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Sample records for janis vetra ilva

  1. Newman-Janis Algorithm Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, O.; Camargo, H. A.; Socolovsky, M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to show that the Newman-Janis and Newman et al algorithm used to derive the Kerr and Kerr-Newman metrics respectively, automatically leads to the extension of the initial non negative polar radial coordinate r to a cartesian coordinate running from to , thus introducing in a natural way the region in the above spacetimes. Using Boyer-Lindquist and ellipsoidal coordinates, we discuss some geometrical aspects of the positive and negative regions of , like horizons, ergosurfaces, and foliation structures

  2. Five-dimensional Janis-Newman algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbin, Harold; Heurtier, Lucien

    2015-08-01

    The Janis-Newman algorithm has been shown to be successful in finding new stationary solutions of four-dimensional gravity. Attempts for a generalization to higher dimensions have already been found for the restricted cases with only one angular momentum. In this paper we propose an extension of this algorithm to five-dimensions with two angular momenta—using the prescription of Giampieri—through two specific examples, that are the Myers-Perry and BMPV black holes. We also discuss possible enlargements of our prescriptions to other dimensions and maximal number of angular momenta, and show how dimensions higher than six appear to be much more challenging to treat within this framework. Nonetheless this general algorithm provides a unification of the formulation in d=3,4,5 of the Janis-Newman algorithm, from which several examples are exposed, including the BTZ black hole.

  3. Cloning of the ilvA538 gene coding for feedback-hypersensitive threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Gray, J E

    1982-01-01

    A variety of experimental results implicate the ilvA gene product, threonine deaminase, as an autoregulatory protein that affects the expression of its own gene and those coding for some related proteins. Some of the most direct evidence comes from the analysis of mutations in the ilvA gene with pleiotropic genetic regulatory effects. The most extensively documented mutation, ilvA538, lowers the expression of and abolishes repression control of the ilvGEDA transcription unit. A pleiotropic effect of the ilvA538 mutation, which may be either incidental or mechanistically related to the loss of repression control, renders threonine deaminase feedback hypersensitive to the inhibition of catalytic activity by the pathway end product, isoleucine. We transferred this mutation to lambda dilv phage and pBR322 derivatives. Direct enzyme assay of the plasmid- and phage-coded ilvA538 gene product in delta ilv hosts confirmed the feedback hypersensitivity of the enzyme product. In conjunction with the ilvG671 (phenotype, ILvG+ Valr; previously designated ilvO671) allele located in cis, high levels of the plasmid and lambda dilv phage-coded mutant enzyme suitable for protein purification were observed. Deletion mapping experiments with lambda dilv phage confirmed that the ilvA538 mutation, and not mutations promoter proximal to ilvD (transcription is from ilvG to ilvA), confer a loss of repression control. These genetic mapping studies indicate, however, that an additional mutation(s) may be present that contributes, at least in part, to the reduced enzyme levels in strains with the ilvA538 mutation. PMID:7045077

  4. Group Dynamics in Janis's Theory of Groupthink: Backward and Forward.

    PubMed

    McCauley

    1998-02-01

    Janis's groupthink theory is an appealing explanation of how group process can get in the way of optimal decision making. Unfortunately, Janis was selective and not always consistent in his application of research in group dynamics. This paper traces groupthink to its theoretical roots in order to suggest how a broader and more consistent use of research in group dynamics can advance understanding of decision-making problems. In particular, the paper explores and reinterprets the groupthink prediction that poor decision making is most likely when group cohesion is based on the personal attractiveness of group members. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705800

  5. Deciphering and generalizing Demiański-Janis-Newman algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbin, Harold

    2016-05-01

    In the case of vanishing cosmological constant, Demiański has shown that the Janis-Newman algorithm can be generalized in order to include a NUT charge and another parameter c, in addition to the angular momentum. Moreover it was proved that only a NUT charge can be added for non-vanishing cosmological constant. However despite the fact that the form of the coordinate transformations was obtained, it was not explained how to perform the complexification on the metric function, and the procedure does not follow directly from the usual Janis-Newman rules. The goal of our paper is threefold: explain the hidden assumptions of Demiański's analysis, generalize the computations to topological horizons (spherical and hyperbolic) and to charged solutions, and explain how to perform the complexification of the function. In particular we present a new solution which is an extension of the Demiański metric to hyperbolic horizons. These different results open the door to applications on (gauged) supergravity since they allow for a systematic application of the Demiański-Janis-Newman algorithm.

  6. An extension of the Newman-Janis algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Aidan J.

    2014-08-01

    The Newman-Janis algorithm is supplemented with a null rotation and applied to the tensors of the Reissner-Nordström spacetime to generate the metric, Maxwell, Ricci and Weyl tensors for the Kerr-Newman spacetime. This procedure also provides a mechanism whereby the Carter Killing tensor arises from the geodesic angular momentum tensor of the underlying Reissner-Nordström metric. The conformal Killing tensor in the Kerr-Newman spacetime is generated in a similar fashion. The extended algorithm is also applied to the Killing vectors of the Reissner-Nordström spacetime with interesting consequences. The Schwarzschild to Kerr transformation is a special case.

  7. Applicability of the Newman-Janis algorithm to black hole solutions of modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Devin; Yunes, Nicolás

    2013-11-01

    The Newman-Janis algorithm has been widely used to construct rotating black hole solutions from nonrotating counterparts. While this algorithm was developed within general relativity (GR), it has more recently been applied to nonrotating solutions in modified gravity theories. We find that the application of the Newman-Janis algorithm to an arbitrary non-GR spherically symmetric solution introduces pathologies in the resulting axially symmetric metric. This then establishes that, in general, the Newman-Janis algorithm should not be used to construct rotating black hole solutions outside of General Relativity.

  8. Geodesic Structure of Janis-Newman-Winicour Space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sheng; Zhang, Ruanjing; Chen, Juhua; Wang, Yongjiu

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper we study the geodesic structure of the Janis-Newman-Winicour(JNW) space-time which contains a strong curvature naked singularity. This metric is an extension of the Schwarzschild geometry included a massless scalar field. We find that the strength parameter μ of the scalar field takes affection on the geodesic structure of the JNW space-time. By solving the geodesic equation and analyzing the behavior of effective potential, we investigate all geodesic types of the test particle and the photon in the JNW space-time. At the same time we simulate all the geodesic orbits corresponding to the energy levels of the effective potential in the JNW space-time.

  9. Supergravity, complex parameters and the Janis-Newman algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbin, Harold; Heurtier, Lucien

    2015-08-01

    The Demiański-Janis-Newman (DJN) algorithm is an original solution generating technique. For a long time it has been limited to producing rotating solutions, restricted to the case of a metric and real scalar fields, despite the fact that Demiański extended it to include more parameters such as a NUT charge. Recently two independent prescriptions have been given for extending the algorithm to gauge fields and thus electrically charged configurations. In this paper we aim to end setting up the algorithm by providing a missing but important piece, which is how the transformation is applied to complex scalar fields. We illustrate our proposal through several examples taken from N = 2 supergravity, including the stationary BPS solutions from Behrndt et al and Sen's axion-dilaton rotating black hole. Moreover we discuss solutions that include pairs of complex parameters, such as the mass and the NUT charge, or the electric and magnetic charges, and we explain how to perform the algorithm in this context (with the example of Kerr-Newman-Taub-NUT and dyonic Kerr-Newman black holes). The final formulation of the DJN algorithm can possibly handle solutions with five of the six Plebański-Demiański parameters along with any type of bosonic fields with spin less than two (exemplified with the stationary Israel-Wilson-Perjes solutions). This provides all the necessary tools for applications to general matter-coupled gravity and to (gauged) supergravity.

  10. Janie Porter Barrett (1865-1948): Exemplary African American Correctional Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, Bill; Gehring, Thom; Puffer, Margaret; Mayers, Camille; Kamusikiri, Sandra; Pressley, Glenda

    2009-01-01

    One problem with the literature of correctional education (CE) and prison reform is that the contributions of African Americans have been generally neglected. This is the first of three essays that will begin to fill that gap. Janie Porter Barrett was an important Virginia leader in the period before and after the turn of the 20th century. She…

  11. JANIS 4: An Improved Version of the NEA Java-based Nuclear Data Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppera, N.; Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.

    2014-06-01

    JANIS is software developed to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated data libraries, and to the EXFOR and CINDA databases. It is stand-alone Java software, downloadable from the web and distributed on DVD. Used offline, the system also makes use of an internet connection to access the NEA Data Bank database. It is now also offered as a full web application, only requiring a browser. The features added in the latest version of the software and this new web interface are described.

  12. JANIS 4: An Improved Version of the NEA Java-based Nuclear Data Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Soppera, N. Bossant, M.; Dupont, E.

    2014-06-15

    JANIS is software developed to facilitate the visualization and manipulation of nuclear data, giving access to evaluated data libraries, and to the EXFOR and CINDA databases. It is stand-alone Java software, downloadable from the web and distributed on DVD. Used offline, the system also makes use of an internet connection to access the NEA Data Bank database. It is now also offered as a full web application, only requiring a browser. The features added in the latest version of the software and this new web interface are described.

  13. Recasting Janis's Groupthink Model: The Key Role of Collective Efficacy in Decision Fiascoes.

    PubMed

    Whyte

    1998-02-01

    This paper advances an explanation for decision fiascoes that reflects recent theoretical trends and was developed in response to a growing body of research that has failed to substantiate the groupthink model (Janis, 1982). In this new framework, the lack of vigilance and preference for risk that characterizes groups contaminated by groupthink are attributed in large part to perceptions of collective efficacy that unduly exceed capability. High collective efficacy may also contribute to the negative framing of decisions and to certain administrative and structural organizational faults. In the making of critical decisions, these factors induce a preference for risk and a powerful concurrence seeking tendency that, facilitated by group polarization, crystallize around a decision option that is likely to fail. Implications for research and some evidence in support of this approach to the groupthink phenomenon are also discussed. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705802

  14. Why Janie Can't--or Won't--Do Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sheila

    1978-01-01

    From elementary school through college women have failed to keep up with men in the study of mathematics. Examines the differences in social experience for men and women in learning mathematics, some reasons for these differences, and what a number of colleges are doing to offset the problem of anxiety suffered by women who attempt to study…

  15. Revision of Aspergillus section Flavipedes: seven new species and proposal of section Jani sect. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus section Flavipedes contains species that are distributed world-wide in soil and rhizosphere, indoor and cave environments, plant endophytes, food contaminants, and occasionally causing human infections. They are producers of many bioactive and extensively studied secondary metabolites an...

  16. Janie Porter Barrett and the Virginia Industrial School for Colored Girls: Community Response to the Needs of African American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peebles-Wilkins, Wilma

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a social ethos evolved among African American women that led to internal child welfare reform in legally segregated African American communities. Uses as an example the Virginia Industrial School for Colored Girls, founded in 1915, to describe these child welfare developments. (TM)

  17. Reduced transaminase B (IlvE) activity caused by the lack of yjgF is dependent on the status of threonine deaminase (IlvA) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, George; Downs, Diana M

    2004-02-01

    The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family is a highly conserved class of proteins that is represented in the three domains of life. Thus far, a biochemical function demonstrated for these proteins in vivo or in vitro has yet to be defined. In several organisms, strains lacking a YjgF homolog have a defect in branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis. This study probes the connection between yjgF and isoleucine biosynthesis in Salmonella enterica. In strains lacking yjgF the specific activity of transaminase B, catalyzing the last step in the synthesis of isoleucine, was reduced. In the absence of yjgF, transaminase B activity could be restored by inhibiting threonine deaminase, the first enzymatic step in isoleucine biosynthesis. Strains lacking yjgF showed an increased sensitivity to sulfometruron methyl, a potent inhibitor of acetolactate synthase. Based on work described here and structural reports in the literature, we suggest a working model in which YjgF has a role in protecting the cell from toxic effects of imbalanced ketoacid pools. PMID:14729707

  18. MRA_1571 is required for isoleucine biosynthesis and improves Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra survival under stress

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rishabh; Keshari, Deepa; Singh, Kumar Sachin; Yadav, Shailendra; Singh, Sudheer Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Threonine dehydratase is a pyridoxal 5-phosphate dependent enzyme required for isoleucine biosynthesis. Threonine dehydratase (IlvA) participates in conversion of threonine to 2-oxobutanoate and ammonia is released as a by-product. MRA_1571 is annotated to be coding for IlvA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra (Mtb-Ra). We developed a recombinant (KD) Mtb-Ra strain by down-regulating IlvA. The growth studies on different carbon sources suggested reduced growth of KD compared to wild-type (WT), also, isoleucine concentration dependent KD growth restoration was observed. The expression profiling of IlvA suggested increased expression of IlvA during oxygen, acid and oxidative stress. In addition, KD showed reduced survival under pH, starvation, nitric oxide and peroxide stresses. KD was more susceptible to antimycobacterial agents such as streptomycin (STR), rifampicin (RIF) and levofloxacin (LVF), while, no such effect was noticeable when exposed to isoniazid. Also, an increase in expression of IlvA was observed when exposed to STR, RIF and LVF. The dye accumulation studies suggested increased permeability of KD to ethidium bromide and Nile Red as compared to WT. TLC and Mass studies confirmed altered lipid profile of KD. In summary down-regulation of IlvA affects Mtb growth, increases its susceptibility to stress and leads to altered cell wall lipid profile. PMID:27353854

  19. May Johnny or Janie play the clarinet? The Eastman Study: a report on the orthodontic evaluations of college-level and professional musicians who play brass and woodwind instruments.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, P A

    1979-09-01

    It is apparent from the findings in this study that although there are some significant differences in the incidence of certain pertinent oral and facial entities between some wind-instrument musicians and their counterpart controls, among mature persons, there is no reason to categorically prohibit all persons with potential malocclusions from studying music. On the other hand, it could be folly to permit any or all instrument pursuits without an extensive, complete, thorough orthodontic analysis. Each case must be counseled on its own merits. In addition, each orthodontically treated patient must be observed closely in the posttreatment retention phase, which should probably be much longer than usual, with particular attention devoted to prevention of lingual collapse or retroclination of the mandibular anterior teeth. PMID:290272

  20. Kak Amerikantsy iskali vetra v pole, a nashli radiatsionnyj poyas i kak Russkie iskali radiatsionnyj poyas, a nashli solnechnyj veter Chast' I %t How Americans looked for "a wind in a field" but found a radiation belt, and how Russians looked for a radiation belt but found a solar wind or physical experiments on the first artificial Earth's satellites and a discovery of radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavidonov, I. V.

    The history of the most important scientific discovery of the early space era - the discovery of the inner and outer radiation belts of the Earth in 1958 is reconstructed. The paper uses archival records to bring to light the relative contributions of Soviet and American reseachers to the complex process of discovery. It also shows how misuses of science in mass-media political propaganda led to misrepresentations of the real historical portrayal of early space research.

  1. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  2. Storage of cord blood attracts private-sector interest

    PubMed Central

    Hass, J

    1999-01-01

    Storage of cord blood from their babies can cost parents several hundred dollars, and some private companies are already offering the service. Janis Hass reports that some Canadian specialists question the value of the banks. PMID:10081471

  3. Caffeine Intake -- Even Dad's -- Linked to Miscarriage, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... new in this study is that men's caffeine consumption also appears to play a role, said Janis ... time to get your body ready -- reduce your consumption of caffeine, get to a healthy weight, don' ...

