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Sample records for jacobian inverse kinematics

  1. JFKengine: A Jacobian and Forward Kinematics Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.N.

    2003-02-13

    During robot path planning and control the equations that describe the robot motions are determined and solved. Historically these expressions were derived analytically off-line. For robots that must adapt to their environment or perform a wide range of tasks, a way is needed to rapidly re-derive these expressions to take into account the robot kinematic changes, such as when a tool is added to the end-effector. The JFKengine software was developed to automatically produce the expressions representing the manipulator arm motion, including the manipulator arm Jacobian and the forward kinematic expressions. Its programming interface can be used in conjunction with robot simulation software or with robot control software. Thus, it helps to automate the process of configuration changes for serial robot manipulators. If the manipulator undergoes a geometric change, such as tool acquisition, then JFKengine can be invoked again from the control or simulation software, passing it parameters for the new arm configuration. This report describes the automated processes that are implemented by JFKengine to derive the kinematic equations and the programming interface by which it is invoked. Then it discusses the tree data structure that was chosen to store the expressions, followed by several examples of portions of expressions as represented in the tree. The C++ classes and their methods that implement the expression differentiation and evaluation operations are described. The algorithms used to construct the Jacobian and forward kinematic equations using these basic building blocks are then illustrated. The activity described in this report is part of a larger project entitled ''Multi-Optimization Criteria-Based Robot Behavioral Adaptability and Motion Planning'' that focuses on the development of a methodology for the generalized resolution of robot motion equations with time-varying configurations, constraints, and task objective criteria. A specific goal of this project is the implementation of this generalized methodology in a single general code that would be applicable to the motion planning of a wide class of systems and would automate many of the processes involved in developing and solving the motion planning and controls equations. This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Management Science Program (DOE-EMSP) as project EMSP no. 82794 and is transitioning to the DOE-Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER) as per FY-02.

  2. Visualization of redundancy resolution for kinematically redundant robots through the Jacobian null space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Che; Walker, Ian D.; Cheatham, John B., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We present a unified formulation for the inverse kinematics of redundant arms, based on a special formulation of the null space of the Jacobian. By extending (appropriately re-scaling) previously used null space parameterizations, we obtain, in a unified fashion, the manipulability measure, the null space projector, and particular solutions for the joint velocities. We obtain the minimum norm pseudo-inverse solution as a projection from any particular solution, and the method provides an intuitive visualization of the self-motion. The result is a computationally efficient, consistent approach to computing redundant robot inverse kinematics.

  3. New insights into input relegation control for inverse kinematics of a redundant manipulator. Part 1, On the orthogonality of matrices B and J and comparison to the extended Jacobian method

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.; Reister, D.B.

    1995-07-01

    A method for kinematically modeling a constrained rigid body mechanical system and a method for controlling such a system termed input relegation control (IRC) were applied to resolve the kinematic redundancy of a serial link manipulator moving in an open chain configuration in. A set of equations was introduced to define a new vector variable parameterizing the redundant degrees of freedom (DOF) as a linear function of the joint velocities. The new set was combined with the classical kinematic velocity model of manipulator and solved to yield a well specified solution for the joint velocities as a function of the Cartesian velocities of the end effector and of the redundant DOF variable. In the previous work a technique was proposed for selecting the matrix relating the redundant DOF variable to the joint velocities which resulted in it rows being orthogonal to the rows of the Jacobian matrix. The implications for such a selection were not discussed in. In Part 1 of this report a basis for the joint space is suggested which provides considerable insight into why picking the aforementioned matrix to be orthogonal to the Jacobian is advantageous. A second objective of Part 1 is to compare the IRC method to the Extended Jacobian method of Baillieul and Martin and other related methods.

  4. Challenges of Inversely Estimating Jacobian from Metabolomics Data

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Länger, Bettina; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Inferring dynamics of metabolic networks directly from metabolomics data provides a promising way to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of biological systems, as reported in our previous studies (Weckwerth, 2011; Sun and Weckwerth, 2012; Nägele et al., 2014) by a differential Jacobian approach. The Jacobian is solved from an overdetermined system of equations as JC?+?CJT?=??2D, called Lyapunov Equation in its generic form,1 where J is the Jacobian, C is the covariance matrix of metabolomics data, and D is the fluctuation matrix. Lyapunov Equation can be further simplified as the linear form Ax?=?b. Frequently, this linear equation system is ill-conditioned, i.e., a small variation in the right side b results in a big change in the solution x, thus making the solution unstable and error-prone. At the same time, inaccurate estimation of covariance matrix and uncertainties in the fluctuation matrix bring biases to the solution x. Here, we first reviewed common approaches to circumvent the ill-conditioned problems, including total least squares, Tikhonov regularization, and truncated singular value decomposition. Then, we benchmarked these methods on several in silico kinetic models with small to large perturbations on the covariance and fluctuation matrices. The results identified that the accuracy of the reverse Jacobian is mainly dependent on the condition number of A, the perturbation amplitude of C, and the stiffness of the kinetic models. Our research contributes a systematical comparison of methods to inversely solve Jacobian from metabolomics data. PMID:26636075

  5. Parallel processing architecture for computing inverse differential kinematic equations of the PUMA arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, T. C.; Lu, G. Z.; Han, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    In advanced robot control problems, on-line computation of inverse Jacobian solution is frequently required. Parallel processing architecture is an effective way to reduce computation time. A parallel processing architecture is developed for the inverse Jacobian (inverse differential kinematic equation) of the PUMA arm. The proposed pipeline/parallel algorithm can be inplemented on an IC chip using systolic linear arrays. This implementation requires 27 processing cells and 25 time units. Computation time is thus significantly reduced.

  6. Robust inverse kinematics using damped least squares with dynamic weighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schinstock, D. E.; Faddis, T. N.; Greenway, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a general method for calculating the inverse kinematics with singularity and joint limit robustness for both redundant and non-redundant serial-link manipulators. Damped least squares inverse of the Jacobian is used with dynamic weighting matrices in approximating the solution. This reduces specific joint differential vectors. The algorithm gives an exact solution away from the singularities and joint limits, and an approximate solution at or near the singularities and/or joint limits. The procedure is here implemented for a six d.o.f. teleoperator and a well behaved slave manipulator resulted under teleoperational control.

  7. Iterative inverse kinematics with manipulator configuration control

    SciTech Connect

    Grudic, G.Z.; Lawrence, P.D.

    1993-08-01

    A new method, termed the offset modification method (OM method), for solving the manipulator inverse kinematics problem is presented. The OM method works by modifying the link offset values of a manipulator until it is possible to derive closed-form inverse kinematics equations for the resulting manipulator (termed the model manipulator). This procedure allows one to derive a set of three nonlinear equations in three unknowns that, when numerically solved, give an inverse kinematics solution for the original manipulator. The OM method can be applied to manipulators with any number of degrees of freedom, as long as the manipulator satisfies a given set of conditions (Theorem 1). The OM method is tested on a 6-degree-of-freedom manipulator that has no known closed-form inverse kinematics equations. It is shown that the OM method is applicable to real-time manipulator control, can be used to guarantee convergence to a desired endpoint position and orientation (if it exists), and allows one to directly choose which inverse kinematics solution the algorithm will converge to (as specified in the model manipulator closed-form inverse kinematics equations). Applications of the method to other 6-DOF manipulator geometries and to redundant manipulators (i.e. greater than 6 DOF geometries) are discussed.

  8. Inverse kinematics problem in robotics using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Lawrence, Charles

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Multilayer Feedforward Networks are applied to the robot inverse kinematic problem. The networks are trained with endeffector position and joint angles. After training, performance is measured by having the network generate joint angles for arbitrary endeffector trajectories. A 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) spatial manipulator is used for the study. It is found that neural networks provide a simple and effective way to both model the manipulator inverse kinematics and circumvent the problems associated with algorithmic solution methods.

  9. Computational neural learning formalisms for manipulator inverse kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulati, Sandeep; Barhen, Jacob; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    1989-01-01

    An efficient, adaptive neural learning paradigm for addressing the inverse kinematics of redundant manipulators is presented. The proposed methodology exploits the infinite local stability of terminal attractors - a new class of mathematical constructs which provide unique information processing capabilities to artificial neural systems. For robotic applications, synaptic elements of such networks can rapidly acquire the kinematic invariances embedded within the presented samples. Subsequently, joint-space configurations, required to follow arbitrary end-effector trajectories, can readily be computed. In a significant departure from prior neuromorphic learning algorithms, this methodology provides mechanisms for incorporating an in-training skew to handle kinematics and environmental constraints.

  10. 3-D magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on SMP computers - Part I: forward problem and parameter Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm, which we call HexMT, for 3-D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permit incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used throughout, including the forward solution, parameter Jacobians and model parameter update. In Part I, the forward simulator and Jacobian calculations are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequencies or small material admittivities, the E-field requires divergence correction. With the help of Hodge decomposition, the correction may be applied in one step after the forward solution is calculated. This allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization and source vector solutions are computed using the MKL PARDISO library, which shows good scalability through 24 processor cores. The factorized matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the Jacobians of electromagnetic (EM) field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure, several synthetic topographic models and the natural topography of Mount Erebus in Antarctica. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of EM waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run-time tests of the parallelized algorithm indicate that for meshes as large as 176 × 176 × 70 elements, MT forward responses and Jacobians can be calculated in ˜1.5 hr per frequency. Together with an efficient inversion parameter step described in Part II, MT inversion problems of 200-300 stations are computable with total run times of several days on such workstations.

  11. Inferring the resolution of source kinematic inversions: a blind test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Mai, P. M.; Francois-Holden, C.; Burjanek, J.; di Carli, S.; Emolo, A.; Gallovic, F.; Zollo, A.; Delouis, B.; Madariaga, R.

    2005-12-01

    Kinematic inversions of near-fault data allow to retrieve certain properties of earthquake rupture, such as the slip distribution, the rupture velocity and the slip rate which depends on the choice of the source time function. Accurate images of the spatio-temporal rupture process are also a necessary ingredient to move from kinematic source characterizations to reliable models of the dynamic fracture process. Several techniques have been developed in the past to carry out such source inversions, with an apparent increase in estimated rupture complexity which also reflects the increasing amount and quality of near-fault strong-motion data. However, the resolution, reliability and quality of these finite-source rupture models still remains an open question. Particular choices in the inversion method (fault parametrization, selection and processing of data, minimum search alogrithm and fitness function) influence the inversion results, leading to different and sometimes incompatible slip maps for the same earthquake. We therefore construct a blind test inversion exercise in which several research groups attempt to derive a kinematic rupture model from synthetic seismograms calculated for an input model unknown to the people performing the inversion. During several stages of this blind test, we increase the complexity of the input model while also the "data quality" will be decreased by adding random noise to the synthetic seismograms. The major aim of this study is to compare different source-imaging techniques, to understand their strengths and weaknesses and to check the processing of data. Besides inferring the general properties of the rupture, we will also be able to asses the resolution and possibly uncertainties in the model parameters, which will furnish guide lines and directions for future work. The test is carried out in the framework of the EU-SPICE project (Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media - a European project), but is also open to other interested researchers.

  12. Production of Radioactive Nuclides in Inverse Reaction Kinematics

    E-print Network

    E. Traykov; A. Rogachevskiy; U. Dammalapati; P. Dendooven; O. C. Dermois; K. Jungmann; C. J. G. Onderwater; M. Sohani; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut; A. R. Young

    2006-08-08

    Efficient production of short-lived radioactive isotopes in inverse reaction kinematics is an important technique for various applications. It is particularly interesting when the isotope of interest is only a few nucleons away from a stable isotope. In this article production via charge exchange and stripping reactions in combination with a magnetic separator is explored. The relation between the separator transmission efficiency, the production yield, and the choice of beam energy is discussed. The results of some exploratory experiments will be presented.

  13. A study on estimation of planar gait kinematics using minimal inertial measurement units and inverse kinematics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyao; Soh, Gim Song

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of using four inertial measurement units (IMUs) attached to the heel and pelvis to estimate the joint angles of normal subjects during walking. The IMU, consisting of a 3-D accelerometer and gyroscope, is used to estimate the planar displacement of the heel and pelvis and the angular change of heel in one gait cycle. We then model the gait as a planar 3R serial chain and solve its inverse kinematics by using such information. The results are validated by comparing the estimated joint angles of lower limbs (i.e. hip, knee and ankle angles) with an optical motion capture system. This study can benefit the future research on conducting complete lower limbs kinematics analysis with minimal and unobtrusive wearable sensors. PMID:25571585

  14. Kinematic Waveform Inversion: Application in Southwest Iberia Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingues, A. L.; Custodio, S.; Cesca, S.

    2011-12-01

    The seismic activity that affects the Portuguese territory occurs mainly and more frequently offshore, in the south and southwest of Mainland Portugal. The study of the Portuguese seismicity is conditioned by the poor azimuthal coverage, due to the geographic location of Portugal, and by the large sedimentary basin west of the straight of Gibraltar (Cadiz Basin). In this work we focus on the study of regional seismicity in Portugal (mostly offshore earthquakes) using a recently developed package - the KIWI (Kinematic Waveform Inversion) tools. This new technique performs point and finite source inversions at regional distances. The KIWI routine is a multi-step approach composed of 3 steps, finding different source parameters at different steps. At first, we assume a point source approximation. We initially retrieve the focal mechanism of the earthquake (strike, dip, and rake), the seismic scalar moment M0 and the depth. This inversion step is performed in the spectral domain, by fitting amplitude spectra. In the second step, compressive and dilatation quadrants are retrieved, which is carried out in the time domain. Refined latitude and longitude for the centroid, as well as an earthquake origin time, are also given at this time. The final step of the inversion consists of a simplified finite-fault inversion. We assume the eikonal source model, and determine parameters such as the fault plane orientation (discrimination between fault and auxiliary plane), radius (rupture extension), nucleation point coordinates (indicative of directivity effects) and average rupture velocity of the earthquake. This inversion is performed in the frequency domain by fitting amplitude spectra in a wider frequency band (including higher frequencies). This multi-step approach has the advantage of using different inversion methods, seismic phases and range of frequencies to infer specific parameters. In this work we study 17 regional earthquakes occurred in Southwest Iberia between 2007 and 2009 with moderate magnitude (3.3 to 4.4). The small magnitude of these earthquakes prevents their study with the third step of the algorithm. The solutions obtained are evaluated by a quality criteria and compared with other moment tensor solutions. The quality factor is based on the number of stations and on the misfit between the recorded and the synthetic waveforms. Apart from this study another offshore event was analyzed. The earthquake occurred SW of St Vincent Cape on February 12, 2007 with Mw 5.9. In this study the KIWI tools were employed to infer both the point and finite source parameters of this earthquake. The results of the kinematic source inversion step indicate that the 2007 HAP earthquake ruptured a plane trending WNW-ESE, whereas previous studies suggest that the conjugate fault plane (ENE-WSW) is the true rupture plane. The proposed solution also indicates that the earthquake occurred within the SWIM fault-zone. However, the 46° dip is difficult to reconcile with the sub-vertical nature of the SWIM faults.

  15. Advanced control schemes and kinematic analysis for a kinematically redundant 7 DOF manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Zhou, Zhen-Lei

    1990-01-01

    The kinematic analysis and control of a kinematically redundant manipulator is addressed. The manipulator is the slave arm of a telerobot system recently built at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to serve as a testbed for investigating research issues in telerobotics. A forward kinematic transformation is developed in its most simplified form, suitable for real-time control applications, and the manipulator Jacobian is derived using the vector cross product method. Using the developed forward kinematic transformation and quaternion representation of orientation matrices, we perform computer simulation to evaluate the efficiency of the Jacobian in converting joint velocities into Cartesian velocities and to investigate the accuracy of Jacobian pseudo-inverse for various sampling times. The equivalence between Cartesian velocities and quaternion is also verified using computer simulation. Three control schemes are proposed and discussed for controlling the motion of the slave arm end-effector.

  16. Automatic generation of forward and inverse kinematics for a reconfigurable modular manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelmar, Laura; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is proposed for automatically generating both the forward and inverse kinematics of a serial-link N-degree-of-freedom reconfigurable manipulator (RM). Generation of the kinematic equations that govern a modular manipulator starts with geometric descriptions of the units, or modules, as well as their sequence in the manipulator. This geometric information is used to obtain the Denavit-Hartenberg (DH) parameters of an RM. The DH kinematic parameters are then used to obtain the forward kinematic transformation of the system. The problem of obtaining the inverse kinematics of RMs is addressed, and the idea of scaling an RM to automate the inverse kinematics and make the procedure as general as possible is proposed.

  17. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a ?E-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(?,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  18. Kinematic source inversions of teleseismic data based on the QUESO library for uncertainty quantification and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; McDougall, D.; Mai, P. M.; Babuska, I.

    2014-12-01

    One fundamental aspect of seismic hazard mitigation is gaining a better understanding of the rupture process. Because direct observation of the relevant parameters and properties is not possible, other means such as kinematic source inversions are used instead. By constraining the spatial and temporal evolution of fault slip during an earthquake, those inversion approaches may enable valuable insights in the physics of the rupture process. However, due to the underdetermined nature of this inversion problem (i.e., inverting a kinematic source model for an extended fault based on seismic data), the provided solutions are generally non-unique. Here we present a statistical (Bayesian) inversion approach based on an open-source library for uncertainty quantification (UQ) called QUESO that was developed at ICES (UT Austin). The approach has advantages with respect to deterministic inversion approaches as it provides not only a single (non-unique) solution but also provides uncertainty bounds with it. Those uncertainty bounds help to qualitatively and quantitatively judge how well constrained an inversion solution is and how much rupture complexity the data reliably resolve. The presented inversion scheme uses only tele-seismically recorded body waves but future developments may lead us towards joint inversion schemes. After giving an insight in the inversion scheme ifself (based on delayed rejection adaptive metropolis, DRAM) we explore the method's resolution potential. For that, we synthetically generate tele-seismic data, add for example different levels of noise and/or change fault plane parameterization and then apply our inversion scheme in the attempt to extract the (known) kinematic rupture model. We conclude with exemplary inverting real tele-seismic data of a recent large earthquake and compare those results with deterministically derived kinematic source models provided by other research groups.

  19. Development of ORRUBA: A Silicon Array for the Measurement of Transfer Reactions in Inverse Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Johnson, Micah; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Livesay, Jake; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-01-01

    The development of high quality radioactive beams has made possible the measurement of transfer reactions in inverse kinematics on unstable nuclei. Measurement of (d,p) reactions on neutron-rich nuclei yield data on the evolution of nuclear structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest. Experimentally, (d,p) reactions on heavy (Z=50) fission fragments are complicated by the strongly inverse kinematics, and relatively low beam intensities. Consequently, ejectile detection with high resolution in position and energy, a high dynamic range and a high solid angular coverage is required. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new silicon detector array optimized for the measurement of (d,p) reactions in inverse kinematics.

  20. Inverse Kinematics for a Serial Chain with Joints under Distance Constraints

    E-print Network

    Rudolph, Lee

    , analysis, planning and control of robot linkage systems such as robotic hands, limbs and humanoid robots Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Clark University Worcester, MA 01610, U.S.A. Email: [lhan, lrudolph]@clarku.edu Abstract-- Inverse kinematics (IK) problems are important in the study of robotics

  1. Inverse Kinematics for a Point-Foot Quadruped Robot with Dynamic Redundancy Resolution

    E-print Network

    Tedrake, Russ

    Inverse Kinematics for a Point-Foot Quadruped Robot with Dynamic Redundancy Resolution Alexander of center of mass and swing leg trajectories in LittleDog, a point-foot quadruped robot. It is not clear how of actuated joint angles because point-foot walkers have no direct actuation between the feet and the ground

  2. Direct and Inverse Kinematics of a Novel Tip-Tilt-Piston Parallel Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2004-01-01

    Closed-form direct and inverse kinematics of a new three degree-of-freedom (DOF) parallel manipulator with inextensible limbs and base-mounted actuators are presented. The manipulator has higher resolution and precision than the existing three DOF mechanisms with extensible limbs. Since all of the manipulator actuators are base-mounted; higher payload capacity, smaller actuator sizes, and lower power dissipation can be obtained. The manipulator is suitable for alignment applications where only tip, tilt, and piston motions are significant. The direct kinematics of the manipulator is reduced to solving an eighth-degree polynomial in the square of tangent of half-angle between one of the limbs and the base plane. Hence, there are at most 16 assembly configurations for the manipulator. In addition, it is shown that the 16 solutions are eight pairs of reflected configurations with respect to the base plane. Numerical examples for the direct and inverse kinematics of the manipulator are also presented.

  3. Real-time neuromorphic algorithms for inverse kinematics of redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep; Zak, Michail

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents an efficient neuromorphic formulation to accurately solve the inverse kinematics problem for redundant manipulators. The approach involves a dynamical learning procedure based on a novel formalism in neural network theory: the concept of 'terminal' attractors. Topographically mapped terminal attractors are used to define a neural network whose synaptic elements can rapidly encapture the inverse kinematics transformations, and, subsequently generalize to compute joint-space coordinates required to achieve arbitrary end-effector configurations. Unlike prior neuromorphic implementations, this technique can also systematically exploit redundancy to optimize kinematic criteria, e.g., torque optimization. Simulations on 3-DOF and 7-DOF redundant manipulators, are used to validate the theoretical framework and illustrate its computational efficacy.

  4. Kinematic Control of Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators in the Presence of Steering Wheels

    E-print Network

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Kinematic Control of Nonholonomic Mobile Manipulators in the Presence of Steering Wheels Alessandro, these inputs are not used by velocity-level control laws based on simple (pseudo)inversion of the task Jacobian law is presented that defines the unspecified steering velocities via an optimization action

  5. Rapid kinematic slip inversion with regional geophysical data: towards site-specific tsunami intensity forecasts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar, D.; Bock, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid kinematic slip inversions immediately following earthquake rupture is traditionally limited to teleseismic data and delayed many hours after large events. Regional data such as strong motion is difficult to incorporate quickly into images of the source process because baseline offsets render the long period portion of the recording unreliable. Recently it's been demonstrated that high rate GPS can potentially produce rapid slip inversions for large events but is limited to very long periods. With an example of the 2011 M9 Tohoku-oki event we will demonstrate that the optimal on-the-fly combination of GPS and strong motion through a seismogeodetic Kalman filter produces reliable, broadband strong motion displacement and velocity waveforms that can be used for kinematic inversion. Through joint inversion of displacement and velocity waveforms we will show that it is possible to obtain a broadband image of the source. Furthermore, we will also show that it is possible to include offshore geophysical observables such as sea surface measurements of tsunami propagation from GPS buoys and ocean bottom pressure sensors into the kinematic inversion. These data better constrain the shallowest part of rupture. We will use the time-dependent deformation of bathymetry predicted from the inversion results as an initial condition for tsunami propagation and inundation modeling. Through a comparison to post-event survey observations we will demonstrate that it is possible to reproduce the inundation pattern along the coastline in great detail and argue that detailed site-specific forecast of tsunami intensity is achievable with current methods and instrumentation.

  6. Neutron capture surrogate reaction on 75As in inverse kinematics using (d,p )

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; O'Malley, Patrick; Jones, K. L.; Schmitt, Kyle; Moazen, Brian; Chae, K. Y.; Pittman, S. T.; Kozub, R. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Jandel, M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Matei, Catalin; Escher, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Pain, Steven D; Smith, Michael Scott

    2010-01-01

    The 75As(d,p ) reaction in inverse kinematics as a surrogate for neutron capture was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a deuterated plastic target. The intensity of the 165 keV -ray from 76As in coincidence with ejected protons, from exciting 76As above the neutron separation energy populating a compound state, was measured. A tight geometry of four segmented germanium clover -ray detectors together with eight ORRUBA-type silicon-strip charged-particle detectors were used to optimize geometric acceptance. The preliminary analysis of the 75As experiment and the ecacy and future plans of the (d,p ) surrogate campaign in inverse kinematics are discussed.

  7. Neutron Capture Surrogate Reaction on 75As in Inverse Kinematics Using (d,p(gamma))

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W A; Cizewski, J A; Hatarik, R; O?Malley, P D; Jones, K L; Schmitt, K; Moazen, B H; Chae, K Y; Pittman, S T; Kozub, R L; Vieira, D; Jandel, M; Wilhelmy, J B; Matei, C; Escher, J; Bardayan, D W; Pain, S D; Smith, M S

    2009-11-09

    The {sup 75}As(d,p{gamma}) reaction in inverse kinematics as a surrogate for neutron capture was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a deuterated plastic target. The intensity of the 165 keV {gamma}-ray from {sup 76}As in coincidence with ejected protons, from exciting {sup 76}As above the neutron separation energy populating a compound state, was measured. A tight geometry of four segmented germanium clover {gamma}-ray detectors together with eight ORRUBA-type silicon-strip charged-particle detectors was used to optimize geometric acceptance. The preliminary analysis of the {sup 75}As experiment, and the efficacy and future plans of the (d,p{gamma}) surrogate campaign in inverse kinematics, are discussed.

  8. Insights into the kinematics of a volcanic caldera drop: Probabilistic finite-source inversion of the 1996 Brdarbunga, Iceland, earthquake

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Insights into the kinematics of a volcanic caldera drop: Probabilistic finite-source inversion Editor: R.D. van der Hilst Keywords: volcanic caldera Bárdarbunga Iceland finite-source inversion critically on information concerning the interaction between the caldera and the underlying magma chamber

  9. Kinematically redundant robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baillieul, J.; Hollerbach, J.; Brockett, R.; Martin, D.; Percy, R.; Thomas, R.

    1987-01-01

    Research on control, design and programming of kinematically redundant robot manipulators (KRRM) is discussed. These are devices in which there are more joint space degrees of freedom than are required to achieve every position and orientation of the end-effector necessary for a given task in a given workspace. The technological developments described here deal with: kinematic programming techniques for automatically generating joint-space trajectories to execute prescribed tasks; control of redundant manipulators to optimize dynamic criteria (e.g., applications of forces and moments at the end-effector that optimally distribute the loading of actuators); and design of KRRMs to optimize functionality in congested work environments or to achieve other goals unattainable with non-redundant manipulators. Kinematic programming techniques are discussed, which show that some pseudo-inverse techniques that have been proposed for redundant manipulator control fail to achieve the goals of avoiding kinematic singularities and also generating closed joint-space paths corresponding to close paths of the end effector in the workspace. The extended Jacobian is proposed as an alternative to pseudo-inverse techniques.

  10. Integrated Analytic and Linearized Inverse Kinematics for Precise Full Body Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulic, Ronan; Raunhardt, Daniel

    Despite the large success of games grounded on movement-based interactions the current state of full body motion capture technologies still prevents the exploitation of precise interactions with complex environments. This paper focuses on ensuring a precise spatial correspondence between the user and the avatar. We build upon our past effort in human postural control with a Prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. One of its key advantage is to ease the dynamic combination of postural and collision avoidance constraints. However its reliance on a linearized approximation of the problem makes it vulnerable to the well-known full extension singularity of the limbs. In such context the tracking performance is reduced and/or less believable intermediate postural solutions are produced. We address this issue by introducing a new type of analytic constraint that smoothly integrates within the prioritized Inverse Kinematics framework. The paper first recalls the background of full body 3D interactions and the advantages and drawbacks of the linearized IK solution. Then the Flexion-EXTension constraint (FLEXT in short) is introduced for the partial position control of limb-like articulated structures. Comparative results illustrate the interest of this new type of integrated analytical and linearized IK control.

  11. Landslide Kinematical Analysis through Inverse Numerical Modelling and Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, R.; Tizzani, P.; Lollino, P.; Calò, F.; Ardizzone, F.; Lanari, R.; Guzzetti, F.; Manunta, M.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to perform inverse numerical modelling of slow landslides that combines the potentialities of both numerical approaches and well-known remote-sensing satellite techniques. In particular, through an optimization procedure based on a genetic algorithm, we minimize, with respect to a proper penalty function, the difference between the modelled displacement field and differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR) deformation time series. The proposed methodology allows us to automatically search for the physical parameters that characterize the landslide behaviour. To validate the presented approach, we focus our analysis on the slow Ivancich landslide (Assisi, central Italy). The kinematical evolution of the unstable slope is investigated via long-term DInSAR analysis, by exploiting about 20 years of ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellite acquisitions. The landslide is driven by the presence of a shear band, whose behaviour is simulated through a two-dimensional time-dependent finite element model, in two different physical scenarios, i.e. Newtonian viscous flow and a deviatoric creep model. Comparison between the model results and DInSAR measurements reveals that the deviatoric creep model is more suitable to describe the kinematical evolution of the landslide. This finding is also confirmed by comparing the model results with the available independent inclinometer measurements. Our analysis emphasizes that integration of different data, within inverse numerical models, allows deep investigation of the kinematical behaviour of slow active landslides and discrimination of the driving forces that govern their deformation processes.

  12. Analytical and semi-analytical inverse kinematics of SSRMS-type manipulators with single joint locked failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; She, Yu; Xu, Yangsheng

    2014-12-01

    Redundant space manipulators, including Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) and European Robotic Arm (ERA), have been playing important roles in the construction and maintenance of International Space Station (ISS). They all have 7 revolute joints arranged in similar configurations, and are referred to as SSRMS-type manipulators. When a joint is locked in an arbitrary position due to some failures, a 7R manipulator degrades to a 6R manipulator. Without a spherical wrist or three consecutive parallel joints, the inverse kinematics of the 6R manipulator is very complex. In this paper, we propose effective methods to resolve the inverse kinematics for different cases of any joint locked in an arbitrary position. Firstly, configuration characteristics of the SSRMS-type redundant manipulators are analyzed. Then, an existing of closed-form inverse kinematics is discussed for locking different joints. Secondly, D-H frames and corresponding D-H parameters of the new 6-DOF manipulator formed by locking a joint in an arbitrary position are re-constructed. A unified table is then created to describe the kinematics for all possible cases of single joint locking failure. Thirdly, completely analytical and semi-analytical methods are presented to solve the inverse kinematics equations, and the former is used for locking joint 1, 2, 6 or 7 while the latter for locking joint 3, 4 or 5. Finally, typical cases for single joint locking are studied. The results verify the proposed methods.

  13. Spectroscopy of Low-Lying Proton-Resonances using the (d , n) Reaction in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Baby, Lagy T.; Kuvin, Sean; Baker, Jessica; Blackmon, Jeff; Deibel, Catherine; Macon, Kevin; Gay, Dennis; Colbert, Kayla; Quails, Nathan; Florida State University Team; Louisiana State University Team; University of North Florida Team

    2014-09-01

    Studies of rp-process nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions show that establishing the lowest l = 0 and l = 1 resonances is the most important step to determine reaction rates in the astrophysical rp -process path. In order to establish the (d , n) reaction as a standard technique for the spectroscopy of astrophysical resonances, we have developed a compact setup of low-energy Neutron-detectors, resoneut and tested it with the stable beam reaction 12 C(d , n) 13 N in inverse kinematics. At the resolut in-flight radioactive beam facility, we have used the new detector system to investigate the l = 0 and l = 1 resonance spectrum in 18Ne and 26Si. Results from these experiments and the implications on proton-induced nucleosynthesis rates will be discussed. Studies of rp-process nucleosynthesis in stellar explosions show that establishing the lowest l = 0 and l = 1 resonances is the most important step to determine reaction rates in the astrophysical rp -process path. In order to establish the (d , n) reaction as a standard technique for the spectroscopy of astrophysical resonances, we have developed a compact setup of low-energy Neutron-detectors, resoneut and tested it with the stable beam reaction 12 C(d , n) 13 N in inverse kinematics. At the resolut in-flight radioactive beam facility, we have used the new detector system to investigate the l = 0 and l = 1 resonance spectrum in 18Ne and 26Si. Results from these experiments and the implications on proton-induced nucleosynthesis rates will be discussed. Supported by NSF under grants PHY-1064819, PHY-0821308 and PHY-0820941. Supported by DOE under grant DE-FG02-02ER41220.

  14. Three-body model for the analysis of quasifree scattering reactions in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    A new method to calculate cross sections for (p ,p n ) and (p ,2 p ) reactions measured under inverse kinematics conditions is proposed. The method uses the prior form of the scattering transition amplitude and replaces the exact three-body wave function appearing in this expression with an expansion in terms of p -n or p -p states, covering the physically relevant excitation energies and partial waves. A procedure of discretization, similar to that used in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations, is applied to make this expansion finite and numerically tractable. The proposed formalism is nonrelativistic, but several relativistic kinematical corrections are applied to extend its applicability to energies of current interest. The underlying optical potentials for the entrance and exit channels are generated microscopically by folding an effective density-dependent G matrix with the density of the composite nucleus. Numerical calculations for 12C(p ,2 p ), 12C(p ,p n ), and 23O(p ,p n ) at ˜400 MeV/nucleon are presented to illustrate the method. The role of final-state interactions and Pauli principle between the outgoing nucleons is also discussed.

  15. Kinematic Slip Model for 12 May 2008 Wenchuan-Beichuan Mw 7.9 Earthquake from Joint Inversion of ALOS, Envisat, and Teleseismic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, Eric; Sladen, Anthony; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Li, Zhenhong; Ryder, Isabelle; Burgmann, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The presentations explores kinematics of the Wenchaun-Beichuan earthquake using data from ALOS, Envisat, and teleseismic recordings. Topics include geomorphic mapping, ALOS PALSAR range offsets, ALOS PALSAR interferometry, Envisat IM interferometry, Envisat ScanSAR, Joint GPS-InSAR inversion, and joint GPS-teleseismic inversion (static and kinematic).

  16. Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2008 Blended Inverse Kinematics: Delta3D System Utilization

    E-print Network

    Darken, Christian J.

    Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC) 2008 Blended Inverse, their usage typically results in the synthesis of animations that fail to impart the sense of weight and timing that would be present in either motion captured or artist created forward kinematic animation

  17. Derivation of three closed loop kinematic velocity models using normalized quaternion feedback for an autonomous redundant manipulator with application to inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Unseren, M.A.

    1993-04-01

    The report discusses the orientation tracking control problem for a kinematically redundant, autonomous manipulator moving in a three dimensional workspace. The orientation error is derived using the normalized quaternion error method of Ickes, the Luh, Walker, and Paul error method, and a method suggested here utilizing the Rodrigues parameters, all of which are expressed in terms of normalized quaternions. The analytical time derivatives of the orientation errors are determined. The latter, along with the translational velocity error, form a dosed loop kinematic velocity model of the manipulator using normalized quaternion and translational position feedback. An analysis of the singularities associated with expressing the models in a form suitable for solving the inverse kinematics problem is given. Two redundancy resolution algorithms originally developed using an open loop kinematic velocity model of the manipulator are extended to properly take into account the orientation tracking control problem. This report furnishes the necessary mathematical framework required prior to experimental implementation of the orientation tracking control schemes on the seven axis CESARm research manipulator or on the seven-axis Robotics Research K1207i dexterous manipulator, the latter of which is to be delivered to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1993.

  18. More power to kinematic earthquake source inversions: With new tools from mismodelling to uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Sebastian; Sudhaus, Henriette; Wang, Rongjiang; Cesca, Simone; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The notorious discrepancies among finite fault slip inversion results have attracted much attention over the last years. In consequence, much effort has been put into methods to improve the robustness of such inversions and to quantify uncertainties on results. The techniques exploited include controlling the smoothness of the inferred slip distribution, reducing dimensionality of parameter-space, propagation of observational errors through Bayesian inference, Monte-Carlo modelling and bootstrapping. The difficulties in earthquake finite source parameter estimation arise from three distinct origins: (1) observational errors, (2) the (in)ability of the earthquake source model to represent nature, and (3) mismodelling of synthetic seismograms. While observational errors can often be formally included in the source parameter estimation process, the latter two are much harder to to handle. Appropriateness of the source model (2) is hard to achieve because more realistic models require more model parameters and quickly lead to underdetermined systems. Mismodelling of synthetic seismograms (3) has not been investigated much, probably because the technical effort to deal with it is usually high (because forward modelling may have to be repeated for many earth model variations). In this presentation, we will show that freely available precomputed Green's functions for ensembles of different earth models will make such investigations feasible for routine practice. We will illustrate this with a synthetic test case of a regional kinematic source parameter optimization. The presented work is closely related with the development of a new open source Python toolbox for the handling of precomputed Green's functions and for synthetic seismogram generation (http://emolch.github.io/pyrocko/gf). Ultimately, we would like to launch a community driven open access Green's function sharing platform and web services for synthetic seismogram and test scenario generation (http://kinherd.org/).

  19. Cerebellum-inspired neural network solution of the inverse kinematics problem.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Eydivand, Mitra; Ebadzadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Darlot, Christian; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-12-01

    The demand today for more complex robots that have manipulators with higher degrees of freedom is increasing because of technological advances. Obtaining the precise movement for a desired trajectory or a sequence of arm and positions requires the computation of the inverse kinematic (IK) function, which is a major problem in robotics. The solution of the IK problem leads robots to the precise position and orientation of their end-effector. We developed a bioinspired solution comparable with the cerebellar anatomy and function to solve the said problem. The proposed model is stable under all conditions merely by parameter determination, in contrast to recursive model-based solutions, which remain stable only under certain conditions. We modified the proposed model for the simple two-segmented arm to prove the feasibility of the model under a basic condition. A fuzzy neural network through its learning method was used to compute the parameters of the system. Simulation results show the practical feasibility and efficiency of the proposed model in robotics. The main advantage of the proposed model is its generalizability and potential use in any robot. PMID:26438095

  20. Measurement of the ^134Te(d,p)^135Te Reaction in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Steven

    2007-10-01

    The development of high quality radioactive beams, such as those at the HRIBF at ORNL, has made possible the performance of transfer reactions on unstable nuclei. Measurements of (d,p) reactions on n-rich fission fragments yield data on nuclear structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r- process paths. The energies and spectroscopic information of single-particle states near to shell closures are of particular importance, since they provide both an important constraint on nuclear structure models and are directly relevant to direct neutron-capture cross sections. The single-neutron states in ^ 135Te, one neutron beyond the N=82 shell closure, are of particular interest, both for r-process nucleosynthesis and its relevance to an isotopic anomaly of Xe found in pre-solar meteoritic grains. The ^134Te(d,p)^135Te reaction has been measured in inverse kinematics at the HRIBF utilizing a beam of ^134Te at 643 MeV and a deuterated plastic target. Proton ejectiles were detected forward and backwards of ?lab = 90^o using an early implementation of the Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) in conjunction with SIDAR. Details of the experiment and the current stage of the data analysis will be presented.

  1. The double universal joint wrist on a manipulator: Solution of inverse position kinematics and singularity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert L., III

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents three methods to solve the inverse position kinematics position problem of the double universal joint attached to a manipulator: (1) an analytical solution for two specific cases; (2) an approximate closed form solution based on ignoring the wrist offset; and (3) an iterative method which repeats closed form position and orientation calculations until the solution is achieved. Several manipulators are used to demonstrate the solution methods: cartesian, cylindrical, spherical, and an anthropomorphic articulated arm, based on the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) arm. A singularity analysis is presented for the double universal joint wrist attached to the above manipulator arms. While the double universal joint wrist standing alone is singularity-free in orientation, the singularity analysis indicates the presence of coupled position/orientation singularities of the spherical and articulated manipulators with the wrist. The cartesian and cylindrical manipulators with the double universal joint wrist were found to be singularity-free. The methods of this paper can be implemented in a real-time controller for manipulators with the double universal joint wrist. Such mechanically dextrous systems could be used in telerobotic and industrial applications, but further work is required to avoid the singularities.

  2. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions in inverse kinematics and applications to nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reifarth, René; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Endres, Anne; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Glorius, Jan; Koloczek, Alexander; Sonnabend, Kerstin; Travaglio, Claudia; Weigand, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Neutron capture cross sections of unstable isotopes are important for neutron-induced nucleosynthesis as well as for technological applications. A combination of a radioactive beam facility, an ion storage ring and a high flux reactor would allow a direct measurement of neutron induced reactions over a wide energy range on isotopes with half lives down to minutes. The idea is to measure neutron-induced reactions on radioactive ions in inverse kinematics. This means, the radioactive ions will pass through a neutron target. In order to efficiently use the rare nuclides as well as to enhance the luminosity, the exotic nuclides can be stored in an ion storage ring. The neutron target can be the core of a research reactor, where one of the central fuel elements is replaced by the evacuated beam pipe of the storage ring. Using particle detectors and Schottky spectroscopy, most of the important neutron-induced reactions, such as (n,?), (n,p), (n,?), (n,2n), or (n,f), could be investigated.

  3. Direct measurement of 38K(p , ?) 39Ca in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotay, Gavin; Christian, Gregory; Burke, Devin; Chen, Alan; Connolly, Devin; Davids, Barry; Fallis, Jenniffer; Hager, Ulrike; Hutcheon, Dave; Mahl, Adam; Rojas, Alex; Ruiz, Chris; Sun, Xuan

    2014-09-01

    Sensitivity studies have identified 38K(p , ?) 39Ca as one of a handful of significant reactions in ONe novae, with the potential to change 38Ar, 39K, and 40Ca abundances in ONe ejecta by factors of ~18, ~17 and ~24, respectively. We have performed the first ever measurement of this reaction using the DRAGON recoil mass separator at TRIUMF. The experiment was performed in inverse kinematics using a beam of radioactive 38K. To date, this is the most massive projectile ever used in a radiative capture experiment. The astrophysical reaction rate is expected to be dominated by low- l resonances inside the Gamow window. Hence we have focused our efforts on the resonances at Ec.m. = 386, 515, and 689 keV. In this talk, I will present an overview of the experiment and data analysis and show preliminary resonance strengths (or upper limits) measured at each of the three energies. Finally, I will discuss the astrophysical implications of the measurements as they relate to ONe novae.

  4. Investigation of the nuclear matter distribution of 56Ni by elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmid, M.; Bagchi, S.; Bönig, S.; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Egelhof, P.; Eremin, V.; Furuno, T.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartig, A.-L.; Ilieva, S.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiselev, O.; Kollmus, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kröll, T.; Kuilman, M.; Litvinov, S.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Mutterer, M.; Nagae, D.; Najafi, M. A.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Popp, U.; Rigollet, C.; Roy, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Steck, M.; Streicher, B.; Stuhl, L.; Thürauf, M.; Uesaka, T.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.; Winters, D.; Woods, P. J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yue, K.; Zamora, J. C.; Zenihiro, J.; for the EXL collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the nuclear-matter distribution of the doubly-magic N = Z nucleus 56Ni by investigating elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics. The radioactive beam of 56Ni was injected and stored in the experimental storage ring (ESR, GSI) and interacted with an internal hydrogen gas-jet target. The high revolution frequency of the ions in the ring enabled a high luminosity, despite the low density of the target being used. This way, measurements at very low momentum transfers became possible. By measuring the energy and the scattering angle of the recoiling protons, we were able to separate the elastic reaction channel from inelastic scattering to the first excited {2}+ state of 56Ni and deduced the differential cross section of 56Ni {(p,p)}56 Ni. The data were analyzed within the framework of the Glauber multiple-scattering theory in order to extract the nuclear-matter radius and radial matter distribution of 56Ni. Parameterizing the matter distribution with the phenomenological Symmetrized Fermi distribution, a preliminary value of 3.5 fm for the rms matter radius was deduced. This experiment was part of an EXL (EXotic nuclei studied in Light-ion induced reactions at storage rings) campaign at GSI in 2012 and was the first successful investigation of nuclear reactions with a stored radioactive beam ever.

  5. Tsunami waveform inversion for sea surface displacement following the 2011 Tohoku earthquake: Importance of dispersion and source kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. Jakir; Cummins, Phil R.; Dettmer, Jan; Baba, Toshitaka

    2015-09-01

    This paper considers the importance of model parameterization, including dispersion, source kinematics, and source discretization, in tsunami source inversion. We implement single and multiple time window methods for dispersive and nondispersive wave propagation to estimate source models for the tsunami generated by the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Our source model is described by sea surface displacement instead of fault slip, since sea surface displacement accounts for various tsunami generation mechanisms in addition to fault slip. The results show that tsunami source models can strongly depend on such model choices, particularly when high-quality, open-ocean tsunami waveform data are available. We carry out several synthetic inversion tests to validate the method and assess the impact of parameterization including dispersion and variable rupture velocity in data predictions on the inversion results. Although each of these effects has been considered separately in previous studies, we show that it is important to consider them together in order to obtain more meaningful inversion results. Our results suggest that the discretization of the source, the use of dispersive waves, and accounting for source kinematics are all important factors in tsunami source inversion of large events such as the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, particularly when an extensive set of high-quality tsunami waveform recordings are available. For the Tohoku event, a dispersive model with variable rupture velocity results in a profound improvement in waveform fits that justify the higher source complexity and provide a more realistic source model.

  6. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic ? scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic ?-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic ?-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  7. A Real-Time Seismogeodetic Network Using MEMS Accelerometers and Its Performance in Kinematic Slip Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, D.; Haase, J. S.; Melgar, D.; Bock, Y.; Geng, J.; Saunders, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    The seismogeodetic combination of high-rate GPS observables and seismic acceleration captures the broadband on-scale recording of earthquake ground motions. The use of these data for determining rapid centroid moment tensor solutions ("fastCMT") has been demonstrated in the post-analysis of the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake. This seismogeodetic combination will improve source inversions for future earthquakes, but large-scale accelerometer deployment at the many available permanent GPS stations is limited by the cost of traditional observatory-grade accelerometers. Instead, we improve feasibility by installing SIO Geodetic Modules and low-cost MEMS accelerometers at 17 GPS stations in southern California near the San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore faults, transmitting data in real time for analysis of seismic velocity and displacement waveforms. We examine the performance of our seismogeodetic subnetwork using the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake as our focus. We calculate a kinematic slip inversion, using the small set of seismogeodetic waveforms available at the time of the event, and assess the reliability of the result in comparison to the fastCMT solution. We evaluate reliability by using our model to predict ground motion at independent stations, and using recorded data as verification at a range of frequencies. Next we supplement the dataset by including realistic simulated waveforms for the additional 17 seismogeodetic stations, adding realistic seismogeodetic noise, and demonstrate the improved reliability of our result in terms of reducing the space of possible solutions due to better geometric constraints. The MEMS accelerometer has higher noise than the observatory-grade accelerometer, which we quantify using strong motion recordings from a series of UCSD NEES outdoor shaketable experiments conducted in December 2013 and January 2014. Results will provide confidence in the use of the MEMS accelerometer for large-scale deployment as an alternative to an observatory-grade accelerometer, as well as the prospects for the increased station density to improve the source parameters of future events, in particular a large earthquake forecast for the southern San Andreas fault.

  8. Estimating periodic organ motions based on inverse kinematics using tetrahedron mesh registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nahyup; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Hyong-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2013-03-01

    Minimally/Non-invasive surgery has become increasingly widespread because of its therapeutic benefits such as less pain, less scarring, and shorter hospital stay. However, it is very difficult to eliminate the target cancer cells selectively without damaging nearby normal tissues and vessels since the tumors inside organs cannot be visually tracked in realtime with the existing imaging devices while organs are deformed by respiration and surgical instruments. Note that realtime 2D US imaging is widely used for monitoring the minimally invasive surgery such as Radiofrequency ablation; however, it is difficult to detect target tumors except high-echogenic regions because of its noisy and limited field of view. To handle these difficulties, we present a novel framework for estimating organ motion and deformed shape during respiration from the available features of 2D US images, by means of inverse kinematics utilizing 3D CT volumes at the inhale and exhale phases. First, we generate surface meshes of the target organ and tumor as well as centerlines of vessels at the two extreme phases considering surface correspondence. Then, the corresponding tetrahedron meshes are generated by coupling the internal components for volumetric modeling. Finally, a deformed organ mesh at an arbitrary phase is generated from the 2D US feature points for estimating the organ deformation and tumor position. To show effectiveness of the proposed method, the CT scans from real patient has been tested for estimating the motion and deformation of the liver. The experimental result shows that the average errors are less than 3mm in terms of tumor position as well as the whole surface shape.

  9. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  10. Inverse methods for modeling non-rigid plate kinematics: Application to mesozoic plate reconstructions of the Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneller, Erik A.; Johnson, Christopher A.; Karner, Garry D.; Einhorn, Jesse; Queffelec, Thomas A.

    2012-12-01

    Published plate reconstructions commonly show significant differences in initial plate configuration and syn-extensional opening directions. The variability of published models is primarily due to the difficulty associated with restoring crustal stretching history. Here we present an inverse non-rigid kinematic method that inverts plate motion and present day crustal thickness to approximate the history of bulk lateral strain and crustal thinning associated with lithospheric stretching. The kinematic link between plate motion and bulk crustal thickness that is used with this method is based on insights obtained from geodynamic models. We implement this approach in open source kinematic modeling software and apply it to test new Early Mesozoic plate kinematic models of the Central Atlantic. This application shows that the patterns of stretching inferred from the syn-rift basins of the Newark Supergroup can be explained if (1) syn-rift Euler pole flow lines were parallel to the Grand Banks transform margin and (2) initial formation of the East Coast Margin Igneous Province was coincident with the formation of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. These syn-rift to breakup models of the Central Atlantic lead to better constrained models of early seafloor spreading that show full spreading velocities in the ultraslow regime and within the transition from ultraslow to slow spreading regimes.

  11. Postseismic Deformation Following the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake: Observations, Kinematic Inversions, and Dynamic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Christopher; Barbot, Sylvain; Avouac, Jean-Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Due to its location on a transtensional section of the Pacific-North American plate boundary, the Salton Trough is a region featuring large strike-slip earthquakes within a regime of shallow asthenosphere, high heat flow, and complex faulting, and so postseismic deformation there may feature enhanced viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip that is particularly detectable at the surface. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was the largest shock in the Salton Trough since 1892 and occurred close to the US-Mexico border, and so the postseismic deformation recorded by the continuous GPS network of southern California provides an opportunity to study the rheology of this region. Three-year postseismic transients extracted from GPS displacement time-series show four key features: (1) 1-2 cm of cumulative uplift in the Imperial Valley and 1 cm of subsidence in the Peninsular Ranges, (2) relatively large cumulative horizontal displacements 150 km from the rupture in the Peninsular Ranges, (3) rapidly decaying horizontal displacement rates in the first few months after the earthquake in the Imperial Valley, and (4) sustained horizontal velocities, following the rapid early motions, that were still visibly ongoing 3 years after the earthquake. Kinematic inversions show that the cumulative 3-year postseismic displacement field can be well fit by afterslip on and below the coseismic rupture, though these solutions require afterslip with a total moment equivalent to at least a earthquake and higher slip magnitudes than those predicted by coseismic stress changes. Forward modeling shows that stress-driven afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation in various configurations within the lithosphere can reproduce the early and later horizontal velocities in the Imperial Valley, while Newtonian viscoelastic relaxation in the asthenosphere can reproduce the uplift in the Imperial Valley and the subsidence and large westward displacements in the Peninsular Ranges. We present two forward models of dynamically coupled deformation mechanisms that fit the postseismic transient well: a model combining afterslip in the lower crust, Newtonian viscoelastic relaxation in a localized zone in the lower crust beneath areas of high heat flow and geothermal activity, and Newtonian viscoelastic relaxation in the asthenosphere; and a second model that replaces the afterslip in the first model with viscoelastic relaxation with a stress-dependent viscosity in the mantle. The rheology of this high-heat-flow, high-strain-rate region may incorporate elements of both these models and may well be more complex than either of them.

  12. Studies of Neutron-Rich Nuclei with (d,p) Reactions in Inverse Kinematics at the HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Grzywacz-Jones, Kate L; Baktash, Cyrus; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Catford, Wilton N; Cizewski, Jolie; Fitzgerald, Ryan; Greife, Uwe; Gross, Carl J; Johnson, Micah; KOZUB, RAYMOND L; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Moazen, Brian H; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Shapira, Dan; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, Jeffrey S; Visser, Dale William

    2005-01-01

    Two N=51 isotones have been measured using (d,p) reactions in inverse kinematics at the Holifield Radioactive Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Additionally, we have performed a test measurement using a stable 124Sn beam in preparation for measurements of the 2H(130,132Sn,p)131,133Sn reactions. Preliminary results for 83Ge and 85Se suggest a 5/2+ ground state and a 1/2+ first excited state for both isotopes, in agreement with systematics for the N=51 isotones. The excitation energy of the first excited state is shown to drop as the proton number is reduced. Proton angular distributions following the 2H(124Sn,p)125Sn reaction show sensitivity to the l-value of the transfered nucleon and spectroscopic factors are in agreement with previous measurements in normal kinematics.

  13. Studies Of Neutron-Rich Nuclei With (d,p) Reactions In Inverse Kinematics At The HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.L.; Cizewski, J.A.; Thomas, J.S.; Baktash, C.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Gross, C.J.; Liang, J.F.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M.S.; Catford, W.N.; Fitzgerald, R.P.; Visser, D.; Greife, U.; Livesay, R.J.; Johnson, M.S.; Kozub, R.L.; Moazen, B.H.; Nesaraja, C.D.; Ma, Z.

