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Sample records for jaamu kaili jaamu

  1. The atyid shrimps from Lake Lindu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia with description of two new species (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea).

    PubMed

    Annawaty; Wowor, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    The atyid shrimp Caridina linduensis Roux, 1904, has not been reported since its description more than a century ago. We here redescribe and figure this poorly known species based on new material from its type locality, Lake Lindu, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Two new species, C. dali sp. nov. and C. kaili sp. nov. are also found in this lake and they are described and illustrated. Compared to C. linduensis, C. dali sp. nov. is distinguished by its relatively shorter rostrum which only overreaches the end of basal segment of antennular peduncle and the fewer teeth on the incisor process of the mandible. Caridina kaili sp. nov. can be separated from C. linduensis by its extremely short rostrum, which reaches almost or just reaches the end of the basal segment of the antennular peduncle, proportionately stouter second pereiopod and larger egg size. The two new species also prefer different habitats; C. linduensis is a true lake inhabitant, C. dali sp. nov. can be found both in the lake itself and associated streams while C. kaili sp. nov. is an obligate stream species. PMID:26249092

  2. Lower Cambrian polychaete from China sheds light on early annelid evolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianni; Ou, Qiang; Han, Jian; Li, Jinshu; Wu, Yichen; Jiao, Guoxiang; He, Tongjiang

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a fossilized polychaete annelid, Guanshanchaeta felicia gen. et sp. nov., from the Lower Cambrian Guanshan Biota (Cambrian Series 2, stage 4). The new taxon has a generalized polychaete morphology, with biramous parapodia (most of which preserve the evidence of chaetae), an inferred prostomium bearing a pair of appendages, and a bifid pygidium. G. felicia is the first unequivocal annelid reported from the Lower Cambrian of China. It represents one of the oldest annelids among those from other early Paleozoic Lagerstätten including Sirius Passet from Greenland (Vinther et al., Nature 451: 185-188, 2011) and Emu Bay from Kangaroo island (Parry et al., Palaeontology 57: 1091-1103, 2014), and adds to our increasing roll of present-day animal phyla recognized in the early Cambrian Guanshan Biota. This finding expands the panorama of the Cambrian 'explosion' exemplified by the Guanshan Biota, suggesting the presence of many more fossil annelids in the Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the Kaili Biota. In addition, this new taxon increases our knowledge of early polychaete morphology, which suggests that polychaete annelids considerably diversified in the Cambrian. PMID:26017277

  3. Lower Cambrian polychaete from China sheds light on early annelid evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianni; Ou, Qiang; Han, Jian; Li, Jinshu; Wu, Yichen; Jiao, Guoxiang; He, Tongjiang

    2015-06-01

    We herein report a fossilized polychaete annelid, Guanshanchaeta felicia gen. et sp. nov., from the Lower Cambrian Guanshan Biota (Cambrian Series 2, stage 4). The new taxon has a generalized polychaete morphology, with biramous parapodia (most of which preserve the evidence of chaetae), an inferred prostomium bearing a pair of appendages, and a bifid pygidium. G. felicia is the first unequivocal annelid reported from the Lower Cambrian of China. It represents one of the oldest annelids among those from other early Paleozoic Lagerstätten including Sirius Passet from Greenland (Vinther et al., Nature 451: 185-188, 2008) and Emu Bay from Kangaroo island (Parry et al., Palaeontology 57: 1091-1103, 2014), and adds to our increasing roll of present-day animal phyla recognized in the early Cambrian Guanshan Biota. This finding expands the panorama of the Cambrian `explosion' exemplified by the Guanshan Biota, suggesting the presence of many more fossil annelids in the Chengjiang Lagerstätte and the Kaili Biota. In addition, this new taxon increases our knowledge of early polychaete morphology, which suggests that polychaete annelids considerably diversified in the Cambrian.