  4. Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful articles antibiotics colds fevers injection tips sports travel in health travel tips janis morrow scholarship links & resources listservs ... disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in health immunizations about immunizations current news Flu's Gonna Lose ...

  5. Estimation of the incidence of MRSA patients: evaluation of a surveillance system using health insurance claim data.

    PubMed

    Tanihara, S; Suzuki, S

    2016-08-01

    Because sentinel surveillance systems cannot obtain information about patients who visit non-sentinel medical facilities, the characteristics of patients identified by these systems may be biased. In this study, we evaluated the representativeness of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surveillance system using health insurance claim (HIC) data, which does not depend on physician notification. We calculated the age-specific incidence of MRSA patients using data from the Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JANIS) programme, which is based on sentinel surveillance systems, and inpatient HICs submitted to employee health insurance organizations in 2011, and then computed age-specific incidence ratios between the HIC and JANIS data. Age-specific MRSA incidence in both datasets followed J-shaped curves with similar shapes. For all age groups, the ratios between HIC and JANIS data were around 10. These findings indicate that JANIS notification of MRSA cases was not affected by patients' age. PMID:27350233

  6. Analysis of the functional domains of biosynthetic threonine deaminase by comparison of the amino acid sequences of three wild-type alleles to the amino acid sequence of biodegradative threonine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Taillon, B E; Little, R; Lawther, R P

    1988-03-31

    The nucleotide sequence of the gene, ilvA, for biosynthetic threonine deaminase (Tda) from Salmonella typhimurium was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared with the deduced amino acid sequences of the biosynthetic Tda from Escherichia coli K-12 (ilvA) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ILV1) and the biodegradative Tda from E. coli K-12 (tdc). The comparison indicated the presence of two types of blocks of homologous amino acids. The first type of homology is in the N-terminal portion of all four isozymes of Tda and probably indicates amino acids involved in catalysis. The second type of homology is found in the C-terminal portion of the three biosynthetic isozymes and presumably is involved in either (i) the binding or interaction of the allosteric effector isoleucine with the enzyme, or (ii) subunit interactions. The sites of amino acid changes of two E. coli K-12 ilvA alleles with altered response to isoleucine are consistent with the conclusion that the C-terminal portion of biosynthetic Tda is involved in allosteric regulation. PMID:3290055

  7. Transcriptional activity of the transposable element Tn10 in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon.

    PubMed

    Blazey, D L; Burns, R O

    1982-08-01

    Polarity of Tn10 insertion mutations in the Salmonella typhimurium ilvGEDA operon depends on both the location and the orientation of the Tn10 element. One orientation of Tn10 insertions in ilvG and ilvE permits low-level expression of the downstream ilvEDA and ilvDA genes, respectively. Our analysis of Salmonella ilv recombinant plasmids shows that this residual ilv expression must result from Tn10-directed transcription and does not reflect the presence of internal promoters in the ilvGEDA operon, as was previously suggested. The opposite orientation of Tn10 insertion in ilvE prevents ilvDA expression, indicating that only one end of Tn10 is normally active in transcribing adjacent genes. Both orientations of Tn10 insertion in ilvD exert absolute polarity on ilvA expression. Expression of ilvA is known to be dependent on effective translation of ilvD, perhaps reflecting the lack of a ribosome binding site proximal to the ilvA sequence. Therefore, recognition of the ability of Tn10 to promote transcription of contiguous genes in the ilvGEDA operon apparently requires the presence of associated ribosome binding sites. PMID:6289328

  8. Synthesis and activities of branched-chain aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in threonine deaminase mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A L; Whitfield, S M; Williams, L S

    1978-01-01

    Valyl-, isoleucyl-, and leucyl-tRNA synthetase activities were examined in an Escherichia coli K-12 strain that possessed a deletion of three genes of the ilv gene cluster, ilvD, A, and C, and in a strain with the same deletion that also carried the lambdadilvCB bacteriophage. It was observed that the branched-chain tRNA synthetase activities of both strains were considerably less than those of the normal strain during growth in unrestricted medium. Furthermore, during an isoleucine limitation, there was a further reduction in isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase activity and an absence of the isoleucine-mediated derepression of valyl-tRNA synthetase formation in both of these mutants, as compared with the normal strain. In addition, it was observed that these branched-chain synthetase activities were reduced in steady-state cultures of several ilvA point mutants. However, upon the introduction of the ilv operon to these ilvA mutants by use of lambda bacteriophage, there was a specific increase in the branched-chain synthetase activities to levels comparable to those of the normal strain. These results support our previous findings that the stability and repression control of synthesis of these synthetases require some product(s) missing in the ilvDAC deletion strain and strongly suggest this component is some form of the ilvA gene product, threonine deaminase. PMID:348689

  9. Linkage Relationships of Genes Controlling Isoleucine, Valine, and Leucine Biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Barat, M.; Anagnostopoulos, C.; Schneider, A.-M.

    1965-01-01

    Barat, M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Gif-sur-Yvette, Seine et Oise, France), C. Anagnostopoulos, and A.-M. Schneider. Linkage relationships of genes controlling isoleucine, valine, and leucine biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol.90:357–369. 1965.—In Bacillus subtilis, the genetic loci controlling isoleucine and valine biosynthesis are not all clustered. Some of them were located on two distinct transforming deoxyribonucleic acid “molecules.” One of these molecules (the “ileilva2–4-met segment”) carries the threonine deaminase and the dihydroxy acid dehydrase loci linked to methionine markers. The other (the “ilva1–3-leu segment”) bears the reductoisomerase locus and one or more loci involved in leucine synthesis. A phenylalanine marker was also shown to be weakly linked to this latter group. In transduction mediated by phage PBS-1, these groups are transferred jointly with other gene clusters. The phage appears to convey chromosome fragments considerably longer than the transforming “molecules.” The genetic maps of both the above segments were extended by transduction. Some groups previously studied by transformation can be placed in the following linear order: the ile-ilva2–4-met segment, the cluster of loci involved in aromatic amino acid synthesis (try segment), and a lysine locus. An arginine locus is cotransduced with the phe-ilva1–2-leu segment. Recombination frequencies between linked markers are much lower in transduction by this phage than in transformation. PMID:14329448

  10. Production of α-ketobutyrate using engineered Escherichia coli via temperature shift.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenglin; Qi, Junsheng; Li, Yanjun; Fan, Xiaoguang; Xu, Qingyang; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-ketobutyrate has been widely used in medicine and food additive industry. Because chemical and enzymatic methods are associated with many deficiencies, the recent focus shifted to fermentation for the production of α-ketobutyrate. In this study, a genetically engineered strain THRDΔrhtAΔilvIH/pWSK29-ilvA was constructed, starting from an L-threonine-producing strain, by overexpressing threonine dehydratase (TD), reducing α-ketobutyrate catabolism and L-threonine export. The shake flask cultivation of THRDΔrhtAΔilvIH/pWSK29-ilvA allowed the production of 16.2 g/L α-ketobutyrate. Accumulation of α-ketobutyrate severely inhibited the cell growth. To develop a better TD expression system and avoid the usage of the expensive inducer IPTG, a temperature-induced plasmid pBV220-ilvA was selected to transform the strain THRDΔrhtAΔilvIH for α-ketobutyrate production. The initial temperature was maintained at 35°C to guarantee normal cell growth, and then elevated to 40°C to induce the expression of TD. Under optimized conditions, the α-ketobutyrate titer reached 40.8 g/L after 28 h of fermentation, with a productivity of 1.46 g/L/h and a yield of 0.19 g/g glucose, suggesting large-scale production potential. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2054-2059. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917255

  11. Towards a History of Adult Literacy in Australia. A Record of the History of Adult Literacy Weekend (Armidale, New South Wales, Australia, November 12-13, 1994). Second Edition, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Univ., Sydney (Australia).

    This document contains materials about and from the "History of Adult Literacy Weekend" that was held at the University of New England in Armidale, Australia. The following papers about the weekend are included: "Foreword" (Patricia Ward, Rosie Wickert); "Introduction" (Rosie Wickert); "Focus on Oral History" (Janis Wilton); and "Arch Nelson…

  12. Effects of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Marigold Growth and Flowering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the growth and flowering responses of greenhouse-grown French marigold (Tagetes patula L. ‘Janie Deep Orange’) to two non-composted broiler chicken litter-based organic fertilizers 4-2-2 and 3-3-3, and one commonly used synthetic controlled-release fertiliz...

  13. The Midcareer Crisis: A Description of the Psychological Dynamics of Transition and Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perosa, Sandra L.; Perosa, Linda M.

    1983-01-01

    Compared three groups of people (N=134) facing midcareer crisis using a structured interview. Suggested that Hopson and Adams' (1977) model can provide a framework for understanding emotional factors in voluntary career transitions. Janis and Mann's (1977) conflict model describes where in the decision-making process the groups chose alternative…

  14. 15. 'Southern Pacific R.R., One 236'0' Bet. End Pins S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Southern Pacific R.R., One 236'-0' Bet. End Pins S. Tr. Thro'. Draw Bridge over Sacramento River at Tehama, The Phoenix Bridge Co., Phoenixville, Pa., Jan'y 19th 98, Dwg. 585.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  15. 75 FR 75695 - Certain Footwear: Recommendations for Modifying the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: David Beck, Director, Office of Tariff Affairs and Trade Agreements (202-205-2603, fax 202-205-2616, david.beck@usitc.gov ), or Janis L. Summers, Attorney Advisor, Office of Tariff Affairs... promote the uniform application of the Harmonized System Convention. Subsections (b)-(d) of section...

  16. High School Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drum, Jean, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on gifted high school students presents several feature articles, a California legislative update, and an editorial. In "Summer Seminar '93--California in the 21st Century," Janis Van Dreal describes a 2-week residential program in which gifted high school students examined California's future. "Visiting a Gifted Program in…

  17. ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF BREVETOXIN TO OYSTERS AND GRASS SHRIMP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Walker, Calvin C., James T. Winstead, Steven S. Foss, Janis C. Kurtz, James Watts, Jeanne E. Scott and William S. Fisher. In press. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Brevetoxin to Oysters and Grass Shrimp (Abstract). To be presented at the SETAC Fourth World Congress, 14-18 November ...

  18. Are We Facing an Epidemic of Self-Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumberg, Joan Jacobs

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses two Cornell research studies on the prevalence of self-injury or "cutting" in today's youth, led by Janis Whitlock, and presents historical perspectives on the issue. The first study randomly surveyed 3,069 undergraduate and graduate students at Cornell University and Princeton University. Data showed that 17 percent of the…

  19. Performance of BNL-TSTA compound cryopump

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, H C; Worwetz, H A

    1980-01-01

    A compound cryopump using cryocondensation pumping for hydrogen isotopes and cryosorption pumping with coconut charcoal as adsorbent for helium was designed. This compound cryopump was subsequently built (by Janis Research, Stoneham, MA) and has been tested at Brookhaven, fulfilling the design requirements and are delivered to Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) Vacuum Facility at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for on-line operations.

  20. Decisionmaking Context Model for Enhancing Evaluation Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses two models that hold promise for helping evaluators understand and cope with different decision contexts: (1) the conflict Model (Janis and Mann, 1977) and the Social Process Model (Vroom and Yago, 1974). Implications and guidelines for using decisionmaking models in evaluation settings are presented. (BS)

  1. Black Image: Education Copes With Color. Essays on the Black Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambs, Jean Dresden, Ed.; And Others

    The contents of this book, about the impact on the values of young people which textbooks and other books designed for them from preschool through twelfth grade have by the way they depict black people in the United States, include the following articles: (1) "Storytellers and gatekeepers," J. Janis and P. Franklin; (2) "Black vs. Negro history:…

  2. Defining Strong State Accountability Systems: How Can Better Standards Gain Greater Traction? A First Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Eileen; Scull, Janie; Slicker, Gerilyn; Winkler, Amber M.

    2012-01-01

    Rigorous standards and aligned assessments are vital tools for boosting education outcomes but they have little traction without strong accountability systems that attach consequences to performance. In this pilot study, Eileen Reed, Janie Scull, Gerilyn Slicker, and Amber Winkler lay out the essential features of such accountability systems,…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (86th, Kansas City, Missouri, July 30-August 2, 2003). Miscellaneous Divisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Miscellaneous Divisions of the proceedings contains the following 17 papers: "Analyzing Sequential Art: Visual Narrative Techniques in 'Calvin and Hobbes'" (Sharron M. Hope); "A Critical Vision of Gender in 2002 Campaign Ads" (Janis Teruggi Page); "Personal Impact Assessment of Advertising Culture of 'Whiteness': Facial Skin Color Preferences…

  4. 76 FR 41450 - Notice of Request for Extension of a Currently Approved Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... of the Sugar Import Licensing Program is to permit entry of raw cane sugar, unrestricted by the... for Sugar Import Licensing Programs described in 7 CFR part 1530. DATES: Comments should be received... (202) 720-2194, or by e-mail at: William.Janis@fas.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title:...

  5. Teaching Medical Student Psychiatry Through Contemporary Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, William H.

    1977-01-01

    An audio technique uses contemporary music recordings to illustrate various personality disorders, including: schizoid, paranoid, compulsive, antisocial, and hysterical. The works of Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Harry Chapin, the Beatles, Janis Ian, James Taylor, Tammy Wynette, and others are cited. (LBH)

  6. A Preliminary View of the Quality of Decision-Making in the Benchmark Year of 1984. AIR 1985 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Louis M.; Campbell, Jill F.

    Perceptions of college institutional research directors concerning the quality of executive decision making at their institutions were studied. Perceptions were assessed using a theoretical model of Groupthink developed by Janis, who postulates that a high amount of environmental stress should lead to a greater degree of "sticking-together" by the…

  7. Groupthink: Hypothesis in Need of Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorhead, Gregory

    1982-01-01

    Reviews the major tenets of the groupthink hypothesis of Irving Janis, as well as the research on which it is based. Reviews previous research on group dynamics related to groupthink. Proposes guidelines for research to test the propositions of groupthink. (Author/RC)

  8. Groupthink: Effects of Cohesiveness and Problem-Solving Procedures on Group Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaway, Michael R.; Esser, James K.

    1984-01-01

    Tested Janis' groupthink formulation with 126 students by manipulating group cohesiveness and adequacy of decision procedures in a factorial design. Results showed highest quality decisions were produced by groups of intermediate cohesiveness. Highly cohesive groups without adequate decision procedures (the groupthink condition) tended to make the…

  9. Small Group Dynamics and the Watergate Coverup: A Case Study of Groupthink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Rebecca J.

    The decisions President Richard Nixon and his closest advisors made in the Watergate coverup were products of what Irving Janis calls "groupthink." Groupthink, a type of decision-making emphasizing unanimity over objective evaluation, develops when the decision makers (1) form a group of marked cohesiveness, (2) insulate themselves from outside…

  10. "Feminism Lite?" Feminist Identification, Speaker Appearance, and Perceptions of Feminist and Antifeminist Messengers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Heather E.; Fernald, Julian L.