    2005-04-05

    Two N=51 isotones have been measured using (d,p) reactions in inverse kinematics at the Holifield Radioactive Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Additionally, we have performed a test measurement using a stable 124Sn beam in preparation for measurements of the 2H(130,132Sn,p)131,133Sn reactions. Preliminary results for 83Ge and 85Se suggest a 5/2+ ground state and a 1/2+ first excited state for both isotopes, in agreement with systematics for the N=51 isotones. The excitation energy of the first excited state is shown to drop as the proton number is reduced. Proton angular distributions following the 2H(124Sn,p)125Sn reaction show sensitivity to the l-value of the transfered nucleon and spectroscopic factors are in agreement with previous measurements in normal kinematics.

  14. Study of the {sup 56}Ni({sup 3}He,d){sup 57}Cu reaction in inverse kinematics.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Harss, B.; Henderson, D.; Henning, W. F.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Nolen, J.; Pardo, R. C.; Reiter, P.; Schiffer, J. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Sonzogni, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Brumwell, F.; McMichael, G.; Paul, M.; Segel, R. E.; Hebrew Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements of (3He,d) reactions can provide information on the proton widths of states that play a role in astrophysically important (p,?) reactions. We report on the first study of the (3He,d) reaction in inverse kinematics with a 56Ni (T1/2=6.1 d) ion beam. The Q-value resolution of keV achieved in this experiment was sufficient to separate the transitions populating the ground state and the 1/2--5/2- doublet at Ex 1.1 MeV in 57Cu. Prospects for similar (3He,d) experiments with improved energy resolution are also discussed.

  15. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  16. Geometry and kinematics of Late Cretaceous inversion structures in the Jiuquan Basin, western China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Chen, H.; Yang, S.; Xiao, A.; Cheng, X.; Rupp, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Late Cretaceous inversion structures, which are significant for oil and gas accumulation, are widely distributed throughout the Jiuquan Basin. These structures are primarily made up of inverted faults and fault-related folds. Most of the axial planes of folds are parallel to inverted faults trending north-east, indicating that the principal stress direction was north-west - south-east in the Late Cretaceous. The average inversion ratios of faults in the four sags that were investigated are 0.39, 0.29, 0.38, 0.32. The average inversion ratio in the Jiuquan Basin is 0.34 and the degree of inversion is moderate to strong. As moderate inversion is suitable for forming excellent hydrocarbon traps, there is considered to be significant potential in the basin for the presence of structural traps. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic constraints on transverse fault kinematics during basin inversion: The Pamplona Fault (Pyrenees, north Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LarrasoañA, Juan Cruz; ParéS, Josep MaríA.; MilláN, HéCtor; Del Valle, JoaquíN.; Pueyo, Emilio Luis

    2003-12-01

    The Pamplona Fault in the Pyrenees is a major transverse structure that has been classically interpreted as a strike-slip fault. However, lack of consensus concerning the sense of movement casts doubt on its actual kinematics and, as a consequence, its role in the Cenozoic evolution of the Pyrenees remains controversial. In order to assess its kinematics, we have conducted a paleomagnetic, structural, and stratigraphic study focused on the Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary rocks that outcrop around the southern segment of the fault. Restoration of balanced cross sections allows us to examine the present-day spatial relationship of the sedimentary sequences on both sides of the fault and to reconstruct the geometry of the extensional basins formed during Mesozoic rifting episodes in the Bay of Biscay and Pyrenean domains. Paleomagnetic results indicate that no significant tectonic rotations occurred around the fault during Tertiary inversion of the Pyrenees. The lack of tectonic rotations and revaluation of previous hypotheses argues against a strike-slip movement of the fault. We propose a new model in which the Pamplona Fault is treated as a large-scale "hanging wall drop" fault whose kinematics was determined by variations in the geometry and thickness of Mesozoic sequences on both sides of the fault. These variations influenced the geometry of the thrust sheet developed during Tertiary compression. We are unaware of any other transverse fault that has been interpreted in this fashion; thus the Pamplona Fault serves as a case study for the evolution of transverse faults involved in basin inversion processes.

  18. Kinematic inversion of strong motion data using a Gaussian parameterization of the slip: application to the Iwate-Miyagi earthquake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca, Ernestina; Festa, Gaetano; Emolo, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    We present a non linear technique to invert strong motion records with the aim of obtaining the final slip and the rupture velocity distributions on the fault plane. Kinematic inversion of strong motion data is an ill-conditioned inverse problem, with several solutions available also in the case of noise-free synthetic data (Blind test on earthquake source inversion,http://www.seismo.ethz.ch/staff/martin/BlindTest.html).On the other hand, complete dynamic inversion still looks impracticable, because of an unclear understanding of the physical mechanisms controlling the energy balance at the rupture tip and a strong correlation between the initial stress field and the parameters of the constitutive law. Hence a strong effort is demanded to increase the robustness of the inversion, looking at the details of the slip and rupture velocity parameterization, at the global exploration techniques, at the efficiency of the cost-function in selecting solutions, at the synthesis process in retrieving the stable features of the rupture. In this study, the forward problem, i.e. the ground motion simulation, is solved evaluating the representation integral in the frequency domain by allowing possible rake variation along the fault plane. The Green's tractions on the fault are computed using the discrete wave-number integration technique that provides the full wave-field in a 1D layered propagation medium. The representation integral is computed through a finite elements technique on a Delaunay triangulation of the fault plane. The rupture velocity is finally defined on a coarser regular grid and rupture times are computed by integration of the eikonal equation. For the inversion, the slip distribution is parameterized by 2D overlapping Gaussian functions, which can easily relate the spectrum of the possible solutions with the minimum resolvable wavelength, related to source-station distribution and data processing. The inverse problem is solved by a two-step procedure aimed at separating the computation of the rupture velocity from the evaluation of the slip distribution, the latter being a linear problem, when the rupture velocity is fixed. The non-linear step is solved by optimization of an L2 misfit function between synthetic and real seismograms, and solution is searched by the use of the Neighbourhood Algorithm. The conjugate gradient method is used to solve the linear step instead. The developed methodology has been applied to the M7.2, Iwate Nairiku Miyagi, Japan, earthquake that was recorded by the K-net and Kik-net accelerometric networks.

  19. Kinematic Point Source Moment Tensor Inversion Using a Hierarchical Bayesian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta?, Marija; Tkal?i?, Hrvoje

    2014-05-01

    The seismic moment tensor (MT) reveals details about source processes within the Earth that cause earthquakes. Although uncertainties in MT inversions are important for estimating solution robustness, they are rarely available. When earthquake location is simultaneously recovered with the MT, uncertainties in structural Green's functions also need to be included in the method. The problem becomes nonlinear and uncertainties in the source mechanism cannot be calculated in a simple manner. We have developed a method and software for a hierarchical Bayesian MT inversion to study moderate earthquakes and explosions generating waveform data at regional distances. The Bayesian inversion gives a posterior probability distribution of model parameters, based on prior knowledge about the MT and the model likelihood, determined by the data. MT uncertainties can then be estimated from the posterior probability distribution. The hierarchical Bayes approach enables us to recover the nature of the data noise and the weight of each waveform, treating them as unknowns in the inversion. Critically, data noise covariance matrix is implemented to account for measurement and theory errors. This knowledge, in turn, enables us to recover the solution within a reasonable range of uncertainty; in other words, it prevents us from "fitting the noise" that can lead to erroneous solutions and interpretation. Synthetic experiments were performed to test the codes, particularly the retrieval of non double-couple components of the MT. A suite of synthetic and observed focal mechanisms was used to create the synthetic data. Additionally, we add noise to synthetic data (as a fraction of data rms) to test its effect on the inversion. Experiments are performed using uncorrelated Gaussian white noise, as well as using correlated noise. Parameter space for the event mechanism is sampled exhaustively, while the code rapidly converges towards the input hypocenter location. Both the input mechanism and noise level were retrieved in the inversion. The codes are currently being applied on real data to test earthquakes in a variety of tectonic settings.

  20. "Phoswich Wall": A charged-particle detector array for inverse-kinematic reactions with the Gretina/GRETA ?-ray arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantites, D. G.; Reviol, W.; Elson, J. M.; Kinnison, J. E.; Izzo, C. J.; Manfredi, J.; Liu, J.; Jung, H. S.; Goerres, J.

    2015-08-01

    A high-efficiency, forward-hemisphere detector system for light charged particles and low-Z heavy ions, as obtained in an accelerator experiment, is described. It consists of four 8×8 pixel multianode photomultiplier tubes with 2.2-mm thick CsI(Tl) and 12 -?m thick fast-plastic scintillation detectors. Its phoswich structure allows individual Z resolution for 1H, 4He, 7Li, 4He+4He, 9Be, 11B, 12C, and 14N ions, which are target-like fragments detected in strongly inverse kinematics. The device design has been optimized for use with a 4? ?-ray array, and the main applications are transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation. A high-angular resolution for the detection of the target-like fragments is achieved which permits angular distributions to be measured in the rest frame of the projectile-like fragment with a resolution of ~ 2 °.

  1. Experimental study of the {sup 56}Ni({sup 3}He,d){sup 57}Cu reaction in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Ackermann, D.; Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P.; Harss, B.; Henderson, D.; Henning, W. F.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Nolen, J.; Pardo, R. C.; Reiter, P.; Schiffer, J. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Sonzogni, A.; Uusitalo, J.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Brumwell, F.; McMichael, G.

    2009-10-15

    Measurements of ({sup 3}He,d) reactions can provide information on the proton widths of states that play a role in astrophysically important (p,{gamma}) reactions. We report on the first study of the ({sup 3}He,d) reaction in inverse kinematics with a {sup 56}Ni (T{sub 1/2}=6.1 d) ion beam. The Q-value resolution of {approx} keV achieved in this experiment was sufficient to separate the transitions populating the ground state and the 1/2{sup -}-5/2{sup -} doublet at E{sub x}{approx}1.1 MeV in {sup 57}Cu. Prospects for similar ({sup 3}He,d) experiments with improved energy resolution are also discussed.

  2. Comparative Analysis for the Inverse Kinematics of Redundant Manipulators based on Repetitive Tracking Tasks

    E-print Network

    Li, Yangmin

    Fund under Grant no. 016/2008/A1. Jingguo Wang is with Department of Electromechanical Engineering.A.R., China ya77403@umac.mo Yangmin Li is with Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science] was proposed to generate feasible output around singularities, which utilized a generalized-inverse matrix

  3. Study of Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation of Hot Nuclei at Forward Angles Using Inverse Kinematics

    E-print Network

    Yennello, Sherry

    Study of Isospin Effects in Multifragmentation of Hot Nuclei at Forward Angles Using Inverse. Martin, and S. J. Yennello Previous works featuring a study of isospin effects on projectile of several multifragmentation observables on the isospin of the quasiprojectile was obtained. In particular

  4. A three-body model for the analysis of quasi-free scattering reactions in inverse kinematics

    E-print Network

    Moro, Antonio M

    2015-01-01

    A new method to calculate cross sections for $(p,pn)$ and $(p,2p)$ reactions measured under inverse kinematics conditions is proposed. The method uses the prior form of the scattering transition amplitude, and replaces the exact three-body wave function appearing in this expression by an expansion in terms of $p$-$n$ or $p$-$p$ states, covering the physically relevant excitation energies and partial waves. A procedure of discretization, similar to that used in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations, is applied in order to make this expansion finite and numerically tractable. The proposed formalism is non-relativistic but several relativistic kinematical corrections are applied to extend its applicability to energies of current interest. The underlying optical potentials for the entrance and exit channels are generated microscopically, by folding an effective density-dependent G-matrix with the density of the composite nucleus. Numerical calculations for $^{12}$C($p$,$2p$), $^{12}$C($p$,$pn$) and ...

  5. A three-body model for the analysis of quasi-free scattering reactions in inverse kinematics

    E-print Network

    Antonio M. Moro

    2015-09-25

    A new method to calculate cross sections for $(p,pn)$ and $(p,2p)$ reactions measured under inverse kinematics conditions is proposed. The method uses the prior form of the scattering transition amplitude, and replaces the exact three-body wave function appearing in this expression by an expansion in terms of $p$-$n$ or $p$-$p$ states, covering the physically relevant excitation energies and partial waves. A procedure of discretization, similar to that used in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations, is applied in order to make this expansion finite and numerically tractable. The proposed formalism is non-relativistic but several relativistic kinematical corrections are applied to extend its applicability to energies of current interest. The underlying optical potentials for the entrance and exit channels are generated microscopically, by folding an effective density-dependent G-matrix with the density of the composite nucleus. Numerical calculations for $^{12}$C($p$,$2p$), $^{12}$C($p$,$pn$) and $^{23}$O($p$,$pn$) at $\\sim$400~MeV/nucleon are presented to illustrate the method. The role of final-state interactions and Pauli principle between the outgoing nucleons is also discussed.

  6. Kinematic earthquake source inversion and tsunami runup prediction with regional geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar, D.; Bock, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Rapid near-source earthquake source modeling relying only on strong motion data is limited by instrumental offsets and magnitude saturation, adversely affecting subsequent tsunami prediction. Seismogeodetic displacement and velocity waveforms estimated from an optimal combination of high-rate GPS and strong motion data overcome these limitations. Supplementing land-based data with offshore wave measurements by seafloor pressure sensors and GPS-equipped buoys can further improve the image of the earthquake source and prediction of tsunami extent, inundation, and runup. We present a kinematic source model obtained from a retrospective real-time analysis of a heterogeneous data set for the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake. Our model is consistent with conceptual models of subduction zones, exhibiting depth dependent behavior that is quantified through frequency domain analysis of slip rate functions. The stress drop distribution is found to be significantly more correlated with aftershock locations and mechanism types when off-shore data are included. The kinematic model parameters are then used as initial conditions in a fully nonlinear tsunami propagation analysis. Notably, we include the horizontal advection of steeply sloping bathymetric features. Comparison with post-event on-land survey measurements demonstrates that the tsunami's inundation and runup are predicted with considerable accuracy, only limited in scale by the resolution of available topography and bathymetry. We conclude that it is possible to produce credible and rapid, kinematic source models and tsunami predictions within minutes of earthquake onset time for near-source coastal regions most susceptible to loss of life and damage to critical infrastructure, regardless of earthquake magnitude.

  7. A Method to Solve Inverse Kinematics of Redundant Slave Arm in The Master-Slave System with Different Degrees of Freedom

    E-print Network

    Tachi, Susumu

    ISMCR2004 A12-Page 1 A Method to Solve Inverse Kinematics of Redundant Slave Arm in The Master-Slave}@star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract A master-slave manipulator with different degrees of freedom has some advantages, such as operational performance. However, it is difficult to determine the angles of a redundant slave manipulator

  8. Bounds for Completely Decomposable Jacobians

    E-print Network

    Duursma, Iwan

    2010-01-01

    A curve over the field of two elements with completely decomposable Jacobian is shown to have at most six rational points and genus at most 26. The bounds are sharp. The previous upper bound for the genus was 145. We also show that a curve over the field of $q$ elements with more than $q^{m/2}+1$ rational points has at least one Frobenius angle in the open interval $(\\pi/m,3\\pi/m)$. The proofs make use of the explicit formula method.

  9. The effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and muscle activation in landing on a tilted surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still uncertainty concerning the beneficial effects of shoe collar height for ankle sprain prevention and very few data are available in the literature regarding the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on muscle responses during landing. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of high-top and low-top shoes on ankle inversion kinematics and pre-landing EMG activation of ankle evertor muscles during landing on a tilted surface. Methods Thirteen physical education students landed on four types of surfaces wearing either high-top shoes (HS) or low-top shoes (LS). The four conditions were 15° inversion, 30° inversion, combined 25° inversion?+?10° plantar flexion, and combined 25° inversion?+?20° plantar flexion. Ankle inversion kinematics and EMG data of the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured simultaneously. A 2?×?4 (shoe?×?surface) repeated measures ANOVA was performed to examine the effect of shoe and landing surfaces on ankle inversion and EMG responses. Results No significant differences were observed between the various types of shoes in the maximum ankle inversion angle, the ankle inversion range of motion, and the maximum ankle inversion angular velocity after foot contact for all conditions. However, the onset time of TA and PB muscles was significantly later wearing HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition. Meanwhile, the mean amplitude of the integrated EMG from the 50 ms prior to contact (aEMGpre) of TA was significantly lower with HS compared to LS for the 15° inversion condition and the combined 25° inversion?+?20° plantarflexion condition. Similarly, the aEMGpre when wearing HS compared to LS also showed a 37.2% decrease in PL and a 31.0% decrease in PB for the combined 25° inversion?+?20° plantarflexion condition and the 15° inversion condition, respectively. Conclusion These findings provide preliminary evidence suggesting that wearing high-top shoes can, in certain conditions, induce a delayed pre-activation timing and decreased amplitude of evertor muscle activity, and may therefore have a detrimental effect on establishing and maintaining functional ankle joint stability. PMID:24548559

  10. Earthquake source kinematics of moderate earthquakes from the inversion of apparent source time functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Eugenio Maria Toraldo; Emolo, Antonio; Orefice, Antonella; Zollo, Aldo

    2013-08-01

    We present an approach to infer the slip and rupture velocity distributions on the fault plane from the non-linear inversion of the apparent source time functions, obtained from the empirical Green's function deconvolution method. The main advantage of this technique is that it allows overcoming, in the forward modelling, the limitations related to the computation of the Green's function, as the choice of a correct and reliable earth propagation model. We perform a parameter resolution and uncertainty study, which is based on the analysis of the misfit function in the neighbourhood of the best-fitting model. In this paper, we present the results obtained by applying the technique to synthetic and real records from an Mw 4 event which occurred during the 2009 L'Aquila (central Italy) aftershock sequence. Results show a heterogeneous slip distribution, characterized by two main high slip patches located NW of the hypocentre and an average slip of 3.7 cm, corresponding to a seismic model of about 0.82 × 1015 Nm.

  11. Formation and inversion of extensional ramp-syncline basins with pre-kinematic salt layers. Experimental results and application to Iberian Mesozoic analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Maria; Pla, Oriol; Butillé, Mireia; Roca, Eduard; Ferrer, Oriol

    2015-04-01

    The widespread extensional deformation that took place during Jurassic to Cretaceous times in the Western Europe and north-Atlantic realm resulted in the formation of several rift systems. Some of the basins associated to these rifts show broad syncline-shapes filled by thick sedimentary successions deposited overlying a hyperextended crust (i.e., Parentis, Cameros, Organyà or Columbrets basins in Iberia). The development of these syncline basins has been associated to the slip of low-angle lithospheric-scale extensional faults with ramp/flat geometries. The shape and kinematics of such faults have been usually established using the architecture of syn-kinematic layers and assuming a complete coupling of the hangingwall rocks and a layer parallel flexural slip deformation mechanism. However almost all these basins include pre-kinematic Upper Triassic salt layers which undubtoufully acted as an effective detachment decoupling the structure of sub- and suprasalt units. The presence of this salt is denoted by the growth of salt structures as diapirs or salt walls at the edges of these basins where the overburden was thinner. During latest Cretaceous and Cenozoic these basins were partially inverted and often incorporated into thrust-and-fold belts as the Pyrenees . Contractional deformation resulted in the reactivation of major extensional faults and, above the salt, the squeezing of pre-existent salt structures. The pre-kinematic salt clearly acted again as as a major detachment decoupling the contractional deformation. Using an experimental approach (scaled sand-box models) the aim of our research is threefold: 1) to determine the geometrical features of the hangingwall above a convex upwards ramp of a low angle extensional fault with and without pre-kinematic salt, and consequently; 2) to decipher the role played by a pre-kinematic viscous layer, such as salt, in the development of these syncline basins; and 3) to characterize the contractional deformation that took place in them during a later contractional inversion. To achieve this goal an experimental program including seven different sand-box models has been carried out. The experimental results show that fault shape controls the geometry and the kinematic evolution of the ramp synclines formed on the hangingwall during extension and subsequent inversion. Regarding this, the experiments also demonstrate that the presence of a viscous layer changed significantly the kinematic of the basin developing two clearly different structural styles above and below the polymer. The kinematic of this basin during extension change dramatically when the silicone layer was depleted with the formation of primary welds. Since this moment model's kinematic becomes similar to the models without silicone. During the inversion, models show that low shortening produced the contractional reactivation of the major fault arched and uplifted the basin. In this scenario, if salt is rather continuous, took place an incipient reactivation of the silicone layer as a contractional detachment. By contrast, high shortening produces the total inversion of the detachment faults and the pop-up of the extensional basin. Finally, models are compared with different natural analogues from Iberia validating previous published interpretations or proposing new interpretations inferring the geometry of the major fault, specially if the presence of a salt interlayer in the deformed rocks is known or suspected.

  12. Inversions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Inversions are fascinating phenomena. They are reversals of the normal or expected order. They occur across a wide variety of contexts. What do inversions have to do with learning spaces? The author suggests that they are a useful metaphor for the process that is unfolding in higher education with respect to education. On the basis of…

  13. Multi-GPU Jacobian Accelerated Computing for Soft Field Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Borsic, A.; Attardo, E. A.; Halter, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use Finite Element Models to represent the volume of interest and to solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are three-dimensional. Though the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in Electrical Impedance Tomography applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Further, providing high-speed reconstructions are essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In the present work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have a much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of 20 times on a single NVIDIA S1070 GPU, and of 50 times on 4 GPUs, bringing the Jacobian computing time for a fine 3D mesh from 12 minutes to 14 seconds. We regard this as an important step towards gaining interactive reconstruction times in 3D imaging, particularly when coupled in the future with acceleration of the forward problem. While we demonstrate results for Electrical Impedance Tomography, these results apply to any soft-field imaging modality where the Jacobian matrix is computed with the Adjoint Method. PMID:23010857

  14. Block kinematics of the PacificNorth America plate boundary in the southwestern United States from inversion of GPS,

    E-print Network

    McCaffrey, Robert

    Block kinematics of the Pacific­­North America plate boundary in the southwestern United States, and earthquake-derived fault slip vector azimuths are inverted for block angular velocities, creep on block-bounding faults, permanent strain rates within the blocks, and the rotations of 11 published GPS velocity fields

  15. The application of striation analysis and focal mechanism stress inversion in deducing the kinematic history of faults: Examples from the Bristol Channel UK and the Ionian Zone Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, Nikolaos S.; Miliorizos, Marios N.; Oshoano Aipoh, Hilary

    2013-04-01

    The present work compliments the application of a methodology, in reviewing and investigating further the kinematic history of faults, based on striation analysis and stress inversion of earthquake focal mechanisms and combines them to refine tectonic modelling and hence improve further hazard assessment. Two areas are chosen for this application: the Bristol Channel, UK and the Ionian Zone, Greece. Striation analysis is carried out in two complementary fault terranes. The first along the northern margin of the Inner Bristol Channel, UK, offers a natural laboratory to study in detail the reactivation history of the inverted Bristol Channel basin; and, the second along the north western coastline of the Ionian Zone, Greece, presents an opportunity to illustrate the relationship between movement of a framework of faults within the external orogenic zone of the Hellenides and the stress deduced from focal mechanisms of earthquakes in the region. The UK example reveals phases of Mesozoic negative inversion of Late Palaeozoic basement frontal and oblique ramp thrust faults, followed by Caenozoic positive inversions of Mesozoic normal and strike slip faults. The Greek example shows an equally composite history of faulting; Tethyan basement strata contain normal faults that pass up sequence and across unconformities into Mesozoic and Caenozoic strata, with thrusts and positively inverted faults recording typical dextral transpression. The fault framework in older strata and the veneers of Recent strata above them display Neotectonic fault histories of sinistral transtension, in addition to the transpression. Since the Ionian Zone lies suitably in the external zone, deformation favours the reactivation of fault lineaments, rather than the genesis of pristine faults. Both examples are used to demonstrate this structural principle. Focal mechanisms of Greek earthquake data are used in stress inversion and the results are applied upon the inherited fault framework and are postulated to reactivate it. For example, structures are selected in the field from the tectonised strata of northern Corfu and from recent geological maps of north western Greece. These data are used in conjunction with the results of stress inversion of focal mechanisms, in order to anticipate and then test the gross senses of fault reactivation. Tests are investigated using structural field techniques and available international striation analysis software modules. The defined framework analysis is applied to both the data from ancient faults, in UK and the focal mechanisms of earthquakes, in Greece. Stress tensors are calculated and fault kinematic histories are evaluated. Hence, this application permits the effects of a modern stress regime to be deduced for a known fault framework, in order to complete and understand fully the kinematic history to the present day. As a corollary, the significant field techniques of tracing major fault lines across regional unconformities and measuring the sense of displacements across these stratigraphic boundaries permit kinematic histories to be defined more precisely in both terranes, than by using only structural techniques.

  16. Study of the {sup 124}Sn(d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics close to the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.L.; Cizewski, J.A.; Thomas, J.S.; Kozub, R.L.; Nesaraja, C.D.; Baktash, C.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Shapira, D.; Smith, M.S.; Catford, W.N.; Fitzgerald, R.P.; Visser, D.W.; Johnson, M.S.; Livesay, R.J.; Ma, Z.

    2004-12-01

    The {sup 2}H({sup 124}Sn,p) reaction has been measured at 562 MeV (4.5 A MeV). Differential cross sections were measured from {theta}{sub c.m}=7 deg. -61 deg. Angular momentum transfers and spectroscopic factors determined using finite range DWBA calculations are in good agreement with earlier measurements performed in normal kinematics.

  17. Learning the inverse kinetics of an octopus-like manipulator in three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Giorelli, M; Renda, F; Calisti, M; Arienti, A; Ferri, G; Laschi, C

    2015-06-01

    This work addresses the inverse kinematics problem of a bioinspired octopus-like manipulator moving in three-dimensional space. The bioinspired manipulator has a conical soft structure that confers the ability of twirling around objects as a real octopus arm does. Despite the simple design, the soft conical shape manipulator driven by cables is described by nonlinear differential equations, which are difficult to solve analytically. Since exact solutions of the equations are not available, the Jacobian matrix cannot be calculated analytically and the classical iterative methods cannot be used. To overcome the intrinsic problems of methods based on the Jacobian matrix, this paper proposes a neural network learning the inverse kinematics of a soft octopus-like manipulator driven by cables. After the learning phase, a feed-forward neural network is able to represent the relation between manipulator tip positions and forces applied to the cables. Experimental results show that a desired tip position can be achieved in a short time, since heavy computations are avoided, with a degree of accuracy of 8% relative average error with respect to the total arm length. PMID:25970238

  18. Lifetime measurement of candidate chiral doublet bands in the {sup 103, 104}Rh isotopes with the RDDS method in inverse kinematics.

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Rainovski, G.; Koike, T.; Ahn, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Costin, A.; Danchev, M.; Dewald, A.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Joshi, P.; Lister, C. J.; Moller, A.; Pietralla, N.; Shinozuka, T.; Timar, J.; Wadsworth, R.; Vaman, C.; Zhu, S.; Physics; Tohoku Univ.; Univ. of Sofia; State Univ. of New York; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. zu Koln; Univ. of York; TU Darmstadt; ATOMKI, Hungary; Michigan State Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Lifetimes of chiral candidate structures in {sup 103,104}Rh were measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method. The Gammasphere detector array was used in conjunction with the Cologne plunger device. Excited states of {sup 103,104}Rh were populated by the {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,4n){sup 103}Rh and {sup 11}B({sup 96}Zr,3n){sup 104}Rh fusion-evaporation reactions in inverse kinematics. Three and five lifetimes of levels belonging to the proposed chiral doublet bands are measured in {sup 103}Rh and {sup 104}Rh, respectively. The previously observed even-odd spin dependence of the B(M1)/B(E2) values is caused by the variation in the B(E2) values, whereas the B(M1) values decrease as a function of spin.

  19. Inverse Kinematic Study of the Alg26(d ,p )27Al Reaction and Implications for Destruction of 26Al in Wolf-Rayet and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, V.; Lotay, G.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Christian, G.; Davids, B.; Davinson, T.; Doherty, D. T.; Fallis, J.; Howell, D.; Kirsebom, O. S.; Mountford, D. J.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.; Tostevin, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    In Wolf-Rayet and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the Alg26(p ,? )27Si reaction is expected to govern the destruction of the cosmic ? -ray emitting nucleus 26Al. The rate of this reaction, however, is highly uncertain due to the unknown properties of key resonances in the temperature regime of hydrogen burning. We present a high-resolution inverse kinematic study of the Alg26(d ,p )27Al reaction as a method for constraining the strengths of key astrophysical resonances in the Alg26(p ,? )27Si reaction. In particular, the results indicate that the resonance at Er=127 keV in 27Si determines the entire Alg26(p ,? )27Si reaction rate over almost the complete temperature range of Wolf-Rayet stars and AGB stars.

  20. A Jacobian elliptic single-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, J. R.; Gallo, Emanuel

    2015-06-01

    In the scenario of single-field inflation, this field is described in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions. This approach provides, when constrained to particular cases, analytic solutions already known in the past, generalizing them to a bigger family of analytical solutions. The emergent cosmology is analyzed using the Hamilton-Jacobi approach and then the main results are contrasted with the recent measurements obtained from the Planck 2015 data.

  1. Inverse kinematics of redundant systems driver IKORv1.0-2.0 (full space parameterization with orientation control, platform mobility, and portability)

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.J.; Fries, G.A.; Pin, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Few optimization methods exist for path planning of kinematically redundant manipulators. Among these, a universal method is lacking that takes advantage of a manipulator`s redundancy while satisfying possibly varying constraints and task requirements. Full Space Parameterization (FSP) is a new method that generates the entire solution space of underspecified systems of algebraic equations and then calculates the unique solution satisfying specific constraints and optimization criteria. The FSP method has been previously tested on several configurations of the redundant manipulator HERMIES-III. This report deals with the extension of the FSP driver, Inverse Kinematics On Redundant systems (IKOR), to include three-dimensional manipulation systems, possibly incorporating a mobile platform, with and without orientation control. The driver was also extended by integrating two optimized versions of the FSP solution generator as well as the ability to easily port to any manipulator. IKOR was first altered to include the ability to handle orientation control and to integrate an optimized solution generator. The resulting system was tested on a 4 degrees-of-redundancy manipulator arm and was found to successfully perform trajectories with least norm criteria while avoiding obstacles and joint limits. Next, the system was adapted and tested on a manipulator arm placed on a mobile platform yielding 7 degrees of redundancy. After successful testing on least norm trajectories while avoiding obstacles and joint limits, IKORv1.0 was developed. The system was successfully verified using comparisons with a current industry standard, the Moore Penrose Pseudo-Inverse. Finally, IKORv2.0 was created, which includes both the one shot and two step methods, manipulator portability, integration of a second optimized solution generator, and finally a more robust and usable code design.

  2. Differential Kinematics Of Contemporary Industrial Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkodny, T.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a simple method of avoiding singular configurations of contemporary industrial robot manipulators of such renowned companies as ABB, Fanuc, Mitsubishi, Adept, Kawasaki, COMAU and KUKA. To determine the singular configurations of these manipulators a global form of description of the end-effector kinematics was prepared, relative to the other links. On the basis of this description , the formula for the Jacobian was defined in the end-effector coordinates. Next, a closed form of the determinant of the Jacobian was derived. From the formula, singular configurations, where the determinant's value equals zero, were determined. Additionally, geometric interpretations of these configurations were given and they were illustrated. For the exemplary manipulator, small corrections of joint variables preventing the reduction of the Jacobian order were suggested. An analysis of positional errors, caused by these corrections, was presented

  3. Decomposition formula of the Jacobian group of plane curve (Draft)

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Decomposition formula of the Jacobian group of plane curve (Draft) Koh-ichi Nagao (nagao of curve. Keywords Decomposition Attack, ECDLP revise 6 Nov First version of this manuscript, we use Weil descent like techinique and the decomposition problem of Jacobian reduces to solving exact g number

  4. Structural and geochronological constraints on the kinematics and timing of Cenozoic inversion of the Salta rift in NW Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortyna, C. D.; DeCelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Cordillera and Santa Barbara systems of northwest Argentina exhibit a transition in structural style between thick- and thin-skinned features. Traditionally, Andean foreland structural geometries are correlated with the orientation of the subducting Nazca Plate. However, deformation in northwest Argentina is controlled by inversion of inherited Cretaceous rift structures of the Salta rift. South of Salta, in the ranges surrounding the Calchaquí and Lerma Valleys (between ~25°-26°S and ~65°-66°W), the foreland thrust belt is characterized by steep west-verging, north-south trending reverse faults juxtaposing Precambrian-Cambrian basement rocks on Mesozoic-Cenozoic syn-to-post-rift and foreland basin deposits. Geologic mapping, structural data and stratigraphic relationships confirm that these reverse faults are primarily reactivated extensional faults of the Cretaceous Salta rift, a complex of extensional basins beneath the modern foreland basin. The rift geometry provides a major control on fold and fault geometries in the area. New detailed (1:24,000 scale) geologic mapping in the Amblayo, Tonco, and Calchaquí Valleys documents a transition in structural style in the Andean thrust belt that correlates with palinspastic geometries of the Salta rift basin. The southern region correlates with the Salta rift flanks whereas the northern region correlates with the rift interior. Reverse faulting in the southern region is characterized by multiple high angle splays (~40°-70°) with variable amounts of stratigraphic separation that, in places, shortcut high angle normal faults of the Salta rift. In the northern region, reverse faulting is less steep (~25°-50°) and is characterized by a singular fault plane that juxtaposes overturned fault propagation folds in the hanging wall and footwall. Overturned limbs are shallowly dipping at ~20°-30°. Fault planes are approximated by thick, m's-scale orange fault gouge and breccia. This study also describes a new synorogenic unit that constrains timing of rift inversion. Described in north Tonco Valley, this unit consists of localized poorly sorted granular-boulder conglomerates and breccias with a poorly sorted mud-to-coarse sand matrix. The breccia outcrops unconformably on underlying Miocene Angastaco Formation and is in faulted contact with overriding Salta Group. Clasts consist primarily of stromatolitic, oolitic, and micritic limestones with subordinate meta-sandstones and mudstones. The larger, angular clasts are almost uniformly limestone and interpreted to be sourced from the Yacoraite Formation that outcrops in the overlying hanging wall. This unit was deposited as synorogenic muddy debris flows to mud slurries derived locally from the Yacoraite Formation as it was exhumed during fault-propagation folding in the hanging wall of the main reverse fault that juxtaposes the Amblayo and Tonco Valleys. The unit was then overridden by the hanging wall strata as the main fault reached the surface. The youngest detrital U-Pb zircon age population combined with low-T-thermochronology will help constrain timing of deformation along this fault and in the region.

  5. A global search inversion for earthquake kinematic rupture history: Application to the 2000 western Tottori, Japan earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatanesi, A.; Cirella, A.; Spudich, P.; Cocco, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a two-stage nonlinear technique to invert strong motions records and geodetic data to retrieve the rupture history of an earthquake on a finite fault. To account for the actual rupture complexity, the fault parameters are spatially variable peak slip velocity, slip direction, rupture time and risetime. The unknown parameters are given at the nodes of the subfaults, whereas the parameters within a subfault are allowed to vary through a bilinear interpolation of the nodal values. The forward modeling is performed with a discrete wave number technique, whose Green's functions include the complete response of the vertically varying Earth structure. During the first stage, an algorithm based on the heat-bath simulated annealing generates an ensemble of models that efficiently sample the good data-fitting regions of parameter space. In the second stage (appraisal), the algorithm performs a statistical analysis of the model ensemble and computes a weighted mean model and its standard deviation. This technique, rather than simply looking at the best model, extracts the most stable features of the earthquake rupture that are consistent with the data and gives an estimate of the variability of each model parameter. We present some synthetic tests to show the effectiveness of the method and its robustness to uncertainty of the adopted crustal model. Finally, we apply this inverse technique to the well recorded 2000 western Tottori, Japan, earthquake (Mw 6.6); we confirm that the rupture process is characterized by large slip (3-4 m) at very shallow depths but, differently from previous studies, we imaged a new slip patch (2-2.5 m) located deeper, between 14 and 18 km depth. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Off-diagonal Jacobian support for Nodal BCs

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, John W.; Andrs, David; Gaston, Derek R.; Permann, Cody J.; Slaughter, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    In this brief note, we describe the implementation of o-diagonal Jacobian computations for nodal boundary conditions in the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) [1] framework. There are presently a number of applications [2{5] based on the MOOSE framework that solve complicated physical systems of partial dierential equations whose boundary conditions are often highly nonlinear. Accurately computing the on- and o-diagonal Jacobian and preconditioner entries associated to these constraints is crucial for enabling ecient numerical solvers in these applications. Two key ingredients are required for properly specifying the Jacobian contributions of nonlinear nodal boundary conditions in MOOSE and nite element codes in general: 1. The ability to zero out entire Jacobian matrix rows after \

  7. Jacobian Joint Adaptation to Noise, Channel and Vocal Tract Length 

    E-print Network

    Shimodaira, Hiroshi; Sakai, Nobuyoshi; Nakai, Mitsuru; Sagayama, Shigeki

    A new Jacobian approach that linearly decomposes the composite of additive noise, multiplicative noise (channel transfer function) and speaker's vocal tract length, and adapts the acoustic model parameters simultaneously to these factors is proposed...

  8. Analysis of the Jacobian-free multiscale method (JFMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul; De, Suvranu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we perform in-depth analysis of Jacobian-free multiscale method (JFMM) in which explicit computation of the Jacobian matrix at the macroscale is circumvented using a Newton-Krylov process. Not having to explicitly compute and store the Jacobian matrix at each Newton step reduces storage requirements and computational costs compared to previous efforts based on homogenized material coefficients with Jacobian computation at every Newton step. We present an estimate of the optimal perturbation step-size that minimizes the finite difference approximation error associated with the Jacobian-vector product in the Jacobian-free approach. Two- and three-dimensional numerical examples demonstrate that while the rate of convergence of Newton iterations for the JFMM and the computational homogenization-based two-level finite element ({FE}2) multiscale method is comparable, the computational cost of JFMM varies linearly with increasing number of degrees of freedom ( n) at the macroscale, and not exponentially as in the {FE}2 method. The storage requirement for the method increases linearly with increasing n at the macroscale, whereas, it increases as approximately O(n^{8/5}) and O(n^{9/5}) for the {FE}2 method in two- and three-dimensions, respectively.

  9. Generic robotic kinematic generator for virtual environment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Piguet, Laurent; Baur, Charles

    1996-12-01

    The expansion of robotic systems' performance, as well as the need for such machines to work in complex environments (hazardous, small, distant, etc.), involves the need for user interfaces which permit efficient teleoperation. Virtual Reality based interfaces provide the user with a new method for robot task planning and control: he or she can define tasks in a very intuitive way by interacting with a 3D computer generated representation of the world, which is continuously updated thanks to multiple sensors fusion and analysis. The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology has successfully tested different kinds of teleoperations. In the early 90s, a transatlantic teleoperation of a conventional robot manipulator with a vision feedback system to update the virtual world was achieved. This approach was then extended to perform teleoperation of several mobile robots (Khepera, Koala) as well as to control microrobots used for microsystems' assembly in the micrometer range. One of the problems encountered with such an approach is the necessity to program a specific kinematic algorithm for each kind of manipulator. To provide a more general solution, we started a project aiming at the design of a 'kinematic generator' (CINEGEN) for the simulation of generic serial and parallel mechanical chains. With CINEGEN, each manipulator is defined with an ascii file description and its attached graphics files; inserting a new manipulator simply requires a new description file, and none of the existing tools require modification. To have a real time behavior, we have chosen a numerical method based on the pseudo-Jacobian method to generate the inverse kinematics of the robot. The results obtained with an object-oriented implementation on a graphic workstation are presented in this paper.

  10. Multi-GPU Jacobian accelerated computing for soft-field tomography.

    PubMed

    Borsic, A; Attardo, E A; Halter, R J

    2012-10-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use finite element models (FEMs) to represent the volume of interest and solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are 3D. Although the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15-20 min with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Furthermore, providing high-speed reconstructions is essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems, 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In this work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with the use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of 20 times on a single NVIDIA S1070 GPU, and of 50 times on four GPUs, bringing the Jacobian computing time for a fine 3D mesh from 12 min to 14 s. We regard this as an important step toward gaining interactive reconstruction times in 3D imaging, particularly when coupled in the future with acceleration of the forward problem. While we demonstrate results for EIT, these results apply to any soft-field imaging modality where the Jacobian matrix is computed with the adjoint method. PMID:23010857

  11. The Jacobian Conjecture, a Reduction of the Degree to the Quadratic Case

    E-print Network

    A. de Goursac; A. Sportiello; A. Tanasa

    2015-07-17

    The Jacobian Conjecture states that any locally invertible polynomial system in C^n is globally invertible with polynomial inverse. C. W. Bass et al. (1982) proved a reduction theorem stating that the conjecture is true for any degree of the polynomial system if it is true in degree three. This degree reduction is obtained with the price of increasing the dimension n. We prove here a theorem concerning partial elimination of variables, which implies a reduction of the generic case to the quadratic one. The price to pay is the introduction of a supplementary parameter 0system must hold. We first give a purely algebraic proof of this reduction result and we then expose a distinct proof, in a Quantum Field Theoretical formulation, using the intermediate field method.

  12. Exploring Strange Nonchaotic Attractors through Jacobian Elliptic Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Hoz, A. Martinez; Chacon, R.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of Jacobian elliptic functions (JEFs) for inquiring into the reshaping effect of quasiperiodic forces in nonlinear nonautonomous systems exhibiting strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs). Specifically, we characterize analytically and numerically some reshaping-induced transitions starting from SNAs in the context of…

  13. ON RELATIONS BETWEEN JACOBIANS OF CERTAIN MODULAR CURVES

    E-print Network

    Chen, Imin

    ], Ligozat [22], Elkies [7]. To describe this relation, suppose now that p is an odd prime and denote by JH a quotient H : X XH, we denote by H : JH J and H : J JH the homomorphisms of jacobians which are induced

  14. Inverse Kinematic Study of the (26g)Al(d,p)(27)Al Reaction and Implications for Destruction of (26)Al in Wolf-Rayet and Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars.

    PubMed

    Margerin, V; Lotay, G; Woods, P J; Aliotta, M; Christian, G; Davids, B; Davinson, T; Doherty, D T; Fallis, J; Howell, D; Kirsebom, O S; Mountford, D J; Rojas, A; Ruiz, C; Tostevin, J A

    2015-08-01

    In Wolf-Rayet and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, the (26g)Al(p,?)(27)Si reaction is expected to govern the destruction of the cosmic ?-ray emitting nucleus (26)Al. The rate of this reaction, however, is highly uncertain due to the unknown properties of key resonances in the temperature regime of hydrogen burning. We present a high-resolution inverse kinematic study of the (26g)Al(d,p)(27)Al reaction as a method for constraining the strengths of key astrophysical resonances in the (26g)Al(p,?)(27)Si reaction. In particular, the results indicate that the resonance at E(r)=127??keV in (27)Si determines the entire (26g)Al(p,?)(27)Si reaction rate over almost the complete temperature range of Wolf-Rayet stars and AGB stars. PMID:26296114

  15. New Kinematic Metric for Quantifying Surgical Skill for Flexible Instrument Manipulation

    E-print Network

    the potential value of new interventional systems, for example de- termining the value of augmented reality robot with multiple bend- ing sections. The Jacobian operator, which relates the proximal forces applied operator performance compared to standard metrics such as elapsed time, path length, and kinematics factors

  16. A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Solution to Reactive Transport in Porous Media Using the Preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov Method

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; David Andrs; George Redden; Chuan Lu; Don Fox; Yoshiko Fujita

    2013-03-01

    Modeling large multicomponent reactive transport systems in porous media is particularly challenging when the governing partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs) are highly nonlinear and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions. Here we present a preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach to solve the governing PDAEs in a fully coupled and fully implicit manner. A well-known advantage of the JFNK method is that it does not require explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations. Our approach further enhances the JFNK method by utilizing physics-based, block preconditioning and a multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of the preconditioner. This preconditioning strategy accounts for self- and optionally, cross-coupling between primary variables using diagonal and off-diagonal blocks of an approximate Jacobian, respectively. Numerical results are presented demonstrating the efficiency and massive scalability of the solution strategy for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. We found that the physics-based, block preconditioner significantly decreases the number of linear iterations, directly reducing computational cost; and the strongly scalable algebraic multigrid algorithm for approximate inversion of the preconditioner leads to excellent parallel scaling performance.

  17. REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING USING A PARALLEL FULLY-COUPLED SIMULATOR BASED ON PRECONDITIONED JACOBIAN-FREE NEWTON-KRYLOV

    SciTech Connect

    Luanjing Guo; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang; Derek R. Gaston

    2012-06-01

    Systems of multicomponent reactive transport in porous media that are large, highly nonlinear, and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions are often described by a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs). A preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach is applied to solve the PDAEs in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner. The advantage of the JFNK method is that it avoids explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations for computational efficiency considerations. This solution approach is also enhanced by physics-based blocking preconditioning and multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of preconditioners. Based on the solution approach, we have developed a reactive transport simulator named RAT. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and massive scalability of the simulator for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. It has been applied to study the highly nonlinearly coupled reactive transport system of a promising in situ environmental remediation that involves urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation.

  18. ON A COHEN-LENSTRA HEURISTIC FOR JACOBIANS OF RANDOM GRAPHS

    E-print Network

    Payne, Sam

    ON A COHEN-LENSTRA HEURISTIC FOR JACOBIANS OF RANDOM GRAPHS JULIEN CLANCY, NATHAN KAPLAN, TIMOTHY on a Cohen-Lenstra type heuristic saying that a finite abelian group with duality pairing appears heuristic. We also give experimental evidence in support of our conjectures. 1. Introduction Jacobians

  19. Timing and Kinematics of Cretaceous to Paleogene inversion at the SE margin of the Central European Basin System: Part 2, Thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, V.-E.; Dunkl, I.; von Eynatten, H.; Jähne, F.; Voigt, T.; Kley, J.

    2009-04-01

    During the Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary some parts of the Central European Basin System (CEBS) were uplifted along NW-SE to WNW-ESE striking compressive fault systems. As a result Pre-Zechstein (Permian) basement is exposed at the southern border of the CEBS from Central Germany to the sudetes still further east (e.g. Harz Mountains, Thuringian Forest). Thrust-related basins like the Subhercynian Cretaceous Basin (SCB) in the foreland of the Harz Mountains accumulated up to 2500m of siliciclastic and chemical sediments in only 10 million years (Late Turonian to Lower Campanian, Voigt et al., 2006). By means of low-temperature thermochronology it is possible to characterise these basin inversion processes with respect to timing, pattern and rates of cooling and exhumation. Differed authors have already applied Apatite Fission Track analysis (AFT) in certain areas of the southern margin of CEBS. Thomson and Zeh (2000) published AFT apparent ages of 69 to 81 Ma for the Ruhla Crystalline Complex in the Thuringian Forest. Similar AFT-ages (73-84 Ma) of granitoids from the Harz Mountains were reported by Thomson et al. (1997). The late Carboniferous felsic volcanic rocks near Halle yield a much broader range of AFT apparent ages (75-108 Ma; Jacobs and Breitkreuz, 2003). Comparable AFT-ages (84-90 Ma) had been also observed for gabbros from the north-eastern part of the Mid German Crystalline High (Ventura et al. 2003). The present study tries to bridge some of the major gaps in the regional distribution of thermochronological data by analysing samples from central and southern parts of the CEBS. Overall almost 50 AFT-ages from Saxony-Anhalt, Lower Saxony, Thuringia, Hesse and North Rhine-Westphalia were measured. Emphasis is placed on the regions from the Harz Mountains to the Rhenish Uplands and the Thuringian Forest and its foreland. Furthermore, apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology is used to better constrain the time-temperature history models. Apart from some mixed age information two different age groups can be recognized. A major group that is similar to the one reported above points to a short but intense pulse of exhumation and inversion in Coniacian to Campanian time. A younger, less significant age cluster yields information on a second phase of cooling and exhumation in the Paleocene-Eocene. The length distribution of AFT data leads to the assumption of rapid, partially multi-phase, exhumation events. In addition, the data of this study provides indications for thick Jurassic burial that likely reflect phases of Mesozoic extensional tectonics in at least parts of the CEBS. Jacobs, J., Breitkreuz, C. (2003): Zircon and apatite fission-track thermochronology of Late Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the NE German Basin. International Journal of Earth Sciences (Geologische Rundschau), 92, 165-172. Thomson, S., Brix, M., Carter, A. (1997): Late Cretaceous denudation of the Harz Massif assessed by apatite fission track analysis. In: G. Büchel and H. Lützner (Editors), Regionale Geologie von Mitteleuropa, 149. Hauptversammlung Deutsche Geologische Gesellschaft, Jena. Schriftenreihe der Deutschen Geologischen Gesellschaft, 3, 115. Thomson, S.N., Zeh, A. (2000): Fission-track thermochronology of the Ruhla Crystalline Complex:. New constraints on the post-Variscan thermal evolution of the NW Saxo-Bohemian Massif. Tectonophysics, 324, 17-35. Ventura, B., Lisker, F., Kopp, J. (2003): Apatite fission track data from the dill-core Züllsdorf 1/63: implications for the reconstruction of the post Variscan exhumation of the Mid German Crystalline High. Zeitschrift für Geologische Wissenschaften, 31, 251-261. Voigt, T., Wiese, F., von Eynatten, H., Franzke, H.-J. & Gaupp, R. (2006): Facies evolution of syntectonic Upper Cretaceous deposits in the Subhercynian Cretaceous Basin and adjoining areas (Germany). Zeitschrift der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Geowissenschaften, 157/2, 203-244.

  20. Fault structure and kinematics of the Long Valley Caldera region, California, revealed by high-accuracy earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanism stress inversions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, S.; Ellsworth, W.; Zoback, M.; Waldhauser, F.

    2002-01-01

    We have determined high-resolution hypocenters for 45,000+ earthquakes that occurred between 1980 and 2000 in the Long Valley caldera area using a double-difference earthquake location algorithm and routinely determined arrival times. The locations reveal numerous discrete fault planes in the southern caldera and adjacent Sierra Nevada block (SNB). Intracaldera faults include a series of east/west-striking right-lateral strike-slip faults beneath the caldera's south moat and a series of more northerly striking strike-slip/normal faults beneath the caldera's resurgent dome. Seismicity in the SNB south of the caldera is confined to a crustal block bounded on the west by an east-dipping oblique normal fault and on the east by the Hilton Creek fault. Two NE-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults are responsible for most seismicity within this block. To understand better the stresses driving seismicity, we performed stress inversions using focal mechanisms with 50 or more first motions. This analysis reveals that the least principal stress direction systematically rotates across the studied region, from NE to SW in the caldera's south moat to WNW-ESE in Round Valley, 25 km to the SE. Because WNW-ESE extension is characteristic of the western boundary of the Basin and Range province, caldera area stresses appear to be locally perturbed. This stress perturbation does not seem to result from magma chamber inflation but may be related to the significant (???20 km) left step in the locus of extension along the Sierra Nevada/Basin and Range province boundary. This implies that regional-scale tectonic processes are driving seismic deformation in the Long Valley caldera.

  1. Kinematics and control of redundant robotic arm based on dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Francesco; Antonello, Andrea; Carron, Andrea; Carli, Ruggero; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Soft robotics is a promising field and its application to space mechanisms could represent a breakthrough in space technologies by enabling new operative scenarios (e.g. soft manipulators, capture systems). Dielectric Elastomers Actuators have been under deep study for a number of years and have shown several advantages that could be of key importance for space applications. Among such advantages the most notable are high conversion efficiency, distributed actuation, self-sensing capability, multi-degree-of-freedom design, light weight and low cost. The big potentialities of double cone actuators have been proven in terms of good performances (i.e. stroke and force/torque), ease of manufacturing and durability. In this work the kinematic, dynamic and control design of a two-joint redundant robotic arm is presented. Two double cone actuators are assembled in series to form a two-link design. Each joint has two degrees of freedom (one rotational and one translational) for a total of four. The arm is designed to move in a 2-D environment (i.e. the horizontal plane) with 4 DoF, consequently having two degrees of redundancy. The redundancy is exploited in order to minimize the joint loads. The kinematic design with redundant Jacobian inversion is presented. The selected control algorithm is described along with the results of a number of dynamic simulations that have been executed for performance verification. Finally, an experimental setup is presented based on a flexible structure that counteracts gravity during testing in order to better emulate future zero-gravity applications.

  2. Low-rank Quasi-Newton updates for Robust Jacobian lagging in Newton methods

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.; Brune, P.

    2013-07-01

    Newton-Krylov methods are standard tools for solving nonlinear problems. A common approach is to 'lag' the Jacobian when assembly or preconditioner setup is computationally expensive, in exchange for some degradation in the convergence rate and robustness. We show that this degradation may be partially mitigated by using the lagged Jacobian as an initial operator in a quasi-Newton method, which applies unassembled low-rank updates to the Jacobian until the next full reassembly. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique on problems in glaciology and elasticity. (authors)

  3. Solving Nonlinear Solid Mechanics Problems with the Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov Method

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Hales; S. R. Novascone; R. L. Williamson; D. R. Gaston; M. R. Tonks

    2012-06-01

    The solution of the equations governing solid mechanics is often obtained via Newton's method. This approach can be problematic if the determination, storage, or solution cost associated with the Jacobian is high. These challenges are magnified for multiphysics applications with many coupled variables. Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) methods avoid many of the difficulties associated with the Jacobian by using a finite difference approximation. BISON is a parallel, object-oriented, nonlinear solid mechanics and multiphysics application that leverages JFNK methods. We overview JFNK, outline the capabilities of BISON, and demonstrate the effectiveness of JFNK for solid mechanics and solid mechanics coupled to other PDEs using a series of demonstration problems.

