA+U approximation to density functional theory, in which a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional is supplemented with a localization correction to treat on-site correlation as inspired by the Hubbard model. The electronic structure of thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin and corresponding Coulomb repulsion U are determined both empirically and self-consistently, yielding spin-distributions, state level splittings, and electronic densities of states consistent with prior hybrid functional calculations. Comparison of this detailed electronic structure with model Hamiltonian calculations suggests that the localized 3d iron moments induce correlation in the surrounding electron gas, strengthening local moment formation. This behavior is analogous to strongly correlated electronic systems such as Mott insulators, in which the GGA+U scheme serves as an effective single-particle representation for the full, correlated many-body problem.

  7. Effects of the background electrolyte on Th(IV) sorption to muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Hellebrandt, Stefan; Knope, Karah E.; Lee, Sang Soo; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Eng, Peter J.; Soderholm, L.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The adsorption of tetravalent thorium on the muscovite mica (0 0 1) basal plane was studied by X-ray crystal truncation rod (CTR) and resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity (RAXR) measurements and alpha spectrometry in the presence of perchlorate background electrolytes LiClO4, NaClO4, and KClO4 ([Th(IV)] = 0.1 mM, I = 0.1 M or 0.01 M, pH = 3.3 ± 0.3). RAXR data directly reveal a strong influence of the background electrolyte on the actinide sorption. No significant Th adsorption was observed in 0.1 M NaClO4, i.e., the Th coverage θ(Th), the number of Th per unit cell area of the muscovite surface (AUC = 46.72 Å2), was ⩽0.01 Th/AUC, whereas limited uptake (θ(Th) ∼ 0.04 Th/AUC) was detected at a lower ionic strength (I = 0.01 M). These results are in stark contrast to the behavior of Th in 0.1 M NaCl which showed a coverage of 0.4 Th/AUC (Schmidt et al., 2012a). Th uptake was also influenced by the electrolyte cation. Weak adsorption was observed in 0.1 M KClO4 (θ(Th) ∼ 0.07 Th/AUC) similar to the results in NaClO4 at lower ionic strength. In contrast, strong adsorption was found in 0.1 M LiClO4, with θ(Th) = 4.9 Th/AUC, a ∼10-fold increase compared with that previously reported in NaCl. These differences are confirmed independently by ex situ alpha spectrometry, which shows no measurable Th coverage in 0.1 M NaClO4 background in contrast to a large coverage of 1.6 Th/AUC in 0.1 M LiClO4. Alpha spectrometry cannot be obtained in situ, but sample preparation requires several washing steps that may affect Th(IV) sorption, RAXR, however, is considered to reflect the in situ sorption structure. The CTR/RAXR analyses of Th-LiClO4 show the sorption structure consisting of Th species that are broadly distributed, centered at heights of 4.1 Å and 29 Å distance from the interface. Neither the very large distribution height of the second species nor the high coverage can be explained with (hydrated) ionic adsorption, suggesting that the enhanced uptake is

  8. Improving cumulative effects assessment in Alberta: Regional strategic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dallas Lalonde, Kim; McEachern, Menzie; Kenney, John; Mendoza, Gustavo; Buffin, Andrew; Rich, Kate

    2011-09-15

    The Government of Alberta, Canada is developing a regulatory framework to better manage cumulative environmental effects from development in the province. A key component of this effort is regional planning, which will lay the primary foundation for cumulative effects management into the future. Alberta Environment has considered the information needs of regional planning and has concluded that Regional Strategic Assessment may offer significant advantages if integrated into the planning process, including the overall improvement of cumulative environmental effects assessment in the province.

  9. Experimental and Computational Assessment of Reactivity and Mechanism in C(sp(3))-N Bond-Forming Reductive Elimination from Palladium(IV).

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Ian M; Pérez-Temprano, Mónica H; Sanford, Melanie S; Zimmerman, Paul M

    2016-05-11

    This report describes a combined experimental and computational investigation of the mechanism of C(sp(3))-N bond-forming reductive elimination from sulfonamide-ligated Pd(IV) complexes. After an initial experimental assessment of reactivity, we used ZStruct, a computational combinatorial reaction finding method, to analyze a large number of multistep mechanisms for this process. This study reveals two facile isomerization pathways connecting the experimentally observed Pd(IV) isomers, along with two competing SN2 pathways for C(sp(3))-N coupling. One of these pathways involves an unanticipated oxygen-nitrogen exchange of the sulfonamide ligand prior to an inner-sphere SN2-type reductive elimination. The calculated ΔG(⧧) values for isomerization and reductive elimination with a series of sulfonamide derivatives are in good agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the simulations predict relative reaction rates with different sulfonamides, which is successful only after considering competition between the proposed operating mechanisms. Overall, this work shows that the combination of experimental studies and new computational tools can provide fundamental mechanistic insights into complex organometallic reaction pathways. PMID:27087364

  10. Assessment Inventories, Surveys, and Templates for Evaluating Educational Technology Regional and Local Assistance Programs. Phase IV of the Comprehensive Study of Educational Technology Programs Authorized from 1984-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This report on Phase IV, of a four-phase study, provided for the development of evaluation templates and instruments to be used by the California Department of Education to facilitate systematic assessment of state funded educational technology programs and projects. These assessment documents comprised the major data collection sources for the…

  11. Liposome Bupivacaine for Postsurgical Analgesia in Adult Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Colectomy: Results from Prospective Phase IV Sequential Cohort Studies Assessing Health Economic Outcomes☆

    PubMed Central

    Candiotti, Keith A.; Sands, Laurence R.; Lee, Edward; Bergese, Sergio D.; Harzman, Alan E.; Marcet, Jorge; Kumar, Anjali S.; Haas, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Background Opioid-based postsurgical analgesia exposes patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy to elevated risk for gastrointestinal motility problems and other opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs). The purpose of our research was to investigate postsurgical outcomes, including opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and ORAE risk associated with a multimodal analgesia regimen, employing a single administration of liposome bupivacaine as well as other analgesics that act by different mechanisms. Methods We analyzed combined results from 6 Phase IV, prospective, single-center studies in which patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy received opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or multimodal analgesia incorporating intraoperative administration of liposome bupivacaine. As-needed rescue therapy was available to all patients. Primary outcome measures were postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay, and hospitalization costs. Secondary measures included time to first rescue opioid use, patient satisfaction with analgesia (assessed using a 5-point Likert scale), and ORAEs. Results Eighty-two patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy and did not meet intraoperative exclusion criteria (PCA n = 56; multimodal analgesia n = 26). Compared with the PCA group, the multimodal analgesia group had significantly lower mean total postsurgical opioid consumption (96 vs 32 mg, respectively; P < 0.0001) and shorter median postsurgical hospital length of stay (3.0 vs 4.0 days; P = 0.0019). Geometric mean costs were $11,234 and $13,018 in the multimodal analgesia and PCA groups, respectively (P = 0.2612). Median time to first rescue opioid use was longer in the multimodal analgesia group versus PCA group (1.1 hours vs 0.6 hours, respectively; P=0.0003). ORAEs were experienced by 41% of patients receiving intravenous opioid PCA and 8% of patients receiving multimodal analgesia (P = 0.0019). Study limitations included use of an open

  12. Investigation of effects of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields on operant and social behavior and on the neuroendocrine system of nonhuman primates: Neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV. Quarterly report No. 38

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Rhodes, J.W.

    1992-08-31

    This quarterly report covers the neuroendocrine Portion of Experiment IV. Serum melatonin concentration was measured in individual baboons, each implanted with a chronically indwelling venous cannula. As in Experiment III the system of six automatic blood samplers was used to achieve undisturbed, 24 hr per day, simultaneous blood sampling from six individual subjects. The objective of the neuroendocrine portion of Experiment IV was to determine if 30 kV/m electric and 1.0 G magnetic field (E/MF) exposure produced a 50% decline in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration. Other groups of subjects were tested concurrently during Experiment IV to assess E/MF effects on group social and individual operant behavior. The results of these experiments will be covered respectively in the next two quarterly reports. The results of Experiment IV, as was the case with the result of Experiments III and IIIA, provide little or no evidence that E/MF exposure, under the conditions of these experiments, affects nocturnal serum melatonin concentrations of nonhuman primates. Together the negative results of Experiments III, IIA and IV indicate that day-time exposure of primates to slow-onset/offset, regularly-scheduled E/MF does not produce melatonin suppression, strongly suggesting that such exposure would not affect human melatonin either. However, before concluding that E/MF exposure in general has no effect on primate melatonin, nightime exposure needs to be examined, and the possibility, suggested by the Pilot Experiment, that fast onset/offset, irregularly-scheduled E/MF can completely suppress melatonin needs to be investigated.

  13. Development of Methodologies for IV and V of Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian; Darrah, Marjorie

    2003-01-01

    Non-deterministic systems often rely upon neural network (NN) technology to "lean" to manage flight systems under controlled conditions using carefully chosen training sets. How can these adaptive systems be certified to ensure that they will become increasingly efficient and behave appropriately in real-time situations? The bulk of Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) research of non-deterministic software control systems such as Adaptive Flight Controllers (AFC's) addresses NNs in well-behaved and constrained environments such as simulations and strict process control. However, neither substantive research, nor effective IV&V techniques have been found to address AFC's learning in real-time and adapting to live flight conditions. Adaptive flight control systems offer good extensibility into commercial aviation as well as military aviation and transportation. Consequently, this area of IV&V represents an area of growing interest and urgency. ISR proposes to further the current body of knowledge to meet two objectives: Research the current IV&V methods and assess where these methods may be applied toward a methodology for the V&V of Neural Network; and identify effective methods for IV&V of NNs that learn in real-time, including developing a prototype test bed for IV&V of AFC's. Currently. no practical method exists. lSR will meet these objectives through the tasks identified and described below. First, ISR will conduct a literature review of current IV&V technology. TO do this, ISR will collect the existing body of research on IV&V of non-deterministic systems and neural network. ISR will also develop the framework for disseminating this information through specialized training. This effort will focus on developing NASA's capability to conduct IV&V of neural network systems and to provide training to meet the increasing need for IV&V expertise in such systems.

  14. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  15. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  16. Sterically less-hindered half-titanocene(IV) phenoxides: ancillary-ligand effect on mono-, bis-, and tris(2-alkyl-/arylphenoxy) titanium(IV) chloride complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sung-Kwan; Kim, Beom-Jun; Son, Ho-Jin; Hahn, Jong Sok; Cheong, Minserk; Mitoraj, Mariusz; Srebro, Monika; Piekoś, Łukasz; Michalak, Artur; Kang, Sang Ook

    2010-05-17

    A series of mono-, bis-, and tris(phenoxy)-titanium(IV) chlorides of the type [Cp*Ti(2-R-PhO)(n)Cl(3-n)] (n=1-3; Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) was prepared, in which R=Me, iPr, tBu, and Ph. The formation of each mono-, bis-, and tris(2-alkyl-/arylphenoxy) series was authenticated by structural studies on representative examples of the phenyl series including [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)Cl(2)] (1 PhCl2), [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)(2)Cl] (2 PhCl), and [Cp*Ti(2-Ph-PhO)(3)] (3 Ph). The metal-coordination geometry of each compound is best described as pseudotetrahedral with the Cp* ring and the 2-Ph-PhO and chloride ligands occupying three leg positions in a piano-stool geometry. The mean Ti-O distances, observed with an increasing number of 2-Ph-PhO groups, are 1.784(3), 1.802(4), and 1.799(3) A for 1 PhCl2, 2 PhCl, and 3 Ph, respectively. All four alkyl/aryl series with Me, iPr, tBu, and Ph substituents were tested for ethylene homopolymerization after activation with Ph(3)C(+)[B(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) and modified methyaluminoxane (7% aluminum in isopar E; mMAO-7) at 140 degrees C. The phenyl series showed much higher catalytic activity, which ranged from 43.2 and 65.4 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1), than the Me, iPr, and tBu series (19.2 and 36.6 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1)). Among the phenyl series, the bis(phenoxide) complex of 2 PhCl showed the highest activity of 65.4 kg (mmol of Ti x h)(-1). Therefore, the catalyst precursors of the phenyl series were examined by treating them with a variety of alkylating reagents, such as trimethylaluminum (TMA), triisobutylaluminum (TIBA), and methylaluminoxane (MAO). In all cases, 2 PhCl produced the most catalytically active alkylated species, [Cp*Ti(2-Ph--PhO)MeCl]. This enhancement was further supported by DFT calculations based on the simplified model with TMA. PMID:20391583

  17. Effective Assessment and Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Christine Brooks; Jordan, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Describes how assessment is tied tightly to program development at Bowdoin College, with assessment criteria set up during the process of faculty members' seeking funding for research or curriculum innovation. Uses the example of innovations in an introductory biology course to illustrate the process. (EV)

  18. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction control kinetics of U(IV) reoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, J.M.; Minyard, M.L.; Dempsey, B.A.; Roden, E.E.; Yeh, G.-T.; Burgos, W.D.

    2006-04-05

    For the in situ reductive immobilization of U to be an acceptable strategy for the removal of that element from groundwater, the long-term stability of U(IV) must be determined. Rates of biotransformation of Fe species influence the mineralogy of the resulting products (Fredrickson et al., 2003; Senko et al., 2005), and we hypothesize that the rate of U(VI) reduction influences the mineralogy of resultant U(IV) precipitates. We hypothesize that slower rates of U(VI) reduction will yield U(IV) phases that are more resistant to reoxidation, and will therefore be more stable upon cessation of electron donor addition. U(IV) phases formed by relatively slow reduction may be more crystalline or larger in comparison to their relatively rapidly-formed counterparts (Figure 1), thus limiting the reactivity of slowly-formed U(IV) phases toward various oxidants. The physical location of U(IV) precipitates relative to bacterial cells may also limit the reactivity of biogenic U(IV) phases. In this situation, we expect that precipitation of U(IV) within the bacterial cell may protect U(IV) from reoxidation by limiting physical contact between U(IV) and oxidants (Figure 1). We assessed the effect of U(VI) reduction rate on the subsequent reoxidation of biogenic U(IV) and are currently conducting column scale studies to determine whether U(VI) reduction rate can be manipulated by varying the electron donor concentration used to stimulate U(VI) reduction.

  19. Effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters of lymphocytes in intact animals and animals with experimental autoimmune process.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M V; Mel'nikova, E V; Trufakin, V A

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor sitagliptin on immunological parameters were studied in animals with experimental autoimmune process. The effects of the drug administered in preventive (before manifestation of autoimmune processes) and therapeutic (after manifestation of autoimmune process) modes were studied. PMID:25408522

  20. Assessing Traumatic Event Exposure: Comparing the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire to the Structured Clinical Interview for "DSM-IV"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peirce, Jessica M.; Burke, Christopher K.; Stoller, Kenneth B.; Neufeld, Karin J.; Brooner, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis requires first identifying a traumatic event, but very few studies have evaluated methods of potential traumatic event assessment and their impact on PTSD diagnosis. The authors compared a behaviorally specific comprehensive multiple-item traumatic event measure with a single-item measure to…

  1. Conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chanchitpricha, Chaunjit; Bond, Alan

    2013-11-15

    This paper aims at conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes through the development of a literature-based framework of criteria to measure impact assessment effectiveness. Four categories of effectiveness were established: procedural, substantive, transactive and normative, each containing a number of criteria; no studies have previously brought together all four of these categories into such a comprehensive, criteria-based framework and undertaken systematic evaluation of practice. The criteria can be mapped within a cycle/or cycles of evaluation, based on the ‘logic model’, at the stages of input, process, output and outcome to enable the identification of connections between the criteria across the categories of effectiveness. This framework is considered to have potential application in measuring the effectiveness of many impact assessment processes, including strategic environmental assessment (SEA), environmental impact assessment (EIA), social impact assessment (SIA) and health impact assessment (HIA). -- Highlights: • Conceptualising effectiveness of impact assessment processes. • Identification of factors influencing effectiveness of impact assessment processes. • Development of criteria within a framework for evaluating IA effectiveness. • Applying the logic model to examine connections between effectiveness criteria.

  2. Reionization on Large Scales. IV. Predictions for the 21 cm Signal Incorporating the Light Cone Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, P.; Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present predictions for the 21 cm brightness temperature power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We discuss the implications of the "light cone" effect, which incorporates evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction and 21 cm brightness temperature along the line of sight. Using a novel method calibrated against radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the neutral hydrogen density field and 21 cm signal in large volumes (L = 2 Gpc h -1). The inclusion of the light cone effect leads to a relative decrease of about 50% in the 21 cm power spectrum on all scales. We also find that the effect is more prominent at the midpoint of reionization and later. The light cone effect can also introduce an anisotropy along the line of sight. By decomposing the 3D power spectrum into components perpendicular to and along the line of sight, we find that in our fiducial reionization model, there is no significant anisotropy. However, parallel modes can contribute up to 40% more power for shorter reionization scenarios. The scales on which the light cone effect is relevant are comparable to scales where one measures the baryon acoustic oscillation. We argue that due to its large comoving scale and introduction of anisotropy, the light cone effect is important when considering redshift space distortions and future application to the Alcock-Paczyński test for the determination of cosmological parameters.

  3. Reionization on large scales. IV. Predictions for the 21 cm signal incorporating the light cone effect

    SciTech Connect

    La Plante, P.; Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present predictions for the 21 cm brightness temperature power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We discuss the implications of the 'light cone' effect, which incorporates evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction and 21 cm brightness temperature along the line of sight. Using a novel method calibrated against radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the neutral hydrogen density field and 21 cm signal in large volumes (L = 2 Gpc h {sup –1}). The inclusion of the light cone effect leads to a relative decrease of about 50% in the 21 cm power spectrum on all scales. We also find that the effect is more prominent at the midpoint of reionization and later. The light cone effect can also introduce an anisotropy along the line of sight. By decomposing the 3D power spectrum into components perpendicular to and along the line of sight, we find that in our fiducial reionization model, there is no significant anisotropy. However, parallel modes can contribute up to 40% more power for shorter reionization scenarios. The scales on which the light cone effect is relevant are comparable to scales where one measures the baryon acoustic oscillation. We argue that due to its large comoving scale and introduction of anisotropy, the light cone effect is important when considering redshift space distortions and future application to the Alcock-Paczyński test for the determination of cosmological parameters.

  4. Using estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis to examine the unique effects of the latent variables measured by the WAIS-IV on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kranzler, John H; Benson, Nicholas; Floyd, Randy G

    2015-12-01

    This study used estimated factor scores from a bifactor analysis of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) to examine the unique effects of its latent variables on academic achievement. In doing so, we addressed the potential limitation of multicollinearity in previous studies of the incremental validity of the WAIS-IV. First, factor scores representing psychometric g and 4 group factors representing the WAIS-IV index scales were computed from a bifactor model. Subtest and composite scores for the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Third Edition (WIAT-II) were then predicted from these estimated factor scores in simultaneous multiple regression. Results of this study only partially replicated the findings of previous research on the incremental validity of scores that can be derived from performance on the WAIS-IV. Although we found that psychometric g is the most important underlying construct measured by the WAIS-IV for the prediction of academic achievement in general, results indicated that the unique effect of Verbal Comprehension is also important for predicting achievement in reading, spelling, and oral communication skills. Based on these results, measures of both psychometric g and Verbal Comprehension could be cautiously interpreted when considering high school students' performance in these areas of achievement. PMID:25844532

  5. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space. IV - Effect of CO2 enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the response of potato to elevated carbon dioxide levels in life support farms for space colonies, Norland and Russet Burbank were grown in solid stands in separate controlled environment rooms at two CO2 levels, 365 micromol/mol and 1000 micromol/mol. It is found that potatoes show only marginal growth gains from elevated CO2: tuber dry weight increased by 2 percent for Norland, and 12 percent for Russet Burbank. CO2 assimilation rates of Norland leaves increased by about 24 percent, but assimilation rates of Russet Burbank leaves decreased by about 12 percent. It is concluded that the best productivity obtained in the study (21.9 g tuber dry weight/sq m/day from Norland at 1000 micromol/mol of CO2) indicates that the dietary energy needs of one human in space could be supplied from 34 sq m of potatoes.

  6. [Comparative assessment of cell mechanisms of the antidiabetic action of a new organic derivative of oxovanadium(IV) and vanadyl sulfate].

    PubMed

    Aleeva, G N; Kiiasov, A P; Burykin, I M; Khafiz'ianova, R Kh

    2004-01-01

    The antidiabetic effect of a new organic derivative of vanadium(IV) oxide with isonicotinic acid hydrazide (compound no. 8), as manifested by the action upon the alpha and beta cell populations in Langerhans islands of the pancreas, was studied in rats with alloxane diabetes model in comparison to the analogous effect of the inorganic drug vanadyl sulfate. The hypoglycemic activity of compound no. 8 was comparable with that of vanadyl sulfate. The results of immunohistochemical and morphometric investigation showed that both preparations produced a reliable increase in the population of insulin-producing cells and a decrease in the (alloxane-enhanced) population of alpha-cells in the pancreatic islands. PMID:15341067

  7. Ameliorative effect of vanadyl(IV)-ascorbate complex on high-fat high-sucrose diet-induced hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Xu, Jie; Guo, Yongli; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2015-10-01

    There is mounting evidence demonstrating causative links between hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance, the core pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Using a combinational approach, we synthesized a vanadium-antioxidant (i.e., l-ascorbic acid) complex and examined its effect on insulin resistance and oxidative stress. This study was designed to examine whether vanadyl(IV)-ascorbate complex (VOAsc) would reduce oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in high-fat high-sucrose diet (HFSD)-induced type 2 diabetes in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFSD for 12 weeks to induce insulin resistance, rendering them diabetic. Diabetic mice were treated with rosiglitazone, sodium l-ascorbate, or VOAsc. At the end of treatment, fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index, and serum adipocytokine levels were measured. Serum levels of nitric oxide (NO) parameters were also determined. The liver was isolated and used for determination of malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, and catalase levels, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. VOAsc groups exhibited significant reductions in serum adipocytokine and NO levels, and oxidative stress parameters compared to the corresponding values in the untreated diabetic mice. The results indicated that VOAsc is non-toxic. In conclusion, we identified VOAsc as a potentially effective adjunct therapy for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26302923

  8. Effect of paricalcitol on renin and albuminuria in non-diabetic stage III-IV chronic kidney disease: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D receptor activators reduce albuminuria, and may improve survival in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Animal studies suggest that these pleiotropic effects of vitamin D may be mediated by suppression of renin. However, randomized trials in humans have yet to establish this relationship. Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded crossover study, the effect of oral paricalcitol (2 μg/day) was investigated in 26 patients with non-diabetic, albuminuric stage III-IV CKD. After treatment, plasma concentrations of renin (PRC), angiotensin II (AngII) and aldosterone (Aldo) were measured. GFR was determined by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Assessment of renal NO dependency was performed by infusion of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Albumin excretion rate (AER) was analyzed in 24-h urine and during 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Results Paricalcitol did not alter plasma levels of renin, AngII, Aldo, or urinary excretion of sodium and potassium. A modest reduction of borderline significance was observed in AER, and paricalcitol abrogated the albuminuric response to L-NMMA. Conclusions In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial paricalcitol only marginally decreased AER and did not alter circulating levels of renin, AngII or Aldo. The abrogation of the rise in albumin excretion by paricalcitol during NOS blockade may indicate that favourable modulation of renal NO dependency could be involved in mediating reno-protection and survival benefits in CKD. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01136564 PMID:23889806

  9. Stormwater BMP Effectiveness Assessment Toolkit

    EPA Science Inventory

    US EPA has identified stormwater BMP effectiveness as a priority research need. Effective protection of biotic integrity requires that processes maintaining the diversity of physical habitats be protected. Methods are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of existing Stormwater ...

  10. Effect of a Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV Inhibitor, Des-Fluoro-Sitagliptin, on Neointimal Formation after Balloon Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo; Choi, Sung Hee; Shin, Hayley; Cho, Bong Jun; Park, Ho Seon; Ahn, Byung Yong; Kang, Seon Mee; Yoon, Ji Won; Jang, Hak Chul; Kim, Young-Bum; Park, Kyong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, it has been suggested that enhancement of incretin effect improves cardiac function. We investigated the effect of a DPP-IV inhibitor, des-fluoro-sitagliptin, in reducing occurrence of restenosis in carotid artery in response to balloon injury and the related mechanisms. Methods and Findings Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were grouped into four: control (normal saline) and sitagliptin 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg per day (n = 10 per group). Sitagliptin or normal saline were given orally from 1 week before to 2 weeks after carotid injury. After 3 weeks of treatment, sitagliptin treatment caused a significant and dose-dependent reduction in intima-media ratio (IMR) in obese diabetic rats. This effect was accompanied by improved glucose homeostasis, decreased circulating levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and increased adiponectin level. Moreover, decreased IMR was correlated significantly with reduced hsCRP, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity. In vitro evidence with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) demonstrated that proliferation and migration were decreased significantly after sitagliptin treatment. In addition, sitagliptin increased caspase-3 activity and decreased monocyte adhesion and NFκB activation in VSMCs. Conclusions Sitagliptin has protective properties against restenosis after carotid injury and therapeutic implications for treating macrovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:22493727

  11. Feasibility and effectiveness of the implementation of a primary prevention programme for type 2 diabetes in routine primary care practice: a phase IV cluster randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to perform an independent evaluation of the feasibility and effectiveness of an educational programme for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2) in high risk populations in primary care settings, implanted within the Basque Health Service - Osakidetza. Methods/design This is a prospective phase IV cluster clinical trial conducted under routine conditions in 14 primary health care centres of Osakidetza, randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. We will recruit a total sample of 1089 individuals, aged between 45 and 70 years old, without diabetes but at high risk of developing the condition (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, FINDRISC ≥ 14) and follow them up for 2 years. Primary health care nursing teams of the intervention centres will implement DE-PLAN, a structured educational intervention program focused on changing healthy lifestyles (diet and physical activity); while the patients in the control centres will receive the usual care for the prevention and treatment of DM2 currently provided in Osakidetza. The effectiveness attributable to the programme will be assessed by comparing the changes observed in patients exposed to the intervention and those in the control group, with respect to the risk of developing DM2 and lifestyle habits. In terms of feasibility, we will assess indicators of population coverage and programme implementation. Discussion The aim of this study is to provide the scientific basis for disseminate the programme to the remaining primary health centres in Osakidetza, as a novel way of addressing prevention of DM2. The study design will enable us to gather information on the effectiveness of the intervention as well as the feasibility of implementing it in routine practice. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365013 PMID:23158830

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of zirconium cladding tubes: IV. Effect of hydrogen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhnov, A. B.; Nikulin, S. A.; Khanzhin, V. G.; Belov, V. A.

    2011-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen saturation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of zirconium cladding tubes in an iodine-containing medium is studied. Comparative SCC tests are performed for tubes produced from E110 and E635 alloys with various hydrogen contents (up to 400 ppm). Hydrogen is shown to decrease the SCC resistance of the tubes predominantly because of the activation of pitting formation processes.

  13. Dissolution of cerium(IV)-lanthanide(III) oxides: Comparative effect of chemical composition, temperature, and acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Horlait, D.; Clavier, N.; Szenknect, S.; Dacheux, N.; Dubois, V.

    2012-03-15

    The dissolution of Ce{sub 1-x}Ln{sub x}O{sub 2-x/2} solid solutions was undertaken in various acid media in order to evaluate the effects of several physicochemical parameters such as chemical composition, temperature, and acidity on the reaction kinetics. The normalized dissolution rates (R{sub L,0}) were found to be strongly modified by the trivalent lanthanide incorporation rate, due to the presence of oxygen vacancies decreasing the samples cohesion. Conversely, the nature of the trivalent cation considered only weakly impacted the R{sub L,0} values. The dependence of the normalized dissolution rates on the temperature then appeared to be of the same order of magnitude than that of chemical composition. Moreover, it allowed determining the corresponding activation energy (E{sub A} ≅ 60-85 kJ.mol{sup -1}) which accounts for a dissolution driven by surface-controlled reactions. A similar conclusion was made regarding the acidity of the solution: the partial order related to (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) reaching about 0.7. Finally, the prevailing effect of the incorporation of aliovalent cations in the fluorite-type CeO{sub 2} matrix on the dissolution kinetics precluded the observation of slight effects such as those linked to the complexing agents or to the crystal structure of the samples. (authors)

  14. Behavioral effects of neuropeptide Y in F344 rat substrains with a reduced dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activity.

    PubMed

    Karl, Tim; Hoffmann, Torsten; Pabst, Reinhard; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2003-07-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) is involved in several physiological functions by cleavage of dipeptides with a Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequence of regulatory peptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY). Cleavage of NPY by DPPIV results in NPY(3-36), which lacks affinity for the Y(1) but not for other NPY receptor subtypes. Among other effects, the NPY Y(1) receptor mediates anxiolytic-like effects of NPY. In previous studies with F344 rat substrains lacking endogenous DPPIV-like activity we found a reduced behavioral stress response, which might be due to a differential degradation of NPY. Here we tested this hypothesis and administered intracerebroventricularly two different doses of NPY (0.0, 0.2, 1.0 nmol) in mutant and wildtype-like F344 substrains. NPY dose-dependently stimulated food intake and feeding motivation, decreased motor activity in the plus maze and social interaction test, and exerted anxiolytic-like effects. More important for the present hypothesis, NPY administration was found to be more potent in the DPPIV-negative substrains in exerting anxiolytic-like effects (increased social interaction time in the social interaction test) and sedative-like effects (decreased motor activity in the elevated plus maze). These data demonstrate for the first time a differential potency of NPY in DPPIV-deficient rats and suggest a changed receptor-specificity of NPY, which may result from a differential degradation of NPY in this genetic model of DPPIV deficiency. Overall, these results provide direct evidence that NPY-mediated effects in the central nervous system are modulated by DPPIV-like enzymatic activity. PMID:12957230

  15. Barriers to Effective Presidential Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, William E.; Smith, James Leroy

    2008-01-01

    A core responsibility of governing boards is the periodic evaluation of institutional leadership, starting with the president. Many very legitimate administrative techniques take time--and often more time than anticipated. But sometimes the use of those processes may deter boards from fulfilling their responsibility for assessing the president's…

  16. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. IV. THE EFFECT OF COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, P. B.; Helling, Ch.

    2013-09-10

    Cosmic rays provide an important source for free electrons in Earth's atmosphere and also in dense interstellar regions where they produce a prevailing background ionization. We utilize a Monte Carlo cosmic ray transport model for particle energies of 10{sup 6} eV effective temperature T{sub eff} = 1500 K, and two example giant gas planets (T{sub eff} = 1000 K, 1500 K). For the model brown dwarf atmosphere, the electron fraction is enhanced significantly by cosmic rays when the pressure p{sub gas} < 10{sup -2} bar. Our example giant gas planet atmosphere suggests that the cosmic ray enhancement extends to 10{sup -4}-10{sup -2} bar, depending on the effective temperature. For the model atmosphere of the example giant gas planet considered here (T{sub eff} = 1000 K), cosmic rays bring the degree of ionization to f{sub e} {approx}> 10{sup -8} when p{sub gas} < 10{sup -8} bar, suggesting that this part of the atmosphere may behave as a weakly ionized plasma. Although cosmic rays enhance the degree of ionization by over three orders of magnitude in the upper atmosphere, the effect is not likely to be significant enough for sustained coupling of the magnetic field to the gas.

  17. Photocontrol of anthocyanin synthesis in turnip seedlings : IV. The effect of feeding precursors.

    PubMed

    Grill, R

    1967-03-01

    Separation of hypocotyls and cotyledons of turnip seedlings (Brassica rapa) reduced the yield of anthocyanin from the former. Feeding with a combination of phenylalanine, acetate and glucose (PAG) considerably increased anthocyanin synthesis in these excised hypocotyls. In blue light the yield equalled that of the controls with cotyledons attached but, in far-red, the maximum obtained was never more than 55% of the controls.A long pre-treatment with red light markedly reduced anthocyanin formation in far-red. In young seedlings (presumed to be still capable of de novo phytochrome synthesis) this effect could largely be overcome by feeding with the same phenylalanine-acetate-glucose medium used with isolated hypocotyls but, in older seedlings, feeding did not prevent the effect of pre-irradiation with red light. It is concluded that red light not only destroys phytochrome but also leads to substrate disappearance.Without feeding pre-irradiation with red did not materially affect the yield from blue light; the addition of the phenylalanine-acetate-glucose mixture caused a significant increase compared with treatments without pre-red in both older and younger seedlings, particularly in the hypocotyl. The blue sensitive system thus appears to be independent of phytochrome destruction.Feeding also increased yields in red light. In water 72 hours red was no more effective than 24 hours: with PAG the longer irradiation period resulted in a considerably increased yield, especially in younger seedlings. The low yields in red light thus appear to result partly from substrate deficiency. PMID:24549375

  18. Astragaloside IV possesses antiarthritic effect by preventing interleukin 1β-induced joint inflammation and cartilage damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Min-Zhu

    2014-06-01

    The saponin astragaloside IV (AST) is one of major active components purified from Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch) Bge, which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat immune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The effects of AST on the suppression of experimental arthritis and its possible mechanisms are unknown. We measured the paw swelling of ankle joints, splenocyte proliferation, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and nitric oxide (NO) formation by macrophages in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). Intraarticular injection of IL-1β to rat knee joint for inducing the edema and in vitro IL-1β-stimulated cartilage impairment were examined. The results showed that oral treatment of AST (100 mg/kg/day) suppressed the joint inflammation and inhibited IL-1β, TNFα and NO production in macrophages from AIA rats. Macrophages were one of AST targeted cells, and mediated the reduced splenocyte proliferation in AIA rats. In addition, AST reduced the swelling induced by intraarticular injection of IL-1β, and protected against IL-1β-induced damage of cartilage proteoglycan synthesis and chondrocyte proliferation. We conclude that AST possesses antiarthritic effect and prevents IL-1β-induced joint inflammation and cartilage destruction. These findings suggest that AST may be used for the treatment of RA and other inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:24469603

  19. Bentonite modification with hexadecylpyridinium and aluminum polyoxy cations and its effectiveness in Se(IV) removal.

    PubMed

    Orucoglu, Esra; Haciyakupoglu, Sevilay

    2015-09-01

    Usage of bentonite as a buffer material is suggested in radioactive waste repositories. Although bentonites have higher sorption ability to cations, they cannot adsorp anions due to negative surface charge. Nowadays, ongoing researches focus on increasing anion adsorption ability of the bentonites with modification. Organic-pillared bentonite (OPBent) was produced by modification of sodium bentonite with aluminum polyoxy and hexadecylpyridinium cations in this study. Variation in structure after modification was demonstrated by using different characterization techniques. Se removal efficiency of OPBent is investigated by using (75)Se, since selenium (Se) is one of the important long lived fission products found in radioactive waste and has toxic anionic species in an aqueous environment. The effect of reaction time, solid/liquid ratio, pH and concentration on the adsorption performance were examined. Se speciation and its effect onto adsorption were also investigated by measuring Eh-pH values under certain experimental conditions. Additionally, importance of the amount of Al-polyoxy cations used in modification was investigated by comparing these results with the results of other organic-pillared bentonite produced in our previous research. Experimental results confirmed that both cations were successfully placed into the bentonite interlayer and significant change in the host structure leads to increase Se adsorption. Consequently, bentonite modification improves its Se adsorption ability and further investigations are needed related to the usage of this adsorbent in other remediation studies especially in sorption of other anionic pollutants. PMID:26081306

  20. Stability of microcystins from cyanobacteria--IV. Effect of chlorination on decomposition.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, K; Watanuki, T; Kondo, F; Watanabe, M F; Nakazawa, H; Suzuki, M; Uchida, H; Harada, K

    1997-07-01

    Microcystins, the cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by cyanobacteria such as Microcystis, show tumor-promoting activity through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. They potentially threaten human health, and are increasing the world-wide interest in the health risk associated with cyanobacterial toxins. In this study, the effect of chlorination on the decomposition of microcystins-LR and -RR was examined. The toxins were easily decomposed by chlorination with sodium hypochlorite, and the decomposition depended on the free chlorine dose. In this operation, many reaction products were formed, one of which was determined to be dihydroxymicrocystin formed through the chloronium ion at the conjugated diene of Adda [3-amino-9-methoxy-10-phenyl-2,6,8-trimethyl-deca-4(E), 6(E)-dienoic acid], followed by hydrolysis. Other products may be its stereoisomers and/or regioismers. No noxious products were detected from the chlorination process of microcystin-LR. Although these results suggested that chlorination at an adequate chlorine dose is very effective for the removal of microcystin in raw water, preoxidation of the cell itself with chlorine must be avoided, because it frequently causes toxin release from algae and produce trihalomethanes during water treatment. PMID:9248002

  1. Temporal weighting functions for interaural time and level differences. IV. Effects of carrier frequency

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, G. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Temporal variation in listeners' sensitivity to interaural time and level differences (ITD and ILD, respectively) was measured for sounds of different carrier frequency using the temporal weighting function (TWF) paradigm [Stecker and Hafter (2002) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112,1046–1057]. Listeners made lateralization judgments following brief trains of filtered impulses (Gabor clicks) presented over headphones with overall ITD and/or ILD ranging from ±500 μs ITD and/or ±5 dB ILD across trials. Individual clicks within each train varied by an additional ±100 μs ITD or ±2 dB ILD to allow TWF calculation by multiple regression. In separate conditions, TWFs were measured for carrier frequencies of 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz. Consistent with past studies, TWFs demonstrated high weight on the first click for stimuli with short interclick interval (ICI = 2 ms), but flatter weighting for longer ICI (5–10 ms). Some conditions additionally demonstrated greater weight for clicks near the offset than near the middle of the train. Results support a primary role of the auditory periphery in emphasizing onset and offset cues in rapidly modulated low-frequency sounds. For slower modulations, sensitivity to ongoing high-frequency ILD and low-frequency ITD cues appears subject to recency effects consistent with the effects of leaky temporal integration of binaural information. PMID:25480069

  2. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme IV: Developing Democratic and Nationalist Movements Have Had an Effect around the World. Student Worksheets. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The worksheets contained in this bulletin are designed for use in conjunction with the teaching strategies for Theme IV entitled, "Developing Democratic and Nationalist Movements Have Had an Effect Around the World." The worksheets correspond to specific strategies with accompanying questions on the appropriate strategy page. Included are…

  3. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Second Semester. Theme IV: Developing Democratic and Nationalist Movements Have Had an Effect around the World. Teacher Strategies. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Designed to assist teachers and supervisors in the implementation of the global history course, this bulletin presents learning activities which include the rationale, performance objectives, and teaching strategies related to Theme IV entitled, "Developing Democratic and Nationalist Movements Have Had an Effect around the World." There are four…

  4. MULTIMEDIA ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: VOLUME IV. MEG CHARTS AND BACKGROUND INFORMATION SUMMARIES (CATEGORIES 13-26)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multimedia Environmental Goals (MEG's) are levels of significant contaminants or degradents (in ambient air, water, or land or in emissions of effluents conveyed to the ambient media) that are judged to be (1) appropriate for preventing certain negative effects in the surrounding...