    2003-01-01

    Drawing on a communications model of persuasion (Hovland, Janis, & Kelley, 1953), this study examined the effect of target appearance on feminists' and nonfeminists' perceptions of a speaker delivering a feminist or an antifeminist message. One hundred three college women watched one of four videotaped speeches that varied by content (profeminist…

  11. Effective Teaching in the Multi-Cultural Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotch, Donna; Brydges, Michael

    Community college instructors and administrators need to understand teacher immediacy research and the role of immediacy in the multi-cultural classroom. Immediacy can be viewed as a combination of nonverbal behaviors used to accentuate a verbal message and reduce physical and psychological distance between interactants. Janis Andersen's research…

  12. Structural properties and UV to NIR absorption spectra of metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc) thin films P. B. Thakor, P. N. Gajjar and A. R. Jani: Different reference systems in the study of structural properties of some simple liquid metals Shazia Bashir, M. S. Rafique, M. Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, Faizan-ul-Haq and B. R. Alvina: CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation induced damage in aluminium Smail Bougouffa: The study of atomic transitions by use of Numerov technique in schematic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nahass, M. M.; Farid, A. M.; Attia, A. A.; Ali, H. A. M.

    The structural properties and absorption spectra of H2Pc thin films have been studied. The films used in these studies were thermally evaporated on glass/quartz substrates with thickness ranging from 60 to 460 nm. The XRD studies of H2Pc thin films showed that the as-deposited films have a-form with monoclinic system. The mean crystallite size (L), the dislocation density (d) and the strain (x) were evaluated. The molecular structure of H2Pc thin films is confirmed by analysis of (FTIR) spectra. The surface morphology of H2Pc thin films was examined by scanning electron microscope. The absorption spectra of H2Pc recorded in the UV - VIS - IR region for the as-deposited and the annealed thin films of different thickness have been analyzed. The spectra showed two absorption bands namely the Q-band and the Soret (B)-band. The Q-band shows its characteristic splitting (Davydove splitting) with DQ = 0.21 eV. Values of some important optical parameters, namely optical absorption coefficient (a¢), molar extinction coefficient (emolar), half-band-width (Dl), electronic dipole strength (q2) and oscillator strength (f) were calculated. The fundamental and the onset of the indirect energy gaps were also determined as 2.47 and 1.4 eV, respectively.

  13. An Unexpected Route to an Essential Cofactor: Escherichia coli Relies on Threonine for Thiamine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bazurto, Jannell V.; Farley, Kristen R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolism consists of biochemical reactions that are combined to generate a robust metabolic network that can respond to perturbations and also adapt to changing environmental conditions. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are closely related enterobacteria that share metabolic components, pathway structures, and regulatory strategies. The synthesis of thiamine in S. enterica has been used to define a node of the metabolic network by analyzing alternative inputs to thiamine synthesis from diverse metabolic pathways. To assess the conservation of metabolic networks in organisms with highly conserved components, metabolic contributions to thiamine synthesis in E. coli were investigated. Unexpectedly, we found that, unlike S. enterica, E. coli does not use the phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase (PurF) as the primary enzyme for synthesis of phosphoribosylamine (PRA). In fact, our data showed that up to 50% of the PRA used by E. coli to make thiamine requires the activities of threonine dehydratase (IlvA) and anthranilate synthase component II (TrpD). Significantly, the IlvA- and TrpD-dependent pathway to PRA functions in S. enterica only in the absence of a functional reactive intermediate deaminase (RidA) enzyme, bringing into focus how these closely related bacteria have distinct metabolic networks. PMID:26733068

  14. A comprehensive survey on isoleucine biosynthesis pathways in seven epidemic Leptospira interrogans reference strains of China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Guo, Xiaokui; Picardeau, Mathieu; Xu, Hai; Zhao, Guoping

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that different species of Leptospira synthesize isoleucine via either pyruvate and/or threonine pathways. Seven epidemic Leptospira interrogans reference strains from China belonging to different serovars, together with three saprophytic strains of Leptospira biflexa and Leptospira meyeri, were analysed. The isoleucine biosynthesis properties were studied firstly by measuring the key enzymes of the two pathways, citramalate synthase (CimA, CE4.1.3.-) and threonine deaminase (IlvA, CE4.2.1.16), from cell extracts of the bacteria. Meanwhile, alpha-isopropylmalate synthase (LeuA, CE4.2.1.12), the key enzyme of leucine biosynthesis, was also measured as a control. It was found that all L. interrogans strains synthesized isoleucine via the pyruvate pathway exclusively, but L. biflexa and L. meyeri used both pathways. Dot-Blot and PCR amplification of both cimA and ilvA genes in the corresponding strains provided additional evidence consistent with the data of enzymatic assays. Although it is evident that leptospires' isoleucine biosynthesis may preferentially adapt either to the pyruvate pathway exclusively for pathogens or to the combination of both pyruvate and threonine pathways for saprophytes, broader sampling with careful genomospecies identification is needed for a solid conclusion. PMID:17227461

  15. Empirical demonstration of hybrid chromosomal races in house mice.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Mabel D; Panithanarak, Thadsin; Hauffe, Heidi C; Searle, Jeremy B

    2016-07-01

    Western house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) and common shrews (Sorex araneus) are important models for study of chromosomal speciation. Both had ancestral karyotypes consisting of telocentric chromosomes, and each is subdivided into numerous chromosomal races many of which have resulted from fixation of new mutations (Robertsonian fusions and whole-arm reciprocal translocations). However, some chromosomal races in both species may alternatively have originated through hybridization, with particular homozygous recombinant products reaching fixation. Here, we demonstrate the process of generation of hybrid chromosomal races for the first time in either species using molecular markers. Analysis of centromeric microsatellite markers show that the Mid Valtellina (IMVA) and Upper Valtellina (IUVA) chromosomal races of the house mouse are recombinant products of hybridization of the Lower Valtellina (ILVA) and Poschiavo (CHPO) chromosomal races, supporting earlier theoretical analysis. IMVA and IUVA occupy a small area of the Italian Alps where ILVA makes contact with CHPO. IUVA and CHPO have previously been shown to be reproductively isolated in one village, emphasizing that hybrid chromosomal races in small mammals, as in plants, have the potential to be part of the speciation process. PMID:27287407

  16. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  17. Charged rotating noncommutative black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Modesto, Leonardo; Nicolini, Piero

    2010-11-15

    In this paper we complete the program of the noncomutative geometry inspired black holes, providing the richest possible solution, endowed with mass, charge and angular momentum. After providing a prescription for employing the Newman-Janis algorithm in the case of nonvanishing stress tensors, we find regular axisymmetric charged black holes in the presence of a minimal length. We study also the new thermodynamics and we determine the corresponding higher-dimensional solutions. As a conclusion we make some consideration about possible applications.

  18. Uniqueness of the static spacetimes with a photon sphere in Einstein-scalar field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho

    2015-06-01

    In the present paper we prove a uniqueness theorem for the static and asymptotically flat solutions to the Einstein-scalar field equations which possess a photon sphere. We show that such solutions are uniquely specified by their mass M and scalar charge q and that they are isometric to the Janis-Newman-Winicour solution with the same mass and scalar charge subject to the inequality q/2M2<3 .

  19. Group Dynamics in Top Management Teams: Groupthink, Vigilance, and Alternative Models of Organizational Failure and Success.

    PubMed

    Peterson; Owens; Tetlock; Fan; Martorana

    1998-02-01

    This study explored the heuristic value of Janis' (1982) groupthink and vigilant decision making models as explanations of failure and success in top management team decision making using the Organizational Group Dynamics Q-sort (GDQ). Top management teams of seven Fortune 500 companies were examined at two historical junctures-one when the team was successful (defined as satisfying strategic constituencies) and one when the team was unsuccessful. Results strongly supported the notion that a group' decision making process is systematically related to the outcomes experienced by the team. Ideal-type Q-sorts organized around Janis' analysis of groupthink and vigilance were substantially correlated with Q-sorts of failing and successful groups, respectively. The fit was, however, far from perfect. Ideal-type Q-sorts derived from other frameworks correlated better with the failure-success classification than did the Janis-derived ideal types. Successful groups showed some indicators of groupthink (e.g., risk-taking, cohesion, and strong, opinionated leaders), whereas unsuccessful groups showed signs of vigilance (e.g., internal debate to the point of factionalism). The results illustrate the usefulness of the GDQ for developing and empirically testing theory in organizational behavior from historical cases. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705805

  20. Nucleotide sequence and in vivo expression of the ilvY and ilvC genes in Escherichia coli K12. Transcription from divergent overlapping promoters.

    PubMed

    Wek, R C; Hatfield, G W

    1986-02-15

    The ilvC gene of Escherichia coli K12 encodes acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase, the second enzyme in the parallel isoleucine-valine biosynthetic pathway. Previous data have shown that transcription of the ilvC gene is induced by the acetohydroxy acid isomeroreductase substrates, acetohydroxybutyrate or acetolactate, and that this substrate induction of ilvC expression is mediated by a positive activator encoded by the ilvY gene. We report here the isolation and complete nucleotide sequence of the ilvY and ilvC genes. The ilvY and ilvC genes encode polypeptides of Mr 33,200 and 54,000, respectively. In vitro transcription-translation of these gene templates results in the synthesis of gene products of these identical molecular weights. The ilvC gene is transcribed in the same direction as the genes of the adjacent ilvGMEDA operon. The ilvY gene is transcribed in a direction opposite to the ilvC and ilvGMEDA genes. The in vivo transcriptional initiation sites of the ilvY and ilvC genes have been determined by S1 nuclease protection experiments. These transcriptional initiation sites are 45 nucleotides apart, and transcription of the ilvY and ilvC genes is initiated via divergent overlapping promoters. The nucleotide sequence of the ilvY and ilvC promoters and 5'-coding regions of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have been determined. A comparison of these sequences with E. coli K12 suggests regions important in the promotion, regulation, and translation of the ilvY and ilvC genes. A model is presented in which the ilvY-encoded activator binds to an operator site in the overlapping promoter region and reciprocally regulates the transcription of the ilvY and ilvC genes. The carboxyl-terminal amino acid sequence of threonine deaminase encoded by the ilvA gene of the ilv-GMEDA operon of E. coli K12 has been identified by homology with the previously deduced threonine deaminase amino acid sequence encoded by the ilv1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on the deduced

  1. Positive control of ilvC expression in Escherichia coli K-12; identification and mapping of regulatory gene ilvY.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, M D; Wild, J; Umbarger, H E

    1979-01-01

    The construction of a plasmid carrying the ilvC::lacZ fusion is described. This plasmid provides a convenient source of template deoxyribonucleic acid for use in an in vitro protein-synthesizing system. We screened strains deleted in regions of the ilv cluster for their ability to support ilvC-dependent beta-galactosidase synthesis. The fact that two deletions prevented beta-galactosidase production indicated that ilv-C expression is under positive control. By use of plasmids carrying the positive-control factor structural gene ilvY, we were able to restore protein-synthesizing ability to these strains. These plasmids also enabled us to map ilvY between ilvA and ilvC. Images PMID:113381

  2. Genetic organization of the Salmonella typhimurium ilv gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Blazey, D L; Burns, R O

    1979-01-01

    A number of Salmonella typhimurium ilv::Tn10 insertion strains were used to analyze the Salmonella ilv gene cluster. Tn10 generated ilv deletion mutants were employed in mapping experiments to conclusively define the gene order as ilvG-E-D-A-C. Examination of ilv enzyme levels confirms that the direction of transcription of ilvGEDA is from ilvG to ilvA. The major control locus, designated ilvO, is located before ilvG forming an ilvOGEDA transcriptional unit that is multivalently repressed by isoleucine, valine and leucine. Two internal promoters, one before ilvE and anonother before ilvD, are identified and are shown to provide repressed levels of the ilvE, D and A gene products. Possible regulation of transcription from these promoters in response to isoleucine limitation is discussed in terms of attenuation. PMID:395408

  3. YjgF is required for isoleucine biosynthesis when Salmonella enterica is grown on pyruvate medium.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Melissa R; Schmitz, G E; Downs, Diana M

    2008-04-01

    The YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins is conserved across the three domains of life, yet no biochemical function has been clearly defined for any member of this family. In Salmonella enterica, a deletion of yjgF results in a requirement for isoleucine when the mutant strain is grown in glucose-serine or pyruvate medium. Feedback inhibition of IlvA is required for the curative effect of isoleucine on glucose-serine medium. On pyruvate medium, yjgF mutants are unable to synthesize enough isoleucine for growth. From this study, we conclude that the isoleucine requirement of a yjgF mutant on pyruvate is a consequence of the decreased transaminase B (IlvE) activity that has previously been characterized in these mutants. PMID:18296521

  4. Physical identification of an internal promoter, ilvAp, in the distal portion of the ilvGMEDA operon.

    PubMed

    Lopes, J M; Lawther, R P

    1989-01-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that the ilvGMEDA operon is expressed in vivo from the promoters ilvGp2 and ilvEp. An additional internal promoter is identified and designated ilvAp. This internal promoter, which allows independent expression of ilvA, has been analyzed both in vivo and in vitro. Our results indicate that: (1) ilvAp exists in both Escherichia coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium, as demonstrated by fusion to the galK reporter gene; (2) ilvAp is located in the distal coding sequence of ilvD; (3) the ilvAp sequences are not identical for these two bacterial species; (4) transcription from ilvAp of E. coli K-12 was demonstrated; (5) expression from ilvAp responds to the availability of oxygen; (6) potential 3' 5'-cyclic AMP receptor protein binding sites exist adjacent to ilvAp. PMID:2473940

  5. The contest for precursors: channelling L-isoleucine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum without byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Krumbach, Karin; Bang, Won-Gi; van Ooyen, Jan; Noack, Stephan; Klein, Bianca; Bott, Michael; Eggeling, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    L-Isoleucine is an essential amino acid, which is required as a pharma product and feed additive. Its synthesis shares initial steps with that of L-lysine and L-threonine, and four enzymes of L-isoleucine synthesis have an enlarged substrate specificity involved also in L-valine and L-leucine synthesis. As a consequence, constructing a strain specifically overproducing L-isoleucine without byproduct formation is a challenge. Here, we analyze for consequences of plasmid-encoded genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum MH20-22B on L-isoleucine formation, but still obtain substantial accumulation of byproducts. In a different approach, we introduce point mutations into the genome of MH20-22B to remove the feedback control of homoserine dehydrogenase, hom, and threonine dehydratase, ilvA, and we assay sets of genomic promoter mutations to increase hom and ilvA expression as well as to reduce dapA expression, the latter gene encoding the dihydrodipicolinate synthase. The promoter mutations are mirrored in the resulting differential protein levels determined by a targeted LC-MS/MS approach for the three key enzymes. The best combination of genomic mutations was found in strain K2P55, where 53 mM L-isoleucine could be obtained. Whereas in fed-batch fermentations with the plasmid-based strain, 94 mM L-isoleucine with L-lysine as byproduct was formed; with the plasmid-less strain K2P55, 109 mM L-isoleucine accumulated with no substantial byproduct formation. The specific molar yield with the latter strain was 0.188 mol L-isoleucine (mol glucose)(-1) which characterizes it as one of the best L-isoleucine producers available and which does not contain plasmids. PMID:25301583

  6. Organization of the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome between kdg and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage: use of Long Accurate PCR and yeast artificial chromosomes for sequencing.

