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  1. The Jaime Escalante Math Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalante, Jaime

    This article describes the Jaime Escalante Math Program, a system that in 1989 helped an East Los Angeles high school set a record by administering over 450 Advanced Placement exams, having administered only 10 tests in 1978. The article is presented in three sections. The first section describes the program, discussing origins and backgrounds:…

  2. Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi Receives 2013 International Award: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    2014-01-01

    Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi was born in Chihuahua, Mexico. His surname Urrutia means "distant" in Basque, and Fucugauchi means roughly "Good luck—come in!" in Japanese. And Jaime, of course, is "James" in Spanish. Thus, Jaime was international from birth. There could hardly have been a better candidate for the AGU International Award.

  3. Spatializing Sexuality in Jaime Hernandez's "Locas"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jessica E.

    2009-01-01

    Focusing on Jaime Hernandez's "Locas: The Maggie and Hopey Stories," part of the "Love and Rockets" comic series, I argue that the graphic landscape of this understudied comic offers an illustration of the theories of space in relation to race, gender, and sexuality that have been critical to understandings of Chicana sexuality. Set in a barrio…

  4. Jaime Torres Bodet: Centenario de su Natalicio (Jaime Torres Bodet: 100th Anniversary of His Birth).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revista Interamericana de Educacion de Adultos, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Articles in this issue, written in Spanish, focus on the following: the philosophy of Jaime Torres Bodet (humanistic vision of adult education; objectives of public education in Mexico; Mexico and the issue of culture; The Mexican National Museum of History; Enrique Gonzalez Martinez, poet of all hours; Marti, Cuba's champion; educational…

  5. Adaptation of a GAD Treatment for Hypochondriasis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langlois, Frederic; Ladouceur, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Health preoccupations are present in both generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and hypochondriasis. Contrary to GAD, in which excessive anxiety and worry encompass a number of events or activities, health is the central theme of worry in hypochondriasis. A recent study demonstrated that two processes involved in GAD are also involved in health…

  6. Genes of the GadX-GadW regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Don L; Tucker, Nancy; Ma, Zhuo; Foster, John W; Miranda, Regina L; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2003-05-01

    Acid in the stomach is thought to be a barrier to bacterial colonization of the intestine. Escherichia coli, however, has three systems for acid resistance, which overcome this barrier. The most effective of these systems is dependent on transport and decarboxylation of glutamate. GadX regulates two genes that encode isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase critical to this system, but additional genes associated with the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system remained to be identified. The gadX gene and a second downstream araC-like transcription factor gene, gadW, were mutated separately and in combination, and the gene expression profiles of the mutants were compared to those of the wild-type strain grown in neutral and acidified media under conditions favoring induction of glutamate-dependent acid resistance. Cluster and principal-component analyses identified 15 GadX-regulated, acid-inducible genes. Reverse transcriptase mapping demonstrated that these genes are organized in 10 operons. Analysis of the strain lacking GadX but possessing GadW confirmed that GadX is a transcriptional activator under acidic growth conditions. Analysis of the strain lacking GadW but possessing GadX indicated that GadW exerts negative control over three GadX target genes. The strain lacking both GadX and GadW was defective in acid induction of most but not all GadX target genes, consistent with the roles of GadW as an inhibitor of GadX-dependent activation of some genes and an activator of other genes. Resistance to acid was decreased under certain conditions in a gadX mutant and even more so by combined mutation of gadX and gadW. However, there was no defect in colonization of the streptomycin-treated mouse model by the gadX mutant in competition with the wild type, and the gadX gadW mutant was a better colonizer than the wild type. Thus, E. coli colonization of the mouse does not appear to require glutamate-dependent acid resistance. PMID:12730179

  7. The exon-intron organization of the genes (GAD1 and GAD2) encoding two human glutamate decarboxylases (GAD[sub 67] and GAD[sub 65]) suggests that they derive from a common ancestral GAD

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, D.F.; Tobin, A.J. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors have cloned and characterized human genes (GAD1 and GAD2) encoding the two human glutamate decarboxylases, GAD[sub 67] and GAD[sub 65]. The coding region of the GAD[sub 65] gene consists of 16 exons, spanning more than 79 kb of genomic DNA. Exon 1 contains the 5[prime] untranslated region of GAD[sub 65] mRNA, and exon 16 specifies the protein's carboxy terminal and at least part of the mRNA's 3[prime] untranslated sequence. Similarly, the coding region of the GAD[sub 67] gene consists of 16 exons, spread over more than 45 kb of genomic DNA. The GAD[sub 67] gene contains an additional exon (exon 0) that, together with part of exon 1, specifies the 5[prime] untranslated region of GAD[sub 67] mRNA. Exon 16 specifies the entire 3[prime] untranslated region of GAD[sub 67] mRNA. Exons 1-3 encode the most divergent region of GAD[sub 65] and GAD[sub 67]. The remaining exon-intron boundaries occur at identical positions in the two cDNAs, suggesting that they derive from a common ancestral GAD gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have GAD? For More Information Share Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control ... go badly? If so, you may have an anxiety disorder called generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). What is ...

  9. GAD65 epitope mapping and search for novel autoantibodies in GAD-associated neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Fouka, P; Alexopoulos, H; Akrivou, S; Trohatou, O; Politis, P K; Dalakas, M C

    2015-04-15

    Antibodies against Glutamic-acid-decarboxylase (GAD65) are seen in various CNS excitability disorders including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis and epilepsy. To explore pathogenicity, we examined whether distinct epitope specificities or other co-existing antibodies may account for each disorder. The epitope recognized by all 27 tested patients, irrespective of clinical phenotype, corresponded to the catalytic core of GAD. No autoantibodies against known GABAergic antigens were found. In a screen for novel specificities using live hippocampal neurons, three epilepsy patients, but no other, were positive. We conclude that no GAD-specific epitope defines any neurological syndrome but other antibody specificities may account for certain phenotypes. PMID:25867471

  10. 77 FR 31045 - Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Jaime Sánchez

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Jaime S nchez I Jaime...

  11. FUTURES with Jaime Escalante: Development of a Successful, Research-Based Instructional Video Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Shelley L.

    "FUTURES with Jaime Escalante" is an educational video series aimed at increasing interest in mathematics. The series of 12 videotapes is aimed at junior high and early high school students and demonstrates that mathematics is a prerequisite for many careers. The series seeks to change students' attitudes toward mathematics and defuse the ideas…

  12. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Rohit A; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U

    2016-03-22

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  13. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A.; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  14. Recent gene conversions between duplicated glutamate decarboxylase genes (gadA and gadB) in pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Tarr, Cheryl L; Christensen, Lisa M; Betting, David J; Whittam, Thomas S

    2007-10-01

    Escherichia coli have evolved adaptive systems to resist strongly acidic habitats in part through the production of 2 biochemically identical isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), encoded by the gadA and gadB genes. These genes occur in E. coli and other members of the genospecies (e.g., Shigella spp.) and originated as part of a genomic fitness island acquired early in Escherichia evolution. The present duplicated gad loci are widely spaced on the E. coli chromosome, and the 2 genes are 97% similar in sequence. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the gadA and gadB in 16 strains of pathogenic E. coli revealed 3.8% and 5.0% polymorphism in the 2 genes, respectively. Alignment of the homologous genes identified a total of 120 variable sites, including 21 fixed nucleotide differences between the loci within the first 82 codons of the genes. Twenty-three phylogenetically informative sites were polymorphic for the same nucleotides in both genes suggesting recent gene conversions or intergenic recombination. Phylogenetic analysis based on the synonymous substitutions per synonymous site indicated 2 cases in which specific gadA and gadB alleles were more closely related to one another than to other alleles at the corresponding locus. The results indicate that at least 3 gene conversion events have occurred after the gad gene duplication in the evolution of E. coli. Despite multiple gene conversion events, the upstream regulatory regions and the 5' end of each gene remains distinct, suggesting that maintaining functionally different gad genes is important in this acid-resistance mechanism in pathogenic E. coli. PMID:17675652

  15. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD): When Worry Gets Out of Control

    MedlinePlus

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder: When Worry Gets Out of Control Are you extremely worried about everything in your life, even ... go badly? If so, you may have an anxiety disorder called generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). national institute ...

  16. Gluconic acid production by gad mutant of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dexin; Wang, Chenhong; Wei, Dong; Shi, Jiping; Kim, Chul Ho; Jiang, Biao; Han, Zengsheng; Hao, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae produces many economically important chemicals. Using glucose as a carbon source, the main metabolic product in K. pneumoniae is 2,3-butanediol. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of the glucose oxidation pathway. In the current study, a metabolic engineering strategy was used to develop a gluconic acid-producing K. pneumoniae strain. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. Gluconic acid accumulation by K. pneumoniae Δgad was an acid-dependent aerobic process, with accumulation observed at pH 5.5 or lower, and at higher levels of oxygen supplementation. Under all other conditions tested, 2,3-butanediol was the main metabolic product of the process. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by K. pneumoniae Δgad, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g. The K. pneumoniae Δgad described in this study is the first genetically modified strain used for gluconic acid production, and this optimized method for gluconic acid production may have important industrial applications. Gluconic acid is an intermediate of this glucose oxidation pathway. Deletion of gad, resulting in loss of gluconate dehydrogenase activity, led to the accumulation of gluconic acid in the culture broth. In fed batch fermentation, a final concentration of 422 g/L gluconic acid was produced by the K. pneumoniae Δgad strain, and the conversion ratio of glucose to gluconic acid reached 1 g/g. PMID:27339313

  17. Decline in Titers of Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies Specific to Autoantibodies to GAD65 (GAD65Ab) Precedes Development of GAD65Ab and Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Helena Elding; Jönsson, Ida; Lernmark, Åke; Ivarsson, Sten; Radtke, Jared R.; Hampe, Christiane S.

    2013-01-01

    The humoral Idiotypic Network consisting of antibodies and their anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) can be temporarily upset by antigen exposure. In the healthy immune response the original equilibrium is eventually restored through counter-regulatory mechanisms. In certain autoimmune diseases however, autoantibody levels exceed those of their respective anti-Id, indicating a permanent disturbance in the respective humoral Idiotypic Network. We investigated anti-Id directed to a major Type 1 diabetes (T1D)-associated autoantibody (GAD65Ab) in two independent cohorts during progression to disease. Samples taken from participants of the Natural History Study showed significantly lower anti-Id levels in individuals that later progressed to T1D compared to non-progressors (anti-Id antibody index of 0.06 vs. 0.08, respectively, p = 0.02). We also observed a significant inverse correlation between anti-Id levels and age at sampling, but only in progressors (p = 0.014). Finally, anti-Id levels in progressors showed a significant decline during progression as compared to longitudinal anti-Id levels in non-progressors (median rate of change: −0.0004 vs. +0.0004, respectively, p = 0.003), suggesting a loss of anti-Id during progression. Our analysis of the Diabetes Prediction in Skåne cohort showed that early in life (age 2) individuals at risk have anti-Id levels indistinguishable from those in healthy controls, indicating that low anti-Id levels are not an innate characteristic of the immune response in individuals at risk. Notably, anti-Id levels declined significantly in individuals that later developed GAD65Ab suggesting that the decline in anti-Id levels precedes the emergence of GAD65Ab (median rate of change: −0.005) compared to matched controls (median rate of change: +0.001) (p = 0.0016). We conclude that while anti-Id are present early in life, their levels decrease prior to the appearance of GAD65Ab and to the development of T1D. PMID

  18. gadA gene locus in Lactobacillus brevis NCL912 and its expression during fed-batch fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Li, Wenming; Liu, Xiaohua; Cao, Yusheng

    2013-12-01

    Normally, Lactobacillus brevis has two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes; gadA and gadB. Using PCR, we cloned the gadA gene from L. brevis strain NCL912, a high yield strain for the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, despite using 61 different primer pairs, including degenerate primers from conserved regions, we were unable to use PCR to clone gadB from the NCL912 strain. Furthermore, we could not clone it by genomic walking over 3000 bp downstream of the aldo-keto reductase gene, a single-copy gene that is located 1003 bp upstream of gadB in L. brevis ATCC367. Altogether, the data suggest that L. brevis NCL912 does not contain a gadB gene. By genomic walking, we cloned regions upstream and downstream of the gadA gene to obtain a 4615 bp DNA fragment that included the complete gadA locus. The locus contained the GAD gene (gadA) and the glutamate:GABA antiporter gene (gadC), which appear to be transcribed in an operon (gadCA), and a transcriptional regulator (gadR) of gadCA. During whole fed-batch fermentation, the expression of gadR, gadC and gadA was synchronized and correlated well with GABA production. The gadA locus we cloned from NCL912 has reduced homology compared with gadA loci of other L. brevis strains, and these differences might explain the ability of NCL912 to produce higher levels of GABA in culture. PMID:24164637

  19. GAD2 Alternative Transcripts in the Human Prefrontal Cortex, and in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Gao, Yuan; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.; Lipska, Barbara K.; Shin, Joo Heon; Xie, Bin; Ye, Tianzhang; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Hyde, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation and early adverse environmental events work together to increase risk for schizophrenia. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain, plays a major role in normal brain development, and has been strongly implicated in the pathobiology of schizophrenia. GABA synthesis is controlled by two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, GAD1 and GAD2, both of which produce a number of alternative transcripts. Genetic variants in the GAD1 gene are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, and reduced expression of its major transcript in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). No consistent changes in GAD2 expression have been found in brains from patients with schizophrenia. In this work, with the use of RNA sequencing and PCR technologies, we confirmed and tracked the expression of an alternative truncated transcript of GAD2 (ENST00000428517) in human control DLPFC homogenates across lifespan besides the well-known full length transcript of GAD2. In addition, using quantitative RT-PCR, expression of GAD2 full length and truncated transcripts were measured in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The expression of GAD2 full length transcript is decreased in the DLPFC of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, while GAD2 truncated transcript is increased in bipolar disorder patients but decreased in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, the patients with schizophrenia with completed suicide or positive nicotine exposure showed significantly higher expression of GAD2 full length transcript. Alternative transcripts of GAD2 may be important in the growth and development of GABA-synthesizing neurons as well as abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. PMID:26848839

  20. Diagnostic Validity of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) among Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Gelaye, Bizu; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Fann, Jesse R.; Rondon, Marta B.; Sánchez, Sixto E.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) during pregnancy is associated with several adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. A reliable and valid screening tool for GAD should lead to earlier detection and treatment. Among pregnant Peruvian women, a brief screening tool, the GAD-7, has not been validated. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and validity of the GAD-7. Methods Of 2,978 women who attended their first perinatal care visit and had the GAD-7 screening, 946 had a Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The Cronbach’s alpha was calculated to examine the reliability. We assessed the criterion validity by calculating operating characteristics. The construct validity was evaluated using factor analysis and association with health status on the CIDI. The cross-cultural validity was explored using the Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM). Results The reliability of the GAD-7 was good (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.89). A cutoff score of 7 or higher, maximizing the Youden Index, yielded a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 67.3%. One-factor structure of the GAD-7 was confirmed by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Concurrent validity was supported by the evidence that higher GAD-7 scores were associated with poor self-rated physical and mental health. The Rasch RSM further confirmed the cross-cultural validity of the GAD-7. Conclusion The results suggest that the Spanish-language version of the GAD-7 may be used as a screening tool for pregnant Peruvian women. The GAD-7 has good reliability, factorial validity, and concurrent validity. The optimal cutoff score obtained by maximizing the Youden Index should be considered cautiously; women who screened positive may require further investigation to confirm GAD diagnosis. PMID:25915929

  1. Structural model of human GAD65: prediction and interpretation of biochemical and immunogenic features.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Guido; De Biase, Daniela; Gut, Heinz; Ahmed, Shaheen; Grütter, Markus G

    2005-04-01

    The 65 kDa human isoform of glutamate decarboxylase, GAD65, plays a central role in neurotransmission in higher vertebrates and is a typical autoantigen in several human autoimmune diseases, such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), Stiff-man syndrome and autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I. In autoimmune diabetes, an attack of inflammatory cells to endocrine pancreatic beta-cells leads to their complete destruction, eventually resulting in the inability to produce sufficient insulin for the body's requirements. Even though the etiology of beta-cell destruction is still a matter of debate, the role and antigenic potency of GAD65 are widely recognized. Herein a model of GAD65 is presented, which is based on the recently solved crystal structures of mammalian DOPA decarboxylase and of bacterial glutamate decarboxylase. The model provides for the first time a detailed and accurate structure of the GAD65 subunit (all three domains) and of its dimeric quaternary assembly. It reveals the structural basis for specific antibody recognition to GAD65 as opposed to GAD67, the other human isoform, which shares 81% sequence similarity with GAD65 and is much less antigenic. Literature data on monoclonal antibody binding are perfectly consistent with the detailed features of the model, which allows explanation of several findings on GAD65 immunogenicity. Importantly, by analyzing the active site, we identified the residues most likely involved in catalysis and substrate recognition, paving the way for rational mutagenesis studies of the GAD65 reaction mechanism, specificity and inhibition. PMID:15690345

  2. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  3. Epigenetic Suppression of GADs Expression is Involved in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy and Pilocarpine-Induced Mice Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Gang; Cai, Qing; Zheng, Jun; Dong, Yu-Shu; Li, Jin-Jiang; Li, Jing-Chen; Hao, Guang-Zhi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ju-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that histone acetylation is involved with the regulation of enzyme glutamate decarboxylases (GADs), including GAD67 and GAD65. Here, we investigated the histone acetylation modifications of GADs in the pathogenesis of epilepsy and explored the therapeutic effect of a novel second-generation histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) JNJ-26481585 in epilepsy animals. We revealed the suppression of GADs protein and mRNA level, and histone hypoacetylation in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and pilocarpine-induced epilepsy mice model. Double-immunofluorescence also indicated that the hypoacetyl-H3 was located in hippocampal GAD67/GAD65 positive neurons in epilepsy mice. JNJ-26481585 significantly reversed the decrease of the GAD67/GAD65 both protein and mRNA levels, and the histone hypoacetylation of GABAergic neurons in epilepsy mice. Meanwhile, single-cell real-time PCR performed in GFP-GAD67/GAD65 transgenic mice demonstrated that JNJ-26481585 induced increase of GAD67/GAD65 mRNA level in GABAergic neurons. Furthermore, JNJ-26481585 significantly alleviated the epileptic seizures in mice model. Together, our findings demonstrate inhibition of GADs gene via histone acetylation plays an important role in the pathgenesis of epilepsy, and suggest JNJ-26481585 as a promising therapeutic strategy for epilepsy. PMID:27220336

  4. Function coupling of otoferlin with GAD65 acts to modulate GABAergic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wu; Rahman, Mona N; Guo, Jun; Roy, Natalie; Xue, Lihua; Cahill, Catherine M; Zhang, Shetuan; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-04-01

    Otoferlin, an integral membrane protein implicated in a late stage of exocytosis, has been reported to play a critical role in hearing although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. However, its widespread tissue distribution infers a more ubiquitous role in synaptic vesicle trafficking. Glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, is converted to its inhibitory counterpart, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), by L-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), which exists in soluble (GAD67) and membrane-bound (GAD65) forms. For the first time, we have revealed a close association between otoferlin and GAD65 in both HEK293 and neuronal cells, including SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and primary rat hippocampus cells, showing a direct interaction between GAD65 and otoferlin's C2 domains. In primary rat hippocampus cells, otoferlin and GAD65 co-localized in a punctate pattern within the cell body, as well as in the axon along the path of vesicular traffic. Significantly, GABA is virtually abolished in otoferlin-knockdown neuronal cells whereas otoferlin overexpression markedly increases endogenous GABA. GABA attenuation in otoferlin-knockdown primary cells is correlated with diminished L-type calcium current. This previously unknown and close correlation demonstrates that otoferlin, through GAD65, modulates GABAergic activity. The discovery of otoferlin-GAD65 functional coupling provides a new avenue for understanding the molecular mechanism by which otoferlin functions in neurological pathways. PMID:25701657

  5. Predictors of CBT outcome in older adults with GAD.

    PubMed

    Hundt, Natalie E; Amspoker, Amber B; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Cully, Jeffrey A; Rhoades, Howard; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-12-01

    The current study is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of CBT for late-life GAD (Stanley et al., 2014) which provided an opportunity to examine predictors of outcome among those who received CBT. Participants were 150 older adults who were randomized to receive 10 sessions of CBT. Completer analyses found that homework completion, number of sessions attended, lower worry severity, lower depression severity, and recruitment site predicted 6-month worry outcome on the PSWQ-A, whereas homework completion, credibility of the therapy, lower anxiety severity, and site predicted 6-month anxiety outcome on the STAI-T. In intent-to-treat multivariate analyses, however, only initial worry and anxiety severity, site, and number of sessions completed predicted treatment outcome. These results are largely consistent with predictors of outcome in younger adults and suggest that lower initial symptom severity and variables consistent with greater engagement in treatment predict outcome. PMID:25445074

  6. Predictors of CBT Outcome in Older Adults with GAD

    PubMed Central

    Hundt, Natalie E.; Amspoker, Amber B.; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Cully, Jeffrey A.; Rhoades, Howard; Kunik, Mark E.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial of CBT for late-life GAD (Stanley et al., 2014) which provided an opportunity to examine predictors of outcome among those who received CBT. Participants were 150 older adults who were randomized to receive 10 sessions of CBT. Completer analyses found that homework completion, number of sessions attended, lower worry severity, lower depression severity, and recruitment site predicted 6-month worry outcome on the PSWQ-A, whereas homework completion, credibility of the therapy, lower anxiety severity, and site predicted better 6-month anxiety outcome on the STAI-T. In intent-to-treat multivariate analyses, however, only initial worry and anxiety severity, site, and number of sessions completed predicted treatment outcome. These results are largely consistent with predictors of outcome in younger adults and suggest that lower initial symptom severity and variables consistent with greater engagement in treatment predict outcome. PMID:25445074

  7. Phosphorylation of the amino-terminus of the AGC kinase Gad8 prevents its interaction with TORC2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Forte, Gabriella M.; Smith, Duncan; Petersen, Janni

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation, metabolism, migration and survival are coordinated through the tight control of two target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that a novel phosphorylation of fission yeast Gad8 (AGC kinase) on the evolutionarily conserved threonine 6 (Thr6) prevents the physical association between Gad8 and TORC2. Accordingly, this block to protein interactions by Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation decreases TORC2-controlled activation of Gad8. Likewise, phosphorylation of Gad8 Thr6, possibly by PKC, prevents the association of Gad8 with TORC2 thereby increasing TORC2 activity, because it reduces Gad8-mediated feedback inhibition of TORC2. Consistently, the introduction of a Gad8 T6D mutant, that mimics phosphorylation, increased TORC2 activity. Increased PKCPck2 expression prevented Gad8–TORC2 binding and so reduced the TORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Gad8 serine 546 that activates Gad8. Interestingly, independent of the Ser546 phosphorylation status, Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation is important for remodelling the actin cytoskeleton and survival upon potassium ion and heat stresses. In contrast, Ser546 phosphorylation is required for the control of G1 arrest, mating, cell length at division and vascular size. Finally, these findings reveal a novel mode of TORC2 activation that is essential for cell survival following stress. PMID:26935949

  8. Phosphorylation of the amino-terminus of the AGC kinase Gad8 prevents its interaction with TORC2.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Forte, Gabriella M; Smith, Duncan; Petersen, Janni

    2016-03-01

    Cell proliferation, metabolism, migration and survival are coordinated through the tight control of two target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that a novel phosphorylation of fission yeast Gad8 (AGC kinase) on the evolutionarily conserved threonine 6 (Thr6) prevents the physical association between Gad8 and TORC2. Accordingly, this block to protein interactions by Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation decreases TORC2-controlled activation of Gad8. Likewise, phosphorylation of Gad8 Thr6, possibly by PKC, prevents the association of Gad8 with TORC2 thereby increasing TORC2 activity, because it reduces Gad8-mediated feedback inhibition of TORC2. Consistently, the introduction of a Gad8 T6D mutant, that mimics phosphorylation, increased TORC2 activity. Increased PKC(Pck2) expression prevented Gad8-TORC2 binding and so reduced the TORC2-mediated phosphorylation of Gad8 serine 546 that activates Gad8. Interestingly, independent of the Ser546 phosphorylation status, Gad8 Thr6 phosphorylation is important for remodelling the actin cytoskeleton and survival upon potassium ion and heat stresses. In contrast, Ser546 phosphorylation is required for the control of G1 arrest, mating, cell length at division and vascular size. Finally, these findings reveal a novel mode of TORC2 activation that is essential for cell survival following stress. PMID:26935949

  9. [The medical and pharmaceutical profession and the mutual care system in the writings of Jaime Vera (1859-1918)].

    PubMed

    Léon Sanz, Pilar

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the perspectives of the physician and politician Jaime Vera y López (1859-1918), co-founder of the Spanish Socialist Workers' Party, on the medical profession, medical practice, and healthcare systems. It compares the Report (Informe) that he presented to the Comisión de Reformas Sociales (1884) with his later writings published in the socialist press ("Farmacia y cooperación obrera,, 1914 and "La locura en los niños. Camino del remedio", 1916). We observe the discrepancies between the political-programme documents and the articles centring on professional questions and highlight how his theoretical focus is modified when applied to matters of medical practice. PMID:17214138

  10. Testing the Proterozoic GAD Hypothesis with Reconstructed Tomography Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzik, J. E.; Driscoll, P. E.; Rudolph, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    Pre-Mesozoic continental reconstructions and paleoclimatic inferences from paleomagnetism rely critically upon the assumption of a time-averaged geocentric axial dipole (GAD) magnetic field. Though the geomagnetic field of the past 5 myr has been extensively studied and small geometric variations are being refined (e.g., Johnson et al., 2008, GGG 9), the pre-Mesozoic geomagnetic field geometry remains unresolved and is suggested to have large, non-dipolar contributions (e.g. Kent and Smethurst, 1998, EPSL 160, 391-402). We address the paleo-morphology by looking at inclination versus paleolatitude histograms derived from numerical geodynamo simulations with spatially variable CMB heat flux, similar to the method used by Bloxham (2000, Nature 405, 63-65). We will be using homogeneous heat flux simulations as a standard and compare the results to those of a present day tomography and a reconstracted 200 Ma tomography CMB heat flux. By comparing the relative contribution of non-dipolar components to the dipole field, we find that strong CMB heat flux heterogeneity is necessary to create the large non-dipolar contributions inferred for the paleomagnetic field.

  11. Anti-GAD65 Containing Cerebrospinal Fluid Does not Alter GABAergic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hackert, Jana K.; Müller, Lorenz; Rohde, Marco; Bien, Christian G.; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase of 65 kDa (GAD65) antibodies have been reported in a variety of neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), sporadic ataxia and some cases of epilepsy. Since the target is believed to be the cytoplasmic enzyme GAD65, the key enzyme of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis, the pathophysiological role of these antibodies is poorly understood. Here, we stereotactically injected human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus of rats in vivo and then prepared hippocampal slices 1–2 days after post-operative recovery. We characterized both evoked and spontaneous GABAergic transmission in vitro using sharp microelectrode and patch-clamp recordings in CA1 neurons. Intracellular recordings with sharp microelectrodes from CA1 neurons showed that evoked GABAAR- or GABABR-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSP) remained unaltered in anti-GAD65 tissue. These results were confirmed with patch-clamp recordings showing no difference in evoked gabazine-sensitive inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). In addition, spontaneous IPSCs also showed no difference between anti-GAD65 tissue and controls with respect to the mean frequency, the mean amplitude and the sIPSC distribution. In conclusion, stereotactic injection of GAD65-antibodies into the hippocampus leaves evoked and spontaneous GABAergic synaptic transmission intact. Hence, dysfunction of the inhibitory GABAergic system does not appear to be the major mechanism of epileptogenicity in this disease. PMID:27242441

  12. Expression of GABA Signaling Molecules KCC2, NKCC1, and GAD1 in Cortical Development and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lipska, Barbara K.; Ali, Towhid; Mathew, Shiny V.; Law, Amanda J.; Metitiri, Ochuko E.; Straub, Richard E.; Ye, Tianzhang; Colantuoni, Carlo; Herman, Mary M.; Bigelow, Llewellyn B.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Kleinman, Joel E.