  4. MORAL KINEMATICS 1 Running head: MORAL KINEMATICS

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    MORAL KINEMATICS 1 Running head: MORAL KINEMATICS Iliev, R., Sachdeva, S., & Medin, D. (2012) Moral kinematics: The role of physical factors in moral judgments. Memory and Cognition. Online. DOI 10.3758/s13421-012-0217-1 Moral Kinematics: the Role of Physical Factors on Moral Judgments Rumen I Iliev*, Sonya Sachdeva

  5. Jacobian Adaptation of HMM with Initial Model Selection for Noisy Speech Recognition 

    E-print Network

    Shimodaira, Hiroshi; Kato, Yukata; Akae, Toshihiko; Nakai, Mitsuru; Sagayama, Shigeki

    An extension of Jacobian Adaptation (JA) of HMMs for degraded speech recognition is presented in which appropriate set of initial models is selected from a number of initial-model sets designed for different noise environments. Based on the first...

  6. Kinematic functions for the 7 DOF robotics research arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreutz, K.; Long, M.; Seraji, Homayoun

    1989-01-01

    The Robotics Research Model K-1207 manipulator is a redundant 7R serial link arm with offsets at all joints. To uniquely determine joint angles for a given end-effector configuration, the redundancy is parameterized by a scalar variable which corresponds to the angle between the manipulator elbow plane and the vertical plane. The forward kinematic mappings from joint-space to end-effector configuration and elbow angle, and the augmented Jacobian matrix which gives end-effector and elbow angle rates as a function of joint rates, are also derived.

  7. Approximating Human Reaching Volumes Using Inverse Kinematics

    E-print Network

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    , Switzerland Abstract This paper presents a system to analyse the reaching capabilities of the human body. Our system for the human body. Our research is motivated due to the necessity of systems which help to manage. Introduction Virtual Humans are a valuable medium for gaining knowledge and understanding about the human body

  8. Learning inverse kinematics via crosspoint function decomposition

    E-print Network

    Torras, Carme

    accuracy. This trick consists in expressing the IK as a com­ position of learnable functions, each having robots is widely recognized. Moreover, rigid non­redundant robots would also benefit from such learning applications, the mapping has a complex shape and should be approximated with a high accuracy. Thus, the number

  9. Simulating avian wingbeat kinematics.

    PubMed

    Parslew, Ben; Crowther, William J

    2010-12-01

    Inverse dynamics methods are used to simulate avian wingbeats in varying flight conditions. A geometrically scalable multi-segment bird model is constructed, and optimisation techniques are employed to determine segment motions that generate desired aerodynamic force coefficients with minimal mechanical power output. The results show that wingbeat kinematics vary gradually with changes in cruise speed, which is consistent with experimental data. Optimised solutions for cruising flight of the pigeon suggest that upstroke wing retraction is used as a method of saving energy. Analysis of the aerodynamic force coefficient variation in high and low speed cruise leads to the proposal that a suitable gait metric should include both thrust and lift generation during each half-stroke. PMID:20732684

  10. Study of the Jacobian of an Extended Kalman Filter for soil analysis in SURFEXv5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, A.; Hamdi, R.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Termonia, P.

    2014-10-01

    An externalised surface scheme like SURFEX allows computationally cheap offline runs. This is a major advantage for surface assimilation techniques such as the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), where the offline runs allow a cheaper numerical estimation of the observation operator Jacobian. In the recent past an EKF has been developped within SURFEX for the initialisation of soil water content and soil temperature based on screen-level temperature and relative humidity observations. In this paper we make a comparison of the Jacobian calculated with offline SURFEX runs and with runs coupled to the atmospheric ALARO model. Comparisons are made with respect to spatial structure and average value of the Jacobian, gain values and increments. We determine the optimal perturbation size of the Jacobian for the offline and coupled approaches and compare the linearity of the Jacobian for these cases. Results show that the offline Jacobian approach gives similar results as the coupled approach and it allows for smaller perturbation sizes that better approximate this linearity assumption. We document a new case of non-linearities that can hamper this linearity assumption and cause spurious 2?t oscillations in small parts of the domain for the coupled as well as the offline runs. While these oscillations do not have a detrimental effect on the model run, they can introduce some noise in the Jacobian in the affected locations. The oscillations influence both the surface fluxes and the screen-level variables. The oscillations occur in the late afternoon in summer when a stable boundary layer starts to form near the surface. We propose a filter to remove the oscillations and show that this filter works accordingly.

  11. Study of the Jacobian of an extended Kalman filter for soil analysis in SURFEXv5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, A.; Hamdi, R.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Termonia, P.

    2015-03-01

    An externalised surface scheme like SURFEX allows computationally cheap offline runs. This is a major advantage for surface assimilation techniques such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF), where the offline runs allow a cheaper numerical estimation of the observation operator Jacobian. In the recent past an EKF has been developed within SURFEX for the initialisation of soil water content and soil temperature based on screen-level temperature and relative humidity observations. In this paper we make a comparison of the Jacobian calculated with offline SURFEX runs and with runs coupled to the atmospheric ALARO model. Comparisons are made with respect to spatial structure and average value of the Jacobian, gain values and increments. We determine the optimal perturbation size of the Jacobian for the offline and coupled approaches and compare the linearity of the Jacobian for these cases. Results show that the offline Jacobian approach gives similar results to the coupled approach and that it allows for smaller perturbation sizes that better approximate this linearity assumption. We document a new case of non-linearities that can hamper this linearity assumption and cause spurious 2? t oscillations in small parts of the domain for the coupled as well as offline runs. While these oscillations do not have a detrimental effect on the model run, they can introduce some noise in the Jacobian at the affected locations. The oscillations influence both the surface fluxes and the screen-level variables. The oscillations occur in the late afternoon in summer when a stable boundary layer starts to form near the surface. We propose a filter to remove the oscillations and show that this filter works accordingly.

  12. Modal kinematics for multisection continuum arms.

    PubMed

    Godage, Isuru S; Medrano-Cerda, Gustavo A; Branson, David T; Guglielmino, Emanuele; Caldwell, Darwin G

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a novel spatial kinematic model for multisection continuum arms based on mode shape functions (MSF). Modal methods have been used in many disciplines from finite element methods to structural analysis to approximate complex and nonlinear parametric variations with simple mathematical functions. Given certain constraints and required accuracy, this helps to simplify complex phenomena with numerically efficient implementations leading to fast computations. A successful application of the modal approximation techniques to develop a new modal kinematic model for general variable length multisection continuum arms is discussed. The proposed method solves the limitations associated with previous models and introduces a new approach for readily deriving exact, singularity-free and unique MSF's that simplifies the approach and avoids mode switching. The model is able to simulate spatial bending as well as straight arm motions (i.e., pure elongation/contraction), and introduces inverse position and orientation kinematics for multisection continuum arms. A kinematic decoupling feature, splitting position and orientation inverse kinematics is introduced. This type of decoupling has not been presented for these types of robotic arms before. The model also carefully accounts for physical constraints in the joint space to provide enhanced insight into practical mechanics and impose actuator mechanical limitations onto the kinematics thus generating fully realizable results. The proposed method is easily applicable to a broad spectrum of continuum arm designs. PMID:25969947

  13. Principal Component Geostatistical Approach for large-dimensional inverse problems

    PubMed Central

    Kitanidis, P K; Lee, J

    2014-01-01

    The quasi-linear geostatistical approach is for weakly nonlinear underdetermined inverse problems, such as Hydraulic Tomography and Electrical Resistivity Tomography. It provides best estimates as well as measures for uncertainty quantification. However, for its textbook implementation, the approach involves iterations, to reach an optimum, and requires the determination of the Jacobian matrix, i.e., the derivative of the observation function with respect to the unknown. Although there are elegant methods for the determination of the Jacobian, the cost is high when the number of unknowns, m, and the number of observations, n, is high. It is also wasteful to compute the Jacobian for points away from the optimum. Irrespective of the issue of computing derivatives, the computational cost of implementing the method is generally of the order of m2n, though there are methods to reduce the computational cost. In this work, we present an implementation that utilizes a matrix free in terms of the Jacobian matrix Gauss-Newton method and improves the scalability of the geostatistical inverse problem. For each iteration, it is required to perform K runs of the forward problem, where K is not just much smaller than m but can be smaller that n. The computational and storage cost of implementation of the inverse procedure scales roughly linearly with m instead of m2 as in the textbook approach. For problems of very large m, this implementation constitutes a dramatic reduction in computational cost compared to the textbook approach. Results illustrate the validity of the approach and provide insight in the conditions under which this method perform best. PMID:25558113

  14. Flux Jacobian matrices and generaled Roe average for an equilibrium real gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1988-01-01

    Inviscid flux Jacobian matrices and their properties used in numerical solutions of conservation laws are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Exact and approximate generalizations of the Roe average are presented. Results are given for one-dimensional flow, and then extended to three-dimensional flow with time-varying grids.

  15. Fully-implicit Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov Solvers for the nonhydrostatic Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. F.; Giraldo, F.; Carr, L.

    2009-12-01

    For most atmospheric flows, gravity and acoustic waves are the fastest waves in the system. These fast waves severely restrict the time-step in the explicit integration of the non-hydrostatic compressible Euler equations. To circumvent this problem, a fully-implicit time-integrator is proposed using the Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) framework. Since forming and storing the Jacobian matrix is computationally expensive, JFNK methods form the action of the Jacobian matrix on a vector. This matrix-vector computation naturally extends the semi-implicit element-based continuous Galerkin paradigm wherein a system of linear equation is solved at each time-step using a Krylov-subspace solver. The JFNK integrator is implemented for the nonhydrostatic, compressible Euler equations in non-conservative form using spectral elements and compared to pervious explicit and semi-implicit codes. Since the resulting Jacobian is poorly conditioned, a block Jacobi preconditioner is developed and implemented, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of Krylov iterations. Numerical results are reported for several test cases, including 1) a rising thermal bubble and 2) flow over hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic mountains.

  16. THE JACOBIAN AND FORMAL GROUP OF A CURVE OF GENUS 2 OVER AN ARBITRARY GROUND FIELD

    E-print Network

    Flynn, E. Victor

    is that nearly all the literature on curves of genus 2 restricts itself to the case Y 2 = quintic, rather than model for the Jacobian variety. We lay the groundwork for Sections 2 and 3 by determining all quadratic to the above form. Most of the literature on genus 2 considers only the case when F(X) is a quintic; we do

  17. Jacobian matrix algorithm for Lyapunov exponents of the discrete fractional maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Cheng; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2015-05-01

    The Jacobian matrix algorithm is often used to calculate the Lyapunov exponents of the chaotic systems. This study extends the algorithm to discrete fractional cases. The tangent maps with memory effect are presented. The Lyapunov exponents of one and two dimensional fractional logistic maps are calculated. The positive ones are used to distinguish the chaotic areas of the maps.

  18. Regularity of mappings inverse to Sobolev mappings

    SciTech Connect

    Vodop'yanov, Sergei K

    2012-10-31

    For homeomorphisms {phi}:{Omega}{yields}{Omega}' on Euclidean domains in R{sup n}, n{>=}2, necessary and sufficient conditions ensuring that the inverse mapping belongs to a Sobolev class are investigated. The result obtained is used to describe a new two-index scale of homeomorphisms in some Sobolev class such that their inverses also form a two-index scale of mappings, in another Sobolev class. This scale involves quasiconformal mappings and also homeomorphisms in the Sobolev class W{sup 1}{sub n-1} such that rankD{phi}(x){<=}n-2 almost everywhere on the zero set of the Jacobian det D{phi}(x). Bibliography: 65 titles.

  19. Application of the least-squares inversion method: Fourier series versus waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implicit link between waveform inversion and Fourier series based on inversion methods such as gradient, Gauss-Newton, and full Newton methods. Fourier series have been widely used as a basic concept in studies on seismic data interpretation, and their coefficients are obtained in the classical Fourier analysis. We show that Fourier coefficients can also be obtained by inversion algorithms, and compare the method to seismic waveform inversion algorithms. In that case, Fourier coefficients correspond to model parameters (velocities, density or elastic constants), whereas cosine and sine functions correspond to components of the Jacobian matrix, that is, partial derivative wavefields in seismic inversion. In the classical Fourier analysis, optimal coefficients are determined by the sensitivity of a given function to sine and cosine functions. In the inversion method for Fourier series, Fourier coefficients are obtained by measuring the sensitivity of residuals between given functions and test functions (defined as the sum of weighted cosine and sine functions) to cosine and sine functions. The orthogonal property of cosine and sine functions makes the full or approximate Hessian matrix become a diagonal matrix in the inversion for Fourier series. In seismic waveform inversion, the Hessian matrix may or may not be a diagonal matrix, because partial derivative wavefields correlate with each other to some extent, making them semi-orthogonal. At the high-frequency limits, however, the Hessian matrix can be approximated by either a diagonal matrix or a diagonally-dominant matrix. Since we usually deal with relatively low frequencies in seismic waveform inversion, it is not diagonally dominant and thus it is prohibitively expensive to compute the full or approximate Hessian matrix. By interpreting Fourier series with the inversion algorithms, we note that the Fourier series can be computed at an iteration step using any inversion algorithms such as the gradient, full-Newton, and Gauss-Newton methods similar to waveform inversion.

  20. Resolving spectral information from time domain induced polarization data through 2-D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Binley, Andrew; Gazoty, Aurélie; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Auken, Esben

    2013-02-01

    Field-based time domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) surveys are usually modelled by taking into account only the integral chargeability, thus disregarding spectral content. Furthermore, the effect of the transmitted waveform is commonly neglected, biasing inversion results. Given these limitations of conventional approaches, a new 2-D inversion algorithm has been developed using the full voltage decay of the IP response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and receiver transfer function. This allows reconstruction of the spectral information contained in the TD decay series. The inversion algorithm is based around a 2-D complex conductivity kernel that is computed over a range of frequencies and converted to the TD through a fast Hankel transform. Two key points in the implementation ensure that computation times are minimized. First, the speed of the Jacobian computation, time transformed from frequency domain through the same transformation adopted for the forward response is optimized. Secondly, the reduction of the number of frequencies where the forward response and Jacobian are calculated: cubic splines are used to interpolate the responses to the frequency sampling necessary in the fast Hankel transform. These features, together with parallel computation, ensure inversion times comparable with those of direct current algorithms. The algorithm has been developed in a laterally constrained inversion scheme, and handles both smooth and layered inversions; the latter being helpful in sedimentary environments, where quasi-layered models often represent the actual geology more accurately than smooth minimum-structure models. In the layered inversion approach, a general method to derive the thickness derivative from the complex conductivity Jacobian is also proposed. One synthetic example of layered inversion and one field example of smooth inversion show the capability of the algorithm and illustrates a complete uncertainty analysis of the model parameters. With this new algorithm, in situ TD IP measurements give access to the spectral content of the polarization processes, opening up new applications in environmental and hydrogeophysical investigations.

  1. A Jacobian generalization of the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons potential

    E-print Network

    W. S. Hipólito-Ricaldi; J. R. Villanueva

    2015-09-08

    We enlarge the classes of inflaton and quintessence fields by generalizing the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson potential by means of elliptic Jacobian functions characterized by a parameter $k$. We use such generalization to implement an inflationary era and a late acceleration of the universe. As an inflationary model the Jacobian generalization leads us to a number of e-foldings and a primordial spectrum of perturbations compatible with the Planck collaboration 2015. As a quintessence model, a study of the evolution of its Equation of State (EoS) and its $w'$-$w$ plane, helps us to classify it as a thawing model. This allows us to consider analytical approximations for the EoS recently discovered for thawing quintessence. By using Union 2.1 Supernova Ia and Hubble parameter $H(z)$ data we determine the range of $k$-values which give rise to viable models for the late acceleration of the universe.

  2. Real time markerless motion tracking using linked kinematic chains

    DOEpatents

    Luck, Jason P. (Arvada, CO); Small, Daniel E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-08-14

    A markerless method is described for tracking the motion of subjects in a three dimensional environment using a model based on linked kinematic chains. The invention is suitable for tracking robotic, animal or human subjects in real-time using a single computer with inexpensive video equipment, and does not require the use of markers or specialized clothing. A simple model of rigid linked segments is constructed of the subject and tracked using three dimensional volumetric data collected by a multiple camera video imaging system. A physics based method is then used to compute forces to align the model with subsequent volumetric data sets in real-time. The method is able to handle occlusion of segments and accommodates joint limits, velocity constraints, and collision constraints and provides for error recovery. The method further provides for elimination of singularities in Jacobian based calculations, which has been problematic in alternative methods.

  3. Multiscale modeling of polycrystalline materials with Jacobian-free multiscale method (JFMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul; De, Suvranu

    2015-04-01

    The non-linear constitutive response of polycrystalline aggregate of single crystal grains is obtained using a micro-macro transition scheme, which is realized within a Jacobian-free multiscale method (JFMM). The Jacobian-free approach circumvents computation of the tangent matrix at the macroscale using a Newton-Krylov process. This has a major advantage in terms of storage requirements and computational cost over existing approaches based on homogenized material coefficients, which may require considerable effort to form the exact Jacobian at every Newton step. The rate-independent constitutive response of polycrystalline copper and rate-dependent stress-strain response of -RDX (cyclotrimethylene trinitramine) polycrystal is verified against the computational homogenization based two-level finite element multiscale method. Numerical examples demonstrate that while the rate of convergence of Newton iterations for the JFMM and method is comparable, the computational cost of JFMM is nearly constant as opposed to exponential increase for the latter with increasing number of degrees of freedom at the macroscale. The storage requirement for the JFMM increases linearly with increasing , whereas, it increases as approximately for the method.

  4. Kinematic Analysis of the vertebra of an eel like robot

    E-print Network

    Chablat, Damien

    2008-01-01

    The kinematic analysis of a spherical wrist with parallel architecture is the object of this article. This study is part of a larger French project, which aims to design and to build an eel like robot to imitate the eel swimming. To implement direct and inverse kinematics on the control law of the prototype, we need to evaluate the workspace without any collisions between the different bodies. The tilt and torsion parameters are used to represent the workspace.

  5. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.; Mai, P.M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  6. Employment of Jacobian elliptic functions for solving problems in nonlinear dynamics of microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodan, Zekovi?; Annamalai, Muniyappan; Slobodan, Zdravkovi?; Louis, Kavitha

    2014-02-01

    We show how Jacobian elliptic functions (JEFs) can be used to solve ordinary differential equations (ODEs) describing the nonlinear dynamics of microtubules (MTs). We demonstrate that only one of the JEFs can be used while the remaining two do not represent the solutions of the crucial differential equation. We show that a kink-type soliton moves along MTs. Besides this solution, we also discuss a few more solutions that may or may not have physical meanings. Finally, we show what kind of ODE can be solved by using JEFs.

  7. Analysis of a Swashplate Mechanism of the Hingeless Rotor Hub with the Flybar in a Model Helicopter, Part I: Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaapour, Mohammad Reza; Zohoor, Hassan

    Swashplate mechanism is the steering control mechanism used in most helicopters. It is a complex multi-loop closed kinematic chain which controls the angles of attack of the main rotor blades. In most new model helicopters, this mechanism is also equipped with the bell-hiller stabilizer bar (flybar), to improve the stability. This paper aimed at the kinematic analysis of one of the latest architectures of the swashplate mechanism, used for hingeless rotor with the flybar. Hence, the position analysis of each module and whole mechanism, based on parallel manipulators concept with more details involved than other works, was presented here. The kinematic model was further developed to obtain Jacobian matrices, velocity and acceleration analysis in detail. Finally, a particular example was conducted and compared with an ADAMS rigid body dynamic model, to verify the analytical model. In many simulated cases, the results matched.

  8. Kinematic synthesis of bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen-Chou

    Bevel-gear-type robotic wrist mechanisms are commonly used in industry. The reasons for their popularity are that they are compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. However, there are singularities in their workspace, which substantially degrade their manipulative performance. The objective of this research is to develop an atlas of three-degree-of-freedom bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, and through dimensional synthesis to improve their kinematic performance. The dissertation contains two major parts: the first is structural analysis and synthesis, the other is kinematic analysis and dimensional synthesis. To synthesize the kinematic structures of bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms, the kinematic structures are separated from their functional considerations. All kinematic structures which satisfy the mobility condition are enumerated in an unbiased, systematic manner. Then the bevel-gear-type wrist mechanisms are identified by applying the functional requirements. Structural analysis shows that a three-degree-of-freedom wrist mechanism usually consists of non-fractionated, two degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear train jointed with the base link. Therefore, the structural synthesis can be simplified into a problem of examining the atlas of non-fractionated, two-degree-of-freedom epicyclic gear trains. The resulting bevel-gear-type wrist mechanism has been categorized and evaluated. It is shown that three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanisms are promising for further improving the kinematic performance. It is found that a spherical planetary gear train is necessarily imbedded in a three-degree-of-freedom, four-jointed wrist mechanism. Therefore, to study the workspace and singularity problems of three-degree-of-freedom four-jointed spherical wrist mechanisms, we have to study the trajectories of spherical planetary gear trains. The parametric equations of the trajectories and some useful geometric properties for the analysis and synthesis of workplace are derived. The workspace boundary equations can be derived via both geometric consideration and Jacobian analysis. The workspace is divided by inner and outer boundaries into regions of accessibility of zero, two, and four. The design criteria of full workspace and a maximum four-root region are established. kinematic performance.

  9. An optimal resolved rate law for kinematically redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, B. J.

    1987-01-01

    The resolved rate law for a manipulator provides the instantaneous joint rates required to satisfy a given instantaneous hand motion. When the joint space has more degrees of freedom than the task space, the manipulator is kinematically redundant and the kinematic rate equations are underdetermined. These equations can be locally optimized, but the resulting pseudo-inverse solution has been found to cause large joint rates in some cases. A weighting matrix in the locally optimized (pseudo-inverse) solution is dynamically adjusted to control the joint motion as desired. Joint reach limit avoidance is demonstrated in a kinematically redundant planar arm model. The treatment is applicable to redundant manipulators with any number of revolute joints and to non-planar manipulators.

  10. Extending the Belavin-Knizhnik "wonderful formula" by the characterization of the Jacobian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matone, Marco

    2012-10-01

    A long-standing question in string theory is to find the explicit expression of the bosonic measure, a crucial issue also in determining the superstring measure. Such a measure was known up to genus three. Belavin and Knizhnik conjectured an expression for genus four which has been proved in the framework of the recently introduced vector-valued Teichmüller modular forms. It turns out that for g ? 4 the bosonic measure is expressed in terms of such forms. In particular, the genus four Belavin-Knizhnik "wonderful formula" has a remarkable extension to arbitrary genus whose structure is deeply related to the characterization of the Jacobian locus. Furthermore, it turns out that the bosonic string measure has an elegant geometrical interpretation as generating the quadrics in ? g-1 characterizing the Riemann surface. All this leads to identify forms on the Siegel upper half-space that, if certain conditions related to the characterization of the Jacobian are satisfied, express the bosonic measure as a multiresidue in the Siegel upper half-space. We also suggest that it may exist a super analog on the super Siegel half-space.

  11. Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov methods with GPU acceleration for computing nonlinear ship wave patterns

    E-print Network

    Pethiyagoda, Ravindra; Moroney, Timothy J; Back, Julian M

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear problem of steady free-surface flow past a submerged source is considered as a case study for three-dimensional ship wave problems. Of particular interest is the distinctive wedge-shaped wave pattern that forms on the surface of the fluid. By reformulating the governing equations with a standard boundary-integral method, we derive a system of nonlinear algebraic equations that enforce a singular integro-differential equation at each midpoint on a two-dimensional mesh. Our contribution is to solve the system of equations with a Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method together with a banded preconditioner that is carefully constructed with entries taken from the Jacobian of the linearised problem. Further, we are able to utilise graphics processing unit acceleration to significantly increase the grid refinement and decrease the run-time of our solutions in comparison to schemes that are presently employed in the literature. Our approach provides opportunities to explore the nonlinear features of three-...

  12. Visual servoing of robot manipulators -- Part 1: Projective kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruf, A.; Horaud, R.

    1999-11-01

    Visual servoing of robot manipulators is a key technique where the appearance of an object in the image plane is used to control the velocity of the end-effector such that the desired position is reached in the scene. The vast majority of visual servoing methods proposed so far uses calibrated robots in conjunction with calibrated cameras. It has been shown that the behavior of visual control loops does not degrade too much in the presence of calibration errors. Nevertheless, camera and robot calibration are complex and time-consuming processes requiring special-purpose mechanical devices, such as theodolites and calibration jigs. In this paper, the authors, suggest formulating a visual servoing control loop in nonmetric space, which in this case amounts to the projective space in which a triangulation of the scene using an uncalibrated stereo rig is expressed. The major consequence of controlling the robot in nonmetric space rather than in Euclidean space is that both the robot's direct kinematic map and the robot's Jacobian matrix must be defined in this space as well. Finally, they provide a practical method to estimate the projective kinematic model and they describe some preliminary simulated experiments that use this nonmetric model to perform stereo-based servoing. Nevertheless, in-depth analysis of projective control will be the topic of a forthcoming paper.

  13. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  14. Kinematics of deformable media

    E-print Network

    Anirvan Dasgupta; Hemwati Nandan; Sayan Kar

    2007-09-05

    We investigate the kinematics of deformations in two and three dimensional media by explicitly solving (analytically) the evolution equations (Raychaudhuri equations) for the expansion, shear and rotation associated with the deformations. The analytical solutions allow us to study the dependence of the kinematical quantities on initial conditions. In particular, we are able to identify regions of the space of initial conditions that lead to a singularity in finite time. Some generic features of the deformations are also discussed in detail. We conclude by indicating the feasibility and utility of a similar exercise for fluid and geodesic flows in flat and curved spacetimes.

  15. Jacobian and stiffness analysis of a novel class of six-DOF parallel minimanipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tashmasebi, F.; Tsai, Lung-Wen

    1992-08-01

    The Jacobian and stiffness matrices of two types of novel, six-DOF parallel minimanipulators are derived. A minimanipulator consists of three inextensible limbs, each of which is driven by a two-DOF driver. Bilinear stepper motors are used as drivers in the first type minimanipulator, whereas five-bar linkages are used as drivers in the second type minimanipulator. All of the minimanipulator actuators are base-mounted. Inextensible limbs (and five-bar linkage drivers in the second type minimanipulator) improve positional resolution and stiffness of the minimanipulators in certain directions. It is shown that, at the central configuration, the stiffness matrix of the first type minimanipulator can be diagonalized (decoupled). It is also shown that the first type minimanipulator can be designed to possess direct or torsional isotropic stiffness properties. Moreover, guidelines for designing the drivers of the second type minimanipulator are established. 20 refs.

  16. Jacobian and stiffness analysis of a novel class of six-DOF parallel minimanipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Tashmasebi, F. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Tsai, Lung-Wen . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The Jacobian and stiffness matrices of two types of novel, six-DOF parallel minimanipulators are derived. A minimanipulator consists of three inextensible limbs, each of which is driven by a two-DOF driver. Bilinear stepper motors are used as drivers in the first type minimanipulator, whereas five-bar linkages are used as drivers in the second type minimanipulator. All of the minimanipulator actuators are base-mounted. Inextensible limbs (and five-bar linkage drivers in the second type minimanipulator) improve positional resolution and stiffness of the minimanipulators in certain directions. It is shown that, at the central configuration, the stiffness matrix of the first type minimanipulator can be diagonalized (decoupled). It is also shown that the first type minimanipulator can be designed to possess direct or torsional isotropic stiffness properties. Moreover, guidelines for designing the drivers of the second type minimanipulator are established. 20 refs.

  17. A Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov method for time-implicit multidimensional hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Viallet, Maxime; Baraffe, Isabelle; Folini, Doris; Geroux, Chris; Popov, Mikhael; Pratt, Jane; Walder, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This work is a continuation of our efforts to develop an efficient implicit solver for multidimensional hydrodynamics for the purpose of studying important physical processes in stellar interiors, such as turbulent convection and overshooting. We present an implicit solver resulting from the combination of a Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov method and a preconditioning technique tailored for the inviscid, compressible equations of stellar hydrodynamics. We assess the accuracy and performance of the solver for both 2D and 3D problems, for Mach numbers down to $10^{-6}$. Although our applications concern flows in stellar interiors, the method can be applied to general advection and/or diffusion dominated flows. The method presented in this paper opens up new avenues in 3D modeling of realistic stellar interiors allowing the study of important problems in stellar structure and evolution.

  18. A fully implicit Newton-Krylov-Schwarz method for tokamak magnetohydrodynamics: Jacobian construction and preconditioner formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Daniel R.; Samtaney, Ravi; Tiedeman, Hilari C.

    2012-01-01

    Single-fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a fluid description of fusion plasmas which is often used to investigate macroscopic instabilities in tokamaks. In MHD modeling of tokamaks, it is often desirable to compute MHD phenomena to resistive time scales or a combination of resistive-Alfvén time scales, which can render explicit time stepping schemes computationally expensive. We present recent advancements in the development of preconditioners for fully nonlinearly implicit simulations of single-fluid resistive tokamak MHD. Our work focuses on simulations using a structured mesh mapped into a toroidal geometry with a shaped poloidal cross-section, and a finite-volume spatial discretization of the partial differential equation model. We discretize the temporal dimension using a fully implicit ? or the backwards differentiation formula method, and solve the resulting nonlinear algebraic system using a standard inexact Newton-Krylov approach, provided by the sundials library. The focus of this paper is on the construction and performance of various preconditioning approaches for accelerating the convergence of the iterative solver algorithms. Effective preconditioners require information about the Jacobian entries; however, analytical formulae for these Jacobian entries may be prohibitive to derive/implement without error. We therefore compute these entries using automatic differentiation with OpenAD. We then investigate a variety of preconditioning formulations inspired by standard solution approaches in modern MHD codes, in order to investigate their utility in a preconditioning context. We first describe the code modifications necessary for the use of the OpenAD tool and sundials solver library. We conclude with numerical results for each of our preconditioning approaches in the context of pellet-injection fueling of tokamak plasmas. Of these, our optimal approach results in a speedup of a factor of 3 compared with non-preconditioned implicit tests, with that performance gap rapidly widening with increasing mesh refinement.

  19. Radiance and Jacobian Intercomparison of Radiative Transfer Models Applied to HIRS and AMSU Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garand, L.; Turner, D. S.; Larocque, M.; Bates, J.; Boukabara, S.; Brunel, P.; Chevallier, F.; Deblonde, G.; Engelen, R.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this study are the evaluation of current fast radiative transfer models (RTMs) and line-by-line (LBL) models. The intercomparison focuses on the modeling of 11 representative sounding channels routinely used at numerical weather prediction centers: seven HIRS (High-resolution Infrared Sounder) and four AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) channels. Interest in this topic was evidenced by the participation of 24 scientists from 16 institutions. An ensemble of 42 diverse atmospheres was used and results compiled for 19 infrared models and 10 microwave models, including several LBL RTMs. For the first time, not only radiances, but also Jacobians (of temperature, water vapor, and ozone) were compared to various LBL models for many channels. In the infrared, LBL models typically agree to within 0.05-0.15 K (standard deviation) in terms of top-of-the-atmosphere brightness temperature (BT). Individual differences up to 0.5 K still exist, systematic in some channels, and linked to the type of atmosphere in others. The best fast models emulate LBL BTs to within 0.25 K, but no model achieves this desirable level of success for all channels. The ozone modeling is particularly challenging. In the microwave, fast models generally do quite well against the LBL model to which they were tuned. However significant differences were noted among LBL models. Extending the intercomparison to the Jacobians proved very useful in detecting subtle and more obvious modeling errors. In addition, total and single gas optical depths were calculated, which provided additional insight on the nature of differences. Recommendations for future intercomparisons are suggested.

  20. Teaching about Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written by Jim and Jane Nelson, Teaching About Kinematics is the latest AAPT/PTRA resource book. Based on physics education research, the book provides teachers with the resources needed to introduce students to some of the fundamental building blocks of physics. It is a carefully thought-out, step-by-step laboratory-based introduction to the…

  1. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  2. Task-Directed Inverse Kinematics For Redundant Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Mark K.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents algorithms for use in controlling redundant robotic manipulators in such way as to exploit redundancy to satisfy task requirements beyond placement of end effectors at desired positions and orientations.

  3. AN INVERSE KINEMATIC MATHEMATICAL MODEL USING GROEBNER BASIS THEORY FOR

    E-print Network

    IN THE GAIT CYCLE By Kimberly D. Kendricks Adam M. Fullenkamp Robert McGrellis Jonathan Juhl and Ronald F Basis Theory for Arm Swing Movement in the Gait Cycle 30 August 2010 1 Kimberly D. Kendricks, 2 Adam M and Research Air Force Institute of Technology Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 2 3D Human Signatures

  4. INVERSE KINEMATICS AND SINGULARITIES OF MANIPULATORS WITH OFFSET WRIST

    E-print Network

    Williams II, Robert L.

    -degree-of-freedom DUJ wrist on three-degree-of- freedom Cartesian, cylindrical, spherical, and articulated regional arms the Cartesian position error is driven towards zero. The orientation error is theoretically zero at each step

  5. Kinematics and dynamics of a six-degree-of-freedom robot manipulator with closed kinematic chain mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with a class of robot manipulators built based on the kinematic chain mechanism (CKCM). This class of CKCM manipulators consists of a fixed and a moving platform coupled together via a number of in-parallel actuators. A closed-form solution is derived for the inverse kinematic problem of a six-degre-of-freedom CKCM manipulator designed to study robotic applications in space. Iterative Newton-Raphson method is employed to solve the forward kinematic problem. Dynamics of the above manipulator is derived using the Lagrangian approach. Computer simulation of the dynamical equations shows that the actuating forces are strongly dependent on the mass and centroid of the robot links.

  6. Efficient Inversion of Mult-frequency and Multi-Source Electromagnetic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gary D. Egbert

    2007-03-22

    The project covered by this report focused on development of efficient but robust non-linear inversion algorithms for electromagnetic induction data, in particular for data collected with multiple receivers, and multiple transmitters, a situation extremely common in eophysical EM subsurface imaging methods. A key observation is that for such multi-transmitter problems each step in commonly used linearized iterative limited memory search schemes such as conjugate gradients (CG) requires solution of forward and adjoint EM problems for each of the N frequencies or sources, essentially generating data sensitivities for an N dimensional data-subspace. These multiple sensitivities allow a good approximation to the full Jacobian of the data mapping to be built up in many fewer search steps than would be required by application of textbook optimization methods, which take no account of the multiplicity of forward problems that must be solved for each search step. We have applied this idea to a develop a hybrid inversion scheme that combines features of the iterative limited memory type methods with a Newton-type approach using a partial calculation of the Jacobian. Initial tests on 2D problems show that the new approach produces results essentially identical to a Newton type Occam minimum structure inversion, while running more rapidly than an iterative (fixed regularization parameter) CG style inversion. Memory requirements, while greater than for something like CG, are modest enough that even in 3D the scheme should allow 3D inverse problems to be solved on a common desktop PC, at least for modest (~ 100 sites, 15-20 frequencies) data sets. A secondary focus of the research has been development of a modular system for EM inversion, using an object oriented approach. This system has proven useful for more rapid prototyping of inversion algorithms, in particular allowing initial development and testing to be conducted with two-dimensional example problems, before approaching more computationally cumbersome three-dimensional problems.

  7. Slickenside kinematic indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblas, Miguel

    1998-09-01

    A new classification of slickenside kinematic indicators is presented based on 61 criteria. These slickensides have been subdivided into eleven major groups: `V' or crescentic markings, steps, fractures, trains of inclined planar structures, trailed material, asymmetric elevations, deformed elements, mineralogical/crystallographic orientations, asymmetric plan-view features, asymmetric cavities, and asymmetric folds. This classification constitutes a useful tool for geologists interested in the determination of the shear sense in fault surfaces bearing slickensides. Examples of application of this classification to natural fault surfaces at different scales are presented.

  8. Statistic inversion of multi-zone transition probability models for aquifer characterization in alluvial fans

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Lin; Gong, Huili; Gable, Carl; Teatini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the heterogeneity arising from the complex architecture of sedimentary sequences in alluvial fans is challenging. This paper develops a statistical inverse framework in a multi-zone transition probability approach for characterizing the heterogeneity in alluvial fans. An analytical solution of the transition probability matrix is used to define the statistical relationships among different hydrofacies and their mean lengths, integral scales, and volumetric proportions. A statistical inversion is conducted to identify the multi-zone transition probability models and estimate the optimal statistical parameters using the modified Gauss-Newton-Levenberg-Marquardt method. The Jacobian matrix is computed by the sensitivity equation method, which results in an accurate inverse solution with quantification of parameter uncertainty. We use the Chaobai River alluvial fan in the Beijing Plain, China, as an example for elucidating the methodology of alluvial fan characterization. The alluvial fan is divided...

  9. Joint inversion of acoustic and resistivity data for the estimation of gas hydrate concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2002-01-01

    Downhole log measurements, such as acoustic or electrical resistivity logs, are frequently used to estimate in situ gas hydrate concentrations in the pore space of sedimentary rocks. Usually the gas hydrate concentration is estimated separately based on each log measurement. However, measurements are related to each other through the gas hydrate concentration, so the gas hydrate concentrations can be estimated by jointly inverting available logs. Because the magnitude of slowness of acoustic and resistivity values differs by more than an order of magnitude, a least-squares method, weighted by the inverse of the observed values, is attempted. Estimating the resistivity of connate water and gas hydrate concentration simultaneously is problematic, because the resistivity of connate water is independent of acoustics. In order to overcome this problem, a coupling constant is introduced in the Jacobian matrix. In the use of different logs to estimate gas hydrate concentration, a joint inversion of different measurements is preferred to the averaging of each inversion result.

  10. Kinematical Analysis of an Articulated Mechanism

    E-print Network

    Fleischfresser, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold: to present mathematical expressions for the kinematics of an articulated mechanism and to perform numerical experiments with the implemented Fortran code. The system of rigid parts is made of two slender bars and a disk. A constant 2 rad/s counterclockwise rotation rate is imposed on the disk triggering the planar motion of the longer bar (link) and the rotation of the shorter one (output). Angular relations, velocities and accelerations are analyzed for a 90-degree turn of the disk. The inversion of the linking bar sense of rotation is well captured by the simulation, and the paper and pencil solutions that may lead to wrong conclusions are explained. Equations are derived from first principles and the Fortran code is placed under version control (currently, v.0.8-beta). This computer project is relevant for those in charge of vector dynamics courses and wishing to expose students to project-based learning activities.

  11. Fast Iterative Implementation of Nonlinear Geostatistical Inverse Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhou, Q.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Previous research reduced the dimensionality of the under-determined geostatistical inverse problems from the number of unknowns (m) to the number of measurements (n), and a fair amount of reduction in computational cost have been achieved when n<Jacobian matrix H (n x m) and its multiplication with the covariance matrix Q (m x m) is still high, especially when n is relatively large. In this research, we use iterative methods, specifically, the Krylov subspace methods, to solve the linearized inverse problem (inner iteration) such that the forward problem only needs to be solved twice for each inner iteration. Since for large inverse problems the computational cost is dominated by finding the solution of each forward problem, the reduction in the number of forward runs results in significant saving in CPU time. On the memory usage side, we reduce the use of large dense matrices to the minimal degree. For demonstration, we use this strategy with the Bayesian inversion method developed in Kitanidis [1996] to solve numerical hydraulic tomography problems with more than 10 million unknowns and transient pressure/moment measurements. In the end, we discuss the extension of the strategy to other geostatistical methods such as the Successive Linear Estimator (SLE) [Yeh et al., 1996].

  12. Kinematics and control of a fully parallel force-reflecting hand controller for manipulator teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryfogle, Mark D.; Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami S.; Chiou, Peter C.

    1993-01-01

    Design of a parallel force-reflecting hand controller that implements a friction- and inertia canceling control loop about the entire mechanism based on wrench sensing in the mechanism handgrip is discussed. Kinematics of the controller under consideration is analyzed and results are presented using a closed-form solution for the inverse kinematics and Newton-Raphson's method for the forward kinematics. Results indicate that the force control scheme based on a handgrip force sensor provides smaller steady-state errors than the scheme without a handigrip sensor.

  13. 3-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements and direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor computers - Part II: direct data-space inverse solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M.; Wannamaker, P.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G.

    2016-01-01

    Following the creation described in Part I of a deformable edge finite-element simulator for 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) responses using direct solvers, in Part II we develop an algorithm named HexMT for 3-D regularized inversion of MT data including topography. Direct solvers parallelized on large-RAM, symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) workstations are used also for the Gauss-Newton model update. By exploiting the data-space approach, the computational cost of the model update becomes much less in both time and computer memory than the cost of the forward simulation. In order to regularize using the second norm of the gradient, we factor the matrix related to the regularization term and apply its inverse to the Jacobian, which is done using the MKL PARDISO library. For dense matrix multiplication and factorization related to the model update, we use the PLASMA library which shows very good scalability across processor cores. A synthetic test inversion using a simple hill model shows that including topography can be important; in this case depression of the electric field by the hill can cause false conductors at depth or mask the presence of resistive structure. With a simple model of two buried bricks, a uniform spatial weighting for the norm of model smoothing recovered more accurate locations for the tomographic images compared to weightings which were a function of parameter Jacobians. We implement joint inversion for static distortion matrices tested using the Dublin secret model 2, for which we are able to reduce nRMS to ˜1.1 while avoiding oscillatory convergence. Finally we test the code on field data by inverting full impedance and tipper MT responses collected around Mount St Helens in the Cascade volcanic chain. Among several prominent structures, the north-south trending, eruption-controlling shear zone is clearly imaged in the inversion.

  14. O-star kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Karimova, D.K.; Pavlovskaya, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    Proper motions determined by the authors are utilized to study the kinematics of 79 O-type stars at distance r< or =2.5 kpc. The sample is divided into two groups, having space-velocity dispersions tau/sub I/roughly-equal10 km/sec, sigma/sub II/roughly-equal35 km/sec. Solutions for the velocity-field parameters for group I yield a galactic angular rotation speed ..omega../sub 0/ = 24.9 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/ at the sun (for R/sub 0/ = 10.0 kpc) and an Oort constant A = 12.2 km sec/sup -1/ kpc/sup -1/. Most of the O stars exhibit a small z-velocity directed away from the galactic plane. The velocity-ellipsoid parameters and box-orbit elements are calculated.

  15. Detailed solution to a complex kinematics chain manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, S.; Jansen, J.F.; Kress, R.L.; Babcock, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents a relatively simple method based on planar geometry to analyze the inverse kinematics for closed kinematics chain (CKC) mechanisms. Although the general problem and method of approach are well defined, the study of the inverse kinematics of a closed-chain mechanism is a very complicated one. The current methodology allows closed-form solutions to be found, if a solution exists, for the displacements and velocities of all manipulator joints. Critical design parameters can be identified and optimized by using symbolic models. This paper will focus on planar closed-chain structures extended with a rotational base. However, with open and CKC mechanisms combined in different planes, the extension to the case is straightforward. Further, real-time algorithms are developed that can be handled by existing microprocessor technology. To clarify the methodology, the Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) manipulator is analyzed, and a graphic simulation is presented as a verification of the results. This manipulator has 17 links, 24 one-degree-of-freedom (DOF) joints, and 7 CKC loops working in a plane and a rotational base, which determine its 3 DOFs. The SRIP manipulator allows a decoupled linear motion along the vertical or horizontal directions using only one of its linear actuators. The symbolic solution for the inverse kinematics allows optimization to be performed to further decouple the Cartesian motions by changing link lengths of the manipulator. The conclusion achieved by the optimization is that only two link lengths need to be changed to tune the manipulator for a perfect decoupling at each area of the workspace.

  16. Detailed solution to a complex kinematics chain manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, S; Jansen, J F; Kress, R L; Babcock, S M

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a relatively simple method based on planar geometry to analyze the inverse kinematics for closed kinematics chain (CKC) mechanisms. Although the general problem and method of approach are well defined, the study of the inverse kinematics of a closed-chain mechanism is a very complicated one. The current methodology allows closed-form solutions to be found, if a solution exists, for the displacements and velocities of all manipulator joints. Critical design parameters can be identified and optimized by using symbolic models. This paper will focus on planar closed-chain structures extended with a rotational base. However, with open and CKC mechanisms combined in different planes, the extension to the case is straightforward. Further, real-time algorithms are developed that can be handled by existing microprocessor technology. To clarify the methodology, the Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP) manipulator is analyzed, and a graphic simulation is presented as a verification of the results. This manipulator has 17 links, 24 one-degree-of-freedom (DOF) joints, and 7 CKC loops working in a plane and a rotational base, which determine its 3 DOFs. The SRIP manipulator allows a decoupled linear motion along the vertical or horizontal directions using only one of its linear actuators. The symbolic solution for the inverse kinematics allows optimization to be performed to further decouple the Cartesian motions by changing link lengths of the manipulator. The conclusion achieved by the optimization is that only two link lengths need to be changed to tune the manipulator for a perfect decoupling at each area of the workspace.

  17. Jacobian-free Newton Krylov discontinuous Galerkin method and physics-based preconditioning for nuclear reactor simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HyeongKae Park; Robert R. Nourgaliev; Richard C. Martineau; Dana A. Knoll

    2008-09-01

    We present high-order accurate spatiotemporal discretization of all-speed flow solvers using Jacobian-free Newton Krylov framework. One of the key developments in this work is the physics-based preconditioner for the all-speed flow, which makes use of traditional semi-implicit schemes. The physics-based preconditioner is developed in the primitive variable form, which allows a straightforward separation of physical phenomena. Numerical examples demonstrate that the developed preconditioner effectively reduces the number of the Krylov iterations, and the efficiency is independent of the Mach number and mesh sizes under a fixed CFL condition.

  18. Improved Implementation of Seismic Waveform Inversion Using Gauss-Newton Method in Elastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.; Baag, C.

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to make a seismic waveform inversion based on the Gauss-Newton method practicable. Seismic waveform inversion had been introduced in the 1980s but due to computational limitation, a noble approximation of the inversion based on the Gradient method has been usually used. In spite of amazing improvements in computing power, it is still a computationally demanding task to carry out seismic waveform inversion in its integrity. The major obstacle to solve a seismic waveform inversion is explicit calculation of the Jacobian and the approximate Hessian matrices. To overcome this, the reciprocity principle and the convolution theorem are employed. The inversion, however, still holds out huge amounts of memory and computation. The limitation can be surmounted by (1) multi-grid approaches in the spatial and in the time domain, (2) a reduction of the time window length, (3) a numerical scaling between the grid spatial size and the physical dimension of a virtual source, and (4) a parallelization of the computation via Message Passing Interface for massively parallel computers. From numerical experiments, it is shown that the Gauss-Newton method has significantly higher resolving power and convergence rate over the gradient method, and this study contributes greatly to making Gauss-Newton seismic waveform inversion efficient and demonstrates potential application to real seismic data.

  19. Geophysical InversionFacility

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    UBC Geophysical InversionFacility Modelling and Inversion of EMI data collected over magnetic soils model parameters: · Location · Orientation · Polarizabilities 4 #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility = L3 L1 L2 L3 Invert Data m=F -1 [d ] Invert Data #12;UBC Geophysical Inversion Facility At sites

  20. Kinematics, controls, and path planning results for a redundant manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gretz, Bruce; Tilley, Scott W.

    1989-01-01

    The inverse kinematics solution, a modal position control algorithm, and path planning results for a 7 degree of freedom manipulator are presented. The redundant arm consists of two links with shoulder and elbow joints and a spherical wrist. The inverse kinematics problem for tip position is solved and the redundant joint is identified. It is also shown that a locus of tip positions exists in which there are kinematic limitations on self-motion. A computationally simple modal position control algorithm has been developed which guarantees a nearly constant closed-loop dynamic response throughout the workspace. If all closed-loop poles are assigned to the same location, the algorithm can be implemented with very little computation. To further reduce the required computation, the modal gains are updated only at discrete time intervals. Criteria are developed for the frequency of these updates. For commanding manipulator movements, a 5th-order spline which minimizes jerk provides a smooth tip-space path. Schemes for deriving a corresponding joint-space trajectory are discussed. Modifying the trajectory to avoid joint torque saturation when a tip payload is added is also considered. Simulation results are presented.

  1. CME Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.-H.; Gallagher, P. T.

    The goal of this study is to investigate the driving mechanisms of CMEs and to infer the magnetic field properties at the onset of the instability. We use EIT 195 Å images and LASCO white-light coronagraph data of a CME event that occurred on 17 December 2006. It was a long-duration event, and was associated with an occulted C2.1 class flare. To determine the driving mechanism, we quantitatively and qualitatively compared the observationally obtained kinematic evolution with that predicted by three CME models: the breakout model (BO, see Antiochos et al. 1999; Lynch et al. 2008; DeVore and Antiochos 2008), the catastrophe model (CM, see Priest and Forbes 2000), and the toroidal instability model (TI, see Chen 1989; Kliem and Török 2006). Our results indicate that this CME is best represented by the CM model. We infer that, at the onset of the instability, the Alfvén speed is approximately 120 km s-1 and the height of the flux rope is roughly 100-200Mm. These parameter values are related to the magnetic environment and the loop geometry and can be used to infer the magnetic condition at the onset of the eruption.We intend to submit the full analysis to A&A.

  2. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  3. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-01

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible. PMID:26248884

  4. Kinematic analysis of a flexible six-DOF parallel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jing, Feng-Shui; Tan, Min; Hou, Zeng-Guang; Liang, Zi-Ze; Wang, Yun-Kuan; Gupta, Madan M; Nikiforuk, Peter N

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a new type of six-degrees of freedom (DOF) flexible parallel mechanism (FPM) is presented. This type of parallel mechanism possesses several favorable properties: (1) its number of DOFs is independent of the number of serial chains which make up the mechanism; (2) it has no kinematical singularities; (3) it is designed to move on rails, and therefore its workspace is much larger than that of a conventional parallel manipulator; and (4) without changing the number of DOFs and the kinematics of the mechanisms, the number of the serial chains can be reconfigured according to the needs of the tasks. These properties make the mechanism very preferable in practice, especially for such tasks as joining huge ship blocks, in which the manipulated objects vary dramatically both in weights and dimensions. Furthermore, the mechanism can be used as either a fully actuated system or an underactuated system. In the fully actuated case, the mechanism has six DOF motion capabilities and manipulation capabilities. However, in the underactuated case, the mechanism still has six DOF motion capabilities, but it has only five DOF manipulation capabilities. In this paper, both the inverse and forward kinematics are studied and expressed in a closed form. The workspace and singularity analysis of the mechanism are also presented. An example is presented to illustrate how to calculate the kinematics of the mechanism in both fully-actuated and underactuated cases. Finally, an application of such a mechanism to manufacturing industry is introduced. PMID:16602597

  5. Kinematics of a New High Precision Three Degree-of-Freedom Parallel Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form direct and inverse kinematics of a new three degree-of-freedom (DOF) parallel manipulator with inextensible limbs and base-mounted actuators are presented. The manipulator has higher resolution and precision than the existing three DOF mechanisms with extensible limbs. Since all of the manipulator actuators are base-mounted; higher payload capacity, smaller actuator sizes, and lower power dissipation can be obtained. The manipulator is suitable for alignment applications where only tip, tilt, and piston motions are significant. The direct kinematics of the manipulator is reduced to solving an eighth-degree polynomial in the square of tangent of half-angle between one of the limbs and the base plane. Hence, there are at most sixteen assembly configurations for the manipulator. In addition, it is shown that the sixteen solutions are eight pairs of reflected configurations with respect to the base plane. Numerical examples for the direct and inverse kinematics of the manipulator are also presented.

  6. Kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements based on screw theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuantao; Wang, Sanmin; Mills, James K.; Zhi, Changjian

    2014-07-01

    Because the deployable structures are complex multi-loop structures and methods of derivation which lead to simpler kinematic and dynamic equations of motion are the subject of research effort, the kinematics and dynamics of deployable structures with scissor-like-elements are presented based on screw theory and the principle of virtual work respectively. According to the geometric characteristic of the deployable structure examined, the basic structural unit is the common scissor-like-element(SLE). First, a spatial deployable structure, comprised of three SLEs, is defined, and the constraint topology graph is obtained. The equations of motion are then derived based on screw theory and the geometric nature of scissor elements. Second, to develop the dynamics of the whole deployable structure, the local coordinates of the SLEs and the Jacobian matrices of the center of mass of the deployable structure are derived. Then, the equivalent forces are assembled and added in the equations of motion based on the principle of virtual work. Finally, dynamic behavior and unfolded process of the deployable structure are simulated. Its figures of velocity, acceleration and input torque are obtained based on the simulate results. Screw theory not only provides an efficient solution formulation and theory guidance for complex multi-closed loop deployable structures, but also extends the method to solve dynamics of deployable structures. As an efficient mathematical tool, the simper equations of motion are derived based on screw theory.

