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Sample records for ivar jrving tnis

  1. Radar images of asteroid 1627 Ivar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Werner, C. L.; Rosema, K. D.; Campbell, D. B.; Hine, A. A.; Shapiro, I. I.; Chandler, J. F.

    1990-01-01

    Radar echoes from the near-earth asteroid 1627 Ivar, whose orbit crosses the earth's, reveal it to be about twice as long as it is wide, with a maximum dimension no less than 7 km and probably within 20 percent of 12 km. The surface is fairly smooth at centimeter-to-meter scales but appears irregular and nonconvex at kilometer scales.

  2. Thermophysical Model of S-complex NEAs: 1627 Ivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Jenna; Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, Christopher; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Marshall, Sean E.; Warner, Brian D.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    We present an updated thermophysical model of 1627 Ivar, an Amor class near Earth asteroid (NEA) with a taxonomic type of Sqw [1]. Ivar's large size and close approach to Earth in 2013 (minimum distance 0.32 AU) provided an opportunity to observe the asteroid over many different viewing angles for an extended period of time, which we have utilized to generate a shape and thermophysical model of Ivar, allowing us to discuss the implications that these results have on the regolith of this asteroid. Using the software SHAPE [2,3], we updated the nonconvex shape model of Ivar, which was constructed by Kaasalainen et al. [4] using photometry. We incorporated 2013 radar data and CCD lightcurves using the Arecibo Observatory's 2380Mz radar and the 0.35m telescope at the Palmer Divide Station respectively, to create a shape model with higher surface detail. We found Ivar to be elongated with maximum extended lengths along principal axes of 12 x 5 x 6 km and a rotation rate of 4.795162 ± 5.4 * 10-6 hrs [5]. In addition to these radar data and lightcurves, we also observed Ivar in the near IR using the SpeX instrument at the NASA IRTF. These data cover a wide range of Ivar's rotational longitudes and viewing geometries. We have used SHERMAN [6,7] with input parameters such as the asteroid's IR emissivity, optical scattering law, and thermal inertia, in order to complete thermal computations based on our shape model and known spin state. Using this procedure, we find which reflective, thermal, and surface properties best reproduce the observed spectra. This allows us to characterize properties of the asteroid's regolith and study heterogeneity of the surface. We will compare these results with those of other S-complex asteroids to better understand this asteroid type and the uniqueness of 1627 Ivar.[1] DeMeo et al. 2009, Icarus 202, 160-180 [2] Magri, C. et al. 2011, Icarus 214, 210-227. [3] Crowell, J. et al. 2014, AAS/DPS 46 [4] Kaasalainen, M. et al. 2004, Icarus 167, 178

  3. Thermophysical Model of S-complex NEAs: 1627 Ivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Jenna L.; Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, Christopher; Fernandez, Yan R.; Marshall, Sean E.; Warner, Brian D.; Vervack, Ronald J.

    2015-11-01

    We present updates to the thermophysical model of asteroid 1627 Ivar. Ivar is an Amor class near Earth asteroid (NEA) with a taxonomic type of Sqw [1] and a rotation rate of 4.795162 ± 5.4 * 10-6 hours [2]. In 2013, our group observed Ivar in radar, in CCD lightcurves, and in the near-IR’s reflected and thermal regimes (0.8 - 4.1 µm) using the Arecibo Observatory’s 2380 MHz radar, the Palmer Divide Station’s 0.35m telescope, and the SpeX instrument at the NASA IRTF respectively. Using these radar and lightcurve data, we generated a detailed shape model of Ivar using the software SHAPE [3,4]. Our shape model reveals more surface detail compared to earlier models [5] and we found Ivar to be an elongated asteroid with the maximum extended length along the three body-fixed coordinates being 12 x 11.76 x 6 km. For our thermophysical modeling, we have used SHERMAN [6,7] with input parameters such as the asteroid’s IR emissivity, optical scattering law and thermal inertia, in order to complete thermal computations based on our shape model and the known spin state. We then create synthetic near-IR spectra that can be compared to our observed spectra, which cover a wide range of Ivar’s rotational longitudes and viewing geometries. As has been noted [6,8], the use of an accurate shape model is often crucial for correctly interpreting multi-epoch thermal emission observations. We will present what SHERMAN has let us determine about the reflective, thermal, and surface properties for Ivar that best reproduce our spectra. From our derived best-fit thermal parameters, we will learn more about the regolith, surface properties, and heterogeneity of Ivar and how those properties compare to those of other S-complex asteroids. References: [1] DeMeo et al. 2009, Icarus 202, 160-180 [2] Crowell, J. et al. 2015, LPSC 46 [3] Magri C. et al. 2007, Icarus 186, 152-177 [4] Crowell, J. et al. 2014, AAS/DPS 46 [5] Kaasalainen, M. et al. 2004, Icarus 167, 178-196 [6] Crowell, J. et

  4. [Ivar Broman - professor of Anatomy at the University of Lund with controversial views].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2004-01-01

    The Swedish physician and Professor of Anatomy Ivar Broman (1868-1946) came from a poor countryside family in the province of Skåne, southern Sweden. As he was intelligent and talented he received help from local people to get him an education at the nearby University of Lund. He stayed both there and at the University in Uppsala, but also in Kiel, Germany, during his early years. Soon Ivar Broman showed his dedication for embryology and comparative anatomy, publishing several books and papers. Later on he also wrote several contributions for daily newspapers, telling about new scientific discoveries and public health related issues. At one occassion Ivar Broman went to Africa for collecting embryos of different mammals. In the political world he showed strong emotional ties to Germany where he had several friends and contacts in medicine. This led Ivar Broman to sign, among 400 other people, a pamphlet calling for establishing a Swedish-German friendship organisation in 1938. He was not a party member of any Nazi party, but was, similar to other of his contemporary friends and scientists, an admirer of German science and culture. In some of his writings Broman was very modern in try to popularize science and new discoveries, but also devoted to aspects of purifying the population and using racial biological arguments. The lesson from Ivar Broman is that a devoted and skilled scientist, with many modern views, could also hold some authoritarian and politically darker views. This could be an example of a "Faustian" dilemma in science during a period of political tensions and distant thunders of war. PMID:16025611