    2011-01-01

    GABA signaling molecules are critical for both human brain development and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We examined the expression of transcripts derived from three genes related to GABA signaling [GAD1 (GAD67 and GAD25), SLC12A2 (NKCC1), and SLC12A5 (KCC2)] in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal formation of a large cohort of nonpsychiatric control human brains (n = 240) across the lifespan (from fetal week 14 to 80 years) and in patients with schizophrenia (n = 30–31), using quantitative RT-PCR. We also examined whether a schizophrenia risk-associated promoter SNP in GAD1 (rs3749034) is related to expression of these transcripts. Our studies revealed that development and maturation of both the PFC and hippocampal formation are characterized by progressive switches in expression from GAD25 to GAD67 and from NKCC1 to KCC2. Previous studies have demonstrated that the former leads to GABA synthesis, and the latter leads to switching from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmission. In the hippocampal formation, GAD25/GAD67 and NKCC1/KCC2 ratios are increased in patients with schizophrenia, reflecting a potentially immature GABA physiology. Remarkably, GAD25/GAD67 and NKCC1/KCC2 expression ratios are associated with rs3749034 genotype, with risk alleles again predicting a relatively less mature pattern. These findings suggest that abnormalities in GABA signaling critical to brain development contribute to genetic risk for schizophrenia. PMID:21795557

  13. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  14. The GAD65 knock out mouse - a model for GABAergic processes in fear- and stress-induced psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Müller, Iris; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Stork, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65 is critically involved in the activity-dependent regulation of GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system. It is also required for the maturation of the GABAergic system during adolescence, a phase that is critical for the development of several neuropsychiatric diseases. Mice bearing a null mutation of the GAD65 gene develop hyperexcitability of the amygdala and hippocampus, and a phenotype of increased anxiety and pathological fear memory reminiscent of posttraumatic stress disorder. Although genetic association of GAD65 in human has not yet been reported, these findings are in line with observations of reduced GABAergic function in these brain regions of anxiety disorder patients. The particular value of GAD65(-/-) mice thus lies in modeling the effects of reduced GABAergic function in the mature nervous system. The expression of GAD65 and a second GAD isozyme, GAD67, are differentially regulated in response to stress in limbic brain areas suggesting that by controlling GABAergic inhibition these enzymes determine the vulnerability for the development of pathological anxiety and other stress-induced phenotypes. In fact, we could recently show that GAD65 haplodeficiency, which results in delayed postnatal increase of GABA levels, provides resilience to juvenile-stress-induced anxiety to GAD65(+/-) mice thus foiling the increased fear and anxiety in homozygous GAD65(-/-) mice. PMID:25470336

  15. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the genome-wide GadEWX transcriptional regulatory network and RpoS involvement in E. coli K-12 MG1655 under acidic stress. Integrative data analysis reveals that GadEWX regulons consist of 45 genes in 31 transcription units and 28 of these genes were associated with RpoS-binding sites. We demonstrate that GadEWX directly and coherently regulate several proton-generating/consuming enzymes with pairs of negative-feedback loops for pH homeostasis. In addition, GadEWX regulate genes with assorted functions, including molecular chaperones, acid resistance, stress response and other regulatory activities. These results show how GadEWX simultaneously coordinate many cellular processes to produce the overall response of E. coli to acid stress. PMID:26258987

  16. Detection of GAD65 antibodies in diabetes and other autoimmune diseases using a simple radioligand assay.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J S; Hejnaes, K R; Moody, A; Karlsen, A E; Marshall, M O; Høier-Madsen, M; Boel, E; Michelsen, B K; Dyrberg, T

    1994-03-01

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) are frequent at or before the onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We have developed a simple, reproducible, and quantitative immunoprecipitation radioligand assay using as antigen in vitro transcribed and translated [35S]methionine-labeled human islet GAD65. By using this assay, 77% (77 of 100) of serum samples from recent-onset IDDM patients were positive for GAD65 antibodies compared with 4% (4 of 100) of serum samples from healthy control subjects. In competition analysis with unlabeled purified recombinant human islet GAD65, binding to tracer was inhibited in 74% (74 of 100) of the GAD65-positive IDDM serum samples compared with 2% of the control samples. The levels of GAD antibodies expressed as an index value relative to a standard serum, analyzed with or without competition, were almost identical (r = 0.991). The intra- and interassay variations of a positive control serum sample were 2.9 and 7.6%, respectively (n = 4). The frequency of GAD antibodies was significantly higher with IDDM onset before the age of 30 (80%, 59 of 74) than after the age of 30 (48%, 10 of 21) (P < 0.01). The prevalence of islet cell antibodies showed a similar pattern relative to age at onset. Because simultaneous occurrences of multiple autoimmune phenomena are common, we analyzed sera from patients with other autoimmune diseases. The frequency of GAD antibodies in sera positive for DNA autoantibodies (8% [2 of 25] and 4% [1 of 25] in competition analysis) or rheuma factor autoantibodies [12% (4 of 35) and 3% (1 of 35) in competition analysis] was not different from that in control samples. In contrast, in sera positive for ribonucleoprotein antibodies the frequency of GAD antibodies was significantly increased (73% [51 of 70] and 10% [7 of 70] in competition analysis [P < 0.025]). In conclusion, even large numbers of serum samples can now be tested for GAD65 antibodies in a relatively short time, allowing

  17. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  18. Postnatal exposure to MK801 induces selective changes in GAD67 or parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Turner, Christopher Paul; DeBenedetto, Danielle; Ware, Emily; Stowe, Robert; Lee, Andrew; Swanson, John; Walburg, Caroline; Lambert, Alexandra; Lyle, Melissa; Desai, Priyanka; Liu, Chun

    2010-03-01

    Brain injury during the last trimester to the first 1-4 years in humans is now thought to trigger an array of intellectual and emotional problems later in life, including disorders such as schizophrenia. In adult schizophrenic brains, there is a specific loss of neurons that co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase-parvalbumin (GAD67-PV). Loss of this phenotype is thought to occur in mature animals previously exposed to N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists during late gestation or at postnatal day 7 (P7). However, in similarly treated animals, we have previously shown that GAD67 and PV are unaltered in the first 24 h. To more precisely define when changes in these markers first occur, we exposed rat pups (P7 or P6-P10) to the NMDAR antagonist MK801 and at P11 co-stained brain sections for GAD67 or PV. In the cingulate cortex, we found evidence for a reduction in PV (GAD67 levels were very low to undetectable). In contrast, in the somatosensory cortex, we found that expression of GAD67 was reduced, but PV remained stable. Further, repeated but not single doses of MK801 were necessary to see such changes. Thus, depending on the region, NMDAR antagonism appears to influence expression of PV or GAD67, but not both. These observations could not have been predicted by previous studies and raise important questions as to how the GAD67-PV phenotype is lost once animals reach maturity. More importantly, such differential effects may be of great clinical importance, given that cognitive deficits are seen in children exposed to anesthetics that act by blocking the NMDAR. PMID:19885653

  19. GAD67-mediated GABA Synthesis and Signaling Regulate Inhibitory Synaptic Innervation in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Di Cristo, Graziella; Wu, Cai Zhi; Knott, Graham; Kuhlman, Sandra; Fu, Yu; Palmiter, Richard D.; Huang, Z. Josh

    2007-01-01

    The development of GABAergic inhibitory circuits is shaped by neural activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. we demonstrate a novel function of GABA in regulating GABAergic innervation in the adolescent brain, when GABA is mainly known as an inhibitory transmitter. Conditional knockdown of the rate-limiting synthetic enzyme GAD67 in basket interneurons in adolescent visual cortex resulted in cell autonomous deficits in axon branching, perisomatic synapse formation around pyramidal neurons, and complexity of the innervation fields; the same manipulation had little influence on the subsequent maintenance of perisomatic synapses. These effects of GABA deficiency were rescued by suppressing GABA re-uptake and by GABA receptor agonists. Germ-line knockdown of GAD67 but not GAD65 showed similar deficits, suggesting a specific role of GAD67 in the maturation of perisomatic innervation. Since intracellular GABA levels are modulated by neuronal activity, our results implicate GAD67-mediated GABA synthesis in activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory innervation patterns. PMID:17582330

  20. Global Regulator of Virulence A (GrvA) Coordinates Expression of Discrete Pathogenic Mechanisms in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli through Interactions with GadW-GadE

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jason K.; Harro, Carly M.; Vendura, Khoury W.; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Global regulator of virulence A (GrvA) is a ToxR-family transcriptional regulator that activates locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-dependent adherence in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). LEE activation by GrvA requires the Rcs phosphorelay response regulator RcsB and is sensitive to physiologically relevant concentrations of bicarbonate, a known stimulant of virulence systems in intestinal pathogens. This study determines the genomic scale of GrvA-dependent regulation and uncovers details of the molecular mechanism underlying GrvA-dependent regulation of pathogenic mechanisms in EHEC. In a grvA-null background of EHEC strain TW14359, RNA sequencing analysis revealed the altered expression of over 700 genes, including the downregulation of LEE- and non-LEE-encoded effectors and the upregulation of genes for glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR). Upregulation of GDAR genes corresponded with a marked increase in acid resistance. GrvA-dependent regulation of GDAR and the LEE required gadE, the central activator of GDAR genes and a direct repressor of the LEE. Control of gadE by GrvA was further determined to occur through downregulation of the gadE activator GadW. This interaction of GrvA with GadW-GadE represses the acid resistance phenotype, while it concomitantly activates the LEE-dependent adherence and secretion of immune subversion effectors. The results of this study significantly broaden the scope of GrvA-dependent regulation and its role in EHEC pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is an intestinal human pathogen causing acute hemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome. For successful transmission and gut colonization, EHEC relies on the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system and a type III secretion apparatus, encoded on the LEE pathogenicity island. This study investigates the mechanism whereby the DNA-binding regulator GrvA coordinates activation of the LEE with

  1. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulos, Sotirios; Theodoridou, Varvara; Argyropoulou, Ourania; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti

    2016-01-01

    Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10%) of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome. PMID:27239355

  2. Guinea Pig Horizontal Cells Express GABA, the GABA-Synthesizing Enzyme GAD65, and the GABA Vesicular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenying; Hirano, Arlene A.; Stella, Salvatore L.; Bitzer, Michaela; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is likely expressed in horizontal cells of all species, although conflicting physiological findings have led to considerable controversy regarding its role as a transmitter in the outer retina. This study has evaluated key components of the GABA system in the outer retina of guinea pig, an emerging retinal model system. The presence of GABA, its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67 isoforms), the plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-3), and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry with well-characterized antibodies. The presence of GAD65 mRNA was also evaluated by using laser capture microdissection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Specific GABA, GAD65, and VGAT immunostaining was localized to horizontal cell bodies, as well as to their processes and tips in the outer plexiform layer. Furthermore, immunostaining of retinal whole mounts and acutely dissociated retinas showed GAD65 and VGAT immunoreactivity in both A-type and B-type horizontal cells. However, these cells did not contain GAD67, GAT-1, or GAT-3 immunoreactivity. GAD65 mRNA was detected in horizontal cells, and sequencing of the amplified GAD65 fragment showed approximately 85% identity with other mammalian GAD65 mRNAs. These studies demonstrate the presence of GABA, GAD65, and VGAT in horizontal cells of the guinea pig retina, and support the idea that GABA is synthesized from GAD65, taken up into synaptic vesicles by VGAT, and likely released by a vesicular mechanism from horizontal cells. PMID:20235161

  3. Antigen presentation of detergent free glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is affected by human serum albumin as carrier protein

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Jordan; Gilliam, Lisa K.; Harris, Robert A.; Lernmark, Åke; Hampe, Christiane S.

    2008-01-01

    1. Summary The smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (TID). Its hydrophobic character requires detergent to keep the protein in solution, which complicates studies of antigen processing and presentation. In this study an attempt was made to replace detergent with human serum albumin (HSA) for in vitro antigen presentation. Different preparations of recombinant human GAD65 complexed with HSA were incubated with Priess B cells (HLA DRB1*0401) and antigen presentation was tested with HLA DRB1*0401-restricted and epitope-specific T33.1 (GAD65 epitope 274-286) and T35 (GAD65 epitope 115-127) T cell hybridomas. Specific epitope recognition by T33.1 (274-286) and T35 (115-127) cells varied between the different GAD65/HSA preparations, and a reverse pattern of antigen presentation were detected by the two hybridoma. The HSA-specific T-cell hybridoma 17.9 response to the different GAD65/HSA preparations followed the same pattern as that observed for the T33.1 cells. The content of immunoreactive GAD65 measured with four GAD65 antibodies indicated that the lowest GAD65 concentration resulted in the highest 274-286, but the lowest 115-127 presentation. This suggests that HSA-GAD65 complexes qualitatively affect the epitope specificity of GAD65 presentation. HSA may enhance the 274-286 epitope presentation, while suppressing the 115-127 epitope. PMID:18353353

  4. A 750 bp sensory integration region directs global control of the Escherichia coli GadE acid resistance regulator.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Atef K; Foster, John W

    2009-03-01

    Escherichia coli survives pH 2 environments through an acid resistance (AR) system regulated by the transcriptional activator GadE. Numerous proteins control gadE at an upstream, conserved, 798 bp intergenic region. We show this region produces three transcripts starting at -124 (T1), -324/-317 (T2) and -566 (T3) bp from the gadE start codon. Transcriptional lacZ fusions to gadE promoter regions revealed P1 and P3 were active while P2 alone was not. However, pairing P3 with P2 activated P2 and increased expression 20-fold above P3 alone. The fusions were transferred to Salmonella, which lacks this AR system, and plasmid-borne E. coli-specific regulators EvgA, YdeO, GadE and GadX were introduced. Data revealed that YdeO and GadX activate P3, P2 and P3P2, while GadE autoactivates P1 and represses P3 and P3P2. The developing model indicates that different signals activate YdeO, GadX, or an MnmE-dependent regulator, which stimulate gadE transcription from the P3 and P2 promoters. Once made, GadE activates P1 and represses P3 and P2. The P1 region also enables efficient downstream transcription and translation of the P3 or P2 transcripts. Evidence indicates the entire 750 bp sensory integration locus is necessary for a versatile response. PMID:19220752

  5. Cysteamine treatment ameliorates alterations in GAD67 expression and spatial memory in heterozygous reeler mice

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Promsote, Wanwisa; Terry, Alvin; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2011-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through its receptor, TrkB is known to regulate GABAergic function and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 expression in neurons. Alterations in BDNF signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and as a result, they are a potential therapeutic target. Interestingly, heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) have decreased GAD67 expression in the frontal cortex and hippocampus and they exhibit many behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities similar to schizophrenia. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of cysteamine, a neuroprotective compound to improve the deficits in GAD67 expression and cognitive function in HRM. We found that cysteamine administration (150 mg/kg/day, through drinking water) for 30 days significantly ameliorated the decreases in GAD67, mature BDNF and full-length TrkB protein levels found in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. A significant attenuation of the increased levels of truncated BDNF in frontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as truncated TrkB in frontal cortex of HRM was also observed following cysteamine treatment. In behavioral studies, HRM were impaired in a Y-maze spatial recognition memory task, but not in a spontaneous alternation task or a sensorimotor, prepulse inhibition (PPI) procedure. Cysteamine improved Y-maze spatial recognition in HRM to the level of wide-type controls and it improved PPI in both wild-type and HRM. Finally, mice deficient in TrkB, showed a reduced response to cysteamine in GAD67 expression suggesting that TrkB signaling plays an important role in GAD67 regulation by cysteamine. PMID:21777509

  6. Prefrontal White Matter Structure Mediates the Influence of GAD1 on Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Lett, Tristram A; Kennedy, James L; Radhu, Natasha; Dominguez, Luis G; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Nazeri, Arash; Farzan, Faranak; Walter, Henrik; Heinz, Andreas; Mulsant, Benoit H; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Voineskos, Aristotle N

    2016-08-01

    The glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) gene is a major determinant of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the most abundant inhibitory neurotransmitter modulating local neuronal circuitry. GABAergic dysfunction and expression of GAD1 have been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and in working memory impairment. We examined the influence of the functional GAD1 rs3749034 variant on white matter fractional anisotropy (FA), cortical thickness, and working memory performance in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls (N=197). Using transcranial magnetic stimulation with electroencephalography (TMS-EEG), we subsequently examined the effect of rs3749034 on long-interval cortical inhibition (LICI) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls (N=66). We found that the rs3749034 T-allele carrier risk group had lower voxel-wise FA in the prefrontal cortex region (PFWE-corrected<0.05) but not cortical thickness. Mixed-model regression revealed a significant effect on attentional processing and working memory across four performance measures (F1,182=11.5, P=8 × 10(-4)). FA in the prefrontal cortex was associated with digit-span performance. Voxel-wise mediation analysis revealed that the effect GAD1 on poorer digit-span performance statistically predicted the lower white matter FA (PFWE-corrected<0.05). In exploratory analysis, we found a prominent GAD1 genotype-by-diagnosis interaction on DLPFC LICI (F1,56=14.3, P=4.1 × 10(-4)). Our findings converge on variation in GAD1 gene predicting a susceptibility mechanism that affects white matter FA, GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission in the DLPFC, and working memory performance. Furthermore, via voxel mediation of FA and TMS-EEG intervention, we provide evidence for a potentially causal mechanism through which aberrant DLPFC GABA signaling may contribute to working memory dysfunction. PMID:26822489

  7. Limbic Encephalitis Associated With GAD65 Antibodies: Brief Review of the Relevant literature.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Maude-Marie; Savard, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Recently, many cases of autoimmune limbic encephalitis with positive GAD65 (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies have been described in the scientific literature. However, it remains an understudied topic of great relevance to practicing neurologists. Thus, we report here a review of published cases, in English, of autoimmune limbic encephalitis with this type of antibodies, focusing on presenting symptoms and signs, associated conditions, and findings upon investigation. We also report treatment responses. We aim to offer a better description of the clinical spectrum of autoimmune limbic encephalitis associated with GAD65 antibodies as well as to expose its paraclinical features and outcome. PMID:27030381

  8. Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and anti-GAD-related CNS degenerations: protean additions to the autoimmune central neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ali, Fatima; Rowley, Merrill; Jayakrishnan, Bindu; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric; Mackay, Ian R

    2011-09-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune neurological disease attributable to autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) more usually associated with the islet beta cell destruction of autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D). SPS is characterized by interference in neurons with the synthesis/activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) resulting in the prototypic progressive spasmodic muscular rigidity of SPS, or diverse neurological syndromes, cerebellar ataxia, intractable epilepsy, myoclonus and several others. Remarkably, a single autoantibody, anti-GAD, can be common to widely different disease expressions, i.e. T1D and SPS. One explanation for these data is the differences in epitope engagement between the anti-GAD reactivity in SPS and T1D: in both diseases, anti-GAD antibody reactivity is predominantly to a conformational epitope region in the PLP- and C-terminal domains of the 65 kDa isoform but, additionally in SPS, there is reactivity to conformational epitope(s) on GAD67, and short linear epitopes in the C-terminal region and at the N-terminus of GAD65. Another explanation for disease expressions in SPS includes ready access of anti-GAD to antigen sites due to immune responsiveness within the CNS itself according to intrathecal anti-GAD-specific B cells and autoantibody. Closer study of the mysterious stiff-person syndrome should enhance the understanding of this disease itself, and autoimmunity in general. PMID:21680149

  9. Assessment of CD4+ T Cell Responses to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Using DQ8 Tetramers Reveals a Pathogenic Role of GAD65 121–140 and GAD65 250–266 in T1D Development

    PubMed Central

    Chow, I-Ting; Yang, Junbao; Gates, Theresa J.; James, Eddie A.; Mai, Duy T.; Greenbaum, Carla; Kwok, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) is strongly associated with MHC class II molecules, particularly HLA-DQ8 (DQ8: DQA1*03:01/DQB1*03:02). Monitoring T1D-specific T cell responses to DQ8-restricted epitopes may be key to understanding the immunopathology of the disease. In this study, we examined DQ8-restricted T cell responses to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) using DQ8 tetramers. We demonstrated that GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 elicited responses from DQ8+ subjects. Circulating CD4+ T cells specific for these epitopes were detected significantly more often in T1D patients than in healthy individuals after in vitro expansion. T cell clones specific for GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 carried a Th1-dominant phenotype, with some of the GAD65121–140-specific T cell clones producing IL-17. GAD65250–266-specific CD4+ T cells could also be detected by direct ex vivo staining. Analysis of unmanipulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) revealed that GAD65250–266-specific T cells could be found in both healthy and diabetic individuals but the frequencies of specific T cells were higher in subjects with type 1 diabetes. Taken together, our results suggest a proinflammatory role for T cells specific for DQ8-restricted GAD65121–140 and GAD65250–266 epitopes and implicate their possible contribution to the progression of T1D. PMID:25405480

  10. Co-Occurring ODD and GAD Symptom Groups: Source-Specific Syndromes and Cross-Informant Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Loney, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Despite important clinical and nosological implications, the comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has received little attention. A clinic-based sample of 243 boys (ages 6–10 years), their parents, and teachers participated in an evaluation that involved assessments of behavioral, academic, and family functioning. ODD and GAD symptom groups were defined using various combinations of mother and teacher reports. ODD symptom groups were associated with conduct disorder symptoms, and GAD symptom groups with major depressive disorder symptoms, regardless of rater. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms were associated with ODD and GAD symptom groups; however, covarying ADHD symptoms altered few findings. The ODD+GAD symptom groups were associated with higher rates of co-occurring symptoms and risk factors within (source-specific syndromes) and across (cross-informant comorbidity) informants. PMID:18470769

  11. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  12. Three ways to test the validity of the Geocentric Axial Dipole (GAD) hypothesis in the Precambrian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veikkolainen, T.; Pesonen, L. J.; Korhonen, K.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most fundamental aspects of paleomagnetism is the assumption that the temporal mean of the geomagnetic field is indistinguishable from a field generated by a geocentric axial dipole (GAD hypothesis). When the theory became mainstream, various ways to test its functionality were presented, based on e.g. deep-sea sediment cores, paleoclimatic indicators and paleointensity. Most suspicion of the dipolar nature of the geomagnetic field has dealt with the Precambrian. To analyze this bias, we have used the data from the novel paleomagnetic database, collected by University of Helsinki, and Yale University for over a decade's time. Altogether 3016 observations from all major Precambrian continents were gathered, and a thorough compilation of reversals of the Archean and Proterozoic geomagnetic field was done. Observations were filtered using different criteria, e.g. geologic age, rock type (igneous vs. metamorphic vs. sedimentary) and reliability according to the modified Voo-grading. Testing the GAD has rested on a) inclination frequency analysis, b) asymmetries in reversal data, and c) paleosecular variation (PSV) using CALS7K, CALS3K, GUFM and IGRF models as references. The results suggest that the geomagnetic field of the Precambrian is not far from the field predicted by the GAD model. The inclination frequency analysis supports the existence of a small octupolar (ca. 6 % of GAD) component and a quadrupole of 0-8 % of GAD as evaluated using chi-square testing. Conclusions drawn from the asymmetry analysis and PSV are statistically indifferent from this. The deviation from the GAD is smallest for the highest-quality observations, especially so called key poles. They have well-defined isotopic ages, small error parameters in their Fisher data and their primary remanent magnetization has been properly isolated. This also means that the observed functionality of GAD cannot be a misconception caused by secondary magnetizations acquired in the Phanerozoic

  13. Oral Administration of Silkworm-Produced GAD65 and Insulin Bi-Autoantigens against Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoping; Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Induction of mucosal tolerance by oral administration of protein antigens is a potential therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the requirement for a large dosage of protein limits clinical applications because of the low efficacy. In this study, we generated a fusion protein CTB-Ins-GAD composed of CTB (cholera toxin B subunit), insulin, and three copies of GAD65 peptide 531–545, which were efficiently produced in silkworm pupae, to evaluate its protective effect against T1D. We demonstrate that oral administration of CTB-Ins-GAD suppressed T1D by up to 78%, which is much more effective than GAD65 single-antigen treatment. Strikingly, CTB-Ins-GAD enhance insulin- and GAD65-specific Th2-like immune responses, which repairs the Th1/Th2 imbalance and increases the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell and suppresses insulin- and GAD65-reactive spleen T lymphocyte proliferation and migration. Our results strongly suggest that the combined dual antigens promote the induction of oral tolerance, thus providing an effective and economic immunotherapy against T1D in combination with a silkworm bioreactor. PMID:26783749

  14. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  15. Bacteria of food and human intestine are the most possible sources of the gad-trigger of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sieger Jeen

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes incidence increases at about 3% per year in the Western world. From genetically predisposed people only 20-50% develop the disease. To unravel these mysteries, literature was searched to determine the disease background and to find suggestions for research and prevention. A promising hypothesis was found: the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in bacteria may be the source of type 1 diabetes. Epidemiological data can be accounted for this possibility. GAD-containing bacteria can originate from raw foods, especially salted or dried or smoked raw meat and fish products or from proliferation in the ileum of the human small intestine. Proliferation of GAD-containing bacteria in the ileum is probably the most frequent causation of type 1 diabetes. This proliferation is stimulated by the consumption of nitrate-containing ingredients such as vegetables, fruits or nitrate-polluted water and by sugars dissolved in liquids, for example lactose in milk or sugars in juicy fruits and fruit-juices. In the ileum GAD is released from bacteria by endocrine enzymes of the small intestine. Released GAD enters Peyer's patches (PP) in the ileum wall, where it is bound or enclosed by immune cells. These cells move GAD by the lymph- and bloodstream to the immune system for priming and elimination. In case of type 1 diabetes, however, malfunction of PP causes GAD freely move in the lymph stream where it settles on vascular endothelial cells and pancreatic beta-cells. GAD-settlement on beta-cells gives an inflammatory immune response, leading to destruction of the beta-cells and to type 1 diabetes. A perspective for prevention of the disease in predisposed individuals is discussed. It is concluded that GAD-containing bacteria and malfunction of PP should be taken into account in future type 1 diabetes research. PMID:15922105

  16. Inflammation-Induced Acid Tolerance Genes gadAB in Luminal Commensal Escherichia coli Attenuate Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Tchaptchet, Sandrine; Fan, Ting-Jia; Goeser, Laura; Schoenborn, Alexi; Gulati, Ajay S.; Sartor, R. Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulated immune responses to commensal intestinal bacteria, including Escherichia coli, contribute to the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) and experimental colitis. Reciprocally, E. coli responds to chronic intestinal inflammation by upregulating expression of stress response genes, including gadA and gadB. GadAB encode glutamate decarboxylase and protect E. coli from the toxic effects of low pH and fermentation acids, factors present in the intestinal lumen in patients with active IBDs. We hypothesized that E. coli upregulates gadAB during inflammation to enhance its survival and virulence. Using real-time PCR, we determined gadAB expression in luminal E. coli from ex-germfree wild-type (WT) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) knockout (KO) (IL-10−/−) mice selectively colonized with a commensal E. coli isolate (NC101) that causes colitis in KO mice in isolation or in combination with 7 other commensal intestinal bacterial strains. E. coli survival and host inflammatory responses were measured in WT and KO mice colonized with NC101 or a mutant lacking the gadAB genes (NC101ΔgadAB). The susceptibility of NC101 and NC101ΔgadAB to killing by host antimicrobial peptides and their translocation across intestinal epithelial cells were evaluated using bacterial killing assays and transwell experiments, respectively. We show that expression of gadAB in luminal E. coli increases proportionately with intestinal inflammation in KO mice and enhances the susceptibility of NC101 to killing by the host antimicrobial peptide cryptdin-4 but decreases bacterial transmigration across intestinal epithelial cells, colonic inflammation, and mucosal immune responses. Chronic intestinal inflammation upregulates acid tolerance pathways in commensal E. coli isolates, which, contrary to our original hypothesis, limits their survival and colitogenic potential. Further investigation of microbial adaptation to immune-mediated inflammation may provide novel insights into the

  17. A comparative study of extraction techniques for maximum recovery of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) from Aspergillus oryzae NSK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mammalian central nervous system that plays a vital role in regulating vital neurological functions. The enzyme responsible for producing GABA is glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an intracellular enzyme that both food and pharmaceutical industries are currently using as the major catalyst in trial biotransformation process of GABA. We have successfully isolated a novel strain of Aspergillus oryzae NSK that possesses a relatively high GABA biosynthesizing capability compared to other reported GABA-producing fungal strains, indicating the presence of an active GAD. This finding has prompted us to explore an effective method to recover maximum amount of GAD for further studies on the GAD’s biochemical and kinetic properties. The extraction techniques examined were enzymatic lysis, chemical permeabilization, and mechanical disruption. Under the GAD activity assay used, one unit of GAD activity is expressed as 1 μmol of GABA produced per min per ml enzyme extract (U/ml) while the specific activity was expressed as U/mg protein. Results Mechanical disruption by sonication, which yielded 1.99 U/mg of GAD, was by far the most effective cell disintegration method compared with the other extraction procedures examined. In contrast, the second most effective method, freeze grinding followed by 10% v/v toluene permeabilization at 25°C for 120 min, yielded only 1.17 U/mg of GAD, which is 170% lower than the sonication method. Optimized enzymatic lysis with 3 mg/ml Yatalase® at 60°C for 30 min was the least effective. It yielded only 0.70 U/mg of GAD. Extraction using sonication was further optimized using a one-variable-at-a-time approach (OVAT). Results obtained show that the yield of GAD increased 176% from 1.99 U/mg to 3.50 U/mg. Conclusion Of the techniques used to extract GAD from A. oryzae NSK, sonication was found to be the best. Under optimized conditions, about 176% of GAD

  18. Lack of Support for the Association between GAD2 Polymorphisms and Severe Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of association between common genetic variants and chronic human diseases such as obesity could have profound implications for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of these conditions. Unequivocal proof of such an association, however, requires independent replication of initial positive findings. Recently, three (−243 A>G, +61450 C>A, and +83897 T>A) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within glutamate decarboxylase 2 (GAD2) were found to be associated with class III obesity (body mass index > 40 kg/m2). The association was observed among 188 families (612 individuals) segregating the condition, and a case-control study of 575 cases and 646 lean controls. Functional data supporting a pathophysiological role for one of the SNPs (−243 A>G) were also presented. The gene GAD2 encodes the 65-kDa subunit of glutamic acid decarboxylase—GAD65. In the present study, we attempted to replicate this association in larger groups of individuals, and to extend the functional studies of the −243 A>G SNP. Among 2,359 individuals comprising 693 German nuclear families with severe, early-onset obesity, we found no evidence for a relationship between the three GAD2 SNPs and obesity, whether SNPs were studied individually or as haplotypes. In two independent case-control studies (a total of 680 class III obesity cases and 1,186 lean controls), there was no significant relationship between the −243 A>G SNP and obesity (OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.83–1.18, p = 0.89) in the pooled sample. These negative findings were recapitulated in a meta-analysis, incorporating all published data for the association between the −243G allele and class III obesity, which yielded an OR of 1.11 (95% CI 0.90–1.36, p = 0.28) in a total sample of 1,252 class III obese cases and 1,800 lean controls. Moreover, analysis of common haplotypes encompassing the GAD2 locus revealed no association with severe obesity in families with the condition. We also obtained functional data

  19. Defense of GAD during the 1950s and early 1960s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, H. R.

    2012-12-01

    Paleomagnetists favoring continental offered empirical and theoretical support for the GAD hypothesis. Initial support came from the discovery that the mean directions of rock units, regardless of polarity, laid down back through the Upper Tertiary centered on the rotational pole. Armed with Fisher's statistics, Hospers (1951, 1953) found that the mean direction of the NRM of Icelandic lava flows back through the Miocene better agreed with the GAD field than with the present field. Similarly, Campbell and Runcorn (1956), Creer (1956), and Irving and Green (1957) respectively found that the natural remanent magnetization of Late Tertiary Columbia River basalts, Quaternary basalts of Argentina, and Late Cenozoic New Volcanics of Victoria supported the hypothesis. If significant continental drift or "true" polar wander has occurred, paleomagnetic data alone cannot determine if the axial element of the GAD hypothesis holds earlier than Late Tertiary. Extending the GAD hypothesis back in time requires an approach involving a means independent of paleomagnetism for determining past latitudes. Irving was the first to realize that the paleoclimatology would work. If the GAD hypothesis holds, then paleolatitudes based on paleomagnetism and paleoclimatology should agree. Irving (1956) found that, except for the Squantum Tillite, the paleomagnetically and paleoclimatically determined paleolatitudes for Europe, North America, India, and Tasmania were in agreement. He concluded that the magnetic and rotational axes have coincided since the Paleozoic. Blackett (1961) also compared paleoclimatic and paleomagnetic data-sets. Irving and Briden (1962, 1964) further appealed to paleoclimatology to defend the hypothesis. Determining the paleolatitude spectra for several paleoclimatic indicators, they found the present latitude of fossil instances inconsistent with the latitude of modern instances while their paleomagnetically determined paleolatitudes, which assumed the GAD hypothesis