  5. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part IV. Beneficial effects.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a gammaproteobacterium of plant origin, possesses many beneficial traits that could be used for the prevention and/or treatment of human and animal diseases, combating plant pathogens, promotion of plant growth and bioremediation of the environment. It produces a number of antibiotics (herbicolin, pantocins, microcin, agglomerins, andrimid, phenazine, among others) which could be used for combating plant, animal and human pathogens or for food preservation. Japanese researchers have demonstrated that the low-molecular-mass lipopolysaccharide of P. agglomerans isolated by them and described as 'Immunopotentiator from Pantoea agglomerans 1 (IP-PA1)' reveals the extremely wide spectrum of healing properties, mainly due to its ability for the maintenance of homeostasis by macrophage activation. IP-PA1 was proved to be effective in the prevention and treatment of a broad range of human and animal disorders, such as tumours, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, ulcer, various infectious diseases, atopic allergy and stress-induced immunosuppression; it also showed a strong analgesic effect. It is important that most of these effects could be achieved by the safe oral administration of IP-PA1. Taking into account that P. agglomerans occurs commonly as a symbiont of many species of insects, including mosquitoes transmitting the Plasmodium parasites causing malaria, successful attempts were made to apply the strategy of paratransgenesis, in which bacterial symbionts are genetically engineered to express and secrete anti-Plasmodium effector proteins. This strategy shows prospects for a successful eradication of malaria, a deadly disease killing annually over one million people, as well as of other vector-borne diseases of humans, animals and plants. Pantoea agglomerans has been identified as an antagonist of many plant pathogens belonging to bacteria and fungi, as a result of antibiotic production, competition mechanisms or induction of plant resistance. Its use as

  6. Health effects of risk-assessment categories

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, C.F.; Rybicka, K.; Knutson, A.; Morris, S.C.

    1983-10-01

    Environmental and occupational health effects associated with exposures to various chemicals are a subject of increasing concern. One recently developed methodology for assessing the health impacts of various chemical compounds involves the classification of similar chemicals into risk-assessment categories (RACs). This report reviews documented human health effects for a broad range of pollutants, classified by RACs. It complements other studies that have estimated human health effects by RAC based on analysis and extrapolation of data from animal research.

  7. Pulmonary gas exchange in cystic fibrosis: basal status and the effect of i.v. antibiotics and inhaled amiloride.

    PubMed

    Lagerstrand, L; Hjelte, L; Jorulf, H

    1999-09-01

    airways is beneficial. An improvement in the ventilation/perfusion relationship was seen after home i.v. antibiotic treatment and inhaled amiloride may possibly have a further positive effect on gas exchange. PMID:10543293

  8. Green Synthesis of Oxovanadium(IV)/chitosan Nanocomposites and Its Ameliorative Effect on Hyperglycemia, Insulin Resistance, and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjun; Jie, Xu; Guo, Yongli; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the preparation, characterization, and ameliorative effect on high-fat high-sucrose diet-induced hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, oxidative stress in mice of novel oxovanadium(IV)/chitosan (OV/CS) nanocomposites were investigated. The nanobiocomposite was produced by chemical reduction by chitosan and L-ascorbic acid using microwave heating, under environment-friendly conditions, using aqueous solutions, and notably, by using both mediators as reducing and stabilizing agents. In addition, OV/CS nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle size, and zeta potential measurements. In vivo experiments were designed to examine whether the OV/CS nanocomposites would provide additional benefits on oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in mice with type 2 diabetes. The results rendered insulin resistant by treating with OV/CS nanocomposites alleviate insulin resistance and improve oxidative stress. Such nanocomposite seem to be a valuable therapy to achieve and/or maintain glycemic control and therapeutic agents in the treatment arsenal for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26144273

  9. Grand Theft Auto IV comes to Singapore: effects of repeated exposure to violent video games on aggression.

    PubMed

    Teng, Scott Kie Zin; Chong, Gabriel Yew Mun; Siew, Amy Sok Cheng; Skoric, Marko M

    2011-10-01

    Given the increasingly dominant role of video games in the mainstream entertainment industry, it is no surprise that the scholarly debate about their impact has been lively and well attended. Although >100 studies have been conducted to examine the impact of violent video games on aggression, no clear consensus has been reached, particularly in terms of their long-term impact on violent behavior and aggressive cognitions. This study employs a first-ever longitudinal laboratory-based experiment to examine longer-term effects of playing a violent video game. One hundred thirty-five participants were assigned either to the treatment condition where they played a violent video game in a controlled laboratory setting for a total of 12 hours or to the control group where they did not play a game. Participants in the treatment group played Grand Theft Auto IV over a period of 3 weeks and were compared with a control group on the posttest measures of trait aggression, attitudes toward violence, and empathy. The findings do not support the assertion that playing a violent video game for a period of 3 weeks increases aggression or reduces empathy, but they suggest a small increase in proviolence attitudes. The implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21381967

  10. A Proposal for a Dimensional Classification System Based on the Shared Features of the "DSM-IV" Anxiety and Mood Disorders: Implications for Assessment and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Timothy A.; Barlow, David H.

    2009-01-01

    A wealth of evidence attests to the extensive current and lifetime diagnostic comorbidity of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., "DSM-IV") anxiety and mood disorders. Research has shown that the considerable cross-sectional covariation of "DSM-IV" emotional disorders is accounted for by common higher order…

  11. Assessing Institutional Effectiveness in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Don, Ed.; Hughes, Billie, Ed.

    Designed for use by college administrators and staff, as well as by boards of trustees and legislators, this seven-part report outlines an approach to assessing institutional effectiveness which utilizes mission-based, student-centered indicators of success. Resources to assist practitioners in conducting such an assessment are also identified.…

  12. Institutional Effectiveness and Educational Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount Hood Community Coll., Gresham, OR.

    This report outlines the work and results of an Educational Assessment Task Force at Mount Hood Community College (Oregon) that was charged with improving institutional planning, strengthening programs and services, and meeting external accountability demands. The task force addressed both institutional effectiveness (the annual assessment of…

  13. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR VANADIUM AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  14. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR TIN AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes and evaluates information relevant to a preliminary interim assessment of adverse health effects associated with specific chemicals or compounds. The Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (Superfund) uses these documents in preparing cost-benefit analyse...

  15. Characterization of Caramel Colour IV.

    PubMed

    Licht, B H; Shaw, K; Smith, C; Mendoza, M; Orr, J; Myers, D V

    1992-05-01

    A large number of commercial Caramel Colour IV samples were characterized in order to assess the uniformity of the class and to provide data to be used in specifications development. Owing to the chemical and physical complexity of caramel colour it was not feasible to perform detailed analysis of all constituents for assessment of uniformity. Instead, selected parameters were evaluated and judgements were made with respect to compositional uniformity based on the similarities of these parameters among the various samples. As Caramel Colour IV is required by the food industry in a range of colour intensities, there must be a range of properties that differ from sample to sample, but that are sufficiently similar for the material to still be considered as part of the Caramel Colour IV class. Fractions as well as whole caramel were analysed using selected spectrophotometric, chromatographic and chemical techniques. Samples were fractionated based on molecular weight and polarity. The data presented here provide evidence for the uniformity in composition of Caramel Colour IV with respect to molecular weight distribution, to nitrogen and sulphur content and their distribution throughout the fractions, to absorbance properties and to specific low molecular weight compounds. Thus, it can be concluded that Caramel Colour IV exhibits compositional uniformity within the range of colour intensity required by the food industry worldwide. PMID:1644377

  16. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P.

    1997-09-01

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  17. Cardiorespiratory effects of continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat in the critically ill.

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, J; Müller, M; Heesen, M; Härter, K; Hempelmann, G

    1995-01-01

    1. Cardiorespiratory effects of long-term, continuous i.v. administration of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat were studied. 2. Forty-five consecutive critically patients suffering from trauma or postoperative complications were randomly separated into three groups (15 patients in each group) receiving either 0.25 mg h-1 or 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat, respectively, or saline solution as placebo (= control group). The infusion was continued for 5 days. 3. Haemodynamic and respiratory parameters were intensively monitored on admission to the intensive care unit (= 'baseline' values) and daily during the next 5 days. 4. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased significantly only in the enalaprilat-treated patients, whereas heart rate (HR) remained unchanged in these patients. 5. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were decreased by enalaprilat (0.50 mg h-1: PAP (mean +/- s.d.) decreased from 28.0 +/- 4.1 to 24.0 +/- 3.0 mm Hg) and remained significantly lower than in the control group. In the untreated control group, cardiac index (CI), oxygen consumption (VO2I) and oxygen delivery (DO2I) significantly decreased, which was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. Oxygen extraction (O2-extr) increased in both enalaprilat groups (0.25 mg h-1: from 26.1 +/- 5.5 to 30.4 +/- 4.0%; 0.50 mg h-1: 25.2 +/- 5.6 to 30.9 +/- 4.4%) and decreased in the control patients. 6. Right ventricular haemodynamics improved by enalaprilat infusion (0.50 mg h-1: RVEF increased from 40.0 +/- 3.5 to 45.5 +/- 4.0%). Lactate plasma concentrations decreased in the group with 0.50 mg h-1 enalaprilat (from 1.9 +/- 1.0 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg dl-1) and increased in the control patients. 7. Continuous infusion of the ACE inhibitor enalaprilat exerted beneficial cardiorespiratory effects in the critically ill. The widespread common risk of altered perfusion with decreased CI, DO2, VO2, O2-extr and increased lactate concentration was blunted by enalaprilat infusion. 8. Although

  18. Synthesis, structural investigations on organotin(IV) chlorin-e6 complexes, their effect on sea urchin embryonic development and induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pellerito, Claudia; D'Agati, Paolo; Fiore, Tiziana; Mansueto, Caterina; Mansueto, Valentina; Stocco, Giancarlo; Nagy, László; Pellerito, Lorenzo

    2005-06-01

    Four new organotin(IV) chlorin derivatives, [chlorin=chlorin-e(6)=21H,23H-porphine-2-propanoic acid, 18-carboxy-20-(carboxymethyl)-8-ethenyl-13-ethyl-2,3-di-hydro-3,7,12,17-tetramethyl-(2S-trans)-], with formula (R(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O (R=Me, n-Bu) and (R(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O (R=Me, Ph) have been synthesized. The solid state and solution phase structures have been investigated by FT-IR, (119)Sn Mössbauer, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In the solid state, (R(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O complexes contain six coordinated Sn(IV), in a skew trapezoidal environment by forming trans-R(2)SnO(4) polymeric units. As far as (R(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O complexes are concerned, Sn(IV) is five coordinated in a polymeric (oligomeric) trigonal bipyramidal environment and eq-R(3)SnO(2) units, in the solid state. In saturated solutions, a polymeric structure comparable to the solid phase, with carboxylate groups of the ligand behaving in monoanionic bidentate fashion bridging Sn(IV) atoms, was detected for the (Me(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O complex, while in more diluted ones a tetrahedral configuration for the trimethyltin(IV) moieties was observed. Cytotoxic activity of the novel organotin(IV) chlorin was investigated in order to assay the effect on sea urchin embryonic development. The results obtained demonstrated that (n-Bu(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O and (Ph(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O exerted the antimitotic effect on the early stages of sea urchin development. In addition, the cytotoxic effect exerted by (n-Bu(2)Sn)(3)(chlorin)(2).2H(2)O appeared with necrosis of the blastomeres, which were clearly destroyed. After treatment with (Ph(3)Sn)(3)chlorin.2H(2)O, a programmed cell death was triggered, as shown by light microscope observations through morphological assays. The apoptotic events in 2-cell stage embryos revealed: (i) DNA fragmentation, with the TUNEL reaction (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling); (ii) phosphatidylserine

  19. Developmental Trajectories of DSM-IV Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Genetic Effects, Family Risk and Associated Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Henrik; Dilshad, Rezin; Lichtenstein, Paul; Barker, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: DSM-IV specifies three ADHD subtypes; the combined, the hyperactive-impulsive and the inattentive. Little is known about the developmental relationships underlying these subtypes. The objective of this study was to describe the development of parent-reported hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptoms from childhood to…

  20. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of

  1. Comparative Studies on Temperature Dependent I-V Characteristics of Al/(p)CdTe and Ni/(n)CdS Schottky Junctions and Their PV Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wary, G.; Kachari, T.; Rahman, A.

    2010-06-29

    Temperature dependent I-V characteristics of vacuum evaporated Al/(p)CdTe and Ni/(n)CdS Schottky junctions and their photovoltaic effects have been studied and compared. Different junction parameters such as ideality factors, barrier heights, Richardson's constant, short-circuit current density, fill factor, PV efficiency etc. were determined from their I-V characteristics. These parameters were found to change significantly on variation of temperature. The structures showed the change of PV effect. Efficiency found were 2.84% for Al/(p)CdTe and 4.44% for Ni hydro/(n)CdS. Polycrystalline nature, and continuous and ordered structure with bigger grain sizes of the CdS film shows more PV conversion efficiency in making Ni/(n)CdS junction as compare to Al/(p)CdTe junction. However these values were found to vary with doping concentration, and in hydrogen treated samples in both cases.

  2. The successful introduction of a programme to reduce the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin in hospital.

    PubMed

    Weller, T M A

    2002-05-01

    The effectiveness of a programme to reduce the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin was assessed. i.v. ciprofloxacin was removed from ward stock and discussion occurred regarding appropriate use of the drug. Six months later, a factsheet containing recommendations was distributed to all medical staff and a requirement for justification before prescription was introduced. The programme reduced expenditure on i.v. ciprofloxacin to 34% of original levels. Savings of > 36,000 pounds sterling were made for two consecutive years. A sustained reduction in the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin was obtained by a combination of education and restriction. PMID:12003978

  3. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in post-graduate psychology students

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rachel M.; Davis, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients’ lives. Twenty three post-graduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers) may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of post-graduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment. PMID:26042071

  4. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in post-graduate psychology students.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M; Davis, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients' lives. Twenty three post-graduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers) may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of post-graduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment. PMID:26042071

  5. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  6. Effect of food reductones, 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) and hydroxyhydroquinone (HHQ), on lipid peroxidation and type IV and I allergy responses of mouse.

    PubMed

    Mi, H; Hiramoto, K; Kujirai, K; Ando, K; Ikarashi, Y; Kikugawa, K

    2001-10-01

    The effect of long-term supplementation of food reductones, 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) (2%, w/w), detected in many foodstuffs including soy sauce, and hydroxyhydroquinone (1,2,4-benzenetriol) (HHQ) (1.2%, w/w), detected in coffee, on mouse lipid peroxidation and type IV and I allergy responses was investigated. The effect of supplementation of these reductones combined with NO(2) inhalation (5-6 ppm) was also investigated. Levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in lung were remarkably increased, and those in kidney and liver were slightly decreased by supplementation of DMHF or HHQ. The degree of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-sensitized lymph node cell proliferation as assessed by lymph node assay was remarkably enhanced by supplementation of DMHF or HHQ. Both the DNCB-sensitized and the trimellitic anhydride-sensitized increases in IgE levels of mice were enhanced to greater extent by supplementation of DMHF or HHQ. In no cases were additive effects of NO(2) inhalation observable. Allergen-sensitized type IV and I allergy responses of mice may be enhanced by supplementation of food reductones, DMHF or HHQ. PMID:11600049

  7. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  8. The Flynn effect in neuropsychological assessment.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Mercedes D; Hiscock, Merrill

    2011-04-01

    The Flynn effect refers to the rise in IQ throughout the 20th century. This study examined whether the Flynn effect has also elevated performance on neuropsychological tests. A search of published norms revealed five tests with appropriate normative data available for comparison. These tests were the Trail-Making Test (TMT), Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Boston Naming Test, Finger Tapping, and Grooved Pegboard. Results indicated a strong Flynn effect for Parts A and B of the TMT and a probable Flynn effect for the oral SDMT. No Flynn effect was evident for the other tests. Implications for clinical assessment are discussed. PMID:21660765

  9. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S.

    1990-12-31

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. Training effectiveness assessment: Methodological problems and issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Kenneth D.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. military uses a large number of simulators to train and sustain the flying skills of helicopter pilots. Despite the enormous resources required to purchase, maintain, and use those simulators, little effort has been expended in assessing their training effectiveness. One reason for this is the lack of an evaluation methodology that yields comprehensive and valid data at a practical cost. Some of these methodological problems and issues that arise in assessing simulator training effectiveness, as well as problems with the classical transfer-of-learning paradigm were discussed.

  11. The effects of apoA-I/C-III/A-IV, apoE and apoB polymorphisms on carotid artery intima-media thickness.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Tuomo; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2006-03-01

    Different apolipoprotein combinations explain most of the functional differences between plasma lipoproteins. This emphasizes the pivotal role of apolipoproteins in the homeostasis and physiological control of lipid metabolism. Genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein (apo)A-I/C-III/A-IV, apoE and apoB have been suggested to modulate plasma lipid levels as well as the risk of coronary artery disease and stroke. Carotid artery intima-media thickness has been shown to represent preclinical atherosclerosis and has, therefore, been used as a surrogate in quantifying the early stages of atherosclerosis. The effects of the polymorphisms in apoA-I/C-III/A-IV and apoB on carotid intima-media thickness are poorly known. The corresponding influence of apoE polymorphisms has been studied more extensively, but the results are not yet conclusive. In this review, these results are presented in detail and the potential reasons and mechanisms for the discrepancies are discussed. PMID:19804074

  12. The effects of anion exchange functional-group variations on the sorption of Pu(IV) from nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.

    1995-12-01

    A macroporous, polyvinylpyridine anion exchange resin has been used for more than five years at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility to recover plutonium from nitrate media. This strong-base anion exchanger, Reillex{trademark} HPQ, offers higher capacity, faster kinetics, and significantly higher resistance to chemical and radiation damage than conventional polystyrene-based resins. In this study, we measured the sorption of Pu(IV) on Reillex{trademark} HPQ and on three macroporous, strong-base anion exchange resins that differ from Reillex{trademark} HPQ only in the alkyl group used to quaternize the pyridinium. nitrogen. These four resins, prepared by Reilly Industries, Inc., are copolymers of 1-alkyl-4-vinylpyridine, where the alkyl groups are methyl, butyl, hexyl, and octyl. We compare the trends in Pu(IV) sorption on these four resins to those obtained in our previous study of four polystyrene anion exchange resins having trimethyl, triethyl, tripropyl, and tributyl ammonium functionality. The Pu(IV) sorption was measured from 1 M to 9 M nitric acid in both studies.

  13. A Spectrum of IV and V Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats; Owen, David

    2004-01-01

    The aerospace industry in general and NASA in particular is using more (semi-formal) model-based software development. Model-based development produces a collection of artifacts, for example, state diagrams, module diagrams (such as class diagrams), control-block diagrams, etc. These artifacts may than be used as a basis for auto code generation for production use. Therefore, these models must be properly evaluated in the IV and V process. IV and V practitioners know how assess standard procedural systems. But what can we du about IV and V of model-based systems? The goal of the work outlined in this proposal is to use cost effective automated techniques to the largest extent possible during the IV and V process. Our working hypotheses are: 1. There exists a range of validation techniques that can assess models built using a range of modeling techniques of increasing cost and complexity. Specifically, we hypotesize that the "cheaper" techniques can find faults cheaply and early in a project. These early results are then used to predict if this is a problem system and if a more elaborate and expensive IV and V effort is justified. 2. There exists a set of migration procedures that let us seamlessly move from simple models using cheaper techniques into more elaborate models suitable for a more expensive and detailed analysis. 3. We further hypothesize that this migration process is much cheaper than simply remodeling the system under investigation from scratch when moving to models needed for the more detailed and expensive IV and V assessments.

  14. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV & V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA IV&V was established in 1993 to improve safety and cost-effectiveness of mission critical software. Since its inception the tools and strategies employed by IV&V have evolved. This paper examines how lessons learned from the Phoenix project were developed and applied to the GRAIL project. Shortly after selection, the GRAIL project initiated a review of the issues documented by IV&V for Phoenix. The motivation was twofold: the learn as much as possible about the types of issues that arose from the flight software product line slated for use on GRAIL, and to identify opportunities for improving the effectiveness of IV&V on GRAIL. The IV&V Facility provided a database dump containing 893 issues. These were categorized into 16 bins, and then analyzed according to whether the project responded by changing the affected artifacts or using as-is. The results of this analysis were compared to a similar assessment of post-launch anomalies documented by the project. Results of the analysis were discussed with the IV&V team assigned to GRAIL. These discussions led to changes in the way both the project and IV&V approached the IV&V task, and improved the efficiency of the activity.

  15. AB171. RNA alternative splicing modulator can effectively increase lymphoblast enzyme activity in patients with cardiac fabry disease caused by IVS4+919G >A mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Li, Cheng-Fang; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Ting-Rong; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background In Taiwan, DNA-based newborn screening showed a surprisingly high incidence (1/875 in males and 1/399 in females) of a cardiac fabry mutation (IVS4 + 919G >A). The common cardiac variant fabry mutation, IVS4+919G >A, affects the splicing of GLA RNA by introducing a 57-nucleotide insertion between exons 4 and 5 that contains a stop codon and leads to a truncated protein and inactive enzyme. And this mutation affected males have up to 10% residual enzyme activity and present clinically with late-onset hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Due to the high cost of enzyme replacement therapy and the large number of patients with this mutation, the development of alternative therapies is essential. Several low-molecular-mass compounds, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors or kinase/phosphatase inhibitors, have been identified as modulators of alternative splicing. It may offer a potential alternative to enzyme replacement therapy. We expect to find out a more economic and effective drug by the detailed study of the mechanism of the small molecule modulators on the IVS4+919G >A mutation for the greater benefits of patients with this mutation. Methods In this study, we used to generate Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines and incubated with different concentrations of three HDIs (sodium butyrate, valproic acid, and trichostatin A) and Amiloride hydrochloride (Amiloride HCl). To identify the respond of these compound, we were monitored the relative amounts of normal and aberrant splice forms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the relative amounts of the normal and truncated α-Gal A protein products were analyzed by Western blotting and enzyme activities. Results Western blotting revealed those females heterozygous for the IVS4+919G >A mutation had approximately 50% of the normal level of α-Gal A protein, whereas hemizygous males had approximately 10% of the normal level. The three HDIs were all found to rescue the aberrant RNA

  16. Accelerated School Programmes: Assessing Their Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziel, Haim

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of Accelerated School Programs (ASPs) on the basis of a study of four comprehensive schools in Israel. Assesses the influence of ASPs upon internal school processes, such as school goals, structures, and cultures, as perceived by school staff. Determines the project's impact on staff and parents' attitudes, and examines…

  17. Effective Online Instructional and Assessment Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaytan, Jorge; McEwen, Beryl C.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the instructional and assessment strategies that are most effective in the online learning environment. Faculty and students identified several strategies for maintaining instructional quality in the online environment, including the importance of using a variety of instructional methods to appeal…

  18. Communicating Conservation Effects Assessment Project Results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a unique effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation practices at watershed scales and nationally. Such a large-scale project cannot be accomplished without the cooperation and communication of a wide range of experts and stakeh...

  19. Using Qualitative Methods to Assess Teaching Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattuca, Lisa R.; Domagal-Goldman, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Instructor evaluation forms--those scannable surveys that students use to rate the quality of their instructors and courses at the end of every term--are the most common method of assessing teaching effectiveness in the United States. A considerable body of research on end-of-course evaluations suggests that student ratings are valid sources of…

  20. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT SUMMARY TABLES (HEAST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Annual Health Effects Summary Tables (HEAST) are for use at both Superfund and RCRA sites. It is maintained by the Environmental Protection Agencys Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation and provides a comprehensive listing of provisional risk assessment in...

  1. Professional Learning Communities: Assessment--Development--Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, Kristine Kiefer; Huffman, Jane Bumpers

    This presentation addresses three topics: (1) the assessment of professional learning communities in schools; (2) the design and development of professional learning communities in schools; and (3) the effects of professional learning communities in schools. The purpose of this brief document is to share descriptions, processes, and materials…

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR GLYCOL ETHERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Image Retrieval Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the problems of developing a framework and testbed for quantitative assessment of image retrieval effectiveness. To better harness the extensive research on content-based retrieval and improve capabilities of image retrieval systems, this article advocates the establishment of common image retrieval testbeds consisting of standardized…

  4. HEALTH EFFECTS ASSESSMENT FOR TRIVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related goals ...

  5. In silico, in vitro and in vivo analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory activity and the antidiabetic effect of sodium caseinate hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Wang, Tzu-Yuan; Hung, Chuan-Chuan; Jao, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, You-Liang; Wu, Si-Xian; Hsu, Kuo-Chiang

    2016-02-01

    The frequency (A), a novel in silico parameter, was developed by calculating the ratio of the number of truncated peptides with Xaa-proline and Xaa-alanine to all peptide fragments from a protein hydrolyzed with a specific protease. The highest in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity (72.7%) was observed in the hydrolysate of sodium caseinate by bromelain (Cas/BRO), and the constituent proteins of bovine casein also had relatively high A values (0.10-0.17) with BRO hydrolysis. 1CBR (the <1 kDa fraction of Cas/BRO) showed the greatest in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity of 77.5% and was used for in vivo test by high-fat diet-fed and low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The daily administration of 1CBR for 6 weeks was effective to improve glycaemic control in diabetic rats. The results indicate that the novel in silico method has the potential as a screening tool to predict dietary proteins to generate DPP-IV inhibitory and antidiabetic peptides. PMID:26796955

  6. Influence of Source/Drain Residual Implant Lattice Damage Traps on Silicon Carbide Metal Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Drain I-V Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjaye, J.; Mazzola, M. S.

    4H-SiC n-channel power metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) with nitrogen n+-implanted source/drain ohmic contact regions, with and without p-buffer layer fabricated on semi-insulating substrates exhibited hysteresis in the drain I-V characteristics of both types of devices at 300 K and 480 K due to traps. However, thermal spectroscopic measurements could detect the traps only in the devices without p-buffer. Device simulation and optical admittance spectroscopy (OAS) are used to resolve the discrepancy in the initial experimental characterization results. Device simulations and OAS suggest that, in addition to the semi-insulating (SI) substrate traps, acceptor traps due to source/drain residual implant lattice damage contribute to the hysteresis observed in the drain I-V characteristics of the devices. Simulations suggest these traps are contained in the lateral straggle of the implanted source and drain regions since the drain current largely flows between the un-gated edges of the source and drain through the volume of lateral straggle traps. Since hysteresis in I-V curves is a manifestation of the presence of defects in devices and since defects degrade carrier mobility and hence device performance, efforts should be made to minimize the source/drain lateral straggle implant damage.

  7. Performance assessment to enhance training effectiveness.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Gieseler, Charles J.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2010-09-01

    Training simulators have become increasingly popular tools for instructing humans on performance in complex environments. However, the question of how to provide individualized and scenario-specific assessment and feedback to students remains largely an open question. To maximize training efficiency, new technologies are required that assist instructors in providing individually relevant instruction. Sandia National Laboratories has shown the feasibility of automated performance assessment tools, such as the Sandia-developed Automated Expert Modeling and Student Evaluation (AEMASE) software, through proof-of-concept demonstrations, a pilot study, and an experiment. In the pilot study, the AEMASE system, which automatically assesses student performance based on observed examples of good and bad performance in a given domain, achieved a high degree of agreement with a human grader (89%) in assessing tactical air engagement scenarios. In more recent work, we found that AEMASE achieved a high degree of agreement with human graders (83-99%) for three Navy E-2 domain-relevant performance metrics. The current study provides a rigorous empirical evaluation of the enhanced training effectiveness achievable with this technology. In particular, we assessed whether giving students feedback based on automated metrics would enhance training effectiveness and improve student performance. We trained two groups of employees (differentiated by type of feedback) on a Navy E-2 simulator and assessed their performance on three domain-specific performance metrics. We found that students given feedback via the AEMASE-based debrief tool performed significantly better than students given only instructor feedback on two out of three metrics. Future work will focus on extending these developments for automated assessment of teamwork.

  8. X-Band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Comparison of Mononuclear Mn(IV)-oxo and Mn(IV)-hydroxo Complexes and Quantum Chemical Investigation of Mn(IV) Zero-Field Splitting.

    PubMed

    Leto, Domenick F; Massie, Allyssa A; Colmer, Hannah E; Jackson, Timothy A

    2016-04-01

    X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to probe the ground-state electronic structures of mononuclear Mn(IV) complexes [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+). These compounds are known to effect C-H bond oxidation reactions by a hydrogen-atom transfer mechanism. They provide an ideal system for comparing Mn(IV)-hydroxo versus Mn(IV)-oxo motifs, as they differ by only a proton. Simulations of 5 K EPR data, along with analysis of variable-temperature EPR signal intensities, allowed for the estimation of ground-state zero-field splitting (ZFS) and (55)Mn hyperfine parameters for both complexes. From this analysis, it was concluded that the Mn(IV)-oxo complex [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+) has an axial ZFS parameter D (D = +1.2(0.4) cm(-1)) and rhombicity (E/D = 0.22(1)) perturbed relative to the Mn(IV)-hydroxo analogue [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) (|D| = 0.75(0.25) cm(-1); E/D = 0.15(2)), although the complexes have similar (55)Mn values (a = 7.7 and 7.5 mT, respectively). The ZFS parameters for [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) were compared with values obtained previously through variable-temperature, variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (VTVH MCD) experiments. While the VTVH MCD analysis can provide a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of D, the E/D values were poorly defined. Using the ZFS parameters reported for these complexes and five other mononuclear Mn(IV) complexes, we employed coupled-perturbed density functional theory (CP-DFT) and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations with second-order n-electron valence-state perturbation theory (NEVPT2) correction, to compare the ability of these two quantum chemical methods for reproducing experimental ZFS parameters for Mn(IV) centers. The CP-DFT approach was found to provide reasonably acceptable values for D, whereas the CASSCF/NEVPT2 method fared worse, considerably overestimating the magnitude of D in several cases. Both methods were poor in

  9. A Comparison Study: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (KABC-II) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) with Referred Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKown, Danielle M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted based on the limited availability of research comparing the KABC-II and WISC-IV. The study included 30 Caucasian students between the ages of 6 years, 7 months to 16 years 11 months who attend rural school districts in Ohio and West Virginia and were referred due to academic concerns; the sample consisted of 19 females and…

  10. EffectiveDB—updates and novel features for a better annotation of bacterial secreted proteins and Type III, IV, VI secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Valerie; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Platzer, Alexander; Jehl, Marc-André; Arnold, Roland; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Protein secretion systems play a key role in the interaction of bacteria and hosts. EffectiveDB (http://effectivedb.org) contains pre-calculated predictions of bacterial secreted proteins and of intact secretion systems. Here we describe a major update of the database, which was previously featured in the NAR Database Issue. EffectiveDB bundles various tools to recognize Type III secretion signals, conserved binding sites of Type III chaperones, Type IV secretion peptides, eukaryotic-like domains and subcellular targeting signals in the host. Beyond the analysis of arbitrary protein sequence collections, the new release of EffectiveDB also provides a ‘genome-mode’, in which protein sequences from nearly complete genomes or metagenomic bins can be screened for the presence of three important secretion systems (Type III, IV, VI). EffectiveDB contains pre-calculated predictions for currently 1677 bacterial genomes from the EggNOG 4.0 database and for additional bacterial genomes from NCBI RefSeq. The new, user-friendly and informative web portal offers a submission tool for running the EffectiveDB prediction tools on user-provided data. PMID:26590402

  11. Specific Design of Titanium(IV) Phenolato Chelates Yields Stable and Accessible, Effective and Selective Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Meker, Sigalit; Braitbard, Ori; Hall, Matthew D; Hochman, Jacob; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-07-11

    Octahedral titanium(IV) complexes of phenolato hexadentate ligands were developed and showed very high stability for days in water solutions. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that, whereas tetrakis(phenolato) systems are generally of low activity presumably due to inaccessibility, smaller bis(phenolato)bis(alkoxo) complexes feature high anticancer activity and accessibility even without formulations, also toward a cisplatin-resistant cell line. An all-aliphatic control complex was unstable and inactive. A leading phenolato complex also revealed: 1) high durability in fully aqueous solutions; accordingly, negligible loss of activity after preincubation for three days in medium or in serum; 2) maximal cellular accumulation and induction of apoptosis following 24-48 h of administration; 3) reduced impact on noncancerous fibroblast cells; 4) in vivo efficacy toward lymphoma cells in murine model; 5) high activity in NCI-60 panel, with average GI50 of 4.6±2 μm. This newly developed family of Ti(IV) complexes is thus of great potential for anticancer therapy. PMID:27320784

  12. Maturational changes in laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and perlecan in germinal matrix, cortex, and white matter and effect of betamethasone.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongmin; Hu, Furong; Sado, Yoshikazu; Ninomiya, Yoshifumi; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Ungvari, Zoltan; Lagamma, Edmund F; Csiszar, Anna; Nedergaard, Maiken; Ballabh, Praveen

    2008-05-15

    Germinal matrix is selectively vulnerable to hemorrhage in premature infants, and use of prenatal betamethasone is associated with a lower occurrence of germinal matrix hemorrhage. Because the major components of extracellular matrix of the cerebral vasculature-laminin, fibronectin, collagen IV, and perlecan-provide structural stability to blood vessels, we examined whether the expression of these molecules was decreased in the germinal matrix and affected by betamethasone. In both human fetuses and premature infants, fibronectin was significantly lower in the germinal matrix than in the cortical mantle or white matter anlagen. Conversely, laminin alpha1 gene expression was greater in the human germinal matrix compared with the cortical mantle or white matter. Expression of alpha1- and alpha2(IV) collagen chains increased with advancing gestational age. Low-dose prenatal betamethasone treatment enhanced fibronectin level by 1.5-2-fold whereas a high dose reduced fibronectin expression by 2-fold in rabbit pups. Because fibronectin provides structural stability to the blood vessels, its reduced expression in the germinal matrix may contribute to the fragility of germinal matrix vasculature and the propensity to hemorrhage in premature neonates. PMID:18214989

  13. Energy levels and lifetimes of Nd IV, Pm IV, Sm IV, and Eu IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Safronova, U. I.; Johnson, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    To address the shortage of experimental data for electron spectra of triply ionized rare-earth elements we have calculated energy levels and lifetimes of 4f{sup n+1} and 4f{sup n}5d configurations of Nd IV (n=2), Pm IV (n=3), Sm IV (n=4), and Eu IV (n=5) using Hartree-Fock and configuration-interaction methods. To control the accuracy of our calculations we also performed similar calculations for Pr III, Nd III, and Sm III, for which experimental data are available. The results are important, in particular, for physics of magnetic garnets.

  14. Astragaloside IV Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Anwen; Guo, Songxue; Tu, Sheng; Ammar, Al-baadani; Tang, Junjia; Hong, Yuan; Wu, Haijian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV, one of the main effective components isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, has multiple neuroprotective properties, while the effects of astragaloside IV on the attenuation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) and its possible mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether astragaloside IV could inhibit oxidative stress, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and improve neurological deficits after experimental SAH in rats. Rats (n=68) were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH+vehicle group, and SAH+astragaloside IV group. Astragaloside IV or an equal volume of vehicle was administered at 1 h and 6 h after SAH, all the rats were subsequently sacrificed at 24 h after SAH. Mortality, neurological scores, and brain edema were assessed, biochemical tests and histological studies were also performed at that point. SAH induced an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis, cleaved caspase 3, brain edema and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Astragaloside IV treatment reversed these changes and improved neurobehavioral outcomes of SAH rats. Our findings suggested that astragaloside IV may alleviate EBI after SAH through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. PMID:25136262

  15. Interplay of Tunneling, Two-State Reactivity, and Bell-Evans-Polanyi Effects in C-H Activation by Nonheme Fe(IV)O Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debasish; Shaik, Sason

    2016-02-24

    The study of C-H bond activation reactions by nonheme Fe(IV)O species with nine hydrocarbons shows that the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) involves strong tunneling and is a signature of the reactive spin states. Theory reproduces the observed spike-like appearance of plots of KIE(exp) against the C-H bond dissociation energy, and its origins are discussed. The experimentally observed Bell-Evans-Polanyi correlations, in the presence of strong tunneling, are reproduced, and the pattern is rationalized. PMID:26824716

  16. Y-shape spin-separator for two-dimensional group-IV nanoribbons based on quantum spin hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Gaurav Abdul Jalil, Mansoor Bin; Liang, Gengchiau; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-20

    An efficient spin-separator that operates in quantum spin hall phase has been investigated for two-dimensional group-IV materials. A three-terminal Y-shaped device has been simulated via non-equilibrium Green Function to demonstrate the separation of unpolarized current at source terminal into spin-polarized current of opposite polarity at the two drain terminals. Device controls, i.e., tunable buckling and perpendicular magnetic field have been modeled comprehensively to evaluate the device feasibility and performance. It is shown that these controls can preferentially steer current between the two drains to create a differential charge current with complementary spin polarization, thus enabling a convenient regulation of output signal.

  17. Observations of a substantial cloud-aerosol indirect effect during the 2014-2015 Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn fissure eruption in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Daniel T.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-12-01

    The Bárðarbunga-Veiðivötn fissure eruption lasted from 31 August 2014 to 28 February 2015, during which its sulfur emissions dwarfed anthropogenic emissions from Europe. This natural experiment offers an excellent opportunity to investigate the aerosol indirect effect and the effect of effusive volcanic eruptions on climate. During the eruption cloud droplet effective radius (re) over the region surrounding Iceland was at the lowest value in the 14 year Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer data record during September and October 2014. The change in reflected solar radiation due to increased cloud reflectivity during September and October is estimated to exceed 2 W m-2 over the region surrounding Iceland, with increases of 1 W m-2 extending as far south as the Açores. The strength of the aerosol indirect effect diagnosed here reaffirms the ability of volcanic aerosols to affect cloud properties and ultimately the planetary albedo.

  18. Using PLATO IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meller, David V.

    This beginning reference manual describes PLATO IV hardware for prospective users and provides an introduction to PLATO for new authors. The PLATO terminal is described in detail in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 provides a block diagram of the PLATO IV system. Procedures for getting on line are described in Chapter 3, and Chapter 4 provides references to…

  19. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 hours a day. If there is a problem with the IV, you can call your home health care agency for help. If the IV comes out of ... bleeding stops. Then call the home health care agency or the doctor right away.

  20. Chronic effects of myocardial infarction on right ventricular function: a noninvasive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Hopkins, J.M.; Shah, P.M.

    1983-10-01

    To assess the chronic effects of myocardial infarction on right ventricular function, 48 subjects were studied utilizing radionuclide angiography and two-dimensional echocardiography. Ten were normal subjects (group I), 11 had previous inferior wall myocardial infarction (group II), 10 had previous anteroseptal infarction (group III), 11 had combined anteroseptal and inferior infarction (group IV) and 6 had extensive anterolateral infarction (group V). The mean (+/- standard deviation) left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.66 +/- 0.03 in group I, 0.58 +/- 0.02 in group II, 0.52 +/- 0.02 in group III, 0.33 +/- 0.03 in group IV and 0.33 +/- 0.01 in group V. No systematic correlation between left and right ventricular ejection fraction was observed among the groups. The mean right ventricular ejection fraction was significantly reduced in the presence of inferior myocardial infarction (0.30 +/- 0.03 in group II and 0.29 +/- 0.03 in group IV compared with 0.43 +/- 0.02 in group I (p less than 0.001)). The group II and IV patients also had increased (p less than 0.001) right ventricular end-diastolic area and decreased (p less than 0.001) right ventricular free wall motion by two-dimensional echocardiography. In the presence of anteroseptal infarction (group III), right ventricular free wall motion was increased (p less than 0.05) compared with normal subjects (group I). Thus, the effects of prior myocardial infarction on right ventricular function depend more on the location of infarction than on the extent of left ventricular dysfunction. Inferior infarction was commonly associated with reduced right ventricular ejection fraction and increased right ventricular end-diastolic area. The right ventricular free wall excursion was increased in the presence of anteroseptal infarction, suggested loss of contribution of interventricular septal contraction to right ventricular ejection.