  5. Physical studies of Apollo-Amor asteroids - UBVRI photometry of 1036 Ganymed and 1627 Ivar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, G.; Magnusson, P.; Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W.; Belkora, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The 1036 Ganymed and 1627 Ivar photoelectric lightcurves presently discussed indicate in the former case a drastic lightcurve shape change, in conjunction with a significant increase of the synodic rotation period; a substantial change in viewing conditions during the apparition, and a complex interaction between these changes and the asteroid's irregular shape, are indicated by the change. In the latter asteroid's case, a prograde rotation rate is apparent in the observed decrease in synodic period. Both asteroids' phase curves exhibit deviations from the H-G magnitude system phase function at large phase angles.

  6. Brain Mapper and IVAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Human Engineering Methods (HEM) Research Laboratory is utilized for the development of human-response measurement technologies to assess the effects of advanced crew station concepts on the crews ability to perform flight-management tasks effectively. Behavioral response and psychophysiological response measurement systems have been developed to assess mental loading, stress, task engagement, and situation awareness. Measurement capabilities include topographic brainmapping (EEG and evoked responses), monitoring of pulse, heart and muscle electrical activity (EKG and EMG), skin temperature and conductance, respiration, and tracking of eye lookpoint (oculometry) and overt behavior (video analysis). A real-time multiattribute task (MAT) battery has been developed to recreate flight-management task conditions in the laboratory setting for initial testing of advanced human-response measurement concepts. Mobile physiological monitoring and behavioral response capture-stations are located at simulator sites to refine these measurement concepts for flight-management research.

  7. Recombinant pro-regions from papain and papaya proteinase IV-are selective high affinity inhibitors of the mature papaya enzymes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A; Baker, K C; Briggs, G S; Connerton, I F; Cummings, N J; Pratt, K A; Revell, D F; Freedman, R B; Goodenough, P W

    1995-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes require the presence of their pro-regions for correct folding. Of the four proteolytic enzymes from Carica papaya, papain and papaya proteinase IV (PPIV) have 68% sequence identity. We find that their pro-regions are even more similar, exhibiting 73.6% identity. cDNAs encoding the pro-regions of these two proteinases have been expressed in Escherichia coli independently from their mature enzymes. The recombinant pro-regions of papain and PPIV have been shown to be high affinity inhibitors of all four of the mature native papaya cysteine proteinases. Their inhibition constants are in the range 10(-6) - 10(-9) M. PPIV was inhibited two to three orders of magnitude less effectively than papain, chymopapain and caricain. The pro-region of PPIV, however, inhibited its own mature enzyme more effectively than did the pro-region of papain. Alignment of the sequences of the four papaya enzymes shows that there is a highly variable section towards the C-terminal of the pro-region. This region may therefore confer selectivity to the pro-regions for the individual proteolytic enzymes. PMID:7770454

  8. Molecular evolution of troponin I and a role of its N-terminal extension in nematode locomotion.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Dawn E; Hwang, Hyundoo; Ono, Kanako; Lu, Hang; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-03-01

    The troponin complex, composed of troponin T (TnT), troponin I (TnI), and troponin C (TnC), is the major calcium-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, which is present widely in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Little is known about evolutionary aspects of troponin in the animal kingdom. Using a combination of data mining and functional analysis of TnI, we report evidence that an N-terminal extension of TnI is present in most of bilaterian animals as a functionally important domain. Troponin components have been reported in species in most of representative bilaterian phyla. Comparison of TnI sequences shows that the core domains are conserved in all examined TnIs, and that N- and C-terminal extensions are variable among isoforms and species. In particular, N-terminal extensions are present in all protostome TnIs and chordate cardiac TnIs but lost in a subset of chordate TnIs including vertebrate skeletal-muscle isoforms. Transgenic rescue experiments in Caenorhabditis elegans striated muscle show that the N-terminal extension of TnI (UNC-27) is required for coordinated worm locomotion but not in sarcomere assembly and single muscle-contractility kinetics. These results suggest that N-terminal extensions of TnIs are retained from a TnI ancestor as a functional domain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26849746

  9. Development of the EURITRACK tagged neutron inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A.; Szabo, J.-L.; Mercier, E.; Sannie, G.; Viesti, G.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Fabris, D.; Zenoni, A.; Bonomi, G.; Donzella, A.; Fontana, A.; Boghen, G.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Moszynski, M.; Batsch, T.; Gierlik, M.; Woski, D.; Klamra, W.; Isaksson, P.; Le Tourneur, P.; Lhuissier, M.; Colonna, A.; Tintori, C.; Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V.; Salvato, M.

    2007-08-01

    The EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project is part of the 6th European Union Framework Program. It aims at developing a Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) to detect illicit materials, such as explosives and narcotics, in cargo containers. Fast neutron induced reactions produce specific gamma-rays used to determine the chemical composition of the inspected material. The associated particle technique is employed to precisely locate the interaction points of the neutrons. A new deuterium-tritium neutron generator has been developed, including a pixelized alpha particle detector. The TNIS also comprises high-efficiency fast neutron and gamma-ray detectors, a dedicated front-end electronics and an integrated software to entirely drive the system and automatically process the data. Most components have been integrated during last months at Institute Ruder Boskovic, in Zagreb, Croatia. An overview of the TNIS and of its preliminary performances is presented.