  20. GAD65 haplodeficiency conveys resilience in animal models of stress-induced psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Iris; Obata, Kunihiko; Richter-Levin, Gal; Stork, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic mechanisms are critically involved in the control of fear and anxiety, but their role in the development of stress-induced psychopathologies, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mood disorders is not sufficiently understood. We studied these functions in two established mouse models of risk factors for stress-induced psychopathologies employing variable juvenile stress and/or social isolation. A battery of emotional tests in adulthood revealed the induction of contextually generalized fear, anxiety, hyperarousal and depression-like symptoms in these paradigms. These reflect the multitude and complexity of stress effects in human PTSD patients. With factor analysis we were able to identify parameters that reflect these different behavioral domains in stressed animals and thus provide a basis for an integrated scoring of affectedness more closely resembling the clinical situation than isolated parameters. To test the applicability of these models to genetic approaches we further tested the role of GABA using heterozygous mice with targeted mutation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD65 [GAD65(+/−) mice], which show a delayed postnatal increase in tissue GABA content in limbic and cortical brain areas. Unexpectedly, GAD65(+/−) mice did not show changes in exploratory activity regardless of the stressor type and were after the variable juvenile stress procedure protected from the development of contextual generalization in an auditory fear conditioning experiment. Our data demonstrate the complex nature of behavioral alterations in rodent models of stress-related psychopathologies and suggest that GAD65 haplodeficiency, likely through its effect on the postnatal maturation of GABAergic transmission, conveys resilience to some of these stress-induced effects. PMID:25147515

  1. Gender Differences in Associations of Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Gene (GAD1) Variants with Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Heike; Scholz, Claus Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Baumann, Christian; Klauke, Benedikt; Jacob, Christian P.; Maier, Wolfgang; Fritze, Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Zwanzger, Peter Michael; Lang, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Ströhle, Andreas; Hamm, Alfons; Gerlach, Alexander L.; Alpers, Georg W.; Kircher, Tilo; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Panic disorder is common (5% prevalence) and females are twice as likely to be affected as males. The heritable component of panic disorder is estimated at 48%. Glutamic acid dehydrogenase GAD1, the key enzyme for the synthesis of the inhibitory and anxiolytic neurotransmitter GABA, is supposed to influence various mental disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. In a recent association study in depression, which is highly comorbid with panic disorder, GAD1 risk allele associations were restricted to females. Methodology/Principal Findings Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the common variation in GAD1 were genotyped in two independent gender and age matched case-control samples (discovery sample n = 478; replication sample n = 584). Thirteen SNPs passed quality control and were examined for gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles associated with panic disorder by using logistic regression including a genotype×gender interaction term. The latter was found to be nominally significant for four SNPs (rs1978340, rs3762555, rs3749034, rs2241165) in the discovery sample; of note, the respective minor/risk alleles were associated with panic disorder only in females. These findings were not confirmed in the replication sample; however, the genotype×gender interaction of rs3749034 remained significant in the combined sample. Furthermore, this polymorphism showed a nominally significant association with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire sum score. Conclusions/Significance The present study represents the first systematic evaluation of gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles of the common SNP variation in the panic disorder candidate gene GAD1. Our tentative results provide a possible explanation for the higher susceptibility of females to panic disorder. PMID:22662185

  2. GADS software for parametric linkage analysis of quantitative traits distributed as a point-mass mixture.

    PubMed

    Axenovich, Tatiana I; Zorkoltseva, Irina V

    2012-02-01

    Often the quantitative data coming from proteomics and metabolomics studies have irregular distribution with a spike. None of the wide used methods for human QTL mapping are applicable to such traits. Researchers have to reduce the sample, excluding the spike, and analyze only continuous measurements. In this study, we propose a method for the parametric linkage analysis of traits with a spike in the distribution, and a software GADS, which implements this method. Our software includes not only the programs for parametric linkage analysis, but also the program for complex segregation analysis, which allows the estimation of the model parameters used in linkage. We tested our method on the real data about vertical cup-to-disc ratio, the important characteristic of the optic disc associated with glaucoma, in a large pedigree from a Dutch isolated population. Significant linkage signal was identified on chromosome 6 with the help of GADS, whereas the analysis of the normal distributed part of the sample demonstrated only a suggestive linkage peak on this chromosome. The software GADS is freely available at http://mga.bionet.nsc.ru/soft/index.html. PMID:22340440

  3. A novel expression platform for the production of diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase (hGAD65)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Brandsma, Martin; Tremblay, Reynald; Maxwell, Denis; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Huner, Norm; Ma, Shengwu

    2008-01-01

    Background Human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65) is a key autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, having much potential as an important marker for the prediction and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, and for the development of novel antigen-specific therapies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, recombinant production of hGAD65 using conventional bacterial or mammalian cell culture-based expression systems or nuclear transformed plants is limited by low yield and low efficiency. Chloroplast transformation of the unicellular eukaryotic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii may offer a potential solution. Results A DNA cassette encoding full-length hGAD65, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast rbcL promoter and 5'- and 3'-UTRs, was constructed and introduced into the chloroplast genome of C. reinhardtii by particle bombardment. Integration of hGAD65 DNA into the algal chloroplast genome was confirmed by PCR. Transcriptional expression of hGAD65 was demonstrated by RT-PCR. Immunoblotting verified the expression and accumulation of the recombinant protein. The antigenicity of algal-derived hGAD65 was demonstrated with its immunoreactivity to diabetic sera by ELISA and by its ability to induce proliferation of spleen cells from NOD mice. Recombinant hGAD65 accumulated in transgenic algae, accounts for approximately 0.25–0.3% of its total soluble protein. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential value of C. reinhardtii chloroplasts as a novel platform for rapid mass production of immunologically active hGAD65. This demonstration opens the future possibility for using algal chloroplasts as novel bioreactors for the production of many other biologically active mammalian therapeutic proteins. PMID:19014643

  4. Loss of topoisomerase I function affects the RpoS-dependent and GAD systems of acid resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Natalee; Feng, Jingyang; Liu, Xiaoping; Chaudhuri, Devyani; Foster, John W.; Drolet, Marc; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Acid resistance (AR) for Escherichia coli is important for its survival in the human gastrointestinal tract and involves three systems. The first AR system is dependent on the sigma factor RpoS. The second system (GAD system) requires glutamate decarboxylase isoforms encoded by the gadA and gadB genes. The third system (ARG system) requires arginine decarboxylase encoded by adiA. Loss of topoisomerase I function from topA deletion or Tn10 insertion mutations lowered the resistance to killing by pH 2 or 2.5 treatment by 10 to >100 fold. The RpoS and GAD systems were both affected by the topA mutation but the ARG system of acid resistance was not affected. Northern blot analysis showed that induction of gadA and gadB transcription in stationary phase and at pH 5.5 was decreased in the topA mutant. Western blot analysis showed that the topA mutation did not affect accumulation of RpoS, GadX or GadW proteins. Topoisomerase I could have a direct influence on transcription of acid resistance genes. This influence did not involve R-loop formation as the overexpression of RNase H did not alleviate the decrease of acid resistance from the topA mutation. The effect of the topA mutation could be suppressed by the hns mutation so topoisomerase I might be required to counteract the effect of H-NS protein on gene expression in addition to its influence on RpoS-dependent transcription. PMID:16079354

  5. Aberrant Accumulation of the Diabetes Autoantigen GAD65 in Golgi Membranes in Conditions of ER Stress and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Edward A; Cianciaruso, Chiara; Michael, Iacovos P; Pasquier, Miriella; Kanaani, Jamil; Nano, Rita; Lavallard, Vanessa; Billestrup, Nils; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Baekkeskov, Steinunn

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic islet β-cells are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is implicated in β-cell dysfunction and loss during the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The peripheral membrane protein GAD65 is an autoantigen in human T1D. GAD65 synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid, an important autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule and a survival factor in islets. We show that ER stress in primary β-cells perturbs the palmitoylation cycle controlling GAD65 endomembrane distribution, resulting in aberrant accumulation of the palmitoylated form in trans-Golgi membranes. The palmitoylated form has heightened immunogenicity, exhibiting increased uptake by antigen-presenting cells and T-cell stimulation compared with the nonpalmitoylated form. Similar accumulation of GAD65 in Golgi membranes is observed in human β-cells in pancreatic sections from GAD65 autoantibody-positive individuals who have not yet progressed to clinical onset of T1D and from patients with T1D with residual β-cell mass and ongoing T-cell infiltration of islets. We propose that aberrant accumulation of immunogenic GAD65 in Golgi membranes facilitates inappropriate presentation to the immune system after release from stressed and/or damaged β-cells, triggering autoimmunity. PMID:27284108

  6. COOH-Terminal Clustering of Autoantibody and T-Cell Determinants on the Structure of GAD65 Provide Insights Into the Molecular Basis of Autoreactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Hampe, Christiane S.; Arafat, Yasir; Law, Ruby H.P.; Banga, J. Paul; Mackay, Ian R.; Whisstock, James C.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2008-11-19

    To gain structural insights into the autoantigenic properties of GAD65 in type 1 diabetes, we analyzed experimental epitope mapping data in the context of the recently determined crystal structures of GAD65 and GAD67, to allow 'molecular positioning' of epitope sites for B- and T-cell reactivity. Data were assembled from analysis of reported effects of mutagenesis of GAD65 on its reactivity with a panel of 11 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), supplemented by use of recombinant Fab to cross-inhibit reactivity with GAD65 by radioimmunoprecipitation of the same mAbs. COOH-terminal region on GAD65 was the major autoantigenic site. B-cell epitopes were distributed within two separate clusters around different faces of the COOH-terminal domain. Inclusion of epitope sites in the pyridoxal phosphate- and NH{sub 2}-terminal domains was attributed to the juxtaposition of all three domains in the crystal structure. Epitope preferences of different mAbs to GAD65 aligned with different clinical expressions of type 1 diabetes. Epitopes for four of five known reactive T-cell sequences restricted by HLA DRB1*0401 were aligned to solvent-exposed regions of the GAD65 structure and colocalized within the two B-cell epitope clusters. The continuous COOH-terminal epitope region of GAD65 was structurally highly flexible and therefore differed markedly from the equivalent region of GAD67. Structural features could explain the differing antigenicity, and perhaps immunogenicity, of GAD65 versus GAD67. The proximity of B- and T-cell epitopes within the GAD65 structure suggests that antigen-antibody complexes may influence antigen processing by accessory cells and thereby T-cell reactivity.

  7. FUTURES with Jaime Escalante

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy awarded the Foundation for Advancements in Science and Education (FASE) $826,000 as support to produce the second set of FUTURES segments consisting of 12, 15-minute programs. The programs provide motivation for students to study math by connecting math to the work place and real-life problem scenarios. The programs are broadcast in 50 states through PBS Elementary and Secondary Service (E/SS). The grant term ended on December 16, 1993 and this final report documents program and financial activity results. The 12 episodes are titled: Animal Care, Meteorology, Mass Communication, Advanced Energy, Oceanography, Graphic Design, Future Habitats, Environmental Science & Technology, Fitness & Physical Performance, Interpersonal Communications, Advanced Transportation and Product Design. Each program addresses as many as ten careers or job types within the broader field named. Minority and gender-balanced role models appear throughout the programs.

  8. ELISA Test for Analyzing of Incidence of Type 1 Diabetes Autoantibodies (GAD and IA2) in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Delic-Sarac, Marina; Mutevelic, Selma; Karamehic, Jasenko; Subasic, Djemo; Jukic, Tomislav; Coric, Jozo; Ridjic, Ognjen; Panjeta, Mirsad; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Anti GAD (antibodies on glutamic acid decarboxylase) and anti-IA2 antibodies (against tyrosine phosphatase), today, have their place and importance in diagnosis and prognosis of Type 1 diabetes. Huge number of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 have these antibodies. Insulin antibodies are of critical importance in diagnosis of diabetes mellitus type 1 for pediatric population. Materials and methods: During 2014, the samples of 80 patients from Clinical Center University Sarajevo (CCUS) Pediatrics clinic’s, Endocrinology department were analyzed on anti-GAD and IA2 antibodies. The samples of serums of all patients were analyzed with ELISA tests using Anti GAD ELISA (IgG) kites from EUROIMMUN company. These are quantitative in vitro tests for human antibodies against decarboxylase of glutamine acid (GAD) and IA2, in serum or EDTA plasm. Results: During the period of one year, in CCUS’s Organizational unit, Institute for Clinical Immunology, 80 samples of patients with anti GAD and IA2 antibodies were analyzed. Out of total number of samples, 41 were male patients, or 51% and 39 female, or 49%. The youngest patient was born in 2012, and the oldest in 1993. Age average was represented by the patients born in 2001. Share of positive results for IA2 antibodies and GAD antibodies was 37% for IA2 antibodies, and 63% for GAD antibodies. Discussion: During an autoimmune – mediated Diabetes mellitus type 1 leads to T-cell mediated destruction of beta cells of pancreatic islets, reduced production of insulin and glucose metabolism. Studies have shown that these bodies are the most intense single marker for identifying persons with increased risk for diabetes development. PMID:27041813

  9. Distinct neurochemical and functional properties of GAD67-containing 5-HT neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shikanai, Hiroki; Yoshida, Takayuki; Konno, Kohtarou; Yamasaki, Miwako; Izumi, Takeshi; Ohmura, Yu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-10-10

    The serotonergic (5-HTergic) system arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is implicated in various physiological and behavioral processes, including stress responses. The DRN is comprised of several subnuclei, serving specific functions with distinct afferent and efferent connections. Furthermore, subsets of 5-HTergic neurons are known to coexpress other transmitters, including GABA, glutamate, or neuropeptides, thereby generating further heterogeneity. However, despite the growing evidence for functional variations among DRN subnuclei, relatively little is known about how they map onto neurochemical diversity of 5-HTergic neurons. In the present study, we characterized functional properties of GAD67-expressing 5-HTergic neurons (5-HT/GAD67 neurons) in the rat DRN, and compared with those of neurons expressing 5-HTergic molecules (5-HT neurons) or GAD67 alone. While 5-HT/GAD67 neurons were absent in the dorsomedial (DRD) or ventromedial (DRV) parts of the DRN, they were selectively distributed in the lateral wing of the DRN (DRL), constituting 12% of the total DRL neurons. They expressed plasmalemmal GABA transporter 1, but lacked vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter. By using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, we found that 5-HT/GAD67 neurons had lower input resistance and firing frequency than 5-HT neurons. As revealed by c-Fos immunohistochemistry, neurons in the DRL, particularly 5-HT/GAD67 neurons, showed higher responsiveness to exposure to an open field arena than those in the DRD and DRV. By contrast, exposure to contextual fear conditioning stress showed no such regional differences. These findings indicate that 5-HT/GAD67 neurons constitute a unique neuronal population with distinctive neurochemical and electrophysiological properties and high responsiveness to innocuous stressor. PMID:23055511

  10. Gads (Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc) is required for BCR-ABL-mediated lymphoid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, LC; Berry, DM; Minden, MD; McGlade, CJ; Barber, DL

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), are driven by the oncogenic BCR-ABL fusion protein. Animal modeling experiments utilizing retroviral transduction and subsequent bone marrow transplantation have demonstrated that BCR-ABL generates both myeloid and lymphoid disease in mice receiving whole bone marrow transduced with BCR-ABL. Y177 of BCR-ABL is critical to the development of myeloid disease, and phosphorylation of Y177 has been shown to induce GRB2 binding to BCR-ABL, followed by activation of the Ras and phosphoinositide 3 kinase signaling pathways. We show that the GRB2-related adapter protein, GADS, also associates with BCR-ABL, specifically through Y177 and demonstrate that BCR-ABL-driven lymphoid disease requires Gads. BCR-ABL transduction of Gads(−/−) bone marrow results in short latency myeloid disease within 3–4 weeks of transplant, while wild-type mice succumb to both a longer latency lymphoid and myeloid diseases. We report that GADS mediates a unique BCR-ABL complex with SLP-76 in BCR-ABL-positive cell lines and B-ALL patient samples. These data suggest that GADS mediates lymphoid disease downstream of BCR-ABL through the recruitment of specific signaling intermediates. PMID:23399893

  11. Co-expression of GAD67 and choline acetyltransferase reveals a novel neuronal phenotype in the mouse medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Gotts, Jittima; Atkinson, Lucy; Edwards, Ian J; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2015-12-01

    GABAergic and cholinergic systems play an important part in autonomic pathways. To determine the distribution of the enzymes responsible for the production of GABA and acetylcholine in areas involved in autonomic control in the mouse brainstem, we used a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) neurones, combined with choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) and GAD67-GFP containing neurones were observed throughout the brainstem. A small number of cells contained both ChAT-IR and GAD67-GFP. Such double labelled cells were observed in the NTS (predominantly in the intermediate and central subnuclei), the area postrema, reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus. All ChAT-IR neurones in the area postrema contained GAD67-GFP. Double labelled neurones were not observed in the dorsal vagal motor nucleus, nucleus ambiguus or hypoglossal nucleus. Double labelled ChAT-IR/GAD67-GFP cells in the NTS did not contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity, whereas those in the reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus did. The function of these small populations of double labelled cells is currently unknown, however their location suggests a potential role in integrating signals involved in oromotor behaviours. PMID:26015156

  12. The amyloid fold of Gad m 1 epitopes governs IgE binding.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Rosa; Martínez, Javier; Castro, Ana; Pedrosa, María; Quirce, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pérez, Rosa; Gasset, María

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are polymeric structural states formed from locally or totally unfolded protein chains that permit surface reorganizations, stability enhancements and interaction properties that are absent in the precursor monomers. β-Parvalbumin, the major allergen in fish allergy, forms amyloids that are recognized by IgE in the patient sera, suggesting a yet unknown pathological role for these assemblies. We used Gad m 1 as the fish β-parvalbumin model and a combination of approaches, including peptide arrays, recombinant wt and mutant chains, biophysical characterizations, protease digestions, mass spectrometry, dot-blot and ELISA assays to gain insights into the role of amyloids in the IgE interaction. We found that Gad m 1 immunoreactive regions behave as sequence-dependent conformational epitopes that provide a 1000-fold increase in affinity and the structural repetitiveness required for optimal IgE binding and cross-linking upon folding into amyloids. These findings support the amyloid state as a key entity in type I food allergy. PMID:27597317

  13. The amyloid fold of Gad m 1 epitopes governs IgE binding

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Rosa; Martínez, Javier; Castro, Ana; Pedrosa, María; Quirce, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pérez, Rosa; Gasset, María

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are polymeric structural states formed from locally or totally unfolded protein chains that permit surface reorganizations, stability enhancements and interaction properties that are absent in the precursor monomers. β-Parvalbumin, the major allergen in fish allergy, forms amyloids that are recognized by IgE in the patient sera, suggesting a yet unknown pathological role for these assemblies. We used Gad m 1 as the fish β-parvalbumin model and a combination of approaches, including peptide arrays, recombinant wt and mutant chains, biophysical characterizations, protease digestions, mass spectrometry, dot-blot and ELISA assays to gain insights into the role of amyloids in the IgE interaction. We found that Gad m 1 immunoreactive regions behave as sequence-dependent conformational epitopes that provide a 1000-fold increase in affinity and the structural repetitiveness required for optimal IgE binding and cross-linking upon folding into amyloids. These findings support the amyloid state as a key entity in type I food allergy. PMID:27597317

  14. GAD65 Autoantibodies Detected by Electrochemiluminescence Assay Identify High Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Dongmei; Guyer, K. Michelle; Dong, Fran; Jiang, Ling; Steck, Andrea K.; Rewers, Marian; Eisenbarth, George S.; Yu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    The identification of diabetes-relevant islet autoantibodies is essential for predicting and preventing type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of the current study was to evaluate a newly developed electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-GAD antibody (GADA) assay and compare its sensitivity and disease relevance with standard radioassay. The assay was validated with serum samples from 227 newly diagnosed diabetic children; 68 prediabetic children who were prospectively followed to T1D; 130 nondiabetic children with confirmed islet autoantibodies to insulin, GAD65, IA-2, and/or ZnT8 longitudinally followed for 12 ± 3.7 years; and 181 age-matched, healthy, antibody-negative children. The ECL-GADA assay had a sensitivity similar to that of the standard GADA radioassay in children newly diagnosed with T1D, prediabetic children, and high-risk children with multiple positive islet autoantibodies. On the other hand, only 9 of 39 nondiabetic children with only a single islet autoantibody (GADA only) by radioassay were positive for ECL-GADA. GADA not detectable by ECL assay is shown to be of low affinity and likely not predictive of future diabetes. In conclusion, the new ECL assay identifies disease-relevant GADA by radioassay. It may help to improve the prediction and correct diagnosis of T1D among subjects positive only for GADA and no other islet autoantibodies. PMID:23974918

  15. Using the GAD-Q-IV to identify generalized anxiety disorder in psychiatric treatment seeking and primary care medical samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael T; Anderson, Nicholas L; Barnes, Jill M; Haigh, Emily A P; Fresco, David M

    2014-01-01

    The fourth edition of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report measure that is commonly used to screen for the presence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The current investigation attempted to identify an optimal cut score using samples obtained from an outpatient psychiatric (n=163) and primary care clinic (n=99). Results indicated that a cut score of 7.67 provided an optimal balance of sensitivity (.85) and specificity (.74) comparable to a previously identified cut score (5.7) across both samples (sensitivity=.90, specificity=.66). However, both cut scores were consistently outperformed by a score representing the criteria for GAD described in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (sensitivity=.89, specificity=.82). PMID:24334213

  16. Cultural adaptation into Spanish of the generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7) scale as a screening tool

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent mental health condition which is underestimated worldwide. This study carried out the cultural adaptation into Spanish of the 7-item self-administered GAD-7 scale, which is used to identify probable patients with GAD. Methods The adaptation was performed by an expert panel using a conceptual equivalence process, including forward and backward translations in duplicate. Content validity was assessed by interrater agreement. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity, predictive positive value and negative value for different cut-off values were determined. Concurrent validity was also explored using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHO-DAS-II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). Average completion time was 2'30''. No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to fill in the questionnaire. The scale was shown to be one-dimensional through factor analysis (explained variance = 72%). A cut-off point of 10 showed adequate values of sensitivity (86.8%) and specificity (93.4%), with AUC being statistically significant [AUC = 0.957-0.985); p < 0.001]. The scale significantly correlated with HAM-A (0.852, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.903, p < 0.001), and WHO-DAS II (0.696, p > 0.001). Limitations Elderly people, particularly those very old, may need some help to complete the scale. Conclusion After the cultural adaptation process, a Spanish version of the GAD-7 scale was obtained. The validity of its content and the relevance and adequacy of items in the Spanish cultural context were confirmed. PMID:20089179

  17. HSV vector-mediated GAD67 suppresses neuropathic pain induced by perineural HIV gp120 in rats through inhibition of ROS and Wnt5a

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Hirotsugu; Kanao, Megumi; Liu, Shue; Yi, Hyun; Iida, Takafumi; Levitt, Roy C; Candiotti, Keith A; Lubarsky, David A; Hao, Shuanglin

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related neuropathic pain is a debilitating chronic condition that is severe and unrelenting. Despite the extensive research, the exact neuropathological mechanisms remain unknown, which hinders our ability to develop effective treatments. Loss of GABAergic tone may play an important role in the neuropathic pain state. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) is one of isoforms that catalyze GABA synthesis. Here, we used recombinant herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors that encode gad1 gene to evaluate the therapeutic potential of GAD67 in peripheral HIV gp120-induced neuropathic pain in rats. We found that 1) subcutaneous inoculation of the HSV vectors expressing GAD67 attenuated mechanical allodynia in the model of HIV gp120-induced neuropathic pain, 2) the anti-allodynic effect of GAD67 was reduced by GABA-A and-B receptors antagonists, 3) HSV vectors expressing GAD67 reversed the lowered GABA-IR expression, and 4) the HSV vectors expressing GAD67 suppressed the upregulated mitochondrial superoxide and Wnt5a in the spinal dorsal horn. Taken together, our studies support the concept that recovering GABAergic tone by the HSV vectors may reverse HIV-associated neuropathic pain through suppressing mitochondrial superoxide and Wnt5a. Our studies provide validation of HSV-mediated GAD67 gene therapy in the treatment of HIV-related neuropathic pain. PMID:26752351

  18. Lack of Support for the Association Between GAD2 Polymorphisms andSevere Human Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Swarbrick, Michael M.; Waldenmaier, Bjorn; Pennacchio, Len A.; Lind,Denise L.; Cavazos, Martha M.; Geller, Frank; Merriman, Raphael; Ustaszewska, Anna; Malloy, Mary; Scherag, Andre; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Rief,Winfried; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Dent, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand,Johannes; Vaisse, Christian

    2004-11-17

    Demonstration of association between common genetic variants and chronic human diseases such as obesity could have profound implications for the prediction, prevention and treatment of these conditions. Unequivocal proof of such an association, however, requires adherence to established methodological guidelines, which include independent replication of initial positive findings. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within GAD2 were found to be associated with class III obesity (BMI > 40 kg/m2) in 188 families (612 individuals) segregating the condition and a case-control study of 575 cases and 646 lean controls. Functional data supporting a pathophysiological role for one of the SNPs (-243A>G) were also presented. In the present study, we attempted to replicate this association in larger groups of subjects, and to extend the functional studies of the -243A>G SNP. In 2,327 subjects comprising 692 German nuclear families with severe, early-onset obesity, we found no evidence for a relationship between the three GAD2 SNPs and obesity, whether SNPs were studied individually or as haplotypes. In two independent case-control studies (a total of 680 class III obesity cases and 1,186 lean controls), there was no significant relationship between the -243A>G SNP and obesity (odds ratio (OR) = 0.99, 95% CI 0.83 - 1.18,in the pooled sample). These negative findings were reinforced by a meta-analysis for the association between the 243G allele and class III obesity, which yielded an OR of 1.11 (95% CI 0.90 - 1.36) in a total sample of 1,252 class III obese cases and 1,800 lean controls. Finally,we were unable to confirm or extend the functional data pertaining to the -243A>G variant. Potential confounding variables in association studies involving common variants and complex diseases (low power to detect modest genetic effects, over-interpretation of marginal data, population stratification and biological plausibility) are also discussed in the context of GAD2 and

  19. Models of the geodynamo over geologic time and the inclination test of the GAD hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The assumption that Earth's mean magnetic field has been a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) over geologic time is fundamental to paleomagnetism and plate-tectonics. Previous models have linked inclination distributions to latitudinal heat flow variations (Bloxham, 2000). While verifying and extending those previous results, I show here that radial heat flow structure controls geomagnetic field morphology as well. The inclination test of the GAD hypothesis (Evans,1976) is used to interpret numerical dynamo models, some with latitudinally variable buoyancy flux boundary conditions and others with uniform flux boundary conditions. All of the models are chosen to be Earth-like, and at or near the polarity reversing dynamical regime. As was found in previous work, the global inclination distribution is a function of the buoyancy flux at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). However, I find here that the sign of a latitudinally quadrupolar variable flux condition is critical for dynamo stability. Enhanced polar cooling causes inclination shallowing and tends to stabilize the dynamos to reversals, while enhanced equatorial cooling destabilizes the dynamo, resulting in complex field morphology and high reversal frequency. The uniform flux models represent three convective states of the mantle and core. 1. Present era Earth - likely a typical state of the geodynamo. 2. Global convective overturn, associated with flood basalt volcanism, anomalous magnetic reversal frequency, climate change and mass extinctions. 3. Ancient Earth prior to solid inner core formation. For these uniform flux models the inclination distribution anomaly scales with the relative buoyancy flux at the CMB versus the inner core boundary. Consistent with the CALS10k model of Earth's magnetic field over the past ten millennia (Korte et al., 2011), the present era Earth-like dynamos are GAD-like, with very small time-averaged inclination anomalies. In contrast, the global overturn and ancient Earth dynamos show

  20. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki; Yoshida, Ryo; Ohta, Shinji; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Mukai, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  1. In vivo knockdown of GAD67 in the amygdala disrupts fear extinction and the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam in mice.

    PubMed

    Heldt, S A; Mou, L; Ressler, K J

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission in the amygdala is particularly important for controlling levels of fear and anxiety. Most GABA synthesis in the brain is catalyzed in inhibitory neurons from L-glutamic acid by the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67). In the current study, we sought to examine the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear in mice with knocked down expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the amygdala using a lentiviral-based (LV) RNA interference strategy to locally induce loss-of-function. In vitro experiments revealed that our LV-siRNA-GAD67 construct diminished the expression of GAD67 as determined with western blot and fluorescent immunocytochemical analyses. In vivo experiments, in which male C57BL/6J mice received bilateral amygdala microinjections, revealed that LV-siRNA-GAD67 injections produce significant inhibition of endogenous GAD67 when compared with control injections. In contrast, no significant changes in GAD65 expression were detected in the amygdala, validating the specificity of LV knockdown. Behavioral experiments showed that LV knockdown of GAD67 results in a deficit in the extinction, but not the acquisition or retention, of fear as measured by conditioned freezing. GAD67 knockdown did not affect baseline locomotion or basal measures of anxiety as measured in open field apparatus. However, diminished GAD67 in the amygdala blunted the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam (1.5 mg kg(-1)) as measured in the elevated plus maze. Together, these studies suggest that of GABAergic transmission in amygdala mediates the inhibition of conditioned fear and the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam in adult mice. PMID:23149445

  2. A unique combination of autoimmune limbic encephalitis, type 1 diabetes, and Stiff person syndrome associated with GAD-65 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Chandra Mohan; Pandey, Rajendra Kumar; Kumawat, Banshi Lal; Khandelwal, Dinesh; Gandhi, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to GAD-65 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis and Stiff person syndrome, however these diseases rarely occur concurrently. We intend to present a rare case of 35 year old female who was recently diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes presented with 1½ month history of recurrent seizures, subacute onset gait ataxia, dysathria, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. No tumor was found on imaging and the classic paraneoplastic panel was negative. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood was positive for GAD-65 antibodies. Patient showed significant improvement with immunomodulatory therapy. Association of GAD-65 antibodies has been found with various disorders including type 1 diabetes, limbic encephalitis, Stiff person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and palatal myoclonus. This case presents with unique combination of type 1 diabetes, Stiff person syndrome and limbic encephalitis associated with GAD-65 antibodies that is responsive to immunotherapy. It also highlights the emerging concept of autoimmunity in the causation of various disorders and there associations. PMID:27011652

  3. Co-Occurring ODD and GAD Symptom Groups: Source-Specific Syndromes and Cross-Informant Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.; Gadow, Kenneth D.; Loney, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Despite important clinical and nosological implications, the comorbidity of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has received little attention. A clinic-based sample of 243 boys (ages 6-10 years), their parents, and teachers participated in an evaluation that involved assessments of behavioral, academic, and…

  4. Type 1 diabetes and GAD65 limbic encephalitis: a case report of a 10-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Grilo, Ema; Pinto, Joana; Caetano, Joana Serra; Pereira, Helena; Cardoso, Patrícia; Cardoso, Rita; Dinis, Isabel; Pereira, Cristina; Fineza, Isabel; Mirante, Alice

    2016-08-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological disorder that may be difficult to recognize. Clinical features include memory impairment, temporal lobe seizures and affective disturbance. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with type 1 diabetes mellitus that presented with seizures, depressed mood and memory changes. The diagnosis of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) mediated limbic encephalitis relied on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging lesions and high serological and cerebrospinal fluid GAD65-antibodies titers. High-dose steroidal therapy was started with clinical improvement. Relapse led to a second high-dose steroid treatment followed by rituximab with remission. A correlation between serum GAD65-antibodies levels and symptoms was found, demonstrating GAD65-antibodies titers may be useful for clinical follow-up and immunotherapy guidance. This report raises awareness of this serious neurological condition that may be associated with type 1 diabetes, underlining the importance of an early diagnosis and prompt treatment for a better prognosis. PMID:27115322

  5. Effects of Increase in Amplitude of Occipital Alpha & Theta Brain Waves on Global Functioning Level of Patients with GAD

    PubMed Central

    Dadashi, Mohsen; Birashk, Behrooz; Taremian, Farhad; Asgarnejad, Ali Asghar; Momtazi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The basic objective of this study is to investigate the effects of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude increase in occipital area on reducing the severity of symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and to increase the global functioning level in patients with GAD. Methods: This study is a quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test with two groups. For this purpose, 28 patients who had been referred to Sohrawardi psychiatric and clinical psychology center in Zanjan were studied based on the interview with the psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and using clinical diagnostic criteria for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders text revision - the DSM-IV-TR Fourth Edition diagnosis of GAD, 14 subjects were studied in neurofeedback treatment group and 14 subjects in the waiting list group. Patients in both groups were evaluated at pre-test and post-test with General Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFs). The treatment group received fifteen 30-minute alpha training sessions and fifteen 30-minute theta brain training sessions in occipital area by neurofeedback training (treatment group). This evaluation was performed according to the treatment protocol to increase the alpha and theta waves. And no intervention was done in the waiting list group. But due to ethical issues after the completion of the study all the subjects in the waiting list group were treated. Results: The results showed that increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area in people with GAD can increase the global functioning level and can reduce symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in a treatment group, but no such change was observed in the waiting list group. Discussion: Increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area can be useful in the treatment of people with GAD.