  1. New technologies - How to assess environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, P. J.; Lavin, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for assessing the environmental effects of a room-and-pillar mining system (RP) and a new hydraulic borehole mining system (HBM). Before environmental assessment can begin, each technology is defined in terms of its engineering characteristics at both the conceptual and preliminary design stages. The mining sites are also described in order to identify the significant advantages and constraints for each system. This can be a basic physical and biological survey of the region at the conceptual stage, but a more specific representation of site characteristics is required at the preliminary stage. Assessment of potential environmental effects of each system at the conceptual design is critical to its hardware development and application. A checklist can be used to compare and identify the negative impacts of each method, outlining the resource affected, the type of impact involved, and the exact activity causing that impact. At the preliminary design stage, these impacts should be evaluated as a result of either utilization or alteration. Underground coal mining systems have three major utilization impacts - the total area disturbed, the total water resources withdrawn from other uses, and the overall energy efficiency of the process - and one major alteration impact - the degradation of water quality by sedimentation and acid contamination. A comparison of the RP and HBM systems shows the HBM to be an environmentally less desirable system for the Central Appalachia region.

  2. Enhanced training effectiveness using automated student assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, James Chris

    2010-05-01

    Training simulators have become increasingly popular tools for instructing humans on performance in complex environments. However, the question of how to provide individualized and scenario-specific assessment and feedback to students remains largely an open question. In this work, we follow-up on previous evaluations of the Automated Expert Modeling and Automated Student Evaluation (AEMASE) system, which automatically assesses student performance based on observed examples of good and bad performance in a given domain. The current study provides an empirical evaluation of the enhanced training effectiveness achievable with this technology. In particular, we found that students given feedback via the AEMASE-based debrief tool performed significantly better than students given only instructor feedback.

  3. Assessment of the Anti-anginal Effect of Tetramethylpyrazine Using Vasopressin-Induced Angina Model Rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xin; Nakamura, Yuji; Wada, Takeshi; Kishie, Takuya; Enkhsaikhan, Azjargal; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Zhu, Bingmei; Xu, Bin; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous tetramethylpyrazine has been widely used in China as a complementary and/or alternative medicine to treat patients with ischemic heart disease. We assessed the anti-anginal effect of tetramethylpyrazine (10 mg/kg, intravenously (i.v.), n=6) in comparison with that of its vehicle, saline (1 mL/kg, i.v., n=6), using vasopressin-induced angina model rats. First, Donryu rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and the surface lead I electrocardiogram was continuously monitored. Administration of vasopressin (0.5 IU/kg, i.v.) to the rats depressed the S-wave level of the electrocardiogram, indicating the onset of subendocardial ischemia. However, pretreatment with tetramethylpyrazine suppressed the vasopressin-induced depression of the S-wave level, which was not observed following pretreatment with its vehicle alone (saline), suggesting that tetramethylpyrazine ameliorated the vasopressin-induced subendocardial ischemia in vivo. These results may provide experimental evidence for the empirically known clinical efficacy of tetramethylpyrazine against ischemic heart disease, and could provide clues to better understanding its in vivo mechanism of action. PMID:27476945

  4. Comparison of the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin in acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media: A randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arijit; Jana, Utpal; Khaowas, Ajoy; Das, Saumik; Mandal, Ananya; Das, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness and safety of cefpodoxime and ciprofloxacin for the treatment of mild to moderate cases of acute exacerbation of chronic suppurative otitis media (AECSOM). Materials and Methods: Adult patients diagnosed with AECSOM were screened and patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomized to receive either cefpodoxime 200 mg twice daily or ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily orally for 7 days. The primary outcome of this randomized, open-labeled, phase IV clinical trial (Registration Number - CTRI/2011/10/002079) was clinical success rate at day 14 visit and the secondary outcome was incidence of adverse events (AEs). Forty-six patients were enrolled: 23 in the cefpodoxime group and 23 in the ciprofloxacin group. Results: The clinical success rates were 95.6% in the cefpodoxime group versus 90.9% in the ciprofloxacin group. These rates are comparable, but no statistically significant difference was observed between the groups. Few mild and self-limiting AEs were observed and the tolerability of both the drugs was also good. Conclusion: The results of this randomized, open-labeled phase IV clinical trial showed that a 7-day course of cefpodoxime is therapeutically comparable to ciprofloxacin in terms of both clinical effectiveness and safety for the treatment of patients with AECSOM. PMID:23326103

  5. AS-IV protects against kidney IRI through inhibition of NF-κB activity and PUMA upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yan; Li, Gang; Liu, Hongxiu; Ai, Dengbin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine and explore the effect of Astragalus saponin IV (AS-IV) on ischemia/reperfusion (IR)-induced renal injury and its mechanisms. Methods: Experimental model of renal I/R was induced in rats by bilateral renal artery clamp for 45 min followed by reperfusion of 6 h. Rats were divided into three groups: ① sham ② IRI ③ IRI/AS-IV. In IRI/AS-IV groups, AS-IV was orally administered once a day to rats at 2 mg·kg-1·d-1 for 7 days prior to ischemia. At 6 h after reperfusion, the inflammatory cytokines and renal function was assessed and NF-κB activity and PUMA expression was detected. Apoptotic cells was detected by TUNEL assay. Results: AS-IV significantly decreased serum and tissue levels of IL-6 and TNF-α, and reduced apoptotic cell counts and histological damage. AS-IV down-regulated the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (NF-κB p65) and PUMA expression, and the NF-κB activity compared to the I/R groups. Conclusions: AS-IV provided protection against IRI-induced renal injury by reducing apoptosis and inflammation through inhibition of NF-κB activity and PUMA expression. AS-IV pre-treatment ameliorated tubular damage and suppressed the NF-κB p65 expression. PMID:26770431

  6. Systemic effects of orally-administered zinc and tin (IV) metalloporphyrins on heme oxygenase expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Ichiro; Wong, Ronald J; Abate, Aida; Vreman, Hendrik J; Contag, Christopher H; Stevenson, David K

    2006-05-01

    Some metalloporphyrins (Mps) inhibit heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of bilirubin, and are potential compounds for the treatment of neonatal jaundice. We studied the safety and efficacy of Mps following oral administration. Adult HO-1-luc reporter mice were administered 30 micromol/kg body weight of tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), zinc bis glycol deuteroporphyrin (ZnBG), or zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), or vehicle by oral gavage. Bilirubin production was measured as total body carbon monoxide (CO) excretion (VeCO). HO activity was quantitated via CO measurements by gas chromatography. HO-1 protein was determined by Western blot. HO-1 transcription levels were assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. A significant 28% decrease in bilirubin production occurred within 3 h of SnMP treatment and persisted beyond 48 h. Bilirubin production decreased 15% and 9% by 3 h after administration of ZnBG and ZnPP, respectively, but returned to baseline within 48 h. Maximal inhibition of liver, spleen, and intestine HO activity was seen at 3 h with inhibitory effects decreasing in the order: SnMP > or = ZnBG > or = ZnPP. After SnMP treatment, HO-1 transcription increased 5.7-fold after 24 h. Furthermore, liver and spleen HO-1 protein significantly increased 3.7- and 2.0-fold, respectively, after 24 h. HO-1 transcription and protein were not affected in ZnBG- or ZnPP-treated mice. We conclude that the three Mps are absorbed at different rates in the mouse and affect bilirubin production and HO-1 expression in a tissue- and time-dependent manner. PMID:16627879

  7. The Effect of Crystal Packing and ReIV Ions on the Magnetisation Relaxation of [Mn6]-Based Molecular Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lillo, José; Cano, Joan; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Brechin, Euan K

    2015-01-01

    The energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) proffers potential technological applications in high-density information storage and quantum computation. Leading candidates amongst complexes of 3d metals ions are the hexametallic family of complexes of formula [Mn6O2(R-sao)6(X)2(solvent)y] (saoH2=salicylaldoxime; X=mono-anion; y=4–6; R=H, Me, Et, and Ph). The recent synthesis of cationic [Mn6][ClO4]2 family members, in which the coordinating X ions were replaced with non-coordinating anions, opened the gateway to constructing families of novel [Mn6] salts in which the identity and nature of the charge balancing anions could be employed to alter the physical properties of the complex. Herein we demonstrate initial experiments to show that this is indeed possible. By replacing the diamagnetic ClO4− anions with the highly anisotropic ReIV ion in the form of [ReIVCl6]2−, the energy barrier to magnetisation relaxation is increased by up to 30 %. PMID:25951415

  8. Effect of the delivery system on the biodistribution of Ge(IV) octabutoxy-phthalocyanines in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Soncin, M; Polo, L; Reddi, E; Jori, G; Kenney, M E; Cheng, G; Rodgers, M A

    1995-02-10

    The pharmacokinetic properties of the Ge(IV)-octabutoxy-phthalocyanines (GePc) with two axially ligated triethylsiloxy (GePcEt) or trihexyl-siloxy (GePcHex) chains were studied in BALB/C mice bearing a transplanted MS-2 fibrosarcoma. The GePcs were delivered to mice after incorporation into unilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or in an emulsion of Cremophor-EL. The Cremophor delivered GePcs were cleared from the blood circulation at a much slower rate than the liposome-delivered GePcs. At the same time, Cremophor induced a slower and reduced uptake of the GePcs in the liver and spleen while it greatly enhanced the uptake in the tumour as compared to liposomes. Maximum tumour uptake was observed at 24 h post-injection and was equivalent to 0.67 and 0.50 nmol/g, respectively, for the Cremophor delivered GePcHex and GePcEt. The corresponding values for the liposome-delivered drugs were approximately one fourth of that observed with Cremophor. PMID:7882292

  9. Cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of stage IIIC and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Gareth K; Chang, Jenny; Ziogas, Argyrios

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery (PDS) when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data linked to Medicare claims (SEER-Medicare). Methods Using a Markov model, the cost-effectiveness of PDS was compared to that of NACT. We modeled cost and survival inputs using data from women in the SEER-Medicare database with ovarian cancer treated by either PDS or NACT between 1992 and 2009. Direct and indirect costs were discounted by an annual rate of 3%. Utility weights were obtained from published data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of PDS compared to NACT was calculated. Results In our model, women with stage IIIC EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost for PDS when compared to NACT ($31,945 vs $30,016) but yielded greater quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (1.79 vs 1.69). The ICER was $19,359/QALY gained. Women with stage IV EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost following PDS when compared to NACT ($31,869 vs $27,338) but yielded greater QALYs (1.69 vs 1.66). The ICER was $130,083/QALY gained. A sensitivity analysis showed that for both PDS and NACT the ICER was sensitive to incremental changes in the utility weight. Conclusion PDS is significantly more cost-effective for women with stage IIIC when compared to NACT. In women with stage IV EOC, PDS is also more cost-effective though the QALYs gained are much more costly and exceed a $50,000 willingness to pay. PMID:27536150

  10. Understanding the Effectiveness of Online Peer Assessment: A Path Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan; Zhang, Zhidong

    2012-01-01

    Peer assessment has been implemented in schools as both a learning tool and an assessment tool. Earlier studies have explored the effectiveness of peer assessment from different perspectives, such as domain knowledge and skills, peer assessment skills, and attitude changes. However, there is no holistic model describing the effects of cognitive…

  11. New Perspectives on Assessing Amplification Effects

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Pamela E.; Tremblay, Kelly L.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians have long been aware of the range of performance variability with hearing aids. Despite improvements in technology, there remain many instances of well-selected and appropriately fitted hearing aids whereby the user reports minimal improvement in speech understanding. This review presents a multistage framework for understanding how a hearing aid affects performance. Six stages are considered: (1) acoustic content of the signal, (2) modification of the signal by the hearing aid, (3) interaction between sound at the output of the hearing aid and the listener's ear, (4) integrity of the auditory system, (5) coding of available acoustic cues by the listener's auditory system, and (6) correct identification of the speech sound. Within this framework, this review describes methodology and research on 2 new assessment techniques: acoustic analysis of speech measured at the output of the hearing aid and auditory evoked potentials recorded while the listener wears hearing aids. Acoustic analysis topics include the relationship between conventional probe microphone tests and probe microphone measurements using speech, appropriate procedures for such tests, and assessment of signal-processing effects on speech acoustics and recognition. Auditory evoked potential topics include an overview of physiologic measures of speech processing and the effect of hearing loss and hearing aids on cortical auditory evoked potential measurements in response to speech. Finally, the clinical utility of these procedures is discussed. PMID:16959734

  12. New perspectives on assessing amplification effects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Pamela E; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2006-09-01

    Clinicians have long been aware of the range of performance variability with hearing aids. Despite improvements in technology, there remain many instances of well-selected and appropriately fitted hearing aids whereby the user reports minimal improvement in speech understanding. This review presents a multistage framework for understanding how a hearing aid affects performance. Six stages are considered: (1) acoustic content of the signal, (2) modification of the signal by the hearing aid, (3) interaction between sound at the output of the hearing aid and the listener's ear, (4) integrity of the auditory system, (5) coding of available acoustic cues by the listener's auditory system, and (6) correct identification of the speech sound. Within this framework, this review describes methodology and research on 2 new assessment techniques: acoustic analysis of speech measured at the output of the hearing aid and auditory evoked potentials recorded while the listener wears hearing aids. Acoustic analysis topics include the relationship between conventional probe microphone tests and probe microphone measurements using speech, appropriate procedures for such tests, and assessment of signal-processing effects on speech acoustics and recognition. Auditory evoked potential topics include an overview of physiologic measures of speech processing and the effect of hearing loss and hearing aids on cortical auditory evoked potential measurements in response to speech. Finally, the clinical utility of these procedures is discussed. PMID:16959734

  13. Impact of TBI on late effects in children treated by megatherapy for Stage IV neuroblastoma. A study of the French Society of Pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Flandin, Isabelle; Michon, Jean; Pinkerton, Ross; Coze, Carole; Stephan, Jean Louis; Fourquet, Bernard; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the contribution of total body irradiation (TBI) to late sequelae in children treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for Stage IV neuroblastoma. Patients and Methods: We compared two populations that were similar with regard to age, stage, pre-autologous bone marrow transplantation chemotherapy (CT) regimen, period of treatment, and follow-up (12 years). The TBI group (n = 32) received TBI as part of the megatherapy procedure (1982-1993), whereas the CT group (n 30) received conditioning without TBI (1985-1992). Analysis 12 years later focused on growth, weight and corpulence (body mass index) delay; hormonal deficiencies; liver, kidney, heart, ear, eye, and dental sequelae; school performance; and the incidence of secondary tumors. Results: Impact of TBI was most marked in relation to growth and weight delay, although the mean delay was not severe, probably because of treatment with growth hormones. Other consequences of TBI were thyroid insufficiency, cataracts, and a high incidence of secondary tumors. Hearing loss and dental agenesis were more prominent in the group treated with CT alone. No differences were observed in school performance. Conclusion: The most frequent side effects of TBI were cataracts, thyroid insufficiency, and growth delay, but more worrying is the risk of secondary tumors. Because of the young mean age of patients and the toxicity of TBI regimens without any survival advantage, regimens without TBI are preferable in the management of Stage IV neuroblastoma.

  14. Effect of axial ligation and delivery system on the tumour-localising and -photosensitising properties of Ge(IV)-octabutoxy-phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Soncin, M; Polo, L; Reddi, E; Jori, G; Kenney, M E; Cheng, G; Rodgers, M A

    1995-04-01

    Four Ge(IV)-octabutoxy-phthalocyanines (GePcs) bearing two alkyl-type axial ligands were assayed for their pharmacokinetic properties and phototherapeutic efficiency in Balb/c mice bearing an intramuscularly transplanted MS-2 fibrosarcoma. The GePcs were i.v. injected at a dose of 0.35 mumol kg-1 body weight after incorporation into either Cremophor emulsions or small unilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Both the nature of the delivery system and the chemical structure of the phthalocyanine were found to affect the behaviour of the GePcs in vivo. Thus, Cremophor-administered GePcs invariably yielded a more prolonged serum retention and a larger association with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) as compared with the corresponding liposome-delivered phthalocyanines. This led to a greater efficiency and selectivity of tumour targeting. These effects were more pronounced for those GePcs having relatively long alkyl chains (hexyl to decyl) in the axial ligands. Maximal tumour accumulation (0.67 nmol per g of tissue) was found for Ge-Pc(hexyl)2 at 24 h after injection. Consistently, the Ge-Pc(hexyl)2, administered via Cremophor, showed the highest phototherapeutic activity towards MS-2 fibrosarcoma. PMID:7710936

  15. Effect of axial ligation and delivery system on the tumour-localising and -photosensitising properties of Ge(IV)-octabutoxy-phthalocyanines.

    PubMed Central

    Soncin, M.; Polo, L.; Reddi, E.; Jori, G.; Kenney, M. E.; Cheng, G.; Rodgers, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Four Ge(IV)-octabutoxy-phthalocyanines (GePcs) bearing two alkyl-type axial ligands were assayed for their pharmacokinetic properties and phototherapeutic efficiency in Balb/c mice bearing an intramuscularly transplanted MS-2 fibrosarcoma. The GePcs were i.v. injected at a dose of 0.35 mumol kg-1 body weight after incorporation into either Cremophor emulsions or small unilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Both the nature of the delivery system and the chemical structure of the phthalocyanine were found to affect the behaviour of the GePcs in vivo. Thus, Cremophor-administered GePcs invariably yielded a more prolonged serum retention and a larger association with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) as compared with the corresponding liposome-delivered phthalocyanines. This led to a greater efficiency and selectivity of tumour targeting. These effects were more pronounced for those GePcs having relatively long alkyl chains (hexyl to decyl) in the axial ligands. Maximal tumour accumulation (0.67 nmol per g of tissue) was found for Ge-Pc(hexyl)2 at 24 h after injection. Consistently, the Ge-Pc(hexyl)2, administered via Cremophor, showed the highest phototherapeutic activity towards MS-2 fibrosarcoma. PMID:7710936

  16. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  17. Total i.v. anaesthesia with propofol and alfentanil: dose requirements for propofol and the effect of premedication with clonidine.

    PubMed

    Richards, M J; Skues, M A; Jarvis, A P; Prys-Roberts, C

    1990-08-01

    We determined in 51 healthy patients undergoing body surface surgery the dose requirements for propofol, as part of a total i.v. anaesthesia technique with an alfentanil infusion. After premedication with temazepam, patients received alfentanil 50 micrograms kg-1 followed by an infusion of 50 micrograms kg-1 h-1. Patients were anaesthetized with a loading dose of propofol followed by a three-stage infusion designed to reach one of five preselected blood concentrations of propofol. The motor response to the initial surgical incision was noted and probit analysis was used to derive the ED50 (2.94 mg kg-1 h-1; 95% confidence limits: 2.35-3.37 mg kg-1 h-1) and ED95 (4.98 mg kg-1 h-1; 95% limits: 4.13-8.8 mg kg-1 h-1) for the final propotol infusion rate under these conditions. Whole blood concentration!of propofol at the time of the incision was related linearly to the inf!sion rate and the EC50 and EC95 (probit analysis) were derived as !.44 (95% confidence limits 0.62-1.87) and 4.05 (95% confidence lim!ts 2.78-30.5) micrograms ml-1, respectively. Post-operative recovery was!rapid, uncomplicated and uneventful. In a subgroup of eight patients,!the addition of clonidine 0.6 mg to the premedication significantly decreased the requirement for propofol (P less than 0.05) during surgery, but resulted in prolonged recovery times. PMID:2223330

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilus Expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Effects of Pilin Subunit Composition on Function and Organelle Dynamics▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Roos, Norbert; Aas, Finn Erik; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang M.; Maier, Berenike; Koomey, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Type IV pili (TFP) play central roles in the expression of many phenotypes including motility, multicellular behavior, sensitivity to bacteriophages, natural genetic transformation, and adherence. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, these properties require ancillary proteins that act in conjunction with TFP expression and influence organelle dynamics. Here, the intrinsic contributions of the pilin protein itself to TFP dynamics and associated phenotypes were examined by expressing the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PilAPAK pilin subunit in N. gonorrhoeae. We show here that, although PilAPAK pilin can be readily assembled into TFP in this background, steady-state levels of purifiable fibers are dramatically reduced relative those of endogenous pili. This defect is due to aberrant TFP dynamics as it is suppressed in the absence of the PilT pilus retraction ATPase. Functionally, PilAPAK pilin complements gonococcal adherence for human epithelial cells but only in a pilT background, and this property remains dependent on the coexpression of both the PilC adhesin and the PilV pilin-like protein. Since P. aeruginosa pilin only moderately supports neisserial sequence-specific transformation despite its assembly proficiency, these results together suggest that PilAPAK pilin functions suboptimally in this environment. This appears to be due to diminished compatibility with resident proteins essential for TFP function and dynamics. Despite this, PilAPAK pili support retractile force generation in this background equivalent to that reported for endogenous pili. Furthermore, PilAPAK pili are both necessary and sufficient for bacteriophage PO4 binding, although the strain remains phage resistant. Together, these findings have significant implications for TFP biology in both N. gonorrhoeae and P. aeruginosa. PMID:17573479

  19. GCF Mark IV development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, L. O.

    1982-01-01

    The Mark IV ground communication facility (GCF) as it is implemented to support the network consolidation program is reviewed. Changes in the GCF are made in the area of increased capacity. Common carrier circuits are the medium for data transfer. The message multiplexing in the Mark IV era differs from the Mark III era, in that all multiplexing is done in a GCF computer under GCF software control, which is similar to the multiplexing currently done in the high speed data subsystem.

  20. Excitation of heliumlike B IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, K.-H.; Koenig, R.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements are reported for line-intensity ratios emitted from heliumlike B IV ions in a plasma with electron density, N(e) = 1.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm and electron temperature, kT(e) = 175 eV. The plasma was produced in a theta-pinch discharge. The analysis supports theoretical excitation rates calculated in the distorted-wave approximation, which include the effect of resonances.

  1. Effects of Increasing Drag on Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigm, Ryan Clayton; McKinley, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis relies heavily on the computation of the Probability of Collision (Pc) and the understanding of the sensitivity of this calculation to the position errors as defined by the covariance. In Low Earth Orbit (LEO), covariance is predominantly driven by perturbations due to atmospheric drag. This paper describes the effects of increasing atmospheric drag through Solar Cycle 24 on Pc calculations. The process of determining these effects is found through analyzing solar flux predictions on Energy Dissipation Rate (EDR), historical relationship between EDR and covariance, and the sensitivity of Pc to covariance. It is discovered that while all LEO satellites will be affected by the increase in solar activity, the relative effect is more significant in the LEO regime around 700 kilometers in altitude compared to 400 kilometers. Furthermore, it is shown that higher Pc values can be expected at larger close approach miss distances. Understanding these counter-intuitive results is important to setting Owner/Operator expectations concerning conjunctions as solar maximum approaches.

  2. Survey to assess Persian Gulf spill effects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-10

    This paper reports that an international group is poised for an extensive survey of the Persian Gulf, including an assessment of the long term effects of last year's oil spill, a legacy of the Persian Gulf war. Saudi Arabia plans a $450 million cleanup program on beaches fouled by the massive spill. Plans for the survey were disclosed by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). It is to be carried out under the auspices of the Regional Organization for the Protection of the Marine Environment (Ropme), Unesco's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Ropme member countries are Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

  3. WISC-IV and Low IQ: Review and Comparison with the WAIS-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The WISC-IV is likely to be in common use for the assessment of children with low intellectual ability for the next 10-12 years. There are several concerns about its uses with these children. Some children may not understand the instructions on some subtests, notably for letter-number sequencing. There may be an unacknowledged floor effect that…

  4. Effect of Vanadium(IV)-Doping on the Visible Light-Induced Catalytic Activity of Titanium Dioxide Catalysts for Methylene Blue Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Churng; Lin, Yo-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vanadium(IV)-doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders were prepared by the sol–gel method and characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller–specific surface area, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. V-doping in the TiO2 increases the crystal grain size, which decreases the specific surface areas of powders. This V-doping changes the band gap of TiO2, leading to extend the absorption to visible light regions (400–800 nm). Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in water was investigated as a function of the vanadium content in TiO2 and was found to follow pseudo first-order rate kinetics. Appropriate content of V-doping is an effective means to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 for MB degradation under visible light irradiation. PMID:22693413

  5. Effect of fluoride, chloride, bromide, and thiocynate on potentiometric titrations of iron(II)-tin(II) mixtures with cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Y.M.

    1980-07-31

    A two-step curve is expected in the potentiometric titration of Fe(II)-Sn(II) mixtures with Ce(IV) in H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Each end point should indicate the respective oxidation of Sn(II) and Fe(II). However, experimentally only one end point was found; it corresponded to the total oxidation of Sn(II) and Fe(II). When this oxidation-reduction reaction was carried out in the presence of Cl/sup -/, the theoretical behavior was observed. The present study was done to ascertain if monovalent anions other than Cl/sup -/ have a similar effect on this oxidation-reduction system. The monovalent species F/sup -/, Br/sup -/, and SCN/sup -/ were selected for this study, and the results indicate that each affects the rate of reaction relative to the ease of oxidation of the individual ions.

  6. Clinical observation of the therapeutic effects of pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    WU, FENG-PENG; WANG, JUN; WANG, HUI; LI, NA; GUO, YIN; CHENG, YUN-JIE; LIU, QING; YANG, XIANG-RAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and side-effects of preventive treatment with pegylated recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (PEG-rhG-CSF) on concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia and to provide a rational basis for its clinical application. A total of 114 patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy-induced grade IV neutropenia were enrolled. A randomized approach was used to divide the patients into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group included three subgroups, namely a P-50 group, P-100 group and P + R group. The P-50 group had 42 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P-100 group had 30 cases, which received a single 100-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF. The P + R group comprised 22 cases, which were given a single 50-μg/kg subcutaneous injection of PEG-rhG-CSF and rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day; when the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) was ≥2.0×109/l, the administration of rhG-CSF was stopped. The control group (RC group) comprised 20 patients, who received rhG-CSF 5 μg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection until the ANC was ≥2.0×109/l. Changes in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values over time, the neutropenic symptom remission time and incidence of adverse drug reactions were analyzed statistically in each group of patients. In the experimental group, the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values were significantly higher than those in the control group; the clinical effects began 12–24 h after treatment in the experimental group, and indicated that the treatment improved neutropenia in ~48 h after treatment. There was no significant difference in the neutrophil proliferation rate and ANC values between the P-50 and P+R groups. In the experimental group, the remission time of neutropenia-induced fever and muscle pain after administration was significantly shorter than that in the control group

  7. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  8. Alternate Assessments as One Measure of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Jacqueline F.; Kleinert, Harold L.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Gong, Brian; Quenemoen, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) flexibility requires states to develop and implement teacher effectiveness measures that consider student assessment results, including assessment results for students with disabilities participating in general and alternate assessments. We describe how alternate assessment results for students with…

  9. The Effect of Assessment of Process after Receiving Teacher Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruegg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the effect of assessing both process and product compared to assessing written products alone. Two groups of students received teacher feedback over a one-year period. One group was assessed on their revisions in addition to the quality of final drafts, while a second group was assessed on the quality of final…

  10. Effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities: An Update, The

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    Describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on SO2 emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. It updates and expands the EIA report, Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  11. Current Knowledge and Projection on Assessing the Effectiveness of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlansky, Jesse

    This discussion of methods used to assess the effectiveness of training for U.S. Army personnel identifies various types of training, describes methods currently used, and suggests ways of improving the assessment process. The methodology and results of assessments of effectiveness, including the costs associated with the level of performance, are…

  12. Effects of pH and fulvic acids concentration on the stability of fulvic acids--cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticle complexes.

    PubMed

    Oriekhova, Olena; Stoll, Serge

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles has been first investigated at different pH conditions. The point of zero charge was determined as well as the stability domains using dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. A baseline hydrodynamic diameter of 180 nm was obtained indicating that individual CeO2 nanoparticles are forming small aggregates. Then we analyzed the particle behavior at variable concentrations of fulvic acids for three different pH-electrostatic scenarios corresponding to positive, neutral and negative CeO2 surface charges. The presence of fulvic acids was found to play a key role on the CeO2 stability via the formation of electrostatic complexes. It was shown that a small amount of fulvic acids (2 mg L(-1)), representative of environmental fresh water concentrations, is sufficient to stabilize CeO2 nanoparticles (50 mg L(-1)). When electrostatic complexes are formed between negatively charged FAs and positively charged CeO2 NPs the stability of such complexes is obtained with time (up to 7 weeks) as well as in pH changing conditions. Based on zeta potential variations we also found that the fulvic acids are changing the CeO2 acid-base surface properties. Obtained results presented here constitute an important outcome in the domain of risk assessment, transformation and removal of engineered nanomaterials released into the environment. PMID:26347935

  13. AN EXPERIMENT IN BASIC AIRBORNE ELECTRONICS TRAINING, PART IV-- EFFECT OF REDUCTION IN TRAINING TIME ON FLEET PERFORMANCE. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, ROBERT O.; AND OTHERS

    THREE PRECEDING REPORTS PRESENTED THE EFFECTS OF SHORTENING TRAINING TIME IN AVIONICS FUNDAMENTALS AND AVIATION ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN (RADAR) TRAINING UPON THE FINAL COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION IN THESE COURSES AND UPON PERFORMANCE IN A SUBSEQUENT EQUIPMENT COURSE. THIS REPORT COMPARES THE ON THE JOB PERFORMANCE OF GRADUATES FROM FOUR GROUPS…

  14. Introduction to Psychology and Leadership. Part Four, Achieving Effective Communication. Segments V, VI, & VII, Volume IV-B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Learning Corp., Annapolis, MD.

    The fourth volume of the introduction to psychology and leadership course (see the final reports which summarize the development project, EM 010 418, EM 010 419, and EM 010 484) concentrates on achieving effective communication. It is a self-instructional text with audiotape and intrinsically programed sections. EM 010 427 and EM 010 426 are the…

  15. Computer-Managed Instruction in the Navy: IV. The Effects of Test Item Format on Learning and Knowledge Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Kathleen A.; And Others

    The relative effectiveness of multiple-choice (MC) and constructed-response (CR) test formats in computer-managed instruction (CMI) were compared using four test groups of 30 trainees each who were assigned nonsystematically from the basics course at the Propulsion Engineering School, Great Lakes Naval Training Center. Group A took module tests in…

  16. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  17. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  18. The PLATO IV Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based instructional system consists of a large scale centrally located CDC 6400 computer and a large number of remote student terminals. This is a brief and general description of the proposed input/output hardware necessary to interface the student terminals with the computer's central processing unit (CPU) using available…

  19. Assessment for Learning: Effects and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flórez, María Teresa; Sammons, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The idea that schools can impact positively on student outcomes is a crucial driver in the rise of interest in school improvement research and practice. This review focuses on assessment for learning. Assessment for learning (AfL)--where the first priority is to promote learning--is a key means of initiating improvement. This review proposes that…

  20. Effects of vanadium (III, IV, V)-chlorodipicolinate on glycolysis and antioxidant status in the liver of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingxia; Chen, Deliang; Zhang, Fang; Willsky, Gail R; Crans, Debbie C; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-07-01

    Vanadium compounds exert various insulin-mimetic and anti-diabetic effects both in vitro and in vivo. Vanadium(III, IV, V)-chlorodipicolinate (Vdipic-Cl) compounds, including H[V(III)(dipic-Cl)2]·5H2O (V3dipic-Cl), V(IV)O(dipic-Cl)(H2O)2 (V4dipic-Cl) and K[V(V)O2(dipic-Cl)] (V5dipic-Cl), were synthesized with the indicated oxidation states. The present study was conducted to investigate if chemical valence and anti-oxidation effects of vanadium compounds are involved in the anti-diabetic effects observed in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats treated with these vanadium compounds. V3dipic-Cl, V4dipic-Cl, V5dipic-Cl, inorganic vanadium salts vanadyl sulfate (VOSO4) or sodium metavanadate (NaVO3) were orally administered in drinking water (50 μgV/ml) to STZ-induced diabetic rats for 28 days. The results showed that Vdipic-Cl treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, as well as increased hepatic glycogen synthesis in diabetic rats. The mRNA levels of key glycolytic enzymes in liver, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucokinase (GK), and L-pyruvate kinase (L-PK) altered in diabetic animals were significantly restored towards normal values by treatment with some of the vanadium compounds. Moreover, the diabetes elevated activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in serum were significantly decreased after treatment with Vdipic-Cl complexes. Furthermore, treatment of diabetic rats with V4dipic-Cl and V5dipic-Cl compounds significantly reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) production and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities. These data suggest that vanadium compounds with the indicated chemical valence promote glycogen synthesis and recover suppressed glycolysis in the liver of diabetic rats due to their capacity to reduce oxidative stress by stimulating antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24747360

  1. EFFECT OF CHLORIDE AND SULFATE CONCENTRATION ON PROBABLITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR LIQUID WASTE TANKS- PART IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2012-08-23

    A series of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests was performed on samples of A537 carbon steel in support of a probability-based approach to evaluate the effect of chloride and sulfate on corrosion susceptibility. Testing solutions were chosen to build off previous experimental results from FY07, FY08, FY09 and FY10 to systemically evaluate the influence of the secondary aggressive species, chloride, and sulfate. The FY11 results suggest that evaluating the combined effect of all aggressive species, nitrate, chloride, and sulfate, provides a consistent response for determining corrosion susceptibility. The results of this work emphasize the importance for not only nitrate concentration limits, but also chloride and sulfate concentration limits as well.

  2. The effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 on electric utilities: An update

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report presents data and analyses related to Phase I implementation of the Clean Air Act Amendment by electric utilities. It describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on sulfur dioxide emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. The first year of Phase I demonstrated that the market-based sulfur dioxide emissions control system could achieve significant reductions in emissions at lower than expected costs. Some utilities reduced aggregate emissions below legal requirements due to economic incentives; other utilities purchased additional allowances to avoid noncompliance. More than half of the utilities switched to or blended with lower sulfur coal, due to price reductions in the coal market which were partially due to the allowance trading program. 21 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. Enterotoxigenic intestinal bacteria in tropical sprue. IV. Effect of linoleic acid on growth interrelationships of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, M J; Klipstein, F A

    1975-11-01

    The factors responsible for colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic coliform bacteria in Puerto Ricans with tropical sprue are unknown, but epidemiological observations have suggested that they may be related to an increased dietary intake of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid, which is known to exert an inhibitory effect on the growth of gram-positive organisms that normally comprise the flora of the small intestine. We have examined, by using a glucose-limited continuous-culture system, what effect this fatty acid exerts on the growth relationships of enteric gram-positive and coliform bacteria. In this system, colonization by an invading strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae was prevented by the presence of an established culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus, principally by virtue of a lowered pH of the medium that was incompatible with Klebsiella growth. However, when the population density of L. acidophilus was reduced by the presence of a sufficient concentration of linoleic acid, the invading K. pneumoniae successfully colonized the system and, once established, suppressed the growth of L. acidophilus. These observations indicate that, under the conditions of our chemostat, gram-positive enteric bacteria suppress coliform growth and that this effect is reversible by the presence of linoleic acid. It remains to be established, however, what pertinence these in vitro observations have to conditions within the intestinal tract of persons living in the tropics. PMID:811564

  4. Agreement for depression diagnosis between DSM-IV-TR criteria, three validated scales, oncologist assessment, and psychiatric clinical interview in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhondali, Wadih; Freyer, Gilles; Adam, Virginie; Filbet, Marilène; Derzelle, Martine; Abgrall-Barbry, Gaelle; Bourcelot, Sophie; Machavoine, Jean-Louis; Chomat-Neyraud, Muriel; Gisserot, Olivier; Largillier, Rémi; Le Rol, Annick; Priou, Frank; Saltel, Pierre; Falandry, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression, a major outcome in cancer patients, is often evaluated by physicians relying on their clinical impressions rather than patient self-report. Our aim was to assess agreement between patient self-reported depression, oncologist assessment (OA), and psychiatric clinical interview (PCI) in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC). Methods This analysis was a secondary endpoint of the Elderly Women AOC Trial 3 (EWOT3), designed to assess the impact of geriatric covariates, notably depression, on survival in patients older than 70 years of age. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-30 (GDS), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, the distress thermometer, the mood thermometer, and OA. The interview guide for PCI was constructed from three validated scales: the GDS, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, revised (DSM) criteria for depression were used as a gold standard. Results Out of 109 patients enrolled at 21 centers, 99 (91%) completed all the assessments. Patient characteristics were: mean age 78, performance status ≥2: 47 (47%). Thirty six patients (36%) were identified as depressed by the PCI versus 15 (15%) identified by DSM. We found moderate agreement for depression identification between DSM and GDS (κ=0.508) and PCI (κ=0.431) and high agreement with MADRS (κ=0.663). We found low or no agreement between DSM with the other assessment strategies, including OA (κ=−0.043). Identification according to OA (yes/no) resulted in a false-negative rate of 87%. As a screening tool, GDS had the best sensitivity and specificity (94% and 80%, respectively). Conclusion The use of validated tools, such as GDS, and collaboration between psychologists and oncologists are warranted to better identify emotional disorders in elderly women with AOC. PMID:26203235

  5. Control of melanoma cell invasion by type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Sylvie; Brassart, Bertrand; Ramont, Laurent; Maquart, François-Xavier; Monboisse, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from diseases of the skin. This review summarizes the data from the literature and our laboratory addressing the effects of type IV collagen on melanoma progression. Many different sequences from type IV collagen promote melanoma cell adhesion, migration and invasion. The triple helical conformation of the collagenous domain plays a critical role in some of these interactions. However, recent studies from our group demonstrated that a sequence from the alpha3(IV) NC1 domain inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MMP production and activation. Peptide sequences from the alpha1(IV), alpha2(IV) and alpha3(IV) chains named arresten, canstatin and tumstatin, respectively were shown to inhibit angiogenesis. Further investigations regarding the inhibitory effects of the alpha(IV) NC1 domains will have a paramount relevance for the design of efficient strategies to limit melanoma development. PMID:15936594

  6. Optimizing IV and V for Mature Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhman, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    NASA is intending for its future software development agencies to have at least a Level 3 rating in the Carnegie Mellon University Capability Maturity Model (CMM). The CMM has built-in Verification and Validation (V&V) processes that support higher software quality. Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) of software developed by mature agencies can be therefore more effective than for software developed by less mature organizations. How is Independent V&V different with respect to the maturity of an organization? Knowing a priori the maturity of an organization's processes, how can IV&V planners better identify areas of need choose IV&V activities, etc? The objective of this research is to provide a complementary set of guidelines and criteria to assist the planning of IV&V activities on a project using a priori knowledge of the measurable levels of maturity of the organization developing the software.

  7. Silk fibroin/gelatin electrospun nanofibrous dressing functionalized with astragaloside IV induces healing and anti-scar effects on burn wound.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ying-Hui; Peng, Li-Hua; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xi; Xiong, Jie; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-02-20

    Functional wound dressing has provided new challenges for researchers who focus on burn to improve skin graft quality, reduce scarring, and develop a pluristratified dermal or epidermal construct of a burn wound. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a silk fibroin/gelatin (SF/GT) electrospun nanofibrous dressing loaded with astragaloside IV (AS) on deep partial-thickness burn wound. AS-loaded SF/GT-blended nanofibrous dressing was prepared by electrospinning nanotechnology. The optimal ratio (25:75) of silk fibroin to gelatin was further optimized by evaluating ATR-FTIR characteristics, mechanical properties, porosity, swelling rate, degradation, and release profile of the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing. In contrast to the blank control, the AS-loaded SF/GT nanofibrous dressing promoted cell adhesion and proliferation with good biocompatibility in vitro (p<0.01). This dressing also accelerated wound healing and inhibited scar formation in vivo by stimulating wound closure (p<0.05), increasing angiogenesis, regulating newly formed types of collagen, and improving collagen organization. These results showed that SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is a promising topical drug delivery system. Furthermore, AS-functionalized SF/GT nanofibrous dressing is an excellent topical therapeutic that could be applied to promote healing and elicit anti-scar effects on partial-thickness burn wound. PMID:25556053

  8. Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistors Possessing Step Functional I-V Curves Caused by the Punch Through between Drain and Inversion Layer of the Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Shinji; Yamanouchi, Kazuhiko; Tachibana, Yukio

    1992-02-01

    Through measurements of an Al gate p-channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) with a gap between the gate and drain, the behavior of the minority carrier in the depletion layer is clarified. The turn-on drain voltage depends upon the length and the density of impurity on the punch-through area. That is, Vd{=}-4 V for Lgap{=}0.5 μm in 3˜5 Ω\\cdotcm n-Si wafer and Vd{=}-3 V for Lgap{=}2.0 μm in 120˜200 Ω\\cdotcm n-Si wafer. The abrupt step functional I-V curve is revealed under the condition of low gate voltage. There are surface effects by which the higher the gate voltage, the lower the turn-on voltage of the drain becomes. The hole mobility in the depletion layer made from lightly doped < 111> wafer abruptly decreases when the temperature is lowered to below 20 K and the turn-on voltage on the step function MOSFET increases remarkably at 4.2 K.