  10. Nerve-responsive troponin I slow promoter does not respond to unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, D. S.; Hodgson, V. R.; Hardeman, E. C.; Booth, F. W.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the regulation of the troponin I slow (TnIs) promoter during skeletal muscle unloading-induced protein isoform transition, by using a transgenic mouse line harboring the -4,200 to +12 base pairs region of the human TnIs promoter. Eighteen female transgenic mice ( approximately 30 g body mass) were randomly divided into two groups: weight-bearing (WB) controls (n = 9) and hindlimb unloaded (HU; n = 9). The HU mice were tail suspended for 7 days. Body mass was unchanged in the WB group but was reduced (-6%; P < 0.05) after the HU treatment. Absolute soleus muscle mass (-25%) and soleus mass relative to body mass (-16%) were both lower (P < 0.05) in the HU group compared with the WB mice. Northern blot analyses indicate that 7 days of HU result in a 64% decrease (P < 0.05) in the abundance of endogenous TnIs mRNA (microg/mg muscle) in the mouse soleus. Furthermore, there is a trend for the abundance of the fast troponin I mRNA to be increased (+34%). Analysis of transgenic chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity in the soleus muscle revealed no difference (P > 0.05) between WB and HU groups. We conclude that additional elements are necessary for the TnIs gene to respond to an unloading-induced, slow-to-fast isoform transition stimulus.

  11. Scanning Cargo Containers with Tagged Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesti, G.; Botosso, C.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Zenoni, A.; Donzella, A.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A.; Szabo, J.-L.; Sannie, G.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Nad, K.; Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V.; Salvato, M.; Moszynski, M.; Gierlik, M.; Klamra, W.; Le Tourneur, P.; Lhuissier, M.; Colonna, A.; Tintori, C.

    2007-10-01

    A new Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) able to detect illicit materials such as explosives and narcotics in cargo containers has been developed within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project. After the R&D phase, the inspection portal has been installed and commissioned at the Rijeka seaport in Croatia, where it has been operated in connection with the existing X-ray scanner for a first two-month demonstration campaign. Results obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  12. Scanning Cargo Containers with Tagged Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Viesti, G.; Botosso, C.; Fabris, D.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Zenoni, A.; Donzella, A.; Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Bernard, S.; Mariani, A.; Szabo, J.-L.; Sannie, G.; Valkovic, V.; Sudac, D.; Nad, K.; Peerani, P.; Sequeira, V.

    2007-10-26

    A new Tagged Neutron Inspection System (TNIS) able to detect illicit materials such as explosives and narcotics in cargo containers has been developed within the EURopean Illicit TRAfficing Countermeasures Kit (EURITRACK) project. After the R and D phase, the inspection portal has been installed and commissioned at the Rijeka seaport in Croatia, where it has been operated in connection with the existing X-ray scanner for a first two-month demonstration campaign. Results obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  13. 'In vitro' capacitation and acrosome reaction are concomitant with specific changes in mitochondrial activity in boar sperm: evidence for a nucleated mitochondrial activation and for the existence of a capacitation-sensitive subpopulational structure.

    PubMed

    Ramió-Lluch, L; Fernández-Novell, J M; Peña, A; Colás, C; Cebrián-Pérez, J A; Muiño-Blanco, T; Ramírez, A; Concha, I I; Rigau, T; Rodríguez-Gil, J E

    2011-08-01

    The main scope of this manuscript is to analyse the dynamics of mitochondrial activity in boar sperm subjected to 'in vitro' capacitation (IVC) and subsequent progesterone-induced 'in vitro' acrosome reaction (IVAR). This was determined after analysis of the rhythm of O(2) consumption and concomitant changes in the mitochondria activity-specific JC-1 staining. Results showed that IVC, and especially IVAR, was concomitant with a peak in O(2) consumption (from 1.61 ± 0.08 nmol O(2)/min/10(7) viable sperm at 0 h of incubation to 2.62 ± 0.12 nmol O(2) /min/10(7) viable sperm after 5 min of IVAR induction). These results were accompanied by parallel changes in the mean intensity of JC-1 staining. Based on JC-1, mitochondrial activation followed a nucleated pattern, with specific, activation starting points at the midpiece from which mitochondrial activation was spread. Moreover, four separate sperm subpopulations were detected following the JC-1 orange-red/green ratio, and the observed changes in the mean JC-1 staining during IVC and IVAR were related to concomitant changes in both the orange-red/green JC-1 ratio and the percentage of sperm included in each subpopulation. All of these results indicate that IVC and the first minutes of IVAR are accompanied by a progressive increase in mitochondrial activity, which reached a peak coincidental with the achievement of IVAR. Moreover, results suggest the presence of separate sperm subpopulations, which show a different mitochondrial sensitivity to IVC and IVAR. Finally, mitochondrial activation, at least under JC-1 staining, seems to originate in concrete nucleation points at the midpiece, thus suggesting thus a well-coordinated pattern in boar-sperm mitochondrial activity modulation. PMID:21121968

  14. 2250-MHz High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier (HEMPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. Herbert; Bell, Joseph L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tnis paper will focus on developing an exotic switching technique that enhances the DC-to-RF conversion efficiency of microwave power amplifiers. For years, switching techniques implemented in the 10 kHz to 30 MHz region have resulted in DC-to-RF conversion efficiencies of 90-95-percent. Currently amplifier conversion efficiency, in the 2-3 GHz region approaches, 10-20-percent. Using a combination of analytical modeling and hardware testing, a High Efficiency Microwave Power Amplifier was built that demonstrated conversion efficiencies four to five times higher than current state of the art.