  7. KINEMATIC ANALYSIS OF MODULAR, TRUSS-BASED MANIPULATOR UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, R. J.

    1994-06-01

    Decontamination and Dismantling (D&D) activities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) require a long reach manipulator with a large load capacity. Variable Geometry Trusses (VGTs) are a unique class of mechanical structures which allow the advantages of truss structures for large scale applications to be applied to large robotic manipulators. Individual VGT units may be assembled to create a modular, long-reach, truss-type manipulator. Each module of such a manipulator system is either a static truss section or one of several possible VGT geometries. While many potential applications exist for this technology, the present work is largely motivated by the need for generic robotic systems for remote manipulation. A manipulator system based on VGT modules provides several advantages. The reconfigurable nature of the manipulator system allows it to be adapted on site to unforeseen conditions. The kinematic redundancy of the manipulator enables it to work effectively even in a highly obstructed workspace. The parallel structure of the truss modules enables the manipulator to be withdrawn in the event of a structural failure. Finally, the open framework of the modules provides a clear, protected passageway for control and power cabling, waste conveyance, or other services required at the end effector. As is implied in a truss structure, all primary members of a VGT are ideally loaded in pure tension or compression. This results in an extremely stiff and strong manipulator system with minimal overall weight. Careful design of the joints of a VGT is very important to the overall stiffness and accuracy of the structure, as several links (as many as six) are joined together at each joint. The greatest disadvantage to this approach to manipulator design has traditionally been that the kinematics of VGT structures are complex and poorly understood. This report specifically addresses the kinematics of several possible geometries for the individual VGT units. Equations and solution techniques are developed for solving the "forward" or "direct" and "inverse" kinematic problems for these geometries. The" forward" kinematic problem is that of finding the position and orientation of the distal end of the VGT relative to the proximal end, given the specific displacements of the (linear) actuators. This problem is rarely solvable in closed form. However, powerful iterative algorithms capable of solution in real time on typical modern robot control hardware are presented. The "inverse" kinematic problem is that of finding the required actuator displacements given the position and orientation of the distal end of the VGT relative to the proximal end. For specific VGT geometries, closed-form solutions are presented. For the more general problem, iterative algorithms capable of solution in real time are again derived and presented.

  8. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-06-15

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log-Jacobian value and the air flow rate correlated well (R{sup 2}=0.858 on average for the entire lung). The correlation for the fifth individual was not as good (R{sup 2}=0.377 on average for the entire lung) and can be explained by the small variation in tidal volume for this individual. The correlation of the average log-Jacobian value and the air flow rate for images near the diaphragm correlated well in all five individuals (R{sup 2}=0.943 on average). These preliminary results indicate a strong correlation between the expansion/compression of the lung measured by image registration and the air flow rate measured by spirometry. Predicting the location, motion, and compression/expansion of the tumor and normal tissue using image registration and spirometry could have many important benefits for radiotherapy treatment. These benefits include reducing radiation dose to normal tissue, maximizing dose to the tumor, improving patient care, reducing treatment cost, and increasing patient throughput.

  9. Reconstruction procedures for two inverse scattering problems without the phase information

    E-print Network

    Michael V. Klibanov; Vladimir G. Romanov

    2015-05-08

    This is a continuation of two recent publications of the authors about reconstruction procedures for 3-d phaseless inverse scattering problems. The main novelty of this paper is that the Born approximation for the case of the wave-like equation is not considered. It is shown here that the phaseless inverse scattering problem for the 3-d wave-like equation in the frequency domain leads to the well known Inverse Kinematic Problem. Uniqueness theorem follows. Still, since the Inverse Kinematic Problem is very hard to solve, a linearization is applied. More precisely, geodesic lines are replaced with straight lines. As a result, an approximate explicit reconstruction formula is obtained via the inverse Radon transform. The second reconstruction method is via solving a problem of the integral geometry using integral equations of the Abel type.

  10. Functional kinematics of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Rainbow, M J; Wolff, A L; Crisco, J J; Wolfe, S W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review past and present concepts concerning functional kinematics of the healthy and injured wrist. To provide a context for students of the wrist, we describe the progression of techniques for measuring carpal kinematics over the past century and discuss how this has influenced today's understanding of functional kinematics. Next, we provide an overview of recent developments and highlight the clinical relevance of these findings. We use these findings and recent evidence that supports the importance of coupled motion in early rehabilitation of radiocarpal injuries to develop the argument that coupled motion during functional activities is a clinically relevant outcome; therefore, clinicians should develop a framework for its dynamic assessment. This should enable a tailored and individualized approach to the treatment of carpal injuries. PMID:26568538

  11. H? Kinematics of KPG 390

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, P.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.; Fuentes-Carrera, I.

    2010-06-01

    In this work we present scanning Fabry-Perot H? observations of the isolated interacting galaxy pair NGC 5278/9 obtained with the PUMA Fabry-Perot interferometer. We derived velocity fields, various kinematic parameters and rotation curves for both galaxies. Our kinematical results together with the fact that dust lanes have been detected in both galaxies, as well as the analysis of surface brightness profiles along the minor axis, allowed us to determine that both components of the interacting pair are trailing spirals.

  12. Emergent gravity requires kinematic nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Donald

    2015-01-23

    This Letter refines arguments forbidding nonlinear dynamical gravity from appearing in the low energy effective description of field theories with local kinematics, even for those with instantaneous long-range interactions. Specifically, we note that gravitational theories with universal coupling to energy-an intrinsically nonlinear phenomenon-are characterized by Hamiltonians that are pure boundary terms on shell. In order for this to be the low energy effective description of a field theory with local kinematics, all bulk dynamics must be frozen and, thus, irrelevant to the construction. The result applies to theories defined either on a lattice or in the continuum, and requires neither Lorentz invariance nor translation invariance. PMID:25658991

  13. Trajectory optimization for kinematically redundant arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, Craig R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of local optimization methods for resolving joint configurations in underconstrained manipulation tasks is conducted. A new approach is developed for observing joint limits and avoiding obstacles during the trajectory planning. The methodology is used in a four-link arm example to avoid a workspace singularity and is compared with results using the extended Moore-Penrose technique. An alternative measure of arm 'manipulability' based directly on the rank of the Jacobian is also introduced.

  14. Kinematics and trajectory generation for MIRADAS arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Gómez, J. M.; Torra, J.; López, M.; Raines, S. N.; Eikenberry, S. S.

    2015-05-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS) is a NIR multi-object spectrograph for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The instrument has a multiplexing system (MXS) that enables the simultaneous observation of twenty objects located within its field of view. These user selected targets are acquired by twenty deployable robotic probe arms with pickoff mirror optics operating at cryogenic temperatures. The MIRADAS probe arm is a close-loop mechanism designed with optics simplicity in mind, presenting good stability when it is operated upside down. Calculating optimum collision-free trajectories requires a good knowledge of the MIRADAS arm behavior based on its geometry and its mechanical constraints. This study introduces a geometric model for the two degree-of-freedom (DoF) mechanism, including solutions for the forward and inverse kinematics problem. The concepts of zone-of-avoidance (ZoA), workspace and envelope of MIRADAS arm are presented and studied. Finally, the paper proposes two different patrolling approaches that can be exploited when planning trajectories.

  15. Top quark mass and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Barberis, Emanuela; /Northeastern U.

    2006-05-01

    A summary of the results on the measurement of the Top Quark mass and the study of the kinematics of the t{bar t} system at the Tevatron collider is presented here. Results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations are reported.

  16. Kinematic Parameters of Signed Verbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Milkovic, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Sign language users recruit physical properties of visual motion to convey linguistic information. Research on American Sign Language (ASL) indicates that signers systematically use kinematic features (e.g., velocity, deceleration) of dominant hand motion for distinguishing specific semantic properties of verb classes in production…

  17. Kinematic support using elastic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geirsson, Arni; Debra, Daniel B.

    1988-01-01

    The design of kinematic supports using elastic elements is reviewed. The two standard methods (cone, Vee and flat and three Vees) are presented and a design example involving a machine tool metrology bench is given. Design goals included thousandfold strain attenuation in the bench relative to the base when the base strains due to temperature variations and shifting loads. Space applications are also considered.

  18. Development of kinematic equations and determination of workspace of a 6 DOF end-effector with closed-kinematic chain mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents results from the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulators, funded by the Goddard Space Flight Center, under Grant NAG5-780, for the period July 1, 1988 to January 1, 1989. An analysis is presented of a 6 degree-of-freedom robot end-effector built to study telerobotic assembly of NASA hardware in space. Since the end-effector is required to perform high precision motion in a limited workspace, closed-kinematic mechanisms are chosen for its design. A closed-form solution is obtained for the inverse kinematic problem and an iterative procedure employing Newton-Raphson method is proposed to solve the forward kinematic problem. A study of the end-effector workspace results in a general procedure for the workspace determination based on link constraints. Computer simulation results are presented.

  19. Abel inversions: Error propagation and inversion reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, A.T.; Diesso, M.

    1999-01-01

    Inversion of chordally integrated data to infer the profile of a plasma parameter (plasma density, radiated power, or, in our case, the visible continuum from bremsstrahlung) propagates errors from outer shells inward as the inversion progresses. If the inversion is done by a matrix technique, error propagation can likewise be determined by a matrix technique. Where other considerations make the matrix method undesirable, there is no clearly defined analytical method to test the reliability of the inversion. We have solved this problem by taking real data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) visible bremsstrahlung (VB) diagnostic, applying normally distributed random noise of a known mean value, and inverting the signal. When we have done this hundreds of times at all points in the profile, we can clearly track the error propagation. At the plasma center, for example, the error is several times the average error in the relative (chord to chord) calibration of the system. This error multiplier is a powerful generalization; it depends little on the details of the inversion, and almost entirely on the profile shape. For the TFTR VB profile it ranges from 2 to 4 for most types of plasma. We have also looked at the damping of the inversion error from an error in a single chord; this damping can be rather fast in some cases. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Kinematic representations, workspace analysis, and grasp stability in robot arms and multi-fingered hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Fu-Hua

    This work studies three related aspects of robotics: the set of possible kinematic representations of robot motion, the range of all possible robot positions, i.e., the workspace, and the designing of stable grasps with a multifingered end-effector. A survey of alternatives to the homogeneous transformation to represent robot coordinate translations and rotations is given. The advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed, and their computational complexities are compared, giving the number of arithmetic operations required by the different methods. In viewing rigid body motions, two aspects are considered: point transformations, which result in matrix-based transformations, and line transformations, which result in screw-based transformations. Algebraic expressions for the robot workspace are helpful in the design of robots. Here, a complete methodology is developed to obtain algebraic expressions to aid robot workspace construction, based on the analysis of Jacobian matrices. Reduction of the complexity of the workspace analysis is achieved by choice of the coordinate system used in the representation. It is shown that, in the worst case 2 x 2 submatrices of the Jacobian need to be checked, and with some specific kinematic structures, it is sufficient to examine only a set of scalar expressions. Examples of using algebraic expressions to generate workspace without mechanical limitations are given. The third part of this work represents the first application of Liapunov stability theory of differential equations to the problem of generating stable grasps of an object with a multifingered hand. The analysis of grasp stability where finger forces are maintained constant is considered, as well as certain modified force control laws that introduce damping. In the robotics community there is considerable research emphasis related to the use of force control methods rather than the usual position control, and this motivates the study. Stability theory for nonlinear differential equations is applied to establish the conditions on finger locations and grasp force directions that are associated with Liapunov stability, with asymptotic stability, and with instability of grasps. Relationships are given between these mathematical concepts and various desirable properties of grasp that have previously been used in defining various concepts of stable grasp. A geometrical representation of the stability condition is given which assists the synthesis of the grasp, and examples in two and three dimensions are given.

  1. Analysis of a closed-kinematic chain robot manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Pooran, Farhad J.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are the research results from the research grant entitled: Active Control of Robot Manipulators, sponsored by the Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA) under grant number NAG-780. This report considers a class of robot manipulators based on the closed-kinematic chain mechanism (CKCM). This type of robot manipulators mainly consists of two platforms, one is stationary and the other moving, and they are coupled together through a number of in-parallel actuators. Using spatial geometry and homogeneous transformation, a closed-form solution is derived for the inverse kinematic problem of the six-degree-of-freedom manipulator, built to study robotic assembly in space. Iterative Newton Raphson method is employed to solve the forward kinematic problem. Finally, the equations of motion of the above manipulators are obtained by employing the Lagrangian method. Study of the manipulator dynamics is performed using computer simulation whose results show that the robot actuating forces are strongly dependent on the mass and centroid locations of the robot links.

  2. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric inversion including topography using deformed hexahedral edge finite elements, direct solvers and data space Gauss-Newton, parallelized on SMP computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordy, M. A.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Maris, V.; Cherkaev, E.; Hill, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an algorithm for 3D simulation and inversion of magnetotelluric (MT) responses using deformable hexahedral finite elements that permits incorporation of topography. Direct solvers parallelized on symmetric multiprocessor (SMP), single-chassis workstations with large RAM are used for the forward solution, parameter jacobians, and model update. The forward simulator, jacobians calculations, as well as synthetic and real data inversion are presented. We use first-order edge elements to represent the secondary electric field (E), yielding accuracy O(h) for E and its curl (magnetic field). For very low frequency or small material admittivity, the E-field requires divergence correction. Using Hodge decomposition, correction may be applied after the forward solution is calculated. It allows accurate E-field solutions in dielectric air. The system matrix factorization is computed using the MUMPS library, which shows moderately good scalability through 12 processor cores but limited gains beyond that. The factored matrix is used to calculate the forward response as well as the jacobians of field and MT responses using the reciprocity theorem. Comparison with other codes demonstrates accuracy of our forward calculations. We consider a popular conductive/resistive double brick structure and several topographic models. In particular, the ability of finite elements to represent smooth topographic slopes permits accurate simulation of refraction of electromagnetic waves normal to the slopes at high frequencies. Run time tests indicate that for meshes as large as 150x150x60 elements, MT forward response and jacobians can be calculated in ~2.5 hours per frequency. For inversion, we implemented data space Gauss-Newton method, which offers reduction in memory requirement and a significant speedup of the parameter step versus model space approach. For dense matrix operations we use tiling approach of PLASMA library, which shows very good scalability. In synthetic inversions we examine the importance of including the topography in the inversion and we test different regularization schemes using weighted second norm of model gradient as well as inverting for a static distortion matrix following Miensopust/Avdeeva approach. We also apply our algorithm to invert MT data collected at Mt St Helens.

  3. INVERSE STABLE SUBORDINATORS.

    PubMed

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Straka, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The inverse stable subordinator provides a probability model for time-fractional differential equations, and leads to explicit solution formulae. This paper reviews properties of the inverse stable subordinator, and applications to a variety of problems in mathematics and physics. Several different governing equations for the inverse stable subordinator have been proposed in the literature. This paper also shows how these equations can be reconciled. PMID:25045216

  4. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-01

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  5. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  6. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Mattione

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  7. Direct Waveform Inversion by Iterative Inverse Propagation

    E-print Network

    Schlottmann, R B

    2009-01-01

    Seismic waves are the most sensitive probe of the Earth's interior we have. With the dense data sets available in exploration, images of subsurface structures can be obtained through processes such as migration. Unfortunately, relating these surface recordings to actual Earth properties is non-trivial. Tomographic techniques use only a small amount of the information contained in the full seismogram and result in relatively low resolution images. Other methods use a larger amount of the seismogram but are based on either linearization of the problem, an expensive statistical search over a limited range of models, or both. We present the development of a new approach to full waveform inversion, i.e., inversion which uses the complete seismogram. This new method, which falls under the general category of inverse scattering, is based on a highly non-linear Fredholm integral equation relating the Earth structure to itself and to the recorded seismograms. An iterative solution to this equation is proposed. The res...

  8. Kinematic Characterization of Left Ventricular Chamber Stiffness and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossahebi, Sina

    Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization today, and diastolic heart failure accounts for 40-50% of cases. Therefore, it is critical to identify diastolic dysfunction at a subclinical stage so that appropriate therapy can be administered before ventricular function is further, and perhaps irreversibly impaired. Basic concepts in physics such as kinematic modeling provide a unique method with which to characterize cardiovascular physiology, specifically diastolic function (DF). The advantage of an approach that is standard in physics, such as the kinematic modeling is its causal formulation that functions in contrast to correlative approaches traditionally utilized in the life sciences. Our research group has pioneered theoretical and experimental quantitative analysis of DF in humans, using both non-invasive (echocardiography, cardiac MRI) and invasive (simultaneous catheterization-echocardiography) methods. Our group developed and validated the Parametrized Diastolic Filling (PDF) formalism which is motivated by basic physiologic principles (LV is a mechanical suction pump at the mitral valve opening) that obey Newton's Laws. PDF formalism is a kinematic model of filling employing an equation of motion, the solution of which accurately predicts all E-wave contours in accordance with the rules of damped harmonic oscillatory motion. The equation's lumped parameters---ventricular stiffness, ventricular viscoelasticity/relaxation and ventricular load---are obtained by solving the 'inverse problem'. The parameters' physiologic significance and clinical utility have been repeatedly demonstrated in multiple clinical settings. In this work we apply our kinematic modeling approach to better understand how the heart works as it fills in order to advance the relationship between physiology and mathematical modeling. Through the use of this modeling, we thereby define and validate novel, causal indexes of diastolic function such as early rapid filling energy, diastatic stiffness, and relaxation and stiffness components of E-wave deceleration time.

  9. A ''Voice Inversion Effect?''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Catherine; Belin, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Voice is the carrier of speech but is also an ''auditory face'' rich in information on the speaker's identity and affective state. Three experiments explored the possibility of a ''voice inversion effect,'' by analogy to the classical ''face inversion effect,'' which could support the hypothesis of a voice-specific module. Experiment 1 consisted…

  10. Seismic Inversion Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jackiewicz, Jason

    2009-09-16

    With the rapid advances in sophisticated solar modeling and the abundance of high-quality solar pulsation data, efficient and robust inversion techniques are crucial for seismic studies. We present some aspects of an efficient Fourier Optimally Localized Averaging (OLA) inversion method with an example applied to time-distance helioseismology.

  11. Development of a sensor coordinated kinematic model for neural network controller training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1990-01-01

    A robotic benchmark problem useful for evaluating alternative neural network controllers is presented. Specifically, it derives two camera models and the kinematic equations of a multiple degree of freedom manipulator whose end effector is under observation. The mapping developed include forward and inverse translations from binocular images to 3-D target position and the inverse kinematics of mapping point positions into manipulator commands in joint space. Implementation is detailed for a three degree of freedom manipulator with one revolute joint at the base and two prismatic joints on the arms. The example is restricted to operate within a unit cube with arm links of 0.6 and 0.4 units respectively. The development is presented in the context of more complex simulations and a logical path for extension of the benchmark to higher degree of freedom manipulators is presented.

  12. Kinematic correction for roller skewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is developed for high-speed cylindrical roller bearings. This stabilization requires race and roller crowning to product changes in the rolling geometry as the roller shifts axially. These changes put a reverse skew in the rolling elements by changing the rolling taper. Twelve basic possible bearing modifications are identified in this paper. Four have single transverse convex curvature in the rollers while eight have rollers with compound transverse curvature composed of a central cylindrical band of constant radius surrounded by symmetric bands with both slope and transverse curvature.

  13. Kinematics in Vector Boson Fusion

    E-print Network

    D. Green

    2006-03-02

    The vector boson fusion process leads to two forward/backward jets (tag jets) and the produced state, a Higgs boson in this case, moving slowly in the p-p C.M. frame at the LHC. For the case of Higgs decaying to W+W (W*) with Higgs mass below 180 GeV, the W bosons have low momentum in the Higgs C.M. For the case of W leptonic decays, this fact allows for an approximate reconstruction of the two final state neutrinos. In turn, those solutions then provide additional kinematic cuts against background.

  14. Kinematic, workspace and singularity analysis of a new parallel robot used in minimally invasive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Alin; Pisla, Doina; Andras, Szilaghyi; Gherman, Bogdan; Gyurka, Bela-Zoltan; Plitea, Nicolae

    2013-03-01

    In the last ten years, due to development in robotic assisted surgery, the minimally invasive surgery has greatly changed. Until now, the vast majority of robots used in surgery, have serial structures. Due to the orientation parallel module, the structure is able to reduce the pressure exerted on the entrance point in the patient's abdominal wall. The parallel robot can also handle both a laparoscope as well an active instrument for different surgical procedures. The advantage of this parallel structure is that the geometric model has been obtained through an analytical approach. The kinematic modelling of a new parallel architecture, the inverse and direct geometric model and the inverse and direct kinematic models for velocities and accelerations are being determined. The paper will demonstrate that with this parallel structure, one can obtain the necessary workspace required for a minimally invasive operation. The robot workspace was generated using the inverse geometric model. An indepth study of different types of singularity is performed, allowing the development of safe control algorithms of the experimental model. Some kinematic simulation results and the experimental model of the robot are presented in the paper.

  15. Basic concepts of kinematic-wave models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The kinematic-wave model is one of a number of approximations of the dynamic-wave model. The dynamic-wave model describes one-dimensional shallow-water waves (unsteady, gradually varied, open-channel flow). The report provides a basic reference on the theory and application of kinematic-wave models and describes the limitations of the model in relation to the other approximations of the dynamic-wave model. In the kinematic-wave approximation, a number of the terms in the equation of motion are assumed to be insignificant. The equation of motion is replaced by an equation describing uniform flow. Thus, the kinematic-wave model is described by the continuity equation and a uniform flow equation such as the well-known Chezy or Manning formulas. Kinematic-wave models are applicable to overland flow where lateral inflow is continuously added and is a large part of the total flow. For channel-routing applications, the kinematic-wave model always predicts a steeper wave with less dispersion and attenuation than actually occurs. The effect of the accumulation of errors in the kinematic-wave model shows that the approximations made in the development of the kinematic-wave equations are not generally justified for most channel-routing applications. Modified flow-routing models can be used which help to stop the accumulation of error that occurs when the kinematic-wave model is applied. (USGS)

  16. Finite rotation and nonlinear beam kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    Standard means of representing finite rotation in rigid-body kinematics, including orientation angles, Euler parameters, and Rodrigues parameters, are reviewed and compared. General kinematical relations for a beam theory that treats arbitrarily large rotation are then presented. The standard methods of representing finite rotations are applied to these kinematical expressions, and comparison is made among the standard methods and additional methods found in the literature, such as quasi-coordinates and linear combinations of projection angles. The method of Rodrigues parameters is shown to stand out for both its simplicity and generality when applied to beam kinematics, a result that is really missing from the literature.

  17. Robust adaptive kinematic control of redundant robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarokh, M.; Zuck, D. D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a general method for the resolution of redundancy that combines the Jacobian pseudoinverse and augmentation approaches. A direct adaptive control scheme is developed to generate joint angle trajectories for achieving desired end-effector motion as well as additional user defined tasks. The scheme ensures arbitrarily small errors between the desired and the actual motion of the manipulator. Explicit bounds on the errors are established that are directly related to the mismatch between actual and estimated pseudoinverse Jacobian matrix, motion velocity and the controller gain. It is shown that the scheme is tolerant of the mismatch and consequently only infrequent pseudoinverse computations are needed during a typical robot motion. As a result, the scheme is computationally fast, and can be implemented for real-time control of redundant robots. A method is incorporated to cope with the robot singularities allowing the manipulator to get very close or even pass through a singularity while maintaining a good tracking performance and acceptable joint velocities. Computer simulations and experimental results are provided in support of the theoretical developments.

  18. Ballistic representation for kinematic access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    This work uses simple two-body orbital dynamics to initially determine the kinematic access for a ballistic vehicle. Primarily this analysis was developed to assess when a rocket body might conjunct with an orbiting satellite platform. A family of access opportunities can be represented as a volume for a specific rocket relative to its launch platform. Alternately, the opportunities can be represented as a geographical footprint relative to aircraft or satellite position that encompasses all possible launcher locations for a specific rocket. A thrusting rocket is treated as a ballistic vehicle that receives all its energy at launch and follows a coasting trajectory. To do so, the rocket's burnout energy is used to find its equivalent initial velocity for a given launcher's altitude. Three kinematic access solutions are then found that account for spherical Earth rotation. One solution finds the maximum range for an ascent-only trajectory while another solution accommodates a descending trajectory. In addition, the ascent engagement for the descending trajectory is used to depict a rapid access scenario. These preliminary solutions are formulated to address ground-, sea-, or air-launched vehicles.

  19. Time-lapse three-dimensional inversion of complex conductivity data using an active time constrained (ATC) approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Werkema, D.D.; Minsley, B.J.; Woodruff, W.F.; Kemna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Induced polarization (more precisely the magnitude and phase of impedance of the subsurface) is measured using a network of electrodes located at the ground surface or in boreholes. This method yields important information related to the distribution of permeability and contaminants in the shallow subsurface. We propose a new time-lapse 3-D modelling and inversion algorithm to image the evolution of complex conductivity over time. We discretize the subsurface using hexahedron cells. Each cell is assigned a complex resistivity or conductivity value. Using the finite-element approach, we model the in-phase and out-of-phase (quadrature) electrical potentials on the 3-D grid, which are then transformed into apparent complex resistivity. Inhomogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions are used at the boundary of the domain. The calculation of the Jacobian matrix is based on the principles of reciprocity. The goal of time-lapse inversion is to determine the change in the complex resistivity of each cell of the spatial grid as a function of time. Each model along the time axis is called a 'reference space model'. This approach can be simplified into an inverse problem looking for the optimum of several reference space models using the approximation that the material properties vary linearly in time between two subsequent reference models. Regularizations in both space domain and time domain reduce inversion artefacts and improve the stability of the inversion problem. In addition, the use of the time-lapse equations allows the simultaneous inversion of data obtained at different times in just one inversion step (4-D inversion). The advantages of this new inversion algorithm are demonstrated on synthetic time-lapse data resulting from the simulation of a salt tracer test in a heterogeneous random material described by an anisotropic semi-variogram. ?? 2011 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2011 RAS.

  20. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  1. Water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level over the tropical western Pacific. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP), several periods of water vapor and temperature inversions near the 0 deg C level were observed. Satellite and radiosonde data from TOGA COARE are used to document the large-scale conditions and thermodynamic and kinematic structures present during three extended periods in which moisture and temperature inversions near the freezing level were very pronounced. Observations from each case are synthesized into schematics which represent typical structures of the inversion phenomena. Frequency distributions of the inversion phenomena along with climatological humidity and temperature profiles are calculated for the four-month IOP.

  2. Kinematics of the free throw in basketball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, A.; Miller, G.

    1981-06-01

    The kinematics of the two basic styles of free throw in basketball are discussed. It is shown that from a purely kinematic and trajectory point of view, the overhand push shot is preferable to the underhand loop shot. The advantages of the underhand shot lie in the actual execution of the shot.

  3. Control Algorithms For Kinematically Redundant Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, David R.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents improved algorithms for controlling kinematically redundant robotic manipulators, producing unique configuration for each end-effector location. Furthermore, they generally produce configurations in which no interference between robot boom and payload or base structures. Report presents comparison between various other robot-kinematic algorithms.

  4. Singularity-theoretic methods in robot kinematics

    E-print Network

    Donelan, Peter

    Singularity-theoretic methods in robot kinematics P. S. Donelan School of Mathematics, Statistics.donelan@vuw.ac.nz Abstract The significance of singularities in the design and control of robot manipulators is well known-theoretic methods in robot kinematics and presents some new results. Keywords: Singularity theory; Robot manipulator

  5. The Kinematics of Circular Motion

    E-print Network

    L. A. N. de Paula

    2008-10-22

    In this paper we introduce a proposal for the kinematics of bodies in uniform circular motion. This model could contribute for the explanation of the two main problems of contemporary cosmology: dark matter and dark energy. We use one of the physical properties of space - the gravitational waves - to define a reference frame at rest with respect to the space and to determine a mechanism for the synchronization of clocks. So we derive through a Postulate the so-called transformations of Lorentz and a new velocity of the bodies in uniform circular motion. This rotational velocity could contribute to clarify both cosmological problems. This contribution would come from effects due to a single phenomenon: the rotational velocity of bodies with respect to the reference frame at rest on the space. And finally, we interpret physically the Postulate - the major point in this model - which allows, inclusive, a comparison with the Relativity Principle and also new theoretical previews.

  6. Erosion controls transpressional wedge kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, K. A.; Oncken, O.

    2012-04-01

    High resolution digital image analysis of analogue tectonic models reveals that erosion strongly influences the kinematics of brittle transpressional wedges. In the basally-driven experimental setup with low-angle transpression (convergence angle of 20 degrees) and a homogeneous brittle rheology, a doubly vergent wedge develops above the linear basal velocity discontinuity. In the erosive case, the experiment is interrupted and the wedge topography fully removed at displacement increments of ~3/4 the model thickness. The experiments are observed by a stereo pair of high resolution CCD cameras and the incremental displacement field calculated by Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). From this dataset, fault slip on individual fault segments - magnitude and angle on the horizontal plane relative to the fault trace - is extracted using the method of Leever et al. (2011). In the non-erosive case, after an initial stage of strain localization, the wedge experiences two transient stages of (1) oblique slip and (2) localized strain partitioning. In the second stage, the fault slip angle on the pro-shear(s) rotates by some 30 degrees from oblique to near-orthogonal. Kinematic steady state is attained in the third stage when a through-going central strike-slip zone develops above the basal velocity discontinuity. In this stage, strain is localized on two main faults (or fault zones) and fully partitioned between plate boundary-parallel displacement on the central strike-slip zone and near-orthogonal reverse faulting at the front (pro-side) of the wedge. The fault slip angle on newly formed pro-shears in this stage is stable at 60-65 degrees (see also Leever et al., 2011). In contrast, in the erosive case, slip remains more oblique on the pro-shears throughout the experiment and a separate central strike-slip zone does not form, i.e. strain partitioning does not fully develop. In addition, more faults are active simultaneously. Definition of stages is based on slip on the retro-side of the wedge. In the first stage, the slip angle on the retro-shear is 27 +/- 12 degrees. In a subsequent stage, slip on the retro-side is partitioned between strike-slip and oblique (~35 degrees) faulting. In the third stage, the slip angle on the retro side stabilizes at ~10 degrees. The pro-shears are characterized by very different kinematics. Two pro-shears tend to be active simultaneously, the extinction of the older fault shortly followed by the initiation of a new one in a forelandward breaking sequence. Throughout the experiment, the fault slip on the pro-shears is 40-60 degrees at their initiation, gradually decreasing to nearly strike-slip at the moment of fault extinction. This is a rotation of similar magnitude but in the reverse direction compared to the non-erosive case. The fault planes themselves do not rotate. Leever, K. A., R. H. Gabrielsen, D. Sokoutis, and E. Willingshofer (2011), The effect of convergence angle on the kinematic evolution of strain partitioning in transpressional brittle wedges: Insight from analog modeling and high-resolution digital image analysis, Tectonics, 30(2), TC2013.

  7. Kinematic model of southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, R.; Humphreys, E.

    1986-02-01

    A kinematic model for southern California, based on late-Quaternary slip rates and orientations of major faults in the region, is proposed. Internally consistent motions are determined assuming that these faults bound rigid blocks. Relative to North America, most of California west of the San Andreas fault is moving parallel to the San Andreas fault through the Transverse Ranges and not parallel to the motion of the Pacific plate. The velocities of the blocks are calculated along several paths in southern California that begin in the Mojave Desert and end off the California coast. A path that crosses the western Transverse Ranges accumulates the accepted relative North America-Pacific plate velocity, whereas paths to the north and south result in a significant missing component of motion, implying the existence of a zone of active deformation in southern California. 70 references.

  8. Cold atoms by kinematic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Jeffrey J.; Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.; Klos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2010-09-15

    We report the preparation and observation of translationally cold atoms using kinematic cooling. In these experiments, krypton atoms are cooled to subkelvin temperatures by elastic collisions in crossed atomic beams. Two independent velocity measurements indicate an upper-bound mean velocity of 13 m/s (E{sub trans}/k=850 mK) and are consistent with a much lower mean velocity of 4 m/s (E{sub trans}/k=80 mK) (k is Boltzmann's constant). The density of the cold atoms is measured to be 10{sup 9} atoms/cm{sup 3}. Scattering calculations and diffusion models support these velocity and density measurements. The results demonstrate that cold, dense samples of ground-state atoms and molecules can be prepared by elastic collisions between identical collision partners.

  9. Some Results on Inverse Scattering

    E-print Network

    A. G. Ramm

    2007-10-19

    A review of some of the author's results in the area of inverse scattering is given. The following topics are discussed: 1) Property $C$ and applications, 2) Stable inversion of fixed-energy 3D scattering data and its error estimate, 3) Inverse scattering with ''incomplete`` data, 4) Inverse scattering for inhomogeneous Schr\\"odinger equation, 5) Krein's inverse scattering method, 6) Invertibility of the steps in Gel'fand-Levitan, Marchenko, and Krein inversion methods, 7) The Newton-Sabatier and Cox-Thompson procedures are not inversion methods, 8) Resonances: existence, location, perturbation theory, 9) Born inversion as an ill-posed problem, 10) Inverse obstacle scattering with fixed-frequency data, 11) Inverse scattering with data at a fixed energy and a fixed incident direction, 12) Creating materials with a desired refraction coefficient and wave-focusing properties.

  10. Enhancement of near-surface elastic full waveform inversion results in regions of low sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuber, André; Manukyan, Edgar; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2015-11-01

    Elastic full waveform inversion of high-resolution seismic data is a potentially very powerful option for imaging the shallow subsurface. Unfortunately, the success of traditional full waveform inversion applied to such problems is limited by a very uneven sensitivity distribution, which can be attributed to the uneven amplitudes of body and surface waves. As a result, very shallow structures are well resolved by fitting the large amplitude surface waves, but the imaging quality decreases rapidly with depth. To account for uneven sensitivity distributions, we present a novel scaling approach that enhances weak sensitivities in regions of interest. To this end, the column sums of the Jacobian matrix - each of them corresponding to one model parameter - are equalized prior to updating the model. The performance of this methodology is demonstrated by inverting two synthetic, but realistic, data sets. Both the P- and S-wave velocity images were improved significantly by applying the new scaling technique. Our results are particularly relevant for shallow elastic full waveform inversion problems, but we also see benefits of our technique for other surface-based geophysical methods, such as geoelectrics or electromagnetics.

  11. Non-linear inverse scattering: High resolution quantitative breast tissue tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wiskin, J.; Borup, D. T.; Johnson, S. A.; Berggren, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent published results in inverse scattering generally show the difficulty in dealing with moderate to high contrast inhomogeneities when employing linearized or iteratively linearized algorithms (e.g., distorted Born iterative method). This paper presents a fully nonlinear algorithm utilizing full wave field data, that results in ultrasound computed tomographic images from a laboratory breast scanner, and shows several such unique images from volunteer subjects. The forward problem, data collection process and inverse scattering algorithm used are discussed. A functional that represents the “best fit” between predicted and measured data is minimized, and therefore requires a very fast forward problem solver, Jacobian calculation, and gradient estimation, all of which are described. The data collection device is described. The algorithm and device yield quantitative estimates of human breast tissue in vivo. Several high resolution images, measuring ?150 by 150 wavelengths, obtained from the 2D inverse scattering algorithms, using data collected from a first prototype, are shown and discussed. The quantitative values are compared with previous published work. PMID:22559356

  12. Electromagnetic inverse scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bojarski, N. N.

    1972-01-01

    A three-dimensional electromagnetic inverse scattering identity, based on the physical optics approximation, is developed for the monostatic scattered far field cross section of perfect conductors. Uniqueness of this inverse identity is proven. This identity requires complete scattering information for all frequencies and aspect angles. A nonsingular integral equation is developed for the arbitrary case of incomplete frequence and/or aspect angle scattering information. A general closed-form solution to this integral equation is developed, which yields the shape of the scatterer from such incomplete information. A specific practical radar solution is presented. The resolution of this solution is developed, yielding short-pulse target resolution radar system parameter equations. The special cases of two- and one-dimensional inverse scattering and the special case of a priori knowledge of scatterer symmetry are treated in some detail. The merits of this solution over the conventional radar imaging technique are discussed.

  13. Kinematic modeling of folding above listric propagating thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, Nestor; Brandenburg, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a kinematic approach to simulate folds above listric propagating thrusts. The model is based on a pre-defined circular thrust geometry with a maximum central angle beyond which the thrust is planar, inclined shear above the circular thrust, and trishear in front of the thrust. Provided the trajectory of thrust propagation is established, the model can be run forward and backwards. We use this last feature to implement a global simulated annealing, inverse modeling strategy. This inverse modeling strategy is applied to synthetic folds as well as two real examples in offshore Venezuela and the Niger Delta toe-thrust system. These three examples illustrate the benefits of the algorithm, particularly in predicting the possible range of models that can fit the structures. Thrust geometry, depth to detachment level, and backlimb geometry have high impact in model parameters such as backlimb shear angle and fault slip; while forelimb geometry is critical to constrain parameters such as fault propagation to fault slip ratio and trishear angle. Steep to overturned beds in forelimb areas are often not imaged by seismic, so in the absence of additional well data, considering all possible thrust-fold geometries is critical for the modeling and whatever prediction (e.g. hydrocarbon trap integrity) is made from it.

  14. Inverse consistent non-rigid image registration based on robust point set matching

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Robust point matching (RPM) has been extensively used in non-rigid registration of images to robustly register two sets of image points. However, except for the location at control points, RPM cannot estimate the consistent correspondence between two images because RPM is a unidirectional image matching approach. Therefore, it is an important issue to make an improvement in image registration based on RPM. Methods In our work, a consistent image registration approach based on the point sets matching is proposed to incorporate the property of inverse consistency and improve registration accuracy. Instead of only estimating the forward transformation between the source point sets and the target point sets in state-of-the-art RPM algorithms, the forward and backward transformations between two point sets are estimated concurrently in our algorithm. The inverse consistency constraints are introduced to the cost function of RPM and the fuzzy correspondences between two point sets are estimated based on both the forward and backward transformations simultaneously. A modified consistent landmark thin-plate spline registration is discussed in detail to find the forward and backward transformations during the optimization of RPM. The similarity of image content is also incorporated into point matching in order to improve image matching. Results Synthetic data sets, medical images are employed to demonstrate and validate the performance of our approach. The inverse consistent errors of our algorithm are smaller than RPM. Especially, the topology of transformations is preserved well for our algorithm for the large deformation between point sets. Moreover, the distance errors of our algorithm are similar to that of RPM, and they maintain a downward trend as whole, which demonstrates the convergence of our algorithm. The registration errors for image registrations are evaluated also. Again, our algorithm achieves the lower registration errors in same iteration number. The determinant of the Jacobian matrix of the deformation field is used to analyse the smoothness of the forward and backward transformations. The forward and backward transformations estimated by our algorithm are smooth for small deformation. For registration of lung slices and individual brain slices, large or small determinant of the Jacobian matrix of the deformation fields are observed. Conclusions Results indicate the improvement of the proposed algorithm in bi-directional image registration and the decrease of the inverse consistent errors of the forward and the reverse transformations between two images. PMID:25559889

  15. Edge-driven microplate kinematics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Klitgord, Kim D.; Gallo, David G.

    1993-01-01

    It is known from plate tectonic reconstructions that oceanic microplates undergo rapid rotation about a vertical axis and that the instantaneous rotation axes describing the microplate's motion relative to the bounding major plates are frequently located close to its margins with those plates, close to the tips of propagating rifts. We propose a class of edge-driven block models to illustrate how slip across the microplate margins, block rotation, and propagation of rifting may be related to the relative motion of the plates on either side. An important feature of these edge-driven models is that the instantaneous rotation axes are always located on the margins between block and two bounding plates. According to those models the pseudofaults or traces of disrupted seafloor resulting from the propagation of rifting between microplate and major plates may be used independently to approximately trace the continuous kinematic evolution of the microplate back in time. Pseudofault geometries and matching rotations of the Easter microplate show that for most of its 5 m.y. history, block rotation could be driven by the drag of the Nazca and Pacific plates on the microplate's edges rather than by a shear flow of mantle underneath.

  16. Jacobian hits circuits: Hitting-sets, lower bounds for depth-D occur-k formulas & depth-3 transcendence degree-k circuits

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Manindra; Saptharishi, Ramprasad; Saxena, Nitin

    2011-01-01

    We present a single, common tool to strictly subsume all known cases of polynomial time blackbox polynomial identity testing (PIT) that have been hitherto solved using diverse tools and techniques. In particular, we show that polynomial time hitting-set generators for identity testing of the two seemingly different and well studied models - depth-3 circuits with bounded top fanin, and constant-depth constant-read multilinear formulas - can be constructed using one common algebraic-geometry theme: Jacobian captures algebraic independence. By exploiting the Jacobian, we design the first efficient hitting-set generators for broad generalizations of the above-mentioned models, namely: (1) depth-3 (Sigma-Pi-Sigma) circuits with constant transcendence degree of the polynomials computed by the product gates (no bounded top fanin restriction), and (2) constant-depth constant-occur formulas (no multilinear restriction). Constant-occur of a variable, as we define it, is a much more general concept than constant-read. A...

  17. Pointwise Fourier Inversion: a Wave Equation Approach

    E-print Network

    Pointwise Fourier Inversion: a Wave Equation Approach Mark A. Pinsky1 Michael E. Taylor2. A general criterion for pointwise Fourier inversion 2. Pointwise Fourier inversion on Rn (n = 3) 3. Fourier inversion on R2 4. Fourier inversion on Rn (general n) 5. Fourier inversion on spheres 6. Fourier inversion

  18. THE EVT HEV MODEL A. Kinematics Model

    E-print Network

    Grizzle, Jessy W.

    a ring to sun ratio of 2 for both planetary gears in the transmission. There is a torque efficiency of 99 all of the masses and gears in the system. All shafts are assumed infinitely stiff. The kinematics

  19. Optimal kinematics and morphologies for spermatozoa

    E-print Network

    Tam, Daniel See-Wai

    We investigate the role of hydrodynamics in the evolution of the morphology and the selection of kinematics in simple uniflagellated microorganisms. We find that the most efficient swimming strategies are characterized by ...

  20. Regge kinematics in soft collinear effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Wyler, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the kinematics of the particles that make up a Reggeon in field theory, using the terminology of the soft collinear effective theory (SCET). Reggeization sums a series of strongly ordered collinear emissions resulting in an overall Reggeon exchange that falls in the Glauber or Coulomb kinematic region. This is an extremely multiscale problem and appears to fall outside of the usual organizing scheme of SCET.

  1. INVERSION BASED CONSTRAINED TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION

    E-print Network

    Murray, Richard M.

    INVERSION BASED CONSTRAINED TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION Nicolas Petit, Mark B. Milam, Richard M. Murray the Nonlinear Trajectory Generation (NTG) software package. Keywords: Real-time optimization, optimal control, inversion, nonlinear optimization 1. INTRODUCTION Computationally efficient trajectory optimization

  2. Chemical Tagging of Solar Neighborhood Kinematic Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, Christopher Bayard

    Elemental abundance measurements for lanthanum, europium, and iron are presented for 504 stars in the solar neighborhood. The bulk of the data are planet search spectra taken with HIRES on the Keck I telescope at R=50,000, but a subset of 45 kinematically selected stars were observed on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory at R=60,000 and S/N=100 at the 3988 angstrom lanthanum line and S/N=250 around 5240 angstrom near the iron lines. Statistical analyses of stellar kinematics in the solar neighborhood reveal much kinematic substructure in the disk, though it is not readily apparent whether this substructure is extragalactic or dynamical in origin. Much of the substructure can be quickly identified as well known moving groups of stars such as the Hercules, Sirius, and Hyades stellar streams. Additionally, the subset of kinematically selected stars observed at McDonald Observatory are members of a stellar stream putatively identified by Amina Helmi as part of a merger remnant. Taking advantage of a large data set and a homogeneous spectral analysis, a Kolmogorov-Smirnov hypothesis test is applied to investigate the possibility that these kinematic structures are chemically distinct from the Galactic Disk. In all cases, the kinematic streams have chemistries roughly consistent with the Galactic disk trends, although the statistical analyses suggest some subtle variations. The accretion hypothesis is not completely ruled out for Helmi's stream, but the chemical variations are interpreted primarily in terms of dynamical effects.

  3. Statistical Methods for Estimation of Direct and Differential Kinematics of the Vocal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Adam; Goldstein, Louis; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Iskarous, Khalil

    2012-01-01

    We present and evaluate two statistical methods for estimating kinematic relationships of the speech production system: Artificial Neural Networks and Locally-Weighted Regression. The work is motivated by the need to characterize this motor system, with particular focus on estimating differential aspects of kinematics. Kinematic analysis will facilitate progress in a variety of areas, including the nature of speech production goals, articulatory redundancy and, relatedly, acoustic-to-articulatory inversion. Statistical methods must be used to estimate these relationships from data since they are infeasible to express in closed form. Statistical models are optimized and evaluated – using a heldout data validation procedure – on two sets of synthetic speech data. The theoretical and practical advantages of both methods are also discussed. It is shown that both direct and differential kinematics can be estimated with high accuracy, even for complex, nonlinear relationships. Locally-Weighted Regression displays the best overall performance, which may be due to practical advantages in its training procedure. Moreover, accurate estimation can be achieved using only a modest amount of training data, as judged by convergence of performance. The algorithms are also applied to real-time MRI data, and the results are generally consistent with those obtained from synthetic data. PMID:24052685

  4. Inverse avalanches on Abelian sandpiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chau, H.F. Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801-3080 )

    1994-11-01

    A simple and computationally efficient way of finding inverse avalanches for Abelian sandpiles, called the inverse particle addition operator, is presented. In addition, the method is shown to be optimal in the sense that it requires the minimum amount of computation among methods of the same kind. The method is also conceptually succinct because avalanche and inverse avalanche are placed in the same footing.

  5. Inverse problems in diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikheev, Andrew G.; Shamaev, Aleksey S.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional problem of diffraction of a plane electromagnetic wave on a smooth 2 pi-periodic surface is considered. A numerical algorithm solving this problem is developed. An inverse problem of determination of the shape of 2 pi-periodic surface using the performance data of reverse scattering is considered. The inverse problem was solved by means of minimization of the residual functional with the help of the gradient descent method. The initial data were calculated with the help of the numerical method. On each step of the iterative method of minimization, the residual functional was calculated approximately with the help of the small slope method. The examples of the shape determination are considered.

  6. Silk inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Mitropoulos, Alexander N.; Spitzberg, Joshua D.; Tao, Hu; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-12-01

    Periodic nanostructures provide the facility to control and manipulate the flow of light through their lattices. Three-dimensional photonic crystals enable the controlled design of structural colour, which can be varied by infiltrating the structure with different (typically liquid) fillers. Here, we report three-dimensional photonic crystals composed entirely of a purified natural protein (silk fibroin). The biocompatibility of this protein, as well as its favourable material properties and ease of biological functionalization, present opportunities for otherwise unattainable device applications such as bioresorbable integration of structural colour within living tissue or lattice functionalization by means of organic and inorganic material doping. We present a silk inverse opal that demonstrates a pseudo-photonic bandgap in the visible spectrum and show its associated structural colour beneath biological tissue. We also leverage silk's facile dopability to manufacture a gold nanoparticle silk inverse opal and demonstrate patterned heating mediated by enhancement of nanoparticle absorption at the band-edge frequency of the photonic crystal.

  7. Kinematic Numerators and a Double-Copy Formula for N = 4 Super-Yang-Mills Residues

    E-print Network

    Sean Litsey; James Stankowicz

    2014-04-17

    Recent work by Cachazo, He, and Yuan shows that connected prescription residues obey the global identities of $\\mathcal{N} = 4$ super-Yang-Mills amplitudes. In particular, they obey the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson (BCJ) amplitude identities. Here we offer a new way of interpreting this result via objects that we call residue numerators. These objects behave like the kinematic numerators introduced by BCJ except that they are associated with individual residues. In particular, these new objects satisfy a double-copy formula relating them to the residues appearing in recently-discovered analogs of the connected prescription integrals for $\\mathcal{N} = 8$ supergravity. Along the way, we show that the BCJ amplitude identities are equivalent to the consistency condition that allows kinematic numerators to be expressed as amplitudes using a generalized inverse.

  8. Kinematics and control algorithm development and simulation for a redundant two-arm robotic manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessey, Michael P.; Huang, Paul C.; Bunnell, Charles T.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient approach to cartesian motion and force control of a 7 degree of freedom (DOF) manipulator is presented. It is based on extending the active stiffness controller to the 7 DOF case in general and use of an efficient version of the gradient projection technique for solving the inverse kinematics problem. Cooperative control is achieved through appropriate configuration of individual manipulator controllers. In addition, other aspects of trajectory generation using standard techniques are integrated into the controller. The method is then applied to a specific manipulator of interest (Robotics Research T-710). Simulation of the kinematics, dynamics, and control are provided in the context of several scenarios: one pertaining to a noncontact pick and place operation; one relating to contour following where contact is made between the manipulator and environment; and one pertaining to cooperative control.

  9. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  10. Interplanetary stream magnetism - Kinematic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1976-01-01

    The particle density and the magnetic-field intensity and direction are calculated for volume elements of the solar wind as a function of the initial magnetic-field direction and the initial speed gradient. It is assumed that the velocity is constant and radial. These assumptions are approximately valid between about 0.1 and 1.0 AU for many streams. Time profiles of the particle density, field intensity, and velocity are calculated for corotating streams, neglecting effects of pressure gradients. The compression and rarefaction of the magnetic field depend sensitively on the initial field direction. By averaging over a typical stream, it is found that the average radial field intensity is inversely proportional to the square of the heliocentric distance, whereas the average intensity in the direction of the planets' motion does not vary in a simple way, consistent with deep space observations. Changes of field direction may be very large, depending on the initial angle; but when the initial angle at 0.1 AU is such that the base of the field line corotates with the sun, the spiral angle is the preferred direction at 1 AU. The theory is also applicable to nonstationary flows.

  11. The kinematics of cosmic reheating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Marco; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-10-01

    We calculate the relaxation rate of a scalar field in a plasma of other scalars and fermions with gauge interactions using thermal quantum field theory. It yields the rate of cosmic reheating and thereby determines the temperature of the "hot big bang" in inflationary cosmology. The total rate originates from various processes, including decays and inverse decays as well as Landau damping by scatterings. It involves quantum statistical effects and off-shell transport. Its temperature dependence can be highly non-trivial, making it impossible to express the reheating temperature in terms of the model parameters in a simple way. We pay special attention to the temperature dependence of the phase space due to the modified dispersion relations in the plasma. We find that it can have a drastic effect on the efficiency of perturbative reheating, which depends on the way particles in the primordial plasma interact. For some interactions thermal masses can effectively close the phase space for the dominant dissipative processes and thereby impose an upper bound on the reheating temperature. In other cases they open up new channels of dissipation, hence increase the reheating temperature. At high temperatures we find that the universe can even be heated through couplings to fermions, which are often assumed to be negligible due to Pauli-blocking. These effects may also be relevant for baryogenesis, dark matter production, the fate of moduli and in scenarios of warm inflation.

  12. Kinematic and Spatial Substructure in NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, John J.; Hartmann, Lee; F?rész, Gabor; Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Mateo, Mario

    2015-04-01

    We present an expanded kinematic study of the young cluster NGC 2264 based upon optical radial velocities measured using multi-fiber echelle spectroscopy at the 6.5 m MMT and Magellan telescopes. We report radial velocities for 695 stars, of which approximately 407 stars are confirmed or very likely members. Our results more than double the number of members with radial velocities from F?rész et al., resulting in a much better defined kinematic relationship between the stellar population and the associated molecular gas. In particular, we find that there is a significant subset of stars that are systematically blueshifted with respect to the molecular (13CO) gas. The detection of Lithium absorption and/or infrared excesses in this blueshifted population suggests that at least some of these stars are cluster members; we suggest some speculative scenarios to explain their kinematics. Our results also more clearly define the redshifted population of stars in the northern end of the cluster; we suggest that the stellar and gas kinematics of this region are the result of a bubble driven by the wind from O7 star S Mon. Our results emphasize the complexity of the spatial and kinematic structure of NGC 2264, important for eventually building up a comprehensive picture of cluster formation. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Chemical Tagging of Solar Neighborhood Kinematic Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, Christopher; Carney, B. W.

    2011-01-01

    We present high resolution spectra measurements for Lanthanum, Europium, and Iron in 700 stars in the solar neighborhood. The bulk of our data are planet search spectra taken with HIRES on the Keck I telescope at R=50,000. A small subset of kinematically selected stars were observed on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory at R=60,000 and S/N 100 at the 3988 Å Lanthanum line and S/N 250 around 5240 Å near the Iron lines. Statistical analyses of stellar kinematics in the solar neighborhood reveal much kinematic substructure in the disk, though it is not readily apparent whether this substructure is extragalactic or dynamical in origin. Much of the substructure can be quickly identified as well known moving groups of stars such as the Hercules, Sirius, and Hyades stellar streams. Additionally, our subset of kinematically selected stars observed at McDonald Observatory are members of a stellar stream putatively identified by Amina Helmi as part of a merger remnant. Taking advantage of a large data set and a homogenous spectral analysis, we apply a Kolmogorov-Smirnov hypothesis test to investigate the possibility that these kinematic structures are chemically distinct from the Galactic Disk.