  9. Communication Arts, Grades 3, 7, and 11. IV: Make Decisions and Act as Responsible Members of Society. Assessment Annotations for the Curriculum Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City. Div. of Instruction.

    This document includes the left-hand column ("What all Students Should Know") and the center column ("What All Students Should Be Able To Do") from "Missouri's Framework for Curriculum Development in Communication Arts K-12." Next to these two columns has been added a column which includes assessment notes for those grade levels which will be…

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Motor and Sensory/Motor Acquisition in Handicapped and Nonhandicapped Infants and Young Children. Volume IV: Application of the Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guess, Doug; And Others

    Three studies that applied quantitative procedures to measure motor and sensory/motor acquisition among handicapped and nonhandicapped infants and children are presented. In addition, a study concerning the replication of the quantitative procedures for assessing rolling behavior is described in a fourth article. The first study, by C. Janssen,…

  11. The Effects of Performance-Based Assessment Criteria on Student Performance and Self-Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based…

  12. New therapeutic approach to Tourette Syndrome in children based on a randomized placebo-controlled double-blind phase IV study of the effectiveness and safety of magnesium and vitamin B6

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Lopez, Rafael; Perea-Milla, Emilio; Garcia, Cesar Ruiz; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Romero-Gonzalez, Julio; Moreno, Jose L; Faus, Vicente; Aguas, Guadalupe del Castillo; Diaz, Juan C Ramos

    2009-01-01

    Background Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurological condition presenting chronic motor and phonic tics, and important degree of comorbidity. Considered an uncommon illness, it first becomes apparent during childhood. Current standard treatment only achieves partial control of the condition, and provokes frequent, and sometimes severe, side effects. Methods and design Main aim: To show that, with respect to placebo treatment, the combination of 0.5 mEq/Kg magnesium and 2 mg/Kg vitamin B6 reduces motor and phonic tics and incapacity in cases of exacerbated TS among children aged 7–14 years, as measured on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS). Secondary aims: Assess the safety of the treatment. Describe metabolic changes revealed by PET. Measure the impact of the experimental treatment on family life. Methodology Randomized, blinded clinical trials. Phase IV study (new proposal for treatment with magnesium and vitamin B6). Scope: children in the geographic area of the study group. Recruitment of subjects: to include patients diagnosed with TS, in accordance with DSM-IV criteria (307.23), during a period of exacerbation, and provided none of the exclusion criteria are met. Instrumentation: clinical data and the YGTSS score will be obtained at the outset of a period of exacerbation (t0). The examinations will be made after 15 (t1), 30 (t2), 60 (t3) and 90 days (t4). PET will be performed at the t0 and t4. We evaluated decrease in the overall score (t0, t1, t2, t3, t4), PET variations, and impact made by the treatment on the patient's life (Psychological General Well-Being Index). Discussion Few clinical trials have been carried out on children with TS, but they are necessary, as current treatment possibilities are insufficient and often provoke side effects. The difficulty of dealing with an uncommon illness makes designing such a study all the more complicated. The present study seeks to overcome possible methodological problems by implementing a prior, phase

  13. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. IV - Results of failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    Potassium hydroxide concentration effects on the cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test on ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test, which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80-percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells, and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  14. Behavioral studies with anxiolytic drugs. IV. Serotonergic involvement in the effects of buspirone on punished behavior of pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Witkin, J.M.; Mansbach, R.S.; Barrett, J.E.; Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Weissman, B.

    1987-12-01

    Interactions of the nonbenzodiazepine anxiolytic, buspirone, with serotonin (5-HT) were studied using behavioral and neurochemical procedures. Punished responding was studied in pigeons as this behavior is a generally acknowledged preclinical predictor of anxiolytic activity and because buspirone increases punished responding of pigeons with greater potency and efficacy than in other species. Keypeck responses were maintained under either fixed-interval or fixed-ratio schedules of food presentation; every 30th response produced a brief electric shock and suppressed responding (punishment). Buspirone (0.1-5.6 mg/kg i.m.) produced dose-related increases in punished responding which reached a maximum at 1 mg/kg. A serotonin agonist, MK-212 (0.01 mg/kg), antagonized whereas the 5-HT antagonist, cyproheptadine (0.01 mg/kg), potentiated the effects of buspirone without having behavioral effects of their own. The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT binding in pigeon brain membranes were similar to results reported in mammalian brain. Neither buspirone, MJ-13805 (gepirone, a related analog), nor MJ-13653 (a buspirone metabolite), significantly affected (/sup 3/H)-5-HT binding and none of the compounds appreciably inhibited uptake of (/sup 3/H)-5-HT into pigeon cerebral synaptosomes. Hill coefficients significantly less than unity for all drugs except 5-HT suggested multiple serotonergic binding sites for buspirone and analogs. Buspirone and MJ-13805 (1 nM) inhibited (/sup 3/H)ketanserin binding (a measure of 5-HT2 binding sites) in pigeon cerebrum with Ki values above 10(-6) M. The number of (/sup 3/H)ketanserin binding sites was estimated to be 109 fmol/mg of protein in pigeon cerebrum compared to 400 fmol/mg of protein in rat cerebrum.

  15. Comprehensive summary--Predict-IV: A systems toxicology approach to improve pharmaceutical drug safety testing.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefan O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Jennings, Paul; Testai, Emanuela; Bois, Frederic

    2015-12-25

    This special issue of Toxicology in Vitro is dedicated to disseminating the results of the EU-funded collaborative project "Profiling the toxicity of new drugs: a non animal-based approach integrating toxicodynamics and biokinetics" (Predict-IV; Grant 202222). The project's overall aim was to develop strategies to improve the assessment of drug safety in the early stage of development and late discovery phase, by an intelligent combination of non animal-based test systems, cell biology, mechanistic toxicology and in silico modeling, in a rapid and cost effective manner. This overview introduces the scope and overall achievements of Predict-IV. PMID:25450741

  16. [A case of stage IV colon cancer effectively treated with tegafur uracil/calcium folinate in a patient on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kobayashi, Michiya; Maeda, Hiromichi; Takeshita, Atsunori

    2012-07-01

    A 61-year-old man on hemodialysis due to chronic renal failure caused by diabetes mellitus was diagnosed as having ascending colon cancer with multiple liver metastases. Colonoscopy revealed a Type 2 tumor located in the ascending colon. Abdominal CT showed hepatic tumors in S8 measuring 8×7 cm and in S6 measuring 5×4 cm, with a number of small tumors in the other sites. In order to prevent a hemorrhage from the colonic tumor, laparoscope-assisted right colectomy was performed. Seventeen days after the operation, oral administration of tegafur uracil(300mg/body/day)and calcium folinate(75mg/body/day)was initiated for the treatment of hepatic metastases. After three courses of treatment, size reduction of the hepatic metastases(the S8 4×3. 5 cm and the S6 2. 5×2. 5 cm)was obtained. Although nine months with seven courses of chemotherapy had passed without significant side effects, the size of hepatic metastases increased. Currently, therefore, CPT-11 and cetuximab are being administered as second-line treatment. PMID:22790059

  17. Children with chronic lung diseases have cognitive dysfunction as assessed by event-related potential (auditory P300) and Stanford-Binet IQ (SB-IV) test.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Abd Elmonaem, Mahmoud Tarek; Khalil, Lobna Hamed; Goda, Mona Hamdy; Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Ramzy, Mourad Alfy

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many clinico-pathological entities with risk of adverse impact of chronic or intermittent hypoxia. So far, few researchers have investigated the cognitive function in these children, and the role of auditory P300 in the assessment of their cognitive function has not been investigated yet. This study was designed to assess the cognitive functions among schoolchildren with different chronic pulmonary diseases using both auditory P300 and Stanford-Binet test. This cross-sectional study included 40 school-aged children who were suffering from chronic chest troubles other than asthma and 30 healthy children of similar age, gender and socioeconomic state as a control group. All subjects were evaluated through clinical examination, radiological evaluation and spirometry. Audiological evaluation included (basic otological examination, pure-tone, speech audiometry and immittancemetry). Cognitive function was assessed by auditory P300 and psychological evaluation using Stanford-Binet test (4th edition). Children with chronic lung diseases had significantly lower anthropometric measures compared to healthy controls. They had statistically significant lower IQ scores and delayed P300 latencies denoting lower cognitive abilities. Cognitive dysfunction correlated to severity of disease. P300 latencies were prolonged among hypoxic patients. Cognitive deficits in children with different chronic lung diseases were best detected using both Stanford-Binet test and auditory P300. P300 is an easy objective tool. P300 is affected early with hypoxia and could alarm subtle cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27075686

  18. Effects of nutritional supplementation on the appetite and energy intake responses to IV cholecystokinin in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kamilia; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Horowitz, Michael; Wishart, Judith M; Chapman, Ian M

    2010-12-01

    Human aging is associated with a reduction in appetite and food intake. Increased activity of the satiety hormone, cholecystokinin (CCK), may be partly responsible. This study aimed to determine whether an increase in fat and energy intake modifies the suppressive effects of CCK-8 on appetite and energy intake. Fourteen healthy older adults completed three separate dietary periods, a 14-day and a 7-day normal diet (ND; 8272 ± 480 kJ/day; 35% fat), and a 14-day high-fat diet (HFD; 11,642 ± 414 kJ/day; 43% fat), in randomised order. Immediately following each diet, subjects received, in single-blinded fashion, a 30-min intravenous infusion of either CCK-8 (1.5 ng/kg/min) (ND-CCK, HFD-CCK) or 0.9% saline (ND-SAL), the latter following only ND. Plasma CCK concentrations, appetite responses and energy intake at a buffet meal were determined. Energy intake at the buffet meal was higher on the ND-SAL study day (3349 ± 224 kJ), when compared with either ND-CCK (3023 ± 317 kJ) or HFD-CCK (2905 ± 316 kJ). The suppression of energy intake by CCK-8 infusion did not differ between the two diets. We conclude that suppression of energy intake by exogenous CCK-8 does not appear to be attenuated by incorporation of supplemental high-energy, high-fat drinks in the diet of healthy older adults. PMID:20800632

  19. Effects of i.v. amino acids on human splanchnic and whole body oxygen consumption, blood flow, and blood temperatures.

    PubMed

    Brundin, T; Wahren, J

    1994-03-01

    The thermic effect of amino acid administration was examined in healthy subjects. Pulmonary and splanchnic oxygen uptake, cardiac output, splanchnic blood flow, and blood temperatures were measured in eight healthy men before and during 2.5 h of intravenous infusion of 600 kJ of a mixture of 19 amino acids. Indirect calorimetry and catheter techniques were used, including thermometry in arterial and a hepatic venous blood. During the infusion, pulmonary oxygen uptake rose progressively from a basal value of 269 +/- 6 to 321 +/- 8 ml/min after 2.5 h. The splanchnic oxygen consumption increased from a basal level of 64 +/- 4 to a peak value of 91 +/- 7 ml/min after 2 h of infusion. The 2.5 h average splanchnic proportion of the amino acid-induced whole body thermogenesis was 51 +/- 11%. Cardiac output increased from 6.2 +/- 0.3 in the basal state to 7.3 +/- 0.4 l/min, whereas the splanchnic blood flow remained unchanged during the infusion period. The arteriohepatic venous oxygen difference increased from 51 +/- 4 in the basal state to 65 +/- 5 ml/l after 2 h of amino acid infusion. The blood temperature rose by approximately 0.25 degrees C during the amino acid infusion, reflecting an increased heat accumulation in the body. It is concluded that the splanchnic tissues account for approximately one-half of the amino acid-induced whole body thermogenesis, that amino acid infusion augments blood flow in the extrasplanchnic but not in the splanchnic tissues, and stimulates the accumulation of heat in the body most likely via a resetting of the central thermosensors. PMID:8166259

  20. A model of the pre-assessment learning effects of summative assessment in medical education.

    PubMed

    Cilliers, Francois J; Schuwirth, Lambert W T; Herman, Nicoline; Adendorff, Hanelie J; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2012-03-01

    It has become axiomatic that assessment impacts powerfully on student learning. However, surprisingly little research has been published emanating from authentic higher education settings about the nature and mechanism of the pre-assessment learning effects of summative assessment. Less still emanates from health sciences education settings. This study explored the pre-assessment learning effects of summative assessment in theoretical modules by exploring the variables at play in a multifaceted assessment system and the relationships between them. Using a grounded theory strategy, in-depth interviews were conducted with individual medical students and analyzed qualitatively. Respondents' learning was influenced by task demands and system design. Assessment impacted on respondents' cognitive processing activities and metacognitive regulation activities. Individually, our findings confirm findings from other studies in disparate non-medical settings and identify some new factors at play in this setting. Taken together, findings from this study provide, for the first time, some insight into how a whole assessment system influences student learning over time in a medical education setting. The findings from this authentic and complex setting paint a nuanced picture of how intricate and multifaceted interactions between various factors in an assessment system interact to influence student learning. A model linking the sources, mechanism and consequences of the pre-assessment learning effects of summative assessment is proposed that could help enhance the use of summative assessment as a tool to augment learning. PMID:21461880

  1. Effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-06-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr protein kinase family. It is regulated by the calcium-calmodulin dependent signal through a secondary messenger, Ca(2+), which leads to the activation of its autoinhibited form. The over-expression and mutation in CAMKIV as well as change in Ca(2+) concentration is often associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. We have successfully cloned, expressed, and purified a functionally active kinase domain of human CAMKIV. To observe the effect of different pH conditions on the structural and functional properties of CAMKIV, we have used spectroscopic techniques such as circular diachroism (CD) absorbance and fluorescence. We have observed that within the pH range 5.0-11.5, CAMKIV maintained both its secondary and tertiary structures, along with its function, whereas significant aggregation was observed at acidic pH (2.0-4.5). We have also performed ATPase activity assays under different pH conditions and found a significant correlation between the structure and enzymatic activities of CAMKIV. In-silico validations were further carried out by modeling the 3-dimensional structure of CAMKIV and then subjecting it to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand its conformational behavior in explicit water conditions. A strong correlation between spectroscopic observations and the output of molecular dynamics simulation was observed for CAMKIV. PMID:27032767

  2. Fabrication of a Core-Shell-Type Photocatalyst via Photodeposition of Group IV and V Transition Metal Oxyhydroxides: An Effective Surface Modification Method for Overall Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Takata, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Chengsi; Nakabayashi, Mamiko; Shibata, Naoya; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    The design of optimal surface structures for photocatalysts is a key to efficient overall water splitting into H2 and O2. A unique surface modification method was devised for a photocatalyst to effectively promote overall water splitting. Photodeposition of amorphous oxyhydroxides of group IV and V transition metals (Ti, Nb, Ta) over a semiconductor photocatalyst from corresponding water-soluble metal peroxide complexes was examined. In this method, amorphous oxyhydroxide covered the whole surface of the photocatalyst particles, creating a core-shell structure. The water splitting behavior of the novel core-shell-type photocatalyst in relation to the permeation behavior of the coating layer was investigated in detail. Overall water splitting proceeded successfully after the photodeposition, owing to the prevention of the reverse reaction. The photodeposited oxyhydroxide layers were found to function as molecular sieves, selectively filtering reactant and product molecules. By exploiting the selective permeability of the coating layer, redox reactions on the photocatalyst surface could be suitably controlled, which resulted in successful overall water splitting. PMID:26161678

  3. ACIDIC DEPOSITION PHENOMENON AND ITS EFFECTS: CRITICAL ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Assessment Document (CAD) is a summary, integration, and interpretation of the current scientific understanding of acidic deposition. It is firmly based upon The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Asse...

  4. Expanding the Ecological Validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV with the Texas Functional Living Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drozdick, Lisa Whipple; Cullum, C. Munro

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The…

  5. Changes of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in the penumbra area after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury and effects of astragaloside IV on rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y L; Chen, C F; Wang, A W; Feng, Y B; Cheng, H X; Zhang, W W; Xin, W

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in the penumbra after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury, and examined the effects of astragaloside IV (AST) on PBRs in rats. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a sham operation group, a model group, and three AST treatment groups. Cerebral ischemic models were induced by the clue-blocked method. Neurological deficits were examined. The animals were sacrificed after 2 h of ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion, and mitochondria from the penumbra were purified. PBR density (Bmax) and affinity were measured by radioligand assays. Mitochondrial [(3)H]PK11195 binding was correlated with neurological deficits in rats. Compared to the model group, the 10 mg/kg AST group, 40 mg/kg AST group, and 100 mg/kg AST group had fewer neurological deficits. The effects in the 40 mg/ kg group did not significantly differ from the effects in the 100 mg/ kg group. Compared to the model group, the 10 mg/kg AST group, 40 mg/kg group, and 100 mg/kg group had a decreased Bmax in the penumbra. The Bmax decreased in the 40 mg/kg AST group and in the 100 mg/kg AST group compared with the 10 mg/kg group. The Bmax and neurological deficits in the 40 mg/kg did not significantly differ from those in the 100 mg/kg group. By contrast, the AST-treated rats showed no significant changes in the binding parameter equilibrium dissociation constant compared with those in the sham operation group and the model group. AST protects ischemic brain tissue by inhibiting PBR expression after cerebral ischemia. PMID:25729960

  6. A Model for Effectively Assessing Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohia, Uche O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a model proven to be effective for assessing and documenting evidence of student learning outcomes. Specifically, it will share a model, F.A.M.O.U.S. Copyright ©2008, which is an acronym exemplifying six effective steps for complying with institutional accountability and eternal assessment requirements proscribed by the…

  7. A sputnik IV saga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    2009-12-01

    The Sputnik IV launch occurred on May 15, 1960. On May 19, an attempt to deorbit a 'space cabin' failed and the cabin went into a higher orbit. The orbit of the cabin was monitored and Moonwatch volunteer satellite tracking teams were alerted to watch for the vehicle demise. On September 5, 1962, several team members from Milwaukee, Wisconsin made observations starting at 4:49 a.m. of a fireball following the predicted orbit of Sputnik IV. Requests went out to report any objects found under the fireball path. An early morning police patrol in Manitowoc had noticed a metal object on a street and had moved it to the curb. Later the officers recovered the object and had it dropped off at the Milwaukee Journal. The Moonwarch team got the object and reported the situation to Moonwatch Headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. A team member flew to Cambridge with the object. It was a solid, 9.49 kg piece of steel with a slag-like layer attached to it. Subsequent analyses showed that it contained radioactive nuclei produced by cosmic ray exposure in space. The scientists at the Observatory quickly recognized that measurements of its induced radioactivity could serve as a calibration for similar measurements of recently fallen nickel-iron meteorites. Concurrently, the Observatory directorate informed government agencies that a fragment from Sputnik IV had been recovered. Coincidently, a debate in the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space involved the issue of liability for damage caused by falling satellite fragments. On September 12, the Observatory delivered the bulk of the fragment to the US Delegation to the UN. Two days later, the fragment was used by US Ambassador Francis Plimpton as an exhibit that the time had come to agree on liability for damage from satellite debris. He offered the Sputnik IV fragment to USSR Ambassador P.D. Morozov, who refused the offer. On October 23, Drs. Alla Massevitch and E.K. Federov of the USSR visited the

  8. Reactivity of [{l{underscore}brace}Mn{sup 4}(salpn){r{underscore}brace}{sub 2}({micro}-O,{micro}-OCH{sub 3})]{sup +} and [{l{underscore}brace}Mn{sup IV}(salpn){r{underscore}brace}{sub 2}({micro}-O,{micro}-OH)]{sup +}: Effects of proton liability and hydrogen bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, M.J.; Law, N.A.; Stemmler, T.L.; Kampf, J.W.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1999-10-18

    It was previously shown that the addition of 1 equiv of a strong acid to [Mn{sup IV}(salpn)({micro}-O)]{sub 2}, 1, generates the oxo/hydroxo complex [{l{underscore}brace}Mn{sup IV}(salpn){r{underscore}brace}{sub 2}({micro}-O,{micro}-OH)](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}), 2, which emphasized the basicity of the {micro}{sub 2}-O{sup 2{minus}} units in the [Mn{sup IV}({micro}-O)]{sub 2} dimers. The authors now demonstrate the inherent nucleophilicity of those {micro}{sub 2}-O{sup 2{minus}} units by showing that the addition of methyl triflate to 1 results in formation of the oxo/methoxo-bridged Mn{sup IV} dimer [{l{underscore}brace}Mn{sup IV}(salph){r{underscore}brace}{sub 2}({micro}-O,{micro}-OCH{sub 3})](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}), 3. EXAFS analysis of 3 demonstrates that alkylation of an oxo bridge results in the same structural modification of the [Mn{sup IV}({micro}-O)]{sub 2} core as an oxo bridge protonation. Electrochemical and spectroscopic comparisons of 3 to 2 indicate that 3 is a good electronic structure analogue for 2 without the complication of proton lability and hydrogen bonding. Indeed, 2 and 3 react nearly identically with hydrogen peroxide and with strong acids. In contrast, the products of their reactions with amines, acetate, and triphenylphosphine are dramatically different. The proton lability of 2 results in simple proton transfer, circumventing the slower redox reactions of these substrates with 3. Isotopic labeling, kinetic, and EPR-monitored radical trap studies lead to a proposed reduction-oxidation mechanistic scheme for the reactions of 3 with amines and triphenylphosphine. The Mn{sup III} product of this reaction, [Mn{sup III}(salpn)(Ph{sub 3}PO)](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}), was isolated and crystallographically characterized as a dimerized complex. The redox nature of the reactions is confirmed by trapping of a reduced Mn intermediate which is identified by EPR spectroscopy. Comparison of the reactions of 2 and 3 demonstrates the dramatic effect of proton

  9. Deciphering the effect of an oxovanadium(iv) complex with the flavonoid chrysin (VOChrys) on intracellular cell signalling pathways in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    León, Ignacio E; Díez, Paula; Etcheverry, Susana B; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium complexes were studied during recent years and considered as a representative of a new class of non-platinum metal antitumor agents in combination with their low toxicity. However, a few challenges still remain in the discovery of new molecular targets for these novel metal-based drugs. The study of cell signaling pathways related to vanadium drugs, which is highly critical for identifying specific targets that play an important role in the antitumor activity of vanadium compounds, is scarce. This research deals with the alterations in intracellular signaling pathways promoted by an oxovanadium(iv) complex with the flavonoid chrysin [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 (VOChrys) in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63). Herein we report for the first time the effect of [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 on the relative abundance of 224 proteins, which are involved in the most common intracellular pathways. Besides, full-length human recombinant (FAK and AKT1) kinases are produced using an in situ IVTT system and then we have evaluated the variation of relative tyrosine-phosphorylation levels caused by the [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 compound. The results of the differential protein expression levels reveal that several proteins such as PKB/AKT, PAK, DAPK, Cdk 4, 6 and 7, FADD, AP2, NAK, and JNK, among others, were altered. Moreover, cell signaling pathways related to the PTK2B, FAK, PKC families suggests an important role associated with the antitumor activity of [VO(chrysin)2EtOH]2 was demonstrated. Finally, the effect of this compound on in situ expressed FAK and AKT1 is validated by determining the phosphorylation level, which decreased in the former and increased in the latter. PMID:27175625

  10. Assessment of Carbon Fiber Electrical Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The risks associated with the use of carbon fiber composites in civil aircraft are discussed along with the need for protection of civil aircraft equipment from fire-released carbon fibers. The size and number of carbon fibers released in civil aircraft crash fires, the downwind dissemination of the fibers, their penetration into buildings and equipment, and the vulnerability of electrical/electronic equipment to damage by the fibers are assessed.

  11. Impact of the agricultural research service watershed assessment studies on the conservation effects assessment project cropland national assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA initiated the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) in 2002 to analyze societal and environmental benefits gained from the increased conservation program funding provided in the 2002 Farm Bill. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and...

  12. PMD IVS Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornatore, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    The main activities carried out at the PMD (Politecnico di Milano DIIAR) IVS Analysis Center during 2012 are briefly higlighted, and future plans for 2013 are sketched out. We principally continued to process European VLBI sessions using different approaches to evaluate possible differences due to various processing choices. Then VLBI solutions were also compared to the GPS ones as well as the ones calculated at co-located sites. Concerning the observational aspect, several tests were performed to identify the most suitable method to achieve the highest possible accuracy in the determination of GNSS (GLOBAL NAVIGATION SATELLITE SYSTEM) satellite positions using the VLBI technique.

  13. Can we effectively assess hyperactivity in schools?

    PubMed

    Bowers, A J

    1978-01-01

    All too often, restless, fidgety children who do not sit still or pay attention at school, and who may be disruptive and difficult to manage, are labelled 'hyperactive' by their teachers. The legitimacy of such a diagnosis is seldom challenged. Just what, though, does a child have to do to be hyperactive? This article sets out to review some of the measures which have been employed and to look, in particular, at their relevance in the assessment of activity levels within the classroom. PMID:737844

  14. A Training Package for Implementing the IEP Process in Wyoming. Volume IV. Compilation of Successful Training Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxworth-Mott, Anita; Moore, Caroline

    Volume IV of a four volume series offers strategies for implementing effective inservice workshops to train administrators, assessment personnel, and others involved in the development and implementation of individualized education programs (IEPs) for handicapped children in Wyoming. Part 1 addresses points often overlooked in delivering training,…

  15. The Design of the IGE Evaluation Project Phase IV Comparative Studies. Comparative Study of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    This paper outlines the design of two Comparative Studies of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IGE) Evaluation Project. More than 2,000 elementary schools in 25 states use the IGE system. The Evaluation Project was designed to gain a comprehensive view of the system's operation and effectiveness. Phase IV investigated pupil outcomes,…

  16. ASSESSING HIPPOCAMPAL CHANGES INDICATIVE OF NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subtle changes in cognitive function are often the earliest indication of neurotoxic effects in humans. The hippocampus is a large forebrain structure subserving specific kinds of information encoding and consolidation in humans and other animals. Because of it laminar structur...

  17. 78 FR 2390 - CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CSOLAR IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC, CSOLAR IV North, LLC v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint Take notice... IV South, LLC, Wistaria Ranch Solar, LLC, CSOLAR IV West, LLC and CSOLAR IV North, LLC...

  18. Developing and Assessing Beginning Teacher Effectiveness: The Potential of Performance Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Newton, Stephen P.; Wei, Ruth Chung

    2013-01-01

    The Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) is an authentic tool for evaluating prospective teachers by examining their abilities to plan, teach, assess, and reflect on instruction in actual classroom practice. The PACT seeks both to measure and develop teacher effectiveness, and this study of its predictive and consequential…

  19. Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness of Services Provided to Abused and Neglected Children and Their Families under Titles IV-A and IV-B. Volume I and Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Kenneth W.; And Others

    An evaluation system for measuring the cost effectiveness of protective services for abused and neglected children was developed and field tested. The system permits the collection and analysis of definitive, quantifiable data to determine: (1) which service agencies, individually, or as aggregated by states or regions, are most effective in…

  20. A Consultative Training Program: Collateral Effect of a Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucier, Kathleen H.

    2008-01-01

    This case study reveals a series of significant and effective changes that resulted from administering a needs assessment to managers working in a bank undergoing a major change in the organizational culture. The assessment changed not only the training objectives or the client organization, but also the training design. What originally began as a…

  1. Assessing Effectiveness of Nurture Groups in Northern Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Isabel; McClatchey, Kirstie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this small-scale study was to assess the effectiveness of nurture groups in Northern Scotland. Data were collected from children (N?=?19) and staff (N?=?5) from three nurture groups. Pre-and post-nurture group Boxall Profile information was also assessed for 33 children across two of the nurture groups. Analysis of the Boxall Profiles…

  2. Assessing the Effectiveness of Integrity Tests: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Iain; Bartram, Dave

    2002-01-01

    Applied a structured framework to the research literature to assess the general effectiveness of integrity tests as used to assess "honesty" in preemployment screening. In terms of acceptability, research has indicated that integrity tests are viewed neither positively nor negatively, but considerable debate remains about false positive rates and…

  3. Online Peer Assessment: Effects of Cognitive and Affective Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan; Law, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the effects of online peer assessment, in the form of peer grading and peer feedback, on students' learning. One hundred and eighty one high school students engaged in peer assessment via an online system--iLap. The number of grade-giving and grade-receiving experiences was examined and the peer feedback was coded according to…

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF WEATHERIZATION ON RESIDENTIAL RADON LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the effects of weatherization on residential radon levels. For this assessment, time-integrated radon measurements were taken for 30- to 45-day periods both before and after weatherization in 32 Retro-Tech homes, 28 advanced homes, and...

  5. The Effects of Portfolio Assessment on Writing of EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nezakatgoo, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the effect of portfolio assessment on final examination scores of EFL students' writing skill. To determine the impact of portfolio-based writing assessment 40 university students who enrolled in composition course were initially selected and divided randomly into two experimental and control…

  6. The Effects of Write Score Formative Assessment on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    In an "ex post facto" causal-comparative research design, this study investigated the effectiveness of a formative writing assessment program, Write Score, on increasing student writing achievement. Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP) reading language arts and writing scores from 2012 were utilized for this study. The…

  7. Assessing the Effects of Public Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorsen, Kathleen E.

    2003-01-01

    Pre/post meeting surveys of 181 participants in public land management meetings (51% response) determined that high-quality public participation in public agency meetings affects participants' beliefs in the effectiveness of those agencies. Positive associations were also found with tolerance for differences of opinion. (Contains 28 references.)…

  8. Assessing the Communications Effectiveness of Your School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Improving communications between administration and staff members is an urgent, ongoing need. Schools should adopt a communications philosophy in conjunction with continuing communication effectiveness. These evaluations must have clear and understandable objectives, mainly to pinpoint communication strengths and weaknesses. All essential…

  9. HEALTH EFFECTS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract - In this review, we will focus on the effects of arsenic (As) exposure from drinking water sources. The primary inorganic As species in water are arsenate (V) and/or arsenite (III); their proportions depend on the water's redox potential and pH. Many As contamination...

  10. Assessing Institutional Effectiveness: Issues, Methods, and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    This collection of 12 papers was presented at a 1987 conference at which speakers presented personal perspectives on institutional effectiveness. Papers are organized under three major headings: "Managing Quality: Methods and Outcomes,""Institutional Response," and "Special Issues." Titles include: (1) "Managing the Meaning of Institutional…

  11. Item Feature Effects in Evolution Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nehm, Ross H.; Ha, Minsu

    2011-01-01

    Despite concerted efforts by science educators to understand patterns of evolutionary reasoning in science students and teachers, the vast majority of evolution education studies have failed to carefully consider or control for item feature effects in knowledge measurement. Our study explores whether robust contextualization patterns emerge within…

  12. NONCARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF CHROMIUM: UPDATE TO HEALTH ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 1990 document updates the 1984 Health Assessment Document for Chromium by addressing issues regarding noncarcinogenic health effects of chromium: oxidation states and persistence of these states in the environment, sampling and analytical methodology to differentiate these o...

  13. Single track effects, Biostack and risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The scientific career of Prof. Bucker has spanned a very exciting period in the fledgling science of Space Radiation Biology. The capability for placing biological objects in space was developed, and the methods for properly packaging, retrieving and analyzing them were worked out. Meaningful results on the effects of radiation were obtained for the first time. In fact, many of the successful techniques and methodologies for handling biological samples were developed in Prof. Bucker's laboratories, as attested by the extensive Biostack program. He was the first to suggest and successfully carry out experiments in space directly aimed at measuring effects of single tracks of high-energy heavy galactic cosmic rays by specifically identifying whether or not the object had been hit by a heavy particle track. Because the "hit" frequencies of heavy galactic cosmic rays to cell nuclei in the bodies of space travelers will be low, it is expected that any effects to humans on the cellular level will be dominated by single-track cell traversals. This includes the most important generally recognized late effect of space radiation exposure: radiation-induced cancer. This paper addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single "hits" in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth's magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when "hit" by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore Bacillus subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground

  14. Single track effects, Biostack and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1994-01-01

    The scientific career of Prof. Bucker has spanned a very exciting period in the fledgling science of Space Radiation Biology. The capability for placing biological objects in space was developed, and the methods for properly packaging, retrieving and analyzing them were worked out. Meaningful results on the effects of radiation were obtained for the first time. In fact, many of the successful techniques and methodologies for handling biological samples were developed in Prof. Bucker's laboratories, as attested by the extensive Biostack program. He was the first to suggest and successfully carry out experiments in space directly aimed at measuring effects of single tracks of high-energy heavy galactic cosmic rays by specifically identifying whether or not the object had been hit by a heavy particle track. Because the "hit" frequencies of heavy galactic cosmic rays to cell nuclei in the bodies of space travelers will be low, it is expected that any effects to humans on the cellular level will be dominated by single-track cell traversals. This includes the most important generally recognized late effect of space radiation exposure: radiation-induced cancer. This paper addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single "hits" in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth's magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when "hit" by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore Bacillus subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground

  15. Evidence for a founder effect for the IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T mutation in the Fanconi anemia gene FACC in a Jewish population

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Kaporis, A.G.; Qian, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder defined by hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C(FACC) has been cloned. Two common mutations, IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG, and several rare mutations have recently been reported in affected individuals. We now report the development of amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) assays for rapid, non-radioactive detection of these known mutations in FACC. Primer pairs specific for variant sequences were designed, with the 3{prime} terminal base of one primer matching the variant base. PCR products are separated by electrophoresis on 2.5% agarose gels; mutations are indicated by the presence of a band of a specific size. These ARMS assays can be multiplexed to allow screening for all known mutations in two PCR reactions. We have used these assays for detection of FACC mutations in affected individuals in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR), and for carrier detection FACC families. IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is the only FACC mutation found in Jewish FA patients and their families, of both Ashkenazi and Sephardic ancestry. This mutation was not found in any affected individual of non-Jewish origin. In addition, DNA samples from 1596 healthy Jewish individuals primarily of Ashkenazi ancestry were supplied to us by Dor Yeshorim. These samples, ascertained for carrier screening for Tay Sachs, cystic fibrosis, and other genetic diseases with a high frequency in the religious Jewish community served by this organization, were tested for both IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG mutations; seventeen IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T are of Sephardic Jewish ancestry. We hypothesize that IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is a very old mutation, predating the divergence of the Ashkenazi and Sephardic populations. Haplotype analysis with microsatellite markers is in progress.

  16. The effects of performance-based assessment criteria on student performance and self-assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Fastré, Greet Mia Jos; van der Klink, Marcel R; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of performance-based versus competence-based assessment criteria on task performance and self-assessment skills among 39 novice secondary vocational education students in the domain of nursing and care. In a performance-based assessment group students are provided with a preset list of performance-based assessment criteria, describing what students should do, for the task at hand. The performance-based group is compared to a competence-based assessment group in which students receive a preset list of competence-based assessment criteria, describing what students should be able to do. The test phase revealed that the performance-based group outperformed the competence-based group on test task performance. In addition, higher performance of the performance-based group was reached with lower reported mental effort during training, indicating a higher instructional efficiency for novice students. PMID:20054648

  17. Item Response Theory analyses of DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder criteria in an American Indian community sample

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, David A.; Gizer, Ian R.; Lau, Philip; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Native Americans experience some of the highest rates of DSM-IV stimulant dependence (SD) of all U.S. ethnic groups. This report compares DSM-IV and DSM-5 stimulant use disorder (SUD) diagnostic criteria in an American Indian community sample. Methods Demographic information, stimulant (methamphetamine or cocaine) use, and lifetime DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnoses were assessed in 858 adult American Indians. Item Response Theory (IRT) analyses were used to assess SUD criteria in both DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria sets along an underlying latent trait severity continuum and the effect of demographic variables on differential item functioning (DIF) in those criteria. Results The overall rate of DSM-IV SD was 33%, of DSM-IV SUD was 38%, and of DSM-5 SUD was 36% with no gender differences. All SUD symptoms in both the DSM-IV and DSM-5 datasets functioned on the moderate portion of the underlying severity continuum. “Craving” discriminated better than any other criterion at its level of severity in indicating the presence or absence of SUD. There was little DIF in groups defined by gender or any other demographic variable in either the DSM-IV or DSM-5 datasets. Conclusions These findings indicate that in this American Indian sample, diagnostic criteria for DSM-IV and DSM-5 SUD function similarly in terms of severity and DIF and that the abolition of the DSM-IV distinction between stimulant abuse and dependence in DSM-5 is warranted. PMID:24200103

  18. The Illiac IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hord, M.

    1982-01-01

    The story of the Illiac IV is also in part the story of the Institute for Advanced Computation. This is the government organization formed in 1971 by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center to develop and operate this computer. The Institute provides access to the Illiac through a connection to the ARPANET, a national communication network. The Institute also performs software development, maintenance, and research in various advanced computation topics. Considerable effort has been invested by the Institute in documenting the evolution of the Illiac system and providing those publications to the user community. This material has experienced quite limited circulation and to most of the computer world the Illiac remains mysterious. This attitude is fostered by the lack of a thorough summary of the Illiac's environment, design and capabilities. It is in response to that information gap that this book is addressed.

  19. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  20. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  1. Laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of the next generation of oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, D; Barrett, Y C; Ramacciotti, E; Weitz, J I

    2013-02-01

    In contrast to vitamin K antagonists, which reduce the functional levels of several coagulation factors, the new oral anticoagulants specifically target either thrombin or factor Xa. These new agents have such predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that routine coagulation monitoring is unnecessary. However, there are still some situations in which measurement of anticoagulant effect may be required. The coagulation assays that are used to monitor heparin derivatives or vitamin K antagonists may not always accurately reflect the anticoagulant activity of the new oral anticoagulants, and specialized assays may be needed. In this article, we: (i) identify situations in which assessment of anticoagulant effect may aid treatment decisions; (ii) describe the effects of the new oral anticoagulants on the various coagulation tests; (iii) review the specialized coagulation assays that have been developed to measure the anticoagulant effects of the new oral anticoagulants; and (iv) provide a clinical perspective on the role of coagulation testing in the clinical management of patients treated with the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:23216682

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  3. Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1992-10-01

    This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single hits'' in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth's magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when hit'' by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the biological'' importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

  4. Single track effects, biostack and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1992-10-01

    This talk addresses the single-track nature of the space radiation environment, and points out the importance of single ``hits`` in the evaluation of radiation risk for long-term missions occurring outside the earth`s magnetic field. A short review is made of biological objects found to show increased effects when ``hit`` by a single heavy charged-particle in space. A brief discussion is given of the most provocative results from the bacterial spore B. subtilis: experimental evidence that tracks can affect biological systems at much larger distances from the trajectory than previously suspected, and that the resultant inactivation cross section in space calculated for this system is very large. When taken at face value, the implication of these results, when compared to those from experiments performed at ground-based accelerators with beams at low energies in the same LET range, is that high-energy particles can exert their influence a surprising distance from their trajectory and the inactivation cross sections are some twenty times larger than expected. Clearly, beams from high-energy heavy-ion accelerators should be used to confirm these results. For those end points that can also be caused by low-LET beams such as high-energy protons, it is important to measure their action cross sections as well. The ratio of the cross sections for a high-LET beam to that of a low-LET beam is an interesting experimental ratio and, we suggest, of more intrinsic interest than the RBE. It is a measure of the ``biological`` importance of one particle type relative to another particle type. This ratio will be introduced and given the name RPPE (Relative Per Particle Effectiveness). Values of RPPE will be discussed.