  15. RDA Requirements For Optimum Hybrid Focal Plane Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, S. B.; Emmons, R. B.; Hawkins, S. R.

    1982-06-01

    In analyzing the performance of direct-injected hybrid focal plane arrays, many factors must be consiaered in determining the minimum detector resistance-area product RDA neces-sary to obtain background-limited performance (BLIP) and good array uniformity. In photo-aioue arrays, a necessary but not sufficient condition is that noise due to the diode generation-recombination and diffusion currents are less than the background photon shot noise. Tnis places a minimum requirement on the magnitude of RoA, the zero bias resistance area product. In addition, there are generally much more stringent requirements on RDA uue to input MOSFET l/f noise and threshold variations which exceed the single detector RoA requirement for BLIP operation at a given background. In general, the input thresnolu variations require that the photodiodes be somewhat back-biased. This produces a substantially higner average RDA at the expense of higher detector l/f noise due to surface leakage. In tnis study we have investigated the detector impedance requirements in terms of tne injection efficiency, threshold nonuniformities, the input MOSFET excess (l/f) noise, and tne detector excess noise. For state-of-the-art parameters, it was determined tnat tne input MOSFET l/f noise always dominates the other elements in determining the required detector impeaance:k

  16. Stories of Discovery Stimulate the Physics Major--A Polemic, with Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1980-01-01

    Provides historical examples of intuitive discovery applicable to the teaching of physics for majors. Cites details for the discovery of Coulomb's law, emphasizing the roles of Joseph Priestley and Henry Cavendish. Also discusses the career of Ivar Giaever, a Nobel Prize winner of 1973 in solid state physics. (CS)

  17. Technology demonstration of space intravehicular automation and robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry; Barker, L. Keith

    1994-01-01

    Automation and robotic technologies are being developed and capabilities demonstrated which would increase the productivity of microgravity science and materials processing in the space station laboratory module, especially when the crew is not present. The Automation Technology Branch at NASA Langley has been working in the area of intravehicular automation and robotics (IVAR) to provide a user-friendly development facility, to determine customer requirements for automated laboratory systems, and to improve the quality and efficiency of commercial production and scientific experimentation in space. This paper will describe the IVAR facility and present the results of a demonstration using a simulated protein crystal growth experiment inside a full-scale mockup of the space station laboratory module using a unique seven-degree-of-freedom robot.

  18. SSBRP Communication & Data System Development using the Unified Modeling Language (UML)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windrem, May; Picinich, Lou; Givens, John J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is the standard method for specifying, visualizing, and documenting the artifacts of an object-oriented system under development. UML is the unification of the object-oriented methods developed by Grady Booch and James Rumbaugh, and of the Use Case Model developed by Ivar Jacobson. This paper discusses the application of UML by the Communications and Data Systems (CDS) team to model the ground control and command of the Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) User Operations Facility (UOF). UML is used to define the context of the system, the logical static structure, the life history of objects, and the interactions among objects.

  19. Simulation of a tagged neutron inspection system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzella, A.; Boghen, G.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.; Formisano, P.; Pesente, S.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.; Zenoni, A.

    2006-05-01

    The illicit trafficking of explosive materials in cargo containers has become, in recent years, a serious problem. Currently used X-ray or γ-ray based systems provide only limited information about the elemental composition of the inspected cargo items. During the last years, a new neutron interrogation technique, named TNIS (Tagged Neutron Inspection System), has been developed, which should permit to determine the chemical composition of the suspect item by coincidence measurements between alpha particles and photons produced. A prototype of such a system for container inspection has been built, at the Institute Ruder Boskovic (IRB) in Zagreb, Croatia, for the European Union 6FP EURITRACK project. We present the results of a detailed simulation of the IRB prototype performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo program and a comparison with beam attenuation calculations performed with GEANT3/MICAP. Detector signals, rates and signal over background ratios have been calculated for 100 kg of TNT explosive located inside a cargo container filled with a metallic matrix of density 0.2 g/cm3. The case of an organic filling material is discussed too.

  20. Observations on the magnitude-frequency distribution of Earth-crossing asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, Eugene M.; Shoemaker, Carolyn S.

    1987-01-01

    During the past decade, discovery of Earth-crossing asteroids has continued at the pace of several per year; the total number of known Earth crossers reached 70 as of September, 1986. The sample of discovered Earth crossers has become large enough to provide a fairly strong statistical basis for calculations of mean probabilities of asteroid collision with the Earth, the Moon, and Venus. It is also now large enough to begin to address the more difficult question of the magnitude-frequency distribution and size distribution of the Earth-crossing asteroids. Absolute V magnitude, H, was derived from reported magnitudes for each Earth crosser on the basis of a standard algorithm that utilizes a physically realistic phase function. The derived values of H range from 12.88 for (1627) Ivar to 21.6 for the Palomar-Leiden object 6344, which is the faintest and smallest asteroid discovered.

  1. Final technical report on atmospheric ozone as a climate gas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Chyung

    1998-11-12

    This report summarizes the major research accomplishments of the project ''Atmospheric Ozone as a Climate Gas'' for the period July 1, 1994--March 31, 1998. The report is divided into three sctions: research summary, publications and participation of graduate students. The objectives of the research program were: (1) to improve understanding of the physical, chemical and dynamical processes that control mid-latitute O{sub 3} in the lower stratosphere and free troposphere; and (2) to develop improved predictions of future O{sub 3} changes in these regions and their influence on (and response to) future climate changes. The research term includes a subcontractor, Professor Ivar Isaksen of the University of Oslo.

  2. Resonances and librations of some Apollo and Amor asteroids with the Earth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mehra, R.