  6. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses. PMID:26241953

  7. The assessment of generalized anxiety disorder: psychometric validation of the Spanish version of the self-administered GAD-2 scale in daily medical practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim To psychometrically validate the Spanish version of the self-administered 2-item GAD-2 scale for screening probable patients with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods The GAD-2 was self-administered by patients diagnosed with GAD according to DSM-IV criteria and by age- and sex-matched controls who were recruited at random in mental health and primary care centres. Criteria validity was explored using ROC curve analysis, and sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined for different cut-off values. Concurrent validity was also established using the HAM-A, HADS, and WHODAS II scales. Results The study sample consisted of 212 subjects (106 patients with GAD) with a mean age of 50.38 years (SD = 16.76). No items of the scale were left blank. Floor and ceiling effects were negligible. No patients with GAD had to be assisted to complete the questionnaire. Reliability (internal consistency) was high; Cronbach’s α = 0.875. A cut-off point of 3 showed adequate sensitivity (91.5%) and specificity (85.8%), with a statistically significant area under the curve (AUC = 0.937, p < 0.001), to distinguish GAD patients from controls. Concurrent validity was also high and significant with HAM-A (0.806, p < 0.001), HADS (anxiety domain, 0.825, p < 0.001) and WHO-DAS II (0.642, p < 0.001) scales. Conclusion The Spanish version of the GAD-2 scale has been shown to have appropriate psychometric properties to rapidly detect probable cases of GAD in the Spanish cultural context under routine clinical practice conditions. PMID:22992432

  8. Common genetic variation in the GAD1 gene and the entire family of DLX homeobox genes and autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shun-Chiao; Pauls, David L.; Lange, Christoph; Sasanfar, Roksana; Santangelo, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological and positional evidence supports the involvement of the GAD1 and distal-less homeobox genes (DLXs) in the etiology of autism. We investigated 42 SNPs in these genes as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in a large family-based association study of 715 nuclear families. No single marker showed significant association after correction for multiple testing. A rare haplotype in the DLX1 promoter was associated with ASD (p-value = 0.001). Given the importance of rare variants to the etiology of autism revealed in recent studies, the observed rare haplotype may be relevant to future investigations. Our observations, when taken together with previous findings, suggest that common genetic variation in the GAD1 and DLX genes is unlikely to play a critical role in ASD susceptibility. PMID:21302352

  9. Parvalbumin and GAD65 Interneuron Inhibition in the Ventral Hippocampus Induces Distinct Behavioral Deficits Relevant to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Robin; Morrissey, Mark D.; Mahadevan, Vivek; Cajanding, Janine D.; Woodin, Melanie A.; Yeomans, John S.; Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivity within the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) has been linked to both psychosis in humans and behavioral deficits in animal models of schizophrenia. A local decrease in GABA-mediated inhibition, particularly involving parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABA neurons, has been proposed as a key mechanism underlying this hyperactive state. However, direct evidence is lacking for a causal role of vHPC GABA neurons in behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Here, we probed the behavioral function of two different but overlapping populations of vHPC GABA neurons that express either PV or GAD65 by selectively inhibiting these neurons with the pharmacogenetic neuromodulator hM4D. We show that acute inhibition of vHPC GABA neurons in adult mice results in behavioral changes relevant to schizophrenia. Inhibiting either PV or GAD65 neurons produced distinct behavioral deficits. Inhibition of PV neurons, affecting ∼80% of the PV neuron population, robustly impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (PPI), startle reactivity, and spontaneous alternation, but did not affect locomotor activity. In contrast, inhibiting a heterogeneous population of GAD65 neurons, affecting ∼40% of PV neurons and 65% of cholecystokinin neurons, increased spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and reduced spontaneous alternation, but did not alter PPI. Inhibition of PV or GAD65 neurons also produced distinct changes in network oscillatory activity in the vHPC in vivo. Together, these findings establish a causal role for vHPC GABA neurons in controlling behaviors relevant to schizophrenia and suggest a functional dissociation between the GABAergic mechanisms involved in hippocampal modulation of sensorimotor processes. PMID:25378161

  10. Superior perception of phasic physiological arousal and the detrimental consequences of the conviction to be aroused on worrying and metacognitions in GAD.

    PubMed

    Andor, Tanja; Gerlach, Alexander L; Rist, Fred

    2008-02-01

    Although people suffering from generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often report arousal symptoms, psychophysiological studies show no evidence of autonomic hyperarousal. Hypersensitivity toward and catastrophic interpretation of phasic arousal cues may explain this discrepancy. The authors tested (a) whether GAD sufferers perceive nonspecific skin conductance fluctuations (NSCFs), an indicator of phasic autonomic arousal, better than controls do and (b) whether the conviction to be aroused contributes to the maintenance of worrying and metacognitive beliefs about worrying. Thirty-three GAD sufferers and 34 healthy controls participated in 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, participants were asked to detect their own NSCFs during a signal detection task. GAD sufferers accurately detected more of their NSCFs than did controls, who tended to miss NSCFs. In Experiment 2, participants were instructed to relax following worry induction. While relaxing, they received nonveridical feedback indicating either arousal or relaxation. Arousal feedback conserved negative metacognitive beliefs regarding worrying and also maintained negative mood and worry exclusively in GAD participants. These findings suggest that superior perception of phasic arousal cues and their catastrophic misinterpretation increases worrying, negative metacognitive beliefs about worrying, and anxious mood in GAD. PMID:18266497

  11. The spatiotemporal segregation of GAD forms defines distinct GABA signaling functions in the developing mouse olfactory system and provides novel insights into the origin and migration of GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Vastagh, Csaba; Schwirtlich, Marija; Kwakowsky, Andrea; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Margolis, Frank L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Katarova, Zoya; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a dual role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system (CNS) and as a signaling molecule exerting largely excitatory actions during development. The rate-limiting step of GABA synthesis is catalyzed by two glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 coexpressed in the GABAergic neurons of the CNS. Here we report that the two GADs show virtually nonoverlapping expression patterns consistent with distinct roles in the developing peripheral olfactory system. GAD65 is expressed exclusively in undifferentiated neuronal progenitors confined to the proliferative zones of the sensory vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia In contrast GAD67 is expressed in a subregion of the nonsensory epithelium/vomeronasal organ epithelium containing the putative Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) progenitors and GnRH neurons migrating from this region through the frontonasal mesenchyme into the basal forebrain. Only GAD67+, but not GAD65+ cells accumulate detectable GABA. We further demonstrate that GAD67 and its embryonic splice variant embryonic GAD (EGAD) concomitant with GnRH are dynamically regulated during GnRH neuronal migration in vivo and in two immortalized cell lines representing migratory (GN11) and postmigratory (GT1-7) stage GnRH neurons, respectively. Analysis of GAD65/67 single and double knock-out embryos revealed that the two GADs play complementary (inhibitory) roles in GnRH migration ultimately modulating the speed and/or direction of GnRH migration. Our results also suggest that GAD65 and GAD67/EGAD characterized by distinct subcellular localization and kinetics have disparate functions during olfactory system development mediating proliferative and migratory responses putatively through specific subcellular GABA pools. PMID:25125027

  12. GAD67-GFP+ Neurons in the Nucleus of Roller. II. Subthreshold and Firing Resonance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Berger, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper we show that GAD67-GFP+ (GFP+) inhibitory neurons located in the Nucleus of Roller of the mouse brain stem can be classified into two main groups (tonic and phasic) based on their firing patterns in responses to injected depolarizing current steps. In this study we examined the responses of GFP+ cells to fluctuating sinusoidal (“chirp”) current stimuli. Membrane impedance profiles in response to chirp stimulation showed that nearly all phasic cells exhibited subthreshold resonance, whereas the majority of tonic GFP+ cells were nonresonant. In general, subthreshold resonance was associated with a relatively fast passive membrane time constant and low input resistance. In response to suprathreshold chirp current stimulation at a holding potential just below spike threshold the majority of tonic GFP+ cells fired multiple action potentials per cycle at low input frequencies (<5 Hz) and either stopped firing or were not entrained by the chirp at higher input frequencies (= tonic low-pass cells). A smaller group of phasic GFP+ cells did not fire at low input frequency but were able to phase-lock 1:1 at intermediate chirp frequencies (= band-pass cells). Spike timing reliability was tested with repeated chirp stimuli and our results show that phasic cells were able to reliably fire when they phase-locked 1:1 over a relatively broad range of input frequencies. Most tonic low-pass cells showed low reliability and poor phase-locking ability. Computer modeling suggested that these different firing resonance properties among GFP+ cells are due to differences in passive and active membrane properties and spiking mechanisms. This heterogeneity of resonance properties might serve to selectively activate subgroups of interneurons. PMID:21047931

  13. Polymorphisms in the GAD2 gene-region are associated with susceptibility for unipolar depression and with a risk factor for anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Unschuld, Paul G; Ising, Marcus; Specht, Michael; Erhardt, Angelika; Ripke, Stephan; Heck, Angela; Kloiber, Stefan; Straub, Verica; Brueckl, Tanja; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Holsboer, Florian; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2009-12-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is the rate limiting enzyme for conversion of glutamic acid to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The GAD 65 kDa isoform is encoded by the gene GAD2 and is mainly expressed in synaptic terminals. It serves as an apoenzyme, which shows enhanced availability in situations of stress, responding to short-term demands for GABA. We analyzed 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GAD2-gene region for associations with psychiatric diagnosis and behavioral inhibition (BI) derived from the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion as defined by the Eysenck Personality Questionaire (EPQ). A total of 268 patients with anxiety disorder (AD), 541 with unipolar depression (MD), and 541 healthy controls were included. We observe associations for five tag-SNPs with BI in the AD- and control samples as well as two additional case-control associations in the MD-sample. The associated SNPs lie within a 16KB linkage disequilibrium-block, including putative 5' GAD2-promoter-elements as well as the 3' end of the gene MYO3A. Using open access mRNA-expression data, we could show that BI-associated SNPs appear to be associated with differences in MYO3A- but not GAD2 lymphoblastoid-mRNA expression levels. These results support earlier studies that suggest associations of polymorphisms within the GAD2 locus with anxiety and affective disorders. However, data from expression studies imply that these polymorphisms could tag functional effects on the neighboring gene MYO3A, which is also expressed in the brain, including the cingulate cortex and the amygdala. PMID:19229853

  14. The Frequency of Langerhans Islets β-Cells Autoantibodies (Anti-GAD) in Georgian Children and Adolescents with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Giorgadze, Elene

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus are organ-specific autoimmune diseases. There is large evidence that autoimmunity against the thyroid gland in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased, but little is known about anti-islet cell autoimmune status in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We evaluated the concentration of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) which are widely used as a diagnostic and predictive tool for type 1 diabetes mellitus, in school-aged Georgian children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods. The frequency of anti-GAD antibodies was measured in Georgian school-aged children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and compared to healthy age and sex matched controls. Results. Of the 41 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis 4 (9.8%) were positive for GAD antibodies. The frequency of GAD positivity in the chronic autoimmune thyroiditis group was significantly higher than in the control subjects (P = 0.036). Conclusion. In the study we found that the frequency of GAD antibody positivity in autoimmune thyroiditis patients was significantly higher (9.8%, P = 0.036) than in the control group. Our findings support the concept that patients with autoimmune thyroid disease may develop type 1 diabetes mellitus in future life. PMID:27429616

  15. The Frequency of Langerhans Islets β-Cells Autoantibodies (Anti-GAD) in Georgian Children and Adolescents with Chronic Autoimmune Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Balakhadze, Mariam; Giorgadze, Elene; Lomidze, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus are organ-specific autoimmune diseases. There is large evidence that autoimmunity against the thyroid gland in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus is increased, but little is known about anti-islet cell autoimmune status in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. We evaluated the concentration of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) which are widely used as a diagnostic and predictive tool for type 1 diabetes mellitus, in school-aged Georgian children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Methods. The frequency of anti-GAD antibodies was measured in Georgian school-aged children with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and compared to healthy age and sex matched controls. Results. Of the 41 patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis 4 (9.8%) were positive for GAD antibodies. The frequency of GAD positivity in the chronic autoimmune thyroiditis group was significantly higher than in the control subjects (P = 0.036). Conclusion. In the study we found that the frequency of GAD antibody positivity in autoimmune thyroiditis patients was significantly higher (9.8%, P = 0.036) than in the control group. Our findings support the concept that patients with autoimmune thyroid disease may develop type 1 diabetes mellitus in future life. PMID:27429616

  16. Enhanced GAD65 production in plants using the MagnICON transient expression system: Optimization of upstream production and downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Matilde; Gecchele, Elisa; Arcalis, Elsa; Remelli, Sabrina; Brozzetti, Annalisa; Pezzotti, Mario; Avesani, Linda

    2016-03-01

    Plants have emerged as competitive production platforms for pharmaceutical proteins that are required in large quantities. One example is the 65-kDa isoform of human glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), a major autoimmune diabetes autoantigen that has been developed as a vaccine candidate for the primary prevention of diabetes. The expression of GAD65 in plants has been optimized but large-scale purification is hampered by its tendency to associate with membranes. We investigated the potential for large-scale downstream processing by evaluating different combinations of plant-based expression systems and engineered forms of GAD65 in terms of yield, subcellular localization and solubility in detergent-free buffer. We found that a modified version of GAD65 lacking the first 87 amino acids accumulates to high levels in the cytosol and can be extracted in detergent-free buffer. The highest yields of this variant protein were achieved using the MagnICON transient expression system. This combination of truncated GAD65 and the MagnICON system dramatically boosts the production of the recombinant protein and helps to optimize downstream processing for the establishment of a sustainable plant-based production platform for an autoimmune diabetes vaccine candidate. PMID:26710327

  17. The neural substrates of response inhibition to negative information across explicit and implicit tasks in GAD patients: electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fengqiong; Zhu, Chunyan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xingui; Li, Dan; Zhang, Long; Ye, Rong; Dong, Yi; Luo, Yuejia; Hu, Xinlong; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been established that the inability to inhibit a response to negative stimuli is the genesis of anxiety. However, the neural substrates of response inhibition to sad faces across explicit and implicit tasks in general anxiety disorder (GAD) patients remain unclear. Methods: Electrophysiological data were recorded when subjects performed two modified emotional go/no-go tasks in which neutral and sad faces were presented: one task was explicit (emotion categorization), and the other task was implicit (gender categorization). Results: In the explicit task, electrophysiological evidence showed decreased amplitudes of no-go/go difference waves at the N2 interval in the GAD group compared to the control group. However, in the implicit task, the amplitudes of no-go/go difference waves at the N2 interval showed a reversed trend. Source localization analysis on no-go/N2 components revealed a decreased current source density (CSD) in the right dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex in GAD individuals relative to controls. In the implicit task, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior parietal lobe showed enhanced activation in GAD individuals and may compensate for the dysfunction of the right dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex. Conclusion: These findings indicated that the processing of response inhibition to socially sad faces in GAD individuals was interrupted in the explicit task. However, this processing was preserved in the implicit task. The neural substrates of response inhibition to sad faces were dissociated between implicit and explicit tasks. PMID:25852597

  18. The Jaime Escalante Math Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalante, Jaime; Dirmann, Jack

    1990-01-01

    Describes the success of the Escalante Math Program in East Los Angeles in teaching mathematics to poor minority students. Fundamental principles of the program include the following: (1) accountability; (2) hard work; (3) demand; (4) love; (5) parental involvement; (6) respect and values; (7) nutrition; and (8) drug use prevention. Discusses…

  19. Jet Stream Analysis and Forecast Errors Using GADS Aircraft Observations in the DAO, ECMWF, and NCEP Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinali, Carla; Rukhovets, Leonid; Tenenbaum, Joel

    2003-01-01

    We have utilized an extensive set of independent British Airways flight data recording wind vector and temperature observations (the Global Aircraft Data Set [GADS] archive) in three ways: (a) as an independent check of operational analyses; (b) as an analysis observing system experiment (OSE) as if the GADS observations were available in real time; and (c) as the corresponding forecast simulation experiment applicable to future operational forecasts. Using a 31 day sample (0000 UTC 20 December 2000 through 0000 UTC 20 January 2000) from Winter 2000, we conclude that over the data-dense continental U. S. analyzed jet streaks are too weak by -2% to -5%. Over nearby data-sparse regions of Canada, analyzed jet streaks are too weak by -5% to -9%. The second range provides a limit on the accuracy of current jet streak analyses over the portions of the -85% of the earth's surface that are poorly covered by non-satellite observations. The -5% to -9% range is relevant for the pre-third generation satellite (AIRS, IASI, GIFTS) era.

  20. GAD Antibodies as Key Link Between Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction, Autonomic Neuropathy, and Limb Stiffness in a Nondiabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andrea; Mannartz, Vera; Wasmuth, Hermann; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf-Peter; Weis, Joachim; Grosse, Joachim; Fuest, Matthias; Hilz, Max-J.; Schulz, Joerg B.; Haubrich, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) can be a severe burden and even a life-threatening disorder. Typically, several years of uncertainty are passing before diagnosis. We are reporting the case of a young woman with a decade of severe, progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility. Unusually, she had also developed an autonomic neuropathy, and a stiff limb syndrome. In addition to achalasia and CIP the young woman also developed neuropathic symptoms: orthostatic intolerance, urinary retention, a Horner syndrome, and lower limb stiffness. Careful interdisciplinary diagnostics excluded underlying infectious, rheumatoid, metabolic or tumorous diseases. The detection of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, however, seemed to link CIP, autonomic neuropathy, and limb stiffness and pointed at an autoimmune origin of our patient's complaints. This was supported by the positive effects of intravenous immunoglobulin. In response to this therapy the body weight had stabilized, orthostatic tolerance had improved, and limb stiffness was reversed. The case suggested that GAD antibodies should be considered in CIP also in nondiabetic patients. This may support earlier diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26252289

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  2. Spatial and temporal pattern of changes in the number of GAD65-immunoreactive inhibitory terminals in the rat superficial dorsal horn following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Magnussen, Claire; Bailey, Andrea L; St Louis, Manon; De Koninck, Yves; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are an important component of dorsal horn circuitry where they serve to modulate spinal nociception. There is now considerable evidence indicating that reduced inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn contributes to neuropathic pain. A loss of these inhibitory neurons after nerve injury is one of the mechanisms being proposed to account for reduced inhibition; however, this remains controversial. This is in part because previous studies have focused on global measurements of inhibitory neurons without assessing the number of inhibitory synapses. To address this, we conducted a quantitative analysis of the spatial and temporal changes in the number of inhibitory terminals, as detected by glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) immunoreactivity, in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord following a chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Isolectin B4 (IB4) labelling was used to define the location within the dorsal horn directly affected by the injury to the peripheral nerve. The density of GAD65 inhibitory terminals was reduced in lamina I (LI) and lamina II (LII) of the spinal cord after injury. The loss of GAD65 terminals was greatest in LII with the highest drop occurring around 3-4 weeks and a partial recovery by 56 days. The time course of changes in the number of GAD65 terminals correlated well with both the loss of IB4 labeling and with the altered thresholds to mechanical and thermal stimuli. Our detailed analysis of GAD65+ inhibitory terminals clearly revealed that nerve injury induced a transient loss of GAD65 immunoreactive terminals and suggests a potential involvement for these alterations in the development and amelioration of pain behaviour. PMID:25189404

  3. 2-ketogluconic acid secretion by incorporation of Pseudomonas putida KT 2440 gluconate dehydrogenase (gad) operon in Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 improves mineral phosphate solubilization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chanchal; Yadav, Kavita; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2013-09-01

    Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 is known to efficiently solubilize rock phosphate by secretion of approximately 50 mM gluconic acid in Tris-buffered medium in the presence of 75 mM glucose and in a mixture of seven aldosugars each at 15 mM concentration, mimicking alkaline vertisol soils. Efficacy of this bacterium in the rhizosphere requires P release in the presence of low amount of sugars. To achieve this, E. asburiae PSI3 has been manipulated to express gluconate dehydrogenase (gad) operon of Pseudomonas putida KT 2440 to produce 2-ketogluconic acid. E. asburiae PSI3 harboring gad operon had 438 U of GAD activity, secreted 11.63 mM 2-ketogluconic and 21.65 mM gluconic acids in Tris-rock phosphate-buffered medium containing 45 mM glucose. E. asburiae PSI3 gad transformant solubilized 0.84 mM P from rock phosphate in TRP-buffered liquid medium. In the presence of a mixture of seven sugars each at 12 mM, the transformant brought about a drop in pH to 4.1 and released 0.53 mM P. PMID:23666029

  4. PeerGAD: a peer-review-based and community-centric web application for viewing and annotating prokaryotic genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Mark D.; Collmer, Alan; Martin, Gregory B.

    2004-01-01

    PeerGAD is a web-based database-driven application that allows community-wide peer-reviewed annotation of prokaryotic genome sequences. The application was developed to support the annotation of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 genome sequence and is easily portable to other genome sequence annotation projects. PeerGAD incorporates several innovative design and operation features and accepts annotations pertaining to gene naming, role classification, gene translation and annotation derivation. The annotator tool in PeerGAD is built around a genome browser that offers users the ability to search and navigate the genome sequence. Because the application encourages annotation of the genome sequence directly by researchers and relies on peer review, it circumvents the need for an annotation curator while providing added value to the annotation data. Support for the Gene Ontology™ vocabulary, a structured and controlled vocabulary used in classification of gene roles, is emphasized throughout the system. Here we present the underlying concepts integral to the functionality of PeerGAD. PMID:15184545

  5. A Requirement of TolC and MDR Efflux Pumps for Acid Adaptation and GadAB Induction in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Ryoko; Rosner, Judah L.; Wachi, Masaaki; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The TolC outer membrane channel is a key component of several multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps driven by H+ transport in Escherichia coli. While tolC expression is under the regulation of the EvgA-Gad acid resistance regulon, the role of TolC in growth at low pH and extreme-acid survival is unknown. Methods and Principal Findings TolC was required for extreme-acid survival (pH 2) of strain W3110 grown aerobically to stationary phase. A tolC deletion decreased extreme-acid survival (acid resistance) of aerated pH 7.0-grown cells by 105-fold and of pH 5.5-grown cells by 10-fold. The requirement was specific for acid resistance since a tolC defect had no effect on aerobic survival in extreme base (pH 10). TolC was required for expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GadA, GadB), a key component of glutamate-dependent acid resistance (Gad). TolC was also required for maximal exponential growth of E. coli K-12 W3110, in LBK medium buffered at pH 4.5–6.0, but not at pH 6.5–8.5. The TolC growth requirement in moderate acid was independent of Gad. TolC-associated pump components EmrB and MdtB contributed to survival in extreme acid (pH 2), but were not required for growth at pH 5. A mutant lacking the known TolC-associated efflux pumps (acrB, acrD, emrB, emrY, macB, mdtC, mdtF, acrEF) showed no growth defect at acidic pH and a relatively small decrease in extreme-acid survival when pre-grown at pH 5.5. Conclusions TolC and proton-driven MDR efflux pump components EmrB and MdtB contribute to E. coli survival in extreme acid and TolC is required for maximal growth rates below pH 6.5. The TolC enhancement of extreme-acid survival includes Gad induction, but TolC-dependent growth rates below pH 6.5 do not involve Gad. That MDR resistance can enhance growth and survival in acid is an important consideration for enteric organisms passing through the acidic stomach. PMID:21541325

  6. Co-expression of GAD67 and choline acetyltransferase in neurons in the mouse spinal cord: A focus on lamina X.

    PubMed

    Gotts, Jittima; Atkinson, Lucy; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Deuchars, Susan A

    2016-09-01

    Lamina X of the spinal cord is a functionally diverse area with roles in locomotion, autonomic control and processing of mechano and nociceptive information. It is also a neurochemically diverse region. However, the different populations of cells in lamina X remain to be fully characterised. To determine the co-localisation of the enzymes responsible for the production of GABA and acetylcholine (which play major roles in the spinal cord) in lamina X of the adult and juvenile mouse, we used a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) neurons, combined with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) and GAD67-GFP containing neurons were observed in lamina X of both adult and juvenile mice and in both age groups a population of cells containing both ChAT-IR and GAD67-GFP were observed in lumbar, thoracic and cervical spinal cord. Such dual labelled cells were predominantly located ventral to the central canal. Immunohistochemistry for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and GAD67 revealed a small number of double labelled terminals located lateral, dorsolateral and ventrolateral to the central canal. This study therefore describes in detail a population of ChAT-IR/GAD67-GFP neurons predominantly ventral to the central canal of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord of adult and juvenile mice. These cells potentially correspond to a sub-population of the cholinergic central canal cluster cells which may play a unique role in controlling spinal cord circuitry. PMID:27378584

  7. Glucose Activates TORC2-Gad8 Protein via Positive Regulation of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase A (PKA) Pathway and Negative Regulation of the Pmk1 Protein-Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adiel; Kupiec, Martin; Weisman, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase belongs to the highly conserved eukaryotic family of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases. TOR proteins are found at the core of two evolutionary conserved complexes, known as TORC1 and TORC2. In fission yeast, TORC2 is dispensable for proliferation under optimal growth conditions but is required for starvation and stress responses. TORC2 has been implicated in a wide variety of functions; however, the signals that regulate TORC2 activity have so far remained obscure. TORC2 has one known direct substrate, the AGC kinase Gad8, which is related to AKT in human cells. Gad8 is phosphorylated by TORC2 at Ser-546 (equivalent to AKT Ser-473), leading to its activation. Here, we show that glucose is necessary and sufficient to induce Gad8 Ser-546 phosphorylation in vivo and Gad8 kinase activity in vitro. The glucose signal that activates TORC2-Gad8 is mediated via the cAMP/PKA pathway, a major glucose-sensing pathway. By contrast, Pmk1, similar to human extracellular signal-regulated kinases and a major stress-induced mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in fission yeast, inhibits TORC2-dependent Gad8 phosphorylation and activation. Inhibition of TORC2-Gad8 also occurs in response to ionic or osmotic stress, in a manner dependent on the cAMP/PKA and Pmk1-MAPK signaling pathways. Our findings highlight the significance of glucose availability in regulation of TORC2-Gad8 and indicate a novel link between the cAMP/PKA, Pmk1/MAPK, and TORC2-Gad8 signaling. PMID:24928510

  8. Sex-specific impairment and recovery of spatial learning following the end of chronic unpredictable restraint stress: Potential relevance of limbic GAD

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, J. Bryce; Taylor, Sara B.; Hoffman, Ann N.; Campbell, Alyssa N.; Lucas, Louis R.; Conrad, Cheryl D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress alters hippocampal-dependent spatial learning and memory in a sex-dependent manner, impairing spatial performance in male rats and leaving intact or facilitating performance in female rats. Moreover, these stress-induced spatial memory deficits improve following post-stress recovery in males. The current study examined whether restraint administered in an unpredictable manner would eliminate these sex differences and impact a post-stress period on spatial ability and limbic glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) expression. Male (n=30) and female (n=30) adult Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to non-stressed control (Con), chronic stress (Str-Imm), or chronic stress given a post-stress recovery period (Str-Rec). Stressed rats were unpredictably restrained for 21 days using daily non-repeated combinations of physical context, duration, and time of day. Then, all rats were tested on the radial arm water maze (RAWM) for two days and given one retention trial on the third day, with brains removed 30 minutes later to assess GAD65 mRNA. In Str-Imm males, deficits occurred on day 1 of RAWM acquisition, an impairment that was not evident in the Str-Rec group. In contrast, females did not show significant outcomes following chronic stress or post-stress recovery. In males, amygdalar GAD65 expression negatively correlated with RAWM performance on day 1. In females, hippocampal CA1 GAD65 positively correlated with RAWM performance on day 1. These results demonstrate that GABAergic function may contribute to the sex differences observed following chronic stress. Furthermore, unpredictable restraint and a recovery period failed to eliminate the sex differences on spatial learning and memory. PMID:25591480

  9. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model.