  5. The assessment by doctors of the effectiveness of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mapes, Roy E. A.; Williams, W. O.

    1976-01-01

    There was no significant difference between the assessments by two groups of randomly-selected general practitioners on the effectiveness of the drug treatment for 19 common clinical conditions. The treatment of simple iron deficiency anaemia was considered the most effective and gained the highest consensus. Least effective, but not matched by worst consensus, was the drug treatment for obesity. The most widespread disagreement among the practitioners was for the effectiveness of the drug treatment of gastroenteritis. PMID:1011206

  6. Insulin-like effects on liver Golgi membrane preparations of bis(oxalato)oxovanadate(IV) complex ion, a new vanadate compound.

    PubMed

    Kordowiak, A M; Trzos, R; Grybos, R

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies have shown the insulin-like effect of vanadyl sulphate or sodium ortho (or meta-)vanadate administered orally to rats. Toxicity of these drugs and reluctance by the animals to drink the solutions and take food, concerning the amelioration of some diabetes syndrome discussed in 1994 by Domingo et al. (1), McNeill et al. (2) and Wiliams and Malabu (3), prompted us to investigate a new vanadate complex: disodium bis(oxalato)oxovanadate (IV), Na2[VO(OX)2]H2O. The main object of the experiment was to study whether this complex administered as 3 mmol/l solution in 0.5% NaCl during 7 days could act on the subcellular level and influence the activity of liver Golgi membrane galactosyltransferase activity. Free blood sugar level was lowered (but was still higher than in the control group) in diabetic rats after seven days of vanadate action and was accompanied by lowered, however not statistically significant, serum triglyceride levels. The yields of isolated Golgi-rich membrane fractions were about half of the level in diabetic groups (untreated and treated with vanadium) compared with the control groups. Purity of these membrane fractions, expressed as nmol Gal transferred per mg of proteins and per h, was the same in four groups investigated and showed the possibility to compare them. Activity of galactosyltransferase calculated in nmol Gal transferred per 1 g of liver and per 1 h or per whole liver in the same time (as a possibility of glycosylation of the secretory and membrane glycoproteins) was lower in both diabetic groups. However, after vanadium treatment (D+V group), the activity was higher than in untreated diabetic rats (D group) in three of five investigated animals. Vanadyl-oxalate complex did not normalize in a statistically significant manner the enzyme activity which was significantly lower in diabetes than in control. This is similar to insulin influence on the galactosyltransferase activity reported previously by Kaczmarski et al. in 1981

  7. Using Self-Assessment to Assess the Effectiveness of Learner Centered Instructional Design and Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary research in pedagogy provides evidence for use of active learning strategies in the classroom. It is important that faculty demonstrate effectiveness across the spectrum of teaching activities, as well as effectiveness in meeting the learning goals of students. This paper illustrates how self-assessment can be used to evaluate the…

  8. Preliminary assessment of pump IST effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    DiBiasio, A.; Grove, E.; Carbonaro, J.

    1994-06-01

    A preliminary review of Inservice Testing (IST) effectiveness for Code Class 1, 2, and 3 pumps at nuclear power plants was performed. IST requirements are specified by ASME Section XI, and the Operations and Maintenance Standard (OM Part 6). The INPO NPRDS database was used to provide failure reports for these components for 1988 to 1992. This time frame coincides with the issuance of Generic Letter 89-04, which resulted in a more consistent application of the requirements by the licensees. For this time period, 2585 pump failures were reported. A review of these failures indicated that the majority (71.6%) were due to external leakage, and were excluded from this study since these events typically do not affect pump operability and are not detected by the measurement of IST parameters. Of the remaining 733 events, a review was performed to identify the primary failure causes, failure modes, and method of detection. Plant testing programs, consisting of IST, surveillance testing, and special testing, detected approximately 40% of these occurrences. Others were detected through operational abnormalities, routine and incidental observations, alarms, and while performing maintenance. This paper provides a discussion of the results of the study.

  9. Equilibrium between Different Coordination Geometries in Oxidovanadium(IV) Complexes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugone, Valeria; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni; Sanna, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory activity, the equilibrium between square pyramidal and octahedral V(IV)O[superscript 2+] complexes is described. We propose a set of experiments to synthesize and characterize two types of V(IV)O[superscript 2+] complexes. The experiment allows great flexibility and may be effectively used at a variety of levels and the activity…

  10. Water-Soluble Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes Supported by Pentapyridine Ligands: Axial Ligand Effects on Hydrogen Atom and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Chantarojsiri, Teera; Sun, Yujie; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-06-15

    We report the photochemical generation and study of a family of water-soluble iron(IV)-oxo complexes supported by pentapyridine PY5Me2-X ligands (PY5Me2 = 2,6-bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine; X = CF3, H, Me, or NMe2), in which the oxidative reactivity of these ferryl species correlates with the electronic properties of the axial pyridine ligand. Synthesis of a systematic series of [Fe(II)(L)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) complexes, where L = CH3CN or H2O, and characterizations by several methods, including X-ray crystallography, cyclic voltammetry, and Mössbauer spectroscopy, show that increasing the electron-donating ability of the axial pyridine ligand tracks with less positive Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potentials and quadrupole splitting parameters. The Fe(II) precursors are readily oxidized to their Fe(IV)-oxo counterparts using either chemical outer-sphere oxidants such as CAN (ceric ammonium nitrate) or flash-quench photochemical oxidation with [Ru(bpy)3](2+) as a photosensitizer and K2S2O8 as a quencher. The Fe(IV)-oxo complexes are capable of oxidizing the C-H bonds of alkane (4-ethylbenzenesulfonate) and alcohol (benzyl alcohol) substrates via hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and an olefin (4-styrenesulfonate) substrate by oxygen atom transfer (OAT). The [Fe(IV)(O)(PY5Me2-X)](2+) derivatives with electron-poor axial ligands show faster rates of HAT and OAT compared to their counterparts supported by electron-rich axial donors, but the magnitudes of these differences are relatively modest. PMID:26039655

  11. Microwave assisted synthesis of novel acridine-acetazolamide conjugates and investigation of their inhibition effects on human carbonic anhydrase isoforms hCA I, II, IV and VII.

    PubMed

    Ulus, Ramazan; Aday, Burak; Tanç, Muhammet; Supuran, Claudiu T; Kaya, Muharrem

    2016-08-15

    4-Amino-N-(5-sulfamoyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)benzamide was condensed with cyclic-1,3-diketones (dimedone and cyclohexane-1,3-dione) and aromatic aldehydes under microwave irradiation, leading to a series of acridine-acetazolamide conjugates. The new compounds were investigated as inhibitors of carbonic anhydrases (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), and more precisely cytosolic isoforms hCA I, II, VII and membrane-bound one hCA IV. All investigated isoforms were inhibited in low micromolar and nanomolar range by the new compounds. hCA IV and VII were inhibited with KIs in the range of 29.7-708.8nM (hCA IV), and of 1.3-90.7nM (hCA VII). For hCA I and II the KIs were in the range of 6.7-335.2nM (hCA I) and of 0.5-55.4nM (hCA II). The structure-activity relationships (SAR) for the inhibition of these isoforms with the acridine-acetazolamide conjugates reported here were delineated. PMID:27298005

  12. pH-metric chemical speciation modeling and studies of in vitro antidiabetic effects of bis[(imidazolyl)carboxylato]oxidovanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gundhla, Isaac Z; Walmsley, Ryan S; Ugirinema, Vital; Mnonopi, Nandipha O; Hosten, Eric; Betz, Richard; Frost, Carminita L; Tshentu, Zenixole R

    2015-04-01

    A range of bidentate N,O-donor ligands of the imidazolyl-carboxylate moiety, which partially mimic naturally occurring bioligands, were prepared and reacted with the oxidovanadium(IV) ion to form the corresponding bis-coordinated oxidovanadium(IV) complexes. The aqueous pH-metric chemical speciation was investigated using glass electrode potentiometry, which allowed for the determination of protonation and stability constants of the ligands and complexes, respectively. The species distribution diagrams generated from this information gave evidence that the bis[(imidazolyl)carboxylato]oxovanadium(IV) complexes possess a broad pH-metric stability. The complexes improved glucose uptake in cell cultures using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, C2C12 muscle cells and Chang liver cells. The PTP inhibition studies indicated that the mechanism underlying insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was possibly via the protein tyrosine phosphorylation through the inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP 1B). The vanadium compounds also demonstrated the inhibition of D-dimer formation, suggesting that these compounds could potentially relieve a hypercoagulative state in diabetic patients. PMID:25594947

  13. Graduate Assessment Centres: An Empirical Investigation of Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garavan, Thomas N.; Morley, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Effectiveness of assessment centers for personal selection in banking was tested with 135 applicants. Results do not support literature findings of the construct and criterion validity of centers. An exercise effect was apparent: judgments made by assessors were interpretable in terms of the exercises used rather than dimensions related to the…

  14. Effectiveness, Teaching, and Assessments: Survey Evidence from Finance Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ming Ming; Kwan, Jing Hui; Kadir, Hazlina Abdul; Abdullah, Mahdhir; Yap, Voon Choong

    2010-01-01

    The present article examines the effectiveness, teaching, assessment methods, and the importance of finance concepts in three undergraduate finance courses in a private university in Malaysia. Approximately 224 undergraduates (finance majors) were surveyed and demonstrated positive attitudes toward the effectiveness of the finance subjects. The…

  15. Assessing Mediational Models: Testing and Interval Estimation for Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.; Falk, Carl F.; Savalei, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical models specifying indirect or mediated effects are common in the social sciences. An indirect effect exists when an independent variable's influence on the dependent variable is mediated through an intervening variable. Classic approaches to assessing such mediational hypotheses (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Sobel, 1982) have in recent years…

  16. Peer-Assessment Debriefing Instrument (PADI): Assessing Faculty Effectiveness in Simulation Education.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Jennifer L; Wainwright, Susan F; Herge, E A; Pohlig, Ryan T

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the debriefing skill of faculty in simulations is essential but often challenging. The Peer Assessment Debriefing Instrument (PADI) is a self and peer assessment designed to assess a debriefers' effectiveness and is grounded in current scientific debriefing literature and peer review methodology. This pilot study tested the PADI at three institutions during 10 different healthcare debriefing sessions. The PADI is useful to faculty and administrators of simulation centers by demonstrating ongoing quality improvement and as a guide to train new debriefers. PMID:27585622

  17. Chalcogenidobis(ene-1,2-dithiolate)molybdenum(IV) complexes (chalcogenide E = O, S, Se): probing Mo≡E and ene-1,2-dithiolate substituent effects on geometric and electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideki; Tano, Hiroyuki; Suyama, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Tomoya; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Shinobu; Mtei, Regina P; Kirk, Martin L

    2011-02-01

    New square-pyramidal bis(ene-1,2-dithiolate)MoSe complexes, [Mo(IV)Se(L)(2)](2-), have been synthesised along with their terminal sulfido analogues, [Mo(IV)S(L)(2)](2-), using alkyl (L(C(4)H(8))), phenyl (L(Ph)) and methyl carboxylate (L(COOMe)) substituted dithiolene ligands (L). These complexes now complete three sets of Mo(IV)O, Mo(IV)S and Mo(IV)Se species that are coordinated with identical ene-1,2-dithiolate ligands. The [alkyl substituted Mo(S/Se)(L(C(4)H(8)))(2)](2-) complexes were reported in prior investigations (H. Sugimoto, T. Sakurai, H. Miyake, K. Tanaka and H. Tsukube, Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 6927, H. Tano, R. Tajima, H. Miyake, S. Itoh and H. Sugimoto, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 7465). The new series of complexes enable a systematic investigation of terminal chalcogenido and supporting ene-1,2-dithiolate ligand effects on geometric structure, electronic structure, and spectroscopic properties. X-ray crystallographic analysis of these (Et(4)N)(2)[MoEL(2)] (E = terminal chalocogenide) complexes reveals an isostructural Mo centre that adopts a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The M≡E bond distances observed in the crystal structures and the ν(M≡E) vibrational frequencies indicate that these bonds are weakened with an increase in L→Mo electron donation (L(COOMe) < L(Ph) < L(C(4)H(8))), and this order is confirmed by an electrochemical study of the complexes. The (77)Se NMR resonances in MoSeL complexes appear at lower magnetic fields as the selenido ion became less basic from MoSeL(C(4)H(8)), MoSeL(Ph) and MoSeL(COOMe). Electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies have been used to assign key ligand-field, MLCT, LMCT and intraligand CT bands in complexes that possess the L(COOMe) ligand. The presence of low-energy intraligand CT transition in these MoEL(COOMe) compounds directly probes the electron withdrawing nature of the -COOMe substituents, and this underscores the complex electronic structure of square pyramidal bis(ene-1

  18. Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Watershed Assessment Studies: Advancing the Science for Conservation Assessment at Watershed Scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEAP Watershed Assessment Studies were initiated in 2004 or later to measure the environmental effects of conservation practices on water resources (quality and availability), soil quality, or fish and wildlife habitat at the watershed scale. Over 40 CEAP Watershed Studies have now been sponsored co...

  19. GDP (Gemcitabine, Dexamethasone, and Cisplatin) Is Highly Effective and Well-Tolerated for Newly Diagnosed Stage IV and Relapsed/Refractory Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-jing; Dong, Mei; He, Xiao-hui; Li, Ye-xiong; Wang, Wei-hu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jian-liang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Chang-gong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Sheng-yu; Shi, Yuan-kai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL). The study enrolled 41 ENKTL patients who received GDP regimen at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College between January 2008 and January 2015. The disease status was newly diagnosed stage IV in 15 patients and relapsed/refractory in 26 patients. The median number of cycles of chemotherapy per patient was 6 (range, 2–8 cycles). The overall response rate and complete-remission rate were 83.0% (34/41) and 41.5% (17/41), respectively. After a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 1-year progression-free survival rate and 1-year overall survival rate for the whole cohort were 54.5% and 72.7%. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events included neutropenia (34.1%), thrombocytopenia (19.5%), and anemia (14.6%). Our study has suggested high efficacy and low toxicity profile of GDP regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory ENKTL. PMID:26871836

  20. GDP (Gemcitabine, Dexamethasone, and Cisplatin) Is Highly Effective and Well-Tolerated for Newly Diagnosed Stage IV and Relapsed/Refractory Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Dong, Mei; He, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ye-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Hu; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jian-Liang; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Chang-Gong; Yang, Sheng; Zhou, Sheng-Yu; Shi, Yuan-Kai

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of GDP (gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin) regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL).The study enrolled 41 ENKTL patients who received GDP regimen at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College between January 2008 and January 2015.The disease status was newly diagnosed stage IV in 15 patients and relapsed/refractory in 26 patients. The median number of cycles of chemotherapy per patient was 6 (range, 2-8 cycles). The overall response rate and complete-remission rate were 83.0% (34/41) and 41.5% (17/41), respectively. After a median follow-up of 16.2 months, 1-year progression-free survival rate and 1-year overall survival rate for the whole cohort were 54.5% and 72.7%. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events included neutropenia (34.1%), thrombocytopenia (19.5%), and anemia (14.6%).Our study has suggested high efficacy and low toxicity profile of GDP regimen in patients with newly diagnosed stage IV and relapsed/refractory ENKTL. PMID:26871836

  1. Parts and Components Reliability Assessment: A Cost Effective Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    System reliability assessment is a methodology which incorporates reliability analyses performed at parts and components level such as Reliability Prediction, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) to assess risks, perform design tradeoffs, and therefore, to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success. The system reliability is used to optimize the product design to accommodate today?s mandated budget, manpower, and schedule constraints. Stand ard based reliability assessment is an effective approach consisting of reliability predictions together with other reliability analyses for electronic, electrical, and electro-mechanical (EEE) complex parts and components of large systems based on failure rate estimates published by the United States (U.S.) military or commercial standards and handbooks. Many of these standards are globally accepted and recognized. The reliability assessment is especially useful during the initial stages when the system design is still in the development and hard failure data is not yet available or manufacturers are not contractually obliged by their customers to publish the reliability estimates/predictions for their parts and components. This paper presents a methodology to assess system reliability using parts and components reliability estimates to ensure effective productivity and/or mission success in an efficient manner, low cost, and tight schedule.

  2. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal. PMID:22738207

  3. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Aaron C.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Laurie, Fran; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Arndt, Carola A.S.; Michalski, Jeff M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  4. Effect of a neutral N2 cloud on the electrical charging of an electron beam-emitting rocket in the ionosphere - Echo IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, G. A.; Winckler, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of 114 moles of neutral N2 and a 40-kV, 80 mA electron beam was studied during the Echo IV rocket flight. Neutralizing return currents to the rocket body preferentially followed a route back through the region where the electron beam interacted with the cloud. Photometric observations of a complex luminous discharge accompanying beam injection are reported. Observations of 3914-A emission produced by the beam indicated a maximum neutral N2 number density of nearly 10 to the 15th power per cu cm. An oscillatory discharge with a frequency somewhat lower than the N2 (+) ion gyrofrequency was noted at one point.

  5. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 3: Aquatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, D.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report is an assessment of information on the aquatic effects of acid rain, produced to act as technical support for development of an acid rain strategy. It first reviews the previous aquatic effects assessment of 1990 and aquatic effects monitoring and research conducted post-1990. It then presents and discusses results of research that proceeds from the knowledge base and status presented in the 1990 assessment. First, the chemical and biological changes observed in aquatic ecosystems since the early 1980s are assessed, including an analysis of the factors (such as declining acidic deposition) that influence the changes. Regional differences and hysteresis between acidification and recovery responses are also discussed. Second, interactions between the acidity stressor and other atmospherically based stressors such as climate change and contaminant deposition are considered. Third, the effectiveness of existing critical and target loads in protecting aquatic ecosystems is re-evaluated. Finally, the likely effect of full implementation of the planned sulphur dioxide controls in Canada and the United States on aquatic chemistry and biology is predicted using up-to-date modelling tools. Knowledge gaps are identified along with recommended actions to be implemented.

  6. pH effect on cellular uptake of Sn(IV) chlorine e6 dichloride trisodium salt by cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaza'leh, Khaled A; Omar, Khalid; Jaafar, M S

    2011-01-01

    The effects of pH value and presence of serum in an incubation medium on photosensitizer drug cellular uptake in MCF7 cancer cells have been investigated. The results showed that the presence of serum in an incubation medium reduced the drug cellular uptake at all pH values. It has been found that decreasing on pH values of the incubation medium increased the cellular uptake of the drug, demonstrating selective uptake of the sensitizer. The HepG2 liver cancer cells exhibited more drug cellular uptake than CCD-18CO normal colon cells, which assessed the selectivity uptake of photosensitizer on cancerous cells. The concentration of photosensitizer measured in 10(6) cells showed a good correlation to the incubation time. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy been have used to examine the cells. PMID:22210969

  7. An introduction and guide to effective Doppler assessment.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Maureen

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of leg ulceration is an essential factor in making evidence-based, effective decisions regarding patient management with the aim of swift wound healing and/or referral to the appropriate specialty. Nurses are professionally responsible for ensuring that patients receive the appropriate assessment and evidence-based management. This article examines the most up-to-date guidance on Doppler ultrasound as a key element of this assessment. Approaches to assessment will be explored, with emphasis on the need to include a Doppler ultrasound as one key element of a larger, holistic assessment. An introduction to the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) will be given, followed by a step-by-step guide to standard procedures for carrying out a full Doppler ultrasound. Alternative options for measuring ABPI are also provided. PMID:25478852

  8. Combining Ecobehavioral Assessment, Functional Assessment, and Response to Intervention to Promote More Effective Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Silvana M. R.; Gable, Robert A.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss ways ecobehavioral assessment (EBA) has contributed to greater understanding of students' response to instructional intervention and its relationship to academic learning and achievement. EBA represents a proven effective way to conduct a contextual analysis of the instructional environments, teacher and…

  9. Pesticide effects on the plant cuticle. IV. The effect of EPTC on the permeability of cabbage, bean, and sugar beet cuticle

    SciTech Connect

    Flore, J.A.; Bukovac, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    S-ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC, 2.24 kg/ha) inhibited epicuticular wax production on developing leaves of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., resulting in an increase in cuticular permeability. This increased penetration of /sup 14/C-1-naphthaleneacetic acid (/sup 14/C-NAA) and increased cuticular transpiration. EPTC-enhanced penetration was a consequence of increased diffusion across the cuticle, and not of active uptake. Application of EPTC increased penetration of NAA 200% in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and 121% in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). For cabbage, the percent increase in penetration due to EPTC inhibition of cuticle development 7 days after treatment (141%) was similar to that at 42 days (112%). The effect of EPTC declined until full leaf expansion (28 days after application). Silver nitrate was preferentially taken up by the cuticular ledges of guard cells and the anticlinal walls of epidermal cells, and was greater in leaves from EPTC-treated plants than in those from non-treated plants. 27 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Secondary flow structures in the presence of Type-IV stent fractures through a bent tube model for curved arteries: Effect of circulation thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shadman; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    A common treatment for atherosclerosis is the opening of narrowed arteries resulting from obstructive lesions by angioplasty and stent implantation to restore unrestricted blood flow. ``Type-IV'' stent fractures involve complete transverse, linear fracture of stent struts, along with displacement of the stent fragments. Experimental data pertaining to secondary flows in the presence of stents that underwent ``Type-IV'' fractures in a bent artery model under physiological inflow conditions were obtained through a two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) PIV technique. Concomitant stent-induced flow perturbations result in secondary flow structures with complex, multi-scale morphologies and varying size-strength characteristics. Ultimately, these flow structures may have a role to play in restenosis and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. Vortex circulation thresholds were established with the goal of resolving and tracking iso-circulation secondary flow vortical structures and their morphological changes. This allowed for a parametric evaluation and quantitative representation of secondary flow structures undergoing deformation and spatial reorganization. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  11. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals the Effects of PilF Phosphorylation on Type IV Pilus and Biofilm Formation in Thermus thermophilus HB27*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lin, Guang-Huey; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Chang, Ying-Che; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Yang, Feng-Ling; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Thermus thermophilus HB27 is an extremely thermophilic eubacteria with a high frequency of natural competence. This organism is therefore often used as a thermophilic model to investigate the molecular basis of type IV pili–mediated functions, such as the uptake of free DNA, adhesion, twitching motility, and biofilm formation, in hot environments. In this study, the phosphoproteome of T. thermophilus HB27 was analyzed via a shotgun approach and high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Ninety-three unique phosphopeptides, including 67 in vivo phosphorylated sites on 53 phosphoproteins, were identified. The distribution of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation sites was 57%/36%/7%. The phosphoproteins were mostly involved in central metabolic pathways and protein/cell envelope biosynthesis. According to this analysis, the ATPase motor PilF, a type IV pili–related component, was first found to be phosphorylated on Thr-368 and Ser-372. Through the point mutation of PilF, mimic phosphorylated mutants T368D and S372E resulted in nonpiliated and nontwitching phenotypes, whereas nonphosphorylated mutants T368V and S372A displayed piliation and twitching motility. In addition, mimic phosphorylated mutants showed elevated biofilm-forming abilities with a higher initial attachment rate, caused by increasing exopolysaccharide production. In summary, the phosphorylation of PilF might regulate the pili and biofilm formation associated with exopolysaccharide production. PMID:23828892

  12. Effect of Porphyrin Ligands on the Regioselective Dehydrogenation versus Epoxidation of Olefins by Oxoiron(IV) Mimics of Cytochrome P450

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Devesh; Tahsini, Laleh; Visser, Sam P. De; Kang, Hye Yeon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Nam, Wonwoo

    2009-08-01

    The cytochromes P450 are versatile enzymes involved in various catalytic oxidation reactions, such as hydroxylation, epoxidation and dehydrogenation. In this work, we present combined experimental and theoretical studies on the change of regioselectivity in cyclohexadiene oxidation (i.e., epoxidation vs dehydrogenation) by oxoiron(IV) porphyrin complexes bearing different porphyrin ligands. Our experimental results show that meso-substitution of the porphyrin ring with electron-withdrawing substituents leads to a regioselectivity switch from dehydrogenation to epoxidation, affording the formation of epoxide as a major product. In contrast, electron-rich iron porphyrins are shown to produce benzene resulting from the dehydrogenation of cyclohexadiene. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the regioselectivity switch of epoxidation vs dehydrogenation have been performed using three oxoiron(IV) porphyrin oxidants with hydrogen atoms, phenyl groups, and pentachlorophenyl (ArCl5) groups on the meso-position. The DFT studies show that the epoxidation reaction by the latter catalyst is stabilized because of favorable interactions of the substrate with halogen atoms of the meso-ligand as well as with pyrrole nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin macrocycle. Hydrogen abstraction transition states, in contrast, have a substrate-binding orientation further away from the porphyrin pyrrole nitrogens, and they are much less stabilized. Finally, the regioselectivity of dehydrogenation versus hydroxylation is rationalized using thermodynamic cycles.

  13. One-pot conversion of levan prepared from Serratia levanicum NN to difructose anhydride IV by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans levan fructotransferase.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hiroto; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Nagura, Taizo; Aritsuka, Tsutomu; Tomita, Fusao; Yokota, Atsushi

    2010-03-01

    The newly established difructose anhydride IV (DFA IV) production system is comprised of the effective production of levan from sucrose by Serratia levanicum NN, the conversion of the levan into DFA IV by levan fructotransferase from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans GS-9, which is highly expressed in an Escherichiacoli transformant, and a practical purification step. The chemical properties of DFA IV were also investigated. PMID:20159571

  14. Documenting Student Performance through Effective Performance Assessments: Workshop Summary. Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Agricultural Education Curriculum Materials Service.

    This document contains materials about and from a workshop that was conducted to help Ohio horticulture teachers learn to document student competence through effective performance assessments. The document begins with background information about the workshop and a list of workshop objectives. Presented next is a key to the 40 performance…

  15. Health Effects Assessment for Benzo[a]pyrene

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report represents a brief, quantitatively oriented scientific summary of health effects data. It was developed by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office to assist the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response in establishing chemical-specific health-related g...

  16. Fine sediment sources in conservation effects assessment project watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two naturally occurring radionuclides, 7Be and 210Pbxs , were used as tracers to discriminate eroded surface soils from channel-derived sediments in the fine suspended sediment loads of eight Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) benchmark watersheds. Precipitation, source soils, and suspe...

  17. Assessing Community Effects on Adolescent Substance Use and Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, M. Lee; Hawkins, J. David; Arthur, Michael W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates community-level prediction of adolescent substance use and problem behaviors using ratings by community leaders to assess the effects of four risk factors on levels of drug use and problem behaviors. Three questions are examined: (a) Can psychometrically sound measures of community leader perceptions of risk factors in…

  18. Effective Peer Assessment Processes: Research Findings and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zundert, Marjo; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Despite the popularity of peer assessment (PA), gaps in the literature make it difficult to describe exactly what constitutes effective PA. In a literature review, we divided PA into variables and then investigated their interrelatedness. We found that (a) PA's psychometric qualities are improved by the training and experience of peer assessors;…

  19. Conservation Effects Assessment in the South Georgia Little River Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Little River Experimental Watershed (LREW) located in the upper Coastal Plain region of Southern Georgia is one of the 14 benchmark watersheds involved in the Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP). The Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory (SEWRL) initiated a hydrologic research prog...

  20. Feedback Effects of Teaching Quality Assessment: Macro and Micro Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feedback effects of teaching quality assessment. Previous literature looked separately at the evolution of individual and aggregate scores to understand whether instructors and university performance depends on its past evaluation. I propose a new quantitative-based methodology, combining statistical distributions and…

  1. Risk assessment and remedial technology effectiveness at Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, C.B.; Travis, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Although the protection of public health is one of the primary goals of the Superfund program, the program's success in achieving risk reduction has been difficult to determine thus far. However, evidence to date suggests that risk reduction is not being effectively integrated into the remedial action decision process in spite of the change of program philosophy since the passage of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and the advances made in the field of risk assessment in recent years. Defining risk, using risk assessment as a priority-setting tool, and defining risk reduction within the confines of both the current state of technology and the resources available with which to address risk are essential components of the decision process. Although risk assessments are conducted at Superfund sites, risk assessment has not been used effectively as a priority-setting tool. Many decisions to remediate are made where no current exposure exists and potential risk is not well-defined. At the same time, the majority of remedial alternatives are selected without evidence of their effectiveness in meeting health-based cleanup goals, even at sites which pose a threat to human health. Recent analyses of the effectiveness of treatment remedies suggest that treating contaminated media to health-based cleanup goals is considerably more difficult than originally expected. Thus, Superfund policy-making should focus on determining when health-based cleanup goals are necessary and when attaining such standards is feasible. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Overview of the Choptank River watershed conservation effectiveness assessment project.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Choptank River is a benchmark watershed in the Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Project. It is an estuary and tributary of the Chesapeake Bay. Land use in the watershed (2057 square km) is classified as 52% agriculture, 26% forested, and 5% developed. Agricultural production is centered ...

  3. Columbia Basin College Assessment & Effectiveness: Report to the College Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Basin Coll., Pasco, WA.

    This report furnishes examples of assessment and effectiveness activities at Columbia Basin College (Washington). In 1997, the college's Board of Trustees began using the Carver Model of policy governance and created a new college mission statement and related end states, which directly answer the question, "What good will be produced for which…

  4. Effective Collaboration among the Gross Motor Assessment Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi S.; Davis, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the gross motor assessment team (GMAT) members' roles and collaborative approach to making appropriate decisions and modifications when addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities in physical education. Case studies of students are used to demonstrate effective uses of the GMAT. The primary outcome of the…

  5. Assessing School Effects without Controlling for Prior Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyten, Hans; Tymms, Peter; Jones, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The research findings presented in this paper illustrate how the "value added" of schooling can be assessed empirically using cross-sectional data. Application of the regression-discontinuity approach within a multilevel framework produces both an estimate of the absolute effect of 1 year schooling and an estimate of the variation across schools…

  6. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... (36 CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines; (iii) Removal of the property from its historic location... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of adverse...

  7. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines, to avoid adverse effects. (c) Consulting party review. If the... (36 CFR part 68) and applicable guidelines; (iii) Removal of the property from its historic location... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Assessment of adverse...

  8. The Conservation Effects Assessment Project—The First Five Years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) was initiated by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), and Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) in response to a general call for better accountability of how soci...

  9. EVALUATION OF THE PILLS IV

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the operating characteristics of the PILLS IV (Particulate Instrumentation by Laser Light Scattering) in situ particle sizing instrument. Results of both investigations show large errors in sizing particle...

  10. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  11. Giant piezoelectricity of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Ruixiang; Li, Wenbin; Li, Ju; Yang, Li

    We predict enormous, anisotropic piezoelectric effects in intrinsic monolayer group IV monochalcogenides (MX, M =Sn or Ge, X =Se or S), including SnSe, SnS, GeSe, and GeS. Using first-principle simulations based on the modern theory of polarization, we find that their piezoelectric coefficients are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than those of other 2D materials, such as MoS2 and GaSe, and bulk quartz and AlN which are widely used in industry. This enhancement is a result of the unique ``puckered'' C2v symmetry and electronic structure of monolayer group IV monochalcogenides. Given the achieved experimental advances in the fabrication of monolayers, their flexible character, and ability to withstand enormous strain, these 2D structures with giant piezoelectric effects may be promising for a broad range of applications such as nano-sized sensors, piezotronics, and energy harvesting in portable electronic devices.

  12. Assessment of direct gating and allosteric modulatory effects of meprobamate in recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Dillon, Glenn H

    2016-03-15

    Meprobamate is a schedule IV anxiolytic and the primary metabolite of the muscle relaxant carisoprodol. Meprobamate modulates GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid Type A) receptors, and has barbiturate-like activity. To gain insight into its actions, we have conducted a series of studies using recombinant GABAA receptors. In αxβzγ2 GABAA receptors (where x=1-6 and z=1-3), the ability to enhance GABA-mediated current was evident for all α subunit isoforms, with the largest effect observed in α5-expressing receptors. Direct gating was present with all α subunits, although attenuated in α3-expressing receptors. Allosteric and direct effects were comparable in α1β1γ2 and α1β2γ2 receptors, whereas allosteric effects were enhanced in α1β2 compared to α1β2γ2 receptors. In "extrasynaptic" (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, meprobamate enhanced EC20 and saturating GABA currents, and directly activated these receptors. The barbiturate antagonist bemegride attenuated direct effects of meprobamate. Whereas pentobarbital directly gated homomeric β3 receptors, meprobamate did not, and instead blocked the spontaneously open current present in these receptors. In wild type homomeric ρ1 receptors, pentobarbital and meprobamate were ineffective in direct gating; a mutation known to confer sensitivity to pentobarbital did not confer sensitivity to meprobamate. Our results provide insight into the actions of meprobamate and parent therapeutic agents such as carisoprodol. Whereas in general actions of meprobamate were comparable to those of carisoprodol, differential effects of meprobamate at some receptor subtypes suggest potential advantages of meprobamate may be exploited. A re-assessment of previously synthesized meprobamate-related carbamate molecules for myorelaxant and other therapeutic indications is warranted. PMID:26872987

  13. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-01-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis'', December 1987.

  14. Toxicological dose assessment and acute health effect criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.C.; White, B.

    1992-09-01

    The use of hazardous materials requires the means of assessing doses from postulated accidental exposures to the hazardous materials. Hazardous materials include radiological and toxicological substances. Health effects are often divided into either acute (short term exposure) or chronic (long-term-exposure)-categories. Dose assessments and health effects are used in Hazard Classification, Safety Analysis Reports and Unreviewed Safety Question Determinations. The use of hazardous substances requires a means of assessing the potential health effects from exposure. Two types of toxicological data exist. The first is measured effects from human exposure, either accidentally or studies. The second consists of data from toxicity and lethality studies on mammals, often mice or rats. Because the data for human exposure is severely limited, an approach is needed that uses basic toxicity and lethality data from animal studies to estimate acute health effects in humans. The approach chosen is the one suggested jointly by the EPA, FEMA, and DOT in their ``Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis``, December 1987.

  15. Assessment of the Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Michael J.; Shih-Chieh, Kao; Ashfaq, Moetasim; Kaiser, Dale P.; Martinez, Rocio; Webb, Cindy; Wei, Yaxing

    2012-10-01

    As directed by Congress in Section 9505 of the SECURE Water Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11), the US Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from these federal facilities. This Oak Ridge National Laboratory report, referred to as the “9505 Assessment,” describes the technical basis for the report to Congress that was called for in the SECURE Water Act.

  16. The Effect of Dislocation Type (Crowe Types I-IV) on Pelvic Development in Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: A Radiologic Study of Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Ömer Faruk; Salar, Necmettin; Bilgen, Muhammet Sadık; Mutlu, Müren; Kara, Gökhan Kürşat; Gürsel, Enis

    2015-05-01

    Classification of hip pathology in developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) helps in appropriate placement of implants during total hip arthroplasty. We examined preoperative unilateral and bilateral pelvic radiographs of 57 patients (114 hips) undergoing total hip arthroplasty because of DDH. Both sides of the pelvis were visually separated into 3 areas for comparison. When area ratios of hips with Crowe types II, III, and IV DDH were compared with ratios for healthy hips, values in hips with DDH were significantly low for the iliac wings, significantly high for the acetabular regions, and significantly low for the ischial area. Using a line crossing the healthy hip's teardrop and parallel to a line joining the distal sacroiliac joints is useful for calculating limb-length discrepancy. PMID:25499171

  17. Biostimulation by Glycerol Phosphate to Precipitate Recalcitrant Uranium(IV) Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Trivedi, Divyesh; Bewsher, Alastair; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-09-15

    Stimulating the microbial reduction of aqueous uranium(VI) to insoluble U(IV) via electron donor addition has been proposed as a strategy to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. However, concerns have been raised regarding the longevity of microbially precipitated U(IV) in the subsurface, particularly given that it may become remobilized if the conditions change to become oxidizing. An alternative mechanism is to stimulate the precipitation of poorly soluble uranium phosphates via the addition of an organophosphate and promote the development of reducing conditions. Here, we selected a sediment sample from a U.K. nuclear site and stimulated the microbial community with glycerol phosphate under anaerobic conditions to assess whether uranium phosphate precipitation was a viable bioremediation strategy. Results showed that U(VI) was rapidly removed from solution and precipitated as a reduced crystalline U(IV) phosphate mineral similar to ningyoite. This mineral was considerably more recalcitrant to oxidative remobilization than the products of microbial U(VI) reduction. Bacteria closely related to Pelosinus species may have played a key role in uranium removal in these experiments. This work has implications for the stewardship of uranium-contaminated groundwater, with the formation of U(IV) phosphates potentially offering a more effective strategy for maintaining low concentrations of uranium in groundwater over long time periods. PMID:26292021

  18. [Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Hunter R., Ed.; Kerstiens, Gene, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    These four serial issues examine the effectiveness and appropriateness of a variety of assessment tests as well as their relationship to developmental education. Included are reviews of the following tests: (1) the Comparative Guidance and Placement Program, a self-scoring test of English and mathematics; (2) the Stanford Achievement Test, an…

  19. DNA ligase IV as a new molecular target for temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Natsuko; Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 ; Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Ohnishi, Ken; McKinnon, Peter J.; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2009-10-02

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is a methylating agent used in chemotherapy against glioblastoma. This work was designed to clarify details in repair pathways acting to remove DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by TMZ. Cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts were used which were deficient in DSB repair genes such as homologous recombination repair-related genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group 2 (XRCC2)and radiation sensitive mutant54 (Rad54), non-homologous end joining repair-related gene DNAligase IV (Lig4). Cell sensitivity to drug treatments was assessed using colony forming assays. The most effective molecular target which was correlated with TMZ cell sensitivity was Lig4. In addition, it was found that small interference RNAs (siRNA) for Lig4 efficiently enhanced cell lethality induced by TMZ in human glioblastoma A172 cells. These findings suggest that down regulation of Lig4 might provide a useful tool for cell sensitization during TMZ chemotherapy.

  20. Assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-09

    On August 13-14, 1987 the Halogenated Organics Subcommittee of the Science Advisory Board's Environmental Health Committee met in Washington, D.C. to review two documents prepared by EPA's Office of Research and Development that assess health effects associated with dichloromethane (methylene chloride). The documents included: a June 1987 Draft Technical Analysis of New Methods and Data Regarding Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology, a July 1987 Draft Addendum to the Health Assessment Document for Dichloromethane: Pharmacokinetics, Mechanism of Action and Epidemiology. The Subcommittees concluded that the Addendum was one of the best documents it has received in terms of its clarity, coverage of the data and analysis of scientific issues. The document clearly demonstrates the potential utility of pharmacokinetics data in risk assessment.

  1. Assessing the Effects of Climate Change on Tropical River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, Jorge D.; Montoro, Hugo; Latrubesse, Edgardo

    2013-01-01

    The Tropical Rivers 2012 international conference (http://www.crearamazonia.org/tropicalrivers2012/) was part of the International Geoscience Programme 582 project of The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's International Union for Geological Sciences (UNESCO-IUGS). The aim of the IGCP 582 is to provide an integrated assessment of long-term direct effects of climate variability and human-induced change and management of tropical river basins. This assessment is to be achieved by identification, quantification, and modeling of key hydro-geomorphologic indicators during the past and present times, and assessment of the potential influences of global change on fluvial systems and the socio-economic implications of these changes.

  2. Determination of the solubility of Np(IV), Pu(III) - (VI),Am(III) - (VI), and Te(IV), (V) hydroxo compounds in 0.5 - 14 M NaOH solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.