    1973-01-01

    The orbital evolution of the Apollo asteroids 1620 Geographos and 1685 Toro and Amor asteroids 433 Eros, 1221 Amor, and 1627 Ivar are investigated by numerical integration. All these asteroids, with the exception of Geographos, exhibit systematic orbital couplings with the Earth during the time interval studied (1600-2350 A.D.). 1685 Toro is captured into libration once with Venus due to the 13.5 resonance, and once with the Earth due to the 8:5 resonance. Both librations are unstable because of the effect of the 13:8 near commensurability of the Venus-Earth system. 433 Eros exhibits no libration pattern; the regular variation of its orbital period is due to the beat-effect of the 4:7 resonance with the Earth.

  3. Effective strategies to counter campus presentations on climate denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbin, Jeffrey D.; Katz, Miriam E.

    2012-07-01

    Although 97%-98% of the climate researchers most actively publishing in the field accept the basic tenets of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) findings [Anderegg et al., 2010], there is a consistent undercurrent of doubt among the general public (A. Leiserowitz et al., Global warming's six Americas in May 2011, online report, 57 pp., Yale Project on Climate Change Communication, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., 2011). To some extent, this doubt is fueled by high-profile climate change deniers who offer "the real view" of climate science [Oreskes and Conway, 2010]. Our campuses recently hosted two such speakers: Ivar Giaever at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Christopher Monckton (also known as Lord Monckton) at Union College. (Monckton's presentation can be seen athttp://union.campusreform.org/group/blog/live-webinar-lord-monckton-at-union-college.)

  4. Spectroscopic and ITC study of the conformational change upon Ca{sup 2+}-binding in TnC C-lobe and TnI peptide complex from Akazara scallop striated muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, Fumiaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Koji; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Ojima, Takao; Tanokura, Masaru

    2008-04-25

    Akazara scallop (Chlamys nipponensis akazara) troponin C (TnC) of striated adductor muscle binds only one Ca{sup 2+} ion at the C-terminal EF-hand motif (Site IV), but it works as the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent regulator in adductor muscle contraction. In addition, the scallop troponin (Tn) has been thought to regulate muscle contraction via activating mechanisms that involve the region spanning from the TnC C-lobe (C-lobe) binding site to the inhibitory region of the TnI, and no alternative binding of the TnI C-terminal region to TnC because of no similarity between second TnC-binding regions of vertebrate and the scallop TnIs. To clarify the Ca{sup 2+}-regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction by scallop Tn, we have analyzed the Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties of the complex of TnC C-lobe and TnI peptide, and their interaction using isothermal titration microcalorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, circular dichroism, and gel filtration chromatography. The results showed that single Ca{sup 2+}-binding to the Site IV leads to a structural transition not only in Site IV but also Site III through the structural network in the C-lobe of scallop TnC. We therefore assumed that the effect of Ca{sup 2+}-binding must lead to a change in the interaction mode between the C-lobe of TnC and the TnI peptide. The change should be the first event of the transmission of Ca{sup 2+} signal to TnI in Tn ternary complex.

  5. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, Ernest D.; Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2007-11-01

    data. It contains two terms, corresponding to the best-understood radiation damage features, matrix damage and copper-rich precipitates, although the empirical calibration will ensure that all other damage processes that are occurring are also reflected in those terms. Effects of material chemical composition, product form, and radiation exposure are incorporated, such that all effects are supported by findings of statistical significance, physical understanding, or comparison with independent data from controlled experiments, such as the Irradiation Variable (IVAR) Program. In most variable effects, the model is supported by two or three of these different forms of evidence. The key variable trends, such as the neutron fluence dependence and copper-nickel dependence in the new TTS model, are much improved over RG1.99/2 and are well supported by independent data and the current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The new model includes the variables copper, nickel, and fluence that are in RG1.99/2, but also includes effects of irradiation temperature, neutron flux, phosphorus, and manganese. The calibrated model is a good fit, with no significant residual error trends in any of the variables used in the model or several additional variables and variable interactions that were investigated. The report includes a chapter summarizing the current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms and one comparing the IVAR database with the TTS model predictions. Generally good agreement is found in that quantitative comparison, providing independent confirmation of the predictive capability of the TTS model. The key new insight in the TTS modeling effort, that flux effects are evident in both low (or no) copper and higher copper materials, is supported by the IVAR data. The slightly simplified version of the TTS model presented in Section 7.3 of this report is recommended for applications.

  6. Physical Characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbo, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) connects diagnostic spectral features to specific surface mineralogies. The combination of spectroscopy with albedos and diameters derived from thermal infrared observations can increase the scientific return beyond that of the individual datasets. For instance, some taxonomic classes can be separated into distinct compositional groupings with albedo and different mineralogies with similar albedos can be distinguished with spectroscopy. To that end, we have completed a spectroscopic observing campaign to complement the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer program that obtained albedos and diameters of nearly 600 NEOs (Trilling et al., 2010). The spectroscopy campaign included visible and near-infrared observations of ExploreNEOs targets from various observatories. Here we present the results of observations using the low-resolution prism mode (approx. 0.7-2.5 microns) of the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We also include near-infrared observations of Explore-NEOs targets from the MIT-UH-IRTF Joint Campaign for Spectral Reconnaissance. Our dataset includes near-infrared spectra of 187 ExploreNEOs targets (125 observations of 92 objects from our survey and 213 observations of 154 objects from the MIT survey). We identify a taxonomic class for each spectrum and use band parameter analysis to investigate the mineralogies for the S-, Q-, and V-complex objects. Our analysis suggests that for spectra that contain near-infrared data but lack the visible wavelength region, the Bus-DeMeo system misidentifies some S-types as Q-types. We find no correlation between spectral band parameters and ExploreNEOs albedos and diameters. We investigate the correlations of phase angle with band area ratio and near-infrared spectral slope. We find slightly negative Band Area Ratio (BAR) correlations with phase angle for Eros and Ivar, but a positive BAR correlation with phase angle for Ganymed.The results of our