  14. Gait Kinematic Analysis in Water Using Wearable Inertial Magnetic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Borra, Davide; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Walking is one of the fundamental motor tasks executed during aquatic therapy. Previous kinematics analyses conducted using waterproofed video cameras were limited to the sagittal plane and to only one or two consecutive steps. Furthermore, the set-up and post-processing are time-consuming and thus do not allow a prompt assessment of the correct execution of the movements during the aquatic session therapy. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 3D joint kinematics of the lower limbs and thorax-pelvis joints in sagittal and frontal planes during underwater walking using wearable inertial and magnetic sensors. Eleven healthy adults were measured during walking both in shallow water and in dry-land conditions. Eight wearable inertial and magnetic sensors were inserted in waterproofed boxes and fixed to the body segments by means of elastic modular bands. A validated protocol (Outwalk) was used. Gait cycles were automatically segmented and selected if relevant intraclass correlation coefficients values were higher than 0.75. A total of 704 gait cycles for the lower limb joints were normalized in time and averaged to obtain the mean cycle of each joint, among participants. The mean speed in water was 40% lower than that of the dry-land condition. Longer stride duration and shorter stride distance were found in the underwater walking. In the sagittal plane, the knee was more flexed (? 23°) and the ankle more dorsiflexed (? 9°) at heel strike, and the hip was more flexed at toe-off (? 13°) in water than on land. On the frontal plane in the underwater walking, smoother joint angle patterns were observed for thorax-pelvis and hip, and ankle was more inversed at toe-off (? 7°) and showed a more inversed mean value (? 7°). The results were mainly explained by the effect of the speed in the water as supported by the linear mixed models analysis performed. Thus, it seemed that the combination of speed and environment triggered modifications in the joint angles in underwater gait more than these two factors considered separately. The inertial and magnetic sensors, by means of fast set-up and data analysis, can supply an immediate gait analysis report to the therapist during the aquatic therapy session. PMID:26368131

  15. Gait Kinematic Analysis in Water Using Wearable Inertial Magnetic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Borra, Davide; Gatta, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Walking is one of the fundamental motor tasks executed during aquatic therapy. Previous kinematics analyses conducted using waterproofed video cameras were limited to the sagittal plane and to only one or two consecutive steps. Furthermore, the set-up and post-processing are time-consuming and thus do not allow a prompt assessment of the correct execution of the movements during the aquatic session therapy. The aim of the present study was to estimate the 3D joint kinematics of the lower limbs and thorax-pelvis joints in sagittal and frontal planes during underwater walking using wearable inertial and magnetic sensors. Eleven healthy adults were measured during walking both in shallow water and in dry-land conditions. Eight wearable inertial and magnetic sensors were inserted in waterproofed boxes and fixed to the body segments by means of elastic modular bands. A validated protocol (Outwalk) was used. Gait cycles were automatically segmented and selected if relevant intraclass correlation coefficients values were higher than 0.75. A total of 704 gait cycles for the lower limb joints were normalized in time and averaged to obtain the mean cycle of each joint, among participants. The mean speed in water was 40% lower than that of the dry-land condition. Longer stride duration and shorter stride distance were found in the underwater walking. In the sagittal plane, the knee was more flexed (? 23°) and the ankle more dorsiflexed (? 9°) at heel strike, and the hip was more flexed at toe-off (? 13°) in water than on land. On the frontal plane in the underwater walking, smoother joint angle patterns were observed for thorax-pelvis and hip, and ankle was more inversed at toe-off (? 7°) and showed a more inversed mean value (? 7°). The results were mainly explained by the effect of the speed in the water as supported by the linear mixed models analysis performed. Thus, it seemed that the combination of speed and environment triggered modifications in the joint angles in underwater gait more than these two factors considered separately. The inertial and magnetic sensors, by means of fast set-up and data analysis, can supply an immediate gait analysis report to the therapist during the aquatic therapy session. PMID:26368131

  16. Kinetic and kinematic differences between deadlifts and goodmornings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to improve training performance, as well as avoid overloading during prevention and rehabilitation exercises in patients, the aim of this study was to understand the biomechanical differences in the knee, hip and the back between the exercises “Goodmornings” (GMs) and “Deadlifts” (DLs). Methods The kinetics and kinematics of 13 subjects, performing GMs and DLs with an additional 25% (GMs), 25% and 50% (DLs) body weight (BW) on the barbell were analysed. Using the kinetic and kinematic data captured using a 3D motion analysis and force plates, an inverse approach with a quasi-static solution was used to calculate the sagittal moments and angles in the knee, hip and the trunk. The maximum moments and joint angles were statistically tested using ANOVA with a Bonferroni adjustment. Results The observed maximal flexion angle of the knee was 5.3?±?6.7° for GMs and 107.8?±?22.4° and 103.4?±?22.6° for DLs with 25% and 50% BW respectively. Of the hip, the maximal flexion angle was 25% smaller during GMs compared to DLs. No difference in kinematics of the trunk between the two exercises was observed. For DLs, the resulting sagittal moment in the knee was an external flexion moment, whereas during GMs an external extension moment was present. Importantly, no larger sagittal knee joint moments were observed when using a heavier weight on the barbell during DLs, but higher sagittal moments were found at the hip and L4/L5. Compared to GMs, DLs produced a lower sagittal moment at the hip using 25% BW while generating the same sagittal moment at L4/L5. Conclusions The two exercises exhibited different motion patterns for the lower extremities but not for the trunk. To strengthen the hip while including a large range of motion, DLs using 50% BW should be chosen. Due to their ability to avoid knee flexion or a knee flexion moment, GMs should be preferentially chosen over DLs as ACL rupture prevention exercises. Here, in order to shift the hamstring to quadriceps ratio towards the hamstrings, GMs should be favoured ahead of DLs using 50% BW before DLs using 25% BW. PMID:24314057

  17. Graph Theory Roots of Spatial Operators for Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2011-01-01

    Spatial operators have been used to analyze the dynamics of robotic multibody systems and to develop novel computational dynamics algorithms. Mass matrix factorization, inversion, diagonalization, and linearization are among several new insights obtained using such operators. While initially developed for serial rigid body manipulators, the spatial operators and the related mathematical analysis have been shown to extend very broadly including to tree and closed topology systems, to systems with flexible joints, links, etc. This work uses concepts from graph theory to explore the mathematical foundations of spatial operators. The goal is to study and characterize the properties of the spatial operators at an abstract level so that they can be applied to a broader range of dynamics problems. The rich mathematical properties of the kinematics and dynamics of robotic multibody systems has been an area of strong research interest for several decades. These properties are important to understand the inherent physical behavior of systems, for stability and control analysis, for the development of computational algorithms, and for model development of faithful models. Recurring patterns in spatial operators leads one to ask the more abstract question about the properties and characteristics of spatial operators that make them so broadly applicable. The idea is to step back from the specific application systems, and understand more deeply the generic requirements and properties of spatial operators, so that the insights and techniques are readily available across different kinematics and dynamics problems. In this work, techniques from graph theory were used to explore the abstract basis for the spatial operators. The close relationship between the mathematical properties of adjacency matrices for graphs and those of spatial operators and their kernels were established. The connections hold across very basic requirements on the system topology, the nature of the component bodies, the indexing schemes, etc. The relationship of the underlying structure is intimately connected with efficient, recursive computational algorithms. The results provide the foundational groundwork for a much broader look at the key problems in kinematics and dynamics. The properties of general graphs and trees of nodes and edge were examined, as well as the properties of adjacency matrices that are used to describe graph connectivity. The nilpotency property of such matrices for directed trees was reviewed, and the adjacency matrices were generalized to the notion of block weighted adjacency matrices that support block matrix elements. This leads us to the development of the notion of Spatial Kernel Operator SKO kernels. These kernels provide the basis for the development of SKO resolvent operators.

  18. The application of Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov methods to reduce the spin-up time of ocean general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Bernsen, Erik; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Thies, Jonas; Wubs, Fred W.

    2010-10-20

    In present-day forward time stepping ocean-climate models, capturing both the wind-driven and thermohaline components, a substantial amount of CPU time is needed in a so-called spin-up simulation to determine an equilibrium solution. In this paper, we present methodology based on Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov methods to reduce the computational time for such a spin-up problem. We apply the method to an idealized configuration of a state-of-the-art ocean model, the Modular Ocean Model version 4 (MOM4). It is shown that a typical speed-up of a factor 10-25 with respect to the original MOM4 code can be achieved and that this speed-up increases with increasing horizontal resolution.

  19. Kinematics of the Most Efficient Cilium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe; Lauga, Eric

    2012-07-01

    In a variety of biological processes, eukaryotic cells use cilia to transport flow. Although cilia have a remarkably conserved internal molecular structure, experimental observations report very diverse kinematics. To address this diversity, we determine numerically the kinematics and energetics of the most efficient cilium. Specifically, we compute the time-periodic deformation of a wall-bound elastic filament leading to transport of a surrounding fluid at minimum energetic cost, where the cost is taken to be the positive work done by all internal molecular motors. The optimal kinematics are found to strongly depend on the cilium bending rigidity through a single dimensionless number, the Sperm number, and closely resemble the two-stroke ciliary beating pattern observed experimentally.

  20. Optimal pumping kinematics of a cilium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloy, Christophe; Lauga, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In a variety of biological processes, eukaryotic cells use cilia to transport flow. Although the internal molecular structure of cilia has been remarkably conserved throughout evolution, experimental observations report qualitatively diverse kinematics in different species. To address this diversity, we have determined numerically the kinematics of the most efficient cilium. Specifically, we have computed the time-periodic deformation of a wall-bound elastic filament leading to transport of a surrounding fluid at minimum energetic cost. Here, the energetic cost is taken to be the sum of positive works done by the internal torques, such that elastic energy is not conservative. The optimal kinematics are found to strongly depend on the cilium bending rigidity through a single dimensionless number, the Sperm number Sp, and closely resemble the two-stroke ciliary beating pattern observed experimentally. We acknowledge supports from the EU (fellowship PIOF-GA-2009-252542 to C.E.) and the NSF (grant CBET-0746285 to E.L.).

  1. Kinematic Detection of the Galactic Nuclear Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönrich, Ralph; Aumer, Michael; Sale, Stuart E.

    2015-10-01

    We report the detection of the Galactic nuclear disk in line-of-sight kinematics of stars, measured with infrared spectroscopy from the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment. This stellar component of the nuclear disk has an extent and rotation velocity V ? 120 {km} {{{s}}}-1 comparable to the gas disk in the central molecular zone. The current data suggest that this disk is kinematically cool and has a small vertical extent of the order of 50 pc. The stellar kinematics suggest a truncation radius/steep decline of the stellar disk at a galactocentric radius R ? 150 pc and provide tentative evidence for an overdensity at the position of the ring found in the molecular gas disk.

  2. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Steven A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  3. Discrepancies in kinematic calculations of HOLZ lines.

    PubMed

    Eades, J A; Moore, S; Pfullmann, T; Hangas, J

    1993-04-15

    We have found significant differences between the results of computer simulations of HOLZ line patterns. The computations in question are made in the kinematical approximation. After trivial errors are eliminated the programs fall into two groups. There is a discrepancy between the two that increases with distance from the zone axis. The difference is small but not negligible at the level of precision used in determining lattice parameters or strain. We show which of the two is correct in the kinematic approximation and that the discrepancy between the two groups is of the order of the error introduced by dynamical interaction. PMID:8490236

  4. A biomimetic approach to inverse kinematics for a redundant robot arm

    E-print Network

    Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    Redundant robots have received increased attention during the last decades, since they provide solutions to problems investigated for years in the robotic community, e.g. task-space tracking, obstacle avoidance etc. However, ...

  5. Inverse-kinematics one-neutron pickup with fast rare-isotope beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Baugher, T.; Brown, B. A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Stroberg, S. R.; Tostevin, J. A.; Bazin, D.; Campbell, C. M.; Grinyer, G. F.; Weisshaar, D.; Winkler, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; Walsh, K. A.

    2011-05-15

    Measurements and reaction model calculations are reported for single-neutron pickup reactions onto a fast {sup 22}Mg secondary beam at 84 MeV per nucleon. Measurements made on both carbon and beryllium targets, having very different structures, were used to investigate the likely nature of the pickup reaction mechanism. The measurements involve thick reaction targets and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the projectile-like reaction residue for final-state resolution, which permit experiments with low incident beam rates compared to traditional low-energy transfer reactions. From measured longitudinal momentum distributions we show that the {sup 12}C({sup 22}Mg,{sup 23}Mg+{gamma})X reaction largely proceeds as a direct two-body reaction, with the neutron transfer producing bound {sup 11}C target residues. The corresponding reaction on the {sup 9}Be target seems to largely leave the {sup 8}Be residual nucleus unbound at excitation energies high in the continuum. We discuss the possible use of such fast-beam one-neutron pickup reactions to track single-particle strength in exotic nuclei and also their expected sensitivity to neutron high-l (intruder) states, which are often direct indicators of shell evolution and the disappearance of magic numbers in the exotic regime.

  6. Submitted to: IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2000) Inverse Kinematics for Humanoid Robots

    E-print Network

    Schaal, Stefan

    of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2520, USA Kawato Dynamic Brain Project (ERATO/JST), 2-2 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, 619-02 Kyoto, Japan Abstract: Real-time control of the endeffector as external kine- matic trajectories--as opposed to complete task-level con- trol laws-- on systems with many

  7. A motion planner for a redundant mobile manipulator using the inverse kinematics 

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Gautam Jagannath

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is an effort to develop a powerful motion-planning algorithm for the mobile manipulator. The mobile manipulator is expected to work in partially defined or unstructured environments. In global/local approach, joint trajectories...

  8. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  9. Inverse problem for Bremsstrahlung radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, K.E.; Fisch, N.J.

    1991-10-01

    For certain predominantly one-dimensional distribution functions, an analytic inversion has been found which yields the velocity distribution of superthermal electrons given their Bremsstrahlung radiation. 5 refs.

  10. A new interpretation of kinematic stormflow generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. G.; Dowd, J. F.; Meyles, E. W.

    2002-10-01

    The paper reviews a number of possible fast and slow hydrological flow mechanisms to account for rapid runoff generation within a catchment. A new interpretation of the kinematic wave process is proposed which develops some of these concepts to explain rapid subsurface flow from a watershed. Evidence for the process is provided by the results from a laboratory soil core experiment and an investigation of the hydrology of a Dartmoor hillslope. A tension response was monitored in the soil core in which pressure waves were propagated downwards and expelled water from the base. The transmission of the wave down the core was considerably faster than the movement of a chloride tracer. The concept of this kinematic wave process and associated water flux was then extended to the Dartmoor watershed. Raindrops reaching the wet soil surface caused pressure waves to travel laterally downslope. During large rainstorms, the hillslope became hydrologically highly connected and the pressure waves forced existing water from seepage faces into the saturated area adjacent to the stream, contributing substantially to the stream discharge. A kinematic contributing area was defined, as determined by both rainfall-runoff ratios and geostatistical analyses of hillslope soil moisture contents, which extended over at least 65% of the catchment area. This kinematic wave theory is consistent with results of translatory flow and macropore flow models, and stable isotope field studies of old/new water.

  11. Kinematic Measurements from YouTube Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Video analysis of motion has been in use now for some time. However, some teachers may not have video equipment or may be looking for innovative ways to engage students with interesting applications at no cost. The recent advent of YouTube offers opportunities for students to measure kinematic properties of real-life events using their computers.…

  12. Constrained tri-sphere kinematic positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Viola, Robert J (Jackson, WY)

    2010-12-14

    A scalable and adaptable, six-degree-of-freedom, kinematic positioning system is described. The system can position objects supported on top of, or suspended from, jacks comprising constrained joints. The system is compatible with extreme low temperature or high vacuum environments. When constant adjustment is not required a removable motor unit is available.

  13. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention. PMID:25495196

  14. COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF PROTEIN KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS

    E-print Network

    Kavraki, Lydia E.

    1 COMPUTATIONAL MODELS OF PROTEIN KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS: BEYOND SIMULATION Bryant Gipson(1) David Hsu(2) Lydia E. Kavraki(3) Jean-Claude Latombe(4) (1) Computer Science Department, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA. Email: bryant.gipson@rice.edu (2) Computer Science Department, National University

  15. PLATE KINEMATICS (Copyright 2010, David T. Sandwell)

    E-print Network

    Sandwell, David T.

    , Cambridge University Press, 1990, Chapter 2) Plate Motions on a Flat Earth Plate tectonic theory describes-fault-fault (R-F-F), and ridge- trench-trench (R-T-T). Each type of plate boundary has rules about relative1 PLATE KINEMATICS (Copyright 2010, David T. Sandwell) (Reference - The Solid Earth, C.M.R. Fowler

  16. Computer Software & Programing Utilization in Kinematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahraee, Mohammad A.; And Others

    This paper discusses two software packages used in kinematics courses at Purdue University, Calumet (Indiana) and some algorithms written by students for cam design. The first software package, 4BAR, requires the user to define the particular four bar linkage in terms of lengths of the individual links and the angle and distance to the coupler…

  17. Kinematics of foldable discrete space cranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Exact kinematic description of a NASA proposed prototype foldable-deployable discrete space crane are presented. A computer program is developed which maps the geometry of the crane once controlling parameters are specified. The program uses a building block type approach in which it calculates the local coordinates of each repeating cell and then combines them with respect to a global coordinates system.

  18. ANALYTIC MODELING OF THE MORETON WAVE KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2009-09-10

    The issue whether Moreton waves are flare-ignited or coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven, or a combination of both, is still a matter of debate. We develop an analytical model describing the evolution of a large-amplitude coronal wave emitted by the expansion of a circular source surface in order to mimic the evolution of a Moreton wave. The model results are confronted with observations of a strong Moreton wave observed in association with the X3.8/3B flare/CME event from 2005 January 17. Using different input parameters for the expansion of the source region, either derived from the real CME observations (assuming that the upward moving CME drives the wave), or synthetically generated scenarios (expanding flare region, lateral expansion of the CME flanks), we calculate the kinematics of the associated Moreton wave signature. Those model input parameters are determined which fit the observed Moreton wave kinematics best. Using the measured kinematics of the upward moving CME as the model input, we are not able to reproduce the observed Moreton wave kinematics. The observations of the Moreton wave can be reproduced only by applying a strong and impulsive acceleration for the source region expansion acting in a piston mechanism scenario. Based on these results we propose that the expansion of the flaring region or the lateral expansion of the CME flanks is more likely the driver of the Moreton wave than the upward moving CME front.

  19. Kinematic GPS positioning in a highway environment 

    E-print Network

    Li, Yingfeng

    1994-01-01

    triple difference model for the GPS phase observable has been used to perform static positioning and kinematic positioning. Trimble data taken by Dr. Benjamin W. Remondi was provided for our use to simulate our model. It has been shown that the triple...

  20. Internal kinematics of H II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. S.; Plana, H.

    2014-10-01

    H II galaxies are dwarf galaxies characterized by high stellar formation rate with spectrum dominated by strong emission lines, superimposed on a weak stellar continuum. The study of internal kinematics of these objects may be realized using the observed emission lines. Based on these lines we obtained monochromatic intensity, velocity dispersion and radial velocity maps. We have studied the internal kinematics of two H II galaxies: UM 461 and CTS 1020, observed with the Gemini South telescope using the GMOS instrument equipped with an IFU. We aim to investigate the origin of the line-broadening observed on emission lines from the use of kinematics diagnostic diagrams: I vs ?, I vs V, eV vs ?. The analysis of these diagrams was based on the Cometary Stirring Model that allows us to identify, for example, the presence of expanding shells and stellar winds. We found that radial velocity and velocity dispersion maps, for each galaxy, show a different kinematical pattern, although both are H II galaxies. CTS 1020 shows a velocity gradient consistent with a rotating disc with a velocity amplitude of ˜ 40 km s^{-1}. On the other hand UM 461 does not exhibit a typical pattern of a rotating system, despite of the observed velocity gradient in both emission nuclei.

  1. Kinematical analysis of Bipolar Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrincic, Martina; Villaver, Eva; Guerrero, Martín A.; Manchado, Arturo

    Bipolar planetary nebulae (BPNe) offer a unique opportunity to test models that aim to reproduce the PNe morphologies. In particular, kinematic studies of BPNe allow a reconstruction of the 3D structure of the nebula, otherwise hidden in imaging studies. With this aim in mind we have obtained long-slit echelle spectra of a sample of PNe which cover the full range of observed bipolar morphologies, from elliptical to highly collimated. The analysis of our kinematical data reveals equatorial expansion velocities in the low to medium range (3 to 16 km s-1), while the polar expansion velocities range from 18 to 100 km s-1. We find that the kinematics of the PN K 3-46 can only be explained by a decrease in the expansion velocity with time. The kinematical ages, calculated by using distances estimated from Galactic rotation curves, when available, or by using statistical values, show that the BPNe in our sample - even those which show non-extreme collimation - appear to be young. We have compared our results with the latest theoretical models of BPN formation, and find good agreement between the observed expansion velocities and the numerical models that use magnetic fields coupled with stellar rotation as the collimation mechanism.

  2. MEASUREMENT OF SWIMMING KINEMATICS IN SMALL

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    CHAPTER 9 MEASUREMENT OF SWIMMING KINEMATICS IN SMALL TERRESTRIALMAMMALS Frank E. Fish INTRODUCTION irtually all mammals can swim,'*2but the sophistication and devel- vopment of this important locomotor activity varies. While swim- ming by small mammals has been investigated for its own intrinsic merit

  3. Compton Effect with Non-Relativistic Kinematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2011-01-01

    In deducing the change of wavelength of x-rays scattered by atomic electrons, one normally makes use of relativistic kinematics for electrons. However, recoiling energies of the electrons are of the order of a few keV which is less than 0.2% of their rest energies. Hence the authors may ask whether relativistic formulae are really necessary. In…

  4. Kinematic conditioning augmentation to haptic interface for teleoperation 

    E-print Network

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet Manohar

    2003-01-01

    A solution is proposed for the kinematic conditioning problem in teleoperation. The proposed solution helps the operator in understanding the kinematic conditioning of the slave manipulator with the help of haptic interface. Teleoperation involves...

  5. Application of a stochastic inverse to the geophysical inverse problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.; Minster, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The inverse problem for gross earth data can be reduced to an undertermined linear system of integral equations of the first kind. A theory is discussed for computing particular solutions to this linear system based on the stochastic inverse theory presented by Franklin. The stochastic inverse is derived and related to the generalized inverse of Penrose and Moore. A Backus-Gilbert type tradeoff curve is constructed for the problem of estimating the solution to the linear system in the presence of noise. It is shown that the stochastic inverse represents an optimal point on this tradeoff curve. A useful form of the solution autocorrelation operator as a member of a one-parameter family of smoothing operators is derived.

  6. Digital seismic inverse methods

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This mathematically based text presents the basic geophysical models used today. It is designed as a text or reference information for courses in geophysics, and also as a professional reference. It presents following contents; the seismic method as a communication system, the design of high-resolution digital filters; principles of digital wiener filtering; sampling geophysical data, filter theory and wave propagation; random processes; spectral estimation; predictive decomposition of seismic traces; multichannel z-transforms and minimum delay; the spectral function of a layered system and the determination of waveforms at depth; deconvolution; spectral approach to geophysical inversion by Lorentz, Fourier, and radon transforms; dynamic predictive deconvolution; the normal incidence synthetic seismogram; maximum entropy and the relationship of the partial autocorrelation to the reflection coefficients of a layered system; maximum entropy spectral decomposition of a seismogram into its minimum entropy component plus noise; optimum stacking techniques; optimum digital filters for signal-to-noise ratio enhancement; bibliography, and index.

  7. Inverse magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, L; López-López, M T; Zubarev, A Y; Gdula, K; Durán, J D G

    2014-09-01

    We report a new kind of field-responsive fluid consisting of suspensions of diamagnetic (DM) and ferromagnetic (FM) microparticles in ferrofluids. We designate them as inverse magnetorheological (IMR) fluids for analogy with inverse ferrofluids (IFFs). Observations on the particle self-assembly in IMR fluids upon magnetic field application showed that DM and FM microparticles were assembled into alternating chains oriented along the field direction. We explain such assembly on the basis of the dipolar interaction energy between particles. We also present results on the rheological properties of IMR fluids and, for comparison, those of IFFs and bidispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. Interestingly, we found that upon magnetic field application, the rheological properties of IMR fluids were enhanced with respect to bidispersed MR fluids with the same FM particle concentration, by an amount greater than the sum of the isolated contribution of DM particles. Furthermore, the field-induced yield stress was moderately increased when up to 30% of the total FM particle content was replaced with DM particles. Beyond this point, the dependence of the yield stress on the DM content was non-monotonic, as expected for FM concentrations decreasing to zero. We explain these synergistic results by two separate phenomena: the formation of exclusion areas for FM particles due to the perturbation of the magnetic field by DM particles and the dipole-dipole interaction between DM and FM particles, which enhances the field-induced structures. Based on the second phenomenon, we present a theoretical model for the yield stress that semi-quantitatively predicts the experimental results. PMID:25022363

  8. The Maiden Voyage of a Kinematics Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwolfe, Matthew L.

    2015-04-01

    In a Montessori preschool classroom, students work independently on tasks that absorb their attention in part because the apparatus are carefully designed to make mistakes directly observable and limit exploration to one aspect or dimension. Control of error inheres in the apparatus itself, so that teacher intervention can be minimal.1 Inspired by this example, I created a robotic kinematics apparatus that also shapes the inquiry experience. Students program the robot by drawing kinematic graphs on a computer and then observe its motion. Exploration is at once limited to constant velocity and constant acceleration motion, yet open to complex multi-segment examples difficult to achieve in the lab in other ways. The robot precisely and reliably produces the motion described by the students' graphs, so that the apparatus itself provides immediate visual feedback about whether their understanding is correct as they are free to explore within the hard-coded limits. In particular, the kinematic robot enables hands-on study of multi-segment constant velocity situations, which lays a far stronger foundation for the study of accelerated motion. When correction is anonymous—just between one group of lab partners and their robot—students using the kinematic robot tend to flow right back to work because they view the correction as an integral part of the inquiry learning process. By contrast, when correction occurs by the teacher and/or in public (e.g., returning a graded assignment or pointing out student misconceptions during class), students all too often treat the event as the endpoint to inquiry. Furthermore, quantitative evidence shows a large gain from pre-test to post-test scores using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K).

  9. Distributed Dynamics of Systems with Closed Kinematic Chains

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    Distributed Dynamics of Systems with Closed Kinematic Chains Waseem Ahmad Khan wakhan@cim.mcgill.ca Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University Distributed Dynamics of Systems with Closed Kinematic Chains ­ p.1/45 #12;Outline Issues in Dynamics - Systems with closed kinematic chains Motivation

  10. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  11. Kinematics and Dynamic Stability of the Locomotion of Polio Patients

    E-print Network

    Basdogan, Cagatay

    Kinematics and Dynamic Stability of the Locomotion of Polio Patients Yildirim Hurmuzlu , Cagatay kinematics and dynamics of polio survivors. Phase plane portraits and first return maps were used as graphical tools to detect abnormal patterns in the sagittal kinematics of polio gait. Two new scalar

  12. Formulating Assur Kinematic Chains as Projective Extensions of Baranov Trusses

    E-print Network

    Formulating Assur Kinematic Chains as Projective Extensions of Baranov Trusses Nicol´as Rojas analysis of the Assur kinematic chains resulting from replacing some of its revolute joints by slider of variable eliminations to obtain the characteristic polynomial of each Assur kinematic chain. Keywords

  13. Polarization of inverse plasmon scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windsor, R. A.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    The scattering of electrostatic plasma waves by a flux of ultrarelativistic electrons passing through a plasma gives rise to a radiation spectrum which is similar to a synchrotron radiation spectrum. This mechanism, first considered by Gailitis and Tsytovich, is analagous to inverse Compton scattering, and we have named it inverse plasmon scattering. For a power-law electron flux, both inverse plasmon scattering and synchrotron radiation have the same spectral index. In an attempt to distinguish between these mechanisms, we have calculated the polarization level expected from inverse plasmon scattering. The polarization level found is similar to that obtained from a synchrotron radiation source. This means that the radiation produced by two mechanisms, synchrotron radiation and inverse plasmon scattering, is indistinguishable; and this attempt to differentiate between them by polarization effects has been unsuccessful.

  14. Two unconventional approaches to electromagnetic inversion Hierarchical Bayesian Inversion and Inverse Scattering Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Myoung Jae

    Electromagnetic methods are effective complementary tools, when combined with seismic exploration, for the delineation of a hydrocarbon reservoir, because electromagnetic methods provide extra information about, for example, electric conductivity, which is an important property for the economic evaluation of reservoirs. In this study, we analyze unconventional approaches of electromagnetic inversion: hierarchical Bayesian inversion and inverse scattering series. We apply the hierarchical Bayesian inversion to the uncertainty analysis for the joint inversion and utilize rock-physics models to integrate these two disparate data sets. The study shows that the uncertainties in the seismic wave velocity and electric conductivity play a more significant role in the variation of posterior uncertainty than do the seismic and CSEM data noise. The numerical simulations also show that the uncertainty in porosity is most affected by the uncertainty in seismic wave velocity and that the uncertainty in water saturation is most influenced by the uncertainty in electric conductivity. The framework of the uncertainty analysis presented in this study can be utilized to effectively reduce the uncertainty of the porosity and water saturation derived from integration of seismic and CSEM data. We also study the feasibility of the inverse scattering series, which can effectively resolve the nonlinearity of an inverse problem, for the interpretation of electromagnetic data. The application of the inverse scattering series has been limited because the series converges when the reference model sufficiently close to the true model. This study quantifies convergence conditions of the inverse scattering series and suggests a different approach of the inverse series, the modified inverse scattering series, which guarantees the convergence of the series and facilitates the choice of a reference model.

  15. Software development for a 3D gravity inversion and application to study of the Border Ranges Fault System, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Rolando

    The Border Ranges Fault System (BRFS) bounds the Cook Inlet and Susitna Basins, and is an important petroleum province within south-central Alaska. A primary goal of our research is to test several plausible models of structure along the BRFS using a novel three-dimensional inversion technique utilizing gravity data, constrained with other geophysical, borehole and surface geological information. This research involves the development of 3D inversion modeling software using C++ Builder from Embarcadero's XE2 Suite. The novel inversion approach directly models known geology with a priori uncertainties assigned to the geologic model to allow researchers to compare alternative interpretations. This technique was developed to evaluate three-dimensional structure in regions of complex and poorly known geology. Our software computes the density solution of a geologic structure by utilizing its location within the gravity field as well as the gridded surface files of known topography and subsurface units. The total gravitational effect of each body is calculated with a series of semi-infinite vertical line elements which improves the computational efficiency of computing forward models of structures with extremely complex geometry. The inversion algorithm considers a priori geophysical constraints and uncertainties due to gravity measurements, surface file inconsistencies, and forward calculations in the model solution. In addition, a Kalman-based filtering estimator is used to minimize our observation and processing noise. The estimator allows the a posteriori covariance matrix to avoid its dependence on the non-singularity of the Jacobian (model) matrix.

  16. 3D Potential Field Inversion for Wireframe Surface Geometry

    E-print Network

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    -based inversion Surface-based inversion (2D) Surface-based inversion (3D) Conclusion Geophysical inversion primer-based inversion (2D) Surface-based inversion (3D) Conclusion Motivation (a) (b) · Geophysical numerical methods-based inversion Surface-based inversion (2D) Surface-based inversion (3D) Conclusion Types of geophysical

  17. The kinematic advantage of electric cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Acceleration of a common car with with a turbocharged diesel engine is compared to the same type with an electric motor in terms of kinematics. Starting from a state of rest, the electric car reaches a distant spot earlier than the diesel car, even though the latter has a better specification for engine power and average acceleration from 0 to 100 km h-1. A three phase model of acceleration as a function of time fits the data of the electric car accurately. The first phase is a quadratic growth of acceleration in time. It is shown that the tenfold higher coefficient for the first phase accounts for most of the kinematic advantage of the electric car.

  18. A classification of finite quantum kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolar, J.

    2014-10-01

    Quantum mechanics in Hilbert spaces of finite dimension N is reviewed from the number theoretic point of view. For composite numbers N possible quantum kinematics are classified on the basis of Mackey's Imprimitivity Theorem for finite Abelian groups. This yields also a classification of finite Weyl-Heisenberg groups and the corresponding finite quantum kinematics. Simple number theory gets involved through the fundamental theorem describing all finite discrete Abelian groups of order N as direct products of cyclic groups, whose orders are powers of not necessarily distinct primes contained in the prime decomposition of N. The representation theoretic approach is further compared with the algebraic approach, where the basic object is the corresponding operator algebra. The consideration of fine gradings of this associative algebra then brings a fresh look on the relation between the mathematical formalism and physical realizations of finite quantum systems.

  19. Missing Mass Measurement Using Kinematic Cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ian-Woo

    2010-02-10

    We propose a new method for mass measurement of missing energy particle using cusp structure in the kinematic distribution. We consider a resonance particle decay into a pair of missing energy particles and a pair of visible particles and show invariant mass and angular distribution have non-smooth profiles. The cusp location only depends on mass parameters. Invariant mass and angular distribution are complementary in visibility of the cusp.

  20. Kinematics of Galaxies Spectral Features of Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Crenshaw, Michael

    (ergss-1cm-2Å-1) (Å) 1 2 1 3 1 #12;7 · For Galactic kinematics, vr and are used · A Gaussian profile-maximum for a Gaussian is: P(vr ) = 1 2! e - 1 2 (vr )2 where vr = centroid = peak, = velocity dispersion FWHM = 2) · Measure vr and at each position. · Subtract systemic velocity (due to Hubble flow, etc.) from vr · Net vr

  1. A kinematical approach to conformal cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varieschi, Gabriele Umberto

    2010-04-01

    We present an alternative cosmology based on conformal gravity, as originally introduced by H. Weyl and recently revisited by P. Mannheim and D. Kazanas. Unlike past similar attempts our approach is a purely kinematical application of the conformal symmetry to the Universe, through a critical reanalysis of fundamental astrophysical observations, such as the cosmological redshift and others. As a result of this novel approach we obtain a closed-form expression for the cosmic scale factor R( t) and a revised interpretation of the space-time coordinates usually employed in cosmology. New fundamental cosmological parameters are introduced and evaluated. This emerging new cosmology does not seem to possess any of the controversial features of the current standard model, such as the presence of dark matter, dark energy or of a cosmological constant, the existence of the horizon problem or of an inflationary phase. Comparing our results with current conformal cosmologies in the literature, we note that our kinematic cosmology is equivalent to conformal gravity with a cosmological constant at late (or early) cosmological times. The cosmic scale factor and the evolution of the Universe are described in terms of several dimensionless quantitites, among which a new cosmological variable ? emerges as a natural cosmic time. The mathematical connections between all these quantities are described in details and a relationship is established with the original kinematic cosmology by L. Infeld and A. Schild. The mathematical foundations of our kinematical conformal cosmology will need to be checked against current astrophysical experimental data, before this new model can become a viable alternative to the standard theory.

  2. Efficient Kinematic Computations For 7-DOF Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark K.; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    Efficient algorithms for forward kinematic mappings of seven-degree-of-freedom (7-DOF) robotic manipulator having revolute joints developed on basis of representation of redundant DOF in terms of parameter called "arm angle." Continuing effort to exploit redundancy in manipulator according to concept of basic and additional tasks. Concept also discussed in "Configuration-Control Scheme Copes With Singularities" (NPO-18556) and "Increasing the Dexterity of Redundant Robots" (NPO-17801).

  3. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  4. Kinematics of 13 brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David; Illingworth, Garth; Franx, Marijn

    1995-01-01

    Velocity dispersion profiles and rotation curves have been determined for a sample of 13 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in order to study their internal stellar kinematics and investigate their relationship to ellipticals. We find that BCGs generally display velocity dispersion profiles with gradients similar to those found in normal bright ellipticals. A rising velocity dispersion profile is found for the BCG IC 1101, the dominant member of Abell 2029, confirming Dressler's (1979) result. No other rising velocity dispersion profiles are found in our sample suggesting that they are not a feature common to brightest cluster galaxies. Significant rotation is found in only two of the galaxies, a result in agreement with previous studies showing the declining importance of rotation with increasing luminosity for elliptical galaxies. Our data suggest that environment plays a role in the kinematic characteristics of BCGs. We find a correlation between the rotation of BCGs and the velocity dispersion of their parent clusters in the sense that very slow rotating galaxies (Vm/(mean value of sigma))* less than 0.1, are predominantly found in high velocity dispersion (sigmacL greater than 650 km/s) clusters. This relation between the internal stellar kinematics of BCGs and the cluster velocity dispersion is in the sense expected if ellipticals formed by merging. Brightest cluster galaxy mass-to-light ratios derived from photometric and kinematic modeling are found to be similar to normal elliptical M/L values. For the galaxy NGC 4073, the dominant galaxy in the poor cluster MKW 4, we find that it contains a counterrotating stellar core suggestive of the occurrence of an accretion event(s).

  5. Using a pseudo-dynamic source inversion approach to improve earthquake source imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Song, S. G.; Dalguer, L. A.; Clinton, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Imaging a high-resolution spatio-temporal slip distribution of an earthquake rupture is a core research goal in seismology. In general we expect to obtain a higher quality source image by improving the observational input data (e.g. using more higher quality near-source stations). However, recent studies show that increasing the surface station density alone does not significantly improve source inversion results (Custodio et al. 2005; Zhang et al. 2014). We introduce correlation structures between the kinematic source parameters: slip, rupture velocity, and peak slip velocity (Song et al. 2009; Song and Dalguer 2013) in the non-linear source inversion. The correlation structures are physical constraints derived from rupture dynamics that effectively regularize the model space and may improve source imaging. We name this approach pseudo-dynamic source inversion. We investigate the effectiveness of this pseudo-dynamic source inversion method by inverting low frequency velocity waveforms from a synthetic dynamic rupture model of a buried vertical strike-slip event (Mw 6.5) in a homogeneous half space. In the inversion, we use a genetic algorithm in a Bayesian framework (Moneli et al. 2008), and a dynamically consistent regularized Yoffe function (Tinti, et al. 2005) was used for a single-window slip velocity function. We search for local rupture velocity directly in the inversion, and calculate the rupture time using a ray-tracing technique. We implement both auto- and cross-correlation of slip, rupture velocity, and peak slip velocity in the prior distribution. Our results suggest that kinematic source model estimates capture the major features of the target dynamic model. The estimated rupture velocity closely matches the target distribution from the dynamic rupture model, and the derived rupture time is smoother than the one we searched directly. By implementing both auto- and cross-correlation of kinematic source parameters, in comparison to traditional smoothing constraints, we are in effect regularizing the model space in a more physics-based manner without loosing resolution of the source image. Further investigation is needed to tune the related parameters of pseudo-dynamic source inversion and relative weighting between the prior and the likelihood function in the Bayesian inversion.

  6. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  7. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  8. Inverse melting and inverse freezing: A spin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupper, Nurith; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2005-10-01

    Systems of highly degenerate ordered or frozen state may exhibit inverse melting (reversible crystallization upon heating) or inverse freezing (reversible glass transition upon heating). This phenomenon is reviewed, and a list of experimental demonstrations and theoretical models is presented. A simple spin model for inverse melting is introduced and solved analytically for infinite range, constant paramagnetic exchange interaction. The random exchange analogue of this model yields inverse freezing, as implied by the analytic solution based on the replica trick. The qualitative features of this system (generalized Blume-Capel spin model) are shown to resemble a large class of inverse melting phenomena. The appearance of inverse melting is related to an exact rescaling of one of the interaction parameters that measures the entropy of the system. For the case of almost degenerate spin states, perturbative expansion is presented, and the first three terms correspond to the empiric formula for the Flory-Huggins ? parameter in the theory of polymer melts. The possible microscopic origin of this ? parameter and the limitations of the Flory-Huggins theory where the state degeneracy is associated with the different conformations of a single polymer or with the spatial structures of two interacting molecules are discussed.

  9. Applications of high-resolution spatial discretization scheme and Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method in two-phase flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the existing reactor system analysis codes were developed using low-order numerical schemes in both space and time. In many nuclear thermal–hydraulics applications, it is desirable to use higher-order numerical schemes to reduce numerical errors. High-resolution spatial discretization schemes provide high order spatial accuracy in smooth regions and capture sharp spatial discontinuity without nonphysical spatial oscillations. In this work, we adapted an existing high-resolution spatial discretization scheme on staggered grids in two-phase flow applications. Fully implicit time integration schemes were also implemented to reduce numerical errors from operator-splitting types of time integration schemes. The resulting nonlinear system has been successfully solved using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method. The high-resolution spatial discretization and high-order fully implicit time integration numerical schemes were tested and numerically verified for several two-phase test problems, including a two-phase advection problem, a two-phase advection with phase appearance/disappearance problem, and the water faucet problem. Numerical results clearly demonstrated the advantages of using such high-resolution spatial and high-order temporal numerical schemes to significantly reduce numerical diffusion and therefore improve accuracy. Our study also demonstrated that the JFNK method is stable and robust in solving two-phase flow problems, even when phase appearance/disappearance exists.

  10. Stylolite stress inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Ebner, Marcus; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul; Rood, Daisy

    2014-05-01

    Stylolites are localized dissolution seams that can be found in a variety of rocks, and can form due to sediment compaction or tectonic forces. Dissolution of the host-rock next to the stylolite is a function of the applied stress on the stylolite plane. Stylolite teeth indicate the direction of the main compressive stress. Recent advances have shown that the stylolite roughness also shows a stress scaling relation that can be used to calculate magnitudes of stress. Elastic and surface energies produce a different roughness, and the transition between the two is stress dependent and can be quantified. In order to measure the roughness a two or three-dimensional section of a stylolite plane is taken and transferred to a one-dimensional function. The cross-over in the roughness is then picked with the help of an FFT plot. Using this method the burial depth of sedimentary stylolites can be determined. Moreover, tectonic stylolites can be used to determine the full three-dimensional stress tensor if the paleodepth of the tectonic stylolite is known. Stylolites can also be used to find fault offsets and to understand when these faults were active and how the paleotopography looked like at the time the stylolites grew. However, uncertainties remain since Youngs Modulus, Poisson Ratio and surface energy may vary in rocks. In addition, the stylolites record only a snapshot in time, probably the moment when they closed and stopped dissolving. We show examples of the use of stress inversion for stylolite formation conditions in different tectonic settings, and discuss the potential of the method.

  11. Kinematics of Haro 11: The miniature Antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, G.; Marquart, T.; Cumming, R. J.; Fathi, K.; Bergvall, N.; Adamo, A.; Amram, P.; Hayes, M.

    2015-11-01

    Luminous blue compact galaxies are among the most active galaxies in the local Universe in terms of their star formation rate per unit mass. They are rare at the current cosmic epoch, but were more abundant in the past and may be seen as the local analogues of higher red shift Lyman break galaxies. Studies of their kinematics is key to understanding what triggers their unusually active star formation. In this work, we investigate the kinematics of stars and ionised gas in Haro 11, one of the most luminous blue compact galaxies in the local Universe. Previous works have indicated that many of these galaxies may be triggered by galaxy mergers. We have employed Fabry-Perot interferometry, long-slit spectroscopy, and integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy to explore the kinematics of Haro 11. We target the near-infrared calcium triplet, and use cross-correlation and penalised pixel fitting techniques to derive the stellar velocity field and velocity dispersion. We analyse ionised gas through emission lines from hydrogen, [O iii], and [S iii]. When spectral resolution and signal to noise allows, we investigate the line profile in detail and identify multiple velocity components when present. The spectra reveal a complex velocity field whose components, both stellar and gaseous, we attempt to disentangle. We find that to first order, the velocity field and velocity dispersions derived from stars and ionised gas agree. Hence the complexities reveal real dynamical disturbances providing further evidence for a merger in Haro 11. Through decomposition of emission lines, we find evidence for kinematically distinct components, for instance, a tidal arm. The ionised gas velocity field can be traced to large galactocentric radii, and shows significant velocity dispersion even far out in the halo. If interpreted as virial motions, this indicates that Haro 11 may have a mass of ~1011 M?. Haro 11 shows many resemblances with the famous Antennae galaxies both morphologically and kinematically, but it is much denser, which is the likely explanation for the higher star formation efficiency in Haro 11. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under observing programmes 71.B-0602, 074.B-0771(A), 074.B-0802A.

  12. Inverse problems in quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwowski, Jacek

    Inverse problems constitute a branch of applied mathematics with well-developed methodology and formalism. A broad family of tasks met in theoretical physics, in civil and mechanical engineering, as well as in various branches of medical and biological sciences has been formulated as specific implementations of the general theory of inverse problems. In this article, it is pointed out that a number of approaches met in quantum chemistry can (and should) be classified as inverse problems. Consequently, the methodology used in these approaches may be enriched by applying ideas and theorems developed within the general field of inverse problems. Several examples, including the RKR method for the construction of potential energy curves, determining parameter values in semiempirical methods, and finding external potentials for which the pertinent Schrödinger equation is exactly solvable, are discussed in detail.

  13. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  14. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  15. Temperature Inversions Have Cold Bottoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.; Brown, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    Uses discussion and illustrations of several demonstrations on air temperature differences and atmospheric stability to explain the phenomena of temperature inversions. Relates this to the smog in Los Angeles and discusses the implications. (DC)

  16. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  17. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-01-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to Tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed.

  18. Whole limb kinematics are preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Young-Hui; Auyang, Arick G.; Scholz, John P.; Nichols, T. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Biomechanics and neurophysiology studies suggest whole limb function to be an important locomotor control parameter. Inverted pendulum and mass-spring models greatly reduce the complexity of the legs and predict the dynamics of locomotion, but do not address how numerous limb elements are coordinated to achieve such simple behavior. As a first step, we hypothesized whole limb kinematics were of primary importance and would be preferentially conserved over individual joint kinematics after neuromuscular injury. We used a well-established peripheral nerve injury model of cat ankle extensor muscles to generate two experimental injury groups with a predictable time course of temporary paralysis followed by complete muscle self-reinnervation. Mean trajectories of individual joint kinematics were altered as a result of deficits after injury. By contrast, mean trajectories of limb orientation and limb length remained largely invariant across all animals, even with paralyzed ankle extensor muscles, suggesting changes in mean joint angles were coordinated as part of a long-term compensation strategy to minimize change in whole limb kinematics. Furthermore, at each measurement stage (pre-injury, paralytic and self-reinnervated) step-by-step variance of individual joint kinematics was always significantly greater than that of limb orientation. Our results suggest joint angle combinations are coordinated and selected to stabilize whole limb kinematics against short-term natural step-by-step deviations as well as long-term, pathological deviations created by injury. This may represent a fundamental compensation principle allowing animals to adapt to changing conditions with minimal effect on overall locomotor function. PMID:19837893

  19. Kinematic Rupture Process Of Karakocan-Elazig Earthquake, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekler, F. N.; Ozel, N. M.; Tanircan, G. B.

    2012-04-01

    An earthquake (Mw=5.9) hit Elazig in the eastern part of Turkey on March 8, 2010 at 02:32 (GMT). It is located midway between the provincial capital of Elaz?? and Bingöl with coordinates reported as 38o48.42N and 40o5.99E by Bogazici University Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI). Source characterization and slip history were estimated the main and four moderate size earthquake almost at the same location. The earthquake occurred at one of the tectonically very active East Anatolian Fault zone starts at the Karl?ova triple junction, where it meets the North Anatolian fault to the NE. Multi time-window linear waveform inversion technique (MTWIT) was applied to strong ground motion (SGM) data. Theoretical Green's functions between subfaults and stations were calculated by a Discrete Wave Number Method (DWNM) using 1-D velocity structure. Inversion technique used in this study yields a non unique solution. Therefore various rupture models have been tried until both observed and synthetic data were matched. Results show simple patterns in slip distributions. Maximum slip is 0.78 and seismic moment is 1.435E+25 dyne.cm from the kinematic rupture process of the strike slip faulting. In this study, we searched a stable 1-D crustal velocity model with low RMS misfit to construct the theoretical Green's function between each sub-fault and each station among the 4 different models. These are Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM; Dziewonski and Anderson, 1981), International Association of Seismology and the Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASP91) (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991), Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) earthquake location model, explosion model (Gurbuz, 2004). We have collected previous studies Rebollar et al., (2001), Ichinose et al., (1997), Abdel-Fattah (2002), Somerville et al., (1999), Wells and Coppersmith (1994) on source information of moderate size earthquakes occurred worldwide and compared with our results. Results were compared with those of similar size earthquakes around the world and a new empirical relationship was proposed between seismic moment and rupture area. We expect our findings provide usefull information to resolving rupture mechanisms and triggering of the events in Eastern Anatoion Region. Key Words: Rupture Process, Elazig Earthquake, Eastern Turkey

  20. Improved hydrogeophysical characterization and monitoring through parallel modeling and inversion of time-domain resistivity and induced-polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy C. Johnson; Roeof J. Versteeg; Andy Ward; Frederick D. Day-Lewis; Andre Revil

    2010-09-01

    Electrical geophysical methods have found wide use in the growing discipline of hydrogeophysics, both for characterizing the electrical properties of the subsurface, and for monitoring subsurface processes in terms of the spatiotemporal changes in subsurface conductivity, chargeability, and source currents they govern. Current multichannel and multielectrode data collections systems are able to collect large amounts of data in relatively short periods of time. However, practitioners are often unable to fully utilize these large data sets and the information they contain due to the processing limitations of standard desktop computers. This limitation can be addressed by utilizing the storage and processing capabilities of high-performance parallel computing environments. We present a parallel distributed-memory forward and inverse modeling algorithm for analyzing resistivity and time-domain induced polarization data. The primary components of the parallel computations include distributed computation of the pole solutions in forward mode, distributed storage and computation of the Jacobian matrix in inverse mode, and parallel execution of the inverse equation solver. We demonstrate the corresponding parallel code for three efforts: (1) resistivity characterization of the Hanford 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford, WA; (2) resistivity characterization of a volcanic island in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea in Italy; and (3) resistivity and IP monitoring of biostimulation at a superfund site in Brandywine, MD. Inverse analysis of each of these data sets would be limited (or impossible) in a standard serial computing environment which underscores the need for high-performance computing to fully utilize the potential of electrical geophysical methods in hydrogeophysical applications.

  1. An algorithm for simultaneous inversion of aerosol properties and surface reflectance from airborne GeoTASO hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, W.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Ding, S.; Han, D.; Leitch, J. W.; Delker, T.; Chen, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an inversion method to retrieve aerosol properties from the hyperspectral data collected by airborne GeoTASO (Geostationary Trance gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization). Mounted on the NASA HU-25C aircraft, GeoTASO measures radiation in 1000 spectral bands from 415 nm to 696 nm, and is a prototype for the TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) instrument. It flew over Houston during September 2013 and gathered several days' of airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data for our research. Our inversion method, which is based on the optimization theory and different from the traditional lookup table (LUT) retrieval technique, can simultaneously retrieve parameters of atmospheric aerosols such as the aerosol optical depth and other aerosol parameters, as well as the surface reflectance albedo. To provide constraints of hyperspectral surface reflectance in the inversion, we first conduct principal component analysis (PCA) using 46 reflectance spectra of various plants and vegetation to identify the most influential components. With the first six principal components and the corresponding calculated weight vector, the spectra could be reconstructed with an accuracy of 1%. UNL-VRTM (UNified Linearized Radiative Transfer Model) is employed for forward model calculation, and its outputs include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements, but also their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol properties parameters and the principal components of surface spectral reflectance. The inversion is carried out with optimization algorithm L-BFGS-B (Large scale BFGS Bound constrained), and is conducted iteratively until the modeled spectral radiance fits with GeoTASO measurements. Finally, the retrieval results of aerosol optical depth and other aerosol parameters are compared against those retrieved by AEROENT and/or in situ measurements during the aircraft campaign.

  2. computational inverse medium scattering at fixed frequency

    E-print Network

    2005-12-08

    A continuation method is presented for solving the inverse medium scattering problem of the. Helmholtz ... The inverse medium scattering problem is to determine the scatterer q(x) from the measurements ... layer of the medium is penetrated. ..... [7] Y. Chen, Inverse scattering via skin effect, Inverse Problems, 13 (1997), pp.

  3. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  4. A Kinematical Approach to Dark Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to cosmological ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t) = 1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t) = j, we measure q{sub 0} = -0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j = 2.16{sub -0.75}{sup +0.81}, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. A standard ''dynamical'' analysis of the same data, employing the Friedmann equations and modeling the dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w (constant), gives {Omega}{sub m} = 0.306{sub -0.040}{sup +0.042} and w = -1.15{sub -0.18}{sup +0.14}, also consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Our results provide further interesting support for the concordance {Lambda}CDM paradigm.