    PubMed

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ. PMID:26812044

  10. Improvements in impaired GABA and GAD65/67 production in the spinal dorsal horn contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, MS, Satoru; Tajima, Fumihiro; Senba, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical exercise effectively attenuates neuropathic pain, and multiple events including the inhibition of activated glial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, activation of the descending pain inhibitory system, and reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokines in injured peripheral nerves may contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Since fewer GABAergic hypoalgesic interneurons exist in the dorsal horn in neuropathic pain model animals, the recovery of impaired GABAergic inhibition in the dorsal horn may improve pain behavior. We herein determined whether the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the dorsal horn is restored by treadmill running and contributes to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in neuropathic pain model mice. C57BL/6 J mice underwent partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). PSL-Runner mice ran on a treadmill at 7 m/min for 60 min/day, 5 days/week, from two days after PSL. Results Mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia developed in PSL-Sedentary mice but were significantly attenuated in PSL-Runner mice. PSL markedly decreased GABA and GAD65/67 levels in neuropils in the ipsilateral dorsal horn, while treadmill running inhibited these reductions. GABA+ neuronal nuclei+ interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horn were significantly decreased in PSL-Sedentary mice but not in PSL-Runner mice. Pain behavior thresholds positively correlated with GABA and GAD65/67 levels and GABAergic interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horns of PSL-Sedentary and -Runner mice. Conclusions Treadmill running prevented PSL-induced reductions in GAD65/67 production, and, thus, GABA levels may be retained in interneurons and neuropils in the superficial dorsal horn. Therefore, improvements in impaired GABAergic inhibition may be involved in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:27030712

  11. Association of aberrant neural synchrony and altered GAD67 expression following exposure to maternal immune activation, a risk factor for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, D D; Overeem, K A; Wolff, A R; Williams, J M; Abraham, W C; Bilkey, D K

    2014-01-01

    A failure of integrative processes within the brain, mediated via altered GABAergic inhibition, may underlie several features of schizophrenia. The present study examined, therefore, whether maternal immune activation (MIA), a risk factor for schizophrenia, altered inhibitory markers in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), while also altering electroencephalogram (EEG) coherence between these regions. Pregnant rats were treated with saline or polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid mid-gestation. EEG depth recordings were made from the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and mPFC of male adult offspring. Glutamic decarboxylase (GAD67) levels were separately assayed in these regions using western blot. GAD67 expression was also assessed within parvalbumin-positive cells in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus using immunofluorescence alongside stereological analysis of parvalbumin-positive cell numbers. EEG coherence was reduced between the dorsal hippocampus and mPFC, but not the ventral hippocampus and mPFC, in MIA animals. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that GAD67 expression within parvalbumin-positive cells was also reduced in the dorsal hippocampus relative to ventral hippocampus in MIA animals when compared with controls. This reduction was observed in the absence of parvalbumin-positive neuronal loss. Overall, MIA produced a selective reduction in EEG coherence between the dorsal hippocampus and mPFC that was paralleled by a similarly specific reduction in GAD67 within parvalbumin-positive cells of the dorsal hippocampus. These results suggest a link between altered inhibitory mechanisms and synchrony and, therefore point to potential mechanisms via which a disruption in neurodevelopmental processes might lead to pathophysiology associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25072323

  12. Association of the −243A>G, +61450C>A Polymorphisms of the Glutamate Decarboxylase 2 (GAD2) Gene with Obesity and Insulin Level in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    PRAKASH, Jai; MITTAL, Balraj; AWASTHI, Shally; SRIVASTAVA, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity associated with type 2 diabetes, and hypertension increased mortality and morbidity. Glutamate decarboxylase 2 (GAD2) gene is associated with obesity and it regulate food intake and insulin level. We investigated the association of GAD-2gene −243A>G (rs2236418) and +61450C>A (rs992990) polymorphisms with obesity and related phenotypes. Methods: Insulin, glucose and lipid levels were estimated using standard protocols. All subjects were genotyped (PCR-RFLP) method. Results: The −243A>G polymorphism of the GAD-2 gene was significantly associated with higher risk of obesity (P<0.05). Conclusion: GAD-2 gene polymorphisms influence obesity and related phenotype in complex manner, probably by regulating the food intake, insulin and body weight. PMID:27252915

  13. Correlations of Clusters of Non-Convulsive Seizure and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Case With GAD65-Positive Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Rachael; Rangaswamy, Rajesh; Peng, Yen-Yi

    2016-01-01

    With the increased availability of laboratory tests, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-positive limbic encephalitis has become an emerging diagnosis. The myriad symptoms of limbic encephalitis make the diagnosis challenging. Symptoms range from seizures, memory loss, dementia, confusion, to psychosis. We present a case of a 21-year-old female with GAD65 antibody-positive limbic encephalitis. The case is unique because the clinical course suggests that non-convulsive seizures are the major cause of this patient’s clinical manifestations. The following is the thesis: systemic autoimmune disease, associated with the GAD65 antibody, gives rise to seizures, in particular, non-convulsive seizures. Temporal lobes happen to be the most susceptible sites to develop seizures. The greater part of these seizures can be non-convulsive and hard to recognize without electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. The variable symptoms mirror the severity and locations of these seizures. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormities in the bilateral hippocampus, fornix, and mammillary body correlate with the density of these seizures in the similar manner, which suggests it is secondary to post-ictal edema. PMID:27429684

  14. Screening instruments for a population of older adults: The 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7).

    PubMed

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Chudzinski, Veronica; Gontijo-Guerra, Samantha; Préville, Michel

    2015-07-30

    Screening tools that appropriately detect older adults' mental disorders are of great public health importance. The present study aimed to establish cutoff scores for the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress (K10) and the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales when screening for depression and anxiety. We used data from participants (n = 1811) in the Enquête sur la Santé des Aînés-Service study. Depression and anxiety were measured using DSM-V and DSM-IV criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis provided an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.767 and 0.833 for minor and for major depression when using K10. A cutoff of 19 was found to balance sensitivity (0.794) and specificity (0.664) for minor depression, whereas a cutoff of 23 was found to balance sensitivity (0.692) and specificity (0.811) for major depression. When screening for an anxiety with GAD-7, ROC analysis yielded an AUC of 0.695; a cutoff of 5 was found to balance sensitivity (0.709) and specificity (0.568). No significant differences were found between subgroups of age and gender. Both K10 and GAD-7 were able to discriminate between cases and non-cases when screening for depression and anxiety in an older adult population of primary care service users. PMID:25956759

  15. Correlations of Clusters of Non-Convulsive Seizure and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Case With GAD65-Positive Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Rachael; Rangaswamy, Rajesh; Peng, Yen-Yi

    2016-08-01

    With the increased availability of laboratory tests, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody-positive limbic encephalitis has become an emerging diagnosis. The myriad symptoms of limbic encephalitis make the diagnosis challenging. Symptoms range from seizures, memory loss, dementia, confusion, to psychosis. We present a case of a 21-year-old female with GAD65 antibody-positive limbic encephalitis. The case is unique because the clinical course suggests that non-convulsive seizures are the major cause of this patient's clinical manifestations. The following is the thesis: systemic autoimmune disease, associated with the GAD65 antibody, gives rise to seizures, in particular, non-convulsive seizures. Temporal lobes happen to be the most susceptible sites to develop seizures. The greater part of these seizures can be non-convulsive and hard to recognize without electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. The variable symptoms mirror the severity and locations of these seizures. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal abnormities in the bilateral hippocampus, fornix, and mammillary body correlate with the density of these seizures in the similar manner, which suggests it is secondary to post-ictal edema. PMID:27429684

  16. Pressure-temperature stability, Ca2+ binding, and pressure-temperature phase diagram of cod parvalbumin: Gad m 1.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo; Smeller, László

    2012-07-31

    Fish allergy is associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to parvalbumins, which are small calcium-binding muscle proteins and represent the major and sole allergens for 95% of fish-allergic patients. We performed Fourier transform infrared and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to explore the pressure-temperature (p-T) phase diagram of cod parvalbumin (Gad m 1) and to elucidate possible new ways of pressure-temperature inactivation of this food allergen. Besides the secondary structure of the protein, the Ca(2+) binding to aspartic and glutamic acid residues was detected. The phase diagram was found to be quite complex, containing partially unfolded and molten globule states. The Ca(2+) ions were essential for the formation of the native structure. A molten globule conformation appears at 50 °C and atmospheric pressure, which converts into an unordered aggregated state at 75 °C. At >200 MPa, only heat unfolding, but no aggregation, was observed. A pressure of 500 MPa leads to a partially unfolded state at 27 °C. The complete pressure unfolding could only be reached at an elevated temperature (40 °C) and pressure (1.14 GPa). A strong correlation was found between Ca(2+) binding and the protein conformation. The partially unfolded state was reversibly refolded. The completely unfolded molecule, however, from which Ca(2+) was released, could not refold. The heat-unfolded protein was trapped either in the aggregated state or in the molten globule state without aggregation at elevated pressures. The heat-treated and the combined heat- and pressure-treated protein samples were tested with sera of allergic patients, but no change in allergenicity was found. PMID:22765301

  17. Color threshold and ratio of S100 beta, MAP5, NF68/200, GABA & GAD. I. Distribution in inner ear afferents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.; Hara, H.

    1997-01-01

    Afferents of chick embryos (Gallus domesticus) VIIIth nerve were examined at E3, E6, E9, E13, El7, and hatching (NH) for anti-S100 beta, anti-MAP5, anti-GABA, anti-GAD and anti-NF68/200 stain. Different ages were processed together to determine if the distribution of these antibodies changed during synaptogenesis and myelination. Color thresholding showed that saturation of pixels changed for S100 beta only 5%, for NF68/200 10%, and for MAP5, 10%, between E9-NH. Color ratio of NF68/200 over MAP5 was 1.00 at E13 and 0.25 at E16 and NH. S100 beta, GABA and GAD were co-expressed on nerve endings at the edge of the maculae and center of the cristae, whereas hair cells in the center of the maculae expressed either S100 beta or GABA, but not both. S100 beta/NF68/200 shared antigenic sites on the chalices, but NF68/200 expression was higher than S100 beta in the chalices at hatching. MAP5 was expressed in more neurons than NF68/200 at E11, whereas NF68/200 was more abundant than MAP5 at hatching. The results suggest that: 1) the immunoexpression of these neuronal proteins is modulated concomitantly with the establishment of afferent synapses and myelination; 2) S100 beta may serve a neurotrophic function in the chalices where it is co-expressed with the neurotransmitter GABA and its synthesizing enzyme GAD.

  18. A specific role for NR2A-containing NMDA receptors in the maintenance of parvalbumin and GAD67 immunoreactivity in cultured interneurons.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Jefferson W; Davis, Christopher N; Tabarean, Iustin; Conti, Bruno; Bartfai, Tamas; Behrens, M Margarita

    2006-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a hypoglutamatergic condition may induce a phenotypic loss of cortical parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons, such as that observed in brain tissue of schizophrenic subjects. However, it is not known whether the loss of PV interneurons is a consequence of the hypoglutamatergic condition or a secondary aspect of the disease. We characterized the signaling and subunit expression of NMDA receptors in cultured cortical PV interneurons and determined whether a hypoglutamatergic condition, created by direct application of sublethal concentrations of ketamine or subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonists, can affect the expression of the GABAergic markers as observed in vivo. Real-time PCR performed on mRNA isolated from single neurons showed that PV interneurons present a fivefold higher NR2A/NR2B ratio than pyramidal neurons. Brief, nontoxic, exposure to NMDA led to an increase in ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in PV interneurons, and this increase was blocked by the NR2A-selective antagonist NVP-AAM077. Application of the nonselective NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, at sublethal concentrations, induced a time and dose-dependent decrease in parvalbumin and GAD67 immunoreactivity specifically in PV interneurons. These effects were reversible and were also observed with the NR2A-selective antagonist, whereas the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro-25-6981 only partially reduced GAD67 immunoreactivity. Coexposure to the calcium channel opener BayK, or the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist DHPG [(RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] attenuated the decrease in GAD67 and parvalbumin induced by the NMDA receptor antagonists. These results suggest that the activity of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the GABAergic function of PV interneurons. PMID:16452684

  19. Decreased GAD65 mRNA levels in select subpopulations in the cerebellar dentate nuclei in autism: an in situ hybridization study

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Jane; Soghomonian, Jean Jacques; Blatt, Gene J.

    2009-01-01

    The laterally positioned dentate nuclei lie in a key position in the cerebellum to receive input from Purkinje cells in the lateral cerebellar hemisphere participating in both motor and cognitive functions. Although neuropathology of the four cerebellar nuclei using Nissl staining has been qualitatively reported in children and adults with autism, surprisingly the dentate nuclei appeared less affected despite reported reductions in Purkinje cells in the posterolateral cerebellar hemisphere. To determine any underlying abnormalities in the critically important GABAergic system, the rate-limiting GABAsynthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) type 65 was measured via in situ hybridization histochemistry in dentate somata. GAD65 mRNA labeling revealed two distinct subpopulations of neurons in adult control and autism post-mortem brains: small-sized cells (about 10–12 µm in diameter, presumed interneurons) and larger-sized neurons (about 18–20 µm in diameter, likely feedback to IO neurons). A mean 51% reduction in GAD65 mRNA levels was found in the larger labeled cells in the autistic group compared to the control group (p=0.009; independent t-test) but not in the smaller cell subpopulation. This suggests a disturbance in the intrinsic cerebellar circuitry in the autism group potentially interfering with the synchronous firing of inferior olivary neurons, and the timing of Purkinje cell firing and inputs to the dentate nuclei. Disturbances in critical neural substrates within these key circuits could disrupt afferents to motor and/or cognitive cerebral association areas in the autistic brain likely contributing to the marked behavioral consequences characteristic of autism. PMID:19358307

  20. LACK OF FUNCTIONAL GABAB RECEPTORS ALTERS Kiss1, Gnrh1 AND Gad1 mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE MEDIAL BASAL HYPOTHALAMUS AT POSTNATAL DAY 4

    PubMed Central

    Di Giorgio, Noelia P.; Catalano, Paolo N.; López, Paula V.; González, Betina; Semaan, Sheila J.; López, Gabriela C.; Kauffman, Alexander S.; Rulli, Susana B.; Somoza, Gustavo M.; Bettler, Bernhard; Libertun, Carlos; Lux-Lantos, Victoria A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Adult mice lacking functional GABAB receptors (GABAB1KO) show altered Gnrh1 and Gad1 expressions in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus (POA-AH) and females display disruption of cyclicity and fertility. Here we addressed whether sexual differentiation of the brain and the proper wiring of the GnRH and kisspeptin systems were already disturbed in postnatal day 4 (PND4) GABAB1KO mice. Methods PND4 wild type (WT) and GABAB1KO mice of both sexes were sacrificed; tissues were collected to determine mRNA expression (qPCR), amino acids (HPLC), and hormones (RIA and/or IHC). Results GnRH neuron number (IHC) did not differ among groups in olfactory bulbs or OVLT-POA. Gnrh1 mRNA (qPCR) in POA-AH was similar among groups. Gnrh1 mRNA in medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was similar in WTs but was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Hypothalamic GnRH (RIA) was sexually different in WTs (males > females) but this sex difference was lost in GABAB1KOs; the same pattern was observed when analyzing only the MBH, but not in the POA-AH. Arcuate nucleus Kiss1 mRNA (micropunch-qPCR) was higher in WT females than in WT males and GABAB1KO females. Gad1 mRNA in MBH was increased in GABAB1KO females compared to GABAB1KO males. Serum LH and gonadal estradiol content were also increased in GABAB1KOs. Conclusion We demonstrate that GABABRs participate in the sexual differentiation of the ARC/MBH, because sex differences in several reproductive genes, such as Gad1, Kiss1 and Gnrh1, are critically disturbed in GABAB1KO mice at PND4, probably altering the organization and development of neural circuits governing the reproductive axis. PMID:24080944

  1. Gad8 Protein Is Found in the Nucleus Where It Interacts with the MluI Cell Cycle Box-binding Factor (MBF) Transcriptional Complex to Regulate the Response to DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Adiel; Kupiec, Martin; Weisman, Ronit

    2016-04-22

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is found at the core of two evolutionarily conserved complexes known as TOR complexes 1 and 2 (TORC1 and TORC2). In fission yeast, TORC2 is dispensable for proliferation under optimal growth conditions but is required for starvation and stress responses. We have previously reported that loss of function of TORC2 renders cells highly sensitive to DNA replication stress; however, the mechanism underlying this sensitivity is unknown. TORC2 has one known direct substrate, the kinase Gad8, which is related to AKT in human cells. Here we show that both TORC2 and its substrate Gad8 are found in the nucleus and are bound to the chromatin. We also demonstrate that Gad8 physically interacts with the MluI cell cycle box-binding factor (MBF) transcription complex that regulates the G1/S progression and the response to DNA stress. In mutant cells lacking TORC2 or Gad8, the binding of the MBF complex to its cognate promoters is compromised, and the induction of MBF target genes in response to DNA replication stress is reduced. Consistently, the protein levels of Cdt2 and Cig2, two MBF target genes, are reduced in the absence of TORC2-Gad8 signaling. Taken together, our findings highlight critical functions of TORC2 in the nucleus and suggest a role in surviving DNA replication stress via transcriptional regulation of MBF target genes. PMID:26912660

  2. GABA and GAD expression in the X-organ sinus gland system of the Procambarus clarkii crayfish: inhibition mediated by GABA between X-organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Polanco, Paola; Garduño, Julieta; Cebada, Jorge; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Lamas, Mónica; García, Ubaldo

    2011-09-01

    In crustaceans, the X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) neurosecretory system is formed of distinct populations of neurons that produce two families of neuropeptides: crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone. On the basis of electrophysiological evidence, it has been proposed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) regulates both electrical and secretory activity of the XO-SG system. In this work we observed that depolarizing current pulses to neurons located in the external rim of the X-organ induced repetitive firing that suppressed the spontaneous firing of previously active X-organ neurons. Picrotoxin reversibly blocked this inhibitory effect suggesting that the GABA released from the stimulated neuron inhibited neighboring cells. Immunoperoxidase in X-organ serial sections showed co-localization of GABA and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) including the aforementioned neurons. Immunofluorescence in whole mount preparations showed that two subpopulations of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-containing neurons colocalized with GABA. The expression of GAD mRNA was determined in crayfish tissue and X-organ single cells by RT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis shows, within the amplified region, 90.4% consensus and 41.9% identity at the amino acid level compared with Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We suggest that crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-GABA-containing neurons can regulate the excitability of other X-organ neurons that produce different neurohormones. PMID:21626307

  3. Olfactory Enrichment Influences Adult Neurogenesis Modulating GAD67 and Plasticity-Related Molecules Expression in Newborn Cells of the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Peretto, Paolo; Fasolo, Aldo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is a highly plastic region of the adult mammalian brain characterized by continuous integration of inhibitory interneurons of the granule (GC) and periglomerular cell (PGC) types. Adult-generated OB interneurons are selected to survive in an experience-dependent way but the mechanisms that mediate the effects of experience on OB neurogenesis are unknown. Here we focus on the new-generated PGC population which is composed by multiple subtypes. Using paradigms of olfactory enrichment and/or deprivation combined to BrdU injections and quantitative confocal immunohistochemical analyses, we studied the effects of olfactory experience on adult-generated PGCs at different survival time and compared PGC to GC modulation. We show that olfactory enrichment similarly influences PGCs and GCs, increasing survival of newborn cells and transiently modulating GAD67 and plasticity-related molecules expression. However, PGC maturation appears to be delayed compared to GCs, reflecting a different temporal dynamic of adult generated olfactory interneuron integration. Moreover, olfactory enrichment or deprivation do not selectively modulate the survival of specific PGC phenotypes, supporting the idea that the integration rate of distinct PGC subtypes is independent from olfactory experience. PMID:19626121

  4. Oral delivery of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-65 and IL10 by Lactococcus lactis reverses diabetes in recent-onset NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Robert, Sofie; Gysemans, Conny; Takiishi, Tatiana; Korf, Hannelie; Spagnuolo, Isabella; Sebastiani, Guido; Van Huynegem, Karolien; Steidler, Lothar; Caluwaerts, Silvia; Demetter, Pieter; Wasserfall, Clive H; Atkinson, Mark A; Dotta, Francesco; Rottiers, Pieter; Van Belle, Tom L; Mathieu, Chantal

    2014-08-01

    Growing insight into the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and numerous studies in preclinical models highlight the potential of antigen-specific approaches to restore tolerance efficiently and safely. Oral administration of protein antigens is a preferred method for tolerance induction, but degradation during gastrointestinal passage can impede such protein-based therapies, reducing their efficacy and making them cost-ineffective. To overcome these limitations, we generated a tolerogenic bacterial delivery technology based on live Lactococcus lactis (LL) bacteria for controlled secretion of the T1D autoantigen GAD65370-575 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 in the gut. In combination with short-course low-dose anti-CD3, this treatment stabilized insulitis, preserved functional β-cell mass, and restored normoglycemia in recent-onset NOD mice, even when hyperglycemia was severe at diagnosis. Combination therapy did not eliminate pathogenic effector T cells, but increased the presence of functional CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. These preclinical data indicate a great therapeutic potential of orally administered autoantigen-secreting LL for tolerance induction in T1D. PMID:24677716

  5. Gadè deceptions and lies told by the ill: The Caribbean sociocultural construction of truth in patient-healer encounters.

    PubMed

    Massé, Raymond

    2002-08-01

    A constructivist approach in medical anthropology suggests that the boundary between lies and truth in sickness narratives is thin. Based on fieldwork in the French (Martinique) and English (Saint-Lucia) Carribbean with gadé and quimboiseurs (local folk healers), this paper addresses the gap between naïve romanticism and radical cynicism in the anthropological analysis of patient-healer encounters. Is the sick person lying when she accuses evil spirits for her behaviour or sickness? Is the quimboiseur who is building a meaningful explanation or diagnosis simply a liar taking advantage of his client's credulity? The challenge for anthropology is not to determine whether or not a person is lying when attributing their ill fortune to witchcraft. Instead, in this paper, the author approaches lying as a language-game played by both patients and folk healers. Concepts of lying as games, tactical lies, pragmatic creativity, and constructive lies are introduced here as a perspective for a reconsideration of lying as a pertinent research object. PMID:26868988

  6. Adaptation and initial validation of the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 Questionnaire (GAD-7) in an Arabic speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Helen; Atoui, Mia; Hamadeh, Aya; Zeinoun, Pia; Nahas, Ziad

    2016-05-30

    The Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 7 (GAD-7) are short screening measures used in medical and community settings to assess depression and anxiety severity. The aim of this study is to translate the screening tools into Arabic and evaluate their psychometric properties in an Arabic-speaking Lebanese psychiatric outpatient sample. The patients completed the questionnaires, among others, prior to being evaluated by a clinical psychiatrist or psychologist. The scales' internal consistency and factor structure were measured and convergent and discriminant validity were established by comparing the scores with clinical diagnoses and the Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening Questionnaire - MDD subset (PDSQ - MDD). Results showed that the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 are reliable screening tools for depression and anxiety and their factor structures replicated those reported in the literature. Sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that the PHQ-9 is sensitive but not specific at capturing depressive symptoms when compared to clinician diagnoses whereas the GAD-7 was neither sensitive nor specific at capturing anxiety symptoms. The implications of these findings are discussed in reference to the scales themselves and the cultural specificity of the Lebanese population. PMID:27031595

  7. GAD67-GFP+ neurons in the Nucleus of Roller: a possible source of inhibitory input to hypoglossal motoneurons. I. Morphology and firing properties.

    PubMed

    van Brederode, J F M; Yanagawa, Y; Berger, A J

    2011-01-01

    In this study we examined the electrophysiological and morphological properties of inhibitory neurons located just ventrolateral to the hypoglossal motor (XII) nucleus in the Nucleus of Roller (NR). In vitro experiments were performed on medullary slices derived from postnatal day 5 (P5) to P15 GAD67-GFP knock-in mouse pups. on cell recordings from GFP+ cells in NR in rhythmic slices revealed that these neurons are spontaneously active, although their spiking activity does not exhibit inspiratory phase modulation. Morphologically, GFP+ cells were bi- or multipolar cells with small- to medium-sized cell bodies and small dendritic trees that were often oriented parallel to the border of the XII nucleus. GFP+ cells were classified as either tonic or phasic based on their firing responses to depolarizing step current stimulation in whole cell current clamp. Tonic GFP+ cells fired a regular train of action potentials (APs) throughout the duration of the pulse and often showed rebound spikes after a hyperpolarizing step. In contrast, phasic GFP+ neurons did not fire throughout the depolarizing current step but instead fired fewer than four APs at the onset of the pulse or fired multiple APs, but only after a marked delay. Phasic cells had a significantly smaller input resistance and shorter membrane time constant than tonic GFP+ cells. In addition, phasic GFP+ cells differed from tonic cells in the shape and time course of their spike afterpotentials, the minimum firing frequency at threshold current amplitude, and the slope of their current-frequency relationship. These results suggest that GABAergic neurons in the NR are morphologically and electrophysiologically heterogeneous cells that could provide tonic inhibitory synaptic input to HMs. PMID:21047932

  8. CD226 rs763361 Is Associated with the Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes and Greater Frequency of GAD65 Autoantibody in a Brazilian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, Teresa Cristina Colvara; Santos, Aritania Sousa; Fukui, Rosa Tsuneshiro; Mainardi-Novo, Debora Teixeira Oliveira; Costa, Vinícius Silva; Santos, Rosa Ferreira; Matioli, Sergio Russo; Rossi da Silva, Maria Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    CD226 rs763361 variant increases susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Caucasians. There is no data about CD226 variants in the very heterogeneous Brazilian population bearing a wide degree of admixture. We investigated its association with T1D susceptibility, clinical phenotypes, and autoimmune manifestations (islet and extrapancreatic autoantibodies). Casuistry. 532 T1D patients and 594 controls in a case-control study. Initially, CD226 coding regions and boundaries were sequenced in a subset of 106 T1D patients and 102 controls. In a second step, two CD226 variants, rs763361 (exon 7) and rs727088 (3′ UTR region), involved with CD226 regulation, were genotyped in the entire cohort. C-peptide and autoantibody levels were determined. No new polymorphic variant was found. The variants rs763361 and rs727088 were in strong linkage disequilibrium. The TT genotype of rs763361 was associated with TID risk (OR = 1.503;  95%  CI = 1.135–1.991; P = 0.0044), mainly in females (P = 0.0012), greater frequency of anti-GAD autoantibody (31.9% × 24.5%; OR = 1.57; CI = 1.136–2.194; P = 0.0081), and lower C-peptide levels when compared to those with TC + CC genotypes (0.41 ± 0.30 ng/dL versus 0.70 ± 0.53 ng/dL P = 0.0218). Conclusions. The rs763361 variant of CD226 gene (TT genotype) was associated with susceptibility to T1D and with the degree of aggressiveness of the disease in T1D patients from Brazil. Ancestry had no effect. PMID:24891767

  9. CD226 rs763361 is associated with the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes and greater frequency of GAD65 autoantibody in a Brazilian cohort.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Teresa Cristina Colvara; Santos, Aritania Sousa; Fukui, Rosa Tsuneshiro; Mainardi-Novo, Debora Teixeira Oliveira; Costa, Vinícius Silva; Santos, Rosa Ferreira; Matioli, Sergio Russo; da Silva, Maria Elizabeth Rossi

    2014-01-01

    CD226 rs763361 variant increases susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Caucasians. There is no data about CD226 variants in the very heterogeneous Brazilian population bearing a wide degree of admixture. We investigated its association with T1D susceptibility, clinical phenotypes, and autoimmune manifestations (islet and extrapancreatic autoantibodies). Casuistry. 532 T1D patients and 594 controls in a case-control study. Initially, CD226 coding regions and boundaries were sequenced in a subset of 106 T1D patients and 102 controls. In a second step, two CD226 variants, rs763361 (exon 7) and rs727088 (3' UTR region), involved with CD226 regulation, were genotyped in the entire cohort. C-peptide and autoantibody levels were determined. No new polymorphic variant was found. The variants rs763361 and rs727088 were in strong linkage disequilibrium. The TT genotype of rs763361 was associated with TID risk (OR = 1.503;  95%  CI = 1.135-1.991; P = 0.0044), mainly in females (P = 0.0012), greater frequency of anti-GAD autoantibody (31.9% × 24.5%; OR = 1.57; CI = 1.136-2.194; P = 0.0081), and lower C-peptide levels when compared to those with TC + CC genotypes (0.41 ± 0.30 ng/dL versus 0.70 ± 0.53 ng/dL P = 0.0218). Conclusions. The rs763361 variant of CD226 gene (TT genotype) was associated with susceptibility to T1D and with the degree of aggressiveness of the disease in T1D patients from Brazil. Ancestry had no effect. PMID:24891767

  10. Multiple microRNAs within the 14q32 cluster target the mRNAs of major type 1 diabetes autoantigens IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65.

    PubMed

    Abuhatzira, Liron; Xu, Huanyu; Tahhan, Georges; Boulougoura, Afroditi; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Notkins, Abner L

    2015-10-01

    Islet antigen (IA)-2, IA-2β, and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Autoantibodies to these autoantigens appear years before disease onset and are widely used as predictive markers. Little is known, however, about what regulates the expression of these autoantigens. The present experiments were initiated to test the hypothesis that microRNAs (miRNAs) can target and affect the levels of these autoantigens. Bioinformatics was used to identify miRNAs predicted to target the mRNAs coding IA-2, IA-2β, and GAD65. RNA interference for the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer1 and individual miRNA mimics and inhibitors were used to confirm the effect in mouse islets and MIN6 cells. We show that the imprinted 14q32 miRNA cluster contains 56 miRNAs, 32 of which are predicted to target the mRNAs of T1D autoantigens and 12 of which are glucose-sensitive. Using miRNA mimics and inhibitors, we confirmed that at least 7 of these miRNAs modulate the mRNA levels of the T1D autoantigens. Dicer1 knockdown significantly reduced the mRNA levels of all 3 autoantigens, further confirming the importance of miRNAs in this regulation. We conclude that miRNAs are involved in regulating the expression of the major T1D autoantigens. PMID:26148972

  11. GAD Antibodies as Key Link Between Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction, Autonomic Neuropathy, and Limb Stiffness in a Nondiabetic Patient: A CARE-Compliant Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Maier, Andrea; Mannartz, Vera; Wasmuth, Hermann; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf-Peter; Weis, Joachim; Grosse, Joachim; Fuest, Matthias; Hilz, Max-J; Schulz, Joerg B; Haubrich, Christina

    2015-08-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) can be a severe burden and even a life-threatening disorder. Typically, several years of uncertainty are passing before diagnosis. We are reporting the case of a young woman with a decade of severe, progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility. Unusually, she had also developed an autonomic neuropathy, and a stiff limb syndrome.In addition to achalasia and CIP the young woman also developed neuropathic symptoms: orthostatic intolerance, urinary retention, a Horner syndrome, and lower limb stiffness. Careful interdisciplinary diagnostics excluded underlying infectious, rheumatoid, metabolic or tumorous diseases.The detection of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, however, seemed to link CIP, autonomic neuropathy, and limb stiffness and pointed at an autoimmune origin of our patient's complaints. This was supported by the positive effects of intravenous immunoglobulin. In response to this therapy the body weight had stabilized, orthostatic tolerance had improved, and limb stiffness was reversed.The case suggested that GAD antibodies should be considered in CIP also in nondiabetic patients. This may support earlier diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26252289

  12. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  13. Jaime Urrutia Fucugauchi Receives 2013 International Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia

    2014-01-01

    Thank you, Cinna, for your kind and generous citation and for your friendship. It is a great recognition having been selected for the 2013 International Award. I feel honored, especially considering the international breadth of AGU, fostering scientific excellence and promoting research in Earth and space sciences worldwide. AGU has evolved over the years, becoming increasingly international and multidisciplinary, providing the intellectual framework and networking for research collaboration. I have been privileged to serve as International Secretary of the Union, which together with work in the committees permitted me to better appreciate the range of activities and the programs AGU does to serve its membership and the geophysics community.