    1996-09-24

    The solubilities of Am(III), Np(IV), Pu(IV), Tc(IV), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(V), and Tc(V) hydroxo compounds were studied in 0.5 to 14 M NaOH solutions at 25{+-}2 {degrees}C. The effects of fluoride, phosphate, carbonate, oxalate, and some other organic complexing agents on the solubilities of Np(IV), Pu(IV), and TC(IV) hydroxides were investigated at 1.0 and 4.0 M NAOH. Some predictions were made on the dissolved (I.V) and (V) species present in alkali solutions.

  3. A Multi-Sample Confirmatory Factor Analysis of PTSD Symptoms: What Exactly Is Wrong with the DSM-IV Structure?

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Grant N.; Schell, Terry L.; Miles, Jeremy N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Within the DSM-IV, PTSD symptoms are rationally classified as assessing one of three symptom domains: reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, or hyperarousal. However, two alternative four-factor models have been advocated as superior to the DSM-IV framework, based on confirmatory factor analysis. In the Numbing model, symptoms of emotional numbing are differentiated from avoidance. In the Dysphoria model, several symptoms of numbing and hyperarousal are combined to form a factor purported to assess general psychological distress. Examination of these models, within 29 separate data sets, supports two conclusions. First, contrary to its conceptual underpinnings, the Dysphoria model differs empirically from the Numbing model solely in the correlation predicted between two hyperarousal symptoms; all other predicted correlations made by the two models are substantively identical. Second, when the factor analytic presumption of simple structure is relaxed to allow for potential presentation order effects, other plausible symptom structures emerge. In particular, the fit of the DSM-IV model improved dramatically and was a better fit to the data than either four-factor model. The ostensible inferiority of the DSM-IV model may be due to a methodological artifact stemming from the order in which symptoms are typically assessed. The provisional decision to revise the structure of PTSD symptoms in the DSM-5 in light of confirmatory factor analytic results may be misguided. PMID:23128035

  4. Lipoprotein ApoC-II activation of lipoprotein lipase. Modulation by apolipoprotein A-IV.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, I J; Scheraldi, C A; Yacoub, L K; Saxena, U; Bisgaier, C L

    1990-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides (TG) contained in chylomicrons requires the presence of a cofactor, apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. The physiological mechanism by which chylomicrons gain apoC-II necessary for LPL activation in whole plasma is not known. Using a gum arabic stabilized TG emulsion, activation of LPL by lipoprotein apoC-II was studied. Hydrolysis of TG by LPL was greater in the presence of serum than with addition of either high density lipoproteins (HDL) or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). LPL activation by either VLDL or HDL increased with addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction of plasma. A similar increase in LPL activity by addition of the lipoprotein-free fraction together with HDL or VLDL was observed when another TG emulsion (Intralipid) or TG-rich lipoproteins from an apoC-II deficient subject were used as a substrate. Human apoA-IV, apoA-I, apoE, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein were assessed for their ability to increase LPL activity in the presence of VLDL. At and below physiological concentrations, only apoA-IV increased LPL activity. One hundred percent of LPL activity measured in the presence of serum was achieved using VLDL plus apoA-IV. In the absence of an apoC-II source, apoA-IV had no effect on LPL activity. Removal of greater than 80% of the apoA-IV from the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma by incubation with Intralipid markedly reduced its ability to activate LPL in the presence of VLDL or HDL. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated that incubation of the nonlipoprotein-containing fraction of plasma with HDL and the TG emulsion caused increased transfer of apoC-II to the emulsion and association of apoA-IV with HDL. Our studies demonstrate that apoA-IV increases LPL activation in the presence of lipoproteins. We hypothesize that apoA-IV is required for efficient release of apoC-II from either HDL or VLDL, which then allows for LPL-mediated hydrolysis of TG in nascent

  5. Effect of soil in nutrient cycle assessment at dairy farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Annual farm nutrient cycle assessments give valuable insight in the nutrient cycles and nutrient losses at dairy farms. It describes nutrient use efficiencies for the entire farm and for the underlying components cattle, manure, crops and soil. In many modelling studies, soil is kept as a constant factor, while soil quality is vital for soil functioning of the ecosystem. Improving soil quality will improve the nutrient cycle, and will also have positive effect on the soil functions crop production, water cycling and greenhouse gas mitigation. Spatial variation of soil properties within a farm, however, are not included in annual nutrient cycle assessments. Therefore it is impossible to identify fields where most profit can be gained by improving farm management at field level, and it is not possible to identify and to quantify nutrient flow path ways. The aim of this study is to develop a framework to improve the annual nutrient cycle assessment at Dutch dairy farms, by including soil properties and their spatial variation within farms. Soil type and soil quality will be described by visual soil assessment of soil quality characteristics. The visual observations will be linked to the nutrient cycle assessment, using soil-hydrological model SWAP. We will demonstrate how soil quality at field level can impact on crop production, eutrophication potential and greenhouse gas potential at farm level. Also, we will show how this framework can be used by farmers to improve their farm management. This new approach is focusing on annual nutrient cycle assessment, but could also be used in life cycle assessment. It will improve understanding of soil functioning and dairy farm management.

  6. Remote sensing for assessing post-fire effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veraverbeke, S.; Hulley, G. C.; Harris, S. L.; Hook, S.

    2011-12-01

    Wildfires play an important role in many ecosystems by modifying the earth's carbon balance and post-fire landscape composition. Remote sensing can fulfill an important role for monitoring post-fire landscapes as it allows timely and cost-effective assessments. Most of the current applications rely on the visible and near infrared (VNIR) to short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectral region (0.4 to 2.5 μm). In this spectral range many burn indices have been applied to assess post-fire effects, e.g. the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) or Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Few studies have assessed the potential of the mid infrared (MIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) data. In this paper MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) airborne simulator data acquired over several burn scars is used to evaluate spectral indices in the 0.4-13 μm range. A first application focuses on the spectral separability of several burn indices for burned area mapping applied over three 2007 southern California scars. In a second application, a novel SWIR-MIR index (SMI) is proposed for assessing fire severity of the large 2011 Wallow wildfire in Arizona. Compared to the traditionally used differenced NBR (dNBR), the SMI has two major advantages: (i) the index is not impeded by smoke and (ii) the approach is based on a single date image. Findings can have important implications for the next generation spaceborne sensor, e.g. the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI).

  7. Identification and characterization of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor from aronia juice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, Miyuki; Yamane, Takuya; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Nakagaki, Takenori; Ohkubo, Iwao; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2015-09-25

    Aronia berries have many potential effects on health, including an antioxidant effect, effect for antimutagenesis, hepatoprotection and cardioprotection, an antidiabetic effect and inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Previous human studies have shown that aronia juice may be useful for treatment of obesity disorders. In this study, we found that aronia juice has an inhibitory effect against dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) (EC 3.4.14.5). DPP IV is a peptidase that cleaves the N-terminal region of incretins such as glucagon-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Inactivation of incretins by DPP IV induces reduction of insulin secretion. Furthermore, we identified that cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside as the DPP IV inhibitor in aronia juice. DPP IV was inhibited more strongly by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside than by cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside. The results suggest that DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside present in aronia juice. The antidiabetic effect of aronia juice may be mediated through DPP IV inhibition by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside. - Highlights: • DPP IV activity is inhibited by aronia juice. • DPP IV inhibitor is cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside in aronia juice. • DPP IV is inhibited by cyanidin 3, 5-diglucoside more than cyanidin and cyanidin 3-glucoside.

  8. Independent Examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV): What Does the WAIS-IV Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Nicholas; Hulac, David M.; Kranzler, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Published empirical evidence for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) does not address some essential questions pertaining to the applied practice of intellectual assessment. In this study, the structure and cross-age invariance of the latest WAIS-IV revision were examined to (a) elucidate the nature of the constructs…

  9. Understanding the Effect of Monomeric Iridium(III/IV) Aquo Complexes on the Photoelectrochemistry of IrO(x)·nH2O-Catalyzed Water-Splitting Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M; Strayer, Megan E; McCool, Nicholas S; Pandelia, Maria-Erini; Saunders, Timothy P; Swierk, John R; Callejas, Juan F; Jensen, Lasse; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2015-07-15

    Soluble, monomeric Ir(III/IV) complexes strongly affect the photoelectrochemical performance of IrO(x)·nH2O-catalyzed photoanodes for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The synthesis of IrO(x)·nH2O colloids by alkaline hydrolysis of Ir(III) or Ir(IV) salts proceeds through monomeric intermediates that were characterized using electrochemical and spectroscopic methods and modeled in TDDFT calculations. In air-saturated solutions, the monomers exist in a mixture of Ir(III) and Ir(IV) oxidation states, where the most likely formulations at pH 13 are [Ir(OH)5(H2O)](2-) and [Ir(OH)6](2-), respectively. These monomeric anions strongly adsorb onto IrO(x)·nH2O colloids but can be removed by precipitation of the colloids with isopropanol. The monomeric anions strongly adsorb onto TiO2, and they promote the adsorption of ligand-free IrO(x)·nH2O colloids onto mesoporous titania photoanodes. However, the reversible adsorption/desorption of electroactive monomers effectively short-circuits the photoanode redox cycle and thus dramatically degrades the photoelectrochemical performance of the cell. The growth of a dense TiO2 barrier layer prevents access of soluble monomeric anions to the interface between the oxide semiconductor and the electrode back contact (a fluorinated tin oxide transparent conductor) and leads to improved photoanode performance. Purified IrO(x)·nH2O colloids, which contain no adsorbed monomer, give improved performance at the same electrodes. These results explain earlier observations that IrO(x)·nH2O catalysts can dramatically degrade the performance of metal oxide photoanodes for the OER reaction. PMID:26106904

  10. Design guidelines for assessing and controlling spacecraft charging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.; Garrett, H. B.; Whittlesey, A. C.; Stevens, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    The need for uniform criteria, or guidelines, to be used in all phases of spacecraft design is discussed. Guidelines were developed for the control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces by the lower energy space charged particle environment. Interior charging due to higher energy particles is not considered. A guide to good design practices for assessing and controlling charging effects is presented. Uniform design practices for all space vehicles are outlined.

  11. FAK and p38-MAP Kinase-Dependent Activation of Apoptosis and Caspase-3 in Retinal Endothelial Cells by α1(IV)NC1

    PubMed Central

    Boosani, Chandra S.; Nalabothula, Narasimharao; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Cosgrove, Dominic; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Sheibani, Nader; Sudhakar, Akulapalli

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of the antiangiogenic factor α1(IV)NC1 on vascular endothelial growth factor mediated proangiogenic activity in mouse retinal endothelial cell (MLEC). Methods Primary culture of mouse retinal endothelial cells were established as previously described and used to determine the effects of α1(IV)NC1 on proangiogenic activity of VEGF. Cell proliferation was evaluated using [H3] thymidine incorporation and 3,(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5- diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assays. Cell migration was determined using modified Boyden chamber and scratch wound assays and tube formation was assessed on Matrigel. The intracellular signaling events Bcl-2/Bcl-xL and caspase-3/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were evaluated in cells stimulated with VEGF and plated on type IV collagen coated dishes. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring different caspases activity as well as quantitative fluorescence analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting assay. Subcutaneously injected VEGF induced in-vivo neovascularization was studied using Matrigel plug assay. Results VEGF induced sub-confluent MREC proliferation, migration, and tube formation was significantly inhibited by α1(IV)NC1 at 1.0µM (P<0.001). α1(IV)NC1 induced MREC apoptosis mediating through by inhibition of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expressions and activation of caspase-3/PARP through FAK/p38-MAPK signaling. In addition, α1(IV)NC1 dose dependently inhibited VEGF-mediated neovascularization in-vivo. Conclusions α1(IV)NC1 inhibited VEGF-mediated angiogenesis by promoting apoptosis, caspase-3/PARP activation and negatively impacting FAK/p38-MAPK phosphorylation, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expressions leading to MREC death. The endothelial specific inhibitory actions of recombinant α1(IV)NC1 may be of benefit in the treatment of a variety of eye diseases with a neovascular component. PMID:19443723

  12. PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and DPP-IV inhibitory effects for chromene derivatives from the leaves of Smilax china L.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bing Tian; Le, Duc Dat; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Ali, Md Yousof; Choi, Jae-Sue; Min, Byung Sun; Shin, Heung Mook; Rhee, Hae Ik; Woo, Mi Hee

    2016-06-25

    Two new flavonoids, bismilachinone (11) and smilachinin (14), were isolated from the leaves of Smilax china L. together with 14 known compounds. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic methods. The PTP1B, α-glucosidase, and DPP-IV inhibitory activities of compounds 1-16 were evaluated at the molecular level. Among them, compounds 4, 7, and 10 showed moderate DPP-IV inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 20.81, 33.12, and 32.93 μM, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, 6, 11, 12, and 16 showed strong PTP1B inhibitory activities, with respective IC50 values of 7.62, 10.80, 0.92, 2.68, 9.77, and 24.17 μM compared with the IC50 value for the positive control (ursolic acid: IC50 = 1.21 μM). Compounds 2-7, 11, 12, 15, and 16 showed potent α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, with respective IC50 values of 8.70, 81.66, 35.11, 35.92, 7.99, 26.28, 11.28, 62.68, 44.32, and 70.12 μM. The positive control, acarbose, displayed an IC50 value of 175.84 μM. In the kinetic study for the PTP1B enzyme, compounds 6, 11, and 12 displayed competitive inhibition with Ki values of 3.20, 8.56, and 5.86 μM, respectively. Compounds 3, 4, and 16 showed noncompetitive inhibition with Ki values of 18.75, 5.95, and 22.86 μM, respectively. Molecular docking study for the competitive inhibitors (6, 11, and 12) radically corroborates the binding affinities and inhibition of PTP1B enzymes. These results indicated that the leaves of Smilax china L. may contain compounds with anti-diabetic activity. PMID:27060210

  13. Chelation of /sup 238/Pu(IV) in vivo by 3,4,3-LICAM(C): Effects of ligand methylation and pH

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.W.; White, D.L.; Jeung, N.L.; Weitl, F.L.; Uhlir, L.C.; Jones, E.S.; Bruenger, F.W.; Raymond, K.N.

    1989-06-01

    The linear tetracarboxycatecholate ligand, 3,4,3-LICAM(C) N1,N5,N10,N14-tetrakis(2,3-dihydroxy-4-carboxybenzoyl-tetraaza tet radecane, tetra sodium salt) injected within 1 h after injection of Pu(IV) citrate, removes about the same fraction of Pu from animals as CaNa3-DTPA but removes less inhaled Pu than CaNa3-DTPA and leaves a Pu residue in the renal cortex. However, the formation constant of the expected Pu-3,4,3-LICAM(C) complexes are orders of magnitude greater than that of Pu-DTPA, and 3,4,3-LICAM(C) is 100 times more efficient than CaNa3-DTPA for removing Pu from transferrin in vitro. Because the formation constants of their actinide complexes are central to in vivo actinide chelation, ligand design strategies are dominated by the search for ligands with large Pu complex stabilities, and it was necessary to explain the failure of 3,4,3-LICAM(C) to achieve its thermodynamic potential in vivo. All the batches of 3,4,3-LICAM(C) prepared at Berkeley or in France (Euro-LICAM(C)) were found by high-pressure liquid chromatography to be mixtures of the pure ligand (55% in Berkeley preparations, 8.5% in Euro-LICAM(C)) and its four methylesters. A revised synthesis for 3,4,3-LICAM(C) is appended to this report. All of the incompletely hydrolyzed 3,4,3-LICAM(C) preparations and the pure ligand were tested for removal of Pu from mice (238Pu(IV) citrate intravenous, 30 mumol kg-1 of ligand at 1 h, kill at 24 h, radioanalyze tissues and separated excretal). The presence of methylesters did not significantly impair the ability of the ligands to remove Pu from mice, and it did not alter the fraction of injected Pu deposited in kidneys. Temporary elevation (reduction) of plasma and urine pH of mice by 0.5 mL of 0.1 M NaHCO3 (NH4Cl) injected before or simultaneously with pure 3,4,3-LICAM(C) somewhat improved (significantly reduced) Pu excretion but had little influence on Pu deposition in kidneys.

  14. An in vitro comparative assessment with a series of new triphenyltin(IV) 2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoates endowed with anticancer activities: structural modifications, analysis of efficacy and cytotoxicity involving human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Paul, Anup; Pellerito, Lorenzo; Scopelliti, Michelangelo; Duthie, Andrew; de Vos, Dick; Verma, Rajeshwar P; Englert, Ulli

    2012-02-01

    Four new triphenyltin(IV) complexes of composition Ph(3)SnLH (where LH=2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoate) (1-4) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (((1))H, ((13))C and ((119))Sn NMR, IR, ((119))Sn Mössbauer) techniques in combination with elemental analysis. The ((119))Sn NMR spectroscopic data indicate a tetrahedral coordination geometry in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structures of three complexes, Ph(3)SnL((1))H (1), Ph(3)SnL((3))H (3), Ph(3)SnL((4))H (4), were determined. All display an essentially tetrahedral geometry with angles ranging from 93.50(8) to 124.5(2)°; ((119))Sn Mössbauer spectral data support this assignment. The cytotoxicity studies were performed with complexes 1-4, along with a previously reported complex (5) in vitro across a panel of human tumor cell lines viz., A498, EVSA-T, H226, IGROV, M19 MEL, MCF-7 and WIDR. The screening results were compared with the results from other related triphenyltin(IV) complexes (6-7) and tributyltin(IV) complexes (8-11) having 2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoates framework. In general, the complexes exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity. The results obtained for 1-3 are also comparable to those of its o-analogs i.e. 4-7, except 5, but the advantage is the former set of complexes demonstrated two folds more cytotoxic activity for the cell line MCF-7 with ID(50) values in the range 41-53 ng/ml. Undoubtedly, the cytotoxic results of complexes 1-3 are far superior to CDDP, 5-FU and ETO, and related tributyltin(IV) complexes 8-11. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies for the cytotoxicity of triphenyltin(IV) complexes 1-7 and tributyltin(IV) complexes 8-11 is also discussed against a panel of human tumor cell lines. PMID:22182574

  15. Hematopoietic effects of benzene inhalation assessed by long-term bone marrow culture

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, N.G.

    1996-12-01

    The strong and long-lasting hematotoxic effect after benzene exposure in vivo (300 ppm, 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks) was assessed in mice with bone marrow cells grown in long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC). Bone marrow cultures initiated 1 day after the last benzene exposure did not produce adequate numbers of hematopoietic cells over 3 weeks and, in most cases, no erythroid or myeloid clonogenic cells could be recovered. The adherent cell layer of these cultures had a lower capacity for supporting in vitro hematopoiesis after the second seeding with normal bone marrow cells compared with control cultures. Two weeks after the last benzene exposure, body weight, hematocrit, bone marrow cellularity, and committed hematopoietic progenitor content (BFU-E and CFU-GM) were regenerated to normal or subnormal values, whereas hematopoiesis in LTB MC was very poor. Over 8 weeks, little or no significant committed progenitor production was observed. Treatment of mice exposed to benzene with hemin (three doses of 3 {mu}g/g bw iv over 2 weeks for a total dose of 9 {mu}g/g) partially overcame the toxic effect of benzene on the hematopoietic system as measured by the LTBMC method. Cultures from mice treated with hemin had a modest recovery of BFU-E and CFU-GM clonogenic potential after 5 to 6 weeks in LTBMC. In contrast, little or no recovery was obtained for the adherent cell layer clonogenic capacity, even after hemin treatment. These results clearly indicate a strong, long-lasting toxic effect on the bone marrow stroma and a limited recovery of hematopoietic potential by clonogenic cells of the nonadherent population after in vivo hemin treatment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Standard Missile Block IV battery

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.

    1996-11-01

    During the 1980`s a trend in automatic primary battery technologies was the replacement of silver-zinc batteries by thermal battery designs. The Standard missile (SM 2) Block IV development is a noteworthy reversal of this trend. The SM2, Block IV battery was originally attempted as a thermal battery with multiple companies attempting to develop a thermal battery design. These attempts resulted in failure to obtain a production thermal battery. A decision to pursue a silver-zinc battery design resulted in the development of a battery to supply the SM 2, Block IV (thermal battery design goal) and also the projected power requirements of the evolving SM 2, Block IVA in a single silver-zinc battery design. Several advancements in silver-zinc battery technology were utilized in this design that improve the producibility and extend the boundaries of silver-zinc batteries.

  17. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  18. Assessing Biological Effects from Highway-Runoff Constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckler, Denny R.; Granato, Gregory E.

    1999-01-01

    Increased emphasis on evaluation of nonpoint-source pollution has intensified the need for techniques that can be used to discern the toxicological effects of complex chemical mixtures. In response, the use of biological assessment techniques is receiving increased regulatory emphasis. When applied with documented habitat assessment and chemical analysis, these techniques can increase our understanding of the influence of environmental contaminants on the biological integrity and ecological function of aquatic communities. The contaminants of greatest potential concern in highway runoff are those that arise from highway construction, maintenance, and use. The major contaminants of interest are deicers; nutrients; metals; petroleum-related organic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX), and methyl tert -butyl ether (MTBE); sediment washed off the road surface; and agricultural chemicals used in highway maintenance. Hundreds, if not thousands, of biological endpoints (measurable responses of living organisms) may be either directly or associatively affected by contaminant exposure. Measurable effects can occur throughout ecosystem processes across the wide range of biological complexity, ranging from responses at the biochemical level to the community level. The challenge to the environmental scientist is to develop an understanding of the relationship of effects at various levels of biological organization in order to determine whether a causal relationship exists between chemical exposure and substantial ecological impairment. This report provides a brief history of the evolution of biological assessment techniques, a description of the major classes of contaminants that are of particular interest in highway runoff, an overview of representative biological assessment techniques, and a discussion of data-quality considerations. Published reports with a focus on the effects of highway runoff on

  19. Platinum(iv) anticancer prodrugs - hypotheses and facts.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Dan

    2016-08-16

    In this manuscript we focus on Pt(iv) anticancer prodrugs. We explore the main working hypotheses for the design of effective Pt(iv) prodrugs and note the exceptions to the common assumptions that are prevalent in the field. Special attention was devoted to the emerging class of "dual action" Pt(iv) prodrugs, where bioactive ligands are conjugated to the axial positions of platinum in order to obtain orthogonal or complementary effects that will increase the efficacy of killing the cancer cells. We discuss the rationale behind the design of the "dual action" prodrugs and the results of the pharmacological studies obtained. Simultaneous release of two bioactive moieties inside the cancer cells often triggers several processes that together determine the fate of the cell. Pt(iv) complexes provide many opportunities for applying new concepts in targeting, synergistic cell killing and exploiting novel nanodelivery systems. PMID:27214873

  20. Effect of external magnetic field on IV 99mTc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: demonstration in a rat model: special report.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Mauro; Barteri, Mario; Megna, Valentina; D'Elia, Piera; Rebonato, Stefania; Latini, Augusto; De Angelis, Francesca; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Guadagno, Noemi Antonella; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rubello, Domenico; Pala, Alessandro; Colletti, Patrick M

    2015-02-01

    Among the most interesting applications of ferromagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine is the potential for localizing pharmacologically or radioactively tagged agents directly to selected tissues selected by an adjustable external magnetic field. This concept is demonstrated by the application external magnetic field on IV Tc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide NPs in a rat model. In a model comparing a rat with a 0.3-T magnet over a hind paw versus a rat without a magnet, a static acquisition at 45 minutes showed that 27% of the administered radioactivity was in the area subtended by the magnet, whereas the liver displays a percentage of binding of 14% in the presence of the magnet and of 16% in the absence of an external magnetic field. These preliminary results suggest that the application of an external magnetic field may be a viable route for the development of methods for the confinement of magnetic NPs labeled with radioactive isotopes targeted for predetermined sites of the body. PMID:25551623

  1. The effect of "on/off" molecular switching on the photophysical and photochemical properties of axially calixarene substituted activatable silicon(iv)phthalocyanine photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ömer; Altınbaş Özpınar, Gül; Durmuş, Mahmut; Ahsen, Vefa

    2016-05-01

    Silicon(iv) phthalocyanines ( and ) bearing two calixarene groups as axial ligands were synthesized. Surprisingly, both phthalocyanines were obtained as two different isomers ( and ) depending on the distance between calixarene benzene groups and the phthalocyanine ring. DFT and TD-DFT computations were performed to model plausible structures of these isomers and to simulate electronic absorption spectra. These isomers converted into each other depending on the polarity of the used solvent, temperature and light irradiation. The photophysical and photochemical properties of each isomer were investigated in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for the determination of photodynamic therapy (PDT) activities of these compounds. The more blue-shifted isomers ( and ) showed higher fluorescence quantum yields and singlet oxygen generation compared to more red-shifted counterparts ( and ). This behavior is extremely important for developing activatable photosensitizers for cancer treatment by PDT. Although these photosensitizers produce lower singlet oxygen in normal cells, they produce higher singlet oxygen (six times higher for ) in cancer cells since these photosensitizers converted to more blue-shifted isomers by using light irradiation. PMID:27052992

  2. Assessing management effects on Oak forests in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sishir; Pietsch, Stephan A.; Hasenauer, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Historic land use as well as silvicultural management practices have changed the structures and species composition of central European forests. Such changes have effects on the growth of forests and contribute to global warming. As insufficient information on historic forest management is available it is hard to explain the effect of management on forests growth and its possible consequences to the environment. In this situation, the BIOME-BGC model, which integrates the main physical, biological and physiological processes based on current understanding of ecophysiology is an option for assessing the management effects through tracking the cycling of energy, water, carbon and nutrients within a given ecosystems. Such models are increasingly employed to simulate current and future forest dynamics. This study first compares observed standing tree volume, carbon and nitrogen content in soil in the high forests and coppice with standards stands of Oak forests in Austria. Biome BGC is then used to assess the effects of management on forest growth and to explain the differences with measured parameters. Close positive correlations and unbiased results and statistically insignificant differences between predicted and observed volumes indicates the application of the model as a diagnostic tool to assess management effects in oak forests. The observed data in 2006 and 2009 was further compared with the results of respective model runs. Further analysis on simulated data shows that thinning leads to an increase in growth efficiency (GE), nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) and water use efficiency (WUE), and to a decrease in the radiation use efficiency (RUE) in both forests. Among all studied growth parameters, only the difference in the NUE was statistically significant. This indicates that the difference in the yield of forests is mainly governed by the NUE difference in stands due to thinning. The coppice with standards system produces an equal amount of net primary

  3. The Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent Using Personnel Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xie

    From January 1994, U.S. nuclear plants must develop a technically rigorous approach for determining the effective dose equivalent for their work forces. This dissertation explains concepts associated with effective dose equivalent and describes how to assess effective dose equivalent by using conventional personnel dosimetry measurements. A Monte Carlo computer code, MCNP, was used to calculate photon transport through a model of the human body. Published mathematical phantoms of the human adult male and female were used to simulate irradiation from a variety of external radiation sources in order to calculate organ and tissue doses, as well as effective dose equivalent using weighting factors from ICRP Publication 26. The radiation sources considered were broad parallel photon beams incident on the body from 91 different angles and isotropic point sources located at 234 different locations in contact with or near the body. Monoenergetic photons of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV were considered for both sources. Personnel dosimeters were simulated on the surface of the body and exposed to with the same sources. From these data, the influence of dosimeter position on dosimeter response was investigated. Different algorithms for assessing effective dose equivalent from personnel dosimeter responses were proposed and evaluated. The results indicate that the current single-badge approach is satisfactory for most common exposure situations encountered in nuclear plants, but additional conversion factors may be used when more accurate results become desirable. For uncommon exposures involving source situated at the back of the body or source located overhead, the current approach of using multi-badges and assigning the highest dose is overly conservative and unnecessarily expensive. For these uncommon exposures, a new algorithm, based on two dosimeters, one on the front of the body and another one on the back of the body, has been shown to yield conservative assessment of

  4. Assessments of atmospheric effects on VHF and UHF communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culbertson, Gary W.

    1990-03-01

    Nonstandard gradients of pressure, temperatures and humidity in the troposphere create refractive conditions that affect electromagnetic waves by either increasing or decreasing VHF and UHF communication ranges. The Naval Ocean Systems Center (NOSC) has developed the Integrated Refractive Effect Prediction System (IREPS) to assess refractive conditions for a point of interest and provide video display or printouts of how the refractive conditions will affect various EM transmissions. A research cruise was conducted from 1 to 8 November 1989 in the Eastern Pacific and included 31 rawinsonde launches. The data from rawinsondes was entered in IREPS PC Version 1.0 assess the refractive conditions. The IREPS generated refractive assessments where then compared to the GTE Sylvania Report and the Pacific Missile Test Center's Interim Procedure for Forecasting Refractivity Conditions (IPFRC). The results indicated that the GTE Sylvania climatology was not an accurate tool for assessing refractive condition at sea mainly because the GTE data set consisted of shore-based rawinsonde data. The IPFRC, based solely on synoptic weather parameters, obtained at 60 percent success rate in predicting the likelihood of the presence of refractive conditions.

  5. Assessment Training Effects on Student Assessment Skills and Task Performance in a Technology-Facilitated Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiongyi; Li, Lan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of an assessment training module on student assessment skills and task performance in a technology-facilitated peer assessment. Seventy-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The participants completed an assessment training exercise, prior to engaging in peer-assessment activities. During the…

  6. Uranium Metalla-Allenes with Carbene Imido R2 C=U(IV) =NR' Units (R=Ph2 PNSiMe3 ; R'=CPh3 ): Alkali-Metal-Mediated Push-Pull Effects with an Amido Auxiliary.

    PubMed

    Lu, Erli; Tuna, Floriana; Lewis, William; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Liddle, Stephen T

    2016-08-01

    We report uranium(IV)-carbene-imido-amide metalla-allene complexes [U(BIPM(TMS) )(NCPh3 )(NHCPh3 )(M)] (BIPM(TMS) =C(PPh2 NSiMe3 )2 ; M=Li or K) that can be described as R2 C=U=NR' push-pull metalla-allene units, as organometallic counterparts of the well-known push-pull organic allenes. The solid-state structures reveal that the R2 C=U=NR' units adopt highly unusual cis-arrangements, which are also reproduced by gas-phase theoretical studies conducted without the alkali metals to remove their potential structure-directing roles. Computational studies confirm the double-bond nature of the U=NR' and U=CR2 interactions, the latter increasingly attenuated by potassium then lithium when compared to the hypothetical alkali-metal-free anion. Combined experimental and theoretical data show that the push-pull effect induced by the alkali metal cations and amide auxiliary gives a fundamental and tunable structural influence over the C=U(IV) =N units. PMID:27403746

  7. 16,17-Dihydro-17b-hydroxy isomitraphylline alkaloid as an inhibitor of DPP-IV, and its effect on incretin hormone and β-cell proliferation in diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ashutosh; Srinivasan, B P

    2012-09-29

    Reduces levels of intact GLP-1 and inhibition of DPPIV augments levels of intact GLP-1 improves glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients and diabetic animal model. Although, GLP-1 is known to stimulate insulin secretion, insulin biosynthesis and dose insulin gene transcription, augmented supplies of insulin for secretion. DHIM is an indole alkaloid, isolated from Mitragyna parvifolia. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the inhibitor activity of novel alkaloid on DPP IV. DHIM produced marked inhibition of DPP IV. Accordingly, we used 5, 10 and 20 μg DHIM alkaloids in DPPIV assay, and then found 18%, 56%, and 68% inhibition activity. In the present in vivo study, we examined the 16,17-dihydro-17b-hydroxy (DHIM) effect on neonatal Wistar albino rats treated with streptozotocin, an established model of type 2 diabetes. Diabetic rats, 8 weeks chronic administered with DHIM (100mg/kg) markedly reduced plasma glucose concentration, increased glucose tolerance in response to glucose loading. Consequently, GLP-1 and IL-10 levels were also significantly increased in treated diabetic rats. Despite, body weight was not found changed significantly; the insulin content and β-cell mass at 2 months were significantly increased by DHIM. Immunostaining and Confocal image of TUNEL assay showed that DHIM stimulates β-cell proliferation and reduced pancreatic cell apoptosis in diabetic treated rats. These results suggest that DHIM induces proliferation of pancreatic cells and increases the formation of β-cells. PMID:22820565

  8. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of a rockfall warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bründl, Michael; Sättele, Martina; Krautblatter, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Rockslides and rockfalls can pose high risk to human settlements and traffic infrastructure. In addition to structural mitigation measures like rockfall nets, warning systems are increasingly installed to reduce rockfall risks. Whereas for structural mitigation measures with reducing effects on the spatial extent a structured evaluation method is existing, no or only few approaches to assess the effectiveness for warning systems are known. Especially for higher magnitude rockfalls structural mitigation measures are not effective, and reliable early warning systems will be essential in future. In response to that, we developed a classification and a framework to assess the reliability and effectiveness of early warning systems (Sättele et al, 2015a; 2016). Here, we demonstrate an application for the rockfall warning system installed in Preonzo prior to a major rockfall in May 2012 (Sättele et al., 2015b). We show that it is necessary to design such a warning system as fail-safe construction, which has to incorporate components with low failure probabilities, high redundancy, low warning thresholds, and additional control systems. With a hypothetical probabilistic analysis, we investigate the effect of the risk attitude of decision makers and of the number of sensors on the probability of detecting an event and on initiating a timely evacuation, as well as on related intervention cost. We conclude that it is possible to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of warning systems, which helps to optimize mitigation strategies against rockfall events. References Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Reliability and effectiveness of warning systems for natural hazards: concept and application to debris flow warning, Rel. Eng. Syst. Safety, 142, 192-202, 2015a. Sättele, M., Krautblatter, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Forecasting rock slope failure: How reliable and effective are warning systems?, Landslides, 605, 1-14, 2015b. Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and

  9. I.v. lidocaine worsens histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Hashimoto, Y; Sato, T; Yoshioka, H; Kudo, T; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1999-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of lidocaine (lignocaine) on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by direct visualization with a superfine fibreoptic bronchoscope. Seven mongrel dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (pentobarbitone) 30 mg kg-1 followed by 2 mg kg-1 h-1 and pancuronium 200 micrograms kg-1 h-1. The trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube containing a second lumen for insertion of a 2.2-mm fibreoptic bronchoscope. This allowed estimation of the bronchial cross-sectional area (BCA) of the third bronchial bifurcation of the right lung. We used NIH image, a public domain image processing and analysis program. Bronchoconstriction was produced with a bolus dose of histamine 10 micrograms kg-1 i.v. followed by continuous infusion of 500 micrograms kg-1 h-1. After 30 min the following i.v. doses of lidocaine were given: lidocaine 0 (saline), 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 at 10-min intervals. BCA was assessed 90 s after each dose. Arterial blood sampling was performed for measurement of plasma catecholamines. Lidocaine 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced histamine-decreased BCA from 69.7 (SEM 4.1)% to 59.8 (7.3)% and 34.3 (6.8)%, respectively. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines decreased significantly after lidocaine 10 mg kg-1 i.v. In addition, there was a significant correlation between percentage decreases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and reduction in %BCA (epinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.674; norepinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.510). This study suggests that i.v. lidocaine may exacerbate histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by a sympatholytic effect. This may have therapeutic implications for patients with acute asthma or anaphylactic shock who may become dependent on circulating catecholamines. PMID:10325842

  10. Assessing treatment effects through changes in perceptions and cognitive organization.

    PubMed

    Szalay, L; Bovasso, G; Vilov, S; Williams, R E

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested the Associative Group Analysis (AGA) for its analytic sensitivity in assessing perceptions and attitudes and in mapping changes in cognitive organization indicative of substance abuse. Based on inferences drawn from the distributions of thousands of spontaneous, free associations elicited by strategically selected stimulus themes, AGA offers an unstructured approach to assess images and meanings, and to map systems of mental representation evasive to the more direct methods of using questions or scales. This article compares pretreatment and posttreatment samples, tracing the psychosocial effects of treatment. The investigations focus on variables related to substance abuse such as self-image, social nexus, and perceptions of illicit substances. The results indicate a sensitive approach, useful in treatment evaluation. PMID:1449123

  11. Alcohol Use Disorders: Translational Utility of DSM-IV Liabilities to the DSM-5 System

    PubMed Central

    Kiselica, Andrew M.; Cohn, Amy M.; Hagman, Brett T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Young adults have some of the highest rates of problem drinking and alcohol use disorders (AUDs) relative to any other age. However, recent evidence suggests that the DSM-IV hierarchical classification system of AUDs does not validly represent symptoms in the population; instead, it evinces a unitary, dimensional classification scheme. The DSM-5 has been altered to fit this changing, evidence-based conceptualization. Nevertheless, little is understood about the degree to which known risk factors for DSM-IV AUD diagnoses will transfer to the new DSM-5 guidelines in this group of high-risk drinkers. The current study built a coherent model of liabilities for DSM-IV AUDs in young adults and tested for transferability to DSM-5. Methods N = 496 college students (51.10% male) were assessed on a variety of factors related to AUD risk, including demographics, substance use (past 90-days), and drinking motives. Liability models were created using all variables in Structural Equation Modeling to test direct and indirect effects on DSM diagnostic status. The best model under the DSM-IV was chosen based on fit and parsimony. This model was then applied to the DSM-5 system to test for transferability. Results The best the fitting model for DSM-IV included direct influences of drug use, quantity-frequency of alcohol consumption, and social and coping drinking motives. Improved model fit was found when the DSM-5 system was the outcome. Conclusions Knowledge of risk factors for AUDs appear to transfer well to the new diagnostic system. PMID:25750592

  12. Survival of Patients with Stage IV Lung Cancer with Diabetes Treated with Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny J.; Gallagher, Emily J.; Sigel, Keith; Mhango, Grace; Galsky, Matthew D.; Smith, Cardinale B.; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Prior studies have shown an anticancer effect of metformin in patients with breast and colorectal cancer. It is unclear, however, whether metformin has a mortality benefit in lung cancer. Objectives: To compare overall survival of patients with diabetes with stage IV non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) taking metformin versus those not on metformin. Methods: Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 750 patients with diabetes 65–80 years of age diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC between 2007 and 2009. We used propensity score methods to assess the association of metformin use with overall survival while controlling for potential confounders. Measurements and Main Results: Overall, 61% of patients were on metformin at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. Median survival in the metformin group was 5 months, compared with 3 months in patients not treated with metformin (P < 0.001). Propensity score analyses showed that metformin use was associated with a statistically significant improvement in survival (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.71–0.89), after controlling for sociodemographics, diabetes severity, other diabetes medications, cancer characteristics, and treatment. Conclusions: Metformin is associated with improved survival among patients with diabetes with stage IV NSCLC, suggesting a potential anticancer effect. Further research should evaluate plausible biologic mechanisms and test the effect of metformin in prospective clinical trials. PMID:25522257

  13. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, D R

    1991-01-01

    The oxidation of organic matter coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) is one of the most important biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments, soils, and groundwater. This process, which may have been the first globally significant mechanism for the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide, plays an important role in the oxidation of natural and contaminant organic compounds in a variety of environments and contributes to other phenomena of widespread significance such as the release of metals and nutrients into water supplies, the magnetization of sediments, and the corrosion of metal. Until recently, much of the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction in sedimentary environments was considered to be the result of nonenzymatic processes. However, microorganisms which can effectively couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) have recently been discovered. With Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor, these organisms can completely oxidize fatty acids, hydrogen, or a variety of monoaromatic compounds. This metabolism provides energy to support growth. Sugars and amino acids can be completely oxidized by the cooperative activity of fermentative microorganisms and hydrogen- and fatty-acid-oxidizing Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reducers. This provides a microbial mechanism for the oxidation of the complex assemblage of sedimentary organic matter in Fe(III)- or Mn(IV)-reducing environments. The available evidence indicates that this enzymatic reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) accounts for most of the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in sedimentary environments. Little is known about the diversity and ecology of the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and only preliminary studies have been conducted on the physiology and biochemistry of this process. PMID:1886521

  14. The PLATO IV Communications System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Bruce Arne; Stifle, Jack

    The PLATO IV computer-based educational system contains its own communications hardware and software for operating plasma-panel graphics terminals. Key echoing is performed by the central processing unit: every key pressed at a terminal passes through the entire system before anything appears on the terminal's screen. Each terminal is guaranteed…

  15. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  16. Dibutyltin(IV) complexes containing arylazobenzoate ligands: chemistry, in vitro cytotoxic effects on human tumor cell lines and mode of interaction with some enzymes.