  7. Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) connects diagnostic spectral features to specific surface mineralogies. The combination of spectroscopy with albedos and diameters derived from thermal infrared observations can increase the scientific return beyond that of the individual datasets. For instance, some taxonomic classes can be separated into distinct compositional groupings with albedo and different mineralogies with similar albedos can be distinguished with spectroscopy. To that end, we have completed a spectroscopic observing campaign to complement the ExploreNEOs Warm Spitzer program that obtained albedos and diameters of nearly 600 NEOs (Trilling, D.E. et al. [2010]. Astron. J. 140, 770-784. http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0004-6256/140/3/770). The spectroscopy campaign included visible and near-infrared observations of ExploreNEOs targets from various observatories. Here we present the results of observations using the low-resolution prism mode (˜0.7-2.5 μm) of the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). We also include near-infrared observations of ExploreNEOs targets from the MIT-UH-IRTF Joint Campaign for Spectral Reconnaissance. Our dataset includes near-infrared spectra of 187 ExploreNEOs targets (125 observations of 92 objects from our survey and 213 observations of 154 objects from the MIT survey). We identify a taxonomic class for each spectrum and use band parameter analysis to investigate the mineralogies for the S-, Q-, and V-complex objects. Our analysis suggests that for spectra that contain near-infrared data but lack the visible wavelength region, the Bus-DeMeo system misidentifies some S-types as Q-types. We find no correlation between spectral band parameters and ExploreNEOs albedos and diameters. We investigate the correlations of phase angle with Band Area Ratio and near-infrared spectral slope. We find slightly negative Band Area Ratio (BAR) correlations with phase angle for Eros and Ivar, but a

  8. From X-Rays to MRI: Physics in GE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Roland W.

    2004-03-01

    The GE Research Laboratory, founded in 1900, became the first laboratory of scientific research in U.S. industry. William Coolidge, a physicist, joined the laboratory in 1905 and produced two advances of immense importance. The first, ductile tungsten, is still the heart of every incandescent light bulb. The second, the "Coolidge" X-Ray tube, remains an essential tool of modern medicine. In the process, Coolidge explored two main approaches of physics in industry. One addresses a commercial problem or opportunity (better light bulbs) and finds interesting physics. The other explores interesting physics (X-rays) and creates a commercial opportunity. This paper addresses the mix of these approaches during GE's years as an "electric" (and therefore physics-based) company. Episodes include the following: the work of Irving Langmuir (1932 Nobel laureate in chemistry, but as much physicist as chemist); the post-World War II "golden age of industrial physics" when the endless frontier offered opportunities from nuclear power to diamond making to superconductivity; the Nobel-prize winning work of Ivar Giaever; and interdisciplinary efforts that enabled GE to become a world business leader in two medical diagnostic technologies it did not invent: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. I will speculate on whether this mix of problem-driven and opportunity-driven effort is as relevant to the 21st century as it was to the 20th.

  9. Performance of the high brightness linac for the Advanced Free Electron Laser Initiative at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, R. L.; Austin, R. H.; Chan, K. D. C.; Gierman, S. M.; Kinross-Wright, J. M.; Kong, S. H.; Nguyen, D. C.; Russell, S. J.; Timmer, C. A.

    1993-08-01

    The AFEL accelerator has produced beams of greater than 2 x 10(exp 12) A/m(exp 2) at 1 nC (brightness = 2*I/(var epsilon)(exp 2), with I greater than 100 A and (var epsilon) of than 2(pi) mm-mrad normalized ms emittance). The 1300 MHz standing-wave accelerator uses on-axis coupling cells. The electron source is a photoinjector with a CsK2Sb photocathode. The photoinjector is an integral part of a single 11-cell accelerator structure. The accelerator operates between 12 and 18 MeV. The beam emittance growth in the accelerator is minimized by using a photoinjector, a focusing solenoid to correct the emittance growth due to space charge, and a special design of the coupling slots between accelerator cavities to minimize quadrupole effects. This paper describes the experimental results and compares those results with PARMELA simulation. The simulation code PARMELA was modified for this effort. This modified version uses SUPERFISH files for the accelerator cavity fields, MAFIA files for the fields due to the coupling slots in the accelerator cells, and POISSON files for the solenoid field in the gun region.

  10. Thermophysical modeling of asteroids from WISE thermal infrared data - Significance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuš, J.; Delbo', M.; Ďurech, J.; Alí-Lagoa, V.

    2015-08-01

    In the analysis of thermal infrared data of asteroids by means of thermophysical models (TPMs) it is a common practice to neglect the uncertainty of the shape model and the rotational state, which are taken as an input for the model. Here, we present a novel method of investigating the importance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties in the thermophysical modeling - the varied shape TPM (VS-TPM). Our method uses optical photometric data to generate various shape models that map the uncertainty in the shape and the rotational state. The TPM procedure is then run for all these shape models. We apply the implementation of the classical TPM as well as our VS-TPM to the convex shape models of several asteroids together with their thermal infrared data acquired by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and compare the results. These show that the uncertainties of the shape model and the pole orientation can be very important (e.g., for the determination of the thermal inertia) and should be considered in the thermophysical analyses. We present thermophysical properties for six asteroids - (624) Hektor, (771) Libera, (1036) Ganymed, (1472) Muonio, (1627) Ivar, and (2606) Odessa.

  11. Planet-crossing asteroids: Interrelationships within the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, L. A.; Ahearn, M. F.