  14. Mudsill Theory, the Lancaster Amish and Jaime Escalante.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatto, John Taylor

    1996-01-01

    Traces current educational philosophy and practices to 19th-century philosophers who proposed the "mudsill theory," the notion that ordinary children could not be intellectually successful and must be coerced and prepared for work by compulsory schooling. Points to the success of relatively underschooled self-sufficient Lancaster Amish and street…

  15. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screening for Social Anxiety Disorder Screening for Specific Phobias Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Children Screening for an Anxiety Disorder: Family Member Self-Help Strategies: Webinars to Calm Anxious Minds "Triumph" E-News ...

  16. Screening for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anxiety Disorder Treating Anxiety Disorders: Educational Videos Clinical Practice Review for Major Depressive Disorder Meetings & Events Mental Health Apps Announcements Awards Alies Muskin Career Development ...

  17. Enlargement of Axo-Somatic Contacts Formed by GAD-Immunoreactive Axon Terminals onto Layer V Pyramidal Neurons in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Adolescent Female Mice Is Associated with Suppression of Food Restriction-Evoked Hyperactivity and Resilience to Activity-Based Anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wable, Gauri Satish; Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Aoki, Chiye

    2016-06-01

    Many, but not all, adolescent female mice that are exposed to a running wheel while food restricted (FR) become excessive wheel runners, choosing to run even during the hours of food availability, to the point of death. This phenomenon is called activity-based anorexia (ABA). We used electron microscopic immunocytochemistry to ask whether individual differences in ABA resilience may correlate with the lengths of axo-somatic contacts made by GABAergic axon terminals onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5P) in the prefrontal cortex. Contact lengths were, on average, 40% greater for the ABA-induced mice, relative to controls. Correspondingly, the proportion of L5P perikaryal plasma membrane contacted by GABAergic terminals was 45% greater for the ABA mice. Contact lengths in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated negatively and strongly with the overall wheel activity after FR (R = -0.87, P < 0.01), whereas those in the prelimbic cortex correlated negatively with wheel running specifically during the hours of food availability of the FR days (R = -0.84, P < 0.05). These negative correlations support the idea that increases in the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) terminal contact lengths onto L5P contribute toward ABA resilience through suppression of wheel running, a behavior that is intrinsically rewarding and helpful for foraging but maladaptive within a cage. PMID:25979087

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Variable stars in globular clusters (Figuera Jaimes+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figuera Jaimes, R.; Bramich, D. M.; Skottfelt, J.; Kains, N.; Jorgensen, U. G.; Horne, K.; Dominik, M.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Calchi Novati, S.; Ciceri, S.; D'Ago, G.; Galianni, P.; Gu, S.-H.; W Harpsoe, K. B.; Haugbolle, T.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Juncher, D.; Korhonen, H.; Mancini, L.; Popovas, A.; Rabus, M.; Rahvar, S.; Scarpetta, G.; Schmidt, R. W.; Snodgrass, C.; Southworth, J.; Starkey, D.; Street, R. A.; Surdej, J.; Wang, X.-B.; Wertz, O.

    2016-02-01

    Observations were taken during 2013 and 2014 as part of an ongoing program at the 1.54m Danish telescope at the ESO observatory at La Silla in Chile that was implemented from April to September each year. table1.dat file contains the time-series I photometry for all the variables in the globular clusters studied in this work. We list standard and instrumental magnitudes and their uncertainties corresponding to the variable star identification, filter, and epoch of mid-exposure. For completeness, we also list the reference flux, difference flux, and photometric scale factor, along with the uncertainties on the reference and difference fluxes. (2 data files).

  19. Health assessment for Mathis Brothers Landfill, Kensington, Georgia, Region 4. CERCLIS No. GAD980838619. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    The Mathis Brothers Landfill (MBL) is on the National Priorities List. MBL is a 20-acre site and is located on the east side of Marble Top Road, one-half mile south of State Highway 136 near Kensington (Walker), Georgia. MBL was licensed by the State to accept nonhazardous waste. The landfill is uncapped and rusted, leaking drums presently exist on-site. No removal operations have occurred. On-site contaminants of concern include lead, various residues from herbicide manufacturing and latex waste from carpet manufacturing. Based on the available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances.

  20. "Our Ultimate Competition," a Speech by John Neufeld, and Readers' Responses to Neufeld's "Boys Lie" by Matthew Ellis, Jaime Miller and Liz Ackert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John Noell, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests the ultimate competition for writers of contemporary adolescent fiction is life--the world that children inhabit is getting stranger and stranger. Discusses parents' and adolescents' different reactions to the novel "Boys Lie," which addresses the issues of rape and sexual harassment. Presents reactions to the speech and the responses of…

  1. Endostatin Polymorphism 4349G/A(D104N) is not Associated with Aggressiveness of Disease in Postate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, He Cheng; Cai, Qiu Yin; Shinohara, Eric T.; Cai, Hui; Cao, Carolyn; Fei Wang, Zuo; Teng, Ming; Zheng, Wei; Lu, Bo

    2005-01-01

    Endostatin is an important inhibitory molecule which mediates the sequential steps involved in angiogenesis. Lower level or impaired function of endostatin is associated with a higher risk of developing malignant solid tumors and with a worse prognosis of the disease. The endostatin N104 polymorphism might be associated with an impaired ability to inhibit angiogenesis. We analyzed the tissues from 98 Caucasian prostate cancer patients for the presence of D104N polymorphism. The frequencies of homozygous 4349G/G(104D/D), and heterozygous 4349G/A(104D/N) were 83.67%(82/98) and 16.33%(16/98), respectively; no individuals were homozygous 4349A/A(104N/N). With the Fisher’s exact test we found the genotype of D104N was not significantly related to age, tumor grade, PSA and clinical stage (P > 0.05). There was no difference in relapse free survival(RFS) or overall survival(OS) between patients with 104D/N and those with 104D/D (P = 0.8283, 0.3713 respectively). We concluded that endostatin polymorphism was not associated with the aggressiveness of prostate cancer in Caucasian patients. PMID:15735323

  2. A validation of the 7.5% CO2 model of GAD using paroxetine and lorazepam in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jayne E; Kendrick, Adrian; Diaper, Alison; Potokar, John P; Nutt, David J

    2007-01-01

    The inhalation of 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) in healthy subjects produces an increase in blood pressure and heart rate, and increased feelings of anxiety, fear and tension (Bailey et al. 2005). As this state is similar to that of general anxiety rather than panic, we further validated this by examining the effects of anxiolytic medication. Two separate studies in healthy volunteers are described; study one is a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of a single dose of 2 mg lorazepam and study two describes the effects of 21 days of treatment with paroxetine. Gas challenges were air and 7.5% CO2 inhaled for 20 minutes, delivered on day 0 (before treatment) and day 21 (after treatment) in the paroxetine study. Subjective effects were measured using visual analogue scales and questionnaires. When compared with placebo, lorazepam 2 mg significantly reduced peak CO2-induced subjective fear, feelings of wanting to leave, tension and worry. In the paroxetine study, when compared with day 0, day 21 showed a significantly attenuated peak CO2-induced nervousness and a trend for reduced ratings of anxiety, fear, feel like leaving, tense and worried. In these studies we have shown that this CO2 model of anxiety is sensitive to lorazepam and to a lesser extent paroxetine. This gives support to its utility as an experimental model of general anxiety disorder in healthy volunteers. PMID:16533865

  3. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  4. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Non-Insulin-Requiring Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase (GAD) Autoantibody-Positive Diabetes: A Nationwide Survey in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Junichi; Kawasaki, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoichiro; Awata, Takuya; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Uchigata, Yasuko; Osawa, Haruhiko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Yumiko; Shimada, Akira; Takahashi, Kazuma; Yasuda, Kazuki; Yasuda, Hisafumi; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Aims Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADAb) differentiate slowly progressive insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM) from phenotypic type 2 diabetes, but many GADAb-positive patients with diabetes do not progress to insulin-requiring diabetes. To characterize GADAb-positive patients with adult-onset diabetes who do not require insulin therapy for >5 years (NIR-SPIDDM), we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey in Japan. Methods We collected 82 GADAb-positive patients who did not require insulin therapy for >5 years (NIR-SPIDDM) and compared them with 63 patients with insulin-requiring SPIDDM (IR-SPIDDM). Clinical and biochemical characteristics, HLA-DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes, and predictive markers for progression to insulin therapy were investigated. Results Compared with the IR-SPIDDM group, the NIR-SPIDDM patients showed later diabetes onset, higher body mass index, longer duration before diagnosis, and less frequent hyperglycemic symptoms at onset. In addition, C-peptide, LDL-cholesterol, and TG were significantly higher in the NIR-SPIDDM compared to IR-SPIDDM patients. The NIR-SPIDDM group had lower frequency of susceptible HLA-DRB1*04:05-DQB1*04:01 and a higher frequency of resistant HLA-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotype compared to IR-SPIDDM. A multivariable analysis showed that age at diabetes onset (OR = 0.82), duration before diagnosis of GADAb-positive diabetes (OR = 0.82), higher GADAb level (≥10.0 U/ml) (OR = 20.41), and fasting C-peptide at diagnosis (OR = 0.07) were independent predictive markers for progression to insulin-requiring diabetes. An ROC curve analysis showed that the optimal cut-off points for discriminating two groups was the GADAb level of 13.6 U/ml, age of diabetes onset of 47 years, duration before diagnosis of 5 years, and fasting C-peptide of 0.65 ng/ml. Conclusions Clinical, biochemical and genetic characteristics of patients with NIR-SPIDDM are different from those of IR-SPIDDM patients. Age of diabetes onset, duration before GADAb-positivity, GADAb level, and fasting C-peptide at diagnosis must be carefully considered in planning prevention trials for SPIDDM. PMID:27177031

  5. Exact distinction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in neural networks: a study with GFP-GAD67 neurons optically and electrophysiologically recognized on multielectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Becchetti, Andrea; Gullo, Francesca; Bruno, Giuseppe; Dossi, Elena; Lecchi, Marzia; Wanke, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing excitatory from inhibitory neurons with multielectrode array (MEA) recordings is a serious experimental challenge. The current methods, developed in vitro, mostly rely on spike waveform analysis. These however often display poor resolution and may produce errors caused by the variability of spike amplitudes and neuron shapes. Recent recordings in human brain suggest that the spike waveform features correlate with time-domain statistics such as spiking rate, autocorrelation, and coefficient of variation. However, no precise criteria are available to exactly assign identified units to specific neuronal types, either in vivo or in vitro. To solve this problem, we combined MEA recording with fluorescence imaging of neocortical cultures from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in GABAergic cells. In this way, we could sort out "authentic excitatory neurons" (AENs) and "authentic inhibitory neurons" (AINs). We thus characterized 1275 units (from 405 electrodes, n = 10 experiments), based on autocorrelation, burst length, spike number (SN), spiking rate, squared coefficient of variation, and Fano factor (FF) (the ratio between spike-count variance and mean). These metrics differed by about one order of magnitude between AINs and AENs. In particular, the FF turned out to provide a firing code which exactly (no overlap) recognizes excitatory and inhibitory units. The difference in FF between all of the identified AEN and AIN groups was highly significant (p < 10(-8), ANOVA post-hoc Tukey test). Our results indicate a statistical metric-based approach to distinguish excitatory from inhibitory neurons independently from the spike width. PMID:22973197

  6. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  7. Generalized anxiety disorder in a nonclinical sample of children: Symptom presentation and predictors of impairment

    PubMed Central

    Layne, Ann E.; Bernat, Debra H.; Victor, Andrea M.; Bernstein, Gail A.

    2012-01-01

    Presentation of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a nonclinical sample of children (7–11 years old) and factors that predict overall impairment were examined. Symptom presentation was compared in children with GAD (n = 49) and anxious children without GAD (n = 42). Children with GAD endorsed significantly more worries, greater intensity of worries, and more DSM-IV associated symptoms than anxious children without GAD. Eighty-six percent of children with GAD had a comorbid diagnosis with 4% having a depressive disorder. Number of associated symptoms was most predictive of GAD impairment based on child perspective and intensity of worry was most predictive based on clinician perspective. Overall, findings from the current study are consistent with reports based on clinical samples. The DSM-IV-TR criteria for GAD were supported, with the exception that children with GAD typically present with several associated symptoms, rather than only one. PMID:18815006

  8. 76 FR 81482 - Information Collection; Submission for OMB Review, Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ..., Jaime Renner, at (612) 334-4085 or email to jrenner@cns.gov . Individuals who use a telecommunications...) Electronically by email to: smar@omb.eop.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The OMB is particularly interested...

  9. The Author and His Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain Today, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Works of Emilio Garcia Gomez, Dario Fernandez Florez, Armando Lopez Salinas, Jaime de Arminan, Luis Lopez Anglada, and Carmen Bravo Villasante are analyzed in this continuing series on Spanish authors. (DS)

  10. 76 FR 65184 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... AND COMMUNITY SERVICE Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Corporation for National and Community Service. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Corporation for National and Community Service... National and Community Service, Minnesota State Office; Attention Jaime Renner, State Program...

  11. Two-Thirds of Americans Report Daily Discrimination in Poll

    MedlinePlus

    ... to race, ethnicity, age, disability, gender or sexual orientation," Jaime Diaz-Granados, executive director for education at the American Psychological Association (APA), said in a news release from ...

  12. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  13. Living With Anxiety Disorders, Worried Sick | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... his life with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic attacks, describes here how he sought help to turn ... was diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) including panic attacks. I discovered that my feelings were coming from ...

  14. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Treatment for Late-Life Anxiety: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Terri L.; Zeno, Darrell; Bush, Amber L.; Barber, Catherine R.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in older adults and, although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for late-life GAD, effect sizes are only moderate and attrition rates are high. One way to increase treatment acceptability and enhance current cognitive behavioral treatments for GAD in older adults might be to…

  15. Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Comparison of Symptom Change in Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy or Applied Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donegan, Eleanor; Dugas, Michel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by excessive worry and somatic symptoms of anxiety (e.g., restlessness, muscle tension). Several psychological treatments lead to significant reductions in GAD symptoms by posttreatment. However, little is known about how GAD symptoms change over time. Our main goal was to examine how…

  16. Neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in expression of two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hippocampus following electroconvulsive shock: A stereology-based study.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Shozo; Kosaka, Toshio

    2009-11-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that GABAergic dysfunction is involved in various psychiatric disorders. The goal of our study was to investigate the influences of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), one of the most effective treatments for depression, on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. In this stereology-based study, we identified GABAergic neurons by immunostaining for two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65, and GAD67 and estimated the expression changes induced by single or repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS; an animal model of ECT). The numerical density (ND) of entire population of GABAergic neurons (expressing GAD65 and/or GAD67) was seldom altered by the administration of ECS. GAD67-positive (GAD67(+)) neurons were also rarely affected by ECS. On the other hand, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was changed in a layer-specific manner. In the CA1 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was increased in the strata radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare (SR/SLM) by repeated ECS. In the CA3 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was decreased in the stratum oriens and SR/SLM after single ECS. The expression ratio of GAD65 in GABAergic neurons was increased specifically in layers receiving afferents from the entorhinal cortex (EC), i.e., SR/SLM of the CA1 region and molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), after repeated ECS administration, whereas the expression ratio of GAD67 in GABAergic neurons was decreased in several layers by the same treatment. These results indicate that the ECS-induced changes in ND of GAD65(+) or GAD67(+) neurons were most likely due to alterations in GAD expression rather than actual increases or decreases in cell numbers. Altogether, the neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in GABA-mediated signaling may play a contributory role in the depression treatment process introduced by ECT. PMID:19283776

  17. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  18. Disorder-specific cognitive profiles in major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This investigation examines differences in cognitive profiles in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods Data were used from subjects with current MDD (n = 655), GAD (n = 107) and comorbid MDD/GAD (n = 266) diagnosis from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). The Composite Interview Diagnostic Instrument was used to diagnose MDD and GAD. Cognitive profiles were measured using the Leiden Index of Depression Sensitivity, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results Results showed that differences in cognitive profiles between single MDD and single GAD subjects were present: scores on hopelessness/suicidality and rumination were significantly higher in MDD than GAD, whereas anxiety sensitivity for physical concerns and pathological worry were higher in GAD than MDD. The cognitive profile of comorbid MDD/GAD showed more extreme depression cognitions compared to single disorders, and a similar anxiety profile compared to single GAD subjects. Conclusions Despite the commonalities in cognitive profiles in MDD and GAD, there are differences suggesting that MDD and GAD have disorder-specific cognitive profiles. Findings of this investigation give support for models like the cognitive content-specificity model and the tripartite model and could provide useful handles for treatment focus. PMID:24690413

  19. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  20. Generalized Anxiety and C-Reactive Protein Levels: A Prospective, Longitudinal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William E.; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Angold, Adrian; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is highly comorbid with depression. Depression is associated with elevated levels of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein (CRP), cross-sectionally and over time. To date, no studies have looked at the association of CRP with GAD. Methods Ten waves of data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used, covering children in the community aged 9-16, 19, and 21 years old. Structured interviews were used at each assessment to assess GAD symptoms, diagnosis, and cumulative episodes. Bloodspots were collected and assayed for CRP levels. Results GAD was associated with increased levels of CRP in bivariate cross-sectional analyses. These bivariate associations, however, were attenuated after accounting for demographic, substance use, and health-related covariates. In longitudinal models, there was little evidence that CRP predicted later GAD. Associations from GAD to later CRP were attenuated in models adjusted for health-related coavariates and there was evidence that the GAD-CRP association was mediated by BMI and medication use. Conclusions Similar to depression, GAD was associated with elevated levels of CRP, but the effect of GAD on CRP levels was explained by the effect of GAD on health-related behaviors such as BMI and medication use. This study suggests differences in the association between inflammation and depression and GAD. PMID:22716910

  1. Generalized anxiety disorder: between neglect and an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Starcevic, Vladan; Portman, Michael E; Beck, Aaron T

    2012-08-01

    This article reviews the main issues associated with the concept and the diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and examines the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for GAD. The lack of specific features, which is the primary issue for GAD, will not be addressed in DSM-5. The hallmark of the condition will remain pathological worry, although it also characterizes other disorders. Likewise, the proposed behavioral diagnostic criteria lack specificity for GAD, and it is not clear how these will be assessed. The proposed changes will lower the diagnostic threshold for GAD in DSM-5. Although this will not necessarily lead to a better recognition of GAD and an improvement in the perception of its relevance and clinical utility, many currently subthreshold cases will qualify for this diagnosis. The likely inclusion of many such "false-positives" will result in an artificial increase in the prevalence of GAD and will have further negative consequences. PMID:22850300

  2. Biochemical and spectroscopic properties of Brucella microti glutamate decarboxylase, a key component of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Gaia; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; Cappadocio, Francesca; Occhialini, Alessandra; De Biase, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In orally acquired bacteria, the ability to counteract extreme acid stress (pH ⩽ 2.5) ensures survival during transit through the animal host stomach. In several neutralophilic bacteria, the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (GDAR) is the most efficient molecular system in conferring protection from acid stress. In Escherichia coli its structural components are either of the two glutamate decarboxylase isoforms (GadA, GadB) and the antiporter, GadC, which imports glutamate and exports γ-aminobutyrate, the decarboxylation product. The system works by consuming protons intracellularly, as part of the decarboxylation reaction, and exporting positive charges via the antiporter. Herein, biochemical and spectroscopic properties of GadB from Brucella microti (BmGadB), a Brucella species which possesses GDAR, are described. B. microti belongs to a group of lately described and atypical brucellae that possess functional gadB and gadC genes, unlike the most well-known “classical” Brucella species, which include important human pathogens. BmGadB is hexameric at acidic pH. The pH-dependent spectroscopic properties and activity profile, combined with in silico sequence comparison with E. coli GadB (EcGadB), suggest that BmGadB has the necessary structural requirements for the binding of activating chloride ions at acidic pH and for the closure of its active site at neutral pH. On the contrary, cellular localization analysis, corroborated by sequence inspection, suggests that BmGadB does not undergo membrane recruitment at acidic pH, which was observed in EcGadB. The comparison of GadB from evolutionary distant microorganisms suggests that for this enzyme to be functional in GDAR some structural features must be preserved. PMID:25853037

  3. Childhood Maltreatment Is Associated with Larger Left Thalamic Gray Matter Volume in Adolescents with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Mei; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yan; He, Zhong; Song, Ming; Jiang, Tianzi; Li, Zexuan; Lu, Shaojia; Wu, Weiwei; Su, Linyan; Li, Lingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common anxiety disorder that usually begins in adolescence. Childhood maltreatment is highly prevalent and increases the possibility for developing a variety of mental disorders including anxiety disorders. An earlier age at onset of GAD is significantly related to maltreatment in childhood. Exploring the underpinnings of the relationship between childhood maltreatment and adolescent onset GAD would be helpful in identifying the potential risk markers of this condition. Methods Twenty-six adolescents with GAD and 25 healthy controls participated in this study. A childhood trauma questionnaire (CTQ) was introduced to assess childhood maltreatment. All subjects underwent high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to investigate gray matter alterations. Results Significantly larger gray matter volumes of the right putamen were observed in GAD patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, a significant diagnosis-by-maltreatment interaction effect for the left thalamic gray matter volume was revealed, as shown by larger volumes of the left thalamic gray matter in GAD patients with childhood maltreatment compared with GAD patients without childhood maltreatment as well as with healthy controls with/without childhood maltreatment. A significant positive association between childhood maltreatment and left thalamic gray matter volume was only seen in GAD patients. Conclusions These findings revealed an increased volume in the subcortical regions in adolescent GAD, and the alterations in the left thalamus might be involved in the association between childhood maltreatment and the occurrence of GAD. PMID:23951265

  4. Expression of the neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase in male germ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, H; Pelto-Huikko, M; Metsis, M; Söder, O; Brene, S; Skog, S; Hökfelt, T; Ritzén, E M

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the key enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid, is shown to be expressed in the testis of several different species. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cDNA clone isolated from the human testis confirmed the presence of GAD mRNA in the testis. The major GAD mRNA in the testis was 2.5 kilobases. Smaller amounts of a 3.7-kilobase mRNA with the same size as GAD mRNA in the brain was also detected in the testis. In situ hybridization using a GAD-specific probe revealed GAD mRNA expressing spermatocytes and spermatids located in the middle part of rat seminiferous tubules. Studies on the ontogeny of GAD mRNA expression showed low levels of GAD mRNA in testes of prepubertal rats, with increasing levels as sexual maturation is reached, compatible with GAD mRNA expression in germ cells. In agreement with this, fractionation of cells from the rat seminiferous epithelium followed by Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed the highest levels of GAD mRNA associated with spermatocytes and spermatids. Evidence for the presence of GAD protein in the rat testis was obtained from the demonstration of GAD-like immunoreactivity in seminiferous tubules, predominantly at a position where spermatids and spermatozoa are found. Furthermore, GAD-like immunoreactivity was seen in the midpiece of ejaculated human spermatozoa, the part that is responsible for generating energy for spermatozoan motility. Images PMID:1697032

  5. Cytokine regulation of glutamate decarboxylase biosynthesis in isolated rat islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, R S; Faulkner-Jones, B E; Harrison, L C; James, R F; DeAizpurua, H J

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an autoimmune disease in which cytokines are thought to play an important role in beta-cell destruction and immune regulation. A major target of beta-cell autoimmunity in IDDM is the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). We hypothesized that cytokines in the insulitis lesion modulate the synthesis of GAD. This may, in turn, modify the rate of beta-cell destruction. Accordingly we cultured rat islets in the presence and absence of cytokines, and measured synthesis of both isoforms of GAD, GAD65 and GAD67, by [35S]methionine incorporation and immunoprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum that recognizes both GAD65 and GAD67. Incubation of islets with interleukin (IL)-1 beta (1 ng/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha; 200 units/ml, 24 h) or interferon gamma (IFN-gamma; 500 units/ml, 72 h) significantly decreased the synthesis of both GAD65 and GAD67, but reduced neither total protein synthesis nor insulin accumulation in the medium or content. Incubation of islets for 24 h in IFN-alpha (1000 units/ml), TNF-beta (50 ng/ml), IL 2 (1000 units/ml), IL-4 (100 ng/ml), IL-6 (10 ng/ml), IL-10 (20 ng/ml), IL-12 (10 ng/ml) or transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta 2; 5 ng/ml) did not significantly alter GAD65 or GAD67 synthesis. Inhibition of GAD65 and GAD67 protein synthesis by IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma was reversed by co-incubation with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-monomethyl arginine (NMMA). Expression of both GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA, measured by RNase protection assay, was also decreased by IL-1 beta and completely restored to baseline levels by NMMA. Thus the synthesis of both isoforms of islet GAD is selectively decreased in the presence of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha or IFN-gamma by a NO-mediated mechanism, probably at the level of cytokine gene transcription. As GAD autoimmunity has been previously shown to have a pathogenic role in an animal model of IDDM, its inhibition by cytokines might limit

  6. Age and racial differences in the presentation and treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in primary care.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Gretchen A; Knudson, Mark; McCall, W Vaughn; Williamson, Jeff D; Miller, Michael E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-10-01

    Despite the prevalence and impact of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in the primary care setting, little is known about its presentation in this setting. The purpose of this study is to examine age and racial differences in the presentation and treatment of GAD in medical patients. Participants were recruited from one family medicine clinic and one internal medicine clinic. The prevalence of GAD was lowest for older adults. Age differences were found in the presentation of GAD, with young adults reporting greater cognitive symptoms of anxiety, negative affect, and depressive symptoms. African-Americans with GAD reported more positive affect and lower rates of treatment. The lower levels of negative affect and depressive symptoms reported among older adults may affect the recognition of GAD by primary care physicians. Further research is needed to better understand the causes of racial differences in treatment. PMID:18182275

  7. An examination of generalized anxiety disorder and dysthymia utilizing the Rorschach inkblot method.

    PubMed

    Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle; Clements, Alyssa; Hilsenroth, Mark; Charnas, Jocelyn; Zodan, Jennifer

    2016-06-30

    This study examined transdiagnostic features of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and dysthymia in an outpatient clinical sample. Fifteen patients who met DSM-IV criteria for GAD and twenty-one patients who met DSM-IV criteria for dysthymia but who did not have comorbid anxiety disorder were evaluated utilizing the Rorschach. Salient clinical variables were then compared. Results showed that patients with GAD scored significantly higher on variables related to cognitive agitation and a desire/need for external soothing. In addition, there was a trend for patients with GAD to produce higher scores on a measure of ruminative focus on negative aspects of the self. Thus, not surprisingly, GAD patients' experienced more distress than the dysthymic patients. The implications of these findings are discussed with regards to better understanding the shared and distinct features of GAD and dysthymia. PMID:27107389

  8. Generalized anxiety disorder: A comorbid disease.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David; Argyropoulos, Spilos; Hood, Sean; Potokar, John

    2006-07-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently occurs comorbidly with other conditions, including depression and somatic complaints. Comorbid GAD sufferers have increased psychologic and social impairment, request additional treatment, and have an extended course and poorer outcome than those with GAD alone; therapy should alleviate both the psychic and somatic symptoms of GAD without negatively affecting the comorbid condition. The ideal treatment would provide relief from both GAD and the comorbid condition, reducing the need for polypharmacy. Physicians need suitable tools to assist them in the detection and monitoring of GAD patients-the GADI, a new, self-rating scale, may meet this requirement. Clinical data have shown that various neurobiologic irregularities (e.g., in the GABA and serotonin systems) are associated with the development of anxiety. Prescribing physicians must take into account these abnormalities when choosing a drug. Effective diagnosis and treatment should improve patients' quality of life and their prognosis for recovery. PMID:16737802

  9. The relationships between perfectionism, pathological worry and generalised anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationships between perfectionism, pathological worry and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) were investigated in a clinical sample presenting for treatment of perfectionism. Method This study explored the utility of perfectionism in predicting pathological worry in a sample of individuals with elevated perfectionism and GAD (n = 36). Following this, the study examined whether perfectionism could predict a principal GAD diagnosis in the full sample (n = 42). Results Scores on the perfectionism dimensions Concern over Mistakes, Personal Standards, and Clinical Perfectionism significantly predicted pathological worry among participants with GAD after controlling for gender and depression. The perfectionism dimension Doubts about Actions significantly predicted whether individuals from the full sample received a principal diagnosis of GAD. Conclusions These findings support certain dimensions of perfectionism having significant associations with pathological worry and GAD. PMID:24693946

  10. Characterization of continuous B-cell epitopes in the N-terminus of glutamate decarboxylase67 using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Agca, Selin; Houen, Gunnar; Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2014-12-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an autoantigen associated with the autoimmune disorders Type-1 diabetes (T1D) and stiff-person syndrome (SPS). The protein, being an essential enzyme involved in the production of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, exists in two isoforms, GAD67 and GAD65. Both isoforms may be targeted by autoantibodies in SPS and T1D patients, although SPS primarily is associated with the presence of GAD67 autoantibodies, whereas T1D mainly is associated with the presence of GAD65 autoantibodies. In this study, we describe antibody reactivity to overlapping GAD67 peptides covering the complete protein sequence by modified peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in order to identify potential GAD67 epitopes using two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Both GAD67 mAbs showed reactivity to linear epitopes located at the N-terminal end of GAD67. The epitopes of GAD mAb 1 and 2 were identified as the amino acid sequences NAGADPNTTN and TETDFSNLF, respectively, corresponding to amino acids 14-23 and 91-99. Fine mapping of the epitopes revealed that antibody reactivity was related to amino acid side-chain functionality, rather than amino acid side-chain specificity. Additionally, results suggested that non-contact amino acids in the epitope structure were essential for antibody reactivity. The exact role of these amino acids remains to be determined, but they are thought to be involved in backbone hydrogen bonds or stabilization of the epitope structure. As only limited knowledge is available in relation to antigenic regions of GAD67, this study contributes to characterization of GAD67 epitopes and may be a first step in the development of peptide-based therapeutics against SPS. PMID:25358241

  11. Protecting quantum entanglement and nonlocality for tripartite states under decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Yin, Yu Hao; Ma, Wen Chao; Ye, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Quantum entanglement and nonlocality will suffer inevitable harm from decoherence environment. Based on GHZ state, we study the harm of the generalized amplitude damping (GAD) operation and the protection by the single local filtering (SLF) operation in this paper. We verify that the SLF functions to depress the loss of entanglement and nonlocality from GAD. This conclusion will guide us to select the best method to protect the GHZ state from GAD decoherence.