    PubMed

    Capuano, V; Galleron, N; Pujic, P; Sorokin, A; Ehrlich, S D

    1996-11-01

    Within the Bacillus subtilis genome sequencing project, the region between lysA and ilvA was assigned to our laboratory. In this report we present the sequence of the last 36 kb of this region, between the kdg operon and the attachment site of the SP beta prophage. A two-step strategy was used for the sequencing. In the first step, total chromosomal DNA was cloned in phage M13-based vectors and the clones carrying inserts from the target region were identified by hybridization with a cognate yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) from our collection. Sequencing of the clones allowed us to establish a number of contigs. In the second step the contigs were mapped by Long Accurate (LA) PCR and the remaining gaps closed by sequencing of the PCR products. The level of sequence inaccuracy due to LA PCR errors appeared to be about 1 in 10,000, which does not affect significantly the final sequence quality. This two-step strategy is efficient and we suggest that it can be applied to sequencing of longer chromosomal regions. The 36 kb sequence contains 38 coding sequences (CDSs), 19 of which encode unknown proteins. Seven genetic loci already mapped in this region, xpt, metB, ilvA, ilvD, thyB, dfrA and degR were identified. Eleven CDSs were found to display significant similarities to known proteins from the data banks, suggesting possible functions for some of the novel genes: cspD may encode a cold shock protein; bcsA, the first bacterial homologue of chalcone synthase; exol, a 5' to 3' exonuclease, similar to that of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli; and bsaA, a stress-response-associated protein. The protein encoded by yplP has homology with the transcriptional NifA-like regulators. The arrangement of the genes relative to possible promoters and terminators suggests 19 potential transcription units. PMID:8969496

  7. Newman-Penrose constants of the Kerr-Newman metric

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xuefei; Shang Yu; Bai Shan; Cao Zhoujian; Lau, Y. K.; Luo Ziren

    2007-11-15

    The Newman-Unti formalism of the Kerr-Newman metric near future null infinity is developed, with which the Newman-Penrose constants for both the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the Kerr-Newman metric are computed and shown to be zero. The multipole structure near future null infinity in the sense of Janis-Newman of the Kerr-Newman metric is then further studied. It is found that up to the 2{sup 4}-pole, modulo a constant dependent upon the order of the pole, these multipole moments agree with those of Geroch-Hansen multipole moments defined at spatial infinity.

  8. Time delay and magnification centroid due to gravitational lensing by black holes and naked singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Virbhadra, K. S.; Keeton, C. R.

    2008-06-15

    We model the massive dark object at the center of the Galaxy as a Schwarzschild black hole as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities, characterized by the mass and scalar charge parameters, and study gravitational lensing (particularly time delay, magnification centroid, and total magnification) by them. We find that the lensing features are qualitatively similar (though quantitatively different) for Schwarzschild black holes, weakly naked, and marginally strongly naked singularities. However, the lensing characteristics of strongly naked singularities are qualitatively very different from those due to Schwarzschild black holes. The images produced by Schwarzschild black hole lenses and weakly naked and marginally strongly naked singularity lenses always have positive time delays. On the other hand, strongly naked singularity lenses can give rise to images with positive, zero, or negative time delays. In particular, for a large angular source position the direct image (the outermost image on the same side as the source) due to strongly naked singularity lensing always has a negative time delay. We also found that the scalar field decreases the time delay and increases the total magnification of images; this result could have important implications for cosmology. As the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric also describes the exterior gravitational field of a scalar star, naked singularities as well as scalar star lenses, if these exist in nature, will serve as more efficient cosmic telescopes than regular gravitational lenses.

  9. "Bipolar groupthink": assessing groupthink tendencies in authentic work groups.

    PubMed

    Rosander, M; Stiwne, D; Granström, K

    1998-06-01

    Research on regressive group processes such as Janis' (1982) "groupthink" phenomenon has rarely focused on work groups in authentic settings. In this study, teams from six different organisations (n = 308) were studied by using a groupthink questionnaire constructed in accordance with the symptoms of groupthink described by Janis. It was hypothesised that groupthink could be described as a bipolar construct identifying either an omnipotent or a depressive variant of a group's delusions about its own and other groups' features. The questionnaire showed reasonably good reliability as a whole and a factor analysis identified three factors in line with the proposed theoretical model in which the two different types of groupthink can be distinguished. We propose that any group might have a tendency or predisposition to react in either of the two directions during provocative circumstances. The six different organisations exhibited different types of groupthink to a varying degree. A religious sect was the one most characterised by omnipotent groupthink, while a technological company and a psychiatric team seemed to be the ones with most features of depressive groupthink. PMID:9676161

  10. Groupthink, Bay of Pigs, and Watergate Reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Raven

    1998-02-01

    Irving Janis's concept of groupthink can be seen in the context of our on-again-off-again love affair with groups. Group decisions have often been seen as offering the benefits of collective wisdom, but may also lead to disastrous consequences. Groupthink then focuses on the negative effects of erroneous group decisions. Two major examples of groupthink are reexamined and compared: the disastrous Bay of Pigs decision by the elite advisory group of President Kennedy, and the advisory groups of President Nixon, which led to the Watergate disaster and at unsuccessful attempts to cover up. In both, it is suggested there was a "runaway norm," escalation and polarization with the norm being to exceed other members of the group in taking more extreme and unrestrained actions against an "enemy." While Janis seems to suggest that groupthink will ultimately lead the group to fail in its ultimate endeavors, we need to consider the frightening possibility that in the case of the Nixon group, the group actions came close to being successful. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705808

  11. Characterization of aspartate kinase and homoserine dehydrogenase from Corynebacterium glutamicum IWJ001 and systematic investigation of L-isoleucine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xunyan; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-01

    Previously we have characterized a threonine dehydratase mutant TD(F383V) (encoded by ilvA1) and an acetohydroxy acid synthase mutant AHAS(P176S, D426E, L575W) (encoded by ilvBN1) in Corynebacterium glutamicum IWJ001, one of the best L-isoleucine producing strains. Here, we further characterized an aspartate kinase mutant AK(A279T) (encoded by lysC1) and a homoserine dehydrogenase mutant HD(G378S) (encoded by hom1) in IWJ001, and analyzed the consequences of all these mutant enzymes on amino acids production in the wild type background. In vitro enzyme tests confirmed that AK(A279T) is completely resistant to feed-back inhibition by L-threonine and L-lysine, and that HD(G378S) is partially resistant to L-threonine with the half maximal inhibitory concentration between 12 and 14 mM. In C. glutamicum ATCC13869, expressing lysC1 alone led to exclusive L-lysine accumulation, co-expressing hom1 and thrB1 with lysC1 shifted partial carbon flux from L-lysine (decreased by 50.1 %) to L-threonine (4.85 g/L) with minor L-isoleucine and no L-homoserine accumulation, further co-expressing ilvA1 completely depleted L-threonine and strongly shifted carbon flux from L-lysine (decreased by 83.0 %) to L-isoleucine (3.53 g/L). The results demonstrated the strongly feed-back resistant TD(F383V) might be the main driving force for L-isoleucine over-synthesis in this case, and the partially feed-back resistant HD(G378S) might prevent the accumulation of toxic intermediates. Information exploited from such mutation-bred production strain would be useful for metabolic engineering. PMID:27033538

  12. Construction and application of an efficient multiple-gene-deletion system in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinyu; Tan, Yanzhen; Li, Yanyan; Hu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Daqing; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-11-01

    Gene deletion techniques are important for modifying Corynebacterium glutamicum, the bacterium for industrial production of amino acids. In this study, a novel multiple-gene-deletion system for C. glutamicum was developed. The system is composed of three plasmids pDTW109, pDTW201 and pDTW202. pDTW109 is a temperature-sensitive vector which harbors a cat gene under the tacM promoter, a cre gene under the tac promoter, an origin oriE for replicating in Escherichia coli, and another origin rep(TS) for replicating in C. glutamicum only at low temperatures; it has high transformation efficiency in C. glutamicum and can be easily eliminated by growing at 37°C. pDTW201 and pDTW202 carry loxp-flanked or mutant lox-flanked kan, respectively. This deletion system combines homologous recombination and Cre/lox site-specific recombination, could efficiently delete the aceE gene from the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC13032, ATCC13869 or ATCC14067, respectively, and could also delete both genes of aceE and ilvA from the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC14067. The system is simple and efficient, and can be easily implemented for multiple-gene-deletion in C. glutamicum. PMID:23856168

  13. Endogenous Synthesis of 2-Aminoacrylate Contributes to Cysteine Sensitivity in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Dustin C.; Lambrecht, Jennifer A.; Schomer, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    RidA, the archetype member of the widely conserved RidA/YER057c/UK114 family of proteins, prevents reactive enamine/imine intermediates from accumulating in Salmonella enterica by catalyzing their hydrolysis to stable keto acid products. In the absence of RidA, endogenous 2-aminoacrylate persists in the cellular environment long enough to damage a growing list of essential metabolic enzymes. Prior studies have focused on the dehydration of serine by the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent serine/threonine dehydratases, IlvA and TdcB, as sources of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate. The current study describes an additional source of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate derived from cysteine. The results of in vivo analysis show that the cysteine sensitivity of a ridA strain is contingent upon CdsH, the predominant cysteine desulfhydrase in S. enterica. The impact of cysteine on 2-aminoacrylate accumulation is shown to be unaffected by the presence of serine/threonine dehydratases, revealing another mechanism of endogenous 2-aminoacrylate production. Experiments in vitro suggest that 2-aminoacrylate is released from CdsH following cysteine desulfhydration, resulting in an unbound aminoacrylate substrate for RidA. This work expands our understanding of the role played by RidA in preventing enamine stress resulting from multiple normal metabolic processes. PMID:25002544

  14. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of 1-propanol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Park, Jin Hwan; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2012-09-01

    An engineered Escherichia coli strain that produces 1-propanol under aerobic condition was developed based on an L-threonine-overproducing E. coli strain. First, a feedback resistant ilvA gene encoding threonine dehydratase was introduced and the competing metabolic pathway genes were deleted. Further engineering was performed by overexpressing the cimA gene encoding citramalate synthase and the ackA gene encoding acetate kinase A/propionate kinase II, introducing a modified adhE gene encoding an aerobically functional AdhE, and by deleting the rpoS gene encoding the stationary phase sigma factor. Fed-batch culture of the final engineered strain harboring pBRthrABC-tac-cimA-tac-ackA and pTacDA-tac-adhE(mut) allowed production of 10.8 g L(-1) of 1-propanol with the yield and productivity of 0.107 g g(-1) and 0.144 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively, from 100 g L(-1) of glucose, and 10.3 g L(-1) of 1-propanol with the yield and productivity of 0.259 g g(-1) and 0.083 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively, from 40 g L(-1) glycerol. PMID:22871504

  15. Production of 2-methyl-1-butanol in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cann, Anthony F; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress has been made in the production of higher alcohols by harnessing the power of natural amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Here, we describe the first strain of Escherichia coli developed to produce the higher alcohol and potential new biofuel 2-methyl-1-butanol (2MB). To accomplish this, we explored the biodiversity of enzymes catalyzing key parts of the isoleucine biosynthetic pathway, finding that AHAS II (ilvGM) from Salmonella typhimurium and threonine deaminase (ilvA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum improve 2MB production the most. Overexpression of the native threonine biosynthetic operon (thrABC) on plasmid without the native transcription regulation also improved 2MB production in E. coli. Finally, we knocked out competing pathways upstream of threonine production (DeltametA, Deltatdh) to increase its availability for further improvement of 2MB production. This work led to a strain of E. coli that produces 1.25 g/L 2MB in 24 h, a total alcohol content of 3 g/L, and with yields of up to 0.17 g 2MB/g glucose. PMID:18758769

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of the ilvGEDAY genes from Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Blazey, D L; Kim, R; Burns, R O

    1981-08-01

    The ilvGEDAY genes of Salmonella typhimurium were cloned in Escherichia coli K-12 by in vitro recombination techniques. A single species of recombinant plasmid, designated pDU1, was obtained by selecting for Valr Ampr transformants of strain SK1592. pDU1 was shown to contain a 14-kilobase EcoRI partial digestion product of the S. typhimurium chromosome inserted into the EcoRI site of the pVH2124 cloning vector. The ilvGEDAY genes were found to occupy a maximum length of 7.5 kilobases. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the S. typhimurium ilv gene cluster provided another demonstration of the gene order as well as established the location of ilv Y between ilvA and ilvC. The presence of a ribosomal ribonucleic acid operon on the pDU1 insert, about 3 kilobases from the 5' end of ilvG, was shown by Southern hybridization. The expression of the ilvGEDA operon from pDU1 was found to be elevated, reflecting the increased gene dosage of the multicopy plasmid. A polarity was observed with respect to ilvEDA expression which is discussed in terms of the possible translational effects of the two internal promoter sequences, one located proximal to ilvE and the other located proximal to ilvD. PMID:6167564

  17. Regulation of branched-chain amino acid transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Quay, S C; Oxender, D L

    1976-01-01

    The repression and derepression of leucine, isoleucine, and valine transport in Escherichia coli K-12 was examined by using strains auxotrophic for leucine, isoleucine, valine, and methionine. In experiments designed to limit each of these amino acids separately, we demonstrate that leucine limitation alone derepressed the leucine-binding protein, the high-affinity branched-chain amino acid transport system (LIV-I), and the membrane-bound, low-affinity system (LIV-II). This regulation did not seem to involve inactivation of transport components, but represented an increase in the differential rate of synthesis of transport components relative to total cellular proteins. The apparent regulation of transport by isoleucine, valine, and methionine reported elsewhere was shown to require an intact leucine, biosynthetic operon and to result from changes in the level of leucine biosynthetic enzymes. A functional leucyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase was also required for repression of transport. Transport regulation was shown to be essentially independent of ilvA or its gene product, threonine deaminase. The central role of leucine or its derivatives in cellular metabolism in general is discussed. PMID:783137

  18. Internal promoter in the ilvGEDA transcription unit of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, D H; Wallen, J W; Traub, L; Gray, J E; Kung, H F

    1985-01-01

    Segments of the ilvGEDA transcription unit have been cloned into the promoter tester plasmid pMC81. This vector contains cloning sites situated upstream of the lacZ gene coding for beta-galactosidase. Using this method we have quantitatively evaluated in vivo (i) the activity of previously described promoter, pG, preceding ilvG; (ii) the relative activity of pE promoter, previously postulated to be located between ilvG and ilvE; and (iii) the effect of the frameshift site present in the wild-type ilvG gene by comparison with mutant derivatives lacking this frameshift site. Isogenic derivatives of strain MC1000 were constructed by transduction with phage P1 grown on rho-120, delta(ilvGEDA), delta(ilvED), and ilvA538 hosts. The potential effects of these alleles that were previously postulated to affect ilvGEDA expression were assessed in vivo by monitoring beta-galactosidase production directed by ilv DNA fragments. Cloned ilv segments were also tested for activity in vitro with a DNA-directed coupled transcription and translation system. The production in vitro of ilv-directed ilv gene expression and beta-galactosidase expression with ara-ilv-lac fusions paralleled the in vivo activity. Images PMID:3917997

  19. Divergent evolution of a bifunctional de novo protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Betsy A; Mularz, Ann E; Hecht, Michael H

    2015-02-01

    Primordial proteins, the evolutionary ancestors of modern sequences, are presumed to have been minimally active and nonspecific. Following eons of selective pressure, these early progenitors evolved into highly active and specific proteins. While evolutionary trajectories from poorly active and multifunctional generalists toward highly active specialists likely occurred many times in evolutionary history, such pathways are difficult to reconstruct in natural systems, where primordial sequences are lost to time. To test the hypothesis that selection for enhanced activity leads to a loss of promiscuity, we evolved a de novo designed bifunctional protein. The parental protein, denoted Syn-IF, was chosen from a library of binary patterned 4-helix bundles. Syn-IF was shown previously to rescue two different auxotrophic strains of E. coli: ΔilvA and Δfes. These two strains contain deletions for proteins with very different biochemical functions; IlvA is involved in isoleucine biosynthesis, while Fes is involved in iron assimilation. In two separate experiments, Syn-IF, was evolved for faster rescue of either ΔilvA or Δfes. Following multiple rounds of mutagenesis, two new proteins were selected, each capable of rescuing the selected function significantly faster than the parental protein. In each case, the evolved protein also lost the ability to rescue the unselected function. In both evolutionary trajectories, the original bifunctional generalist was evolved into a monofunctional specialist with enhanced activity. PMID:25420677