    PubMed

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Paul, Anup; Pellerito, Lorenzo; Scopelliti, Michelangelo; Singh, Palwinder; Verma, Pooja; Duthie, Andrew; de Vos, Dick; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2011-04-01

    Dibutyltin(IV) complexes of composition Bu₂Sn(LH)₂, where LH is a carboxylate residue derived from 2-[(E)-(5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L¹H) with water molecule (1), 4-[(E)-(5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L²H) (2) and 4-[(E)-(4-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L³H) (3), were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (¹H, ¹³C and ¹¹⁹Sn NMR, IR, ¹¹⁹Sn Mössbauer) techniques. A full characterization was accomplished from the crystal structure of complex 1. The molecular structures and geometries of the complexes (1a i.e. 1 without water molecule and 3) were fully optimized using the quantum mechanical method (PM6). Complexes 1 and 3 were found to exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity in vitro across a panel of human tumor cell lines viz., A498, EVSA-T, H226, IGROV, M19 MEL, MCF-7 and WIDR. Compound 3 is found to be four times superior for the A498, EVSA-T and MCF-7 cell lines than CCDP (cisplatin), and four, eight and sixteen times superior for the A498, H226 and MCF-7 cell lines, respectively, compared to ETO (etoposide). The mechanistic role of cytotoxic activity of test compounds is discussed in relation to the theoretical results of docking studies with some key enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, thymidylate synthase, thymidylate phosphorylase and topoisomerase II associated with the propagation of cancer. PMID:20012338

  17. Silicon(IV) phthalocyanines substituted axially with different nucleoside moieties. Effects of nucleoside type on the photosensitizing efficiencies and in vitro photodynamic activities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bi-Yuan; Shen, Xiao-Min; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Cai, Yi-Bin; Ke, Mei-Rong; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-06-01

    A series of new silicon(IV) phthalocyanines (SiPcs) di-substituted axially with different nucleoside moieties have been synthesized and evaluated for their singlet oxygen quantum yields (ΦΔ) and in vitro photodynamic activities. The adenosine-substituted SiPc shows a lower photosensitizing efficiency (ΦΔ=0.35) than the uridine- and cytidine-substituted analogs (ΦΔ=0.42-0.44), while the guanosine-substituted SiPc exhibits a weakest singlet oxygen generation efficiency with a ΦΔ value down to 0.03. On the other hand, replacing axial adenosines with chloro-modified adenosines and purines can result in the increase of photogenerating singlet oxygen efficiencies of SiPcs. The formed SiPcs 1 and 2, which contain monochloro-modified adenosines and dichloro-modified purines respectively, appear as efficient photosensitizers with ΦΔ of 0.42-0.44. Both compounds 1 and 2 present high photocytotoxicities against HepG2 and BGC823 cancer cells with IC50 values ranging from 9nM to 33nM. The photocytotoxicities of these two compounds are remarkably higher than the well-known anticancer photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (IC50=752nM against HepG2 cells) in the same condition. As revealed by confocal microscopy, for both cell lines, compound 1 can essentially bind to mitochondria, while compound 2 is just partially localized in mitochondria. In addition, the two compounds induce cell death of HepG2 cells likely through apoptosis. PMID:27085051

  18. Effects That Facebook-Based Online Peer Assessment with Micro-Teaching Videos Can Have on Attitudes toward Peer Assessment and Perceived Learning from Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects that Facebook-based online peer assessment with micro-teaching videos can have on attitudes toward peer assessment and perceived learning from peer assessment. The study recruited a sample of 31 university students who were enrolled in a teacher-training course. Using assessees' microteaching videos, the…

  19. An Approach to Assess Generalizability in Comparative Effectiveness Research

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Adam; Grieve, Richard; Bardsley, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Policy makers require estimates of comparative effectiveness that apply to the population of interest, but there has been little research on quantitative approaches to assess and extend the generalizability of randomized controlled trial (RCT)–based evaluations. We illustrate an approach using observational data. Methods. Our example is the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) trial, in which 3230 adults with chronic conditions were assigned to receive telehealth or usual care. First, we used novel placebo tests to assess whether outcomes were similar between the RCT control group and a matched subset of nonparticipants who received usual care. We matched on 65 baseline variables obtained from the electronic medical record. Second, we conducted sensitivity analysis to consider whether the estimates of treatment effectiveness were robust to alternative assumptions about whether “usual care” is defined by the RCT control group or nonparticipants. Thus, we provided alternative estimates of comparative effectiveness by contrasting the outcomes of the RCT telehealth group and matched nonparticipants. Results. For some endpoints, such as the number of outpatient attendances, the placebo tests passed, and the effectiveness estimates were robust to the choice of comparison group. However, for other endpoints, such as emergency admissions, the placebo tests failed and the estimates of treatment effect differed markedly according to whether telehealth patients were compared with RCT controls or matched nonparticipants. Conclusions. The proposed placebo tests indicate those cases when estimates from RCTs do not generalize to routine clinical practice and motivate complementary estimates of comparative effectiveness that use observational data. Future RCTs are recommended to incorporate these placebo tests and the accompanying sensitivity analyses to enhance their relevance to policy making. PMID:25986472

  20. Assessing Sediment-Related Effects of Dam Removals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallick, J. Rose; Randle, Timothy

    2009-04-01

    Subcommittee on Sedimentation: Sediment Management and Dam Removal Workshop; Portland, Oregon, 14-16 October 2008; For a host of reasons including dam safety, maintenance costs, and ecological concerns, more dams are currently being removed each year in the United States than are being constructed. Because many reservoirs have accumulated sediments within their pools, dam removal can potentially impose a variety of sediment-related risks, including downstream effects on habitat, water quality, infrastructure, and flood storage. Sediment-related risks are particularly heightened when the sediment stored behind a dam is contaminated. Currently no standard procedure exists for assessing sediment-related risks associated with dam removal. As a result, there are wide-ranging levels of analysis used to predict and monitor sediment impacts after a dam is removed. To develop a decision framework for assessing sediment-related effects from dam removals, the U.S. Federal Subcommittee on Sedimentation (SOS) held a workshop in October on the campus of Portland State University, in Oregon, hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Oregon Water Science Center. At the meeting, attendees crafted a decision framework that will help standardize data collection and analysis methods necessary for understanding sediment-related effects associated with dam removals.

  1. Assessing fuel treatment effectiveness using satellite imagery and spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Wimberly, Michael C; Cochrane, Mark A; Baer, Adam D; Pabst, Kari

    2009-09-01

    Understanding the influences of forest management practices on wildfire severity is critical in fire-prone ecosystems of the western United States. Newly available geospatial data sets characterizing vegetation, fuels, topography, and burn severity offer new opportunities for studying fuel treatment effectiveness at regional to national scales. In this study, we used ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression and sequential autoregression (SAR) to analyze fuel treatment effects on burn severity for three recent wildfires: the Camp 32 fire in western Montana, the School fire in southeastern Washington, and the Warm fire in northern Arizona. Burn severity was measured using differenced normalized burn ratio (dNBR) maps developed by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. Geospatial data sets from the LANDFIRE project were used to control for prefire variability in canopy cover, fuels, and topography. Across all three fires, treatments that incorporated prescribed burning were more effective than thinning alone. Treatment effect sizes were lower, and standard errors were higher in the SAR models than in the OLS models. Spatial error terms in the SAR models indirectly controlled for confounding variables not captured in the LANDFIRE data, including spatiotemporal variability in fire weather and landscape-level effects of reduced fire severity outside the treated areas. This research demonstrates the feasibility of carrying out assessments of fuel treatment effectiveness using geospatial data sets and highlights the potential for using spatial autoregression to control for unmeasured confounding factors. PMID:19769087

  2. Improving the effectiveness of environmental assessment in the World Bank

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, C. . Environment Dept.)

    1999-05-01

    Environmental assessment (EA) has been a standard procedure for the preparation and implementation of World Bank projects since 1989. The experience with using EA procedures was the subject of two internal reviews in 1995 and 1996. This article presents the main findings and recommendations of these reviews, emphasizing that whereas considerable progress has been made in integrating EA into Bank practice, much remains to be achieved both upstream (through the development of sectoral and regional EAs) and downstream (through the preparation and more effective use of environmental management plans).

  3. The emerging context for advances in comparative effectiveness assessment.

    PubMed

    Rowe, John W; Cortese, Denis A; McGinnis, J Michael

    2006-01-01

    The call for an entity for independent assessment and guidance on alternative medical interventions is timely. The emergence of four developments underscores the importance and sets the stage for progress: an improving evidence base; growing recognition of the importance of variation in the effectiveness of treatments across patients; recent emphasis on transparency; and growing adoption of pay-for-performance initiatives. To advance progress on these issues, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has convened a Roundtable on Evidence-based Medicine. The roundtable is exploring ways to improve the development of evidence, the thoroughness with which it is applied, and the mechanisms for increasing national capacity for the work. PMID:17090558

  4. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, Paula P.

    2010-02-02

    The complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by solvent extraction technique. A solution of NaBrO3 was used as holding oxidant to maintain the oxidation state of plutonium throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-F- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of fluoride ions on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters, including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Pu(IV) and fluoride at 25 degrees C - 55 degrees C were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van’t Hoff equation.

  5. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) With Sulfate At Variable Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Xia; J.I. Friese; D.A> Moore; P.P. Bachelor; L. Rao

    2006-10-05

    The complexation of plutonium(IV) with sulfate at variable temperatures has been investigated by solvent extraction method. A NaBrO{sub 3} solution was used as holding oxidant to maintain the plutonium(IV) oxidation state throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of sulfate were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-HSO{sub 4}{sup -} complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase, were calculated from the effect of [HSO{sub 4}{sup -}] on the distribution ratio. The enthalpy and entropy of complexation were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures using the Van't Hoff equation.

  6. Extending the quantitative assessment of industrial risks to earthquake effects.

    PubMed

    Campedel, Michela; Cozzani, Valerio; Garcia-Agreda, Anita; Salzano, Ernesto

    2008-10-01

    In the general framework of quantitative methods for natural-technological (NaTech) risk analysis, a specific methodology was developed for assessing risks caused by hazardous substances released due to earthquakes. The contribution of accidental scenarios initiated by seismic events to the overall industrial risk was assessed in three case studies derived from the actual plant layout of existing oil refineries. Several specific vulnerability models for different equipment classes were compared and assessed. The effect of differing structural resistances for process equipment on the final risk results was also investigated. The main factors influencing the final risk values resulted from the models for equipment vulnerability and the assumptions for the reference damage states of the process equipment. The analysis of case studies showed that in seismic zones the additional risk deriving from damage caused by earthquakes may be up to more than one order of magnitude higher than that associated to internal failure causes. Critical equipment was determined to be mainly pressurized tanks, even though atmospheric tanks were more vulnerable to containment loss. Failure of minor process equipment having a limited hold-up of hazardous substances (such as pumps) was shown to have limited influence on the final values of the risk increase caused by earthquakes. PMID:18657068

  7. Facile Routes to Th(IV), U(IV), and Np(IV) Phosphites and Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Eric M.; Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2011-08-05

    Three actinide(IV) phosphites and a NpIV phosphate, AnIV(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) and Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂, respectively, were synthesized using mild hydrothermal conditions. The first three phases are isotypic and were obtained using similar reaction conditions. Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ was synthesized using an analogous method to that of Np(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂. However, this fourth phase is quite different in comparison to the other phases in both composition and structure. The structure of Cs[Np(H1.5PO₄)(PO₄)]₂ is constructed from double layers of neptunium(IV) phosphate with caesium cations in the interlayer region. In contrast, An(HPO₃)₂(H₂O)₂ (An = Th, U, Np) form dense 3D networks. The actinide contraction is detected in variety of metrics obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. Changes in the oxidation state of the neptunium starting materials yield different products.

  8. Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA): A Practical and Cost Effective Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lydia L.; Ingegneri, Antonino J.; Djam, Melody

    2006-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is the first mission of the Robotic Lunar Exploration Program (RLEP), a space exploration venture to the Moon, Mars and beyond. The LRO mission includes spacecraft developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and seven instruments built by GSFC, Russia, and contractors across the nation. LRO is defined as a measurement mission, not a science mission. It emphasizes the overall objectives of obtaining data to facilitate returning mankind safely to the Moon in preparation for an eventual manned mission to Mars. As the first mission in response to the President's commitment of the journey of exploring the solar system and beyond: returning to the Moon in the next decade, then venturing further into the solar system, ultimately sending humans to Mars and beyond, LRO has high-visibility to the public but limited resources and a tight schedule. This paper demonstrates how NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission project office incorporated reliability analyses in assessing risks and performing design tradeoffs to ensure mission success. Risk assessment is performed using NASA Procedural Requirements (NPR) 8705.5 - Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Procedures for NASA Programs and Projects to formulate probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). As required, a limited scope PRA is being performed for the LRO project. The PRA is used to optimize the mission design within mandated budget, manpower, and schedule constraints. The technique that LRO project office uses to perform PRA relies on the application of a component failure database to quantify the potential mission success risks. To ensure mission success in an efficient manner, low cost and tight schedule, the traditional reliability analyses, such as reliability predictions, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), and Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), are used to perform PRA for the large system of LRO with more than 14,000 piece parts and over 120 purchased or contractor

  9. Assessing Weather Effects on Dengue Disease in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Yoon Ling; Burkart, Katrin; Leitão, Pedro J.; Lakes, Tobia

    2013-01-01

    The number of dengue cases has been increasing on a global level in recent years, and particularly so in Malaysia, yet little is known about the effects of weather for identifying the short-term risk of dengue for the population. The aim of this paper is to estimate the weather effects on dengue disease accounting for non-linear temporal effects in Selangor, Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya, Malaysia, from 2008 to 2010. We selected the weather parameters with a Poisson generalized additive model, and then assessed the effects of minimum temperature, bi-weekly accumulated rainfall and wind speed on dengue cases using a distributed non-linear lag model while adjusting for trend, day-of-week and week of the year. We found that the relative risk of dengue cases is positively associated with increased minimum temperature at a cumulative percentage change of 11.92% (95% CI: 4.41–32.19), from 25.4 °C to 26.5 °C, with the highest effect delayed by 51 days. Increasing bi-weekly accumulated rainfall had a positively strong effect on dengue cases at a cumulative percentage change of 21.45% (95% CI: 8.96, 51.37), from 215 mm to 302 mm, with the highest effect delayed by 26–28 days. The wind speed is negatively associated with dengue cases. The estimated lagged effects can be adapted in the dengue early warning system to assist in vector control and prevention plan. PMID:24287855

  10. Construction of river model biofilm for assessing pesticide effects.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shohei; Jang, Ji Eun; Itoh, Kazuhito; Suyama, Kousuke; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Due to the high importance of biofilms on river ecosystems, assessment of pesticides' adverse effects is necessary but is impaired by high variability and poor reproducibility of both natural biofilms and those developed in the laboratory. We constructed a model biofilm to evaluate the effects of pesticides, consisting in cultured microbial strains, Pedobacter sp. 7-11, Aquaspirillum sp. T-5, Stenotrophomonas sp. 3-7, Achnanthes minutissima N71, Nitzschia palea N489, and/or Cyclotella meneghiniana N803. Microbial cell numbers, esterase activity, chlorophyll-a content, and the community structure of the model biofilm were examined and found to be useful as biological factors for evaluating the pesticide effects. The model biofilm was formed through the cooperative interaction of bacteria and diatoms, and a preliminary experiment using the herbicide atrazine, which inhibits diatom growth, indicated that the adverse effect on diatoms inhibited indirectly the bacterial growth and activity and, thus, the formation of the model biofilm. Toxicological tests using model biofilms could be useful for evaluating the pesticide effects and complementary to studies on actual river biofilms. PMID:20422166

  11. Effect of doping LiMn2O4 spinel with a tetravalent species such as Si(IV) versus with a trivalent species such as Ga(III). Electrochemical, magnetic and ESR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturrondobeitia, A.; Goñi, A.; Palomares, V.; Gil de Muro, I.; Lezama, L.; Rojo, T.

    2012-10-01

    Three cathode compounds for lithium ion batteries, LiMn2O4, LiMn1.95Si0.05O4 and LiMn1.9Ga0.1O4 have been synthesized by the freeze-drying method. All samples present partially sintered particles of 80 nm average size, corresponding to single crystalline phases with cubic spinel structure. The substitution of a little portion of Mn(IV) by Si(IV) in the crystal framework leads to more expanded and regular MnO6 octahedra, whereas the replacement of some Mn(III) by Ga(III) induces the opposing effect. The ESR measurements support the effectiveness of doping as an evolution of the width of the resonance signal with the composition is observed. A complete magnetic study has been carried out, including ac and dc magnetic susceptibility measurements at different fields, FC and ZFC, and magnetization versus field. Due to the in-built magnetic frustration in spinel structure and the competition between different exchange pathways, the insertion of small quantities of dopants causes significant differences in the magnetic behaviour. The electrochemical study has revealed very good values of specific capacity for LiMn1.95Si0.05O4 reaching 146 mA h g-1 and 139 mA h g-1 at C/10 and 1C rates, respectively. A capacity retention up to 75% has been observed for the three samples after 300th cycles.

  12. Bringing science into river systems cumulative effects assessment practice

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Nicole E.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Noble, Bram F.

    2011-04-15

    Fast-paced watershed change, driven by anthropogenic development, is threatening the sustainability of freshwater resources across the globe. Developments within watersheds interact in a manner that is additive and synergistic over space and time. Such cumulative environmental effects are defined as the results of actions that are individually minor but collectively significant when added to other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future actions. Cumulative effects assessment (CEA) then is broadly defined as the process of evaluating the potential impacts of such collective actions on the environment and is a requirement in many countries, including in Canada at the federal level under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. However, current approaches to CEA for river systems are proving to be ineffective, which is largely attributed to the disconnect between CEA science and practice. We highlight this gap herein by discussing contradictions in the CEA literature, challenges in quantifying cumulative interactions, including overcoming spatiotemporal scale issues, multiple hydrologic and ecological pathways, and lack of predictive analysis. Our analysis shows there is a need for improved CEA for river systems, and in responding to this need we propose a conceptual framework for better integrating science and practice for improved CEA for river systems using one of the most adversely affected rivers basins in Canada, the Athabasca River, as our model. We conclude by addressing the challenges inherent to CEA with the intent of providing scientists with ways to help improve CEA of river systems.

  13. Apolipoprotein A-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) in the brain potently suppresses food intake. However the mechanisms underlying its anorexigenic effects remain to be identified. We first examined the effects of apoA-IV on cellular activities in hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and ne...

  14. Validation of DSM-IV Model of Psychiatric Syndromes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecavalier, Luc; Gadow, Kenneth D.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Edwards, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the internal construct validity of the DSM-IV as a conceptual model for characterizing behavioral syndromes in children with ASD. Parent and teachers completed the Child Symptom Inventory-4, a DSM-IV-referenced rating scale, for 6-to-12 year old clinic referrals with an ASD (N = 498). Ratings were…

  15. Construct Validity of the WISC-IV[superscript UK] with a Large Referred Irish Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Marley W.; Canivez, Gary L.; James, Trevor; James, Kate; Good, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Irish educational psychologists frequently use the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth U.K. Edition (WISC-IV[superscript UK]) in clinical assessments of children with learning difficulties. Unfortunately, reliability and validity studies of the WISC-IV[superscript UK] have not yet been reported. This study examined the construct…

  16. Validity of the WISC-IV Spanish for a Clinically Referred Sample of Hispanic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel Montes, Liza E.; Allen, Daniel N.; Puente, Antonio E.; Neblina, Cris

    2010-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is the most commonly used intelligence test for children. Five years ago, a Spanish version of the WISC-IV was published (WISC-IV Spanish; Wechsler, 2005), but a limited amount of published information is available regarding its utility when assessing clinical samples. The current study included…

  17. Construct Validity of the WISC-IV with a Referred Sample: Direct versus Indirect Hierarchical Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canivez, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) is one of the most frequently used intelligence tests in clinical assessments of children with learning difficulties. Construct validity studies of the WISC-IV have generally supported the higher order structure with four correlated first-order factors and one higher-order…

  18. How Effective Are Self- and Peer Assessment of Oral Presentation Skills Compared with Teachers' Assessments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grez, Luc; Valcke, Martin; Roozen, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of oral presentation skills is an underexplored area. The study described here focuses on the agreement between professional assessment and self- and peer assessment of oral presentation skills and explores student perceptions about peer assessment. The study has the merit of paying attention to the inter-rater reliability of the…

  19. Chalcogenidobis(ene–1,2–dithiolate)molybdenum(IV) complexes (chalcogenide E = S, Se): Probing Mo≡E and ene–1,2–dithiolate substituent effects on geometric and electronic structure†

    PubMed Central

    Tano, Hiroyuki; Suyama, Koichiro; Kobayashi, Tomoya; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Mtei, Regina P.

    2011-01-01

    New square–pyramidal bis(ene–1,2–dithiolate)MoSe complexes, [MoIVSe(L)2]2−, have been synthesised along with their terminal sulfido analogues, [MoIVS(L)2]2−, using alkyl (LC4H8), phenyl (LPh) and methyl carboxylate (LCOOMe) substituted dithiolene ligands (LR). These complexes now complete three sets of MoIVO, MoIVS and MoIVSe species that are coordinated with identical ene–1,2–dithiolate ligands. The alkyl substituted [Mo(S/Se)(LC4H8)2]2 − complexes were reported in prior investigations (H. Sugimoto, T. Sakurai, H. Miyake, K. Tanaka and H. Tsukube, Inorg. Chem. 2005, 44, 6927, H. Tano, R. Tajima, H. Miyake, S. Itoh and H. Sugimoto, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 7465). The new series of complexes enable a systematic investigation of terminal chalcogenido and supporting ene–1,2–dithiolate ligand effects on geometric structure, electronic structure, and spectroscopic properties. X–ray crystallographic analysis of these (Et4N)2[Mo(E)L2] (E = terminal chalcogenide) complexes reveals an isostructural Mo centre that adopts a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The M≡E bond distances observed in the crystal structures and the ν(M≡E) vibrational frequencies indicate that these bonds are weakened with an increase in L→Mo electron donation (LCOOMe < LPh < LC4H8), and this order is confirmed by an electrochemical study of the complexes. The 77Se NMR resonances in MoSeL complexes appear at lower magnetic fields as the selenido ion became less basic from MoSeLC4H8, MoSeLPh and MoSeLCOOMe. Electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies have been used to assign key ligand-field, MLCT, LMCT and intraligand CT bands in complexes that possess the LCOOMe ligand. The presence of low-energy intraligand CT transition in these MoELCOOMe compounds directly probes the electron withdrawing nature of the −COOMe substituents, and this underscores the complex electronic structure of square pyramidal bis(ene–1,2–dithiolate)-MoIV complexes that possess

  20. Assessing locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Drake; Dupree, Jameson P; Bibbey, Alex D; Sizemore, Glen M

    2012-01-01

    Locomotor activity procedures are useful for characterizing the behavioral effects of a drug, the influence of pharmacological, neurobiological, and environmental manipulations on drug sensitivity, and changes in activity following repeated administration (e.g., tolerance or sensitization) are thought to be related to the development of an addiction-like behavioral phenotype. The effects of cocaine on locomotor activity have been relatively extensively characterized. Many of the published studies use between-subject experimental designs, even though changes in sensitivity within a particular individual due to experimental manipulations, or behavioral and pharmacological histories is potentially the most important outcome as these changes may relate to differential development of an addiction-like phenotype in some, but not all, animals (including humans). The two behavioral protocols described herein allow extensive within-subject analyses. The first protocol uses daily locomotor activity levels as a stable baseline to assess the effects of experimental manipulations, and the second uses a pre- versus post-session experimental design to demonstrate the importance of drug-environment interactions in determining the behavioral effects of cocaine. PMID:22231824

  1. Evaluating Environmental Knowledge Dimension Convergence to Assess Educational Programme Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liefländer, Anne K.; Bogner, Franz X.; Kibbe, Alexandra; Kaiser, Florian G.

    2015-03-01

    One aim of environmental education is fostering sustainable environmental action. Some environmental behaviour models suggest that this can be accomplished in part by improving people's knowledge. Recent studies have identified a distinct, psychometrically supported environmental knowledge structure consisting of system, action-related and effectiveness knowledge. Besides system knowledge, which is most often the focus of such studies, incorporating the other knowledge dimensions into these dimensions was suggested to enhance effectiveness. Our study is among the first to implement these dimensions together in an educational campaign and to use these dimensions to evaluate the effectiveness of a programme on water issues. We designed a four-day environmental education programme on water issues for students at an educational field centre. We applied a newly developed multiple-choice instrument using a pre-, post-, retention test design. The knowledge scales were calibrated with the Rasch model. In addition to the commonly assessed individual change in knowledge level, we also measured the change in knowledge convergence, the extent to which the knowledge dimensions merge as a person's environmental knowledge increases, as an innovative indicator of educational success. Following programme participation, students significantly improved in terms of amount learned in each knowledge dimension and in terms of integration of the knowledge dimensions. The effectiveness knowledge shows the least gain, persistence and convergence, which we explain by considering the dependence of the knowledge dimensions on each other. Finally, we discuss emerging challenges for educational researchers and practical implications for environmental educators.

  2. Al III, Si IV, and C IV absorption toward zeta Ophiuchi: Evidence for photionized and collisionally ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    We present Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph observations at 3.5 km/s resolution and signal-to-noise ratios of 30 to 60 for the Al III, Si IV, and N V absorption lines in the far-ultraviolet spectrum of the O9.5 V star zeat Ophiuchi. The measurement reveal three types of highly ionized gas along the 140 pc line of sight. (1) Narrow components of Al III (b = 4.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(helio)) = -7.8 km/s; b = 3.2 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -14.4 km/s) and Si IV (b = 5.3 km/s, the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -15.0 km/s) trace photionized gas in the expanding H II region surrounding zeta Oph. The observed magnitude and direction of the velocity offset between the Al III and Si IV profiles can be explained by models of H II regions that incorporate expansion. Narrow C IV absorption associated with the H II region is not detected. Predictions of the expected amounts of Si IV and C IV overestimate the column densities of these ions by factors of 30 and more than 10, respectively. The discrepancy may be due to the effects of elemental depletions in the gas and/or to the interaction of the stellar wind with surrounding matter. (2) Broad (b = 15 to 18 km/s) and weak Si IV and C IV absorption components are detected near the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -26 km/s. The high-ionization species associated with these absorption components are probably produced by electron collisional ionization in a heated gas. This absorption may be physically related to the zeta Oph bow shock ot to a cloud complex situated within the local interstellar medium at d less than 60 pc. The C IV to Si IV column density ratio in this gas is 8, a factor of 6 less than conductive interface models predict, but this discrepancy may be removed by considering the effects of self-photoionization within the cooling gas in the model calculations. (3) A broad (b = 13 km/s) and weak C IV absorption feature detected at the mean value of (v(sub helio)) = -61 km/s is not seen in other

  3. Workplace-Based Assessment: Effects of Rater Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govaerts, M. J. B.; Schuwirth, L. W. T.; Van der Vleuten, C. P. M.; Muijtjens, A. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional psychometric approaches towards assessment tend to focus exclusively on quantitative properties of assessment outcomes. This may limit more meaningful educational approaches towards workplace-based assessment (WBA). Cognition-based models of WBA argue that assessment outcomes are determined by cognitive processes by raters which are…

  4. Student Aid and Postsecondary Tax Preferences. Limited Research Exists on Effectiveness of Tools to Assist Students and Families through Title IV Student Aid and Tax Preferences. Report to the Committee on Finance, U.S. Senate. GAO05-684

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Federal assistance helps students and families pay for postsecondary education through several policy tools--grant and loan programs authorized by title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and more recently enacted tax preferences. In fiscal year 2004, about $14 billion in grants and $56 billion in loans were made under title IV while…

  5. The Reliability and Validity of WISC-IV Scores with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krouse, Hailey E.; Braden, Jeffery P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability and validity of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) for use with deaf and hard-of-hearing (D/HOH) children. Psychologists (n = 10) provided data for 128 D/HOH children who were assessed with the WISC-IV as part of routine assessments. All the WISC-IV subtests (8) and…

  6. Guidelines for Assessing Sediment-Related Effects of DAM Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greimann, B. P.; Randle, T.; Bountry, J.

    2010-12-01

    Dam removal is becoming more common in the United States as dams age and environmental concerns increase. Sediment management is an important part of many dam removal projects, but there are no commonly accepted methods to assess the level of risk associated with sediment stored behind dams. Therefore, the interagency Subcommittee on Sedimentation (SOS) is sponsoring the development of a decision framework for assessing sediment-related effects from dam removals. The decision framework provides guidance on the level of sediment data collection, analysis, and modeling needed for reservoir sediment management. The framework is based on criteria which scale the characteristics of the reservoir sediment to sediment characteristics of the river on which the reservoir is located. To assist with the framework development, workshops of invited technical experts from around the United States were convened October 2008 in Portland, Oregon and October 2009 in State College, Pennsylvania. The decision framework developed at these workshops is currently being validated with actual dam-removal case studies from across the United States including small, medium, and large reservoir sediment volumes. This paper provides the latest thinking on key components of the guidelines. The paper represents contributions from over 26 entities who have participated in the development of the guidelines. After completion of the case study application, the framework will be finalized and published.

  7. Assessing the cumulative effects of projects using geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Samuel F.; Canter, Larry W.

    2011-09-15

    Systems that allow users to store and retrieve spatial data, provide for analyses of spatial data, and offer highly detailed display of spatial data are referred to as geographic information systems, or more typically, GIS. Since their initial usage in the 1960s, GISs have evolved as a means of assembling and analyzing diverse data pertaining to specific geographical areas, with spatial locations of the data serving as the organizational basis for the information systems. The structure of GISs is built around spatial identifiers and the methods used to encode data for storage and manipulation. This paper examines how GIS has been used in typical environmental assessment, its use for cumulative impact assessment, and explores litigation that occurred in the United States Federal court system where GIS was used in some aspect of cumulative effects. The paper also summarizes fifteen case studies that range from area wide transportation planning to wildlife and habitat impacts, and draws together a few lessons learned from this review of literature and litigation.

  8. Does WISC-IV Underestimate the Intelligence of Autistic Children?

    PubMed

    Nader, Anne-Marie; Courchesne, Valérie; Dawson, Michelle; Soulières, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is widely used to estimate autistic intelligence (Joseph in The neuropsychology of autism. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2011; Goldstein et al. in Assessment of autism spectrum disorders. Guilford Press, New York, 2008; Mottron in J Autism Dev Disord 34(1):19-27, 2004). However, previous studies suggest that while WISC-III and Raven's Progressive Matrices (RPM) provide similar estimates of non-autistic intelligence, autistic children perform significantly better on RPM (Dawson et al. in Psychol Sci 18(8):657-662, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.01954.x , 2007). The latest WISC version introduces substantial changes in subtests and index scores; thus, we asked whether WISC-IV still underestimates autistic intelligence. Twenty-five autistic and 22 typical children completed WISC-IV and RPM. Autistic children's RPM scores were significantly higher than their WISC-IV FSIQ, but there was no significant difference in typical children. Further, autistic children showed a distinctively uneven WISC-IV index profile, with a "peak" in the new Perceptual Reasoning Index. In spite of major changes, WISC-IV FSIQ continues to underestimate autistic intelligence. PMID:25308198

  9. Astragaloside IV enhances diabetic wound healing involving upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaochun; Huang, Ping; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Liangcheng; Liu, Yunjun; Yin, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active compounds extracted from Astragali Radix, has been used experimentally for its potent antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. In this study, we further investigate the potential efficacy of AS-IV on impaired wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A full-thickness skin wound was produced on the back of diabetic mice and treated with AS-IV or vehicle topically. Our results showed that AS-IV application promoted diabetic wound repair with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting augmented reepithelialization. AS-IV enhanced the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of AS-IV on matrix synthesis. AS-IV also improved the new blood vessel formation in wound tissue with increased numbers of endothelial cells and enhanced expression of VEGF and vWF. Moreover, the beneficial effect of AS-IV was related to the development of polarized alternatively activated macrophages, which involved in resolution of inflammation and facilitation of wound repair. All together, these findings suggest that AS-IV may play a potential effect on maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of diabetic wound healing. PMID:27016716

  10. Behavioral assay for assessing effects of pollutants on fish chemoreception

    SciTech Connect

    Lemly, A.D.; Smith, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Behavioral assays are sensitive to sublethal levels of pollution but they usually require highly trained personnel and long observation periods. We describe a system that combines the sensitivity of a behavioral assay with commercially available automated monitoring equipment. The observation system consists of a special aquarium coupled to a recirculating water system, and an Opto-Varimex-Aqua activity tracking meter (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, Ohio) interfaced to a microcomputer. The tracking meter forms an intersecting, planar grid of light beams which, when interrupted by fish movements, is translated into a digitized signal and fed to the computer. The assay is based on the response of fish to natural chemical stimuli such as food odors or pheromones. When these stimulus solutions are injected into the water circulation the response of the fish is monitored by the computer system, which is capable of discriminating and quantifying changes in eight parameters. Normal responses to stimuli are compared with the response of fish that have been exposed to pollutants. We have successfully used this technique to examine effects of reduced pH on the response of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, to chemical feeding stimuli. The system should be easily adapted to any laboratory concerned with testing for effects of toxic substances, and will identify effects of pollution that have thus far been difficult or impossible to assess.

  11. Assessing the sensitivity of methods for estimating principal causal effects.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth A; Jo, Booil

    2015-12-01

    The framework of principal stratification provides a way to think about treatment effects conditional on post-randomization variables, such as level of compliance. In particular, the complier average causal effect (CACE) - the effect of the treatment for those individuals who would comply with their treatment assignment under either treatment condition - is often of substantive interest. However, estimation of the CACE is not always straightforward, with a variety of estimation procedures and underlying assumptions, but little advice to help researchers select between methods. In this article, we discuss and examine two methods that rely on very different assumptions to estimate the CACE: a maximum likelihood ('joint') method that assumes the 'exclusion restriction,' (ER) and a propensity score-based method that relies on 'principal ignorability.' We detail the assumptions underlying each approach, and assess each methods' sensitivity to both its own assumptions and those of the other method using both simulated data and a motivating example. We find that the ER-based joint approach appears somewhat less sensitive to its assumptions, and that the performance of both methods is significantly improved when there are strong predictors of compliance. Interestingly, we also find that each method performs particularly well when the assumptions of the other approach are violated. These results highlight the importance of carefully selecting an estimation procedure whose assumptions are likely to be satisfied in practice and of having strong predictors of principal stratum membership. PMID:21971481

  12. Effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment system in Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Heinma, Kaupo; Poder, Tonis

    2010-07-15

    To be effective, an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) system, first, has to minimize the probability that projects with significant environmental effects are implemented without EIA, and second, minimize the number of EIAs, which do not provide decision makers with essential information, so that the decision is improved as a result of EIA. The objective of this study was to find out how frequently in Estonia the projects implemented without EIA have caused significant environmental effects, and to measure the relative frequency of EIAs that have no influence on decision. An extensive survey with e-mail distributed questionnaires was carried out to reveal information from governmental agencies, local self-governments, and developers. There was no evidence that projects authorized without EIA have had environmental impacts, which could have been mitigated as a result of EIA. In contrast, about half of EIAs did not alter the decision of relevant authorities. This proportion was valid to both mandatory EIAs and those initiated on judgement basis. In our view, the proportion of no-influence EIAs was excessive and indicated the need to reconsider the provisions applying to the projects with a mandatory EIA requirement as well as judgements practice.

  13. Assessing effectiveness of WEEE management policy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ashleigh; Metternicht, Graciela

    2016-10-01

    Australia is one of the top ten consumers of electrical and electronic (EE) products in the world; yet legislation for the management of WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) is in its infancy and has received minimal review. This paper sets to assess the effectiveness of Australian legislation, policies and associated instruments, with a focus on the sub-national level of implementation. A mixed methodology was adopted to this end, including: literature review, case study, semi-structured interviews and a comparative analysis of WEEE management practices in Australia versus Japan and Switzerland; the latter to identify causative factors of international leading practice that could advance current policy in Australia. The findings indicate that Australia's management of WEEE is not effective. The rate and types of WEEE generated in Australia far exceed the measures prescribed in legislation to address or even curb the problem. The five key issues were identified around stakeholder roles and responsibilities; scope of WEEE categories legislated for recovery and recycling; public engagement and accessibility to services; recycling and material recovery targets; and the auditing and compliance of material flows within the system. Our findings suggest that Australia has the capacity to address the five key priority areas within the current legal framework and achieve effective WEEE management in line with leading practice examples from Japan and Switzerland. PMID:27353372

  14. Assessing intervention effects in the Minnesota Heart Health Program.

    PubMed

    Murray, D M; Hannan, P J; Jacobs, D R; McGovern, P J; Schmid, L; Baker, W L; Gray, C

    1994-01-01

    The Minnesota Heart Health Program is a 13-year research and demonstration project to reduce morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease in whole communities in the upper Midwest. Six communities were selected for the study: three intervention and three comparison sites, matched to increase baseline comparability. After 2-4 years of baseline observations, a 5- to 6-year program of intensive intervention was introduced in the three intervention communities. Periodic cross-sectional and cohort surveys provided data on risk factors and related behaviors. Regression adjustments within and between communities reduced the confounding influences of important covariates and the variance inflation associated with the nesting of individuals within communities and surveys. Post hoc stratification allowed exploration of the main and strata-specific effects of the intervention program. Finally, the intervention effect was modeled as a departure from the trend line fit to the nonintervention city-year means. Together, these procedures explicitly acknowledged the component of variance associated with communities, and so avoided a major source of bias created in the usual analysis when that variation is ignored. They also increased the interpretability of the analyses and reduced the mean square errors used to assess the treatment effects. PMID:8296778

  15. Effect of the Mn Oxidation State on Single-Molecule-Magnet Properties: Mn(III) vs Mn(IV) in Biologically Inspired DyMn3O4 Cubanes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Heng; Tsui, Emily Y; Habib, Fatemah; Murugesu, Muralee; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-06-20

    Inspired by the ferromagnetic coupling in the cubane model CaMn(IV)3O4 of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II, 3d-4f mixed-metal DyMn3O4 clusters were prepared for investigation of the magnetic properties. For comparison, YMn(IV)3O4 and YMn(IV)2Mn(III)O4 clusters were investigated as well and showed ferromagnetic interactions, like the calcium analogue. DyMn(IV)3O4 displays single-molecule-magnet properties, while the one-electron-reduced species (DyMn(IV)2Mn(III)O4) does not, despite the presence of a Mn(III) center with higher spin and single-ion anisotropy. PMID:27281290

  16. Medical Assessment of Late Effects of National Socialist Persecution

    PubMed Central

    Grobin, W.