  5. Athletic Footwear, Leg Stiffness, and Running Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark; Fiolkowski, Paul; Conrad, Bryan; Brunt, Denis; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2006-01-01

    Context: The leg acts as a linear spring during running and hopping and adapts to the stiffness of the surface, maintaining constant total stiffness of the leg-surface system. Introducing a substance (eg, footwear) may affect the stiffness of the leg in response to changes in surface stiffness. Objective: To determine if the type of athletic footwear affects the regulation of leg stiffness in dynamic activities. Design: Repeated-measures design. Setting: Motion analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Nine healthy adults (age = 28 ± 6.8 years, mass = 71.6 ± 12.9 kg) free from lower extremity injuries. Intervention(s): Subjects hopped at 2.2 Hz on a forceplate under 3 footwear conditions (barefoot, low-cost footwear, high-cost footwear). Subjects ran on a treadmill at 2 speeds (2.23 m/s, 3.58 m/s) under the same footwear conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s): Limb stiffness was calculated from forceplate data. Kinematic data (knee and ankle angles at initial contact and peak joint excursion after contact) were collected during running. We calculated 1-way repeated-measures (stiffness) and 2-way (speed by footwear) repeated-measures analyses of variance (running kinematics) to test the dependent variables. Results: A significant increase in leg stiffness from the barefoot to the “cushioned” shoe condition was noted during hopping. When running shod, runners landed in more dorsiflexion but had less ankle motion than when running barefoot. No differences were seen between the types of shoes. The primary kinematic difference was identified as running speed increased: runners landed in more knee flexion. At the ankle, barefoot runners increased ankle motion to a significantly greater extent than did shod runners as speed increased. Conclusions: Footwear influences the maintenance of stiffness in the lower extremity during hopping and joint excursion at the ankle in running. Differences in cushioning properties of the shoes tested did not appear to be significant. PMID:17273463

  6. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    E-print Network

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations of magnetic energy emerge at some particular wave frequencies.

  7. The Stellar Kinematics of Extragalactic Bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón-Barroso, Jesús

    Galactic bulges are complex systems. Once thought to be small-scale versions of elliptical galaxies, advances in astronomical instrumentation (spectroscopy in particular) has revealed a wealth of photometric and kinematic substructure in otherwise simple-looking components. This review provides an overview of how our perspective on galactic bulges has changed over the years. While it is mainly focused on aspects related to the dynamical state of their stars, there will be natural connections to other properties (e.g. morphology, stellar populations) discussed in other reviews in this volume.

  8. Quantum simulation of noncausal kinematic transformations.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U; Casanova, J; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2013-08-30

    We propose the implementation of Galileo group symmetry operations or, in general, linear coordinate transformations in a quantum simulator. With an appropriate encoding, unitary gates applied to our quantum system give rise to Galilean boosts or spatial and time parity operations in the simulated dynamics. This framework provides us with a flexible toolbox that enhances the versatility of quantum simulation theory, allowing the direct access to dynamical quantities that would otherwise require full tomography. Furthermore, this method enables the study of noncausal kinematics and phenomena beyond special relativity in a quantum controllable system. PMID:24033011

  9. Kinematical and mechanical aspects of wafer slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, P. G.

    1982-01-01

    Some recently achieved results concerning the technological fundamentals of slurry sawing are presented. The specific material removal process and the related kinematic and geometric contact conditions between workpiece and saw blade are described. The result of a functional description of the slurry sawing process is presented, expressing the main process criteria, such as infeed per stroke, specific removal rate, specific tool wear, and vertical stroke intensity, in terms of the dominating process parameters, such as stroke length, width of workpiece, stroke frequency, specific cutting force and slurry specification.

  10. Kinematic bias in cosmological distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick; Hudson, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Recent calculations using non-linear relativistic cosmological perturbation theory show biases in the mean luminosity distance and distance modulus at low redshift. We show that these effects may be understood very simply as a non-relativistic, and purely kinematic, Malmquist-like bias, and we describe how the effect changes if one averages over sources that are limited by apparent magnitude. This effect is essentially identical to the distance bias from small-scale random velocities that has previously been considered by astronomers, though we find that the standard formula overestimates the homogeneous bias by a factor 2.

  11. 1 Introduction The solution of the inverse scattering problem requires, in essence, an inversion of

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yu

    1 Introduction The solution of the inverse scattering problem requires, in essence, an inversion. In this paper, we present a stable method that solves the inverse scattering prob­ lem. The new approach the ill­posedness and the inverse scattering problem, and present the inversion method, and in Section 4

  12. Geometric deviation modeling by kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Yu; Dai, Wanyi

    2015-09-01

    Typical representation of dimension and geometric accuracy is limited to the self-representation of dimension and geometric deviation based on geometry variation thinking, yet the interactivity affection of geometric variation and gesture variation of multi-rigid body is not included. In this paper, a kinematic matrix model based on Lagrangian coordinate is introduced, with the purpose of unified model for geometric variation and gesture variation and their interactive and integrated analysis. Kinematic model with joint, local base and movable base is built. The ideal feature of functional geometry is treated as the base body; the fitting feature of functional geometry is treated as the adjacent movable body; the local base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the ideal geometry, and the movable base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the fitting geometry. Furthermore, the geometric deviation is treated as relative location or rotation variation between the movable base and the local base, and it's expressed by the Lagrangian coordinate. Moreover, kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate for different types of geometry tolerance zones is constructed, and total freedom for each kinematic model is discussed. Finally, the Lagrangian coordinate library, kinematic matrix library for geometric deviation modeling is illustrated, and an example of block and piston fits is introduced. Dimension and geometric tolerances of the shaft and hole fitting feature are constructed by kinematic matrix and Lagrangian coordinate, and the results indicate that the proposed kinematic matrix is capable and robust in dimension and geometric tolerances modeling.

  13. The kinematic signature of voluntary actions.

    PubMed

    Becchio, Cristina; Zanatto, Debora; Straulino, Elisa; Cavallo, Andrea; Sartori, Giuseppe; Castiello, Umberto

    2014-10-01

    Research in the field of psychology and cognitive neuroscience has begun to explore the functional underpinnings of voluntary actions and how they differ from stimulus-driven actions. From these studies one can conclude that the two action modes differ with respect to their neural and behavioural correlates. So far, however, no study has investigated whether the voluntary and stimulus-driven actions also differ in terms of motor programming. We report two experiments in which participants had to perform either voluntary or stimulus-driven reach-to-grasp actions upon the same stimulus. Using kinematic methods, in Experiment 1 we obtained evidence that voluntary actions and stimulus-driven actions translate into differential movement patterns. Results for Experiments 2 suggest that selecting what to do, when to act, and whether to act are characterized by specific kinematic signatures and affect different aspects of the reach-to-grasp movement in a selective fashion. These findings add to current models of volition suggesting that voluntary action control results from an interplay of dissociable subfunctions related to specific decision components: what action execute, when to execute an action, and whether to execute any action. PMID:25264611

  14. THE KINEMATICS OF PRIMATE MIDFOOT FLEXIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Thomas M.; Ball, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a unique assessment of primate intrinsic foot joint kinematics based upon bone pin rigid cluster tracking. It challenges the assumption that human evolution resulted in a reduction of midfoot flexibility, which has been identified in other primates as the “midtarsal break.” Rigid cluster pins were inserted into the foot bones of human, chimpanzee, baboon and macaque cadavers. The positions of these bone pins were monitored during a plantarflexion-dorsiflexion movement cycle. Analysis resolved flexion-extension movement patterns and the associated orientation of rotational axes for the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and lateral cubometatarsal joints. Results show that midfoot flexibility occurs primarily at the talonavicular and cubometatarsal joints. The rotational magnitudes are roughly similar between humans and chimps. There is also a similarity among evaluated primates in the observed rotations of the lateral cubometatarsal joint, but there was much greater rotation observed for the talonavicular joint, which may serve to differentiate monkeys from the hominines. It appears that the capability for a midtarsal break is present within the human foot. A consideration of the joint axes shows that the medial and lateral joints have opposing orientations, which has been associated with a rigid locking mechanism in the human foot. However, the potential for this same mechanism also appears in the chimpanzee foot. These findings demonstrate a functional similarity within the midfoot of the hominines. Therefore, the kinematic capabilities and restrictions for the skeletal linkages of the human foot may not be as unique as has been previously suggested. PMID:25234343

  15. The kinematics of turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  16. Nuclear Rings in Galaxies - A Kinematic Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzuca, Lisa M.; Swaters, Robert A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We combine DensePak integral field unit and TAURUS Fabry-Perot observations of 13 nuclear rings to show an interconnection between the kinematic properties of the rings and their resonant origin. The nuclear rings have regular and symmetric kinematics, and lack strong non-circular motions. This symmetry, coupled with a direct relationship between the position angles and ellipticities of the rings and those of their host galaxies, indicate the rings are in the same plane as the disc and are circular. From the rotation curves derived, we have estimated the compactness (v(sup 2)/r) up to the turnover radius, which is where the nuclear rings reside. We find that there is evidence of a correlation between compactness and ring width and size. Radially wide rings are less compact, and thus have lower mass concentration. The compactness increases as the ring width decreases. We also find that the nuclear ring size is dependent on the bar strength, with weaker bars allowing rings of any size to form.

  17. Multiplanar breast kinematics during different exercise modalities.

    PubMed

    Risius, Deborah; Milligan, Alexandra; Mills, Chris; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Multiplanar breast movement reduction is crucial to increasing physical activity participation amongst women. To date, research has focused on breast movement during running, but until breast movement is understood during different exercise modalities, the breast support requirements for specific activities are unknown. To understand breast support requirements during different exercise modalities, this study aimed to determine multiplanar breast kinematics during running, jumping and agility tasks. Sixteen 32D participants had markers attached to their right nipple and torso. Relative multiplanar breast displacement was calculated during bare-breasted treadmill running (10 kph), maximum countermovement jumping and an agility t-test. Exercise modality influenced the magnitude and direction of breast displacement, velocity and acceleration (p < .05). Jumping produced greater vertical breast displacement (.09 m) but less mediolateral breast displacement (.05 m) than running or the agility task, but agility tasks produced the highest multiplanar breast velocities and acceleration. Breast movement during jumping was predominantly in the vertical direction, whereas the agility task produced a greater percentage of mediolateral breast acceleration than running or jumping. Exercise modality impacted upon the magnitude and distribution of bare-breasted multiplanar breast kinematics in this homogenous 32D cohort. Therefore, to reduce breast movement in women of a 32D bra size, manufacturers may wish to design sport-specific products, with greater vertical support for exercise modalities incorporating jumping and greater mediolateral support for agility tasks. PMID:24942053

  18. Optimization and geophysical inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barhen, J.; Berryman, J.G.; Borcea, L.; Dennis, J.; de Groot-Hedlin, C.; Gilbert, F.; Gill, P.; Heinkenschloss, M.; Johnson, L.; McEvilly, T.; More, J.; Newman, G.; Oldenburg, D.; Parker, P.; Porto, B.; Sen, M.; Torczon, V.; Vasco, D.; Woodward, N.B.

    2000-10-01

    A fundamental part of geophysics is to make inferences about the interior of the earth on the basis of data collected at or near the surface of the earth. In almost all cases these measured data are only indirectly related to the properties of the earth that are of interest, so an inverse problem must be solved in order to obtain estimates of the physical properties within the earth. In February of 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a workshop that was intended to examine the methods currently being used to solve geophysical inverse problems and to consider what new approaches should be explored in the future. The interdisciplinary area between inverse problems in geophysics and optimization methods in mathematics was specifically targeted as one where an interchange of ideas was likely to be fruitful. Thus about half of the participants were actively involved in solving geophysical inverse problems and about half were actively involved in research on general optimization methods. This report presents some of the topics that were explored at the workshop and the conclusions that were reached. In general, the objective of a geophysical inverse problem is to find an earth model, described by a set of physical parameters, that is consistent with the observational data. It is usually assumed that the forward problem, that of calculating simulated data for an earth model, is well enough understood so that reasonably accurate synthetic data can be generated for an arbitrary model. The inverse problem is then posed as an optimization problem, where the function to be optimized is variously called the objective function, misfit function, or fitness function. The objective function is typically some measure of the difference between observational data and synthetic data calculated for a trial model. However, because of incomplete and inaccurate data, the objective function often incorporates some additional form of regularization, such as a measure of smoothness or distance from a prior model. Various other constraints may also be imposed upon the process. Inverse problems are not restricted to geophysics, but can be found in a wide variety of disciplines where inferences must be made on the basis of indirect measurements. For instance, most imaging problems, whether in the field of medicine or non-destructive evaluation, require the solution of an inverse problem. In this report, however, the examples used for illustration are taken exclusively from the field of geophysics. The generalization of these examples to other disciplines should be straightforward, as all are based on standard second-order partial differential equations of physics. In fact, sometimes the non-geophysical inverse problems are significantly easier to treat (as in medical imaging) because the limitations on data collection, and in particular on multiple views, are not so severe as they generally are in geophysics. This report begins with an introduction to geophysical inverse problems by briefly describing four canonical problems that are typical of those commonly encountered in geophysics. Next the connection with optimization methods is made by presenting a general formulation of geophysical inverse problems. This leads into the main subject of this report, a discussion of methods for solving such problems with an emphasis upon newer approaches that have not yet become prominent in geophysics. A separate section is devoted to a subject that is not encountered in all optimization problems but is particularly important in geophysics, the need for a careful appraisal of the results in terms of their resolution and uncertainty. The impact on geophysical inverse problems of continuously improving computational resources is then discussed. The main results are then brought together in a final summary and conclusions section.

  19. Inversions of Stokes profiles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Toro Iniesta, Jose Carlos

    The last thirty years have witnessed the appearance of a number of techniques that have revolutionized our way to measure magnetic fields, namely, the so-called inversions of the radiative transfer equation techniques. Starting from simple models and solutions of the transfer equation and ending with sophisticated processes including full numeric solution of the equation and instrumental effects at the same time, passing through different model approaches and mathematical tools, inversion techniques have become common usage for solar observers. A revision of the ideas, hypotheses, advantages, limitations, and constraints behind inversions is presented, beginning with critical reviews of commonly accepted approximations that are becoming useless as long as new instrumentation is providing better and better observables. The advent of state-of-the-art computing tools increase our capabilities for finer analyses of these new observations.

  20. Darwin's "strange inversion of reasoning".

    PubMed

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-06-16

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive "inversion of reasoning" (according to a 19th century critic): "to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it" [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own. PMID:19528651

  1. Multiphase inverse modeling: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.

    1998-03-01

    Inverse modeling is a technique to derive model-related parameters from a variety of observations made on hydrogeologic systems, from small-scale laboratory experiments to field tests to long-term geothermal reservoir responses. If properly chosen, these observations contain information about the system behavior that is relevant to the performance of a geothermal field. Estimating model-related parameters and reducing their uncertainty is an important step in model development, because errors in the parameters constitute a major source of prediction errors. This paper contains an overview of inverse modeling applications using the ITOUGH2 code, demonstrating the possibilities and limitations of a formalized approach to the parameter estimation problem.

  2. Darwin's “strange inversion of reasoning”

    PubMed Central

    Dennett, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection unifies the world of physics with the world of meaning and purpose by proposing a deeply counterintuitive “inversion of reasoning” (according to a 19th century critic): “to make a perfect and beautiful machine, it is not requisite to know how to make it” [MacKenzie RB (1868) (Nisbet & Co., London)]. Turing proposed a similar inversion: to be a perfect and beautiful computing machine, it is not requisite to know what arithmetic is. Together, these ideas help to explain how we human intelligences came to be able to discern the reasons for all of the adaptations of life, including our own. PMID:19528651

  3. Six-point remainder function in multi-Regge-kinematics: an efficient approach in momentum space

    E-print Network

    Broedel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the known all-order expressions for the BFKL eigenvalue and impact factor, we establish a formalism allowing the direct calculation of the six-point remainder function in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory in momentum space to - in principle - all orders in perturbation theory. Based upon identities which relate different integrals contributing to the inverse Fourier-Mellin transform recursively, the formalism allows to easily access the full remainder function in multi-Regge kinematics up to 7 loops and up to 10 loops in the fourth logarithmic order. Using the formalism, we prove the all-loop formula for the leading logarithmic approximation proposed by Pennington and investigate the behavior of several newly calculated functions.

  4. Uncertainty in kinematic rupture models from variation in source time function and Earth structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafindrakoto, H. N.; Mai, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    We apply Bayesian inference to quantitatively assess the uncertainty of kinematic rupture model. This technique allows to map the chosen solution space (in our case peak slip-rate, rupture time and rise time to characterize the space-time rupture evolution) in terms of posterior density functions. In this study, we consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation in the 'Source Inversion Validation' exercises. In particular, we analyze the change of uncertainty using three predefined analytical source time functions (isosceles triangle, Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1s and 0.3s). We find that the use of an isosceles triangle as source-time function biases the result of finite fault source inversions. It accelerates the rupture to propagate faster by about 40%, leading to rupture speed overestimation. We also observe that the use of an isosceles triangle generates an artificial linear correlation between parameters that does not exist for the Yoffe source-time functions. These appear to compensate the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular source time function. We subsequently investigate the effect of inadequate knowledge of Earth's crustal structure. Our results show significant change in the resolution of the parameters, with a broadening of the posterior PDFs and some shift in peak location. These changes in the PDFs of kinematic parameters are associated to the blurring effect from using incorrect Earth structure. The change in rupture time uncertainty can also be understood in terms of isochrone theory. Comparing the results for two types of crustal model uncertainty (variable wave speeds only, and variable wave speeds and layer depths) we find that the posterior PDFs remain essentially unchanged. This occurs because the major differences in the considered crustal models appear at depth greater than 15 km. In this region, only a small fraction of the rupture is located, which has only a small effect on radiated seismic waves, and the subsequently inferred source model.

  5. Near field ground motion variability in kinematic simulations of the 1992 Landers earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Jagdish Chandra; Galis, Martin; Mai, Paul Martin

    2014-05-01

    We investigate near field ground motion variability due to five different kinematic rupture models inverted from observed data for 1992 Landers earthquake. The ground motion simulations are accomplished by solving the elastic equation of motion using a generalized finite-difference method (Ely et al., 2008) that handles geometric complexity of the fault, 3D variations in the medium as well as topography. Simulated waveforms are calibrated against near-field strong-motion recordings. We then analyze a large data-set of ground-motions computed at 2000 sites, binned with respect to distance and azimuth to compute mean and standard deviation of peak ground velocity (PGV) and pseudo spectral acceleration (PSA) for all five source models. We consider 1D-velocity structures as used in the source inversions, and honor the geometrical complexity due to segmentation of the rupture models. Our simulations reveal that ground motion variability is reduced as the distance from the fault increases. Variability in the kinematic sources has considerable impact on the resulting shaking variability, although the five source models considered are derived by inversion of seismic and/or geodetic data. Simulated mean PSA and its standard deviation are larger compared to empirical estimates using the ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) of Boore and Atkinson (2008), whereas simulated PGV are comparable to GMPE estimates. In addition, we find that intra-event ground motion variability is large both in forward and backward directivity region, strongest in the backward region, and smallest in the fault perpendicular direction. We then examine ground-motion variability with respect to directivity effects, due to a combination of rupture propagation and radiation pattern. The comparison of our simulations with and without Spudich and Chiou (2008) directivity corrections to Boore and Atkinson (2008) predictions indicates that slip heterogeneity is the key contributor to ground motion variability in the low frequency range.

  6. Design, analysis and testing of a parallel-kinematic high-bandwidth XY nanopositioning stage.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xia; Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design, analysis, and testing of a parallel-kinematic high-bandwidth XY nanopositioning stage driven by piezoelectric stack actuators. The stage is designed with two kinematic chains. In each kinematic chain, the end-effector of the stage is connected to the base by two symmetrically distributed flexure modules, respectively. Each flexure module comprises a fixed-fixed beam and a parallelogram flexure serving as two orthogonal prismatic joints. With the purpose to achieve high resonance frequencies of the stage, a novel center-thickened beam which has large stiffness is proposed to act as the fixed-fixed beam. The center-thickened beam also contributes to reducing cross-coupling and restricting parasitic motion. To decouple the motion in two axes totally, a symmetric configuration is adopted for the parallelogram flexures. Based on the analytical models established in static and dynamic analysis, the dimensions of the stage are optimized in order to maximize the first resonance frequency. Then finite element analysis is utilized to validate the design and a prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. According to the results of static and dynamic tests, the resonance frequencies of the developed stage are over 13.6 kHz and the workspace is 11.2 ?m × 11.6 ?m with the cross-coupling between two axes less than 0.52%. It is clearly demonstrated that the developed stage has high resonance frequencies, a relatively large travel range, and nearly decoupled performance between two axes. For high-speed tracking performance tests, an inversion-based feedforward controller is implemented for the stage to compensate for the positioning errors caused by mechanical vibration. The experimental results show that good tracking performance at high speed is achieved, which validates the effectiveness of the developed stage. PMID:24387472

  7. Design, analysis and testing of a parallel-kinematic high-bandwidth XY nanopositioning stage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chun-Xia; Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents the design, analysis, and testing of a parallel-kinematic high-bandwidth XY nanopositioning stage driven by piezoelectric stack actuators. The stage is designed with two kinematic chains. In each kinematic chain, the end-effector of the stage is connected to the base by two symmetrically distributed flexure modules, respectively. Each flexure module comprises a fixed-fixed beam and a parallelogram flexure serving as two orthogonal prismatic joints. With the purpose to achieve high resonance frequencies of the stage, a novel center-thickened beam which has large stiffness is proposed to act as the fixed-fixed beam. The center-thickened beam also contributes to reducing cross-coupling and restricting parasitic motion. To decouple the motion in two axes totally, a symmetric configuration is adopted for the parallelogram flexures. Based on the analytical models established in static and dynamic analysis, the dimensions of the stage are optimized in order to maximize the first resonance frequency. Then finite element analysis is utilized to validate the design and a prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. According to the results of static and dynamic tests, the resonance frequencies of the developed stage are over 13.6 kHz and the workspace is 11.2??m × 11.6??m with the cross-coupling between two axes less than 0.52%. It is clearly demonstrated that the developed stage has high resonance frequencies, a relatively large travel range, and nearly decoupled performance between two axes. For high-speed tracking performance tests, an inversion-based feedforward controller is implemented for the stage to compensate for the positioning errors caused by mechanical vibration. The experimental results show that good tracking performance at high speed is achieved, which validates the effectiveness of the developed stage.

  8. Optimal Estimation of Dynamically Consistent Kinematics and Kinetics for Forward Dynamic Simulation of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Christian D.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Forward dynamic simulation provides a powerful framework for characterizing in vivo loads, and for predicting changes in movement due to injury, impairment or surgical intervention. However, the computational challenge of generating simulations has greatly limited the use and application of forward dynamic models for simulating human gait. Methods In this study, we introduce an optimal estimation approach to effciently solve for generalized accelerations that satisfy the overall equations of motion and best agree with measured kinematics and ground reaction forces. The estimated accelerations are numerically integrated to enforce dynamic consistency over time, resulting in a forward dynamic simulation. Numerical optimization is then used to determine a set of initial generalized coordinates and speeds that produce a simulation that is most consistent with the measured motion over a full cycle of gait. The proposed method was evaluated with synthetically created kinematics and forceplate data in which both random noise and bias errors were introduced. We also applied the method to experimental gait data collected from five young healthy adults walking at a preferred speed. Results and Conclusions We show that the proposed residual elimination algorithm (REA) converges to an accurate solution, reduces the detrimental effects of kinematic measurement errors on joint moments, and eliminates the need for residual forces that arise in standard inverse dynamics. The greatest improvements in joint kinetics were observed proximally, with the algorithm reducing joint moment errors due to marker noise by over 20% at the hip and over 50% at the low back. Simulated joint angles were generally within 1 deg of recorded values when REA was used to generate a simulation from experimental gait data. REA can thus be used as a basis for generating accurate simulations of subject-specific gait dynamics. PMID:19154064

  9. The Double-Ring Algorithm: Reconciling Surface Flux Transport Simulations and Kinematic Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Nandy, D.; Martens, P. C. H.; Yeates, A. R.

    2011-05-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation and meridional circulation is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed ?-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on active region eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. We demonstrate that our treatment of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism through double-ring eruption leads to an inverse relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed as expected, reconciling the discrepancy between surface flux-transport simulations and kinematic dynamo models. Finally, we show how this new formulation paves the way for applications, which were not possible before, like understanding the nature of the extended minimum of sunspot cycle 23 and direct assimilation of active region data. This work is funded by NASA Living With a Star Grant NNX08AW53G to Montana State University/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the Government of India's Ramanujan Fellowship.

  10. Kinematic Decoupling in Mechanisms and Application to a Passive Hand

    E-print Network

    Hayward, Vincent

    Kinematic Decoupling in Mechanisms and Application to a Passive Hand Controller Design Vincent, 1992 Observations regarding the kinematics of mechanisms are applied to the synthesis of a passive hand yet effective hand-held mechanism in- tended to be used as an input device. Such a device can be used

  11. Thermal and Kinematic Evolution of the Eastern Cordillera Fold and

    E-print Network

    Toro, Jaime

    Thermal and Kinematic Evolution of the Eastern Cordillera Fold and Thrust Belt, Colombia Jaime Toro and then calculated the conductive thermal state of key steps of the kinematic history using ThrustpackR 4.0. The models were constrained by well, seismic, apatite fission-track, and thermal-maturity data. The main

  12. Kinematic Signatures of Telic and Atelic Events in ASL Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (throw, hit), the end-point of the event is…

  13. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  14. A School Experiment in Kinematics: Shooting from a Ballistic Cart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kranjc, T.; Razpet, N.

    2011-01-01

    Many physics textbooks start with kinematics. In the lab, students observe the motions, describe and make predictions, and get acquainted with basic kinematics quantities and their meaning. Then they can perform calculations and compare the results with experimental findings. In this paper we describe an experiment that is not often done, but is…

  15. Mathematical Analysis of Thermoplasticity with Linear Kinematic Hardening

    E-print Network

    Racke, Reinhard

    Mathematical Analysis of Thermoplasticity with Linear Kinematic Hardening Krzysztof Che lmi#19;nski and with a linear evo- lution equation for the kinematic hardening. The yield function associated with the system hardening property and the evolution equation for the backstress (new internal variable enlarging locally

  16. Fault slip and rupture velocity inversion by isochrone backprojection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, Gaetano; Zollo, Aldo

    2006-08-01

    A new technique is proposed here for the retrieval of slip images from the backprojection of high-frequency displacement records. When direct S waves are seen to be dominant in the near-source data, Green functions can be approximated by the far-field terms, as described by ray theory. Assuming that the slip rapidly reaches the final value (i.e. short slip duration), the measured displacement can be ascribed to the slip contributions lying on the corresponding isochrone on the fault plane. Here we use the far-field representation theorem to backproject on the fault plane the displacement amplitudes measured along the seismogram. Through the weighted stack of amplitude maps obtained from different stations we recover high slip zones on the fault. The resolution analysis of the backprojected images is realized with spike tests (that we refer to as `image Green functions'), which revealed to be an useful tool for detecting and locating artificial distortions of high slip patches, due to a poor data coverage. However, when the slip is uniformly spread along the isochrones, energy is scattered everywhere on the fault, leading to defocusing effects on the final images. A partial deconvolution technique is proposed by reiterating the backprojection. An important implication of this study is that slip maps can be obtained as functions of the rupture time on the fault, that is, the method can be used to retrieve variable rupture velocity kinematic models. Since the latter parameter is not known a priori, we suggest that a data set of coupled rupture velocity and slip maps is built up and the optimal model is chosen according to a waveform fitness criterion. This procedure allows the slip inversion to be separated from the rupture velocity inversion, significantly reducing the number of parameters to be estimated. Additionally, the parametrization of the rupture velocity is done on a less dense grid than the slip. By way of example, the technique is applied to estimation of the kinematic rupture model of the 2000 Tottori earthquake (M = 6.8), based on the inversion of near-source strong-motion data.

  17. MIT inverse Compton source concept

    E-print Network

    Graves, William S.

    A compact X-ray source based on inverse Compton scattering of a high-power laser on a high-brightness linac beam is described. The facility can operate in two modes: at high (MHz) repetition rate with flux and brilliance ...

  18. Action Understanding as Inverse Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Chris L.; Saxe, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Joshua B.

    2009-01-01

    Humans are adept at inferring the mental states underlying other agents' actions, such as goals, beliefs, desires, emotions and other thoughts. We propose a computational framework based on Bayesian inverse planning for modeling human action understanding. The framework represents an intuitive theory of intentional agents' behavior based on the…

  19. INVERSE PROBLEMS FOR LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL

    E-print Network

    Horváth, Miklós

    hundred meters below the surface of the Earth (geological prospecting). Inverse problems occur e and to navigate aircrafts using high precision gravitational data. Example 2. Conductivity The conductivity and a is the conductivity. The direct problem is to find u given a and g ; using appropriate Soboleff spaces, this problem

  20. INVERSION BASED CONSTRAINED TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION

    E-print Network

    INVERSION BASED CONSTRAINED TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION Nicolas Petit, Mark B. Milam, Richard M. Murray trajectory optimization is an enabling technology for many new facets of engineering. Formation flying), are two examples where the tools of real-time trajectory optimization would be extremely useful. In (Milam

  1. A kinematic model of southern California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weldon, R.; Humphreys, E.

    1986-01-01

    We propose a kinematic model for southern California based on late Quaternary slip rates and orientations of major faults in the region. Internally consistent motions are determined assuming that these faults bound rigid blocks. The velocities of the blocks are calculated along several paths that begin in the Mojave Desert and end off the California coast. A path that crosses the western Transverse Ranges accumulates the accepted relative North America-Pacific plate velocity, whereas paths to the north and south result in a significant missing component of motion. This implies the existence of a zone of active deformation in southern California that is interpreted to include the western Transverse Ranges and northwest trending, predominately strike-slip faults close to the coast both north and south of the Transverse Ranges. Strain on this system accounts for about a third of the total North America- Pacific plate motion. -from Authors

  2. Relativistic kinematics for motion faster than light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The use of conformal coordinates in relativistic kinematics is illustrated and a simple extension of the theory of motions faster than light is provided. An object traveling at a speed greater than light discloses its presence by appearing suddenly at a point, splitting into two apparent objects which then recede from each other at sublight velocities. According to the present theory motion at speeds faster than light would not benefit a space traveler, since the twin paradox becomes inverted at such speeds. In Einstein's theory travel at the velocity of light in an intertial system is equivalent to infinite velocity for the traveler. In the present theory the converse is also true; travel at infinite velocity is equivalent to the velocity of light for the traveler.

  3. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, J.C.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-05-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early Universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-deSitter model of the Universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the Universe which possess a smooth component by energy density. We study in detail the kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings. We also discuss the observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations.

  4. Uncertainty quantification in kinematic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a probabilistic approach to quantify parametric uncertainty in first-order hyperbolic conservation laws (kinematic wave equations). The approach relies on the derivation of a deterministic equation for the cumulative density function (CDF) of the system state, in which probabilistic descriptions (probability density functions or PDFs) of the system parameters and/or initial and boundary conditions serve as inputs. In contrast to PDF equations, which are often used in other contexts, CDF equations allow for straightforward and unambiguous determination of boundary conditions with respect to sample variables.The accuracy and robustness of solutions of the CDF equation for one such system, the Saint-Venant equations of river flows, were investigated via comparison with Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Unraveling L_{n,k}: Grassmannian Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

    2010-02-15

    It was recently proposed that the leading singularities of the S-Matrix of N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory arise as the residues of a contour integral over a Grassmannian manifold, with space-time locality encoded through residue theorems generalizing Cauchy's theorem to more than one variable. We provide a method to identify the residue corresponding to any leading singularity, and we carry this out explicitly for all leading singularities at tree level and one-loop. We also give several examples at higher loops, including all generic two-loop leading singularities and an interesting four-loop object. As an example we consider a 12-pt N{sup 4}MHV leading singularity at two loops that has a kinematic structure involving double square roots. Our analysis results in a simple picture for how the topological structure of loop graphs is reflected in various substructures within the Grassmannian.

  6. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Turner, Michael S.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-de Sitter model of the universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the universe which posses a smooth component of energy density. The kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings is studied in detail. The observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models are also discussed. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations.

  7. Effective kinematic viscosity of turbulent He II

    SciTech Connect

    Chagovets, T. V.; Gordeev, A. V.; Skrbek, L.

    2007-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the effective kinematic viscosity of turbulent He II, {nu}{sub eff}(T), is deduced from second sound attenuation data using the late stage of decay of thermally induced counterflow He II turbulence in two channels of square cross section. It is shown to qualitatively agree with the published data for {nu}{sub eff}(T) calculated based on experiments on decaying-grid-generated He II turbulence [Niemela et al., J. Low Temp. Phys. 138, 537 (2005)]. Corrections to these data due to the 'sine squared' law that describes attenuation of the second sound wave propagating along an arbitrary direction with respect to the direction of the core of a quantized vortex in turbulent He II are discussed and applied.

  8. Global and regional kinematics from SLR stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    The stations of the Global Laser Tracking Network have significantly contributed to the measurement of plate kinematics. The expanding network of progressively improved instruments clearly demonstrates the systems' centimeter positioning accuracy. Several satellite laser ranging (SLR) analysis groups have adopted techniques to distill geodynamic information from the Lageos-1 satellite observations using orbital arc lengths from an hour to a decade. SLR observations now provide the scale for the International Terrestrial Reference System and help to define the Earth's polar motion in this system. Agreement between positions separately determined with SLR, VLBI and GPS systems has been established at the level of a few centimeters in position and a few millimeters per year in horizontal velocity.

  9. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two.

  10. Beating kinematics of magnetically actuated cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downton, M. T.; Stark, H.

    2009-02-01

    We study the beating kinematics and pumping performance of a magnetically actuated artificial cilium attached to a surface using a bead spring model. Several different beating patterns for the external field are considered along with the possiblity of defects in the filament at isolated points. Hydrodynamic interactions between the beads are included by a modified Rotne-Prage tensor such that the no-slip boundary condition at the surface is satisfied. We find that the correct positioning of defects along the filament length can lead to significant increases in the pumping performance of a planar beating pattern. Even more efficient for pumping fluid are three-dimensional beating strokes which bring the filament close to the surface during the return part of the stroke.

  11. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems is disclosed. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two. 3 figs.

  12. Kinematical and Dynamical Modeling of Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamon, G. A.; ?okas, E.; Dekel, A.; Stoehr, F.; Cox, T. J.

    Elements of kinematical and dynamical modeling of elliptical galaxies are presented. In projection, NFW models resemble Sérsic models, but with a very narrow range of shapes (m=3±1). The total density profile of ellipticals cannot be NFW-like because the predicted local M/L and aperture velocity dispersion within an effective radius (R_e) are much lower than observed. Stars must then dominate ellipticals out to a few R_e. Fitting an NFW model to the total density profile of Sérsic+NFW (stars+dark matter [DM]) ellipticals results in very high concentration parameters, as found by X-ray observers. Kinematical modeling of ellipticals assuming an isotropic NFW DM model underestimates M/L at the virial radius by a factor of 1.6 to 2.4, because dissipationless ?CDM halos have slightly different density profiles and slightly radial velocity anisotropy. In N-body+gas simulations of ellipticals as merger remnants of spirals embedded in DM halos, the slope of the DM density profile is steeper when the initial spiral galaxies are gas-rich. The Hansen & Moore (2006) relation between anisotropy and the slope of the density profile breaks down for gas and DM, but the stars follow an analogous relation with slightly less radial anisotropies for a given density slope. Using kurtosis (h_4) to infer anisotropy in ellipticals is dangerous, as h4 is also sensitive to small levels of rotation. The stationary Jeans equation provides accurate masses out to 8 R_e. The discrepancy between the modeling of Romanowsky et al. (2003), indicating a dearth of DM in ellipticals, and the simulations analyzed by Dekel et al. (2005), which match the spectroscopic observations of ellipticals, is partly due to radial anisotropy and to observing oblate ellipticals face-on. However, one of the 15 solutions to the orbit modeling of Romanowsky et al. is found to have an amount and concentration of DM consistent with ?CDM predictions.

  13. Color-Kinematics Duality in Multi-Regge Kinematics and Dimensional Reduction

    E-print Network

    Henrik Johansson; Agustin Sabio Vera; Eduardo Serna Campillo; Miguel A. Vazquez-Mozo

    2013-11-04

    In this note we study the applicability of the color-kinematics duality to the scattering of two distinguishable scalar matter particles with gluon emission in QCD, or graviton emission in Einstein gravity. Previous analysis suggested that direct use of the Bern-Carrasco-Johansson double-copy prescription to matter amplitudes does not reproduce the gravitational amplitude in multi-Regge kinematics. This situation, however, can be avoided by extensions to the gauge theory, while maintaning the same Regge limit. Here we present two examples of these extensions: the introduction of a scalar contact interaction and the relaxation of the distinguishability of the scalars. In both cases new diagrams allow for a full reconstruction of the correct Regge limit on the gravitational side. Both modifications correspond to theories obtained by dimensional reduction from higher-dimensional gauge theories.

  14. Applications of inverse pattern projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Bothe, Thorsten; Kalms, Michael K.; von Kopylow, Christoph; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Fast and robust 3D quality control as well as fast deformation measurement is of particular importance for industrial inspection. Additionally a direct response about measured properties is desired. Therefore, robust optical techniques are needed which use as few images as possible for measurement and visualize results in an efficient way. One promising technique for this aim is the inverse pattern projection which has the following advantages: The technique codes the information of a preceding measurement into the projected inverse pattern. Thus, it is possible to do differential measurements using only one camera frame for each state. Additionally, the results are optimized straight fringes for sampling which are independent of the object curvature. The hardware needs are low as just a programmable projector and a standard camera are necessary. The basic idea of inverse pattern projection, necessary algorithms and found optimizations are demonstrated, roughly. Evaluation techniques were found to preserve a high quality phase measurement under imperfect conditions. The different application fields can be sorted out by the type of pattern used for inverse projection. We select two main topics for presentation. One is the incremental (one image per state) deformation measurement which is a promising technique for high speed deformation measurements. A video series of a wavering flag with projected inverse pattern was evaluated to show the complete deformation series. The other application is the optical feature marking (augmented reality) that allows to map any measured result directly onto the object under investigation. Any properties can be visualized directly on the object"s surface which makes inspections easier than with use of a separated indicating device. The general ability to straighten any kind of information on 3D surfaces is shown while preserving an exact mapping of camera image and object parts. In many cases this supersedes an additional monitor to view results and allows an operator to investigate results on the object, directly.

  15. Structure and kinematics of edge-on galaxy discs - I. Observations of the stellar kinematics

    E-print Network

    Kregel, M; Freeman, K C

    2004-01-01

    We present deep optical long-slit spectra of 17 edge-on spiral galaxies of intermediate to late morphological type, mostly parallel to their major axes and in a few cases parallel to the minor axes.The line-of-sight stellar kinematics are obtained from the stellar absorption lines using the improvedc ross-correlation technique. In general, the stellar kinematics are regular and can be traced well into the disc-dominated region. The mean stellar velocity curves are far from solid-body, indicating that the effect of dust extinction is not large. The line-of-sight stellar disc velocity dispersion correlates with the galaxy maximum rotational velocity, but detailed modeling is necessary to establish whether this represents a physical relation. In four spirals with a boxy- or peanut-shaped bulge we are able to detect asymmetric velocity distributions, having a common signature with projected radius in the mean line-of-sight velocity and the $h_{3}$ and $h_{4}$ curves. In two cases this kinematic asymmetry probably...

  16. Broad-band strong motion simulations coupling k-square kinematic source models with empirical Green's functions: the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, Sergio; Causse, Mathieu; Festa, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    The use of simulated accelerograms may improve the evaluation of the seismic hazard when an accurate modelling of both source and propagation is performed. In this paper, we performed broad-band simulations of the 2009, M 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake, coupling a k-2 kinematic model for the seismic source with empirical Green's functions (EGFs) as propagators. We extracted 10 EGFs candidates from a database of aftershocks satisfying quality criteria based on signal-to-noise ratio, fault proximity, small magnitude, similar focal mechanism and stress drop. For comparison with real observations, we also derived a low-frequency kinematic model, based on inversion of ground displacement as integrated from strong motion data. Kinematic properties of the inverted model (rupture velocity, position of the rupture nucleation, low-frequency slip and roughness degree of slip heterogeneity) were used as constraints in the k-2 model, to test the use of a single specific EGF against the use of the whole set of EGFs. Comparison to real observations based on spectral and peak ground acceleration shows that the use of all available EGFs improves the fit of simulations to real data. Moreover the epistemic variability related to the selection of a specific EGF is significantly larger (two to three times) than recent observations of between event variability, that is the variability associated with the randomness of the rupture process. We finally performed `blind' simulations releasing all the information on source kinematics and only considering the fault geometry and the magnitude of the target event as known features. We computed peak ground acceleration, acceleration Fourier and response spectra. Simulations follow the same trend with distance as real observations. In most cases these latter fall within one sigma from predictions. Predictions with source parameters constrained at low frequency do not perform better than `blind' simulations, showing that extrapolation of the low-frequency description of the rupture front as inferred by the kinematic inversion may introduce some bias in the final simulations.

  17. Ionized gas kinematics of galaxies in the CALIFA survey. I. Velocity fields, kinematic parameters of the dominant component, and presence of kinematically distinct gaseous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Márquez, I.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Masegosa, J.; Husemann, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, J.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; van de Ven, G.; Spekkens, K.; Holmes, L.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; del Olmo, A.; Ziegler, B.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Marino, R. A.; González Delgado, R. M.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Bekerait?, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Bomans, D.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Ionized gas kinematics provide important clues to the dynamical structure of galaxies and hold constraints to the processes driving their evolution. Aims: The motivation of this work is to provide an overall characterization of the kinematic behavior of the ionized gas of the galaxies included in the Calar Alto Legacy Integral field Area (CALIFA), offering kinematic clues to potential users of the CALIFA survey for including kinematical criteria in their selection of targets for specific studies. From the first 200 galaxies observed by CALIFA survey in its two configurations, we present the two-dimensional kinematic view of the 177 galaxies satisfaying a gas content/detection threshold. Methods: After removing the stellar contribution, we used the cross-correlation technique to obtain the radial velocity of the dominant gaseous component for each spectrum in the CALIFA data cubes for different emission lines (namely, [O ii] ??3726,3729, [O iii] ??4959,5007, H?+[N ii] ??6548,6584, and [SII]??6716,6730). The main kinematic parameters measured on the plane of the sky were directly derived from the radial velocities with no assumptions on the internal prevailing motions. Evidence of the presence of several gaseous components with different kinematics were detected by using [O iii] ??4959,5007 emission line profiles. Results: At the velocity resolution of CALIFA, most objects in the sample show regular velocity fields, although the ionized-gas kinematics are rarely consistent with simple coplanar circular motions. Thirty-five percent of the objects present evidence of a displacement between the photometric and kinematic centers larger than the original spaxel radii. Only 17% of the objects in the sample exhibit kinematic lopsidedness when comparing receding and approaching sides of the velocity fields, but most of them are interacting galaxies exhibiting nuclear activity (AGN or LINER). Early-type (E+S0) galaxies in the sample present clear photometric-kinematic misaligments. There is evidence of asymmetries in the emission line profiles in 117 out of the 177 analyzed galaxies, suggesting the presence of kinematically distinct gaseous components located at different distances from the optical nucleus. The kinematic decoupling between the dominant and secondary component/s suggested by the observed asymmetries in the profiles can be characterized by a limited set of parameters. Conclusions: This work constitutes the first determination of the ionized gas kinematics of the galaxies observed in the CALIFA survey. The derived velocity fields, the reported kinematic distortions/peculiarities and the identification of the presence of several gaseous components in different regions of the objects might be used as additional criteria for selecting galaxies for specific studies. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronmico Hispano Alemn (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Generalized inversion and theory of agree

    E-print Network

    Wu, Hsiao-hung Iris

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis I examine some of the fundamental questions surrounding inversion structures. I first provide an analysis of Locative Inversion. I show that the mixed A- and A- syntactic behavior of the fronted PP in English ...

  19. Radon Transform Inversion using the Shearlet Representation

    E-print Network

    Labate, Demetrio

    Radon Transform Inversion using the Shearlet Representation Flavia Colonna Department The inversion of the Radon transform is a classical ill-posed inverse problem where some method-optimal rate of convergence in estimating a large class of images from noisy Radon data. This is achieved

  20. INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    INVERSION FOR APPLIED GEOPHYSICS: A TUTORIAL Douglas W. Oldenburg* and Yaoguo Li** * UBC-Geophysical of images obtained from geophysical inversion depends critically upon other information. There is a bright future for the use of geophysics but it requires that inversion be applied with care and understanding

  1. Transdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems

    E-print Network

    Bodin, Thomas

    Transdimensional Approaches to Geophysical Inverse Problems Thomas Bodin October 2010 A thesis appeared in publication in Inverse Problems and Geophysical Journal International. These articles were co in the eyes. #12;#12;v Abstract In geophysical inversion the model parameterisation, the number of unknown

  2. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-01-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination. PMID:10471710

  3. Metal abundances and kinematics of quasar absorbers.- I. Absorption systems toward J2233-606

    E-print Network

    S. A. Levshakov; I. I. Agafonova; M. Centurion; I. E. Mazets

    2002-01-08

    The metal line profiles of different ions observed in high HI column density systems [N(HI) > 10^{16} cm^{-2}] in quasar spectra can be used to constrain the ionization structure and kinematic characteristics of the absorbers. For these purposes, a modified Monte Carlo Inversion (MCI) procedure was applied to the study of three absorption systems in the spectrum of the HDF-South quasar J2233-606 obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT/Kueyen telescope. The MCI does not confirm variations of metal abundances within separate systems which were discussed in the literature. Instead, we found that an assumption of a homogeneous metal content and a unique photoionizing background is sufficient to describe the observed complex metal profiles. It was also found that the linear size L and the line-of-sight velocity dispersion sigma_v measured within the absorbers obey a scaling relation, namely, sigma_v increases with increasing L, and that metal abundance is inversely proportional to the linear size of the system: the highest metallicity was measured in the system with the smallest L.

  4. Metal abundances and kinematics of quasar absorbers.- I. Absorption systems toward J2233-606

    E-print Network

    Levshakov, S A; Centurion, M; Mazets, I E

    2002-01-01

    The metal line profiles of different ions observed in high HI column density systems [N(HI) > 10^{16} cm^{-2}] in quasar spectra can be used to constrain the ionization structure and kinematic characteristics of the absorbers. For these purposes, a modified Monte Carlo Inversion (MCI) procedure was applied to the study of three absorption systems in the spectrum of the HDF-South quasar J2233-606 obtained with the UVES spectrograph at the VLT/Kueyen telescope. The MCI does not confirm variations of metal abundances within separate systems which were discussed in the literature. Instead, we found that an assumption of a homogeneous metal content and a unique photoionizing background is sufficient to describe the observed complex metal profiles. It was also found that the linear size L and the line-of-sight velocity dispersion sigma_v measured within the absorbers obey a scaling relation, namely, sigma_v increases with increasing L, and that metal abundance is inversely proportional to the linear size of the sys...

  5. Techniques in Doppler gravity inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The types of Doppler gravity data available for local as opposed to planetwide geophysical modeling are reviewed. Those gravity fields that are determined dynamically in orbit determination programs yield a smoothed representation of the local gravity field that may be used for quantitative modeling. An estimate of the difference between smoothed and true fields can be considered as a noise limitation in generating local gravity models. A nonlinear inversion for the geometry, depth, and density of the Mare Serenitatis mascon using an ellipsoidal model yielded a global least squares minimum in horizontal dimensions, depth, and thickness-density contrast product. It was subsequently found, by using a linear model, that there were an infinite number of solutions corresponding to various combinations of depth and lateral inhomogeneity. Linear modeling was performed by means of generalized inverse theory.

  6. Pyramidal inversion domain boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Remmele, T.; Albrecht, M.; Irmscher, K.; Fornari, R.; Strassburg, M.

    2011-10-03

    The structure of pyramidal inversion domain boundaries in GaN:Mg was investigated by aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows the upper (0001) boundary to consist of a single Mg layer inserted between polarity inverted GaN layers in an abcab stacking. The Mg bound in these defects is at least one order of magnitude lower than the chemical Mg concentration. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements show that up to 27% of the Mg acceptors is electrically compensated.

  7. Lightcurve Inversion for 65 Cybele

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Lorenzo; Pilcher, Frederick

    2015-07-01

    We present a shape and spin axis model for main-belt asteroid 65 Cybele. The model was obtained with lightcurve inversion process, using combined dense photometric data obtained during fifteen apparitions from 1977 to 2014 and sparse data from USNO Flagstaff. Analysis of the resulting data found a sidereal period P = 6.081434 ± 0.000005 hours and two possible pole solutions: (l = 208°, b = -7°) and (l = 27°, b = -14°) with an error of ±15 degrees.

  8. The Indian monsoon speeds up plate kinematics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, L.

    2008-12-01

    The convergence of the Indian plate towards Eurasia is faster on the eastern side of the Himalayas by ~ 10 mm yr-1 than on the western side. The Carlsberg ridge records the motion of the Indian plate with respect to Africa, which moves very slowly with respect to Eurasia. Consistently, spreading rates are faster on the eastern side of the ridge. This situation has not remained for ever; available data indicate that the Carlsberg ridge spread at a uniform rate between 20 and 11 Ma, only afterwards did the spreading pattern become more complex. The onset of the Indian monsoon, at ~8 Ma, could be responsible for the rotational convergence of India towards Eurasia and spreading of the Carlsberg ridge, by the action of two joint mechanisms. The very active erosion lowered the bhutanese Himalayas with respect the nepalese Himalayas to a new morphologic equilibrium between tectonics and climate. First, volume balance suggests that the fast eastern erosion "consumes" more Indian crust than the slower western erosion and pumps the Indian lithosphere at mean horizontal velocity of 3 to 5 mm yr-1, i.e. only less than half the velocity increase along the Himalayan arc. The missing term is found in plate kinematics. The post-monsoon force balance requires a faster deformation and larger viscous stresses to compensate the deficit in gravitational potential energy (GPE) associated to the new eastern morphology. Far-field driving forces are less balanced by a lower mountain belt and plate kinematics subsequently accelerate. The Carlsberg-India-Himalyas system can therefore be regarded as a system in which extensional stresses from the ridge are unevenly resisted by the Himalayan load that varies through time and space. Not only does the monsoon affect the topography but it also boosts the convergence in the eastern Himalayas and spreading of the SE side of the Carlsberg ridge. Pairs of convergence rates and GPE can be extracted and ultimately allow one to estimate an effective viscosity for the lithosphere of ~1022 Pa s with no need to quantify the driving tectonic forces.

  9. Effective dislocation lines in continuously dislocated crystals. III. Kinematics

    E-print Network

    Andrzej Trzesowski

    2008-07-16

    A class of congruences of principal Volterra-type effective dislocation lines associated with a dislocation density tensor is distinguished in order to investigate the kinematics of continuized defective crystals in terms of their dislocation densities (tensorial as well as scalar). Moreover, it shown, basing oneself on a formula defining the mean curvature of glide surfaces for principal edge effective dislocation lines, that the considered kinematics of continuized defective crystals is consistent with some relations appearing in the physical theory of plasticity (e.g. with the Orowan-type kinematic relations and with the treatment of shear stresses as driving stresses of moving dislocations).

  10. Abstract Coordinate Transforms in Kinematic Changeable Sets and their Properties

    E-print Network

    Ya. I. Grushka

    2015-04-14

    One of the fundamental postulates of the special relativity theory is existence of a single system of universal coordinate transforms for inertial reference frames, that is coordinate transforms, which are uniquely determined by space-time coordinates of a material point. In this paper the abstract mathematical theory of coordinate transforms in kinematic changeable sets is developed. In particular it is proved the formal possibility of existence of kinematics, which do not allow universal coordinate transforms. Such kinematics may be applied for simulation the evolution of physical systems under the condition of hypothesis on existence of particle-dependent velocity of light.

  11. Power regulation of kinematic control inputs for forward flying Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFarlane, Kenneth; Faruque, Imraan; Sean Humbert, J.

    2014-12-01

    The choices of insect wing kinematic programs is not well understood, particularly the mechanism by which an insect selects a distortion to achieve flight control. A methodology to evaluate prospective kinematic control inputs is presented based on the reachable states when control actuation was constrained to a unit of power. The method implements a computationally-derived reduced order model of the insect's flight dynamics combined with calculation of power requirement. Four kinematic inputs are evaluated based on this criterion for a Drosophila size insect in forward flight. Stroke bias is shown to be the dominant control input using this power normalized evaluation measure.

  12. Inversion climatology at San Jose, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T.; Bornstein, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Month-to-month variations in the early morning surface-based and near-noon elevated inversions at San Jose, Calif., were determined from slow rise radiosondes launched during a four-year period. A high frequency of shallow, radiative, surface-based inversions were found in winter during the early morning hours, while during the same period in summer, a low frequency of deeper based inversions arose from a combination of radiative and subsidence processes. The frequency of elevated inversions in the hours near noon was lowest during fall and spring, while inversion bases were highest and thicknesses least during these periods.

  13. The Inverse Electromagnetic Scattering Problem for Anisotropic Media

    E-print Network

    Cakoni, Fioralba

    The Inverse Electromagnetic Scattering Problem for Anisotropic Media Fioralba Cakoni1 , David. The inverse electromagnetic scattering problem for anisotropic media plays a special role in inverse. Introduction The inverse electromagnetic scattering problem for anisotropic media plays a special role

  14. The tectonic evolution of a critical segment of the Dinarides-Alps connection: Kinematic and geochronological inferences from the Medvednica Mountains, NE Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelder, I. E.; Matenco, L.; Willingshofer, E.; Tomljenovi?, B.; Andriessen, P. A. M.; Ducea, M. N.; Beniest, A.; Grui?, A.