    1986-01-01

    Near-infrared reflectance spectra 0.6 to 2.5 micrometer were acquired of asteroids 1627 Ivar (Amor), 43 Ariadne, 335 Roberta, 386 Siegena and 695 Bella (3:1 Kirkwood Gap) with the IRTF, Mauna Kea. CCD spectra 0.5-1.0 micrometer were acquired of 1866 Sisyphus (Apollo), 17 Thetis, 695 Bella, 797 Montana, and 877 Walkure (3:1 Kirkwood Gap) using facilities at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. An upper limit on the production rate of CN in asteroid 3200 Phaeton of < 4 x 10 to the 23rd power sec was determined based on photometric measurements at 3871A using facilities at Lowell Observatory. This value is in the range of the lowest production rate measured for a comet, however, it does not constitute a positive detection of CN in this asteroid. A first attempt of look for companion objects or evidence of dust debris associated with this asteroid was made with a CCD camera. Whereas the search extended to 19th magnitude (corresponding to 150m and 330m for albedos of 0.15 and 0.03 respectively), a look close enough to the asteroid was not attained to definitively eliminate the presence of coorbiting dust debris.

  12. The Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expedition 2010. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A.; Benning, L. G.; Fogel, M. L.; Amundsen, H.; Schmitz, N.; Amase 2010 Team

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expeditions (AMASE) 2010 was the latest of a series of expeditions that are NASA ASTEP and ESA funded and have as their primary goals 1) testing portable instruments for their robustness as field instruments for life detection, 2) assessing Mars analogue environments for abiosignatures and biosignatures, 3) refining protocols for contamination reduction, 4) defining a minimal instrument suite for Astrobiology science on Mars and 5) sample acquisition, collection and caching of suitable samples by rover platforms containing sample acquisition hardware: first Cliffbot, then Athena. As well as testing ESA instrumentation for the ExoMars mission and NASA instruments for Mars Science Laboratory, the goals and technologies used during this 2010 campaign are very similar to that proposed by the current MEPAG MAX-C mission concept and therefore set the stage for future sample return missions. As such the field-tested technologies, procedures and protocols can be used to address specific science objectives proposed for the 2018 Mars mission opportunity. As NASA and ESA enter a new era of collaboration, AMASE has provided and will continue to provide, a test bed for both current in-situ robotic missions and Mars Sample Return mission architectures. AMASE has proved to be a unique platform to build understanding and collaboration amongst scientists and engineers from Europe and the USA. AMASE 2010 team (other than those mentioned above): Ivar Midtkandal, Kjell Ove Storvik, Garret Huntress, Verena Starke, Pan Conrad, Francis McCubbin, Tor Viscor, Antonio Sensano, Laureline Josset, Jean-Luc Josset, Mihaela Glamoclija, Steve Squyres, Inge Loes Ten Kate, Kyong Hou, Jen Stern, Amy McAdam, Dave Blake, Dick Morris, Claire Cousins, Arnold Bauer, Carole Phillippon, Eckhard Steinmetz, Dave Potts, Dominique Tobler, Guillermo Lopez.

  13. The Contribution of Soil Moisture Information to Forecast Skill: Two Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal

    2010-01-01

    This talk briefly describes two recent studies on the impact of soil moisture information on hydrological and meteorological prediction. While the studies utilize soil moisture derived from the integration of large-scale land surface models with observations-based meteorological data, the results directly illustrate the potential usefulness of satellite-derived soil moisture information (e.g., from SMOS and SMAP) for applications in prediction. The first study, the GEWEX- and ClIVAR-sponsored GLACE-2 project, quantifies the contribution of realistic soil moisture initialization to skill in subseasonal forecasts of precipitation and air temperature (out to two months). The multi-model study shows that soil moisture information does indeed contribute skill to the forecasts, particularly for air temperature, and particularly when the initial local soil moisture anomaly is large. Furthermore, the skill contributions tend to be larger where the soil moisture initialization is more accurate, as measured by the density of the observational network contributing to the initialization. The second study focuses on streamflow prediction. The relative contributions of snow and soil moisture initialization to skill in streamflow prediction at seasonal lead, in the absence of knowledge of meteorological anomalies during the forecast period, were quantified with several land surface models using uniquely designed numerical experiments and naturalized streamflow data covering mUltiple decades over the western United States. In several basins, accurate soil moisture initialization is found to contribute significant levels of predictive skill. Depending on the date of forecast issue, the contributions can be significant out to leads of six months. Both studies suggest that improvements in soil moisture initialization would lead to increases in predictive skill. The relevance of SMOS and SMAP satellite-based soil moisture information to prediction are discussed in the context of these

  14. A study of the 21 March 2012 tornadic quasi linear convective system in Catalonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Joan; Arús, Joan; Castán, Salvador; Pineda, Nicolau; Rigo, Tomeu; Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    This study presents a description of a quasi linear convective system that took place in Catalonia (NE Spain) on 21 March 2012 producing heavy rainfall, moderate lightning activity and a weak tornado in the village of Ivars d'Urgell around 19 UTC after local sunset. A post-event survey indicated EF0 and EF1 damage in houses of the village - roofs and ceilings, broken windows, fences and walls and trees knocked down - along a track approximately 4 km long and about 20 m wide. Doppler radar observations show that the parent thunderstorm that spawned the tornado was one of a series that developed along a convective line that moved from S to N, initiating convective activity in terms of precipitation and lightning in the Mediterranean Sea and moving inland in S Catalonia (Tarragona and Salou coastal areas, producing local flash floods). Convective activity remained several hours with series of thunderstorms developing along the same paths. The synoptic situation was dominated by a high pressure ridge extending from northern Africa to central Europe, with a closed maximum sea level pressure area around 1036 hPa over northern France, southern Germany and Austria. On the other hand a relative low pressure area seen on 850 hPa and upper levels was present over the Iberian Peninsula, favouring a southern maritime flow from the Mediterranean between the forward part of the low pressure area and the high pressure system which blocked the advance of the low to the east. In the study we examine both the synoptic environment and storm scale observations with Doppler radar and total lightning data (cloud to ground and intracloud flashes) that lead to this cool-season severe convective event which is remarkable given the fact that, unlike in this case, most reported tornadoes in the region occur during the warm season (with peaks in August and September) and during daylight hours (6 to 18 UTC).