  20. One-step fermentative production of poly(lactate-co-glycolate) from carbohydrates in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, So Young; Park, Si Jae; Kim, Won Jun; Yang, Jung Eun; Lee, Hyuk; Shin, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-04-01

    Poly(lactate-co-glycolate) (PLGA) is a widely used biodegradable and biocompatible synthetic polymer. Here we report one-step fermentative production of PLGA in engineered Escherichia coli harboring an evolved polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase that polymerizes D-lactyl-CoA and glycolyl-CoA into PLGA. Introduction of the Dahms pathway enables production of glycolate from xylose. Deletion of ptsG enables simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose. An evolved propionyl-CoA transferase converts D-lactate and glycolate to D-lactyl-CoA and glycolyl-CoA, respectively. Deletion of adhE, frdB, pflB and poxB prevents by-product formation. We also demonstrate modulation of the monomer fractions in PLGA by overexpressing ldhA and deleting dld to increase the proportion of D-lactate or by deleting aceB, glcB, glcD, glcE, glcF and glcG to increase the proportion of glycolate. Incorporation of 2-hydroxybutyrate is prevented by deleting ilvA or feeding strains with L-isoleucine. The utility of our approach for generating diverse forms of PLGA is shown by the production of copolymers containing 3-hydroxybutyrate, 4-hydroxybutyrate or 2-hydroxyisovalerate. PMID:26950748

  1. Light on curved backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, D.; Nelson, S.; Nowakowski, M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the motion of light on different spacetime manifolds by calculating the deflection angle, lensing properties and by probing into the possibility of bound states. The metrics in which we examine the light motion include, among other items, a general relativistic dark matter metric, a dirty black hole, and a worm hole metric, the last two inspired by noncommutative geometry. The lensing in a holographic screen metric is discussed in detail. We study also the bending of light around naked singularities like, e.g., the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric and include other cases. A generic property of light behavior in these exotic metrics is pointed out. For the standard metric like the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter cases, we improve the accuracy of the lensing results for the weak and strong regimes.

  2. Cosmic Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; Mallik, D. C. V.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    2008-07-01

    1. Astronomy in ancient and medieval China Joseph Needham; 2. Indian astronomy: an historical perspective B. V. Subbarayappa; 3. Making of astronomy in ancient India Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya; 4. The impact of astronomy on the development of western science Jean-Claude Pecker; 5. Man and the Universe Hubert Reeves; 6. Understanding the Universe - challenges and directions in modern observational astronomy Harlan Smith, Jr: 7. Frontiers in cosmology Fred Hoyle; 8. Did the Universe originate in a big bang? Jayant Narlikar; 9. The dark matter problem Bernard Carr; 10. Geometry and the Universe C. V. Vishveshwara; 11. The origin and evolution of life Cyril Ponnamperuma; 12. The anthropic principle: self selection as an adjunct to natural selection Brandon Carter; 13. Astrology and science: an examination of the evidence Ivan Kelly, Roger Culver and Peter Loptson; 14. Astronomy and science fiction Allen Janis.

  3. Penrose process in a charged axion-dilaton coupled black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Chandrima; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2016-04-01

    Using the Newman-Janis method to construct the axion-dilaton coupled charged rotating black holes, we show that the energy extraction from such black holes via the Penrose process takes place from the axion/Kalb-Ramond field energy responsible for rendering the angular momentum to the black hole. Determining the explicit form for the Kalb-Ramond field strength, which is argued to be equivalent to spacetime torsion, we demonstrate that at the end of the energy extraction process, the spacetime becomes torsion free with a spherically symmetric non-rotating black hole remnant. In this context, applications to physical phenomena, such as the emission of neutral particles in astrophysical jets, are also discussed. It is seen that the infalling matter gains energy from the rotation of the black hole, or equivalently from the axion field, and that it is ejected as a highly collimated astrophysical jet.

  4. Rotating black hole and quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spherically symmetric exact solutions of the Einstein equations for quintessential matter surrounding a black hole, which has an additional parameter (ω ) due to the quintessential matter, apart from the mass ( M). In turn, we employ the Newman-Janis complex transformation to this spherical quintessence black hole solution and present a rotating counterpart that is identified, for α =-e^2 ne 0 and ω =1/3, exactly as the Kerr-Newman black hole, and as the Kerr black hole when α =0. Interestingly, for a given value of parameter ω , there exists a critical rotation parameter (a=aE), which corresponds to an extremal black hole with degenerate horizons, while for aaE. We find that the extremal value a_E is also influenced by the parameter ω and so is the ergoregion.

  5. Ultrarelativistic boost with scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svítek, O.; Tahamtan, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the ultrarelativistic boost of the general global monopole solution which is parametrized by mass and deficit solid angle. The problem is addressed from two different perspectives. In the first one the primary object for performing the boost is the metric tensor while in the second one the energy momentum tensor is used. Since the solution is sourced by a triplet of scalar fields that effectively vanish in the boosting limit we investigate the behavior of a scalar field in a simpler setup. Namely, we perform the boosting study of the spherically symmetric solution with a free scalar field given by Janis, Newman and Winicour. The scalar field is again vanishing in the limit pointing to a broader pattern of scalar field behaviour during an ultrarelativistic boost in highly symmetric situations.

  6. Sex differences in self-concept in Spanish secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, M J

    2000-12-01

    The aims of the study were to examine differences between boys and girls in global self-esteem and in specific domains of self-concept. Several measures of global self-esteem and multidimensional self-concept were administered to 61 boys and 64 girls. Analysis showed that boys reported higher scores than girls on global self-esteem, measured on the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory and the Feelings of Inadequacy Scale by Janis-Field, but this result was not reproduced when self-esteem was measured on the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. No differences have been found in domain-specific self-concepts, except for the ethical-moral self-concept, on which girls reported higher scores than boys. PMID:11191376

  7. Preventing Groupthink Revisited: Evaluating and Reforming Groups in Government.

    PubMed

    Hart

    1998-02-01

    This article critically examines Janis's recommendations for preventing groupthink in high-level policymaking. It puts forward three models of small group functioning in government, each of which highlights different dimensions of collegial policymaking and distinct criteria for evaluating group performance. Each model also inspires different proposals for groupthink prevention and improvement of group performance in general. Proposals for designing and managing high-level groups in government need to take into account these multiple perspectives. Furthermore, their proponents should be aware of the institutionalized and competitive context in which political decision groups operate. Evaluations of their performance and proposals for reforming them are inevitably tied up in this process. This has important implications for the feasibility of recommendations set forth by small group analysts. The article concludes with an agenda for increasing the policy relevance and practical feasibility of research on political decision groups. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705806

  8. Effects of dominance on group decision making: toward a stress-reduction explanation of groupthink.

    PubMed

    Callaway, M R; Marriott, R G; Esser, J K

    1985-10-01

    Janis (1972) proposed that groupthink is essentially a stress-reduction process. Cohesive groups reduce the stress of decision making by suppressing critical inquiry. Theoretically, groupthink could be prevented in cohesive groups if the stress could be diffused by other factors. We investigated the effects of task structure (decision-making procedures) and an individual factor (dominance) on the quality of group decision making, anxiety, and symptoms of groupthink. Students (n = 112) participated in twenty-eight 4-person, mixed-sex groups. Groups composed of highly dominant members made higher quality decisions, exhibited lower state anxiety, and took more time to reach a decision. They also tended to make more statements of disagreement and agreement, and to report more group influence on the members. Decision-making procedures had little effect on the decision process. PMID:4057051

  9. Magnetism, Superconductivity and Pseudogap at the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannhart, Jochen

    2014-03-01

    The electron liquid at the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface is a two-dimensional superconductor and simultaneously displays magnetic order. To experimentally explore the fundamental properties of this state, we developed a planar tunnel junction technology that allows to measure the spectral density-of-states of the superconducting liquid while its carrier density can be altered by the electric-field effect. These studies yield surprising results, as key features of the superconducting electron liquid at the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface are found to be analogous to features deemed characteristic for the high-Tc cuprates. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Richter, H. Boschker, W. Dietsche, E. Fillis-Tsirakis, R. Jany, F. Loder, L.F. Kourkoutis, D.A. Muller, J.R. Kirtley, and C.W. Schneider.

  10. Cosmic Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; Mallik, D. C. V.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    1989-09-01

    1. Astronomy in ancient and medieval China Joseph Needham; 2. Indian astronomy: an historical perspective B. V. Subbarayappa; 3. Making of astronomy in ancient India Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya; 4. The impact of astronomy on the development of western science Jean-Claude Pecker; 5. Man and the Universe Hubert Reeves; 6. Understanding the Universe - challenges and directions in modern observational astronomy Harlan Smith, Jr: 7. Frontiers in cosmology Fred Hoyle; 8. Did the Universe originate in a big bang? Jayant Narlikar; 9. The dark matter problem Bernard Carr; 10. Geometry and the Universe C. V. Vishveshwara; 11. The origin and evolution of life Cyril Ponnamperuma; 12. The anthropic principle: self selection as an adjunct to natural selection Brandon Carter; 13. Astrology and science: an examination of the evidence Ivan Kelly, Roger Culver and Peter Loptson; 14. Astronomy and science fiction Allen Janis.

  11. Reproductive Biology and Its Impact on Body Size: Comparative Analysis of Mammalian, Avian and Dinosaurian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jan; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2011-01-01

    Janis and Carrano (1992) suggested that large dinosaurs might have faced a lower risk of extinction under ecological changes than similar-sized mammals because large dinosaurs had a higher potential reproductive output than similar-sized mammals (JC hypothesis). First, we tested the assumption underlying the JC hypothesis. We therefore analysed the potential reproductive output (reflected in clutch/litter size and annual offspring number) of extant terrestrial mammals and birds (as “dinosaur analogs”) and of extinct dinosaurs. With the exception of rodents, the differences in the reproductive output of similar-sized birds and mammals proposed by Janis and Carrano (1992) existed even at the level of single orders. Fossil dinosaur clutches were larger than litters of similar-sized mammals, and dinosaur clutch sizes were comparable to those of similar-sized birds. Because the extinction risk of extant species often correlates with a low reproductive output, the latter difference suggests a lower risk of population extinction in dinosaurs than in mammals. Second, we present a very simple, mathematical model that demonstrates the advantage of a high reproductive output underlying the JC hypothesis. It predicts that a species with a high reproductive output that usually faces very high juvenile mortalities will benefit more strongly in terms of population size from reduced juvenile mortalities (e.g., resulting from a stochastic reduction in population size) than a species with a low reproductive output that usually comprises low juvenile mortalities. Based on our results, we suggest that reproductive strategy could have contributed to the evolution of the exceptional gigantism seen in dinosaurs that does not exist in extant terrestrial mammals. Large dinosaurs, e.g., the sauropods, may have easily sustained populations of very large-bodied species over evolutionary time. PMID:22194835

  12. [Subjective verbal methods in preoperative measurement of anxiety].

    PubMed

    Höfling, S; Hutner, G; Ott, H; Fichte, K; Doenicke, A

    1988-06-01

    The role of preoperative anxiety in perioperative adaptation is viewed in two different ways. Janis suggested that anxiety is a drive that evokes the cognitive work of worrying. Leventhal stresses the importance of coping behavior for adaptation, while anxiety may or may not accompany this coping process. Both theories have empirical support. The aim of this study was to determine whether both theories could show empirical support because the scientists chose different methods: Janis used interviews, Leventhal and Lazarus anxiety scales. The study analyzed the pre- and postoperative emotional reactions of surgical patients with three different methods of anxiety measurement: an anxiety scale, a fear thermometer, and a psychoanalytic interview (Gottschalk-Gleser content analysis method). The different methods were compared and related to the adaptation behavior (Table 3). The data showed a clear interaction between the selected methods and respective theories about the effects of preoperative anxiety on intra- and postoperative adaptation. The anxiety scales showed no correlation with adaptation behavior (blood pressure and heart rate during surgery; postoperative pain medication) and were not related to the anxiety scores obtained from the interview (content analysis). On the other hand, the interview anxiety measurements showed a clear relationship between separation anxiety (and also shame anxiety), physiological excitement during surgery (increase in heart rate), and postoperative medication (increased analgesics and tranquilizers). The patients who worried about the risks of surgery (Verletzungsangst, see Fig. 3) had very good perioperative adjustment, so that the quality of anxiety measured in the interview was very important for the prediction of adaptation. PMID:3407901

  13. Revisiting the Bay of Pigs and Vietnam Decisions 25 Years Later: How Well Has the Groupthink Hypothesis Stood the Test of Time?

    PubMed

    Kramer

    1998-02-01

    Even after a quarter of a century, the groupthink hypothesis remains an influential framework for understanding the origins of group decision making fiascoes. Much of the original empirical evidence for this hypothesis was derived from a series of incisive qualitative studies of major policy fiascoes, including the ill-fated Bay of Pigs invasion and U.S. military escalation of the Vietnam War. In the 25 years since the groupthink hypothesis was first formulated, new evidence, including recently declassified documents, rich oral histories, and informative memoirs by key participants in these decisions have become available to scholars, casting new light on the decision making process behind both the Bay of Pigs and Vietnam. Much of this new evidence does not support Janis's original characterization of these processes. In particular, it suggests that dysfunctional group dynamics stemming from group members' strivings to maintain group cohesiveness were not as prominent a causal factor in the deliberation process as Janis argued. Instead, the evidence suggests that the decision making process was heavily influenced by how Presidents Kennedy and Johnson construed their options. Both Kennedy and Johnson tended to evaluate their alternatives primarily in terms of their political consequences, especially the desire to avoid what they construed as unacceptable political losses and potential damage to their reputations. Viewed in aggregate, this new evidence suggests that the groupthink hypothesis overstates the influence of small group dynamics, while understating the role political considerations played in these decisions. Thus, although both decisions may have been seriously flawed, the logic of this failure should be attributed to political psychological rather than social psychological processes. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9705804

  14. ISO/OSI compliant network-on-chip implementation for CNN applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Suleyman; Hansson, Andreas; Spaanenburg, Lambert; Akesson, Benny

    2005-06-01

    The paper investigates the potential for a packet switching network for real-time image processing by a Cellular Neural Network (CNN) implemented on a Field-Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA). The implementation of a CNN requires several parameter restrictions with respect to the universal concept. For instance, the number representation and the cloning template are often confined to respectively 8 bits and a neighborhood of 1. It has been shown that optimal (i.e. minimal level) CNN architectures as derived from a morphological specification of the desired operation lead to arbitrarily large templates. A subsequent transformation step can turn this into a sequence of smaller templates for a specified hardware platform. The existence of a generic platform that can already handle the universal CNN architecture for prototyping and verification eliminates this need for technology-driven performance degradation. The proposed packet switcher consists of a physical layer where the CNN nodal function is performed, a data-link layer where the nodal data are maintained, a network layer with the packet receiver and sender and the actual switch as element of the transport layer. This ISO/OSI compliant level-wise structure monitors the network parameters and autonomously adjusts for the size of the neighborhood. It separates the broadcast of the network variables from the actual computation, allowing each to be executed at its own speed. The concept is tested on a re-design of the ILVA architecture and has been shown to handle arbitrary neighborhoods and precision at a comparable size and speed (1 node per BlockRAM / multiplier module @220 MHz clock).