    2015-09-01

    The transition zone between the Alps and Dinarides is a key area to investigate kinematic interactions of neighboring orogens with different subduction polarities. A study combining field kinematic and sedimentary data, microstructural observations, thermochronological data (Rb-Sr and fission track), and regional structures in the area of Medvednica Mountains has revealed a complex polyphase tectonic evolution. We document two novel stages of extensional exhumation. The first stage of extension took place along a Late Cretaceous detachment following the late Early Cretaceous nappe stacking, burial, and greenschist facies metamorphism. Two other shortening events that occurred during the latest Cretaceous-Oligocene were followed by a second event of extensional exhumation, characterized by asymmetric top-NE extension during the Miocene. Top-NW thrusting took place subsequently during the Pliocene inversion of the Pannonian Basin. The Cretaceous nappe burial, Late Cretaceous extension, and the Oligocene(-Earliest Miocene) contraction are events driven by the Alps evolution. In contrast, the latest Cretaceous-Eocene deformation reflects phases of Dinaridic contraction. Furthermore, the Miocene extension and subsequent inversion display kinematics similar with observations elsewhere in the Dinarides and Eastern Alps. All these processes demonstrate that the Medvednica Mountains were affected by Alpine phases of deformations to a much higher degree than previously thought. Similarly with what has been observed in other areas of contractional polarity changes, such as the Mediterranean, Black Sea, or New Guinea systems, the respective tectonic events are triggered by rheological weak zones which are critical for localizing the deformation created by both orogens.

  15. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory’s predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored “while-loops” over “for-loops” in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  16. Stellar kinematics in the local disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, R.; de Souza, R. E.; Dos Anjos, S.

    2008-12-01

    From Hipparcos distances and proper motions for approximately 22000 stars we described the residual velocity distribution by the superposition of two Gaussians instead one as traditionally used. The sample of stars was selected by magnitude, color, Galactic position and distance and ranged in 6 spectral-type groups, 3 of early-type and 3 of late-type stars. We verified that for the early-type stars no gain is attained with our representation but for the late-type stars it is clear that the superposition of two Gaussians better describe the velocity distribution. Our results clearly point to the existence of two different kinematic populations very well characterized in the three late-type star groups: one population with high velocity dispersion and another with low velocity dispersion. It is still more interesting since the high and the low velocity dispersion population is the same in all the three groups. The core of this work was published in De Souza & Teixeira 2007.

  17. Bat flight: aerodynamics, kinematics and flight morphology.

    PubMed

    Hedenström, Anders; Johansson, L Christoffer

    2015-03-01

    Bats evolved the ability of powered flight more than 50 million years ago. The modern bat is an efficient flyer and recent research on bat flight has revealed many intriguing facts. By using particle image velocimetry to visualize wake vortices, both the magnitude and time-history of aerodynamic forces can be estimated. At most speeds the downstroke generates both lift and thrust, whereas the function of the upstroke changes with forward flight speed. At hovering and slow speed bats use a leading edge vortex to enhance the lift beyond that allowed by steady aerodynamics and an inverted wing during the upstroke to further aid weight support. The bat wing and its skeleton exhibit many features and control mechanisms that are presumed to improve flight performance. Whereas bats appear aerodynamically less efficient than birds when it comes to cruising flight, they have the edge over birds when it comes to manoeuvring. There is a direct relationship between kinematics and the aerodynamic performance, but there is still a lack of knowledge about how (and if) the bat controls the movements and shape (planform and camber) of the wing. Considering the relatively few bat species whose aerodynamic tracks have been characterized, there is scope for new discoveries and a need to study species representing more extreme positions in the bat morphospace. PMID:25740899

  18. Kinematic structure of OH/IR stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Kwok, S.

    1987-10-01

    A kinematic model is constructed for 1612 MHz OH maser emssion in OH/IR stars. The spatial distributions of OH maser intensity are calculated from a model of spherically-symmetric uniformly-expanding circumstellar shell. By comparing VLA/VLBI maps of OH/IR stars with model results, the acceptable range of combination of physical parameters M/Ve, (nH2)max, (nH2)min, fOH = [nOH]/[nH2] are derived. The theoretical relations between OH shell radius R0 and mass loss rate Mand between OH maser luminosity LOH and Mare also obtained. These relations are in good agreement with empirical relations established by Bowers et al. (1983) and Baud et al. (1983). The ranges of (nH2)max and (nOH)min under different Mrequired for operating saturated 1612 MHz OH masers are also discussed. The authors find that the OH emission phase can last over 1000 years after the termination of the asymptotic giant branch and many protoplanetary nebulae may have the characteristics of OH/IR stars.

  19. On the Kinematics of Undulator Girder Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, J; ,

    2011-08-18

    The theory of rigid body kinematics is used to derive equations that govern the control and measurement of the position and orientation of undulator girders. The equations form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system. The equations are linear for small motion and easily inverted as desired. For reference, some relevant girder geometrical data is also given. Equations 6-8 relate the linear potentiometer readings to the motion of the girder. Equations 9-11 relate the cam shaft angles to the motion of the girder. Both sets are easily inverted to either obtain the girder motion from the angles or readings, or, to find the angles and readings that would give a desired motion. The motion of any point on the girder can be calculated by applying either sets of equations to the two cam-planes and extrapolating in the z coordinate using equation 19. The formulation of the equations is quite general and easily coded via matrix and vector methods. They form the basis of the girder matlab software on the LCLS control system.

  20. The kinematics of halo red giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, B. W.; Latham, D. W.

    1986-07-01

    The authors have obtained 337 radial velocities with typical accuracies of ± 0.7 km s-1 for 85 metal-poor field red giants, selected from the kinematically unbiased samples of Bond (1980) and Bidelman and MacConnell (1973). The multiply observed stars suggest the field halo giant binary fraction exceeds 10%. Using their own velocities and those published by others, the authors have a sample of 174 red giants with [Fe/H] ? -1.5. Their mean motion with respect to the local standard of rest is >V< = -206±23 km s-1, and the velocity dispersions are ?R = 154±18 km s-1, ?? = 102±27 km s-1, and ?? = 107±15 km s-1. Using photometrically derived absolute magnitudes and published proper motions, the authors compute orbital eccentricities for 72 stars not already considered in a similar study of southern stars by Norris, Bessell, and Pickles (1985). They find a few (5% - 8%) stars with e < 0.4.

  1. Kinematic mental simulations in abduction and deduction.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet Suresh; Mackiewicz, Robert; Bucciarelli, Monica; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2013-10-15

    We present a theory, and its computer implementation, of how mental simulations underlie the abductions of informal algorithms and deductions from these algorithms. Three experiments tested the theory's predictions, using an environment of a single railway track and a siding. This environment is akin to a universal Turing machine, but it is simple enough for nonprogrammers to use. Participants solved problems that required use of the siding to rearrange the order of cars in a train (experiment 1). Participants abduced and described in their own words algorithms that solved such problems for trains of any length, and, as the use of simulation predicts, they favored "while-loops" over "for-loops" in their descriptions (experiment 2). Given descriptions of loops of procedures, participants deduced the consequences for given trains of six cars, doing so without access to the railway environment (experiment 3). As the theory predicts, difficulty in rearranging trains depends on the numbers of moves and cars to be moved, whereas in formulating an algorithm and deducing its consequences, it depends on the Kolmogorov complexity of the algorithm. Overall, the results corroborated the use of a kinematic mental model in creating and testing informal algorithms and showed that individuals differ reliably in the ability to carry out these tasks. PMID:24082090

  2. Restraints and occupant kinematics in vehicular rollovers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Steven E; Herbst, Brian; Forrest, Stephen; Syson, Stephen R; Sances, Anthony; Kumaresan, Srirangam

    2002-01-01

    Occupant kinematics and the potential for injury in vehicular rollover crashes are dramatically affected by various restraint system characteristics. This study reviews previous research that utilized various methodologies and test fixtures to evaluate restrained occupant motions, primarily in the vertical direction, during both inverted and quasi-static simulated rollover environments. Additional laboratory tests were conducted in order to understand the static and dynamic excursion of restrained humans and surrogates in typical production motor vehicles under inverted circumstances. These tests indicated that volunteer occupants restrained within a complete vehicle by typical production 3 point seat belts will move vertically towards the vehicle roof structure by approximately 50-150 mm in production vehicles, depending on occupant size and belt configuration, when inverted and subjected to a static 1 g acceleration. Dynamic inverted vehicle drop testing in 3-point belt production vehicles, resulting in 4 to 11 g impacts, resulted in surrogates moving only about an additional 23 to 55 mm beyond the static inverted 1 g excursions. PMID:12085651

  3. SHIELD: Neutral Gas Kinematics and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew; Teich, Yaron; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we present new results of detailed kinematic analyses of these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (?300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we produce velocity fields and dispersion maps using different spatial and spectral resolution representations of the data in order to attempt derivation of an inclination-corrected rotation curve. While both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make multiple position-velocity cuts across each galaxy to determine the maximum circular rotation velocity (? 30 km-1 for the survey population). Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish H I fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are contextualized on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  4. Feeding underground: kinematics of feeding in caecilians.

    PubMed

    Herrel, Anthony; Measey, G John

    2012-11-01

    Caecilians are limbless amphibians that have evolved distinct cranial and postcranial specializations associated with a burrowing lifestyle. Observations on feeding behavior are rare and restricted to above-ground feeding in laboratory conditions. Here we report data on feeding in tunnels using both external video and X-ray recordings of caecilians feeding on invertebrate prey. Our data show feeding kinematics similar to those previously reported, including the pronounced neck bending observed during above-ground feeding. Our data illustrate, however, that caecilians may be much faster than previously suspected, with lunge speeds of up to 7 cm?sec(-1). Although gape cycles are often slow (0.67?±?0.29 sec), rapid jaw closure is observed during prey capture, with cycle times and jaw movement velocities similar to those observed in other terrestrial tetrapods. Finally, our data suggest that gape angles may be large (64.8?±?18°) and that gape profiles are variable, often lacking distinct slow and fast opening and closing phases. These data illustrate the importance of recording naturalistic feeding behavior and shed light on how these animals are capable of capturing and processing prey in constrained underground environments. Additional data on species with divergent cranial morphologies would be needed to better understand the co-evolution between feeding, burrowing, and cranial design in caecilians. PMID:22927194

  5. Thermally Insulating, Kinematic Tensioned-Fiber Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    2004-01-01

    A salt pill and some parts of a thermally insulating, kinematic suspension system that holds the salt pill rigidly in an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is presented. "Salt pill" in this context denotes a unit comprising a cylindrical container, a matrix of gold wires in the container, and a cylinder of ferric ammonium alum (a paramagnetic salt) that has been deposited on the wires. The structural members used in this system for both thermal insulation and positioning are aromatic polyamide fibers (Kevlar(R) or equivalent) under tension. This suspension system is designed to satisfy several special requirements to ensure the proper operation of the ADR. These requirements are to (1) maintain the salt pill at a specified position within the cylindrical bore of an electromagnet; (2) prevent vibrations, which would cause dissipation of heat in the salt pill; and (3) minimize the conduction of heat from the electromagnet bore and other neighboring objects to the salt pill; all while (4) protecting the salt pill (which is fragile) against all tensile and bending loads other than those attributable to its own weight. In addition, the system is required to consist of two subsystems -- one for the top end and one for the bottom end of the salt pill -- that can be assembled and tensioned separately from each other and from the salt pill, then later attached to the salt pill.

  6. Kinematic analysis of rope skipper's stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Ghani, Nor Atikah; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    There are various kinds of jumping that can be done while performing rope skipping activity. This activity was always associated with injury. But, if the rope skipper can perform the activity in a right way, it is believed that the injury might be reduced. The main purpose of this paper is to observe the stability of rope skipper from a biomechanics perspective, which are the centre of mass, angle at the ankle, knee and hip joints and also the trajectory for the ipsilateral leg between the two types of skip which is one leg and two legs. Six healthy, physically active subject, two males and four females (age: 8.00±1.25 years, weight: 17.90±6.85 kg and height: 1.22±0.08 m) participated in this study. Kinematic data of repeated five cycles of rope skipping activity was captured by using Vicon Nexus system. Based on the data collected, skipping with two legs shows more stable behavior during preparation, flight and landing phases. It is concluded that landing on the balls of the feet, lowering the trajectory positions of the feet from the ground as well as flexion of each joint which would reduce the injury while landing.

  7. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wang, Xuben; Li, Zhirong; Li, Qiong; Li, Zhengwen

    2009-06-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  8. Kinematical and Chemical Vertical Structure of the Galactic Thick Disk. I. Thick Disk Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Méndez, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    The variation of the kinematical properties of the Galactic thick disk with Galactic height Z is studied by means of 412 red giants observed in the direction of the south Galactic pole up to 4.5 kpc from the plane. We confirm the non-null mean radial motion toward the Galactic anticenter found by other authors, but we find that it changes sign at |Z| = 3 kpc, and the proposed inward motion of the local standard of rest alone cannot explain these observations. The rotational velocity decreases with |Z| by -30 km s-1 kpc-1, but the data are better represented by a power law with index 1.25, similar to that proposed from the analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. All the velocity dispersions increase with |Z|, but the vertical gradients are small. The dispersions grow proportionally, with no significant variation of the anisotropy. The ratio ?U/?W = 2 suggests that the thick disk could have formed from a low-latitude merging event. The vertex deviation increases with Galactic height, reaching ~20° at |Z| = 3.5 kpc. The tilt angle also increases, and the orientation of the ellipsoid in the radial-vertical plane is constantly intermediate between the alignment with the cylindrical and the spherical coordinate systems. The tilt angle at |Z| = 2 kpc coincides with the expectations of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics, but an extension of the calculations to higher |Z| is required to perform a conclusive test. Finally, between 2.5 and 3.5 kpc we detect deviations from the linear trend of many kinematical quantities, suggesting that some kinematical substructure could be present. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (proposal IDs 075.B-0459(A), 077.B-0348(A)). This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan and the duPont Telescopes, located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. New inverse synthetic aperture radar algorithm for translational motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocker, Richard P.; Henderson, Thomas B.; Jones, Scott A.; Frieden, B. R.

    1991-10-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is an imaging technique that shows real promise in classifying airborne targets in real time under all weather conditions. Over the past few years a large body of ISAR data has been collected and considerable effort has been expended to develop algorithms to form high-resolution images from this data. One important goal of workers in this field is to develop software that will do the best job of imaging under the widest range of conditions. The success of classifying targets using ISAR is predicated upon forming highly focused radar images of these targets. Efforts to develop highly focused imaging computer software have been challenging, mainly because the imaging depends on and is affected by the motion of the target, which in general is not precisely known. Specifically, the target generally has both rotational motion about some axis and translational motion as a whole with respect to the radar. The slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities must be first accurately estimated from the data and compensated before the image can be focused. Following slant-range motion compensation, the image is further focused by determining and correcting for target rotation. The use of the burst derivative measure is proposed as a means to improve the computational efficiency of currently used ISAR algorithms. The use of this measure in motion compensation ISAR algorithms for estimating the slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities of an uncooperative target is described. Preliminary tests have been performed on simulated as well as actual ISAR data using both a Sun 4 workstation and a parallel processing transputer array. Results indicate that the burst derivative measure gives significant improvement in processing speed over the traditional entropy measure now employed.

  10. PERIORAL BIOMECHANICS, KINEMATICS, AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    E-print Network

    Chu, Shin Ying

    2010-11-21

    This investigation quantitatively characterized the orofacial biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyography (EMG) patterns in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of anti-PD medication state. Passive perioral...

  11. Kinematical classification of two-pion production on the nucleon

    E-print Network

    N. E. Ligterink

    2003-04-22

    We give a full kinematical classification of all the tree-level two-pion photoproduction processes on the nucleon, which consists of seventeen diagrams. It suggests a method of analysis of two-pion data with little model bias.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL CATALYSTS AND OROFACIAL KINEMATICS OF EMERGENT CANONICAL SYLLABLES

    E-print Network

    Poore, Meredith Ann

    2011-08-31

    The vocalizations and jaw kinematics of 30 infants aged 6-8 months were recorded using a Motion Analysis System and audiovisual technologies. This study represents the first attempt to determine the effect of play environment on infants' rate...

  13. A kinematic coupling based 6 degrees of freedom dynamometer

    E-print Network

    Moreu Gamazo, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    A new 6-degree of freedom dynamometer is presented. Six load cells measure the normal forces at the contact points of a three groove kinematic coupling. Three toggle clamps are used to preload the machine, so that it does ...

  14. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31: OLD CLUSTERS WITH BAR KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Athanassoula, E.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze our accurate kinematical data for the old clusters in the inner regions of M31. These velocities are based on high signal-to-noise Hectospec data. The data are well suited for analysis of M31's inner regions because we took particular care to correct for contamination by unresolved field stars from the disk and bulge in the fibers. The metal-poor clusters show kinematics that are compatible with a pressure-supported spheroid. The kinematics of metal-rich clusters, however, argue for a disk population. In particular the innermost region (inside 2 kpc) shows the kinematics of the x{sub 2} family of bar periodic orbits, arguing for the existence of an inner Lindblad resonance in M31.

  15. A kinematic model for surface irrigation: An extension 

    E-print Network

    Sherman, Bernard; Singh, Vijay P.

    1982-01-01

    RESEARCH, VOL. 18, NO. 3, PAGES 659-667, JUNE 1982 A Kinematic Model for Surface Irrigation' An Extension BERNARD SHERMAN Department of Mathematics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 VIJAY P. SINGH Department...

  16. Kinematic wave model of bed profiles in alluvial channels 

    E-print Network

    Tayfur, Gokmen; Singh, Vijay P.

    2006-06-21

    A mathematical model, based on the kinematic wave (KW) theory, is developed for describing the evolution and movement of bed profiles in alluvial channels. The model employs a functional relation between sediment transport rate and concentration, a...

  17. COMPARISON OF SWIMMING KINEMATICS BETWEEN TERRESTRIAL AND SEMIAQUATIC OPOSSUMS

    E-print Network

    Fish, Frank

    I COMPARISON OF SWIMMING KINEMATICS BETWEEN TERRESTRIAL AND SEMIAQUATIC OPOSSUMS FRANK E of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiunu) and water opossum (Chironectes minimus) were studied to determine unrestricted movement of the hind limbs. Key words: Didelphis, Chironectes, opossum, swimming, gait

  18. Characterization and testing of a height adjustable kinematic coupling

    E-print Network

    Bosworth, William R., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    A new height adjustable kinematic coupling has been designed for a next generation high precision ceramics grinding machine designed to have total loop stiffness of 60 N/[mu]m. A test apparatus and prototype of the new ...

  19. Kinematic distributions for electron pair production by muons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsker, R.

    1972-01-01

    Cross sections and kinematic distributions for the trident production process plus or negative muon plus charge yields plus or minus muon plus electron plus positron plus charge (with charge = dipion moment and Fe) are given for beam energies of 100 to 300 GeV at fixed (electron positron) masses from 5 to 15 GeV. This process is interesting as a test of quantum electrodynamics at high energies, and in particular as a test of the form of the photon propagator at large timelike (four-momentum) squared. For this purpose, it is desirable to impose kinematic cuts that favor those Bethe-Heitler graphs which contain a timelike photon propagator. It is found that there are substantial differences between the kinematic distributions for the full Bethe-Heitler matrix element and the distributions for the two timelike-photon graphs alone; these differences can be exploited in the selection of appropriate kinematic cuts.

  20. Predictions of undirectional irregular wave kinematics and evolution 

    E-print Network

    Ye, Mao

    1994-01-01

    Although irregular ocean waves can be viewed as the summation of many wave components with different frequencies, accurate prediction of elevation evolution and kinematics is difficult due to the existence of nonlinear interactions among the wave...

  1. Kinematic power corrections in off-forward hard reactions.

    PubMed

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2011-11-11

    We develop a general approach to the calculation of kinematic corrections ?t/Q(2), m(2)/Q(2) in hard processes which involve momentum transfer from the initial to the final hadron state. As the principal result, the complete expression is derived for the time-ordered product of two electromagnetic currents that includes all kinematic corrections to twist-four accuracy. The results are immediately applicable, e.g., to the studies of deeply virtual Compton scattering. PMID:22181726

  2. Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

    1974-01-01

    The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

  3. Notes 03. Kinematics of motion in cylindrical journal bearings 

    E-print Network

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    ?? ? ?? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?? ? ? ?? ?? ?? ? ? ?? ? ? ??? (3.5) Fluid Flow in a Cylindrical Journal Bearing Cylindrical fluid film bearings are commonly used to support loads, static and dynamic, in rotating machinery. These lubricated bearings also introduce viscous damping that aids in reducing... 3. KINEMATICS OF JOURNAL BEARINGS ? Dr. Luis San Andr?s (2009) 1 NOTES 3 KINEMATICS OF JOURNAL BEARINGS Lecture 3 introduces the analysis of fluid flow in a (simple & ideal) cylindrical journal bearing whose film thickness is a function...

  4. Singular divergence instability thresholds of kinematically constrained circulatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, O. N.; Challamel, N.; Darve, F.; Lerbet, J.; Nicot, F.

    2014-01-01

    Static instability or divergence threshold of both potential and circulatory systems with kinematic constraints depends singularly on the constraints' coefficients. Particularly, the critical buckling load of the kinematically constrained Ziegler's pendulum as a function of two coefficients of the constraint is given by the Plücker conoid of degree n=2. This simple mechanical model exhibits a structural instability similar to that responsible for the Velikhov-Chandrasekhar paradox in the theory of magnetorotational instability.

  5. Generalized Gravity I : Kinematical Setting and reformalizing Quantum Field Theory

    E-print Network

    Johan Noldus

    2008-04-20

    The first part of this work deals with the development of a natural differential calculus on non-commutative manifolds. The second part extends the covariance and equivalence principle as well studies its kinematical consequences such as the arising of gauge theory. Furthermore, a manifestly causal and covariant formulation of quantum field theory is presented which surpasses the usual Hamiltonian and path integral construction. A particular representation of this theory on the kinematical structure developed in section three is moreover given.

  6. 3d And 2d Automatic Inverse Modelling Of Sedimentary Basin Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, S. M.; Podladchikov, Yu. Yu.; Schmid, D.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    We present 3D and 2D forward models (TECMOD2D and 3D), which numerically simulate sedimentary basin formation and are coupled with automatic inversion algo- rithms. The forward models are based on depth-dependent kinematic stretching and/or asymmetric extension along faults. The inversion algorithm iteratively finds the opti- mal set of thinning factors or fault offsets (which fit any observed basin stratigraphy best) in such a way that symmetric versus asymmetric mode of extension is not as- sumed a priori. The inversion algorithms are able to fit thinning factors that corre- spond to multiple, finite rifting events. The 2D inversion algorithms generally find the optimal set of thinning factors within 10 to 20 iterations for given initial condi- tions. For 3D applications, the inversion algorithm has to fit the horizontal stretching direction in addition to the thinning factors. Necessary modifications of the 2D inver- sion algorithms for 3D applications are discussed. The 3D forward model includes the effects of finite rift duration, thermal sediment blanketing, sediment compaction, radiogenic heat production, lateral heat conduction and advection, flexural isostasy and depth of necking. The 2D model additionally includes faulting and new oceanic crust formation. A 3D forward run with a numerical resolution of 41x41x51 nodes and 28 time steps takes around 15 minutes on a standard PC (1.3 GHz). The influ- ence of finite rift duration, thermal sediment blanketing and lateral heat conduction on the basin subsidence is evaluated. The coupled forward/inverse models are applied to restore the palaeo heat flow at the basement-sediment contact using observed basin stratigraphies. The effects of thermal sediment blanketing and lateral heat conduction in combination with radiogenic heat production are shown to strongly influence the palaeo heat flow reconstructions.

  7. The Association of Scapular Kinematics and Glenohumeral Joint Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    LUDEWIG, PAULA M.; REYNOLDS, JONATHAN F.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There is a growing body of literature associating abnormal scapular positions and motions, and, to a lesser degree, clavicular kinematics with a variety of shoulder pathologies. The purpose of this manuscript is to (1) review the normal kinematics of the scapula and clavicle during arm elevation, (2) review the evidence for abnormal scapular and clavicular kinematics in glenohumeral joint pathologies, (3) review potential biomechanical implications and mechanisms of these kinematic alterations, and (4) relate these biomechanical factors to considerations in the patient management process for these disorders. There is evidence of scapular kinematic alterations associated with shoulder impingement, rotator cuff tendinopathy, rotator cuff tears, glenohumeral instability, adhesive capsulitis, and stiff shoulders. There is also evidence for altered muscle activation in these patient populations, particularly, reduced serratus anterior and increased upper trapezius activation. Scapular kinematic alterations similar to those found in patient populations have been identified in subjects with a short rest length of the pectoralis minor, tight soft-tissue structures in the posterior shoulder region, excessive thoracic kyphosis, or with flexed thoracic postures. This suggests that attention to these factors is warranted in the clinical evaluation and treatment of these patients. The available evidence in clinical trials supports the use of therapeutic exercise in rehabilitating these patients, while further gains in effectiveness should continue to be pursued. PMID:19194022

  8. Growth Kinematics of Opening-Mode Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, P.; Alzayer, Y.; Laubach, S.; Fall, A.

    2014-12-01

    Fracture aperture is a primary control on flow in fractured reservoirs of low matrix permeability including unconventional oil and gas reservoirs and most geothermal systems. Guided by principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, fracture aperture is generally assumed to be a linear function of fracture length and elastic material properties. Natural opening-mode fractures with significant preserved aperture are observed in core and outcrop indicative of fracture opening strain accommodated by permanent solution-precipitation creep. Fracture opening may thus be decoupled from length growth if the material effectively weakens after initial elastic fracture growth by either non-elastic deformation processes or changes in elastic properties. To investigate the kinematics of fracture length and aperture growth, we reconstructed the opening history of three opening-mode fractures that are bridged by crack-seal quartz cement in Travis Peak Sandstone of the SFOT-1 well, East Texas. Similar crack-seal cement bridges had been interpreted to form by repeated incremental fracture opening and subsequent precipitation of quartz cement. We imaged crack-seal cement textures for bridges sampled at varying distance from the tips using scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence, and determined the number and thickness of crack-seal cement increments as a function of position along the fracture length and height. Observed trends in increment number and thickness are consistent with an initial stage of fast fracture propagation relative to aperture growth, followed by a stage of slow propagation and pronounced aperture growth. Consistent with fluid inclusion observations indicative of fracture opening and propagation occurring over 30-40 m.y., we interpret the second phase of pronounced aperture growth to result from fracture opening strain accommodated by solution-precipitation creep and concurrent slow, possibly subcritical, fracture propagation. Similar deformation mechanisms are envisioned to govern fracture growth over shorter timescales in reactive chemical subsurface environments including CO2 reservoirs, organic-rich shales, and geothermal systems.

  9. A quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2015-07-01

    We construct a quantum kinematics for asymptotically flat gravity based on the Koslowski-Sahlmann (KS) representation. The KS representation is a generalization of the representation underlying loop quantum gravity (LQG) which supports, in addition to the usual LQG operators, the action of ‘background exponential operators’, which are connection dependent operators labelled by ‘background’ su(2) electric fields. KS states have, in addition to the LQG state label corresponding to one dimensional excitations of the triad, a label corresponding to a ‘background’ electric field that describes three dimensional excitations of the triad. Asymptotic behaviour in quantum theory is controlled through asymptotic conditions on the background electric fields that label the states and the background electric fields that label the operators. Asymptotic conditions on the triad are imposed as conditions on the background electric field state label while confining the LQG spin net graph labels to compact sets. We show that KS states can be realised as wave functions on a quantum configuration space of generalized connections and that the asymptotic behaviour of each such generalized connection is determined by that of the background electric fields which label the background exponential operators. Similar to the spatially compact case, the Gauss law and diffeomorphism constraints are then imposed through group averaging techniques to obtain a large sector of gauge invariant states. It is shown that this sector supports a unitary action of the group of asymptotic rotations and translations and that, as anticipated by Friedman and Sorkin, for appropriate spatial topology, this sector contains states that display fermionic behaviour under 2? rotations.

  10. Fundamental Principles of Proper Space Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Sean

    It is desirable to understand the movement of both matter and energy in the universe based upon fundamental principles of space and time. Time dilation and length contraction are features of Special Relativity derived from the observed constancy of the speed of light. Quantum Mechanics asserts that motion in the universe is probabilistic and not deterministic. While the practicality of these dissimilar theories is well established through widespread application inconsistencies in their marriage persist, marring their utility, and preventing their full expression. After identifying an error in perspective the current theories are tested by modifying logical assumptions to eliminate paradoxical contradictions. Analysis of simultaneous frames of reference leads to a new formulation of space and time that predicts the motion of both kinds of particles. Proper Space is a real, three-dimensional space clocked by proper time that is undergoing a densification at the rate of c. Coordinate transformations to a familiar object space and a mathematical stationary space clarify the counterintuitive aspects of Special Relativity. These symmetries demonstrate that within the local universe stationary observers are a forbidden frame of reference; all is in motion. In lieu of Quantum Mechanics and Uncertainty the use of the imaginary number i is restricted for application to the labeling of mass as either material or immaterial. This material phase difference accounts for both the perceived constant velocity of light and its apparent statistical nature. The application of Proper Space Kinematics will advance more accurate representations of microscopic, oscopic, and cosmological processes and serve as a foundation for further study and reflection thereafter leading to greater insight.

  11. Seismicity and kinematic evolution of middle Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, A.; Abdel-Monem, S. M.; Sakr, K.; Ali, Sh. M.

    2006-08-01

    Based on historical and instrumental seismicity as well as recent GPS measurements, the seismicity and kinematic evaluation of middle Egypt is presented. Middle Egypt suffered in historical times by six major earthquakes and the Ramses II temple on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, was almost destroyed by an ancient event. The temporal distribution of recent earthquakes (1900-1997) is highly scattered with only nine events recorded. Only after the installation of the modern Egyptian national seismograph network (ENSN) the seismic record of middle Egypt increased with a total of 280 earthquakes from 1998 to 2004. Focal mechanism solutions of the largest five events during the ENSN's operation period reveal reverse faulting mechanism with minor strike-slip component on the west bank of the Nile, while a normal faulting mechanism dominate in the eastern side. The orientations of both P- and T-axes are consistent with the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez stress field. Dynamic source parameters of these five events were derived from P-wave spectra as well. Three campaigns of GPS measurements were carried out for the middle Egypt network that established after the first instrumental earthquake on 14 December 1998 in this area. The velocity vectors for each epoch of observations were calculated and deformation analysis was performed. The horizontal velocity varies between 1 and 4 mm/year across the network. The deformation pattern suggests significant contraction across the southeastern sector of the study area while, the northwestern part is characterized by an extension strain rates. High shear strain is observed along the epicenteral area of the Mw = 4.0 June 2003 earthquake possibly reflecting the stress accumulation stage of a seismic cycle.

  12. Parallel inverse iteration with reorthogonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, G.I.; Littlefield, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A parallel method for finding orthogonal eigenvectors of real symmetric tridiagonal is described. The method uses inverse iteration with repeated Modified Gram-Schmidt (MGS) reorthogonalization of the unconverged iterates for clustered eigenvalues. This approach is more parallelizable than reorthogonalizing against fully converged eigenvectors, as is done by LAPACK`s current DSTEIN routine. The new method is found to provide accuracy and speed comparable to DSTEIN`s and to have good parallel scalability even for matrices with large clusters of eigenvalues. We present al results for residual and orthogonality tests, plus timings on IBM RS/6000 (sequential) and Intel Touchstone DELTA (parallel) computers.

  13. Parallel inverse iteration with reorthogonalization

    SciTech Connect

    Fann, G.I.; Littlefield, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A parallel method for finding orthogonal eigenvectors of real symmetric tridiagonal is described. The method uses inverse iteration with repeated Modified Gram-Schmidt (MGS) reorthogonalization of the unconverged iterates for clustered eigenvalues. This approach is more parallelizable than reorthogonalizing against fully converged eigenvectors, as is done by LAPACK's current DSTEIN routine. The new method is found to provide accuracy and speed comparable to DSTEIN's and to have good parallel scalability even for matrices with large clusters of eigenvalues. We present al results for residual and orthogonality tests, plus timings on IBM RS/6000 (sequential) and Intel Touchstone DELTA (parallel) computers.

  14. Inverse problem for Planck formula

    E-print Network

    A. N. Pechenkov

    2012-07-19

    Planck formula is considered as a first moment (average value) of unknown function of electromagnetic energy distribution of black body radiation. In-verse problem for the definition of the unknown function is solved for Gibbs ensemble. The solution needs of ensembles with both absolute temperatures: positive temperature and negative temperature. Such ensembles are the part of more extended class of ensembles with finite energies and finite phase vol-umes. In addition, the absence of Bohr - van Leeuwen paradox is considered for such statistical ensembles.

  15. Inverse scattering in multimode structures

    E-print Network

    Ole Henrik Waagaard; Johannes Skaar

    2007-07-22

    We consider the inverse scattering problem associated with any number of interacting modes in one-dimensional structures. The coupling between the modes is contradirectional in addition to codirectional, and may be distributed continuously or in discrete points. The local coupling as a function of position is obtained from reflection data using a layer-stripping type method, and the separate identification of the contradirectional and codirectional coupling is obtained using matrix factorization. Ambiguities are discussed in detail, and different {\\it a priori} information that can resolve the ambiguities is suggested. The method is exemplified by applications to multimode optical waveguides with quasi-periodical perturbations.

  16. Minimal dynamical inverse seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bazzocchi, Federica

    2011-05-01

    We present a minimal model in which the inverse see saw is realized dynamically. The two unity lepton number-breaking term is induced at two-loop level and is naturally around the keV scale, while right-handed neutrinos are at the TeV scale. An interesting extension of the model is obtained by gauging B-L: in this case, anomaly cancellation has as a direct consequence the presence of a sterile neutrino at the MeV scale that may be a good dark matter candidate. Moreover, the new gauge boson Z{sup '} and the new neutral scalars may have characteristic signatures at LHC.

  17. Uncertainty of rapid earthquake source inversion using the regional seismogeodetic networks around megacity Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Faqi; Wang, Rongjiang; Hedio, Aochi; Walter, Thomas; Zheng, Yong; Xiong, Xiong

    2015-04-01

    During the 20th century, a series of devastating earthquakes occurred along the north Anatolian fault, which generally propagated westward towards Istanbul, leaving the main NAF segment beneath the Marmara Sea as a seismic gap. For the nearby megacity Istanbul, rapid seismic hazard assessment is of most importance. A key issue is how such strong earthquakes can be characterized reliably and rapidly using the regional seismogeodetic monitoring networks. For this purpose, a new source imaging tool has been developed and improved. Several tests are carried out to estimate uncertainties of the kinematic rupture models inverted from synthetic data that were generated based on 3D dynamic modelling of different scenario earthquakes. In the kinematic inversion, a practical 1D earth model is used and uncertainties in the hypocenter location and focal mechanism are considered to investigate their influences on the inversion results. It is found that the rupture processes can be well reconstructed using the current monitoring networks if the same earth structure, hypocenter location, fault geometry and focal mechanism are adopted as used in the forward modelling. In comparison, if some reasonable uncertainties are included in these input parameters, no substantial changes are observed in the key source parameters, such as the moment magnitude, the fault size and centroid location, which are essential for rapid hazard assessment, while the spatial distribution and the peak value of fault slip may have significant bias. Finally, the potential and limitation of the current seismogeodetic networks around the megacity Istanbul for real-time earthquake source imaging are discussed.

  18. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input file, with preferred parameters values, is given in Appendix A. An example of the plot generated at a normal completion of the inversion is shown in Appendix B.

  19. Human inversions and their functional consequences

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Marta; Casillas, Sònia; Villatoro, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic inversions are a type of structural variants that are difficult to analyze owing to their balanced nature and the location of breakpoints within complex repeated regions. So far, only a handful of inversions have been studied in detail in humans and current knowledge about their possible functional effects is still limited. However, inversions have been related to phenotypic changes and adaptation in multiple species. In this review, we summarize the evidences of the functional impact of inversions in the human genome. First, given that inversions have been shown to inhibit recombination in heterokaryotes, chromosomes displaying different orientation are expected to evolve independently and this may lead to distinct gene-expression patterns. Second, inversions have a role as disease-causing mutations both by directly affecting gene structure or regulation in different ways, and by predisposing to other secondary arrangements in the offspring of inversion carriers. Finally, several inversions show signals of being selected during human evolution. These findings illustrate the potential of inversions to have phenotypic consequences also in humans and emphasize the importance of their inclusion in genome-wide association studies. PMID:25998059

  20. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Diego; Ullastres, Anna; González, Josefa

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species—human malaria vectors—is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed. PMID:24904633

  1. Fast methods for inverse wave scattering problems

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jung Hoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01

    Inverse wave scattering problems arise in many applications including computerized/diffraction tomography, seismology, diffraction/holographic grating design, object identification from radar singals, and semiconductor ...

  2. Interpreting functions of one-dimensional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, Reality S.

    The present work examined several factors related to interpreting graphical representations of motion concepts. Since the seminal work of Larkin and Simon (1987), cognitive research has investigated informational equivalence and computational efficiency by contrasting performance across different representations systems such as line versus bar graph (Ali & Peebles, 2012; Shah & Freedman, 2009; Zacks & Tversky, 1999), table versus graph (Speier, 2006; Vessey, 1991) or table versus map (Smelcer & Carmel, 1997). Physics education research has focused on difficulties related to interpreting motion concepts in graphs, accounting for them in terms of misconceptions. Kinematics, the branch of physics concerned with the motion of objects, makes an interesting study of informational equivalence and computational efficiency because its three primary representations -- position-time, velocity-time, and acceleration-time graphs -- can reflect the same information in the same representational system which provides a different type of contrast than has usually been used in this area of cognitive research. In the present work, four experiments were used to test several hypotheses concerned with whether information about the motion of objects can be directly read-off the graph or whether it needed additional processing beyond what was directly visible; Palmer (1987) referred to this as the derivational structure of representations. The main findings across the four experiments were that (a) graph type was not a reliable factor of graph interpretation difficulty, (b) derivational structure was useful for analyzing tasks but there was no evidence supporting it as a process account, (c) graph-based judgment is susceptible to visual features in the graph that trigger powerful spatial-conceptual correspondences particularly height (e.g., higher means more, lower means less), direction of slope (e.g., zero, positive, negative), and curvature (e.g., increasing rate of change, decreasing rate of change), (d) subjects primarily based their judgments on information from these features even when interpretation demanded more elaborate inferences with respect to the actual properties of motion depicted, and (e) domain knowledge was not enough to override the spatial-conceptual correspondences that biased judgment.

  3. 2.5D regularized inversion for the interpretation of residual gravity data by a dipping thin sheet: numerical examples and case studies with an insight on sensitivity and non-uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehanee, Salah A.; Essa, Khalid S.

    2015-12-01

    A new two-and-a-half dimensional (2.5D) regularized inversion scheme has been developed for the interpretation of residual gravity data by a dipping thin-sheet model. This scheme solves for the characteristic inverse parameters (depth to top z, dip angle ?, extension in depth L, strike length 2 Y, and amplitude coefficient A) of a model in the space of logarithms of these parameters (log( z), log( ?), log( L), log( Y), and log(| A|)). The developed method has been successfully verified on synthetic examples without noise. The method is found stable and can estimate the inverse parameters of the buried target with acceptable accuracy when applied to data contaminated with various noise levels. However, some of the inverse parameters encountered some inaccuracy when the method was applied to synthetic data distorted by significant neighboring gravity effects/interferences. The validity of this method for practical applications has been successfully illustrated on two field examples with diverse geologic settings from mineral exploration. The estimated inverse parameters of the real data investigated are found to generally conform well with those yielded from drilling. The method is shown to be highly applicable for mineral prospecting and reconnaissance studies. It is capable of extracting the various characteristic inverse parameters that are of geologic and economic significance, and is of particular value in cases where the residual gravity data set is due to an isolated thin-sheet type buried target. The sensitivity analysis carried out on the Jacobian matrices of the field examples investigated here has shown that the parameter that can be determined with the superior accuracy is ? (as confirmed from drilling information). The parameters z, L, Y, and A can be estimated with acceptable accuracy, especially the parameters z and A. This inverse problem is non-unique. The non-uniqueness analysis and the tabulated inverse results presented here have shown that the parameters most affected by the non-uniqueness are L and Y. It has also been shown that the new scheme developed here is advantageous in terms of computational efficiency, stability and convergence than the existing gravity data inversion schemes that solve for the characteristic inverse parameters of a sheet/dike.

  4. Compliance modeling and analysis of a 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Yanqin; Dai, Jiansheng

    2014-07-01

    The compliance modeling and rigidity performance evaluation for the lower mobility parallel manipulators are still to be remained as two overwhelming challenges in the stage of conceptual design due to their geometric complexities. By using the screw theory, this paper explores the compliance modeling and eigencompliance evaluation of a newly patented 1T2R spindle head whose topological architecture is a 3-RPS parallel mechanism. The kinematic definitions and inverse position analysis are briefly addressed in the first place to provide necessary information for compliance modeling. By considering the 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine(PKM) as a typical compliant parallel device, whose three limb assemblages have bending, extending and torsional deflections, an analytical compliance model for the spindle head is established with screw theory and the analytical stiffness matrix of the platform is formulated. Based on the eigenscrew decomposition, the eigencompliance and corresponding eigenscrews are analyzed and the platform's compliance properties are physically interpreted as the suspension of six screw springs. The distributions of stiffness constants of the six screw springs throughout the workspace are predicted in a quick manner with a piece-by-piece calculation algorithm. The numerical simulation reveals a strong dependency of platform's compliance on its configuration in that they are axially symmetric due to structural features. At the last stage, the effects of some design variables such as structural, configurational and dimensional parameters on system rigidity characteristics are investigated with the purpose of providing useful information for the structural design and performance improvement of the PKM. Compared with previous efforts in compliance analysis of PKMs, the present methodology is more intuitive and universal thus can be easily applied to evaluate the overall rigidity performance of other PKMs with high efficiency.

  5. A bio-inspired kinematic controller for obstacle avoidance during reaching tasks with real robots.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Narayan; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Sundareswara, Rashmi; Lee, Craig; Grossberg, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a redundant robot arm that is capable of learning to reach for targets in space in a self-organized fashion while avoiding obstacles. Self-generated movement commands that activate correlated visual, spatial and motor information are used to learn forward and inverse kinematic control models while moving in obstacle-free space using the Direction-to-Rotation Transform (DIRECT). Unlike prior DIRECT models, the learning process in this work was realized using an online Fuzzy ARTMAP learning algorithm. The DIRECT-based kinematic controller is fault tolerant and can handle a wide range of perturbations such as joint locking and the use of tools despite not having experienced them during learning. The DIRECT model was extended based on a novel reactive obstacle avoidance direction (DIRECT-ROAD) model to enable redundant robots to avoid obstacles in environments with simple obstacle configurations. However, certain configurations of obstacles in the environment prevented the robot from reaching the target with purely reactive obstacle avoidance. To address this complexity, a self-organized process of mental rehearsals of movements was modeled, inspired by human and animal experiments on reaching, to generate plans for movement execution using DIRECT-ROAD in complex environments. These mental rehearsals or plans are self-generated by using the Fuzzy ARTMAP algorithm to retrieve multiple solutions for reaching each target while accounting for all the obstacles in its environment. The key aspects of the proposed novel controller were illustrated first using simple examples. Experiments were then performed on real robot platforms to demonstrate successful obstacle avoidance during reaching tasks in real-world environments. PMID:22954479

  6. Upper-limb kinematic reconstruction during stroke robot-aided therapy.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, E; Zollo, L; Garcia-Aracil, N; Badesa, F J; Morales, R; Mazzoleni, S; Sterzi, S; Guglielmelli, E

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel method for an accurate and unobtrusive reconstruction of the upper-limb kinematics of stroke patients during robot-aided rehabilitation tasks with end-effector machines. The method is based on a robust analytic procedure for inverse kinematics that simply uses, in addition to hand pose data provided by the robot, upper arm acceleration measurements for computing a constraint on elbow position; it is exploited for task space augmentation. The proposed method can enable in-depth comprehension of planning strategy of stroke patients in the joint space and, consequently, allow developing therapies tailored for their residual motor capabilities. The experimental validation has a twofold purpose: (1) a comparative analysis with an optoelectronic motion capturing system is used to assess the method capability to reconstruct joint motion; (2) the application of the method to healthy and stroke subjects during circle-drawing tasks with InMotion2 robot is used to evaluate its efficacy in discriminating stroke from healthy behavior. The experimental results have shown that arm angles are reconstructed with a RMSE of 8.3 × 10(-3) rad. Moreover, the comparison between healthy and stroke subjects has revealed different features in the joint space in terms of mean values and standard deviations, which also allow assessing inter- and intra-subject variability. The findings of this study contribute to the investigation of motor performance in the joint space and Cartesian space of stroke patients undergoing robot-aided therapy, thus allowing: (1) evaluating the outcomes of the therapeutic approach, (2) re-planning the robotic treatment based on patient needs, and (3) understanding pathology-related motor strategies. PMID:25861746

  7. Kinematics and Evolution of Local Features of the Large-Scale Magnetic Field I. Kinematical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. V.

    1998-09-01

    Kinematics of local magnetic features (LMFs) have been investigated by analyzing a 22-year series of synoptic maps of the radial magnetic field of the Sun (the term ‘local’ refers hereinafter to magnetic features with an effective size of the order of an arc min). We applied the cross-correlation technique to analyse separately each of the harmonics obtained by using a one-dimensional Fourier transform of the magnetic field in longitude. Such an approach allowed us to trace the motion of the LMFs for a time interval as long as 12 Carrington rotations. The analysis also has shown that the effective size of the magnetic tracers grows significantly with increasing age, which indicates that the local-scale magnetic features undergo diffusion-like expansion and weakening, in agreement with Leighton's model of magnetic field evolution.

  8. Kinematic evolution of simulated star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ?8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of 'disk settling'. For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art 'zoom in' hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (?{sub g}) and increase in ordered rotation (V{sub rot}) with time. The slopes of the relations between both ?{sub g} and V{sub rot} with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling'.

  9. Comparisons of Kinematics and Dynamics Simulation Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul

    2002-01-01

    Kinematic and dynamic analyses for moving bodies are essential to system engineers and designers in the process of design and validations. 3D visualization and motion simulation plus finite element analysis (FEA) give engineers a better way to present ideas and results. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system engineering researchers are currently using IGRIP from DELMIA Inc. as a kinematic simulation tool for discrete bodies motion simulations. Although IGRIP is an excellent tool for kinematic simulation with some dynamic analysis capabilities in robotic control, explorations of other alternatives with more powerful dynamic analysis and FEA capabilities are necessary. Kinematics analysis will only examine the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the mechanism without considering effects from masses of components. With dynamic analysis and FEA, effects such as the forces or torques at the joint due to mass and inertia of components can be identified. With keen market competition, ALGOR Mechanical Event Simulation (MES), MSC visualNastran 4D, Unigraphics Motion+, and Pro/MECHANICA were chosen for explorations. In this study, comparisons between software tools were presented in terms of following categories: graphical user interface (GUI), import capability, tutorial availability, ease of use, kinematic simulation capability, dynamic simulation capability, FEA capability, graphical output, technical support, and cost. Propulsion Test Article (PTA) with Fastrac engine model exported from IGRIP and an office chair mechanism were used as examples for simulations.

  10. Statistical modeling to characterize relationships between knee anatomy and kinematics.

    PubMed

    Smoger, Lowell M; Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Clary, Chadd W; Cyr, Adam J; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J; Laz, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The mechanics of the knee are complex and dependent on the shape of the articular surfaces and their relative alignment. Insight into how anatomy relates to kinematics can establish biomechanical norms, support the diagnosis and treatment of various pathologies (e.g., patellar maltracking) and inform implant design. Prior studies have used correlations to identify anatomical measures related to specific motions. The objective of this study was to describe relationships between knee anatomy and tibiofemoral (TF) and patellofemoral (PF) kinematics using a statistical shape and function modeling approach. A principal component (PC) analysis was performed on a 20-specimen dataset consisting of shape of the bone and cartilage for the femur, tibia and patella derived from imaging and six-degree-of-freedom TF and PF kinematics from cadaveric testing during a simulated squat. The PC modes characterized links between anatomy and kinematics; the first mode captured scaling and shape changes in the condylar radii and their influence on TF anterior-posterior translation, internal-external rotation, and the location of the femoral lowest point. Subsequent modes described relations in patella shape and alta/baja alignment impacting PF kinematics. The complex interactions described with the data-driven statistical approach provide insight into knee mechanics that is useful clinically and in implant design. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1620-1630, 2015. PMID:25991502

  11. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-Forming Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last approximately 8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking as the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (sigma(sub g)) and increase in ordered rotation (V(sub rot)) with time. The slopes of the relations between both sigma(sub g) and V(sub rot) with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling.

  12. Kinematic Evolution of Simulated Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, Susan A.; Brooks, Alyson; Governato, Fabio; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations have shown that star-forming galaxies like our own Milky Way evolve kinematically into ordered thin disks over the last ~8 billion years since z = 1.2, undergoing a process of "disk settling." For the first time, we study the kinematic evolution of a suite of four state of the art "zoom in" hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation and evolution in a fully cosmological context and compare with these observations. Until now, robust measurements of the internal kinematics of simulated galaxies were lacking because the simulations suffered from low resolution, overproduction of stars, and overly massive bulges. The current generation of simulations has made great progress in overcoming these difficulties and is ready for a kinematic analysis. We show that simulated galaxies follow the same kinematic trends as real galaxies: they progressively decrease in disordered motions (? g ) and increase in ordered rotation (V rot) with time. The slopes of the relations between both ? g and V rot with redshift are consistent between the simulations and the observations. In addition, the morphologies of the simulated galaxies become less disturbed with time, also consistent with observations. This match between the simulated and observed trends is a significant success for the current generation of simulations, and a first step in determining the physical processes behind disk settling.

  13. Modeling Host Disk Kinematics of Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuca, Camilo; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by our group has shown that, although the kinematics of many active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be modeled by biconal outflow, most AGN have kinematics that are too convolved with other forms of motion to be modeled so simply, such as the rotation of the host disk. To disentangle these rotational components from the outflowing ionized gas due to AGN "feedback" in the narrow-line region (NLR) and understand the AGN's relationship with the host galaxy at extended distances, we present this study on two Seyfert 2 galaxies, Markarian 3 and Markarian 573, based on two-dimensional long-slit spectra taken with the ARC 3.5m telescope at Apache-Point Observatory. The two targets were observed multiple times at varying position angles (in order to trace the kinematics of the host disk at multiple points) and their total kinematics were analyzed and modeled using DiskFit, a publicly available code that fits given velocity fields. We compare the results of DiskFit to observed velocities and consider the applications of this technique to the kinematic fitting of other nearby AGN with convolved motions.

  14. Kinematics and dynamics of barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Kevin

    Methods of interpreting observations of velocity fields are investigated. If streamlines in a bar have the same symmetry as the bar, the velocity field can be recovered. This inversion is singular when the line of nodes of projection corresponds to one of the axes of symmetry of the bar. Near these viewing geometries, the velocity field cannot be inverted; it is important to select target galaxies far from these singular points. Fitting to circular motion alone can lead to large systematic errors (approximately 50 percent or more) in the rotation curve. Formulae for estimating forces from a noncircular velocity field are derived. These methods were tested on synthesized observations of a N-body bar. Williams' Fabry-Perot observations of the projected velocity field for NGC 1832 were analyzed. The bar is near a singular point of projection, yet there are large asymmetries in the projected field. The velocity field can more reasonably be explained by a combination of barlike streaming motion (approximately vc/2) and a slight (approximately 10-20 deg) warp. A method for computing analytical approximations to the potentials of nearly spherical galaxies is presented. The accuracy and the effect on orbital structure were tested. For the models tested, the approximations were accurate for axis ratios less than approx.= 1.4, and surfaces of section were not significantly altered. A computer program for automatic computation of these approximate formulae is presented. A self consistent field method for the calculation of equilibrium models of rotating bars is presented. The closed orbits in a potential are integrated and each response density is calculated. A new density model is computed. This model is then used to generate a new potential, and the process is iterated until convergence.

  15. Inverse Magnetic/Shear Catalysis

    E-print Network

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ``inverse magnetic catalysis'', signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magne...

  16. Bayesian multitask inverse reinforcement learning

    E-print Network

    Dimitrakakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    We generalise the problem of inverse reinforcement learning to multiple tasks, from a set of demonstrations. Each demonstration may represent one expert trying to solve a different task. Alternatively, one may see each demonstration as given by a different expert trying to solve the same task. Our main technical contribution is to solve the problem by formalising it as statistical preference elicitation, via a number of structured priors, whose form captures our biases about the relatedness of different tasks or expert policies. We show that our methodology allows us not only to learn to efficiently from multiple experts but to also effectively differentiate between the goals of each. Possible applications include analysing the intrinsic motivations of subjects in behavioural experiments and imitation learning from multiple teachers.