  12. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:26515497

  13. Venlafaxine

    MedlinePlus

    ... acting) capsules are also used to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; excessive worrying that is difficult to control), social anxiety disorder (extreme fear of interacting with others or ...

  14. Extracellular expression of glutamate decarboxylase B in Escherichia coli to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anqi; Hu, Xiaoqing; Li, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli overexpressing glutamate decarboxylase GadB can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid with addition of monosodium glutamate. The yield and productivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid might be significantly improved if the overexpressed GadB in E. coli cells can be excreted outside, where it can directly transforms monosodium glutamate to gamma-aminobutyric acid. In this study, GadB was fused to signal peptides TorA or PelB, respectively, and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). It was found that TorA could facilitate GadB secretion much better than PelB. Conditions for GadB secretion and gamma-aminobutyric acid production were optimized in E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB, leading the secretion of more than half of the overexpressed GadB. Fed-batch fermentation for GadB expression and gamma-aminobutyric acid production of BL21(DE3)/pET20b-torA-gadB was sequentially performed in one fermenter; 264.4 and 313.1 g/L gamma-aminobutyric acid were obtained with addition of monosodium glutamate after 36 and 72 h, respectively. PMID:27549808

  15. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity. PMID:27443004

  16. Gray and white matter volume abnormalities in generalized anxiety disorder by categorical and dimensional characterization.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Kevin; Pine, Daniel S; Muehlhan, Markus; Lueken, Ulrike; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2015-12-30

    Increasing efforts have been made to investigate the underlying pathophysiology of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but only limited consistent information is available on gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volume changes in affected adults. Additionally, few studies employed dimensional approaches to GAD pathology. This study compares structural brain imaging data from n=19 GAD subjects and n=24 healthy comparison (HC) subjects, all medication-free and matched on age, sex and education. Separate categorical and dimensional models were employed using voxel-based morphometry for GM and WM. Significantly higher GM volumes were found in GAD subjects mainly in basal ganglia structures and less consistently in the superior temporal pole. For WM, GAD subjects showed significantly lower volumes in the dlPFC. Largely consistent findings in dimensional and categorical models point toward these structural alterations being reliable and of importance for GAD. While lower volume in the dlPFC could reflect impaired emotional processing and control over worry in GAD, basal ganglia alterations may be linked to disturbed gain and loss anticipation as implicated in previous functional GAD studies. As perturbations in anticipation processes are central to GAD, these areas may warrant greater attention in future studies. PMID:26490569

  17. Alleviation of high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis and glucose intolerance by a novel GLP-1 fusion protein in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yuelin; Tong, Yue; Chen, Chen; Gao, Mingming; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2016-07-01

    We have previously constructed an engineered anti-diabetic fusion protein using glucagon-like peptide-1 and the globular domain of adiponectin. Herein, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of this fusion protein (GAD) on high-fat diet (HFD)-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. The lipid-lowering effect of GAD was determined in C57BL/6 mice using a lipid tolerance test. The effects of GAD on HFD-induced glucose intolerance, atherosclerosis, and hepatic steatosis were evaluated in HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice using glucose tolerance test, histological examinations and real-time quantitative PCR. The anti-inflammation activity of GAD was assessed in vitro on macrophages. GAD improved lipid metabolism in C57BL/6 mice. GAD treatment alleviated glucose intolerance, reduced blood lipid level, and attenuated atherosclerotic lesion in HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice, which was associated with a repressed macrophage infiltration in the vessel wall. GAD treatment also blocked hepatic macrophage infiltration and prevented hepatic inflammation. GAD suppressed lipopolysaccharide-triggered inflammation responses on macrophages, which can be abolished by H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. These findings demonstrate that GAD is able to generate a variety of metabolic benefits in HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice and indicate that this engineered fusion protein is a promising lead structure for anti-atherosclerosis drug discovery. PMID:26832342

  18. The prevalence and burden of subthreshold generalized anxiety disorder: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To review the prevalence and impact of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) below the diagnostic threshold and explore its treatment needs in times of scarce healthcare resources. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted until January 2013 using PUBMED/MEDLINE, PSYCINFO, EMBASE and reference lists to identify epidemiological studies of subthreshold GAD, i.e. GAD symptoms that do not reach the current thresholds of DSM-III-R, DSM-IV or ICD-10. Quality of all included studies was assessed and median prevalences of subthreshold GAD were calculated for different subpopulations. Results Inclusion criteria led to 15 high-quality and 3 low-quality epidemiological studies with a total of 48,214 participants being reviewed. Whilst GAD proved to be a common mental health disorder, the prevalence for subthreshold GAD was twice that for the full syndrome. Subthreshold GAD is typically persistent, causing considerably more suffering and impairment in psychosocial and work functioning, benzodiazepine and primary health care use, than in non-anxious individuals. Subthreshold GAD can also increase the risk of onset and worsen the course of a range of comorbid mental health, pain and somatic disorders; further increasing costs. Results are robust against bias due to low study quality. Conclusions Subthreshold GAD is a common, recurrent and impairing disease with verifiable morbidity that claims significant healthcare resources. As such, it should receive additional research and clinical attention. PMID:24886240

  19. International Priorities for Teacher Education. World Assembly 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Council on Education for Teaching, Washington, DC.

    Four papers are included in this pamphlet, the proceedings of the World Assembly at Abidjan, Ivory Coast. The keynote address, "A Turning Point in History" by Jaime Benitez, President of the University of Puerto Rico, discusses the Apollo 11 moon landing as an object lesson on values with international implications for shifting educational…

  20. Critical Issues in Native North America. IWGIA Document No. 62.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Ward, Ed.

    This collection of articles compares the problems and issues facing indigenous nations within the United States and Canada and examines forms of native resistance. Glenn T. Morris and M. Annette Jaimes summarize the evolution of the "legal status" of indigenous nations under U.S. law and examine how U.S. legal definitions undermine indigenous…

  1. My Many Years of Working with the Gifted: An Academic Approach. The Fourth Lecture in the Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Julian C.

    This lecture examines the failure of the United States to produce literate, mathematically competent high school graduates and criticizes "cyclic faddism" as a ploy of desperate educators who keep going back to methods that have been tried and found wanting. Bright spots in education are cited, including the achievement of Jaime Escalante's…

  2. 75 FR 69160 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Richie James Drake Richman Eliot Marshall Richter Andrea Virginia Rigazzi Alain R. Ritter John D. Roden... Beattie Daniel Becker Kaja K. Bednarz Andrew James Beirnes Denise Bell William Anthony Bergandi Marco Lee... Machlin Rachel Shirley Maduro Jaime Eduardo Maggard James Douglas Magnoni Olivia Malik Akhtar...

  3. Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATS 2013 Biomarkers of asbestos-induced lung injury: the influence of fiber characteristics and exposure methodology Urmila P Kodavanti, Debora Andrews, Mette C Schaldweiler, Jaime M Cyphert, Darol E Dodd, and Stephen H Gavett NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC; NIEH...

  4. Immigrant Charter Schools: A Better Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Third-grader Jaime of Denver, Colorado, was having a hard time concentrating in school. The son of Mexican immigrants, he had learned to speak English perfectly in his dual-language public school, but reading and writing was another story. When her mother, Xochitl Rico, knew about Cesar Chavez Academy, a new tuition-free charter school where the…

  5. "You Are a Flaw in the Pattern": Difference, Autonomy and Bullying in YA Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Ropero, Lourdes

    2012-01-01

    Though portrayals of bullying in children's books stretch back to Victorian public school stories, this article sees a new subgenre about bullying in young adult novels emerging in the post-Columbine years. Selected works by Jerry Spinelli, Walter Dean Myers, Jaime Adoff, Carol Plum-Ucci and Rita Williams-Garcia are examined, although the article…

  6. 76 FR 11566 - Unblocking of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons Pursuant to Executive Order 12978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...) (``IEEPA''), issued Executive Order 12978 (60 FR 54579, October 24, 1995) (the ``Order''). In the Order...) (individual) MORALES ESPINAR, Carmen Rosa, c/o COLFARMA PERU S.A., Lima, Peru; DOB 9 Aug 1976; D.N.I. 10006822 (Peru) (individual) MORALES LUYO, Luis Jaime, c/o COLFARMA PERU S.A., Lima, Peru; LE Number...

  7. Schooling as a Regime of Equality and Reproducing Difference in an Afro-Ecuadorian Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ethan

    2009-01-01

    In this article I compare and contrast curricular, ceremonial and pedagogical practices with how students and teachers make sense of racial identity and discrimination at the Jaime Hurtado Academy in the city and province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, which is the only region of the nation where Afro-Ecuadorian people comprise a majority of the…

  8. Pre-Service Geometry Education in South Africa: A Typical Case?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Sandt, Suriza

    2007-01-01

    A two year study investigating the state of pre-service teachers' (PTs') (n=224), teachers' (n=18) and students' knowledge (n=123) of Grade 7 geometry (using the van Hiele theory (1986) and acquisition scales of Gutierrez, Jaime & Fortuny (1991)) is reported. Results indicate that both teachers and PTs fail to reach the expected level of geometric…

  9. 77 FR 27078 - Cancellation of May 8, 2012, Meeting of the Wekiva River System Advisory Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ..., 2012, 77 FR 23277, is cancelled. Instead, members of the Committee will meet on May 8, 2012, solely to share information and discuss preparations for the Wekiva Wild and Scenic River Plan Dedication Ceremony... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jaime Doubek-Racine, DFO, Wekiva Wild and Scenic River, RTCA Program, Florida...

  10. 76 FR 34197 - Anchorage; Change to Cottonwood Island Anchorage, Columbia River, Oregon and Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ...: You may submit comments identified by docket number USCG- 2011-0348 using any one of the following... on submitting comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this proposed rule...; telephone ] 503-240-9319, e-mail Jaime.A.Sayers@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or...

  11. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of an online e health application for the prevention of Generalised Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a highly prevalent psychiatric disorder. Effective prevention in young adulthood has the potential to reduce the prevalence of the disorder, to reduce disability and lower the costs of the disorder to the community. The present trial (the WebGAD trial) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an evidence-based online prevention website for GAD. Methods/Design The principal clinical question under investigation is the effectiveness of an online GAD intervention (E-couch) using a community-based sample. We examine whether the effect of the intervention can be maximised by either human support, in the form of telephone calls, or by automated support through emails. The primary outcome will be a reduction in symptoms on the GAD-7 in the active arms relative to the non active intervention arms. Discussion The WebGAD trial will be the first to evaluate the use of an internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) program contrasted with a credible control condition for the prevention of GAD and the first formal RCT evaluation of a web-based program for GAD using community recruitment. In general, internet-based CBT programs have been shown to be effective for the treatment of other anxiety disorders such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Phobia, Panic Disorder and stress in clinical trials; however there is no evidence for the use of internet CBT in the prevention of GAD. Given the severe shortage of therapists identified in Australia and overseas, and the low rates of treatment seeking in those with a mental illness, the successful implementation of this protocol has important practical outcomes. If found to be effective, WebGAD will provide those experiencing GAD with an easily accessible, free, evidence-based prevention tool which can be promoted and disseminated immediately. Trial Registration Controlled-trials.com: ISRCTN76298775 PMID:20302678

  12. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step. PMID:23322022

  13. Neuropsychological functioning in young subjects with generalized anxiety disorder with and without pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tempesta, D; Mazza, M; Serroni, N; Moschetta, F S; Di Giannantonio, M; Ferrara, M; De Berardis, D

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuropsychological functioning and the effect of antidepressant drug intake on cognitive performance in a group of relatively young generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. Forty patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of GAD and 31 healthy subjects participated in the study (Control group, CON). None of the selected subjects had comorbid depression. GAD subjects were divided into two different subgroups: 18 were taking antidepressants [GAD-pharmacotherapy (GAD-p group)] and 22 were treatment-naïve (GAD group). Each group was administered with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery to assess attention, memory and executive functions. Performance on executive and non-verbal memory tasks of both GAD groups was largely worse than the CON group. However, these deficits seem to be more marked in patients taking antidepressants, especially in the domains of attention, non-verbal memory and executive functions. The present study indicates that GAD is associated with cognitive impairments among young adults. However, the observed association of neuropsychological deficits and the use of pharmacotherapy suggest a possible effect of antidepressant treatment on attention, executive functioning and non-verbal memory. PMID:23796524

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J.; Marchand, Andre; Letarte, Andree

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). A single-case, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used with 3 primary GAD patients with secondary PDA. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated with…

  15. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  16. Therapeutic alteration of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus progression by T cell tolerance to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 peptides in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S S; White, T C; DeLuca, D

    2001-07-01

    We have reported previously that nonobese diabetic (NOD) fetal pancreas organ cultures lose the ability to produce insulin when maintained in contact with NOD fetal thymus organ cultures (FTOC). Initial studies indicated that exposure to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) peptides in utero resulted in delay or transient protection from insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in NOD mice. We also found that exposure of young adult NOD mice to the same peptides could result in acceleration of the disease. To more closely examine the effects of early and late exposure to diabetogenic Ags on T cells, we applied peptides derived from GAD65 (GAD AA 246-266, 509-528, and 524-543), to our "in vitro IDDM" (ivIDDM) model. T cells derived from NOD FTOC primed during the latter stages of organ culture, when mature T cell phenotypes are present, had the ability to proliferate to GAD peptides. ivIDDM was exacerbated under these conditions, suggesting that GAD responsiveness correlates with the ivIDDM phenotype, and parallels the acceleration of IDDM we had seen in young adult NOD mice. When GAD peptides were present during the initiation of FTOC, GAD proliferative responses were inhibited, and ivIDDM was reduced. This result suggests that tolerance to GAD peptides may reduce the production of diabetogenic T cells or their capacity to respond, as suggested by the in utero therapies studied in NOD mice. PMID:11418696

  17. The Influence of Gender, Age, Psychological Resilience and Family Interaction Factors upon Anxiety and Depression in Non-Autism Spectrum Disorder Siblings of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.; Mailli, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The influence of gender, age, Psychological resilience and family interaction factors upon generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) was investigated in 75 non-autism spectrum disorder (NASD) siblings who had a brother or sister with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). GAD and MDD were much more prevalent than in…

  18. Treating co-occurring chronic low back pain & generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Kristina; Peters-Watral, Brenda

    2016-01-16

    The complex, bidirectional correlation between chronic low back pain (CLBP) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), common ailments in primary care, can increase the risk of inadequate treatment. This article will review the relationship between CLBP and GAD and provide optimal management strategies for NPs caring for individuals with this dyad. PMID:26642348

  19. Characterization of the YdeO Regulon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:25375160

  20. Efficacy of an Acceptance-Based Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Evaluation in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M.; Salters-Pedneault, Kristalyn

    2008-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic anxiety disorder, associated with comorbidity and impairment in quality of life, for which improved psychosocial treatments are needed. GAD is also associated with reactivity to and avoidance of internal experiences. The current study examined the efficacy of an acceptance-based behavioral therapy…

  1. A Case of Premature Termination in a Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, James F.; Llera, Sandra J.; Newman, Michelle G.; Castonguay, Louis G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a case of failure in an integrative treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) combining cognitive-behavioral therapy, an empirically supported treatment for GAD, and interpersonal-emotional processing therapy. The client of focus dropped out of treatment after the 8th session. Based on our analysis of this case, we…

  2. Testing a cognitive model of generalized anxiety disorder in the eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Konstantellou, Anna; Campbell, Mari; Eisler, Ivan; Simic, Mima; Treasure, Janet

    2011-10-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common comorbid disorders found in individuals with eating disorders. Despite this, little is known of shared vulnerability factors between the two disorders. The aim of the present study was to examine the four main components of a cognitive model for GAD in the eating disorders. One hundred and sixty-two females took part. Three groups were formed comprising of 19 participants with an eating disorder and GAD, 70 with an eating disorder without GAD and 73 healthy controls. All completed self-report questionnaires that measured eating attitudes, levels of GAD, intolerance of uncertainty, positive beliefs about worry, negative problem orientation, and cognitive avoidance. Participants with an eating disorder and GAD scored the highest on all four components when compared to healthy individuals and on most components when compared to those with an eating disorder. Participants with an eating disorder without GAD scored higher on all components compared to healthy controls. Findings extend our understanding of shared vulnerability factors between the eating disorders and GAD. PMID:21632204

  3. Intolerance of uncertainty, causal uncertainty, causal importance, self-concept clarity and their relations to generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Kusec, Andrea; Tallon, Kathleen; Koerner, Naomi

    2016-06-01

    Although numerous studies have provided support for the notion that intolerance of uncertainty plays a key role in pathological worry (the hallmark feature of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)), other uncertainty-related constructs may also have relevance for the understanding of individuals who engage in pathological worry. Three constructs from the social cognition literature, causal uncertainty, causal importance, and self-concept clarity, were examined in the present study to assess the degree to which these explain unique variance in GAD, over and above intolerance of uncertainty. N = 235 participants completed self-report measures of trait worry, GAD symptoms, and uncertainty-relevant constructs. A subgroup was subsequently classified as low in GAD symptoms (n = 69) or high in GAD symptoms (n = 54) based on validated cut scores on measures of trait worry and GAD symptoms. In logistic regressions, only elevated intolerance of uncertainty and lower self-concept clarity emerged as unique correlates of high (vs. low) GAD symptoms. The possible role of self-concept uncertainty in GAD and the utility of integrating social cognition theories and constructs into clinical research on intolerance of uncertainty are discussed. PMID:27113431

  4. The Impact of Written Exposure on Worry: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Natalie; Dugas, Michel J.; Sexton, Kathryn A.; Gervais, Nicole J.

    2007-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine the effect of written exposure on generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)-related symptoms in high worriers. Thirty nonclinical high worriers were randomly assigned to either a written exposure condition or a control writing condition. Self-report measures were used to assess worry, GAD somatic symptoms,…

  5. Comparison of Younger and Older Adults' Acceptability of Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder Co-Occurring with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Ament, Patrick A.; Holt, Peter S.; Hunt, Lauren S.

    2013-01-01

    Acceptability ratings of medication or Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT), for general anxiety disorder (GAD) co-occurring with Parkinson's Disease (PD) were obtained from younger ("n" = 79) and older ("n" = 54) adults. Participants read a case description of an older adult with PD and comorbid GAD followed by a…

  6. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water. PMID:26940489

  7. Evaluation of oxidative and antioxidative parameters in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Emhan, Ali; Selek, Salih; Bayazıt, Hüseyin; Fatih Karababa, İbrahim; Katı, Mahmut; Aksoy, Nurten

    2015-12-30

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder. The exact causes of GAD still unknown, in addition to neurochemical and neuroanatomic disorders, genetic and environmental factors are discussed in etiology. In our study we aimed to evaluate the oxidative metabolism's status and investigate the role of oxidative metabolites in GAD. Blood samples were taken from enrolled subjects in appropriate way and total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were studied in Harran University Biochemistry Labs. Results were compared between groups. The patients' TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher than control group. The patients' TAS levels were significantly lower than controls'. According to our findings, oxidative stress mechanism might have a role in GAD pathophysiology. In the future, total antioxidants may be used as a biologic marker in GAD etiology but more research is needed. PMID:26564548

  8. Generalized anxiety disorder: What are we missing?

    PubMed

    Allgulander, Christer

    2006-07-01

    One of the most prevalent anxiety conditions seen in primary care is generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Numerous physical ailments frequently accompany the psychic symptoms of anxiety, which often drive patients to ask for help. In spite of the high incidence of GAD, only 30% of sufferers are diagnosed. Furthermore, very few patients are prescribed medication or referred to a psychiatrist. The key aim is to ensure the early detection and management of these patients. Developing physician education programs may improve the identification of GAD. The use of simple diagnostic tools would also aid the early detection of sufferers. Physicians require more long-term data, including that on the influence of ethnicity and genetics, to assist them to better understand and more effectively manage GAD. By achieving early diagnosis and treatment of GAD, physicians can ensure that a lesser burden is inflicted upon sufferers, thus improving their quality of life. PMID:16730165

  9. Brain Activation Patterns Associated with the Effects of Emotional Distracters during Working Memory Maintenance in Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Il; Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo; Chung, Gyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the neural mechanisms of the effects of emotion on cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. In this functional MRI (fMRI), we investigated the effects of emotional interference on working memory (WM) maintenance in GAD patients. Fifteen patients with GAD participated in this study. Event-related fMRI data were obtained while the participants performed a WM task (face recognition) with neutral and anxiety-provoking distracters. The GAD patients showed impaired performance in WM task during emotional distracters and showed greater activation on brain regions such as DLPFC, VLPFC, amygdala, hippocampus which are responsible for the active maintenance of goal relevant information in WM and emotional processing. Although our results are not conclusive, our finding cautiously suggests the cognitive-affective interaction in GAD patients which shown interfering effect of emotional distracters on WM maintenance. PMID:26766958

  10. Brain Activation Patterns Associated with the Effects of Emotional Distracters during Working Memory Maintenance in Patients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Il; Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Yang, Jong-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the neural mechanisms of the effects of emotion on cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients. In this functional MRI (fMRI), we investigated the effects of emotional interference on working memory (WM) maintenance in GAD patients. Fifteen patients with GAD participated in this study. Event-related fMRI data were obtained while the participants performed a WM task (face recognition) with neutral and anxiety-provoking distracters. The GAD patients showed impaired performance in WM task during emotional distracters and showed greater activation on brain regions such as DLPFC, VLPFC, amygdala, hippocampus which are responsible for the active maintenance of goal relevant information in WM and emotional processing. Although our results are not conclusive, our finding cautiously suggests the cognitive-affective interaction in GAD patients which shown interfering effect of emotional distracters on WM maintenance. PMID:26766958

  11. Future-oriented decision-making in Generalized Anxiety Disorder is evident across different versions of the Iowa Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Erik M; Nguyen, Jennifer; Ray, William J; Borkovec, Thomas D

    2010-06-01

    Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and excessive worrying are characterized by a preoccupation with the future. Thus, enhanced identification of potential future punishments or omissions of reward may be related to the disorder. To test this hypothesis, n=47 students meeting GAD criteria according to the GADQ-IV (GAD analogues) or not (control participants) performed the Iowa Gambling Task, which has been related to sensitivity to future consequences. In order to disentangle sensitivity to future loss and sensitivity to high short-term loss magnitudes, which could also lead to enhanced Iowa Gambling Task performance, participants also performed a modified version of the task with reversed contingencies. In both versions, GAD analogues learned to avoid decisions with high probability of long-term loss significantly faster than control participants. Results, therefore, indicate that GAD is characterized by enhanced processing of potential future losses rather than sensitivity to large short-term loss. PMID:20060098

  12. Episodic future thinking in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jade Q; Szpunar, Karl K; Godovich, Sheina A; Schacter, Daniel L; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-12-01

    Research on future-oriented cognition in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has primarily focused on worry, while less is known about the role of episodic future thinking (EFT), an imagery-based cognitive process. To characterize EFT in this disorder, we used the experimental recombination procedure, in which 21 GAD and 19 healthy participants simulated positive, neutral and negative novel future events either once or repeatedly, and rated their phenomenological experience of EFT. Results showed that healthy controls spontaneously generated more detailed EFT over repeated simulations. Both groups found EFT easier to generate after repeated simulations, except when GAD participants simulated positive events. They also perceived higher plausibility of negative-not positive or neutral-future events than did controls. These results demonstrate a negativity bias in GAD individuals' episodic future cognition, and suggest their relative deficit in generating vivid EFT. We discuss implications for the theory and treatment of GAD. PMID:26398003

  13. Sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal asymmetry in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jonathan W; Fisher, Aaron J; Newman, Michelle G; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-06-01

    Physiologic investigations of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have skewed toward assessment of the autonomic nervous system, largely neglecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis variables. Although these systems coordinate-suggesting a degree of symmetry-to promote adaptive functioning, most studies opt to monitor either one system or the other. Using a ratio of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) over salivary cortisol, the present study examined symmetry between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and HPA axis in individuals with GAD (n = 71) and healthy controls (n = 37). Compared to healthy controls, individuals with GAD exhibited greater baseline ratios of sAA/cortisol and smaller ratios of sAA/cortisol following a mental arithmetic challenge. We propose that the present study provides evidence for SNS-HPA asymmetry in GAD. Further, these results suggest that increased SNS suppression in GAD may be partially mediated by cortisol activity. PMID:26934635

  14. Mechanisms of Selective Attention in Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yiend, Jenny; Mathews, Andrew; Burns, Tom; Dutton, Kevin; Fernández-Martín, Andrés; Georgiou, George A.; Luckie, Michael; Rose, Alexandra; Russo, Riccardo; Fox, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    A well-established literature has identified different selective attentional orienting mechanisms underlying anxiety-related attentional bias, such as engagement and disengagement of attention. These mechanisms are thought to contribute to the onset and maintenance of anxiety disorders. However, conclusions to date have relied heavily on experimental work from subclinical samples. We therefore investigated individuals with diagnosed generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), healthy volunteers, and individuals with high trait anxiety (but not meeting GAD diagnostic criteria). Across two experiments we found faster disengagement from negative (angry and fearful) faces in GAD groups, an effect opposite to that expected on the basis of the subclinical literature. Together these data challenge current assumptions that we can generalize, to those with GAD, the pattern of selective attentional orienting to threat found in subclinical groups. We suggest a decisive two-stage experiment identifying stimuli of primary salience in GAD, then using these to reexamine orienting mechanisms across groups. PMID:26504675

  15. Inattention symptoms and the diagnosis of comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among youth with generalized anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, R. Meredith; Carpenter, Aubrey L.; Pincus, Donna B.; Comer, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) commonly co-occur in childhood. Inattention symptoms can be hallmarks of both conditions, however assessment tools of inattention may not effectively distinguish between the two conditions. The present study used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses to examine the high-end specificity of the Attention Problems Scale of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) for detecting comorbid ADHD among youth with GAD (N = 46). Results support the utility of the Attention Problems Scale for accurately distinguishing between the two groups (AUC = 0.84, SE = .06). Specifically, a cut score of 63 achieved the most favorable values across diagnostic utility indices; 74% of GAD youth with ADHD scored above this cutoff and 91% of GAD youth without ADHD scored below this cutoff. Findings provide support for the use of the CBCL Attention Problems Scale to supplement diagnostic interviews and identify inattention associated with ADHD among GAD youth. PMID:25260213

  16. Enhanced expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65 improves symptoms of rat parkinsonian models.

    PubMed

    Lee, B; Lee, H; Nam, Y R; Oh, J H; Cho, Y H; Chang, J W

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we report the amelioration of parkinsonian symptoms in rat Parkinson's disease (PD) models, as a result of the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 65 with a modified cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The transfer of the gene for gamma-amino butryic acid (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme in gama-amino butrylic acid (GABA) production, has been investigated as a means to increase inhibitory synaptic activity. Electrophysiological evidence suggests that the transfer of the GAD65 gene to the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can change the excitatory output of this nucleus to inhibitory output. Our in vitro results also demonstrated higher GAD65 expression in cells transfected with the JDK promoter, as compared to cells transfected with the CMV promoter. Also, a rat PD model in which recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV2)-JDK-GAD65 was delivered into the STN exhibited significant behavioral improvements, as compared to the saline-injected group. Interestingly, we observed that these behavioral improvements were more obvious in rat PD models in which rAAV2-JDK-GAD65 was injected into the STN than in rat PD models in which rAAV2-CMV-GAD65 was injected into the STN. Moreover, according to electrophysiological data, the rAAV2-JDK-GAD65-injected group exhibited more constant improvements in firing rates than did the rAAV2-CMV-GAD65-injected group. These data indicate that the JDK promoter, when coupled with GAD65 expression, is more effective with regard to parkinsonian symptoms than is the CMV promoter. PMID:15829994

  17. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  18. Understanding the Association Between Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Current Anxiety: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley

    2016-10-01

    This study's objectives were to investigate the independent relationship between COPD and past-year Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) in a population-based sample of adult Canadians and to identify significant correlates of GAD among COPD patients. A series of logistic regression analyses were conducted with a sample of 11,163 respondents aged 50+ from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health to determine the degree to which the direct association between COPD and GAD was attenuated by socio-demographic factors, social support, health behaviors, sleep problems, pain, functional limitations, and early childhood adversities. Additional analyses were completed using the sub-sample of those diagnosed with COPD (n = 746) to determine predictors of GAD. One in 17 (5.8%) of older individuals with COPD had past-year GAD, in comparison to 1.7% of those without (p < .001). The age-sex-race adjusted odds of GAD were four times higher for those with COPD compared to those without COPD (OR = 3.90, 95%CI: 2.64, 5.77). After full adjustment for 18 characteristics, these odds declined to 1.72 (95%CI: 1.10, 2.71). Factors associated with GAD among those with COPD include not having a confidant (OR = 7.85, 95%CI: 3.47, 17.75), exposure to parental domestic violence (OR = 5.63, 95% CI: 2.07, 15.34) and lifetime depressive disorders (OR = 3.59, 95% CI:1.61,7.98). Those with COPD have substantially higher odds of GAD even after most known risk factors for GAD are accounted for. These findings have implications for targeted outreach and screening, particularly for patients with pain and functional limitations. The importance of a multidisciplinary healthcare team is underscored by the multiple issues that may impact GAD among COPD patients. PMID:26830204

  19. Generalised anxiety disorder symptoms and utilisation of health care services. A cross-sectional study from the “Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort”

    PubMed Central

    Kujanpää, Tero; Jokelainen, Jari; Auvinen, Juha; Timonen, Markku

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the utilization of health care services of people who tested positive for GAD compared to those who tested negative. Setting A cross-sectional study from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. Subjects A total of 10,282 members followed from birth in a longitudinal study were asked to participate in a follow-up survey at the age of 46. As part of this survey they filled in questionnaries concerning health care utilization and their illness history as well as the GAD-7 screening tool. Althogether 5,480 cohort members responded to the questionnaries. Main outcome measures Number of visits in different health care services among people who tested positive for GAD with the GAD-7 screening tool compared to those who tested negative. Results People who tested positive for GAD had 112% more total health care visits, 74% more total physician visits, 115% more visits to health centres, 133% more health centre physician visits, 160% more visits to secondary care, and 775% more mental health care visits than those who tested negative. Conclusion People with GAD symptoms utilize health care services more than other people. Key PointsGeneralised anxiety disorder (GAD) is a common but poorly identified mental health problem in primary care.People who tested positive for GAD utilise more health care services than those who tested negative.About 58% of people who tested positive for GAD had visited their primary care physician during the past year.Only 29% of people who tested positive for GAD had used mental health services during the past year. PMID:27054674