  15. Balloon Angioplasty – The Legacy of Andreas Grüntzig, M.D. (1939–1985)

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Grüntzig, Johannes; Husmann, Marc; Rösch, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In 1974, at the Medical Policlinic of the University of Zürich, German-born physician-scientist Andreas Grüntzig (1939–1985) for the first time applied a balloon-tipped catheter to re-open a severely stenosed femoral artery, a procedure, which he initially called “percutaneous transluminal dilatation”. Balloon angioplasty as a therapy of atherosclerotic vascular disease, for which Grüntzig and Charles T. Dotter (1920–1985) received a nomination for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1978, became one of the most successful examples of translational medicine in the twentieth century. Known today as percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in peripheral arteries or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in coronary arteries, balloon angioplasty has become the method of choice to treat patients with acute myocardial infarction or occluded leg arteries. On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of balloon angioplasty, we summarize Grüntzig’s life and career in Germany, Switzerland, and the United States and also review the developments in vascular medicine from the 1890s to the 1980s, including Dotter’s first accidental angioplasty in 1963. The work of pioneers of catheterization, including Pedro L. Fariñas in Cuba, André F. Cournand in France, Werner Forssmann, Werner Porstmann and Eberhard Zeitler in Germany, António Egas Moniz and Reynaldo dos Santos in Portugal, Sven-Ivar Seldinger in Sweden, and Barney Brooks, Thomas J. Fogarty, Melvin P. Judkins, Richard K. Myler, Dickinson W. Richards, and F. Mason Sones in the United States, is discussed. We also present quotes by Grüntzig and excerpts from his unfinished autobiography, statements of Grüntzig’s former colleagues and contemporary witnesses, and have included hitherto unpublished historic photographs and links to archive recordings and historic materials. This year, on June 25, 2014, Andreas Grüntzig would have celebrated

  16. Balloon Angioplasty - The Legacy of Andreas Grüntzig, M.D. (1939-1985).

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias; Grüntzig, Johannes; Husmann, Marc; Rösch, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In 1974, at the Medical Policlinic of the University of Zürich, German-born physician-scientist Andreas Grüntzig (1939-1985) for the first time applied a balloon-tipped catheter to re-open a severely stenosed femoral artery, a procedure, which he initially called "percutaneous transluminal dilatation". Balloon angioplasty as a therapy of atherosclerotic vascular disease, for which Grüntzig and Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985) received a nomination for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1978, became one of the most successful examples of translational medicine in the twentieth century. Known today as percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in peripheral arteries or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in coronary arteries, balloon angioplasty has become the method of choice to treat patients with acute myocardial infarction or occluded leg arteries. On the occasion of the 40(th) anniversary of balloon angioplasty, we summarize Grüntzig's life and career in Germany, Switzerland, and the United States and also review the developments in vascular medicine from the 1890s to the 1980s, including Dotter's first accidental angioplasty in 1963. The work of pioneers of catheterization, including Pedro L. Fariñas in Cuba, André F. Cournand in France, Werner Forssmann, Werner Porstmann and Eberhard Zeitler in Germany, António Egas Moniz and Reynaldo dos Santos in Portugal, Sven-Ivar Seldinger in Sweden, and Barney Brooks, Thomas J. Fogarty, Melvin P. Judkins, Richard K. Myler, Dickinson W. Richards, and F. Mason Sones in the United States, is discussed. We also present quotes by Grüntzig and excerpts from his unfinished autobiography, statements of Grüntzig's former colleagues and contemporary witnesses, and have included hitherto unpublished historic photographs and links to archive recordings and historic materials. This year, on June 25, 2014, Andreas Grüntzig would have celebrated his 75(th

  17. Synchrotron X-ray Scattering from Self-organized Soft Nanostructures in Clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossum, J. O.

    2009-04-01

    . Gog, C. Venkataraman, Observations of orientational ordering in aqueous suspensions of a nano-layered silicate, ENERGY The International Journal 30, 873 (2005). 2. D. M. Fonseca, Y. Méheust, J. O. Fossum, K. D. Knudsen, K. J. Måløy and K. P. S. Parmar, Phase behavior of platelet-shaped nanosilicate colloids in saline solutions: A small-angle X-ray scattering study J. Appl. Cryst. 40 292 (2007) 3. E. N. de Azevedo, M. Engelsberg, J. O. Fossum, R. E. de Souza, Anisotropic water diffusion in nematic self-assemblies of clay nano-platelets suspended in water, Langmuir 23, 5100 (2007) 4. Nils Ivar Ringdal, Master thesis, Department of Physics, NTNU (2008) 5. J.O. Fossum, Y. Meheust, K.P.S. Parmar, K.D. Knudsen, K.J. Maloy, D.d.M. Fonseca, Intercalation-enhanced electric polarization and chain formation of nano-layered particles, Europhys. Lett., 74, 438 (2006), and in the Scientific Highlights 2006 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility - ESRF (2007) 6. K.P.S. Parmar, Y. Meheust, B. Schelderupsen and J.O. Fossum, Electrorheological suspensions of laponite in oil: rheometry studies, Langmuir 24,1814 (2008) 7. F. Bergaya, B. K. G. Theng, and G. Lagaly, editors. Handbook of Clay Science. Elsevier (2006)