  15. Isoleucine biosynthesis in Leptospira interrogans serotype lai strain 56601 proceeds via a threonine-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai; Zhang, Yuzhen; Guo, Xiaokui; Ren, Shuangxi; Staempfli, Andreas A; Chiao, Juishen; Jiang, Weihong; Zhao, Guoping

    2004-08-01

    Three leuA-like protein-coding sequences were identified in Leptospira interrogans. One of these, the cimA gene, was shown to encode citramalate synthase (EC 4.1.3.-). The other two encoded alpha-isopropylmalate synthase (EC 4.1.3.12). Expressed in Escherichia coli, the citramalate synthase was purified and characterized. Although its activity was relatively low, it was strictly specific for pyruvate as the keto acid substrate. Unlike the citramalate synthase of the thermophile Methanococcus jannaschii, the L. interrogans enzyme is temperature sensitive but exhibits a much lower K(m) (0.04 mM) for pyruvate. The reaction product was characterized as (R)-citramalate, and the proposed beta-methyl-d-malate pathway was further confirmed by demonstrating that citraconate was the substrate for the following reaction. This alternative pathway for isoleucine biosynthesis from pyruvate was analyzed both in vitro by assays of leptospiral isopropylmalate isomerase (EC 4.2.1.33) and beta-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.85) in E. coli extracts bearing the corresponding clones and in vivo by complementation of E. coli ilvA, leuC/D, and leuB mutants. Thus, the existence of a leucine-like pathway for isoleucine biosynthesis in L. interrogans under physiological conditions was unequivocally proven. Significant variations in either the enzymatic activities or mRNA levels of the cimA and leuA genes were detected in L. interrogans grown on minimal medium supplemented with different levels of the corresponding amino acids or in cells grown on serum-containing rich medium. The similarity of this metabolic pathway in leptospires and archaea is consistent with the evolutionarily primitive status of the eubacterial spirochetes. PMID:15292141

  16. Exometabolomics Assisted Design and Validation of Synthetic Obligate Mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kosina, Suzanne M; Danielewicz, Megan A; Mohammed, Mujahid; Ray, Jayashree; Suh, Yumi; Yilmaz, Suzan; Singh, Anup K; Arkin, Adam P; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Northen, Trent R

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic microbial ecology has the potential to enhance the productivity and resiliency of biotechnology processes compared to approaches using single isolates. Engineering microbial consortia is challenging; however, one approach that has attracted significant attention is the creation of synthetic obligate mutualism using auxotrophic mutants that depend on each other for exchange or cross-feeding of metabolites. Here, we describe the integration of mutant library fitness profiling with mass spectrometry based exometabolomics as a method for constructing synthetic mutualism based on cross-feeding. Two industrially important species lacking known ecological interactions, Zymomonas mobilis and Escherichia coli, were selected as the test species. Amino acid exometabolites identified in the spent medium of Z. mobilis were used to select three corresponding E. coli auxotrophs (proA, pheA and IlvA), as potential E. coli counterparts for the coculture. A pooled mutant fitness assay with a Z. mobilis transposon mutant library was used to identify mutants with improved growth in the presence of E. coli. An auxotroph mutant in a gene (ZMO0748) with sequence similarity to cysteine synthase A (cysK), was selected as the Z. mobilis counterpart for the coculture. Exometabolomic analysis of spent E. coli medium identified glutathione related metabolites as potentially available for rescue of the Z. mobilis cysteine synthase mutant. Three sets of cocultures between the Z. mobilis auxotroph and each of the three E. coli auxotrophs were monitored by optical density for growth and analyzed by flow cytometry to confirm high cell counts for each species. Taken together, our methods provide a technological framework for creating synthetic mutualisms combining existing screening based methods and exometabolomics for both the selection of obligate mutualism partners and elucidation of metabolites involved in auxotroph rescue. PMID:26885935

  17. A Defect in Menadione Biosynthesis Induces Global Changes in Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Christian; von Eiff, Christof; Liebeke, Manuel; McNamara, Peter J.; Lalk, Michael; Proctor, Richard A.; Hecker, Michael; Engelmann, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Both the high-resolution two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis technique and full-genome DNA microarrays were used for identification of Staphylococcus aureus genes whose expression was changed by a mutation in menD. Because the electron transport chain is interrupted, the mutant should be unable to use oxygen and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors. Consistent with this, a mutation in menD was found to cause a gene expression pattern typically detected under anaerobic conditions in wild-type cells: proteins involved in glycolytic as well as in fermentation pathways were upregulated, whereas tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes were significantly downregulated. Moreover, the expression of genes encoding enzymes for nitrate respiration and the arginine deiminase pathway was strongly increased in the mutant strain. These results indicate that the menD mutant, just as the site-directed S. aureus hemB mutant, generates ATP from glucose or fructose mainly by substrate phosphorylation and might be defective in utilizing a variety of carbon sources, including TCA cycle intermediates and compounds that generate ATP only via electron transport phosphorylation. Of particular interest is that there are also differences in the gene expression patterns between hemB and menD mutants. While some anaerobically active enzymes were present in equal amounts in both strains (Ldh1, SACOL2535), other classically anaerobic enzymes seem to be present in higher amounts either in the hemB mutant (e.g., PflB, Ald1, IlvA1) or in the menD mutant (arc operon). Only genes involved in nitrate respiration and the ald1 operon seem to be additionally regulated by a depletion of oxygen in the hemB and/or menD mutant. PMID:18676673

  18. PREFACE: Annual Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies - FM&NT 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Muzikante, Inta; Zicans, Janis

    2011-06-01

    The International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2011) was held in Riga, 5-8 April 2011 in the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia (ISSP LU). The conference was organized in co-operation with projects ERANET 'MATERA' and National Research programme in Materials Science and Information Technologies. The purpose of the conference was to bring together scientists, engineers and students from universities, research institutes and related industrial companies active in the field of advanced material science and materials technologies trends and future activities. Scientific themes covered in the conference are: theoretical research and modelling of processes and materials; materials for energetics, renewable energy technologies and phtovoltaics; multifunctional inorganic, organic and hybrid materials for photonic, micro and nanoelectronic applications and innovative methods for research of nanostructures; advanced technologies for synthesis and research of nanostructured materials, nanoparticles, thin films and coatings; application of innovative materials in science and economics. The number of registered participants from 17 countries was nearly 300. During three days of the conference 22 invited, 69 oral reports and 163 posters were presented. 40 papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Additional information about FM&NT-2011 is available in its homepage http://www.fmnt.lu.lv. The Organizing Committee would like to thank all speakers, contributors, session chairs, referees and meeting staff for their efforts in making the FM&NT-2011 successful. The Organizing Committee sincerely hopes that that the conference gave all participants new insights into the widespread development of functional materials and nanotechnologies and would enhance the circulation of information released at the meeting. Andris Sternberg Inta Muzikante Janis Zicans

  19. High energy particle collisions and geometry of horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-06-01

    We consider collision of two geodesic particles near the lightlike surface (black hole horizon or naked singularity) of such an axially symmetric rotating or static metric that the coefficient gϕϕ → 0 on this surface. It is shown that the energy in the center of mass frame Ec.m. is indefinitely large even without fine-tuning of particles’ parameters. Kinematically, this is the collision between two rapid particles that approach the horizon almost with the speed of light but at different angles (or they align along the normal to the horizon too slowly). The latter is the reason why the relative velocity tends to that of light, hence to high Ec.m.. Our approach is model-independent. It relies on general properties of geometry and is insensitive to the details of material source that supports the geometries of the type under consideration. For several particular models (the stringy black hole, the Brans-Dicke analogue of the Schwarzschild metric and the Janis-Newman-Winicour one) we recover the results found in literature previously.

  20. Gravitational lensing by rotating naked singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-10-15

    We model massive compact objects in galactic nuclei as stationary, axially symmetric naked singularities in the Einstein-massless scalar field theory and study the resulting gravitational lensing. In the weak deflection limit we study analytically the position of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications as well as the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are functions of the scalar charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly for the weakly naked and vastly for the strongly naked singularities with the increase of the scalar charge. The pointlike caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the scalar charge. In the strong deflection limit approximation, we compute numerically the position of the relativistic images and their separability for weakly naked singularities. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities.

  1. Experimental setup for investigation of nanoclusters at cryogenic temperatures by electron spin resonance and optical spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, S.; Meraki, A.; McColgan, P. T.; Shemelin, V.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and performance of an experimental setup for simultaneous electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical studies of nanoclusters with stabilized free radicals at cryogenic temperatures. A gas mixture of impurities and helium after passing through a RF discharge for dissociation of molecules is directed onto the surface of superfluid helium to form the nanoclusters of impurities. A specially designed ESR cavity operated in the TE011 mode allows optical access to the sample. The cavity is incorporated into a homemade insert which is placed inside a variable temperature insert of a Janis 4He cryostat. The temperature range for sample investigation is 1.25-300 K. A Bruker EPR 300E and Andor 500i optical spectrograph incorporated with a Newton EMCCD camera are used for ESR and optical registration, respectively. The current experimental system makes it possible to study the ESR and optical spectra of impurity-helium condensates simultaneously. The setup allows a broad range of research at low temperatures including optically detected magnetic resonance, studies of chemical processes of the active species produced by photolysis in solid matrices, and investigations of nanoclusters produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium.

  2. Experimental setup for investigation of nanoclusters at cryogenic temperatures by electron spin resonance and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. Meraki, A.; McColgan, P. T.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.; Shemelin, V.

    2014-07-15

    We present the design and performance of an experimental setup for simultaneous electron spin resonance (ESR) and optical studies of nanoclusters with stabilized free radicals at cryogenic temperatures. A gas mixture of impurities and helium after passing through a RF discharge for dissociation of molecules is directed onto the surface of superfluid helium to form the nanoclusters of impurities. A specially designed ESR cavity operated in the TE{sub 011} mode allows optical access to the sample. The cavity is incorporated into a homemade insert which is placed inside a variable temperature insert of a Janis {sup 4}He cryostat. The temperature range for sample investigation is 1.25–300 K. A Bruker EPR 300E and Andor 500i optical spectrograph incorporated with a Newton EMCCD camera are used for ESR and optical registration, respectively. The current experimental system makes it possible to study the ESR and optical spectra of impurity-helium condensates simultaneously. The setup allows a broad range of research at low temperatures including optically detected magnetic resonance, studies of chemical processes of the active species produced by photolysis in solid matrices, and investigations of nanoclusters produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium.

  3. The Power of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Zhaneta; Miteva, Kamelia

    2013-04-01

    The Power of Water Zh. Petrova, K. Miteva Bio Games, Sofia, Bulgaria (petrova.jani@gmail.com; miteva.kamelia@gmail.com) Lessons "The Power of Water" Due to our belief in the initial creativity of the children and their capacity for discover and perceive logically the world, we consider that the primary and even the pre-school learning have a significant influence in the process of suggesting the idea of respect to the natural forces. These classroom activities include a variety of hand- and self-made simulation models with natural materials and toys which lead the children to easy understanding of what could 'friendly' water do and how powerful, dangerous and not-friendly it could be. During the lessons the children draw their own conclusions of the causes and possible solutions of natural hazards caused by water in each of its forms - avalanches, inundations, floods, the water influence in activation of landslides. The children make on their own some of the models and test them via simulations. In the end they discuss what they have learned in groups.

  4. The K-8 Aeronautics Internet Testbook: Project Plan-Year 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallis, Jani Macari

    1997-01-01

    The Project Plan - Year 3 includes: the major tasks and milestones, the assignment of tasks, and the key personnel assigned to each task, a description of the milestone and major task, and the deliverables for the project. Milestones have project numbers ending in "0.0", such as "25.0.0 Phase III Development". Major tasks under that milestone begin with the same first number such as, "25.0.1 Develop Future Of Aeronautics". The assignment of tasks included in the Year 3 project plan contains the names of the key personnel responsible for the task and others participating on the task. Although the PI has the overall and ultimately responsible for all the tasks and milestones, the name of the first individual on a task or milestone is the person responsible for that task. Other names listed under that task will be participating on the task. Since there are two individuals at Cislunar Aerospace, Inc. with the name "J. Pallis", the principal investigator, Jani Macari Pallis is designated as PI in the Project Plan and James Pallis is designated as J. Pallis.

  5. Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (1959-2013).

    PubMed

    Kaslow, Nadine J; Hilt, Lori; Wisco, Blair E; Brownell, Kelly D

    2013-01-01

    Presents an obituary for Susan Nolen-Hoeksema. Susan received her bachelor's degree from Yale University and her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. Her undergraduate and graduate school mentors were Irving Janis, Robert Sternberg, and Martin Seligman. Susan began her career at Stanford University, where she became a tenured associate professor in 1993, and moved to the University of Michigan, where she was promoted to the rank of professor and directed the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Susan joined the Yale University Department of Psychology in 2004 as a professor and served as its chair and director of graduate studies. Few words can capture Susan's masterful approach to research, which balanced creativity with pragmatism. A pioneer in the study of depression and a leading figure in research on sex differences in depression, she transformed clinical psychology with her research. Raised in the small town of Stonington, Illinois, Susan acquired a decency, kindness, and strength of character that lasted her lifetime. Despite her academic achievements and stature in the field, she treated everyone with respect and dignity. She was remarkable in her ability to support people through difficult circumstances, fairly treat all individuals, and be a kind and dedicated mentor and colleague to those of us fortunate enough to know her. Our field is richer for her presence, and her untimely death is a tragic loss. There could be no better colleague and friend. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23895616

  6. Non-singular rotating black hole with a time delay in the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Tommaso De; Giusti, Andrea; Speziale, Simone

    2016-03-01

    As proposed by Bambi and Modesto, rotating non-singular black holes can be constructed via the Newman-Janis algorithm. Here we show that if one starts with a modified Hayward black hole with a time delay in the centre, the algorithm succeeds in producing a rotating metric, but curvature divergences reappear. To preserve finiteness, the time delay must be introduced directly at the level of the non-singular rotating metric. This is possible thanks to the deformation of the inner stationarity limit surface caused by the regularisation, and in more than one way. We outline three different possibilities, distinguished by the angular velocity of the event horizon. Along the way, we provide additional results on the Bambi-Modesto rotating Hayward metric, such as the structure of the regularisation occurring at the centre, the behaviour of the quantum gravity scale alike an electric charge in decreasing the angular momentum of the extremal black hole configuration, or details on the deformation of the ergosphere.