    1965-01-01

    Emotional involvement of the examiner, hostility and mistrust on the part of the examinees and the long interval since the original events comprise some of the problems facing medical assessors of survivors of National Socialist persecution. Experience with over 100 such persons confirmed the high incidence of irreversible and usually disabling disorders, mainly functional and psychiatric—“late damage” as it has been designated in recent reports on this subject. The most common disorders encountered in the assessments of 70 survivors are reviewed. A number of organic diseases such as organic brain damage, active tuberculosis and fractures were revealed only after careful search. Recent findings by psychiatric assessors are reviewed; their plea for greater familiarity with late effects in survivors of National Socialist persecution is echoed, and the need for medical, psychiatric and social support of these unfortunate individuals is emphasized. PMID:14289139

  17. Ecotoxicological effects assessment: A comparison of several extrapolation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Okkerman, P.C.; v.d. Plassche, E.J.; Slooff, W.; Van Leeuwen, C.J.; Canton, J.H. , Bilthoven )

    1991-04-01

    In the future, extrapolation procedures will become more and more important for the effect assessment of compounds in aquatic systems. For achieving a reliable method these extrapolation procedures have to be evaluated thoroughly. As a first step three extrapolation procedures are compared by means of two sets of data, consisting of (semi)chronic and acute toxicity test results for 11 aquatic species and 8 compounds. Because of its statistical basis the extrapolation procedure of Van Straalen and Denneman is preferred over the procedures of the EPA and Stephan et al. The results of the calculations showed that lower numbers of toxicity data increase the chance of underestimating the risk of a compound. Therefore it is proposed to extend the OECD guidelines for algae, Daphnia, and fish with chronic (aquatic) toxicity tests for more species of different taxonomic groups.

  18. Assessing effective care in normal labor: the Bologna score.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, B; Porter, R

    2001-06-01

    The intention of the "Bologna score" is to quantify, both in an individual labor and in a wider population, the extent to which labors have been managed as if they are normal as opposed to complicated. In this way it may be possible to assess both attitudes and practices within a maternity service toward the effective care of normal labor. A scoring system for normal labor was proposed at the World Health Organization (Regional Office for Europe) Task Force Meeting on Monitoring and Evaluation of Perinatal Care, held in Bologna in January 2000. This paper describes conceptual development of the scale. Recommendations for future evaluation of the Bologna score's validity and potential include field testing globally, comparison with the Apgar score, and evaluation of the relative weight contributed by each of the five measures comprising the Bologna score. PMID:11380378

  19. Disaster relief work: an assessment of training effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Paton, D

    1994-04-01

    This study evaluates the applicability of the training and operational practices of a group of firefighters to disaster search and rescue duties. Using schema theory it is hypothesized that training effectiveness could be evaluated by assessing the incidence with which event characteristics are perceived as stressors. A comparison of the propensity of a group of firefighters and a group of predominantly nonemergency service volunteers (who were specifically trained for disaster relief work) to define event characteristics as stressors provided the means of testing the hypothesis. The results suggest that the training and experience of these firefighters did not prepare them for major disaster work. The difference in stressor susceptibility serves as a basis for identifying training and response factors that appeared to promote an adaptive response. The implications of schema theory for the design of training programs is discussed. PMID:8012747

  20. Cephalometric Assessment of Upper Airway Effects on Craniofacial Morphology.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Mojtaba Mohamadi; Zarch, Varasteh Vakili; Joibari, Mohammad-Esmaeil; Kouhi, Ali

    2016-03-01

    To investigate craniofacial growth deformities in children with upper airway obstruction, this controlled study was performed. Cephalometry is used as a screening test for anatomic abnormalities in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Therefore, the current work selected this method to investigate the effect of upper airway obstruction on craniofacial morphology.Patients with upper airway obstruction (104) were compared with 71 controls. Patients with upper airway compromise had mandibular hypoplasia, mandibular retrognathism, and higher hard palates in comparison with controls with no history of airway obstruction. The difference was higher in the older age group.Airway obstruction has significant correlation craniofacial morphology. Our findings support the idea of early assessment and thorough management of mouth breathing in children. PMID:26967073

  1. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  2. The effect of nitroglycerin on response to tracheal intubation. Assessment by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, A.P.; Camporesi, E.M.; Sell, T.L.; Croughwell, N.; Silva, R.; Jones, R.H.; McIntyre, R.W.; Stanley, T.E.; Reves, J.G. )

    1989-06-01

    The effect of intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin (NTG) on perioperative myocardial ischemia as detected by single pass radionuclide angiocardiography was studied in 20 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Ten patients, selected at random, received IV NTG 1 microgram.kg-1.min-1 (NTG group) and 10 others, IV saline (control group). Anesthetic induction consisted of midazolam 0.2 mg.kg-1, vecuronium 0.1 mg.kg-1, and 50% N{sub 2}O in O{sub 2}. ECG leads I, II, and V5 were monitored for ST segment changes. Single pass radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) was performed at 5 times: prior to induction, prior to tracheal intubation, and at 1, 3.5, and 6 min following intubation. The presence of new regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) was determined from each RNA study as compared with the preinduction measurement. Apart from one patient in the control group who developed a new v wave after intubation, there was no evidence of ischemia by pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. No ECG evidence of ischemia was detected in any patient. Despite this, new regional wall motion abnormalities were observed in 3 patients in the control group and 1 patient in the NTG group. Blood pressure and heart rate responses of patients with new RWMA were not significantly different from other patients. The low incidence of ischemia in this population precludes a definitive statement regarding the efficacy of IV NTG, but the lower incidence of RWMA in the NTG group suggests a protective effect.

  3. Impacts of Title IV in Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwell, J.; Ellis, H.; Corio, L.; Seinfelt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources` Power Plant Research Program has evaluated the environmental effects of acid deposition on Maryland`s air, land, water (especially the Chesapeake Bay), and human resources since the mid-1980`s. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) has focused much attention on the mandated reductions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to control acid deposition. Baseline data on acidic deposition and air emissions/pollution control for NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} acquired through PPRP studies have proved useful in evaluating the impacts of Title IV on Maryland power plants and resources. Three example programs are discussed: The first is an evaluation of SO{sub 2} emissions on ecosystems through the use of critical loads--the amount of acid rain that an ecosystem can tolerate without continuing to acidify. Results support the use of broadly based emissions trading scenarios: The second study is an evaluation of the potential for reducing nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay by reducing NO{sub x} emissions. Results indicate substantial NO{sub x} emission reductions could offer significant reductions in nitrate deposition to the Bay: The final study is a review of the impacts of Title IV on the Maryland coal industry and the prospects for coal cleaning and advanced combustion technologies. Current results indicate that Maryland coal will meet Phase 2 SO{sub 2} emission standards using advanced combustion techniques, such as fluidized bed technologies, but that additional emissions controls, such as a scrubber would be required in a conventional boiler.

  4. Stroke Mimic Secondary to IV Fentanyl Administration.

    PubMed

    Uhegwu, Nnamdi; Bashir, Asif; Dababneh, Haitham; Hussain, Mohammed; Misthal, Sara; Mocco, J Duffy

    2015-02-01

    Fentanyl is a potent opioid used commonly in acute care because of its rapid onset and short duration of action. It has fewer side effects when compared with commonly available opioids, such as morphine and hydromorphine. We report an unusual side effect of transient aphasia following fentanyl administration. A 61-year-old female presented for an elective embolization of a periophthalmic artery aneurysm. She developed immediate episodes of aphasia on two separate occasions following administration of intravenous (IV) fentanyl. The high lipid solubility explains the rapid onset of action of fentanyl as it rapidly passes through the blood-brain barrier and through cell membranes. Immediately following the administration of fentanyl, the patient developed aphasia. There were no other clinical or neurological imaging findings that could account for these symptoms. We believe that aphasia may be an unusual side effect of fentanyl, and it is something clinicians should be aware of. PMID:25825627

  5. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a clinical tool for extending the…

  6. The Effectiveness of Ineffectiveness: A New Approach to Assessing Patterns of Organizational Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim S.

    A way to assess and improve organizational effectiveness is discussed, with a focus on factors that inhibit successful organizational performance. The basic assumption is that it is easier, more accurate, and more beneficial for individuals and organizations to identify criteria of ineffectiveness (faults and weaknesses) than to identify criteria…

  7. Decreasing IV Infiltrates in the Pediatric Patient--System-Based Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Major, Tracie Wilt; Huey, Tricia K

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous infiltrates pose tremendous risk for the hospitalized pediatric patient. Infiltrate events increase hospital-acquired harm, the number of painful procedures, use of supplies, length of stay, and nursing time; it threatens relationships essential in patient- and family-centered care. The goal of this quality improvement project was to achieve a 10% decrease in the baseline infiltrate rate on two inpatient units and in the overall infiltrate rate across all of the pediatric units. A Lean Six Sigma methodology was used to guide project activities. Improvement strategies focused on evidence-based education, intravenous (IV) catheter securement, and family engagement. A comparative purposive sample was used to evaluate the pre- and post-implementation period to determine if desired project success measures were achieved. Data analysis revealed positive results across all units, with the number of events (n = 51 pre; n = 19 post) and the infiltration rates (13.5 pre; 7.1 post) decreasing over a three-month period. A decrease was also noted in the overall percent of IVs that infiltrated in the first 24 hours (45% pre; 42% post). A statistically significant increase (t = 15.16; p < 0.001) was noted in nurses' education pre- and post-assessment survey scores. The family engagement strategy revealed overall parental responses to be 88% positive. By decreasing infiltrates, quality of care improved, resulting in the delivery of safe, effective, and patient-centered IV therapy. PMID:27019937

  8. Influence of cavity design on the biomechanics of direct composite resin restorations in Class IV preparations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiping; Jiang, Zhe; Xiao, Ximei; Fu, Jing; Su, Qin

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cavity design on stress distribution and fracture resistance of direct composite resin restorations in Class IV preparations. A finite element analysis (FEA) model of the maxillary central incisor with a Class IV cavity was established. Five model variations were studied: (i) a 1-mm bevel (ii) a 2-mm bevel, (iii) a plain chamfer, (iv) a stair-step chamfer, and (v) butt joints (a control configuration). All FEA variations modeled a tooth restored with composite resin loaded under 100 N at an angle of 45° to the longitudinal axis. The interfacial von Mises stress was evaluated. The FEA was complemented with an in vitro assessment. Fracture resistance of direct composite resin restorations was tested with a universal testing machine and fracture patterns were observed. Finite element analysis showed that stress in chamfer and stair-step chamfer models was more homogenously distributed, while stress in bevel models was relatively concentrated at lingual regions. Fracture resistance of a 1-mm bevel preparation was lower than for the 2-mm bevel, plain chamfer, and stair-step chamfer preparations, but was higher than for butt joints. The stair-step chamfer group presented the most favorable failure pattern. Considering biomechanics and esthetics, the present study indicates that the stair-step chamfer and 2-mm bevel should be recommended for clinical restoration. PMID:22409223

  9. Paraho environmental data. Part IV. Land reclamation and revegetation. Part V. Biological effects. Part VI. Occupational health and safety. Part VII. End use

    SciTech Connect

    Limbach, L.K.

    1982-06-01

    Characteristics of the environment and ecosystems at Anvil Points, reclamation of retorted shale, revegetation of retorted shale, and ecological effects of retorted shale are reported in the first section of this report. Methods used in screening shale oil and retort water for mutagens and carcinogens as well as toxicity studies are reported in the second section of this report. The third section contains information concerning the industrial hygiene and medical studies made at Anvil Points during Paraho research operations. The last section discusses the end uses of shale crude oil and possible health effects associated with end use. (DMC)

  10. Assessment of the effect of vasodilators on the distribution of cardiac output by whole-body Thallium imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Juni, J.E.; Wallis, J.; Diltz, E.; Nicholas, J.; Lahti, D.; Pitt, B.

    1985-05-01

    Vasodilator therapy (tx) of congestive heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be effective in increasing cardiac output (CO) and lowering vascular resistance. Unfortunately, these hemodynamic effects are not usually accompanied by improved peripheral circulation of exercise capacity. To assess the effect of a new vasodilator, Cl-914, on the redistribution of CO to the peripheral circulation, the authors performed testing whole-body thallium scanning (WB-Th) on 6 patients (pts) with severe CHF. Immediately following i.v. injection of 1.5 mCi Th-201, WB scanning was performed from anterior and posterior views. Regions of interest were defined for the peripheral (P) muscles (legs and arms), central torso (C), and splanchnic bed (S). The geometric mean of activity in these regions was calculated from both views. Each pt was studied before tx and again, after 1 week on tx. Invasive measurements revealed that all pts had significant improvements in resting cardiac output (mean increase 49%) and vascular resistance (mean decrease 30%). Unlike other vasodilators, all CI-914 pts had a significant improvement in treadmill exercise capacity (mean increase 54%). WB-Th revealed a significant shift in CO to the peripheral circulation with P:C increased 33.2% (rho= .001) and P:S increased 29% (rho=.01). Vasoactive drugs may significantly alter the relative distribution of cardiac output. WB-Th scanning provides a simple quantitative means of following such changes.

  11. Stage IV-S neuroblastoma. Results with definitive therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, S.H.; Thomas, P.R.; Perez, C.A.; Vietti, T.J.

    1984-05-15

    The results of management of 14 patients with Stage IV-S neuroblastoma are reported. The treatment policy, although not consistent over this time span, in general used a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy or infrequently one modality alone. Twelve of 14 (86%) survived more than 6 years. One patient, with a solitary mediastinal primary tumor, died of rapidly progressive disease at three months. The other death occurred in a 4.5-year-old presenting with hepatomegaly at diagnosis followed by skeletal dissemination 2.5 years later. Thirteen of the patients were younger than 1 year of age. Of the 11 patients that received radiotherapy, 4 experienced mild asymptomatic scoliosis or kyphoscoliosis at 3 to 12 years after initial therapy. A review of the literature indicates that spontaneous regression in this tumor is very frequent; therefore, it is recommended that for the common presentation of massive hepatomegaly in an infant, close observation is warranted, unless life threatening complications occur. However, initial therapeutic intervention may be indicated in those patients with life threatening presentations. This data did not substantiate the necessity for complete surgical excision of the primary tumor, as has been suggested by others.

  12. The Calibration of Student Judgement through Self-Assessment: Disruptive Effects of Assessment Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boud, David; Lawson, Romy; Thompson, Darrall G.

    2015-01-01

    Can extended opportunities for self-assessment over time help students develop the capacity to make better judgements about their work? Using evidence gathered through students' voluntary self-assessment of their performance with respect to assessment tasks in two different disciplines at two Australian universities, the paper focuses on the…

  13. DSM-IV Diagnoses and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children Before and 1 Year after Adenotonsillectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, James E.; Blunden, Sarah; Ruzicka, Deborah L.; Guire, Kenneth E.; Champine, Donna; Weatherly, Robert A.; Hodges, Elise K.; Giordani, Bruno J.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    DSM-IV criteria-based psychiatric diagnoses done in children before and one year after adenotonsillectomy are assessed to record any improvement in behavior. It is found that surgery might be associated with reduced behavioral morbidity.

  14. A methodology for assessing high intensity RF effects in aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, R.A.; Avalle, C.A.; Kunz, K.S.; Molau, N.E.; Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1993-07-01

    Optical components have an inherent immunity to the electromagnetic interference (EMI) associated with High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF). The optical technology embodied in Fly-by-Light (FBL) might therefore minimize the effects of HIRF on digitally controlled systems while providing lifetime immunity to signal EMI. This is one of the primary motivations for developing FBL systems for aircraft. FBL has the potential to greatly simplify EMI certification by enabling technically acceptable laboratory tests of subsystems, as opposed to expensive full airplane tests. In this paper the authors describe a methodology for assessing EMI effects on FBL aircraft that reduces or potentially eliminates the need for full airplane tests. This methodology is based on comparing the applied EMI stress--the level of interference signal that arrives at a unit under test--versus the EMI strength of the unit--the interference level it can withstand without upset. This approach allows one to use computer models and/or low power coupling measurement and similarity (to other previously tested aircraft) to determine the stress applied to installed subsystems, and to use benchtop cable injection tests and/or mode stirred chamber radiated tests to determine the strength of the subsystem.

  15. Assessing Effects of Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels on Ocean Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Veronica P.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon Productivity Responses to Increased Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentrations in Surface Ocean: Exploring the Feasibility of an in Situ Mesoscale Carbon Addition Experiment; Palisades, New York, 23-24 March 2009; To assess the effects of future elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on ocean biogeochemistry and ecosystems, it is desirable to mimic such an environment in nature. A workshop to explore an in situ open ocean mesoscale CO2 perturbation experiment that would simulate the oceanic conditions expected toward the end of this century was held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University (LDEO). The objectives were to evaluate the current understanding of the potential effects on open ocean ecosystems and biogeochemical cycling resulting from carbon chemistry and pH changes in response to increased atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and to examine the scientific justification and logistical feasibility of an in situ open ocean mesoscale CO2/pH perturbation experiment. The 15 participants represented fields of modeling and physical, geochemical, and biological oceanography.

  16. Rapid assessment of nonlinear optical propagation effects in dielectrics.

    PubMed

    del Hoyo, J; de la Cruz, A Ruiz; Grace, E; Ferrer, A; Siegel, J; Pasquazi, A; Assanto, G; Solis, J

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser processing applications need fast approaches to assess the nonlinear propagation of the laser beam in order to predict the optimal range of processing parameters in a wide variety of cases. We develop here a method based on the simple monitoring of the nonlinear beam shaping against numerical prediction. The numerical code solves the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with nonlinear absorption under simplified conditions by employing a state-of-the art computationally efficient approach. By comparing with experimental results we can rapidly estimate the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients of the material. The validity of this approach has been tested in a variety of experiments where nonlinearities play a key role, like spatial soliton shaping or fs-laser waveguide writing. The approach provides excellent results for propagated power densities for which free carrier generation effects can be neglected. Above such a threshold, the peculiarities of the nonlinear propagation of elliptical beams enable acquiring an instantaneous picture of the deposition of energy inside the material realistic enough to estimate the effective nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients that can be used for predicting the spatial distribution of energy deposition inside the material and controlling the beam in the writing process. PMID:25564243

  17. Rapid assessment of nonlinear optical propagation effects in dielectrics

    PubMed Central

    Hoyo, J. del; de la Cruz, A. Ruiz; Grace, E.; Ferrer, A.; Siegel, J.; Pasquazi, A.; Assanto, G.; Solis, J.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser processing applications need fast approaches to assess the nonlinear propagation of the laser beam in order to predict the optimal range of processing parameters in a wide variety of cases. We develop here a method based on the simple monitoring of the nonlinear beam shaping against numerical prediction. The numerical code solves the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with nonlinear absorption under simplified conditions by employing a state-of-the art computationally efficient approach. By comparing with experimental results we can rapidly estimate the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients of the material. The validity of this approach has been tested in a variety of experiments where nonlinearities play a key role, like spatial soliton shaping or fs-laser waveguide writing. The approach provides excellent results for propagated power densities for which free carrier generation effects can be neglected. Above such a threshold, the peculiarities of the nonlinear propagation of elliptical beams enable acquiring an instantaneous picture of the deposition of energy inside the material realistic enough to estimate the effective nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients that can be used for predicting the spatial distribution of energy deposition inside the material and controlling the beam in the writing process. PMID:25564243

  18. Echocardiographic Assessment of Cardiotoxic Effects of Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bottinor, Wendy J; Migliore, Christopher K; Lenneman, Carrie A; Stoddard, Marcus F

    2016-10-01

    Patients with cancer can present with difficult management issues, as the medicine can sometimes cause sequelae destructive to healthy tissue. As this population lives longer, cardiotoxic effects are beginning to emerge, but the early recognition of this signal can prove difficult, with too late a recognition leading to lifelong cardiac impairment and dysfunction. Cardio-oncology can bridge this difficulty, and echocardiography and its newer imaging abilities are proving efficacious in this population. This article will address common sequelae of cardiotoxic treatment regimens and offer recommendations for echocardiographic surveillance. We recommend echocardiography, preferably three-dimensional and strain imaging, to monitor for cardiotoxic myocardial effects before, during, and after chemotherapy with cardiotoxic drug regimens, particularly anthracycline derivatives. A reduction in left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain in all patients, or reduction in LV global circumferential strain or global radial strain in patients at intermediate to high risk for cardiotoxicity, despite normal LV ejection fraction warrants a clinical assessment on the benefits of continuing cardiotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. Lifelong surveillance using echocardiography for cardiotoxicity and radiation-related valvular, pericardial, and coronary artery disease is prudent. PMID:27566332

  19. Molecular Genetics of Growth and Development in Populus. IV. Mapping Qtls with Large Effects on Growth, Form, and Phenology Traits in a Forest Tree

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw-Jr, H. D.; Stettler, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for commercially important traits (stem growth and form) and an adaptive trait (spring leaf flush) in a Populus F(2) generation derived from a cross between interspecific F(1) hybrids (P. trichocarpa X P. deltoides). Phenotypic data were collected over a 2-year period from a replicated clonal trial containing ramets of the parental, F(1), and F(2) trees. Contrary to the assumptions of simple polygenic models of quantitative trait inheritance, 1-5 QTLs of large effect are responsible for a large portion of the genetic variance in each of the traits measured. For example, 44.7% of the genetic variance in stem volume after 2 years of growth is controlled by just two QTLs. QTLs governing stem basal area were found clustered with QTLs for sylleptic branch leaf area, sharing similar chromosomal position and mode of action and suggesting a pleiotropic effect of QTLs ultimately responsible for stem diameter growth. PMID:7713445

  20. Data Management for Effective Condition Assessment of Collection Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Condition assessment provides critical information for assessment of an asset’s physical condition, remaining useful service life, and long-term performance. This paper will describe data management issues integral to a successful condition assessment program. Key points will b...

  1. Classroom Assessment. Principles and Practices for Effective Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, James H.

    This book is designed to provide prospective and practicing teachers with: (1) a concise presentation of assessment principles that clearly and specifically relate to instruction, (2) current research in the field, and (3) practical and realistic examples of assessment and suggestions for assessment built into the instructional process. The book…

  2. Using Brief Assessments To Identify Effective Interventions for Individual Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, George H.; Freeland, Jennifer T.; Witt, Joseph C.; Gansle, Kristin A.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the utility of brief teaching probes as an assessment for students referred due to poor academic performance. Reading-decoding skills as assessed by students' oral reading rate on probes containing letters, words, or prose were examined. Ten of the 12 assessments identified one or both interventions as promising, based on a 20% or greater…

  3. Building Analytic Capacity and Statistical Literacy Among Title IV-E MSW Students

    PubMed Central

    LERY, BRIDGETTE; PUTNAM-HORNSTEIN, EMILY; WIEGMANN, WENDY; KING, BRYN

    2016-01-01

    Building and sustaining effective child welfare practice requires an infrastructure of social work professionals trained to use data to identify target populations, connect interventions to outcomes, adapt practice to varying contexts and dynamic populations, and assess their own effectiveness. Increasingly, public agencies are implementing models of self-assessment in which administrative data are used to guide and continuously evaluate the implementation of programs and policies. The research curriculum described in the article was developed to provide Title IV-E and other students interested in public child welfare systems with hands-on opportunities to become experienced and “statistically literate” users of aggregated public child welfare data from California’s administrative child welfare system, attending to the often missing link between data/research and practice improvement.

  4. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  5. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  6. Platinum(IV)-chlorotoxin (CTX) conjugates for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Graf, Nora; Mokhtari, Tara E; Papayannopoulos, Ioannis A; Lippard, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anticancer drugs. Its side effects, however, have motivated researchers to search for equally effective analogs that are better tolerated. Selectively targeting cancer tissue is one promising strategy. For this purpose, a platinum(IV) complex was conjugated to the cancer-targeting peptide chlorotoxin (CTX, TM601) in order to deliver cisplatin selectively to cancer cells. The 1:1 Pt-CTX conjugate was characterized by mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis. Like most platinum(IV) derivatives, the cytotoxicity of the conjugate was lower in cell culture than that of cisplatin, but greater than those of its Pt(IV) precursor and CTX in several cancer cell lines. PMID:22465700

  7. Combined parecoxib and I.V. paracetamol provides additional analgesic effect with better postoperative satisfaction in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elseify, Zeinab Ahmed; El-Khattab, Salwa Omar; Khattab, Ahmed Metwally; Atta, Eman Mohammed; Ajjoub, Layal Fares

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adequacy of postoperative analgesia is one of the most important factors that determine early hospital discharge and patients’ ability to resume their normal activities postoperatively. The optimal non-opioid analgesic technique for postoperative pain management would reduce pain and enhance patient satisfaction, and it also facilitates earlier mobilization and rehabilitation by reducing pain-related complications after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib when used alone, or in combination. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) physical status I and II adult patients who were scheduled for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included in this study. Patients were allocated into three groups: group I patients received 1g intravenous paracetamol after induction and another 1 g 4 h later, group II received 40 mg parecoxib after induction, while group III received combination of both drugs (paracetamol 1 g and parecoxib 40 mg). Pain during rest and mobility was assessed in the immediate postoperative period, 2 h and 8 h successively using visual analog scale (VAS). Patient satisfaction was rated according to satisfaction score. Results: Total morphine requirements were lower in group III patients (6.9±2.7 mg) in comparison to group I patients (12.6±3.6 mg) or group II patients (9.8±2.8 mg). The least VAS scores were recorded during knee movement (3.8±1.1) in group III patients compared to group I (6.0±1.8) and group II patients (4.8±1.9). Eight hours postoperatively, group III patients were more satisfied regarding the postoperative pain management. Conclusion: Combination of intravenous paracetamol and parecoxib provided better analgesia and higher patient satisfaction than each drug when used separately. PMID:21655016

  8. Assessment of climate change effects on Canada's National Park system.

    PubMed

    Suffling, Roger; Scott, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    To estimate the magnitude of climate change anticipated for Canada's 38 National Parks (NPs) and Park Reserves, seasonal temperature and precipitation scenarios were constructed for 2050 and 2090 using the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) coupled model (CGCM1). For each park, we assessed impacts on physical systems, species, ecosystems and people. Important, widespread changes relate to marine and freshwater hydrology, glacial balance, waning permafrost, increased natural disturbance, shorter ice season, northern and upward altitudinal species and biome shifts, and changed visitation patterns. Other changes are regional (e.g., combined East coast subsidence and sea level rise increase coastal erosion and deposition, whereas, on the Pacific coast, tectonic uplift negates sea level rise). Further predictions concern individual parks (e.g., Unique fens of Bruce Peninsular NP will migrate lakewards with lowered water levels, but structural regulation of Lake Huron for navigation and power generation would destroy the fens). Knowledge gaps are the most important findings. For example: we could not form conclusions about glacial mass balance, or its effects on rivers and fjords. Likewise, for the East Coast Labrador Current we could neither estimate temperature and salinity effects of extra iceberg formation, nor the further effects on marine food chains, and breeding park seabirds. We recommend 1) Research on specific large knowledge gaps; 2) Climate change information exchange with protected area agencies in other northern countries; and 3) incorporating climate uncertainty into park plans and management. We discuss options for a new park management philosophy in the face of massive change and uncertainty. PMID:11878639

  9. Atmosphere of Mars: Mariner IV Models Compared.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, G; Fjeldbo, W C; Eshleman, V R

    1966-09-23

    Three classes of models for the atmosphere of Mars differ in identifying the main ionospheric layer measured by Mariner IV as being analogous to a terrestrial F(2), F(1), or E layer. At an altitude of several hundred kilometers, the relative atmospheric mass densities for these models (in the order named) are approximately 1, 10(2), and 10(4), and the temperatures are roughly 100 degrees , 200 degrees , and 400 degrees K. Theory and observation are in best agreement for an F, s model, for which photodissociation of CO(2), and diffusive separation result in an atomic-oxygen upper atmosphere, with O(+) being the principal ion in the isothermal topside of the ionosphere. The mesopause temperature minimum would be at or below the freezing point of CO(2), and dry ice particles would be expected to form. However, an F(1) model, with molecular ions in a mixed and warmer upper atmosphere, might result if photodissociation and diffusive separation are markedly less than would be expected from analogy with Earth's upper atmosphere. The E model proposed by Chamberlain and McElroy appears very unlikely; it is not compatible with the measured ionization profile unless rather unlikely assumptions are made about the values, and changes with height, of the effective recombination coefficient and the average ion mass. Moreover our theoretical heat-budget computations for the atmospheric region probed by Mariner IV indicate markedly lower temperatures and temperature gradients than were obtained for the E model. PMID:17749730

  10. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  11. An analysis of the effects on precipitation chemistry of Phase I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Title IV

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, J.A.; Grimm, J.W.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1997-12-31

    Sulfate and free hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation decreased 10 to 25 percent over large areas of the eastern United States in 1995. The largest decreases in both ions occurred in and downwind of the Ohio River Valley, the same area where Phase I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments set limitations, effective January 1, 1995, on sulfur dioxide emissions from affected coal-fired sources. Based on the authors analysis of precipitation chemistry and emissions data, they conclude that substantial declines in acid rain occurred in the eastern United States in 1995 because of large reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions in the same region.

  12. Taming Tin(IV) Polyazides.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rory; Davis, Martin F; Fazakerley, Mathew; Portius, Peter

    2015-12-14

    The first charge-neutral Lewis base adducts of tin(IV) tetraazide, [Sn(N3)4(bpy)], [Sn(N3)4(phen)] and [Sn(N3)4(py)2], and the salt bis{bis(triphenylphosphine)iminium} hexa(azido)stannate [(PPN)2Sn(N3)6] (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; py = pyridine; PPN = N(PPh3)2) have been prepared using covalent or ionic azide-transfer reagents and ligand-exchange reactions. The azides were isolated on the 0.3 to 1 g scale and characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopies, microanalytical and thermal methods and their molecular structures determined by single-crystal XRD. All complexes have a distorted octahedral Sn[N]6 coordination geometry and possess greater thermal stability than their Si and Ge homologues. The nitrogen content of the adducts of up to 44% exceed any Sn(IV) compound known hitherto. PMID:26767331

  13. MECHANISM OF CHEMICAL MUTAGENESIS IV.

    PubMed Central

    Lorkiewicz, Z.; Szybalski, Waclaw

    1961-01-01

    Lorkiewicz, Z. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and Waclaw Szybalski. Mechanism of chemical mutagenesis. IV. Reaction between triethylene melamine and nucleic acid components. J. Bacteriol. 82: 195–201. 1961.—Triethylene melamine interacts primarily with phosphorylated intracellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) precursors and not with DNA. It was found by direct chemical and chromatographic analysis that only pyrimidine precursors of nucleic acids are attacked by triethylene melamine. In the course of the triethylene melamine-deoxycytidine reaction the mutagenicity of the reaction mixture is lost, but the mutagenicity of the triethylene melamine-thymidine reaction products significantly increases above that of the reaction substrates. Several steps are postulated to explain the mechanism of the triethylene melamine-initiated mutagenic reaction: (i) Reaction I, semireversible uptake of triethylene melamine; (ii) reaction II, chemical interaction between triethylene melamine and intracellular thymidine mono- or triphosphate with the production of a functional analogue of the latter; (iii) incorporation of this fraudulent analogue into the newly formed DNA strand; (iv) occurrence of self-perpetuating errors in the sequence of natural bases during subsequent rounds of replication of the analogue-containing DNA strand. It is postulated that the mechanism of mutagenic responses to different types of mutagens can fit either a simplified (mutagenic base analogues) or extended version (radiation) of this schema. PMID:16561917

  14. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. IV. Effects of Rotational Axis Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2015-08-01

    Both astronomical observations of the interaction of Type II supernova remnants (SNRs) with dense interstellar clouds as well as cosmochemical studies of the abundances of daughter products of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRIs) formed by supernova nucleosynthesis support the hypothesis that the Solar System's SLRIs may have been derived from a supernova. This paper continues a series devoted to examining whether or not such a shock wave could have triggered the dynamical collapse of a dense, presolar cloud core and simultaneously injected sufficient abundances of SLRIs to explain the cosmochemical evidence. Here, we examine the effects of shock waves striking clouds whose spin axes are oriented perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the direction of propagation of the shock front. The models start with 2.2 {M}⊙ cloud cores and shock speeds of 20 or 40 km s-1. Central protostars and protoplanetary disks form in all models, although with their disk spin axes aligned somewhat randomly. The disks derive most of their angular momentum not from the initial cloud rotation, but from the Rayleigh-Taylor fingers that also inject shock wave SLRIs. Injection efficiencies, fi, the fraction of the incident shock wave material injected into the collapsing cloud core, are ˜0.04-0.1 in these models, similar to when the rotation axis is parallel to the shock propagation direction. Evidently, altering the rotation axis orientation has only a minor effect on the outcome, strengthening the case for this scenario as an explanation for the Solar System's SLRIs.

  15. Pharmacokinetic interactions between Japanese traditional Kampo medicine and modern medicine (IV). Effect of Kamisyoyosan and Tokisyakuyakusan on the pharmacokinetics of etizolam in rats.

    PubMed

    Makino, Toshiaki; Inagaki, Takahiro; Komatsu, Ken-ichi; Kano, Yoshihiro

    2005-02-01

    Kamisyoyosan (KSS) and Tokisyakuyakusan (TSS) are widely used herbal formulas in Japanese traditional kampo medicine to relieve the symptoms occurred in climacteric disturbance. Since Japanese physicians frequently prescribe these formulas combined with etizolam, one of benzodiazepine anxiolytics, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic interaction between KSS or TSS and etizolam, and in vitro inhibitory effect of KSS and TSS on rat cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A activity in rat microsomes, to obtain drug information to prevent from disadvantage or adverse effects by their combined therapy. In in vitro experiment, KSS and TSS inhibited CYP3A activity comparable to grapefruit juice. However in in vivo experiments, oral administration of KSS did not influence the plasma concentration profile of etizolam. The maximum concentration (Cmax) of etizolam was significantly reduced when TSS was co-administered at 20 times amount of human daily dosage. Since the double of human daily dose of TSS did not suppress the absorption of etizolam, TSS would not influence the pharmacokinetics of etizolam at the usual clinical dosage. Since both KSS and TSS did not influence the metabolism of etizolam, the result of in vitro experiment would not reflect to that of in vivo experiment or in clinic. The combination of etizolam with KSS or TSS at usual dosage would not cause drug interaction. PMID:15684484

  16. The effect of leaf biopesticide Mirabilis jalapa and fungi Metarhizium anisopliae to immune response and mortality of Spodoptera exigua instar IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, A. Irma; Anggraeni, Tjandra

    2014-03-01

    Spodoptera exigua is one of insect causing damage in agriculture sector. This insect can be controlled by a natural biopesticide by combining two agents of biological control, biopesticides Mirabilis jalapa and entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium anisopliae, considered to be virulent toward a wide range of insects. The objective of research was to determine the effect of biopesticides M. jalapa and fungi M. anisopliae against immune system and mortality of S. exigua. This research used a complete randomized block design with five concentrations Mirabilis jalapa and optimum dose of M. anisopliae. A high dose of M. jalapa (0.8% w/v) is the most effective one to decrease total haemocytes especially granulocyt and plasmatocyt (cellular immune) and decrease the concentration of lectin (humoral immune) from S. exigua (p < 0.05). The combination of M. jalapa (0, 8% w/v) and lethal dose of M. anisopliae 2.59 × 107 spore/ml were significant to increase mortality of S. exigua within 48 hours (p < 0.05).

  17. Studies towards assessing the effects of aviation on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayari, Arezoo

    Emissions from aviation are an important component in the overall concerns about the effects of human activities on climate. Aviation emissions modify the chemical and physical properties of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in various ways. Aircraft emit gases and particles that can either directly or indirectly affect climate and air quality, including: carbon dioxide (CO2); nitrogen oxides (NOx) that can increase ozone (O3) production and increase the destruction of methane (CH4); water vapor that under certain atmospheric conditions can lead to contrail formation; and soot and other particles that along with contrails can affect the amount and characteristics of cirrus clouds. Soot and sulfate particles can also change the cloudiness by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Due to the high growth in air traffic that is projected to continue, it is important to understand the effects of aviation on air quality and climate. Based on then existing analyses of the emissions and their effects, the aviation contribution in changing the radiative forcing on the climate system was about 5% of the total human-related emissions (relative to 1750) in 2005 (Lee et al., 2009). This contribution is a result of various effects, especially the direct effects of CO2, NOx-induced effects, aerosol direct and indirect effects, and increased cloudiness from contrail formation and aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei. One of the main challenges of the aviation scientific community has been to increase the level of scientific understanding of these effects, especially with respect to those most uncertain (i.e. NOx effects, contrail-cirrus and aerosol effects). Another challenge has been to develop a simple climate model (SCM) that has the level of sophistication necessary to accurately assess aviation induced climate effects while being easy to use by policy makers for use in policy considerations. The main objectives in this study were: (1) to evaluate the

  18. Assessment of the effectiveness of flood adaptation strategies for HCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasage, R.; Veldkamp, T. I. E.; de Moel, H.; Van, T. C.; Phi, H. L.; Vellinga, P.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal cities are vulnerable to flooding, and flood risk to coastal cities will increase due to sea-level rise. Moreover, Asian cities in particular are subject to considerable population growth and associated urban developments, increasing this risk even more. Empirical data on vulnerability and the cost and benefits of flood risk reduction measures are therefore paramount for sustainable development of these cities. This paper presents an approach to explore the impacts of sea-level rise and socio-economic developments on flood risk for the flood-prone District 4 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and to develop and evaluate the effects of different adaptation strategies (new levees, dry- and wet proofing of buildings and elevating roads and buildings). A flood damage model was developed to simulate current and future flood risk using the results from a household survey to establish stage-damage curves for residential buildings. The model has been used to assess the effects of several participatory developed adaptation strategies to reduce flood risk, expressed in expected annual damage (EAD). Adaptation strategies were evaluated assuming combinations of both sea-level scenarios and land-use scenarios. Together with information on costs of these strategies, we calculated the benefit-cost ratio and net present value for the adaptation strategies until 2100, taking into account depreciation rates of 2.5% and 5%. The results of this modelling study indicate that the current flood risk in District 4 is USD 0.31 million per year, increasing up to USD 0.78 million per year in 2100. The net present value and benefit-cost ratios using a discount rate of 5 % range from USD -107 to -1.5 million, and from 0.086 to 0.796 for the different strategies. Using a discount rate of 2.5% leads to an increase in both net present value and benefit-cost ratio. The adaptation strategies wet-proofing and dry-proofing generate the best results using these economic indicators. The information

  19. A model of the pre-assessment learning effects of assessment is operational in an undergraduate clinical context

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background No validated model exists to explain the learning effects of assessment, a problem when designing and researching assessment for learning. We recently developed a model explaining the pre-assessment learning effects of summative assessment in a theory teaching context. The challenge now is to validate this model. The purpose of this study was to explore whether the model was operational in a clinical context as a first step in this process. Methods Given the complexity of the model, we adopted a qualitative approach. Data from in-depth interviews with eighteen medical students were subject to content analysis. We utilised a code book developed previously using grounded theory. During analysis, we remained alert to data that might not conform to the coding framework and open to the possibility of deploying inductive coding. Ethical clearance and informed consent were obtained. Results The three components of the model i.e., assessment factors, mechanism factors and learning effects were all evident in the clinical context. Associations between these components could all be explained by the model. Interaction with preceptors was identified as a new subcomponent of assessment factors. The model could explain the interrelationships of the three facets of this subcomponent i.e., regular accountability, personal consequences and emotional valence of the learning environment, with previously described components of the model. Conclusions The model could be utilized to analyse and explain observations in an assessment context different to that from which it was derived. In the clinical setting, the (negative) influence of preceptors on student learning was particularly prominent. In this setting, learning effects resulted not only from the high-stakes nature of summative assessment but also from personal stakes, e.g. for esteem and agency. The results suggest that to influence student learning, consequences should accrue from assessment that are immediate

  20. Effective Use of Demonstration Assessments in the Classroom Relative to Laboratory Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, David T.; Pierce, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrations assessment techniques are shown to be more effective in the teaching process, as compared to the normally used laboratory topics and aids. These assessments improve learning and help students learn the principles or concepts underlying chemistry.