  17. Hierarchical Bayesian inverse reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaedeug; Kim, Kee-Eung

    2015-04-01

    Inverse reinforcement learning (IRL) is the problem of inferring the underlying reward function from the expert's behavior data. The difficulty in IRL mainly arises in choosing the best reward function since there are typically an infinite number of reward functions that yield the given behavior data as optimal. Another difficulty comes from the noisy behavior data due to sub-optimal experts. We propose a hierarchical Bayesian framework, which subsumes most of the previous IRL algorithms as well as models the sub-optimality of the expert's behavior. Using a number of experiments on a synthetic problem, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach including the robustness of our hierarchical Bayesian framework to the sub-optimal expert behavior data. Using a real dataset from taxi GPS traces, we additionally show that our approach predicts the driving behavior with a high accuracy. PMID:25291805

  18. Kinematics and force analysis of a robot hand based on an artificial biological control scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Man Guen

    An artificial biological control scheme (ABCS) is used to study the kinematics and statics of a multifingered hand with a view to developing an efficient control scheme for grasping. The ABCS is based on observation of human grasping, intuitively taking it as the optimum model for robotic grasping. A final chapter proposes several grasping measures to be applied to the design and control of a robot hand. The ABCS leads to the definition of two modes of the grasping action: natural grasping (NG), which is the human motion to grasp the object without any special task command, and forced grasping (FG), which is the motion with a specific task. The grasping direction line (GDL) is defined to determine the position and orientation of the object in the hand. The kinematic model of a redundant robot arm and hand is developed by reconstructing the human upper extremity and using anthropometric measurement data. The inverse kinematic analyses of various types of precision and power grasping are studied by replacing the three-link with one virtual link and using the GDL. The static force analysis for grasping with fingertips is studied by applying the ABCS. A measure of grasping stability, that maintains the positions of contacts as well as the configurations of the redundant fingers, is derived. The grasping stability measure (GSM), a measure of how well the hand maintains grasping under the existence of external disturbance, is derived by the torque vector of the hand calculated from the external force applied to the object. The grasping manipulability measure (GMM), a measure of how well the hand manipulates the object for the task, is derived by the joint velocity vector of the hand calculated from the object velocity. The grasping performance measure (GPM) is defined by the sum of the directional components of the GSM and the GMM. Finally, a planar redundant hand with two fingers is examined in order to study the various postures of the hand performing pinch grasping by applying the GSM and the GMM.

  19. Structural a priori information for reflection tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jannaud, L.; Delprat-Jannaud, F.

    1994-12-31

    The model calculated by traveltime inversion is underdetermined. One solution to this problem is to introduce a priori information so as to reduce the set of possible solutions to those satisfactory from a geological point of view. In this paper, the authors impose geological constraints on the relative position of the reflectors and in particular on the location in depth of faults. To implement this method in the context of a Gauss-Newton algorithm for the inversion, the Jacobian of the impact points with respect to the model is computed. They thus compute, using the adjoint state technique, the exact jacobian at a low computational cost. To illustrate the efficiency of the method, field data acquired on fault structures are inversed. They obtain a structural model which is satisfactory from both a kinematic and a geological point of view.

  20. Comparison of misfit functions for phase-only inversion in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, G.; Jeong, W.; Min, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform inversion suffers from non-uniqueness and non-linearity problems. By using kinematic property of wavefield rather than dynamic property, we can mitigate such problems because the phase is linear and robust (Kamei et al. 2013). For the phase-only inversion, several misfit functions were suggested. Bednar et al. (2007) compared the logarithmic phase-only inversion proposed by Shin and Min (2006) with the conventional phase-only inversion. On the other hand, Kamei et al. (2014) introduced another method that uses the exponential of phase by normalizing the wavefield with respect to the amplitude. In this study, we compare the aforementioned three phase-only inversion methods in the frequency domain: i) the logarithmic phase-only inversion, ii) the conventional phase-only inversion I (briefly conventional I method) that normalizes wavefield with respect to the amplitude variation, and iii) the conventional phase-only inversion II (briefly conventional II method) that replaces the amplitude of the modeled data with that of field data. In the cases of the logarithmic and conventional I methods, if the modeled signal function is close to 0 or becomes large, the gradients of the misfit function diverge to infinity or converge to 0, respectively. In contrast, the conventional II method does not suffer from these problems. For fair comparison, we removed extremely small or large values with Gaussian filtering to avoid the instability problem in the logarithmic and conventional I methods. In addition, we assumed that the phase of the field data is unwrapped to the same degree as the phase of the modeled data in all the cases. On the other hand, the logarithmic and conventional II methods require the additional assumption that amplitudes of the field data are the same as those of the modeled data. However, the conventional I method does not require such an assumption. Our numerical examples show that the conventional I method yields more robust and accurate results than the logarithmic and conventional II methods. Acknowledgements This work was supported by the Human Resources Development program (No. 20134010200510) of the KETEP grant funded by the Korean government MOTIE and by the "Development of Technology for CO2 Marine Geological Storage" grant funded by the MOF of Korea.

  1. Post Pyrenean temporal changes in the stress state of Eastern Provence (SE France): fault kinematics and regional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanian, Esmaeil; Bellier, Olivier; Hollender, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    Provence (SE France) is deformed due to a resultant force of the interacting Africa-Eurasia plate convergence and gravitational collapse of the Alps. During Cenozoic, changes in the balance of concurrent tectonic forces have changed both the geodynamics and kinematics of the involved areas. This study focuses on kinematic changes in a key area that expresses kinematic signatures of several post-Variscan deformation stages. The area of interest comprises small parts of both Western and Eastern Provence between the Mirabeau Anticline to the north, and Sainte-Victoire Mountain to the south. We investigate the evolution of the Cenozoic tectonic regimes of the area. We present evidence of drastic temporal changes in the stress state by the inversion of geological fault kinematics data that lead to identify five distinct stress states prevailing during the Cenozoic. The oldest kinematic signature belongs to the Late Cretaceous - Early Eocene Pyrenean contractional stage characterized by a NNE-trending compression. This period is separated from three distinct Alpine tectonic regimes by the Oligocene extensional period. The earlier Alpine stress state (paleostress) was active during the Early to Middle Miocene, with a mean N030±10°E-trending horizontal maximum stress axis (?1). This represents a transpressional tectonic regime that changed to a mainly strike-slip tectonic regime (intermediate) characterized by a N140±10°E-trending compression in the Late Miocene. The youngest (modern) stress state shows a strike-slip tectonic regime with a regional mean of N178±15°E-trending horizontal ?1 that prevails since the Pliocene. The significant variations in the direction of Miocene compressions may imply an important change in the geodynamics of the Provence that is currently undergoing the resultant force of Africa-Eurasia convergence/gravitational collapse of the Alps. It is likely that, in this area, the Early to Middle Miocene stress state was influenced by the concurrent Ligurian Sea opening and the SSW-ward lateral extrusion of the western Alps that became the governing tectonic force in, at least, Eastern Provence.

  2. Rigging skeletal perissodactyl and artiodactyl ungulate limbs using analytic inverse kinematic-based solutions for a feature film production environment 

    E-print Network

    Telford, William Lawrence, Jr

    2007-04-25

    The goal of this thesis is to develop and construct a repeatable, scalable, and portable rigging solution for the skeletal limbs of ungulates, maximizing functionality while streamlining intuitive interface controls for a feature film production...

  3. `Cliff notes' summary of: The kinematic determinants of anuran swimming performance: an inverse and forward dynamics approach, by Christopher Richards

    E-print Network

    Richards, Chris

    the thrust force exerted by the foot on the water. This is nearly impossible to measure directly, so, elbows, hips) for thrust: the force that moves us forward. Yet, our abilities are far weaker than (feet pivoting backward). 2. As assumed by previous investigators, frogs produce thrust mainly by foot

  4. GAS KINEMATICS IN Ly{alpha} NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yujin; Jahnke, Knud; Zabludoff, Ann; Eisenstein, Daniel; Dave, Romeel; Shectman, Stephen A.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2011-07-10

    Exploring the origin of Ly{alpha} nebulae ('blobs') at high redshift requires measurements of their gas kinematics that are impossible with only the resonant, optically thick Ly{alpha} line. To define gas motions relative to the systemic velocity of the blob, the Ly{alpha} line must be compared with an optically thin line like H{alpha} {lambda}6563, which is not much altered by radiative transfer effects and is more concentrated about the galaxies embedded in the nebula's core. We obtain optical and near-IR (NIR) spectra of the two brightest Ly{alpha} blobs (CDFS-LAB01 and CDFS-LAB02) from the Yang et al. sample using the Magellan/Magellan Echellette Spectrograph optical and Very Large Telescope/SINFONI NIR spectrographs. Both the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} lines confirm that these blobs lie at the survey redshift, z {approx} 2.3. Within each blob, we detect several H{alpha} sources, which roughly correspond to galaxies seen in Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV images. The H{alpha} detections show that these galaxies have large internal velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} = 130-190 km s{sup -1}) and that, in the one system (LAB01), where we can reliably extract profiles for two H{alpha} sources, their velocity difference is {Delta}v {approx} 440 km s{sup -1}. The presence of multiple galaxies within the blobs, and those galaxies' large velocity dispersions and large relative motion, is consistent with our previous finding that Ly{alpha} blobs inhabit massive dark matter halos that will evolve into those typical of present-day rich clusters and that the embedded galaxies may eventually become brightest cluster galaxies. To determine whether the gas near the embedded galaxies is predominantly infalling or outflowing, we compare the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} line centers, finding that Ly{alpha} is not offset ({Delta}v{sub Ly{alpha}} = +0 km s{sup -1}) in LAB01 and redshifted by only +230 km s{sup -1} in LAB02. These offsets are small compared to those of Lyman break galaxies, which average +450 km s{sup -1} and extend to about +700 km s{sup -1}. In LAB02, we detect C II {lambda}1334 and Si II {lambda}1526 absorption lines, whose blueward shifts of {approx}200 km s{sup -1} are consistent with the small outflow implied by the redward shift of Ly{alpha}. We test and rule out the simplest infall models and those outflow models with super/hyperwinds, which require large outflow velocities. Because of the unknown geometry of the gas distribution and the possibility of multiple sources of Ly{alpha} emission embedded in the blobs, a larger sample and more sophisticated models are required to test more complex or a wider range of infall and outflow scenarios.

  5. Inversion of the attenuated Radon transform

    E-print Network

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    Inversion of the attenuated Radon transform F. Natterer Institut fur Numerische und instrumentelle@math.uni-muenster.de Abstract We derive an exact inversion formula for the attenuated Radon transform. The formula is closely for x 2 IR2, #12; 2 S1 Dax; #12; = 1Z 0 ax + t#12;dt : 1.1 The attenuated Radon transform Ra is de ned

  6. Inverse Scattering on Matrices with Boundary Conditions

    E-print Network

    M. Harmer

    2007-02-21

    We describe inverse scattering for the matrix Schroedinger operator with general selfadjoint boundary conditions at the origin using the Marchenko equation. Our approach allows the recovery of the potential as well as the boundary conditions. It is easily specialised to inverse scattering on star-shaped graphs with boundary conditions at the node.

  7. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  8. Chronic total uterine inversion in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Birge, Ozer; Merdin, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Uterine inversion is rarely seen in adolescents in western countries. But it might be seen in teenagers and adolescents due to poor conditions and early pregnancies in Africa. And early troubleshooting chronic uterine inversion represents an early resolution of the problem and allows planning pregnancy without complications.

  9. Molecular Seismology: An Inverse Problem in Nanobiology

    E-print Network

    Hinow, Peter

    ;Example of a reflection inverse problem Given a certain fixed excitation profile (Neumann data) ux (0, t;Overview of the talk Introduction to the biological background Formulation of the inverse problem Numerical" "Hopping" along fiber along fiber Consider the fiber as an elastic string with linear mass density profile

  10. INVERSE SCALE SPACE METHODS FOR BLIND DECONVOLUTION

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    INVERSE SCALE SPACE METHODS FOR BLIND DECONVOLUTION ANTONIO MARQUINA Abstract. In this paper we propose a blind deconvolution algorithm based on the total variation regulariza- tion formulated deconvolution, Gaussian blur, denoising, inverse scale space methods. 1. Introduction. Given a blurry and noisy

  11. INVERSE DOPING PROBLEMS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES

    E-print Network

    Markowich, Peter A.

    INVERSE DOPING PROBLEMS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Martin Burger #3; Institut f is devoted to a class of inverse problems arising in the test- ing of semiconductor devices, namely of semiconductor devices has developed well in the last #12;fty years, since Van Roosbroeck (cf.[20]) #12;rst

  12. Recursive inversion of externally defined linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph E., Jr.; Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    The approximate inversion of an internally unknown linear system, given by its impulse response sequence, by an inverse system having a finite impulse response, is considered. The recursive least squares procedure is shown to have an exact initialization, based on the triangular Toeplitz structure of the matrix involved. The proposed approach also suggests solutions to the problems of system identification and compensation.

  13. Primitive inverse congruences on categorical John Fountain #

    E-print Network

    Fountain, John

    primitive inverse congruence on a categorical semigroup and show that it is #­reflexive, #­unitaryPrimitive inverse congruences on categorical semigroups John Fountain # Department of Mathematics of the kernel of a proper primitive in­ verse congruence on a categorical semigroup. More specifically we show

  14. Inverse kinetic theory for quantum hydrodynamic equations

    E-print Network

    Massimo Tessarotto; Marco Ellero; Piero Nicolini

    2006-06-10

    We propose a solution for the inverse kinetic theory for quantum hydrodynamic equations associated to the non-relativistic Schr\\"{o}dinger equation. It is shown that an inverse kinetic equation of the form of the Vlasov equation can be non-uniquely determined under suitable mathematical prescriptions.

  15. Population Inversion, Negative Temperature, and Quantum Degeneracies

    E-print Network

    Zotin K. -H. Chu

    2009-04-09

    We revisit the basic principle for lasing : Population inversion which is nevertheless closely linked to the negative temperature state in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. With the introduction of quantum degeneracies, we also illustrate their relationship with the lasing via the tuning of population inversion.

  16. Tracing kinematic (mis)alignments in CALIFA merging galaxies. Stellar and ionized gas kinematic orientations at every merger stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; García-Lorenzo, B.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Wild, V.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Marquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Ziegler, B.; del Olmo, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; García-Benito, R.; Husemann, B.; Mast, D.; Kehrig, C.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Marino, R. A.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Walcher, C. J.; Vílchez, J. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; González Delgado, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; McIntosh, D. H.; Bekerait?, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present spatially resolved stellar and/or ionized gas kinematic properties for a sample of 103 interacting galaxies, tracing all merger stages: close companions, pairs with morphological signatures of interaction, and coalesced merger remnants. In order to distinguish kinematic properties caused by a merger event from those driven by internal processes, we compare our galaxies with a control sample of 80 non-interacting galaxies. We measure for both the stellar and the ionized gas components the major (projected) kinematic position angles (PAkin, approaching and receding) directly from the velocity distributions with no assumptions on the internal motions. This method also allow us to derive the deviations of the kinematic PAs from a straight line (?PAkin). We find that around half of the interacting objects show morpho-kinematic PA misalignments that cannot be found in the control sample. In particular, we observe those misalignments in galaxies with morphological signatures of interaction. On the other hand, thelevel of alignment between the approaching and receding sides for both samples is similar, with most of the galaxies displaying small misalignments. Radial deviations of the kinematic PA orientation from a straight line in the stellar component measured by ?PAkin are large for both samples. However, for a large fraction of interacting galaxies the ionized gas ?PAkin is larger than the typical values derived from isolated galaxies (48%), indicating that this parameter is a good indicator to trace the impact of interaction and mergers in the internal motions of galaxies. By comparing the stellar and ionized gas kinematic PA, we find that 42% (28/66) of the interacting galaxies have misalignments larger than 16°, compared to 10% from the control sample. Our results show the impact of interactions in the motion of stellar and ionized gas as well as the wide the variety of their spatially resolved kinematic distributions. This study also provides a local Universe benchmark for kinematic studies in merging galaxies at high redshift. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Kinematic quantities of finite elastic and plastic deformation

    E-print Network

    T. Fülöp; P. Ván

    2012-03-05

    Kinematic quantities for finite elastic and plastic deformations are defined via an approach that does not rely on auxiliary elements like reference frame and reference configuration, and that gives account of the inertial-noninertial aspects explicitly. These features are achieved by working on Galilean spacetime directly. The quantity expressing elastic deformations is introduced according to its expected role: to measure how different the current metric is from the relaxed/stressless metric. Further, the plastic kinematic quantity is the change rate of the stressless metric. The properties of both are analyzed, and their relationship to frequently used elastic and plastic kinematic quantities is discussed. One important result is that no objective elastic or plastic quantities can be defined from deformation gradient.

  18. Nonlinear kinematics for piezoelectricity in ALEGRA-EMMA.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, John Anthony; Fuller, Timothy Jesse

    2013-09-01

    This report develops and documents nonlinear kinematic relations needed to implement piezoelectric constitutive models in ALEGRA-EMMA [5], where calculations involving large displacements and rotations are routine. Kinematic relationships are established using Gauss's law and Faraday's law; this presentation on kinematics goes beyond piezoelectric materials and is applicable to all dielectric materials. The report then turns to practical details of implementing piezoelectric models in an application code where material principal axes are rarely aligned with user defined problem coordinate axes. This portion of the report is somewhat pedagogical but is necessary in order to establish documentation for the piezoelectric implementation in ALEGRA-EMMA. This involves transforming elastic, piezoelectric, and permittivity moduli from material principal axes to problem coordinate axes. The report concludes with an overview of the piezoelectric implementation in ALEGRA-EMMA and small verification examples.

  19. Kinematic Self-Similar Heat Conducting and Charge Solutions

    E-print Network

    M. Sharif; Wajiha Javed

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the plane symmetric kinematic self-similar heat conducting fluid and charge dust solutions of the Einstein field equations. These solutions are classified according to self-similarity of the first, second, zeroth and infinite kinds with different equations of state. We take the self-similar vector to be tilted, orthogonal and parallel to the fluid flow. For heat conducting fluid, it is found that there exist only \\emph{one} solution in parallel case. In all other possibilities, these solutions reduce to the perfect fluid kinematic self-similar solutions. For charge dust case, we also obtain only \\emph{one} kinematic self-similar solution.

  20. Strict abnormal extremals in nonholonomic and kinematic control systems

    E-print Network

    Linan, M Barbero

    2008-01-01

    In optimal control problems, there exist different kinds of extremals, that is, curves candidates to be solution: abnormal, normal and strictly abnormal. The key point for this classification is how those extremals depend on the cost function. We focus on control systems such as nonholonomic control mechanical systems and the associated kinematic systems as long as they are equivalent. With all this in mind, first we study conditions to relate an optimal control problem for the mechanical system with another one for the associated kinematic system. Then, Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be used to connect the abnormal extremals of both optimal control problems. An example is given to glimpse what the abnormal solutions for kinematic systems become when they are considered as extremals to the optimal control problem for the corresponding nonholonomic mechanical systems.

  1. Pure Gravities via Color-Kinematics Duality for Fundamental Matter

    E-print Network

    Henrik Johansson; Alexander Ochirov

    2015-11-05

    We give a prescription for the computation of loop-level scattering amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity, and four-dimensional pure supergravities, using the color-kinematics duality. Amplitudes are constructed using double copies of pure (super-)Yang-Mills parts and additional contributions from double copies of fundamental matter, which are treated as ghosts. The opposite-statistics states cancel the unwanted dilaton and axion in the bosonic theory, as well as the extra matter supermultiplets in supergravities. As a spinoff, we obtain a prescription for obtaining amplitudes in supergravities with arbitrary non-self-interacting matter. As a prerequisite, we extend the color-kinematics duality from the adjoint to the fundamental representation of the gauge group. We explain the numerator relations that the fundamental kinematic Lie algebra should satisfy. We give nontrivial evidence supporting our construction using explicit tree and loop amplitudes, as well as more general arguments.

  2. In vivo determination of total knee arthroplasty kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Komistek, Richard D; Mahfouz, Mohamed R; Bertin, Kim; Rosenberg, Aaron; Kennedy, William

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if consistent posterior femoral rollback of an asymmetrical posterior cruciate retaining (PCR) total knee arthroplasty was mostly influenced by the implant design, surgical technique, or presence of a well-functioning posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Three-dimensional femorotibial kinematics was determined for 80 subjects implanted by 3 surgeons, and each subject was evaluated under fluoroscopic surveillance during a deep knee bend. All subjects in this present study having an intact PCL had a well-functioning PCR knee and experienced normal kinematic patterns, although less in magnitude than the normal knee. In addition, a surprising finding was that, on average, subjects without a PCL still achieved posterior femoral rollback from full extension to maximum knee flexion. The findings in this study revealed that implant design did contribute to the normal kinematics demonstrated by subjects having this asymmetrical PCR total knee arthroplasty.

  3. Scaling of Hadronic Form Factors in Point Form Kinematics

    E-print Network

    F. Coester; D. O. Riska

    2003-05-31

    The general features of baryon form factors calculated with point form kinematics are derived. With point form kinematics and spectator currents hadronic form factors are functions of $\\eta:={1\\over 4}(v_{out}-v_{in})^2$ and, over a range of $\\eta$ values are insensitive to unitary scale transformations of the model wave functions when the extent of the wave function is small compared to the scale defined by the constituent mass, $ \\ll 1/m^2$. The form factors are sensitive to the shape of such compact wave functions. Simple 3-quark proton wave functions are employed to illustrate these features. Rational and algebraic model wave functions lead to a reasonable representation of the empirical form factors, while Gaussian wave functions fail. For large values of $\\eta$ point form kinematics with spectator currents leads to power law behavior of the wave functions.

  4. Pure gravities via color-kinematics duality for fundamental matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Henrik; Ochirov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We give a prescription for the computation of loop-level scattering amplitudes in pure Einstein gravity, and four-dimensional pure supergravities, using the color-kinematics duality. Amplitudes are constructed using double copies of pure (super-)Yang-Mills parts and additional contributions from double copies of fundamental matter, which are treated as ghosts. The opposite-statistics states cancel the unwanted dilaton and axion in the bosonic theory, as well as the extra matter supermultiplets in the supergravity theories. As a spinoff, we obtain a prescription for obtaining amplitudes in supergravities with arbitrary non-self-interacting matter. As a prerequisite, we extend the color-kinematics duality from the adjoint to the fundamental representation of the gauge group. We explain the numerator relations that the fundamental kinematic Lie algebra should satisfy. We give nontrivial evidence supporting our construction using explicit tree and loop amplitudes, as well as more general arguments.

  5. Amount of kinematic feedback affects learning of speech motor skills.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kirrie J; Smith, Heather D; Paramatmuni, Divija; McCabe, Patricia; Theodoros, Deborah G; Murdoch, Bruce E

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of Performance (KP) feedback, such as biofeedback or kinematic feedback, is used to provide information on the nature and quality of movement responses for the purpose of guiding active learning or rehabilitation of motor skills. It has been proposed that KP feedback may interfere with long-term learning when provided throughout training. Here, twelve healthy English-speaking adults were trained to produce a trilled Russian [r] in words with KP kinematic feedback using electropalatography (EPG) and without KP (noKP). Five one-hour training sessions were provided over one week with testing pretraining and one day and one week posttraining. No group differences were found at pretraining or one day post training for production accuracy. A group by time interaction supported the hypothesis that providing kinematic feedback continually during skill acquisition interferes with retention. PMID:22402216

  6. Inverse scattering: applications to nuclear physics

    E-print Network

    Raymond S. Mackintosh

    2012-05-02

    In what follows we first set the context for inverse scattering in nuclear physics with a brief account of inverse problems in general. We then turn to inverse scattering which involves the S-matrix, which connects the interaction potential between two scattering particles with the measured scattering cross section. The term `inverse' is a reference to the fact that instead of determining the scattering S-matrix from the interaction potential between the scattering particles, we do the inverse. That is to say, we calculate the interaction potential from the S-matrix. This review explains how this can now be done reliably, but the emphasis will be upon reasons why one should wish to do this, with an account of some of the ways this can lead to understanding concerning nuclear interactions.

  7. Lopsidedness in WHISP galaxies. I. Rotation curves and kinematic lopsidedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eymeren, J.; Jütte, E.; Jog, C. J.; Stein, Y.; Dettmar, R.-J.

    2011-06-01

    The frequently observed lopsidedness of the distribution of stars and gas in disc galaxies is still considered as a major problem in galaxy dynamics. It is even discussed as an imprint of the formation history of discs and the evolution of baryons in dark matter haloes. Here, we analyse a selected sample of 70 galaxies from the Westerbork H i Survey of Spiral and Irregular Galaxies. The H i data allow us to follow the morphology and the kinematics out to very large radii. In the present paper, we present the rotation curves and study the kinematic asymmetry. We extract the rotation curves of the receding and approaching sides separately and show that the kinematic behaviour of disc galaxies can be classified into five different types: symmetric velocity fields where the rotation curves of the receding and approaching sides are almost identical; global distortions where the rotation velocities of the receding and approaching sides have an offset that is constant with radius; local distortions leading to large deviations in the inner and negligible deviations in the outer parts (and vice versa); and distortions that divide the galaxies into two kinematic systems that are visible in terms of the different behaviour of the rotation curves of the receding and approaching sides, which leads to a crossing and a change in side. The kinematic lopsidedness is measured from the maximum rotation velocities, averaged over the plateau of the rotation curves. This gives a good estimate of the global lopsidedness in the outer parts of the sample galaxies. We find that the mean value of the perturbation parameter denoting the lopsided potential as obtained from the kinematic data is 0.056. Altogether, 36% of the sample galaxies are globally lopsided, which can be interpreted as the disc responding to a halo that was distorted by a tidal encounter. In Paper II, we study the morphological lopsidedness of the same sample of galaxies. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Rapid approximate inversion of airborne TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullagar, Peter K.; Pears, Glenn A.; Reid, James E.; Schaa, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    Rapid interpretation of large airborne transient electromagnetic (ATEM) datasets is highly desirable for timely decision-making in exploration. Full solution 3D inversion of entire airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys is often still not feasible on current day PCs. Therefore, two algorithms to perform rapid approximate 3D interpretation of AEM have been developed. The loss of rigour may be of little consequence if the objective of the AEM survey is regional reconnaissance. Data coverage is often quasi-2D rather than truly 3D in such cases, belying the need for `exact' 3D inversion. Incorporation of geological constraints reduces the non-uniqueness of 3D AEM inversion. Integrated interpretation can be achieved most readily when inversion is applied to a geological model, attributed with lithology as well as conductivity. Geological models also offer several practical advantages over pure property models during inversion. In particular, they permit adjustment of geological boundaries. In addition, optimal conductivities can be determined for homogeneous units. Both algorithms described here can operate on geological models; however, they can also perform `unconstrained' inversion if the geological context is unknown. VPem1D performs 1D inversion at each ATEM data location above a 3D model. Interpretation of cover thickness is a natural application; this is illustrated via application to Spectrem data from central Australia. VPem3D performs 3D inversion on time-integrated (resistive limit) data. Conversion to resistive limits delivers a massive increase in speed since the TEM inverse problem reduces to a quasi-magnetic problem. The time evolution of the decay is lost during the conversion, but the information can be largely recovered by constructing a starting model from conductivity depth images (CDIs) or 1D inversions combined with geological constraints if available. The efficacy of the approach is demonstrated on Spectrem data from Brazil. Both separately and in combination, these programs provide new options to exploration and mining companies for rapid interpretation of ATEM surveys.

  9. Phase inversion emulsification: Current understanding and applications.

    PubMed

    Perazzo, A; Preziosi, V; Guido, S

    2015-08-01

    This review is addressed to the phase inversion process, which is not only a common, low-energy route to make stable emulsions for a variety of industrial products spanning from food to pharmaceuticals, but can also be an undesired effect in some applications, such as crude oil transportation in pipelines. Two main ways to induce phase inversion are described in the literature, i.e., phase inversion composition (PIC or catastrophic) and phase inversion temperature (PIT or transitional). In the former, starting from one phase (oil or water) with surfactants, the other phase is more or less gradually added until it reverts to the continuous phase. In PIT, phase inversion is driven by a temperature change without varying system composition. Given its industrial relevance and scientific challenge, phase inversion has been the subject of a number of papers in the literature, including extensive reviews. Due to the variety of applications and the complexity of the problem, most of the publications have been focused either on the phase behavior or the interfacial properties or the mixing process of the two phases. Although all these aspects are quite important in studying phase inversion and much progress has been done on this topic, a comprehensive picture is still lacking. In particular, the general mechanisms governing the inversion phenomenon have not been completely elucidated and quantitative predictions of the phase inversion point are limited to specific systems and experimental conditions. Here, we review the different approaches on phase inversion and highlight some related applications, including future and emerging perspectives. PMID:25632889

  10. A Standard Kinematic Model for Flight Simulation at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A standard kinematic model for aircraft simulation exists at NASA-Ames on a variety of computer systems, one of which is used to control the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The derivation of the kinematic model is given and various mathematical relationships are presented as a guide. These include descriptions of standardized simulation subsystems such as the atmospheric turbulence model and the generalized six-degrees-of-freedom trim routine, as well as an introduction to the emulative batch-processing system which enables this facility to optimize its real-time environment.

  11. A Kinematic, Kevlar(registered) Suspension System for an ADR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Jackson, Michael L.; Shirron, Peter J.; Tuttle, James G.

    2003-01-01

    The High Resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) and the Submillimeter And Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) will use identical Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR) to cool their bolometer detectors to 200mK and 100mK, respectively. In order to minimize thermal loads on the salt pill, a Kevlar@ suspension system is used to hold it in place. An innovative, kinematic suspension system is presented. The suspension system is unique in that it consists or two parts that can be assembled and tensioned offline, and later bolted onto the salt pill. The resulting assembly constrains each degree of freedom only once, yielding a kinematic, tensile structure.

  12. An Independent and Coordinated Criterion for Kinematic Aircraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Hagen, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a mathematical definition of an aircraft-separation criterion for kinematic-based horizontal maneuvers. It has been formally proved that kinematic maneu- vers that satisfy the new criterion are independent and coordinated for repulsiveness, i.e., the distance at closest point of approach increases whether one or both aircraft maneuver according to the criterion. The proposed criterion is currently used in NASA's Airborne Coordinated Resolution and Detection (ACCoRD) set of tools for the design and analysis of separation assurance systems.

  13. Geometric, Kinematic and Radiometric Aspects of Image-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses theoretical foundations of quantitative image-based measurements for extracting and reconstructing geometric, kinematic and dynamic properties of observed objects. New results are obtained by using a combination of methods in perspective geometry, differential geometry. radiometry, kinematics and dynamics. Specific topics include perspective projection transformation. perspective developable conical surface, perspective projection under surface constraint, perspective invariants, the point correspondence problem. motion fields of curves and surfaces. and motion equations of image intensity. The methods given in this paper arc useful for determining morphology and motion fields of deformable bodies such as elastic bodies. viscoelastic mediums and fluids.

  14. [Kinematic study of reaching-grasping movements in the monkey].

    PubMed

    Fogassi, L; Gallese, V; Gentilucci, M; Chieffi, S; Rizzolatti, G

    1991-07-01

    Kinematics of reaching-grasping movement towards stimuli of three different sizes located at two different distances were studied in one monkey (Macaca nemestrina). Transport and manipulation components were analyzed using the ELITE system. Transport time, peak velocity and deceleration phase of velocity were influenced by stimulus size, whilst acceleration phase remained unmodified. Peak velocity clearly increased with distance, while transport time remained constant (isochrony ). The main parameters of manipulation component were all influenced by stimulus size but they did not vary with distance. A comparison with kinematic data obtained from human subjects was made. PMID:1818597

  15. Geometry and Kinematics of Structures in the South Polar Terrain of Enceladus: Over-Interpreting Kinematics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, P.; Yoshinobu, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    There remains some debate as to whether fractures, ridges, grooves and other structures in the SPT region of Enceladus are the result of tidally-driven extensional, contractional or a combination of dip-slip and strike slip deformation. We document fractures, faults, and ridges that are both kinematically compatible and incompatible with current models for strain fields in the SPT. We utilize traditional geometric and kinematic structural analysis to map structures within the SPT. These observations may then be used to constrain models for the evolving strain field within the SPT. Six linear fractures, > 120 km in length, define the structural morphology of the SPT. These include the 'tiger stripes' as well as two elongate fractures that occur to the north of Damascus Sulcus and are subparallel to each other. These two fractures are associated with smaller pinnate fractures striking at 45° from the tiger stripes, or parallel to the tidal axis or the direction of maximum stress. These feather fractures are consistent with a component of right-lateral strike slip motion. Elsewhere, the tips of the recognized 'tiger stripes' display an apparent dextral curvature with radii of approximately 5-10 km. Such curved fractures are best observed at the tips of Alexandria Sulcus. In contrast, at the tips of Baghdad and Damascus Sulcii, both arcuate and linear fractures systems appear to emanate from the tips. The Mohr-Coulomb criterion for shear fracture predicts that faults develop with angles around 45° to the maximum compressive stress. The fact that the series of 'tiger stripes' are at an orientation of approximately 45° from 0° longitude, the direction of maximum stress, suggests that there is a component of shear force acting on Enceladus' SPT. The presence of ridge-like structures with amplitudes ranging from 10's to 1000 m located in regions between the tiger stripes is consistent with local contraction. While the type of folding mechanism is not known, minor longitudinal fractures along the crests of some ridges is consistent with a buckling model. It has been suggested that the tiger stripes are under varying compression and tension forces at different times in relation to each other. It is possible that the ridge-groove structures between the 'tiger stripes' formed by contraction of the ice terrains between sub-parallel, extending 'tiger stripes'. Linear fractures 10's of kms long, orthogonal to the 'tiger stripes', have been variously interpreted as transform faults, similar to those found on Earth. However, cross cutting relations, differences in geomorphology, and a lack of reliably identified 3-D displaced markers make such interpretations tenuous. Based on observations and analysis, we propose that the dominant strain field recorded in the features of the SPT is the result of transcurrent shearing and extension. However, the magnitude and direction of strains cannot be quantified until adequate 3-D topographic data are obtained and analyzed. Given the complexity of kinematic and geometrical relations in the SPT, we urge caution in interpreting displacement fields from structural orientation in the SPT.

  16. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  17. Improvement of upper extremity kinematics estimation using a subject-specific forearm model implemented in a kinematic chain.

    PubMed

    Fohanno, Vincent; Lacouture, Patrick; Colloud, Floren

    2013-04-01

    Human movement reconstruction is still difficult due to noise generated by the use of skin markers. The a priori definition of a kinematic chain associated with a global optimisation method allows reducing these deleterious effects. When dealing with the forearm, this approach can be improved by personalising the two axes of rotation because their common modelling is not representative of joint geometry. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the kinematic effects of personalising these two axes of rotation, determined by a functional method and implemented in a kinematic chain (AXIS model). The AXIS model was compared with a reference model (ISB model), in which the forearm axes of rotation were defined according to the recommendations of the International Society of Biomechanics. The kinematic comparison (15 subjects and 3 tasks) was based on marker residuals (actual versus model-determined), joint kinematic root mean square differences (AXIS versus ISB) and joint amplitudes (AXIS versus ISB). The AXIS model improved the pose of the forearm and hand. The reduction in marker residuals for these segments ranged between 23% and 60%. The use of a functional method was also beneficial in personalising the flexion-extension and pronation-supination axes of the forearm. The contribution of pronation-supination, in terms of joint amplitudes, was increased by 15% during the specific task. The approach developed in this study is all the more interesting since this forearm model could be integrated into a kinematic chain to be used with a global approach becoming increasingly popular in biomechanics. PMID:23481420

  18. Feeding kinematics and performance of Hawaiian stream gobies, Awaous guamensis and Lentipes concolor: linkage of functional morphology and ecology.

    PubMed

    Maie, Takashi; Wilson, Megan P; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2009-03-01

    Distributions of Hawaiian stream fishes are typically interrupted by waterfalls that divide streams into multiple segments. Larvae hatch upstream, are flushed into the ocean, and must climb these waterfalls to reach adult habitats when returning back to freshwater as part of an amphidromous life cycle. Stream surveys and studies of climbing performance show that Lentipes concolor Gill can reach fast-flowing upper stream segments but that Awaous guamensis Valenciennes reaches only slower, lower stream segments. Gut content analyses for these two species indicate considerable overlap in diet, suggesting that feeding kinematics and performance of these two species might be comparable. Alternatively, feeding kinematics and performance of these species might be expected to differ in relation to the different flow regimes in their habitat (feeding in faster stream currents for L. concolor versus in slower currents for A. guamensis). To test these alternative hypotheses, we compared food capturing kinematics and performance during suction feeding behaviors of A. guamensis and L. concolor using morphological data and high-speed video. Lentipes concolor showed both a significantly larger gape angle and faster jaw opening than A. guamensis. Geometric models calculated that despite the inverse relationship of gape size and suction pressure generation, the fast jaw motions of L. concolor allow it to achieve higher pressure differentials than A. guamensis. Such elevated suction pressure would enhance the ability of L. concolor to successfully capture food in the fast stream reaches it typically inhabits. Differences in jaw morphology may contribute to these differences in performance, as the lever ratio for jaw opening is about 10% lower in L. concolor compared with A. guamensis, suiting the jaws of L. concolor better for fast opening. PMID:19107821

  19. Two Approaches for Tomographic Density Imaging Using Inverse Scattering

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Two Approaches for Tomographic Density Imaging Using Inverse Scattering Roberto J. Lavarello for density imaging using inverse scattering were explored through simulations in order to evaluate], diffraction tomography [2], and inverse scattering methods [3] have been developed to reconstruct quantitative

  20. THE ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE SCATTERING PROBLEM FOR PARTIALLY COATED LIPSCHITZ DOMAINS

    E-print Network

    Cakoni, Fioralba

    THE ELECTROMAGNETIC INVERSE SCATTERING PROBLEM FOR PARTIALLY COATED LIPSCHITZ DOMAINS FIORALBA CAKONI, DAVID COLTON AND PETER MONK Abstract. We consider the inverse scattering problem of determining method. Key words. Electromagnetic inverse scattering, Lipschitz domain, mixed boundary conditions

  1. Inverse medium scattering for the Helmholtz equation at fixed ...

    E-print Network

    2005-09-03

    Feb 23, 2012 ... continuation method for the inverse medium scattering, which ... Consider the Helmholtz equation in two dimensions ? + k2 .... penetrated. ...... [7] Chen Y 1997 Inverse scattering via skin effect Inverse Problems 13 649–67.

  2. Inverse Magnetic/Shear Catalysis

    E-print Network

    Brett McInnes

    2015-11-17

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ``inverse magnetic catalysis'', signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials

  3. Altimetry Waveform Inversion over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumstein, D.; Nino, F.; Berthier, E.; Remy, F.; Fleury, S.; Steunou, N.; Picot, N.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement provided by radar altimeters is much richer than the fewparameters traditionnally used in the applications (mainly ground altitudeand backscatter). Indeed, the whole history of the radar return is available,this is called radar waveforms.By a careful analysis of sequences of consecutive waveforms, it is possible toretrieve crucial information about the nature of the soil backscatter as wellas details about the topography at a resolution much better than the footprintof the altimeter. In particular the shape of the waveforms allows us todiscriminate the power return by the surface from the return by the subsurface.These parameters can then be used to provide information about geophysicalcharacteristics of the terrain (snow grain size, etc) and its temporalevolution through the analysis of the penetration of the radar wave in thesnow.This presentation will describe the technics we have developped to performwaveforms inversions through the use of an accurate waveform simulation modelthat is able to handle the Envisat mission (Ku band, 13.6 GHz) as well as thenew AltiKa mission from CNES/ISRO that provides measurements in Ka band(35.75 GHz) on the same orbit.We will also show how we can use good high resolution DEM, e.g. fromthe Spirit projet (CNES/SPOT IMAGE), in order to improve the retrievalsin regions which are notoriously difficult for radar altimetry(near the coast).Finally we will show results obtained on a few places of theAntarctica icesheet.

  4. Moment Tensor Inversion Using the Kiwi Tools: Application to Regional Seismicity in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, Susana; Cesca, Simone; Domingues, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Automatic moment tensor inversions have been applied to earthquakes worldwide since the early 1980s. Since then many techniques have been developed and implemented to perform moment tensor inversions of earthquakes at different scales and in different regions. These inversions typically yield the focal mechanism, magnitude and hypocentral depth of the earthquakes. In some cases, the centroid location is also determined. The finite source of earthquakes has also been studied using several methods. However, fewer attempts have been carried out so far, in order to quickly and automatically determinate extended source parameters. In this presentation we will focus on the adoption of a recently developed inversion method to perform point and kinematic source inversions at regional distances, and its application to regional seismicity recorded in Portugal and neighboring regions. The algorithm works in different steps. At first, we assume a point source approximation. We initially retrieve the focal mechanism of the earthquake (strike, dip, and rake), the seismic scalar moment M0 and the depth. This inversion step is performed in the spectral domain, by fitting amplitude spectra. Since compressive and dilatation quadrants are not distinguishable, this information is retrieved during the second step, which is carried out in the time domain. Refined latitude and longitude for the centroid, as well as an earthquake origin time, can be also retrieved at this time. The final step of the inversion consists of a simplified finite-fault inversion. We assume the recently proposed eikonal source model, and determine parameters such as the fault plane orientation (discrimination between fault and auxiliary plane), radius (rupture extension), nucleation point coordinates (indicative of directivity effects) and average rupture velocity of the earthquake. This inversion is performed in the spectral domain, including higher frequency during the fitting process, and using a grid walk scheme with an L1 norm. This multi-step approach has the advantage of using different inversion methods, seismic phases and range of frequencies to infer specific parameters. The presented inversion algorithm is implemented with the Kiwi tools, an experimental software package that allows the fast calculation of synthetic seismograms for extended earthquake sources by using Green's function databases. We will show the application of the inversion algorithm to regional earthquakes recorded by the Portuguese broadband seismic network since 2007. In particular, we will present results for the Mw5.9, 12 February 2007, Cape St Vincent earthquake. For this earthquake we were able to determine not only point-source parameters (focal mechanism, depth, seismic moment and centroid location), but also finite-fault parameters (preferred fault plane, rupture extension and directivity analysis). We assess the robustness of our results by using both regional and teleseismic waveforms, and by performing a bootstrap analysis. We will further present point-source characteristics (focal mechanism, depth, seismic moment and centroid location) of other regional earthquakes of M>3.5. The small magnitude of these earthquakes prevents their study with the third step of the algorithm and consequent determination of finite-fault parameters. We present focal mechanisms for this set of smaller magnitude events. Among these, only four earthquakes have previously published focal mechanisms.

  5. Effects of load on good morning kinematics and EMG activity

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Erin Nicole; Ryan, David Russell; Contreras, Bret

    2015-01-01

    Many strength and conditioning coaches utilize the good morning (GM) to strengthen the hamstrings and spinal erectors. However, little research exists on its electromyography (EMG) activity and kinematics, and how these variables change as a function of load. The purpose of this investigation was to examine how estimated hamstring length, integrated EMG (IEMG) activity of the hamstrings and spinal erectors, and kinematics of the lumbar spine, hip, knee, and ankle are affected by changes in load. Fifteen trained male participants (age = 24.6 ± 5.3 years; body mass = 84.7 ± 11.3 kg; height = 180.9 ± 6.8 cm) were recruited for this study. Participants performed five sets of the GM, utilizing 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) in a randomized fashion. IEMG activity of hamstrings and spinal erectors tended to increase with load. Knee flexion increased with load on all trials. Estimated hamstring length decreased with load. However, lumbar flexion, hip flexion, and plantar flexion experienced no remarkable changes between trials. These data provide insight as to how changing the load of the GM affects EMG activity, kinematic variables, and estimated hamstring length. Implications for hamstring injury prevention are discussed. More research is needed for further insight as to how load affects EMG activity and kinematics of other exercises. PMID:25653899

  6. Kinematic Dipole Detection with Galaxy Surveys: Forecasts and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mijin; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-11-01

    Upcoming or future deep galaxy samples with wide sky coverage can provide independent measurement of the kinematic dipole—our motion relative to the rest frame defined by the large-scale structure. Such a measurement would present an important test of the standard cosmological model, as the standard model predicts the galaxy measurement should precisely agree with the existing precise measurements made using the cosmic microwave background. However, the required statistical precision to measure the kinematic dipole typically makes the measurement susceptible to bias from the presence of the local-structure-induced dipole contamination. In order to minimize the latter, a sufficiently deep survey is required. We forecast both the statistical error and the systematic bias in the kinematic dipole measurements. We find that a survey covering ?75% of the sky in both hemispheres and having ?30 million galaxies can detect the kinematic dipole at 5?, while its median redshift should be at least {z}{{med}}? 0.75 for negligible bias from the local structure.

  7. Kinematic signatures of telic and atelic events in ASL predicates.

    PubMed

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B

    2012-09-01

    This article presents an experimental investigation of kinematics of verb sign production in American Sign Language (ASL) using motion capture data. The results confirm that event structure differences in the meaning of the verbs are reflected in the kinematic formation: for example, in the telic verbs (THROW, HIT), the end-point of the event is marked in the verb sign movement by significantly greater deceleration, as compared to atelic verbs (SWIM, TRAVEL). This end-point marker is highly robust regardless of position of the verb in the sentence (medial vs. final), although other prominent kinematic measures, including sign duration and peak speed of dominant hand motion within the sign, are affected by prosodic processes such as Phrase Final Lengthening. The study provides the first kinematic confirmation that event structure is expressed in movement profiles of ASL verbs, up to now only supported by apparent perceptual distinctions. The findings raise further questions about the psychology of event representation both in human languages and in the human mind. PMID:23094321

  8. Shoulder Function and 3-Dimensional Scapular Kinematics in

    E-print Network

    Karduna, Andrew

    , and scapular dysfunction are commonly believed to contribute to shoulder impingement. The purpose of this study in subjects with and without primary shoulder impingement syndrome. Subjects. Forty-five subjects function and 3-dimensional scapular kinematics in people with and without shoulder impingement syndrome

  9. Shoulder Function and 3-Dimensional Kinematics in People With Shoulder

    E-print Network

    Karduna, Andrew

    Shoulder Function and 3-Dimensional Kinematics in People With Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Before and After a 6-Week Exercise Program Background and Purpose. Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common condi an exercise program in patients with shoulder impingement syn- drome. Specifically, the purpose

  10. Predicting power-optimal kinematics of avian wings.

    PubMed

    Parslew, Ben

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of avian flight is developed which simulates wing motion through a class of methods known as predictive simulation. This approach uses numerical optimization to predict power-optimal kinematics of avian wings in hover, cruise, climb and descent. The wing dynamics capture both aerodynamic and inertial loads. The model is used to simulate the flight of the pigeon, Columba livia, and the results are compared with previous experimental measurements. In cruise, the model unearths a vast range of kinematic modes that are capable of generating the required forces for flight. The most efficient mode uses a near-vertical stroke-plane and a flexed-wing upstroke, similar to kinematics recorded experimentally. In hover, the model predicts that the power-optimal mode uses an extended-wing upstroke, similar to hummingbirds. In flexing their wings, pigeons are predicted to consume 20% more power than if they kept their wings full extended, implying that the typical kinematics used by pigeons in hover are suboptimal. Predictions of climbing flight suggest that the most energy-efficient way to reach a given altitude is to climb as steeply as possible, subjected to the availability of power. PMID:25392398

  11. Forelimb kinematics during hopping and landing in toads.

    PubMed

    Cox, S M; Gillis, Gary B

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated landing in a variety of animals involves the re-positioning of limbs prior to impact to safely decelerate the body. However, limb kinematics strategies for landing vary considerably among species. For example, human legs are increasingly flexed before impact as drop height increases, while turkeys increasingly extend their legs before impact with increasing drop height. In anurans, landing typically involves the use of the forelimbs to decelerate the body after impact. Few detailed, quantitative descriptions of anuran forelimb kinematics during jumping exist and it is not known whether they prepare for larger landing forces by changing forelimb kinematics. In this study, we used high-speed video of 51 hops from five cane toads (Bufo marinus) to test the hypothesis that forelimb kinematics change predictably with distance. We measured excursions of the elbow (flexion/extension) and humerus (protraction/retraction and elevation/depression) throughout every hop. The results indicate that elbow and humeral excursions leading up to impact increase significantly with hop length, but do so without any change in the rate of movement. Instead, because the animal is in the air longer during longer hops, near-constant velocity movements lead to the larger excursions. These larger excursions in elbow extension result in animals hitting the ground with more extended forelimbs in longer hops, which in turn allows animals to decelerate over a greater distance. PMID:26254325

  12. Chromospherically active binaries members of young stellar kinematic groups

    E-print Network

    Complutense de Madrid, Universidad

    Chromospherically active binaries members of young stellar kinematic groups D. Montes, M.J. Fern study of a large sample of CAB in order to determine their membership to representative young disk and amplifies the magnetic fields in the convective zone, but there is a further relationship between rotation

  13. 1 INTRODUCTION The kinematics characterization of landslides is a

    E-print Network

    Toussaint, Renaud

    1 1 INTRODUCTION The kinematics characterization of landslides is a prior to understand landslide of landslide kine- matics difficult with conventional and punctual geo- detic measurements like tacheometry for moni- toring the spatial heterogeneity of landslide dis- placements (Kääb, 2002; Casson et al., 2003

  14. Knee's Motion Path Relative to the Passive Coupled Kinematic Envelope

    E-print Network

    Dodd, Kevin A.

    2009-06-15

    by manual manipulation to motion limits. Lunges with ±3.3 Nm IE torques and ±4.7 Nm VV torque were used to verify the IE-VV coupled kinematic envelope. The IE envelope compared well, while the VV envelope was constantly offset. For six of the eight knees, a...

  15. Primate Anatomy, Kinematics, and Principles for Humanoid Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O.; Ambrose, Catherine G.

    2004-01-01

    The primate order of animals is investigated for clues in the design of Humanoid Robots. The pursuit is directed with a theory that kinematics, musculature, perception, and cognition can be optimized for specific tasks by varying the proportions of limbs, and in particular, the points of branching in kinematic trees such as the primate skeleton. Called the Bifurcated Chain Hypothesis, the theory is that the branching proportions found in humans may be superior to other animals and primates for the tasks of dexterous manipulation and other human specialties. The primate taxa are defined, contemporary primate evolution hypotheses are critiqued, and variations within the order are noted. The kinematic branching points of the torso, limbs and fingers are studied for differences in proportions across the order, and associated with family and genus capabilities and behaviors. The human configuration of a long waist, long neck, and short arms is graded using a kinematic workspace analysis and a set of design axioms for mobile manipulation robots. It scores well. The re emergence of the human waist, seen in early Prosimians and Monkeys for arboreal balance, but lost in the terrestrial Pongidae, is postulated as benefiting human dexterity. The human combination of an articulated waist and neck will be shown to enable the use of smaller arms, achieving greater regions of workspace dexterity than the larger limbs of Gorillas and other Hominoidea.

  16. Differences in Soccer Kick Kinematics between Blind Players and Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Katis, Athanasios; Kellis, Eleftherios; Natsikas, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the kinematic differences during instep soccer kicks between players who were blind and sighted controls. Eleven male soccer players who were blind and nine male sighted performed instep kicks under static and dynamic conditions. The results indicated significantly higher (p less than 0.05) ball…

  17. A framework for modelling kinematic measurements in gravity field applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, K. P.; Wei, M.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the resolution of the local gravity field from kinematic measurements, a state model for motion in the gravity field of the earth is formulated. The resulting set of equations can accommodate gravity gradients, specific force, acceleration, velocity and position as input data and can take into account approximation errors as well as sensor errors.

  18. Kinematic Measures of Imitation Fidelity in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Justin H. G.; Casey, Jackie M.; Braadbaart, Lieke; Culmer, Peter R.; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We sought to develop a method for measuring imitation accuracy objectively in primary school children. Children imitated a model drawing shapes on the same computer-tablet interface they saw used in video clips, allowing kinematics of model and observers' actions to be directly compared. Imitation accuracy was reported as a correlation…

  19. 2D kinematic signatures of boxy/peanut bulges

    E-print Network

    Iannuzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    We study the imprints of boxy/peanut structures on the 2D line-of-sight kinematics of simulated disk galaxies. The models under study belong to a family with varying initial gas fraction and halo triaxiality, plus few other control runs with different structural parameters; the kinematic information was extracted using the Voronoi-binning technique and parametrised up to the fourth order of a Gauss-Hermite series. Building on a previous work for the long-slit case, we investigate the 2D kinematic behaviour in the edge-on projection as a function of the boxy/peanut strength and position angle; we find that for the strongest structures the highest moments show characteristic features away from the midplane in a range of position angles. We also discuss the masking effect of a classical bulge and the ambiguity in discriminating kinematically this spherically-symmetric component from a boxy/peanut bulge seen end-on. Regarding the face-on case, we extend existing results to encompass the effect of a second bucklin...

  20. Influence of kinematic parameters on result efficiency in javelin throw.

    PubMed

    Saratlija, Predrag; Zagorac, Nebojsa; Babi?, Vesna

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the research was to define the influence of the kinematic parameters in the javelin throw success in the top junior athletes at the European Junior Athletics Championships in Novi Sad. A set, consisting of 17 kinematic variables, was applied on a sample of 16 athletes, and the same variables were registered at the 2009 Novi Sad European Junior Championships. The criteria variable was the achieved throw length (javelin throw). The subjects were represented by 113 successful javelin throws. The results of the chosen kinematic variables correlation analysis showed the existence of multiple significant relations between the observed variables. Based on the observed kinematic variables correlation analysis, the next conclusion can be made: the javelin release speed has the most important role, followed by the fast front support leg placing. The results are expected and logical, and can be used in kinesiology practice, especially in the process of young throwers' technique learning and in development of motor abilities relevant for this athletic discipline. PMID:23914486