  7. Revision of the Gonioctena nivosa species-group (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Chrysomelinae) in the Holarctic region, with descriptions of two new species

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee-Wook; Kippenberg, Horst; Borowiec, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Gonioctena nivosa species-group of the genus Gonioctena Chevrolat, 1836 is defined and reviewed. It contains six species including two new to science: Gonioctena gracilicornis (Kraatz, 1879), Gonioctena nivosa (Suffrian, 1851), Gonioctena norvegica (Strand, 1936), Gonioctena springlovae (Bechyně, 1948), Gonioctena amurensis Cho & Borowiec, sp. n. and Gonioctena jani Cho & Borowiec, sp. n. Six new synonyms are proposed: Gonioctena nivosa (= Gonioctena arctica alberta Brown, 1952, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeana bergrothi Jacobson, 1901, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeanus var. mutatus Achard, 1924, syn. n., Phytodecta linnaeanus var. simplex Achard, 1924, syn. n. and Phytodecta nivosa var. cedehensis Ronchetti, 1922, syn. n.) and Gonioctena norvegica (= Gonioctena janovskii Medvedev, 1976, syn. n.). Phytodecta flavicornis var. limbatipennis Achard, 1924 and Phytodecta nivosa var. bicolor Heyden, 1883 are removed from synonymy with Gonioctena nivosa (Suffrian, 1851) and are synonymized with Gonioctena flavicornis (Suffrian, 1851). Distribution maps, a key to species, color variation, geographic variation of male genitalia and host plants are provided. Ovoviviparity is newly recorded in Gonioctena gracilicornis and Gonioctena nivosa. Lectotypes are designated for Gonioctena affinis, Gonioctena arctica, Gonioctena linnaeana bergrothi and Gonioctena nivosa. PMID:27408579

  8. Newtonian analogue of static general relativistic spacetimes: An extension to naked singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Sarkar, Tamal; Bhadra, Arunava

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a generic Newtonian-like analogous potential for static spherically symmetric general relativistic (GR) spacetime and subsequently derived proper Newtonian-like analogous potential corresponding to Janis-Newman-Winicour (JNW) and Reissner-Nordström (RN) spacetimes, both exhibiting naked singularities. The derived potentials were found to reproduce the entire GR features including the orbital dynamics of the test particle motion and the orbital trajectories, with precise accuracy. The nature of the particle orbital dynamics including their trajectory profiles in JNW and RN geometries show altogether different behaviors with distinctive traits as compared to the nature of particle dynamics in Schwarzschild geometry. Exploiting the Newtonian-like analogous potentials, we found that the radiative efficiency of a geometrically thin and optically thick Keplerian accretion disk around naked singularities corresponding to both JNW and RN geometries, in general, is always higher than that for Schwarzschild geometry. The derived potentials would thus be useful to study astrophysical processes, especially to investigate more complex accretion phenomena in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or in x-ray binaries (XRBs) in the presence of naked singularities and thereby to explore any noticeable differences in their observational features from those in the presence of black holes (BHs) to ascertain outstanding debatable issues relating to gravity—whether the end state of gravitational collapse in our physical Universe renders BH or naked singularity.

  9. Regular rotating de Sitter–Kerr black holes and solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina; Galaktionov, Evgeny

    2016-07-01

    We study the basic generic properties of the class of regular rotating solutions asymptotically Kerr for a distant observer, obtained with using the Gürses–Gürsey algorithm from regular spherically symmetric solutions specified by {T}tt={T}rr which belong to the Kerr–Schild metrics. All regular solutions obtained with the Newman–Janis complex translation from the known spherical solutions, belong to this class. Spherical solutions with {T}tt={T}rr satisfying the weak energy condition (WEC), have obligatory de Sitter center. Rotation transforms the de Sitter center into the interior de Sitter vacuum disk. Regular de Sitter–Kerr solutions have at most two horizons and two ergospheres, and two different kinds of interiors. In the case when an original spherical solution satisfies the dominant energy condition, there can exist the interior de Sitter vacuum { S }-surface which contains the de Sitter disk as a bridge. The WEC is violated in the internal cavities between the { S }-surface and the disk, which are filled thus with a phantom fluid. In the case when a related spherical solution violates the dominant energy condition, vacuum interior of a rotating solution reduces to the de Sitter disk only.

  10. Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for adult include Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Janis-Field Feeling of Inadequacy Scale, and these for children include Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Pope's 5-Scale Test of Self-Esteem for children, and Kid- KINDL®. Other methods include Ziller Social Self-Esteem Scale and Implicit Association Test. The development of children's self-esteem is heavily influenced by their environment, that is, their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Children with damaged self-esteem are at risk of developing psychological and social problems, which hinders recovery from low self-esteem. Thus, to recover low self-esteem, it is important for children to accumulate a series of successful experiences to create a positive concept of self. Evaluating children's self-esteem can be an effective method for understanding their past and present circumstances, and useful to treat for children with psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22433387

  11. Importance and usefulness of evaluating self-esteem in children.

    PubMed

    Hosogi, Mizuho; Okada, Ayumi; Fujii, Chikako; Noguchi, Keizou; Watanabe, Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Self-esteem is the "feeling of self-appreciation" and is an indispensable emotion for people to adapt to society and live their lives. For children, in particular, the environment in which they are raised contributes profoundly to the development of their self-esteem, which in turn helps them to adapt better to society. Various psychologists have provided definitions of self-esteem, and examined methods of objectively evaluating self-esteem. Questionnaire-style assessment methods for adult include Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Janis-Field Feeling of Inadequacy Scale, and these for children include Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, Pope's 5-Scale Test of Self-Esteem for children, and Kid- KINDL®. Other methods include Ziller Social Self-Esteem Scale and Implicit Association Test. The development of children's self-esteem is heavily influenced by their environment, that is, their homes, neighborhoods, and schools. Children with damaged self-esteem are at risk of developing psychological and social problems, which hinders recovery from low self-esteem. Thus, to recover low self-esteem, it is important for children to accumulate a series of successful experiences to create a positive concept of self. Evaluating children's self-esteem can be an effective method for understanding their past and present circumstances, and useful to treat for children with psychosomatic disorders. PMID:22433387

  12. Emotional vulnerability and coping styles for resolving decisional conflict.

    PubMed

    Umeh, Kanayo; Omari-Asor, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    This investigation supplements the study by D. Bouckenooghe, K. Vanderheyden, S. Mestdagh, and S. van Laethem (2007) on the role of cognitive dispositions in coping patterns for resolving decisional conflict. Literature suggests emotional vulnerabilities may significantly affect decision making. Thus, the present authors assessed the role of trait anxiety and depression in decision coping styles as specified by I. L. Janis and L. Mann's (1977) conflict-theory model. The participants--100 young adults--completed the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (J. A. Taylor, 1953), Beck's Depression Inventory (A. T. Beck, R. A. Steer, & G. M. Garbin, 1988), and the Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (L. Mann et al., 1998), which measures 4 coping strategies: vigilance, buck-passing, procrastination, and hypervigilance. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis, controlling for demographic and lifestyle factors, revealed trait anxiety and depression as significant predictors of procrastination and hypervigilance. Depression failed to predict buck-passing but functioned as an important moderator variable whereby trait anxiety better predicted hypervigilance in nondepressed participants. Consistent with past research, emotional dispositions failed to predict vigilance. Overall, these findings implicate emotional vulnerabilities in the quality of decision making but raise important questions about their unique and conditional effects. PMID:21834323

  13. Erratum: Erratum to: Non-singular rotating black hole with a time delay in the center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Tommaso; Giusti, Andrea; Speziale, Simone

    2016-08-01

    As proposed by Bambi and Modesto, rotating non-singular black holes can be constructed via the Newman-Janis algorithm. Here we show that if one starts with a modified Hayward black hole with a time delay in the centre, the algorithm succeeds in producing a rotating metric, but curvature divergences reappear. To preserve finiteness, the time delay must be introduced directly at the level of the non-singular rotating metric. This is possible thanks to the deformation of the inner stationarity limit surface caused by the regularisation, and in more than one way. We outline three different possibilities, distinguished by the angular velocity of the event horizon. Along the way, we provide additional results on the Bambi-Modesto rotating Hayward metric, such as the structure of the regularisation occurring at the centre, the behaviour of the quantum gravity scale alike an electric charge in decreasing the angular momentum of the extremal black hole configuration, or details on the deformation of the ergosphere.

  14. An expanded two-state model accounts for homotropic cooperativity in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, E; Yu, H D; Fisher, K E; Iacuzio, D A; Ducote, K R; Schwarz, F P

    1995-07-25

    The linkage between substrate and regulatory effector binding to separate sites on allosteric enzymes results in shifts in their sigmoidal kinetics to regulate metabolism. Control of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli occurs in part through shifts in the sigmoidal dependence of alpha-ketobutyrate production promoted by isoleucine and valine binding to biosynthetic threonine deaminase. The structural similarity of threonine, valine, and isoleucine have given rise to suggestions that there may be competition among different ligands for the same sites on this tetrameric enzyme, resulting in a complex pattern of regulation. In an effort to provide a coherent interpretation of the cooperative association of ligands to the active sites and to the effector sites of threonine deaminase, binding studies using single amino acid variants were undertaken. A previously-isolated, feedback-resistant mutant identified in Salmonella typhimurium, ilvA219, has been cloned and sequenced. The phenotype is attributable to a single amino acid substitution in the regulatory domain of the enzyme in which leucine at position 447 is substituted with phenylalanine. The mutant exhibits hyperbolic saturation curves in both ligand binding and steady-state kinetics. These results, in addition to calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements of isoleucine and valine binding, indicate that the low affinity (T) state is destabilized in the mutant and that it exists predominantly in the high affinity (R) conformation in the absence of ligands, providing an explanation for its resistance to isoleucine. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses of another mutant, in which alanine has replaced an essential lysine at position 62 that forms a Schiff base with pyridoxal phosphate, indicate that the cofactor is complexed to exogenous threonine and is therefore unable to bind additional amino acids at the active sites. Isoleucine and valine binding to this inactive, active site

  15. Upper Devonian vertebrate taphonomy and sedimentology from the Klunas fossil site, Tervete Formation, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiļkova, J.; Lukševičs, E.; Stinkulis, Ä.¢.; Zupinš, I.

    2012-04-01

    The deposits of the Tervete Formation, Famennian Stage of Latvia, comprising weakly cemented sandstone and sand intercalated with dolomitic marls, siltstone and clay, have been traditionally interpreted as having formed in a shallow, rather restricted sea with lowered salinity. During seven field seasons the excavations took place in the south-western part of Latvia, at the Klunas site, and resulted in extensive palaeontological and sedimentological data. The taphonomical analysis has been performed, having evaluated the size, sorting, orientation of the fossils, articulation and skeletal preservation as well as the degree of fragmentation and abrasion. The sedimentological analysis involved interpretation of sedimentary structures, palaeocurrent direction reconstruction, grain-size analysis and approximate water depth calculations. The vertebrate assemblage of the Klunas site represents all known taxa of the Sparnene Regional Stage of the Baltic Devonian, comprising placoderms Bothriolepis ornata Eichwald, B. jani Lukševičs, Phyllolepis tolli Vasiliauskas, Dunkleosteus sp. and Chelyophorus sp., sarcopterygians Holoptychius nobilissimus Agassiz, Platycephalichthys skuenicus Vorobyeva, Cryptolepis sp., Conchodus sp., Glyptopomus ? sp., "Strunius" ? sp., and Dipterus sp., as well as an undetermined actinopterygian. Placoderms Bothriolepis ornata and B. jani dominate the assemblage. The fossils are represented in the main by fully disarticulated placoderm plates and plate fragments, sarcopterygian scales and teeth, rarely bones of the head and shoulder girdle, and acanthodian spines and scales. The characteristic feature is the great amount of fragmentary remains several times exceeding the number of intact bones. The horizontal distribution of the bones over the studied area is not homogenous, distinct zones of increased or decreased density of fossils can be traced. Zones of the increased density usually contain many elements of various sizes, whereas zones of the

  16. The Fast Alternative Cryogenic Experiment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Alfred; Holmes, Warren

    2000-01-01

    One of the challenges in the area of cryogenics for space exploration in the next millennium is providing the capability for inexpensive, frequent, access to space. Faced with this challenge during the International Space Station (ISS) build era, when other Space Shuttle manifesting opportunities are unavailable, a "proof of concept" cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier. The Hitchhiker siderail carrier is available on a "mass available" basis during the ISS build era. In fact, several hitchhiker payloads flew with the deployment of the Unity module. Hitchhiker siderail carrier payloads have historically flown an average of about four times a year. A hybrid Solid Neon - Superfluid Helium cryostat has been developed with Janis Research Company to accommodate instruments of 16.5 cm diameter and 30 cm. length. This hybrid approach was taken in part to provide adequate on-orbit lifetime for instruments with high (conducted) heat loads from the instrumentation wiring. Mass, volume, lifetime and the launch hold scenario were all design drivers. In addition, with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, a multichannel VME architecture Germanium Resistance Thermometer (GRT) readout and heater control servo system has been developed. In a flight system, the cryostat and electronics payloads would be umbilically attached in a paired Hitchhiker siderail mount, and permit on-orbit command and telemetry capability. The results of performance tests of both the cryostat, and a helium sample instrument will be presented. The instrument features a self contained, miniaturized, nano-Kelvin resolution High Resolution Thermometer (HRT). This high level of thermal resolution is achieved through the utilization of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). Although developed for the Low Temperature Microgravity Fundamental Physics

  17. A Silent Safety Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) referred 8 times to the NASA "Silent Safety Program." This term, "Silent Safety Program" was not an original observation but first appeared in the Rogers Commission's Investigation of the Challenger Mishap. The CAIB on page 183 of its report in the paragraph titled 'Encouraging Minority Opinion,' stated "The Naval Reactor Program encourages minority opinions and "bad news." Leaders continually emphasize that when no minority opinions are present, the responsibility for a thorough and critical examination falls to management. . . Board interviews revealed that it is difficult for minority and dissenting opinions to percolate up through the agency's hierarchy. . ." The first question and perhaps the only question is - what is a silent safety program? Well, a silent safety program may be the same as the dog that didn't bark in Sherlock Holmes' "Adventure of the Silver Blaze" because system safety should behave as a devil's advocate for the program barking on every occasion to insure a critical review inclusion. This paper evaluates the NASA safety program and provides suggestions to prevent the recurrence of the silent safety program alluded to in the Challenger Mishap Investigation. Specifically targeted in the CAM report, "The checks and balances the safety system was meant to provide were not working." A silent system safety program is not unique to NASA but could emerge in any and every organization. Principles developed by Irving Janis in his book, Groupthink, listed criteria used to evaluate an organization's cultural attributes that allows a silent safety program to evolve. If evidence validates Jams's criteria, then Jams's recommendations for preventing groupthink can also be used to improve a critical evaluation and thus prevent the development of a silent safety program.