  20. POSTTRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION OF GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE 67 BY INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA: Evidence for the involvement of dopamine D1 receptor signaling$

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Gayatri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with sleep apnea leads to cardio-respiratory morbidities. Previous studies have shown that IH alters the synthesis of neurotransmitters including catecholamines and neuropeptides in brainstem regions associated with regulation of cardio-respiratory functions. GABA, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has been implicated in cardio-respiratory control. GABA synthesis is primarily catalyzed by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Here, we tested the hypothesis that IH like its effect on other transmitters also alters GABA synthesis. The impact of IH on GABA synthesis was investigated in pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells, a neuronal cell line which is known to express active form of GAD67 in the cytosolic fraction and also assessed the underlying mechanisms contributing to IH-evoked response. Exposure of cell cultures to IH decreased GAD67 activity and GABA level. IH-evoked decrease in GAD67 activity was due to increased cAMP - protein kinase A (PKA) - dependent phosphorylation of GAD67, but not as a result of changes in either GAD67 mRNA or protein expression. PKA inhibitor restored GAD67 activity and GABA levels in IH treated cells. PC12 cells express dopamine 1 receptor (D1R), a G-protein coupled receptor whose activation increased adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Treatment with either D1R antagonist or AC inhibitor reversed IH-evoked GAD67 inhibition. Silencing D1R expression with siRNA reversed cAMP elevation and GAD67 inhibition by IH. These results provide evidence for the role of D1R-cAMP-PKA signaling in IH mediated inhibition of GAD67 via protein phosphorylation resulting in down regulation of GABA synthesis. PMID:20969567

  1. Possible role for glutamic acid decarboxylase in fibromyalgia symptoms: a conceptual model for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Caris T; Carter, Lawrence P

    2011-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a condition of chronic generalized musculoskeletal pain that is thought to be a disorder of central pain sensitization. A number of neurotransmitters in the ascending and descending pain pathways have been implicated in FM including glutamate and GABA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the conversion of glutamate to GABA and decreased expression or activity of this enzyme could result in an imbalance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the ascending and descending pain pathways. Specifically, the expression and activity of the predominant isoform of GAD (GAD65) is influenced by several factors that are associated with FM such as female sex, poor diet, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and stress. We hypothesize that decreased GAD expression and/or activity plays a role in the development and exacerbation of FM leading to impairments in the three common domains of FM symptomatology: increased pain (hyperalgesia and allodynia), disrupted sleep, and disturbances in mood (anxiety and depression). There are several lines of evidence that appear to support a role of GAD in FM. First, the defining symptom of FM is pain and GAD65 knockout mice have been shown to exhibit supraspinal hyperalgesia. Second, GAD has been implicated in disorders of muscle stiffness and rigidity and morning stiffness is a common symptom of FM. Third, stress, depression, and anxiety, which are often comorbid with FM, decrease GAD activity. Fourth, FM is associated with poor sleep, specifically disrupted non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and the pharmacological induction of NREM sleep is associated with the activation of GAD-containing neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus. Fifth, FM is more commonly diagnosed in women than men and the activity of GAD is reduced by low levels of its cofactor pyroxidine, which is less well-absorbed by women and can be further lowered by diet, tobacco, and alcohol intake. Sixth, FM patients tend to be

  2. Dopamine up-regulates Th17 phenotype from individuals with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Thais B; Kasahara, Taissa M; Barros, Priscila O; Vieira, Morgana M M; Bittencourt, Vera Carolina B; Hygino, Joana; Andrade, Regis M; Linhares, Ulisses C; Andrade, Arnaldo F; Bento, Cleonice A

    2011-09-15

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of stress-related dose of dopamine (DA) on the in vitro proliferation and cytokine production in polyclonally-activated T cells from healthy individuals or individuals with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Our results demonstrated that cell cultures from GAD group proliferated less following T cell activation, as compared with control group. The addition of DA reduced the proliferative response in cell cultures from healthy but not from GAD individuals. The cytokine profile in GAD individuals revealed Th1 and Th2 deficiencies associated with a dominant Th17 phenotype, which was enhanced by DA. A similar DA-induced immunomodulation was also observed in PPD-activated cell cultures from GAD individuals. Unlike the control, DA-enhanced Th17 cytokine production in GAD individuals was not affected by glucocorticoid. In conclusion, our results show that the T cell functional dysregulation in GAD individuals is significantly amplified by DA. These immune abnormalities can have impact in increasing the susceptibility of individuals with anxiety disorders to infectious diseases and inflammatory/autoimmune disorders. PMID:21872345

  3. Asking patients about their general level of functioning: Is IT worth IT for common mental disorders?

    PubMed

    Olariu, Elena; Forero, Carlos G; Álvarez, Pilar; Castro-Rodriguez, José-Ignacio; Blasco, M J; Alonso, Jordi

    2015-10-30

    Functional disability (FD) is a diagnostic criterion for the psychiatric diagnosis of many mental disorders (e.g. generalized anxiety disorder (GAD); major depressive episode (MDE)). We aimed to assess the contribution of measuring FD to diagnosing GAD and MDE using clinical (Global Assessment of Functioning, GAF) and self-reported methods (Analog scale of functioning, ASF and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule WHODAS 2.0). Patients seeking professional help for mood/anxiety symptoms (N=244) were evaluated. The MINI interview was used to determine the presence of common mental disorders. Symptoms were assessed with two short checklists. Logistic and hierarchical logistic models were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy and the added diagnostic value of FD assessment in detecting GAD and MDE. For GAD, FD alone had a diagnostic accuracy of 0.79 (GAF), 0.79 (ASF) and 0.78 (WHODAS) and for MDE of 0.83, 0.84 and 0.81, respectively. Self-reported measures of FD improved the diagnostic performance of the number of symptoms (4% AUC increase) for GAD, but not for MDE. If assessed before symptom evaluation, FD can discriminate well between patients with and without GAD/MDE. When assessed together with symptoms, self-reported methods improve GAD detection rates. PMID:26279129

  4. Adult attachment, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Marganska, Anna; Gallagher, Michelle; Miranda, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Differences in attachment style have been linked to both emotion regulation and psychological functioning, but the emotion regulatory mechanism through which attachment style might impact symptoms of depression and anxiety is unclear. The present study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between adult attachment style and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of 284 adults. Secure attachment was associated with lower depression and GAD symptoms and lower emotion dysregulation, whereas insecure attachment styles were generally associated with higher depression and GAD scores and higher emotion dysregulation. Perceived inability to generate effective emotion regulation strategies mediated the relation between insecure attachment and both depression and GAD symptoms. Nonacceptance of negative emotions and inability to control impulsive behaviors emerged as additional mediators of the relation between insecure attachment styles and GAD symptoms. The differential contribution of attachment style and emotion regulation to the prediction of depression and GAD symptoms may reflect differences in vulnerability to depression and GAD. PMID:23330631

  5. Comparison of spiritual well-being and coping strategies of patients with generalized anxiety disorder and with minor general medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Faiza; Bokharey, Iram Zehra

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the spiritual well-being and coping strategies of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and those with general medical conditions (GMC). The sample was comprised of 40 participants with GAD fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of DSM IV-TR and 50 participants with GMC. The descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and independent sample t test were used for data analysis. The results revealed the significant negative correlation of spiritual wellness with GAD symptoms and positive correlation between spiritual wellness, active practical and religious-focused coping strategies. The independent sample t test showed that spiritual wellness of participants with GMC was higher than participants with GAD. Moreover, out of 13 dimensions of spiritual wellness inventory, the scores of participants with minor general medical conditions in the dimensions of conception of divinity, present centeredness, hope, forgiveness, conscientiousness and spiritual freedom remained significantly higher than those with GAD. The participants with GMC used more active practical coping strategies and religious-focused coping strategies than participants with GAD. There was no difference between two groups of participants in using active distracting coping strategies, while avoidance-focused coping strategies were used by participants with GAD more than those with GMC. PMID:24535043

  6. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics. PMID:24965288

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire for DSM-IV Among Four Racial Groups

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christina M.; Klenck, Suzanne C.; Norton, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GAD-Q-IV) is a self-report diagnostic measure of generalized anxiety disorder. Previous studies have established the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV revealing excellent diagnostic specificity and sensitivity as well as good test-retest reliability and convergent and discriminant validity (Newman et al., 2002). Recent analyses with other measures of anxiety symptoms have revealed differences across racial or national groups. Given that the GAD-Q-IV was tested primarily on Caucasian (78%) participants, the purpose of this study was to demonstrate the psychometric properties of the GAD-Q-IV across four racial groups: African American, Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, and Asian. A student sample of 585 undergraduate psychology students completed the GAD-Q-IV as well as other measures of anxiety symptoms. A clinical replication sample was obtained from 188 clinical participants who completed the GAD-Q-IV as part of a larger psychotherapy study. Results indicated excellent and very similar factor structures in the student sample, and similar psychometric properties across both samples across the racial groups. Implications for the use of the GAD-Q-IV across racial groups are discussed. PMID:20830629

  8. Experience and appraisal of worry among high worriers with and without generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Borkovec, T D

    2004-12-01

    Recent research has revealed that a large number of highly worried individuals do not qualify for a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). This raises the intriguing question of why some high worriers are more impaired and distressed by their worrying than others, particularly when the severity of their worry is the same. The present investigation sought to address this question by examining whether GAD and non-GAD high worriers differ in their actual worry experiences, their subjective appraisals of worry experiences, or both experiences and appraisals of worry. GAD and non-GAD worriers, selected for matching levels of trait worry severity, completed an attention-focus task with thought sampling before and after a brief worry induction. They also completed questionnaires assessing their experiences during and after the worry induction, as well as their general beliefs about worry. GAD worriers experienced less control over negative intrusive thoughts immediately after worrying, reported greater somatic hyperarousal following worry, and endorsed several negative beliefs about worry more strongly than their worry-matched controls. Results suggest that GAD is associated with unique experiences and appraisals that distinguish it from other forms of severe worry. PMID:15500816

  9. Polysomnographic Sleep Characteristics of Generally-Anxious and Healthy Children Assessed in the Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Patriquin, Michelle A.; Mellman, Thomas A.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Alfano, Candice A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Using laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) we recently provided evidence of significantly prolonged sleep onset latency (SOL) and reduced latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep among non-depressed children with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) compared to healthy age-matched controls. In the current study we conducted unattended ambulatory PSG in a new sample of children with GAD and controls in order to examine sleeping characteristics in the home environment. Method Thirty-two children (ages of 7–11 years) including 16 children with primary GAD and 16 controls receiving no psychotropic medications were studied. The anxious group had a primary diagnosis of GAD without secondary mood disorders and controls were free of any medical or psychiatric diagnoses. All participants underwent structured diagnostic assessments and completed one night of home-based polysomnography (PSG). Results Children with GAD exhibited significantly higher sleep efficiency (SE) and fewer rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods compared to controls. Self-reported somatic arousal during the pre-sleep period was negatively correlated with the percentage of total REM sleep among controls, but positively correlated with REM sleep percentage in the GAD group. Limitations A small sample size and one night of PSG only. Conclusions Home-based PSG recording do not provide evidence of disrupted sleep patterns in children with GAD. Contextual factors that better elucidate differences between laboratory and home-based sleep findings are suggested as important directions for future research. PMID:24751311

  10. Influence of light on the free amino acid content and γ-aminobutyric acid synthesis in Brassica juncea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Uddin, Md Romij; Lee, Sanghyun; Kim, Sun-Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2013-09-11

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) is an important enzyme in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) biosynthesis. Here we report the influence of light on amino acid accumulation and investigate the molecular mechanism by which light influences GABA biosynthesis at the seedling stage of two mustard (Brassica juncea) cultivars (green-leaf and purple-leaf). Gene expression profiles of four GAD-encoding genes (GAD1, GAD2, GAD4a, and GAD4b) and their impact on GABA biosynthesis were analyzed. Light exerted an obvious influence on amino acid accumulation in mustard seedlings. GAD gene expression was also significantly regulated by light/dark or dark treatment, which differentially regulated GABA biosynthesis in B. juncea seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed that the seeds of purple cultivars contain a higher amount of free amino acids and GABA than do the seeds of green cultivars. After seed germination, however, the accumulation of free amino acids peaked in dark-treated seedlings on day 9 in both cultivars, whereas GABA synthesis peaked at 9 days under light conditions. This study may provide a foundation for understanding the effect of light on amino acids, particularly GABA biosynthesis in Brassica plants. PMID:23909820

  11. Photon manipulation in silicon nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaari, Ali Wanis

    2011-12-01

    CD8+ T cells are the branch of the adaptive immune system responsible for recognizing and killing tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, when CD8+ T cells target our own tissues, they can cause autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. For CD8+ T cells to fulfill these functions, the T cell receptors (TCRs) on CD8+ T cells must recognize pathogens or antigens presented on the surface of target cells. TCR ligation triggers multiple signaling pathways that lead to the activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The goal of our research is to define the TCR-proximal signaling events that regulate CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. To accomplish this goal, we are focusing on an adaptor protein Gads, which is critical for optimal TCR-mediated calcium mobilization. We reported the first analysis of the function of Gads in peripheral naive CD8+ T cells. To examine the function of Gads in CD8+ T cell mediated immune responses, we crossed Gads-/- mice with mice expressing an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR recognizing ovalbumin (OVA). The transgenic mice are called ovalbumin-specific T cell receptor-major histocompatibility complex class I restricted (OT-I) mice. We investigated the effect of Gads on the proliferation of CD8+ T cells following stimulation with peptide antigen in vivo and in vitro. We stimulated splenocytes from Gads+/+ OT-I and Gads -/- OT-I mice with the peptide agonist. The experiments revealed that Gads is required for optimal proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The regulation of Gads is most evident at the early time points of proliferation. Then we demonstrated that Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have impaired TCR-mediated exit from G0 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have delayed expression of c-myc and the activation markers CD69 and CD25, upon stimulation with peptide antigen. Next, we investigated how Gads affects CD8+ T cell

  12. Glutamic acid decarboxylase activity is stimulated in quail retina neuronal cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus and is regulated by pp60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1985-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) stimulates in quail embryo neuro-retina (NR) cultures the specific activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in NR and in central nervous system. In quail embryo NR cultures transformed by ts NY-68, a thermodependent transformation-defective mutant of RSV, stimulation of GAD activity is regulated by pp60v-src, the product of the src gene of RSV. Fibroblasts and myoblasts have a very low GAD activity that is not stimulated after transformation by RSV. Neuronal clones, previously derived from ts NY-68-transformed established NR cell lines, have a high GAD activity which is regulated by pp60v-src, while other clones have a low GAD activity apparently not regulated by pp60v-src. These data indicate that pp60v-src selectively activates the expression of GAD in distinct neuronal cells of quail embryo NR cultures transformed by RSV. GAD activity is also stimulated in NR cells infected with viruses containing v-mil. PMID:2992933

  13. Brain morphological alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: A combined DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS study.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficit in conjunction with brain morphometric and metabolic alterations. This study assessed the combined neural morphological deficits and metabolic abnormality in patients with GAD. Thirteen patients with GAD and 13 healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education level underwent high-resolution T1-weighted MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 3Tesla. In this study, the combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and (1)H-MRS was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in GAD. The patients showed significantly reduced white matter (WM) volumes in the midbrain (MB), precentral gyrus (PrG), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC) compared to the controls. In MRS study, the choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and choline/N-acetylaspartate (Cho/NAA) ratios in the DLPFC were significantly lower in the patients. Particularly, the WM volume variation of the DLPFC was positively correlated with both of the Cho/Cr and Cho/NAA ratios in patients with GAD. This study provides an evidence for the association between the morphometric deficit and metabolic changes in GAD. This finding would be helpful to understand the neural dysfunction and pathogenesis in connection with cognitive impairments in GAD. PMID:26708039

  14. Anxiety, social support, and physical health in a sample of spouses of OEF/OIF service members.

    PubMed

    Fields, Jordan A; Nichols, Linda O; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Zuber, Jeffrey; Graney, Marshall

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the relationships between heightened anxiety, social support, and physical health in a sample of spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members. 86 spouses were recruited nationally as part of a pilot trial of a military spouse telephone support group. Participants completed measures of physical and mental health via telephone including a screening tool for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Scores for social support and health outcomes were compared across two groups (positive vs. negative screens for GAD) using one-way analysis of variance analysis procedures. Path analytic techniques were used to evaluate the relative effects of anxiety and perceived social support on overall health and physical health comorbidities. A total of 38 participants screened positive for GAD. Participants with probable GAD reported having less social support than those screening negative for GAD. GAD participants also reported poorer overall health and more physical health comorbidities than their GAD-negative counterparts. Path analysis indicated that heightened anxiety is associated with worse overall health and social support does not buffer this interaction. The results suggest that anxiety-related health is a critical factor to be addressed in spouses of service members. PMID:23397694

  15. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S.; Guerra-Narbona, Rafael; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Delgado-García, José María; Saitow, Fumihito; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct GAD autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal GAD antibodies. We found that GAD autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7) and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15) recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by GAD autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10) or limbic encephalitis (n = 4). We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal GAD antibody representing this epitope specificity; (1) disrupted in vitro the association of GAD with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles; (2) depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect; (3) significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task; (4) markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm; and (5) induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of GAD by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such GAD antibodies could be envisioned. PMID:25870548

  16. Symptoms of Generalised Anxiety disorder but not Panic Disorder at age 15 increase the risk of depression at 18 in the ALSPAC cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Simon J C; Pearson, Rebecca; Stapinski, Lexine; Bould, Helen; Christmas, David M; Button, Katherine S; Skapinakis, Petros; Lewis, Glyn; Evans, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Panic Disorder (PD) differ in their biology and co-morbidities. We hypothesised that GAD but not PD symptoms at 15 are associated with depression diagnosis at 18. Methods Using longitudinal data from the ALSPAC birth cohort we examined relations of GAD and PD symptoms (measured by DAWBA) at 15 to depression at 18 (by CIS-R) using logistic regression. We excluded adolescents already depressed at 15 and adjusted for social class, maternal education, birth order, gender, alcohol intake and smoking. We repeated these analyses following multiple imputation for missing data. Results In the sample with complete data (n=2835), high and moderate GAD symptoms in adolescents not depressed at 15, were associated with increased risk of depression at 18 both in unadjusted analyses and adjusting for PD symptoms at 15 and the above potential confounders. The adjusted OR for depression at 18 in adolescents with high relative to low GAD scores was 5.2 [95% C.I. 3.0 - 9.1; overall p<0.0001]. There were no associations between PD symptoms and depression at 18 in any model (high relative to low PD scores, adjusted OR= 1.3 [95% C.I. 0.3 - 4.8], overall p=0.737). Missing data imputation strengthened the relations of GAD symptoms with depression (high relative to low GAD scores, OR= 6.2, [95% C.I. 3.9 - 9.9]) but those for PD became weaker. Conclusion Symptoms of GAD but not PD at 15 are associated with depression at 18. Clinicians should be aware that adolescents with GAD symptoms may develop depression. PMID:26315278

  17. Cortical Gene Expression After a Conditional Knockout of 67 kDa Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Parvalbumin Neurons.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Danko; Yoshihara, Toru; Kawabata, Rika; Matsubara, Takurou; Tsubomoto, Makoto; Minabe, Yoshio; Lewis, David A; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    In the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the enzyme primarily responsible for cortical GABA synthesis, is reduced in the subset of GABA neurons that express parvalbumin (PV). This GAD67 deficit is accompanied by lower cortical levels of other GABA-associated transcripts, including GABA transporter-1, PV, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin receptor kinase B, somatostatin, GABAA receptor α1 subunit, and KCNS3 potassium channel subunit mRNAs. In contrast, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), another enzyme for GABA synthesis, are not altered. We tested the hypothesis that this pattern of GABA-associated transcript levels is secondary to the GAD67 deficit in PV neurons by analyzing cortical levels of these GABA-associated mRNAs in mice with a PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout. Using in situ hybridization, we found that none of the examined GABA-associated transcripts had lower cortical expression in the knockout mice. In contrast, PV, BDNF, KCNS3, and GAD65 mRNA levels were higher in the homozygous mice. In addition, our behavioral test battery failed to detect a change in sensorimotor gating or working memory, although the homozygous mice exhibited increased spontaneous activities. These findings suggest that reduced GAD67 expression in PV neurons is not an upstream cause of the lower levels of GABA-associated transcripts, or of the characteristic behaviors, in schizophrenia. In PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout mice, increased levels of PV, BDNF, and KCNS3 mRNAs might be the consequence of increased neuronal activity secondary to lower GABA synthesis, whereas increased GAD65 mRNA might represent a compensatory response to increase GABA synthesis. PMID:26980143

  18. Risk factors for late-onset generalized anxiety disorder: results from a 12-year prospective cohort (the ESPRIT study).

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Norton, J; Carrière, I; Ritchie, K; Chaudieu, I; Ancelin, M-L

    2015-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is a chronic and highly prevalent disorder associated with increased disability and mortality in the elderly. Treatment is difficult with low rate of full remission, thus highlighting the need to identify early predictors for prevention in elderly people. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize incident GAD predictors in elderly people. A total of 1711 individuals aged 65 years and above and free of GAD at baseline were randomly recruited from electoral rolls between 1999 and 2001 (the prospective ESPRIT study). The participants were examined at baseline and five times over 12 years. GAD and psychiatric comorbidity were diagnosed with a standardized psychiatric examination, the Mini-International Neuropsychiatry Interview on the basis of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition) criteria and validated by a clinical panel. During the follow-up, 8.4% (95% confidence interval=7.1-9.7%) of the participants experienced incident GAD, 80% being first episodes; the incident rate being 10 per 1000 person-years. The principal predictors of late-onset incident GAD over 12 years derived from a multivariate Cox model were being female, recent adverse life events, having chronic physical (respiratory disorders, arrhythmia and heart failure, dyslipidemia, cognitive impairment) and mental (depression, phobia and past GAD) health disorders. Poverty, parental loss or separation and low affective support during childhood, as well as history of mental problems in parents were also significantly and independently associated with incident GAD. GAD appears as a multifactorial stress-related affective disorder resulting from both proximal and distal risk factors, some of them being potentially modifiable by health care intervention. PMID:25826111

  19. Threshold and subthreshold generalized anxiety disorder among US adolescents: prevalence, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, M.; Beesdo-Baum, K.; He, J.-P.; Merikangas, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Threshold and subthreshold forms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are highly prevalent and impairing conditions among adults. However, there are few general population studies that have examined these conditions during the early life course. The primary objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the prevalence, and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of threshold and subthreshold forms of GAD in a nationally representative sample of US youth; and (2) test differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between threshold and subthreshold forms of the disorder. Method The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement is a nationally representative face-to-face survey of 10123 adolescents 13 to 18 years of age in the continental USA. Results Approximately 3% of adolescents met criteria for threshold GAD. Reducing the required duration from 6 months to 3 months resulted in a 65.7% increase in prevalence (5.0%); further relaxing the uncontrollability criterion led to an additional 20.7% increase in prevalence (6.1%). Adolescents with all forms of GAD displayed a recurrent clinical course marked by substantial impairment and co-morbidity with other psychiatric disorders. There were few significant differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between threshold and subthreshold cases of GAD. Results also revealed age-related differences in the associated symptoms and clinical course of GAD. Conclusions Findings demonstrate the clinical significance of subthreshold forms of GAD among adolescent youth, highlighting the continuous nature of the GAD construct. Age-related differences in the associated symptoms and clinical course of GAD provide further support for criteria that capture variation in clinical features across development. PMID:24384401

  20. Structure-function relationships in histidine-rich antimicrobial peptides from Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Mark; Mannion, Michael; Pike, Damien; Lewis, Krystina; Flynn, Andrew; Brannan, Alex M; Browne, Mitchell J; Jackman, Donna; Madera, Laurence; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Hoskin, David W; Rise, Matthew L; Booth, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    Gad-1 and Gad-2 are antimicrobial peptide (AMP) sequences encoded by paralogous genes. They are rich in histidine, which suggests that their activity might be pH-dependent. We examined their structure-function relationships with a view to learning how to improve AMP therapeutic ratios. Activity assays with Gram-negative bacteria and cancer cell lines demonstrate that Gad-2 is substantially more active at slightly acidic pH than it is at neutral pH. By contrast, the activity of Gad-1 at lower pH is similar to its activity at pH7. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that the greater functional plasticity of Gad-2 correlates with a greater structural plasticity; Gad-2's percent helicity varies dramatically with altered pH and lipid environment. Interestingly, Gad-2's highest levels of helicity do not correspond to the conditions where it is most active. High resolution solution NMR structures were determined in SDS micelles at pH5, conditions that induce an intermediate level of helicity in the peptides. Gad-1 is more helical than Gad-2, with both peptides exhibiting the greatest helical tendencies in their central region and lowest helicity in their N-termini. The high resolution structures suggest that maximum activity relies on the appropriate balance between an N-terminal region with mixed hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure features and an amphipathic central and C-terminal region. Taken together with previous studies, our results suggest that to improve the therapeutic ratio of AMPs, consideration should be given to including sequential histidine-pairs, keeping the overall charge of the peptide modest, and retaining a degree of structural plasticity and imperfect amphipathicity. PMID:25839356

  1. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: <0.02) and was treated with multiple immuno- and chemotherapies, with eventual partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. PMID:26878120

  2. Glutamate Decarboxylase-Dependent Acid Resistance in Brucella spp.: Distribution and Contribution to Fitness under Extremely Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative. PMID:25381237

  3. Distinguished Visitors to Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, Henri; Madsen, Claus

    2007-12-01

    As part of his first official trip to Brazil and Chile, the European Science and Research Commissioner, Janez Potocnik, visited the ESO Paranal Observatory on 27 November. The Commissioner was accompanied by, among others, Jaime Pérez Vidal, Head of the Delegation of the European Commission (EC) to Chile, Mary Minch and Cornelia Nauen, respectively Director and Principal Administrator of International Scientific Cooperation for the EC, and Hervé Peró, Head of EC Unit Research Infrastructures.

  4. 78 FR 44943 - EcoEléctrica, L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission EcoEl ctrica, L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 3, 2013, EcoEl ctrica, L.P. (EcoEl ctrica), Road 337, Km. 3.7, Bo. Tallaboa Poniente, Pe uelas, PR 00624, filed... directed to Jaime L. Sanabria, EcoEl ctrica, L.P., Road 337, Km. 3.7, Bo. Tallaboa Poniente, Pe uelas,...

  5. Apraxia in anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-associated stiff person syndrome: link to corticobasal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Subramony, S H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with asymmetrical rigidity as well as asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by muscle stiffness and gait difficulties. Whereas patients with CBS have several forms of pathology, many patients with SPS have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-ab), but these 2 disorders have not been reported to coexist. We report 2 patients with GAD-ab-positive SPS who also had signs suggestive of CBS, including asymmetrical limb rigidity associated with both asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Future studies should evaluate patients with CBS for GAD-ab and people with SPS for signs of CBS. PMID:25100431

  6. Appraisal of activating thoughts in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Upatel, Tanja; Gerlach, Alexander L

    2008-09-01

    Worrying may be an avoidance behaviour preventing the discomfort of imagining future threats. To study the link between phasic physiological activation and thought contents, we recruited 32 generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients and 31 controls and asked them to report whatever was in their mind just prior to whenever they were prompted. Half of 20 prompts were triggered by non-specific skin conductance fluctuations (activating thoughts). Controls judged activating thoughts as being less pleasant. GAD participants judged activating thoughts as more anxiety provoking, less relaxing and less controllable. Not the level of activation but the appraisal of activating thoughts in a catastrophic fashion differentiates GAD patients from controls. PMID:17900526

  7. [Neurons with Different Neurotransmitters in Embryonic Neocortical Allografts in the Rat Sciatic Nerve].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E S

    2016-01-01

    Different subsets of interneurons in the Wistar rat neocortex and in neocortical transplants developing in a damaged nerve were identified by the following immunohistochemical markers: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD 67) for GABAergic nerve cells, NO-synthase (NOS) for NO-ergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) for cholinergic cells, and tyrosine hydroxylase for catecholaminergic structures. Twenty-eight days after surgery, individual GAD 67-ir, NO-ir, ChAT-ir, and very rarely TH-ir cells were detected in the graft. It was shown that the number of GAD 67-ir neurons per unit area in the grafts was less than in the rat neocortex P20. PMID:27396173

  8. Photon manipulation in silicon nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaari, Ali Wanis

    2011-12-01

    CD8+ T cells are the branch of the adaptive immune system responsible for recognizing and killing tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, when CD8+ T cells target our own tissues, they can cause autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. For CD8+ T cells to fulfill these functions, the T cell receptors (TCRs) on CD8+ T cells must recognize pathogens or antigens presented on the surface of target cells. TCR ligation triggers multiple signaling pathways that lead to the activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The goal of our research is to define the TCR-proximal signaling events that regulate CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. To accomplish this goal, we are focusing on an adaptor protein Gads, which is critical for optimal TCR-mediated calcium mobilization. We reported the first analysis of the function of Gads in peripheral naive CD8+ T cells. To examine the function of Gads in CD8+ T cell mediated immune responses, we crossed Gads-/- mice with mice expressing an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR recognizing ovalbumin (OVA). The transgenic mice are called ovalbumin-specific T cell receptor-major histocompatibility complex class I restricted (OT-I) mice. We investigated the effect of Gads on the proliferation of CD8+ T cells following stimulation with peptide antigen in vivo and in vitro. We stimulated splenocytes from Gads+/+ OT-I and Gads -/- OT-I mice with the peptide agonist. The experiments revealed that Gads is required for optimal proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The regulation of Gads is most evident at the early time points of proliferation. Then we demonstrated that Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have impaired TCR-mediated exit from G0 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have delayed expression of c-myc and the activation markers CD69 and CD25, upon stimulation with peptide antigen. Next, we investigated how Gads affects CD8+ T cell

  9. Generalized anxiety disorder

    MedlinePlus

    GAD; Anxiety disorder ... you can help yourself get better by: Reducing caffeine Not using street drugs or large amounts of ... a helpful addition. Resources for more information include: Anxiety and Depression Association of America: www.adaa.org ...

  10. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD. PMID:27019339