  18. Study of Sperm Reproductive Parameters in Mature Zanjani Viper

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Malihe; Todehdehghan, Fatemeh; Shiravi, Abdolhossein

    2014-01-01

    Objective Zanjani viper (Vipera albicornuta) is an endemic venomous snake in East Azerbai- jan Province, Iran which is medically important due to its application for antivenin production in the laboratory. We need to produce this snake in captivity. This study was conducted to charac- terize mature male Zanjani viper and to evaluate its sperm reproductive parameters. Materials and Methods This applied- descriptive study was conducted on twenty Zan- jani viper samples collected from Ag Dag Mountain in East Azarbaijan Province, Iran, between September and October 2010. After the snakes were anesthetized and sacrificed humanly, their morphometric specifications and sperm reproductive parameters, including concentration, motility, vitality, morphology, and survival time, were measured. Results Morphometric specifications and evaluation of sperms of the snake showed the following information: Zanjani male viper, body length of 73.65 ± 4.35 cm, tail length of 5.465 ± 0.48 cm, and mature snakes with testicular volumes of 0.61 ± 0.81 ml (right) and of 0.46 ± 0.17 ml (left). Our findings revealed average sperm concen- tration of 0.47 ± 0.1 ×106ml-1, motility of 49 -55 %, vitality of 46.11 ± 9.63 %, normal morphology of 61.71 ± 5.3%, and survival time of 6 ± 2 hours at the laboratory tem- perature. Statistical analyses were performed using Student’s t test for comparison of two values, and one-way ANOVA was applied where three values were compared. Conclusion Results suggest that mature Zanjani male viper with mature sperms in its vas deferens is present in late summer and early autumn seasons in Bostanabad County, Iran. PMID:24567940

  19. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  20. Local conductivity enhancement due to the tetragonal domain structure in LaAlO3- SrTiO3 heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moler, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Progress in the difficult task of growing oxide heterostructures has enabled the field of oxide interface engineering. The ability to control materials properties through interface engineering is demonstrated by the appearance of conductivity at the interface of certain insulators, most famously the {001}interface of the band insulators LaAlO3 (LAO) and TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO). The prevailing explanation of conduction at the interface is electronic reconstruction due to a `polar catastrophe' in which charge migrates from the top LAO layer to the interface. Transport and other measurements in this system display a plethora of diverse physical phenomena. To better understand the interface conductivity, we used scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy to image the magnetic field locally generated by current in an interface. At low temperature, we found that the current flowed in conductive narrow paths oriented along the crystallographic axes, embedded in a less conductive background. The configuration of these paths changed upon thermal cycling above the STO cubic to tetragonal structural transition temperature, implying that the local conductivity is strongly modified by the STO tetragonal domain structure. In this talk, I will summarize these results and also report on measurements of conductivity and diamagnetism in related materials that firmly establish the influence of the STO tetragonal domains on electronic properties. Coauthors C. Bell, H.K. Sato, M. Hosoda, Y. Xie, Y. Hikita, & H.Y. Hwang (SIMES); R. Jany & C. Richter (Augsburg); C. Woltmann, G. Pfanzelt, & J. Mannhart (MP Stuttgart); B. Kalisky, E.M. Spanton, H. Noad, K.C. Nowack, A. Rosenberg, & J.R. Kirtley.

  1. Particle motion and Penrose processes around rotating regular black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    The neutral particle motion around rotating regular black hole that was derived from the Ayón-Beato-García (ABG) black hole solution by the Newman-Janis algorithm in the preceding paper (Toshmatov et al., Phys. Rev. D, 89:104017, 2014) has been studied. The dependencies of the ISCO (innermost stable circular orbits along geodesics) and unstable orbits on the value of the electric charge of the rotating regular black hole have been shown. Energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole through various processes has been examined. We have found expression of the center of mass energy for the colliding neutral particles coming from infinity, based on the BSW (Baňados-Silk-West) mechanism. The electric charge Q of rotating regular black hole decreases the potential of the gravitational field as compared to the Kerr black hole and the particles demonstrate less bound energy at the circular geodesics. This causes an increase of efficiency of the energy extraction through BSW process in the presence of the electric charge Q from rotating regular black hole. Furthermore, we have studied the particle emission due to the BSW effect assuming that two neutral particles collide near the horizon of the rotating regular extremal black hole and produce another two particles. We have shown that efficiency of the energy extraction is less than the value 146.6 % being valid for the Kerr black hole. It has been also demonstrated that the efficiency of the energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole via the Penrose process decreases with the increase of the electric charge Q and is smaller in comparison to 20.7 % which is the value for the extreme Kerr black hole with the specific angular momentum a= M.

  2. A preliminary report on noble gas isotope analyses using the Helix-MC multi-collector mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Szczepanski, S.; Deerberg, M.; Hamilton, D.; Krummen, M.; Schwieters, J.

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of noble gas isotopes by multi-collector mass spectrometry substantially improve measurement precision and accuracy, with the potential to revolutionise applications to cosmo-geo-sciences. The Helix-MC noble gas mass spectrometer manufactured by Thermo-Fisher is a 350mm, 120 degree extended geometry, high resolution, multi-collector mass spectrometer for the simultaneous analysis of noble gas isotopes. The detector array includes a fixed axial (Ax) detector, 2 adjustable high mass (H1 and H2) detectors and 2 adjustable low mass (L1 and L2) detectors. Each detector is equipped with a Faraday/ion counting multiplier CFM (Combined Faraday and CDD Multiplier) detector. Mass resolution and mass resolving power on the H2, Ax and L2 detectors of the Helix-MC installed at the Australian National University (ANU) are approximately 1,800 and 8,000, respectively. The noble gas handling system on-line to the Helix-MC consists of: (1) a resistively-heated, double-vacuum, tantalum furnace system, (2) air actuated vacuum crusher, (3) Photon-Machines diode laser heating system, (4) Janis He cryogenic trap assembly, (5) gas purification system and (6) standard gas pipette tanks, which are totally automated and controlled by the Qtegra software platform developed by Thermo-Fisher. Eleven repeat measurements of atmospheric Ar using the H2 Faraday (1E11 ohm resistor) and L2 CDD collectors on the Helix-MC, yield a mean 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 322.09 +- 0.28 (0.089%) with a 4,700 fA 40Ar beam current. This result compares favourably with the precision achieved by the Argus VI at the University of Melbourne (318.12 +- 0.17; 0.052%; n = 10) with a similar beam size of 4,200 fA. The high mass resolution of the L2 collector permits complete separation of the 36Ar and interfering 3 x 12C (required mass resolution (MR) of 1,100) and partial separation of H35Cl (MR = 3,900). This capability enables evaluation of the significance of Ar isotopic interferences related to the correction of

  3. Scalar fields and particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin

    2015-06-01

    The phenomenon discovered in 2009 by Bañados, Silk and West where particle collisions can achieve arbitrary high center-of-mass (c.m.) energies close to the event horizon of an extreme Kerr black hole, has generated a lot of interest. Although rotation seemed to be an essential requirement, it was later shown that arbitrary high energies can also be achieved for collisions between radially moving particles near the horizon of the electrically charged extreme Reissner-Nordström black hole. Recently Patil and Joshi claimed that instead of spinning up the black hole one can also crank up the c.m. energy of particle collisions by "charging up" a static black hole with a massless scalar field. In this regard they showed that infinite energies can be attained in the vicinity of the naked singularity of the Janis-Newman-Wincour (JNW) spacetime, which contains a massless scalar field that also becomes infinite at the position of the curvature singularity. In this study we show that Patil and Joshi's claim does not apply for other static black hole systems endowed with a massless scalar field. In particular we consider the well-known Bekenstein black hole and the recently discovered Martínez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole, and show that the expression of the c.m. energy for particle collisions near the event horizons of these black holes is no different than the corresponding case with vanishing scalar field represented by the Schwarzschild solution. Moreover by studying the motion of scalar test charges that interact with the background scalar field in these black hole spacetimes we show that the resulting c.m. energies are even smaller than in the case of free particles. This shows that the infinite energies obtained by Patil and Joshi may not be due to the fact that the black hole contains a massless scalar field, but may be instead related to the geometry of the naked singularity in the JNW spacetime. An analogous case of infinite c.m. energy in the vicinity of a naked

  4. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muiznieks, A.

    2005-06-01

    The Workshop "Use of Magnetic Fields in Crystal Growth" was organized by the Institute of Physics of University of Latvia together with the Department of Physics of University of Latvia and held on December 5-6, 2004, at the Department of Physics of University of Latvia, 8 Zellu str., Riga. The workshop was organized in the framework of the supported by EU project "Development of the Institute of Physics of University of Latvia for European Centre of MagnetoHydroDynamics Research" (2003-2005, Research Programme: GROW-2001, coordinator of the project Dr. Janis Priede) and in the framework of the COST action P6, Magnetohydrodynamics, Working Group 2 "Use of Magnetic Fields in Crystal Growth" (coordinator asoc. prof. Dr. Andris Muiznieks, who was responsible for the workshop organization). The goal of the Workshop was to discuss the use of magnetic fields in crystal growth through mathematical analysis, numerical modeling and experimental investigations. Important part of reports was devoted to the crystal quality, e.g., occurrence and density of dislocations, distribution of dopants in semiconductors and growth stability. Other important aspects were: melt flow, turbulence, mass transport in the melt, melt flow stability and instability, shape of crystallization interface, etc. About 30 scientists from Latvia, Germany and the United Kingdom took part in the Workshop and 24 oral presentations were contributed. These presentations have shown the state of art in understanding the use of magnetic fields in crystal growth in such scientific centers as Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Germany; Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Latvia; Institute for Electrothermal Processes, University of Hanover, Germany; Kristallographisches Institut, University of Freiburg, Germany; TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institut fur NE-Metallurgie und Reinststoffe, Germany; Siltronic AG, Burghausen, Germany; Institute for Crystal Growth, Berlin, Germany; Coventry University, School of

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Muzikante, Inta; Sarakovskis, Anatolijs; Grinberga, Liga

    2012-08-01

    Organizing Committee sincerely hopes that the Conference gave all the participants new insights into the widespread development of functional materials and nanotechnologies and would enhance the circulation of the information released at the meeting. Inta Muzikante Andris Sternberg Liga Grinberga Anatolijs Sarakovskis Conference photograph The manuscripts are published thanks to the financial support from ERAF project 'Atbalsts starptautiskas sadarbibas projektiem zinatne un tehnologijas LU Cietvielu fizikas instituta' Nr.2010/0204/2DP/2.1.1.2.0./10/APIA/VIAA/010 Sponsors Sponsors flag Sponsors logo International Organizing Committee 1. Andris Sternberg (chairperson), Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Latvia 2. Juras Banys, Vilnius University, Lithuania 3. Gunnar Borstel, University of Osnabrück, Germany 4. Niels E Christensen, University of Aarhus, Denmark 5. Robert A Evarestov, St. Petersburg State University, Russia 6. Claes-Goran Granqvist, Uppsala University, Sweden 7. Dag Høvik, The Research Council of Norway, Norway 8. Marco Kirm, Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia 9. Jiri Kulda, Institut Laue-Langevin, France 10. Witold Lojkowski, Institute of High Pressure Physics, Poland 11. Ergo Nommiste, University of Tartu, Estonia 12. Ingólfur Torbjörnsson, Icelandic Centre for Research, Iceland 13. Marcel H. Van de Voorde, University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands International Program Committee 1. Liga Grinberga (chairperson), Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Latvia 2. Eugene Kotomin, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Germany 3. Martins Rutkis, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Latvia 4. Inta Muzikante, Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Latvia 5. Liga Berzina-Cimdina, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomechanics, Riga Technical University, Latvia 6. Janis Grabis, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Riga Technical University, Latvia 7. Linards Skuja

  6. Quantitative multiplex detection of biomarkers on a waveguide-based biosensor using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hongzhi; Mukundan, Harshini; Martinez, Jennifer S; Swanson, Basil I; Anderson, Aaron S; Grace, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative, simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity is critical for biomedical diagnostics, drug discovery and biomarker characterization [Wilson 2006, Tok 2006, Straub 2005, Joos 2002, Jani 2000]. Detection systems relying on optical signal transduction are, in general, advantageous because they are fast, portable, inexpensive, sensitive, and have the potential for multiplex detection of analytes of interest. However, conventional immunoassays for the detection of biomarkers, such as the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assays (ELISAs) are semi-quantitative, time consuming and insensitive. ELISA assays are also limited by high non-specific binding, especially when used with complex biological samples such as serum and urine (REF). Organic fluorophores that are commonly used in such applications lack photostability and possess a narrow Stoke's shift that makes simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores with a single excitation source difficult, thereby restricting their use in multiplex assays. The above limitations with traditional assay platforms have resulted in the increased use of nanotechnology-based tools and techniques in the fields of medical imaging [ref], targeted drug delivery [Caruthers 2007, Liu 2007], and sensing [ref]. One such area of increasing interest is the use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for biomedical research and diagnostics [Gao and Cui 2004, Voura 2004, Michalet 2005, Chan 2002, Jaiswal 2004, Gao 2005, Medintz 2005, So 2006 2006, Wu 2003]. Compared to organic dyes, QDs provide several advantages for use in immunoassay platforms, including broad absorption bands with high extinction coefficients, narrow and symmetric emission bands with high quantum yields, high photostablility, and a large Stokes shift [Michalet 2005, Gu 2002]. These features prompted the use of QDs as probes in biodetection [Michalet 2005, Medintz 2005]. For example, Jaiswal et al. reported long term multiple color

  7. Preface: Materiaux 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheikhrouhou, Abdelwaheb

    2012-02-01

    Ceramics, glasses, polymers Natural materials (phosphates, clay,...) Metallic materials, alloys, metallurgy,... Others (materials and environment, materials and energy, biomaterials,...) I want to thank the scientific committee, the organizing committee, the local committee and everyone who contributed to the organization of this meeting for their invaluable efforts in order to guarantee the complete success of this conference. Abdelwaheb Cheikhrouhou President of 'Tu-MRS' Chairman of the Conference 'MATERIAUX 2010' Conference photograph Committies Organizing Committee Chairman CHEIKHROUHOU Abdelwaheb (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Members ALAYA Sahbi (Faculté des Sciences de Gabès) BENNACEUR Raouf (Faculté des Sciences de Tunis) BEN SALEM Mohamed (Faculté des Sciences de Bizerte) CHEIKHROUHOU-KOUBAA Wissem (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) EL JANI Belgacem (Faculté des Sciences de Monastir) EZZAOUIA Hatem (Centre de Recherches et de Technologies de l'Energie, Technopole de Borj Cédria) LAMLOUMI Jilani (Ecole Supérieure des Sciences et Techniques de Tunis) REZIG Bahri (Ecole Nationale d'Ingénieurs de Tunis) Local Committee Chairman CHEIKHROUHOU Abdelwaheb (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Members CHEIKHROUHOU-KOUBAA Wissem (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) KOUBAA Mohamed (Institut Supérieur de Biotechnologie de Sfax) NJEH Anwar (Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d'Ingénieurs de Sfax) BEN SALAH Issam (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) TAKKALI Férid (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) REGAIEG Yassin (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) OTHMANI Safa (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) MNASSRI Rafik (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Secretariat BEN GHOZLEN Afifa (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) BOUGHARIOU Sana (Faculté des Sciences de Sfax) Scientific Committee M. ADDOU, Faculté des Sciences de Kénitra (Morocco) N. AMDOUNI, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) M. BACCOUCHE, Faculté des Sciences d'Annaba (Algeria) H. BATIS, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (Tunisia) A. BELAFHAL

  8. Motion4D-library extended

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Chandrasekhar [6].HalilsoyWave: see Ref. [7].JaNeWi: Janis-Newman-Winicour metric, see Ref. [8].MinkowskiConformal: Minkowski metric in conformally rescaled coordinates.PTD_AI, PTD_AII, PTD_AIII, PTD_BI, PTD_BII, PTD_BIII, PTD_C Petrov-Type D - Levi-Civita spacetimes, see Ref. [7].PainleveGullstrand: Schwarzschild metric in Painlevé-Gullstrand coordinates, see Ref. [9].PlaneGravWave: Plane gravitational wave, see Ref. [10].SchwarzschildIsotropic: Schwarzschild metric in isotropic coordinates, see Ref. [11].SchwarzschildTortoise: Schwarzschild metric in tortoise coordinates, see Ref. [11].Sultana-Dyer: A black hole in the Einstein-de Sitter universe by Sultana and Dyer [12].TaubNUT: see Ref. [13]. The Christoffel symbols and the natural local tetrads of these new metrics are given in the Catalogue of Spacetimes, Ref. [14].To study the behavior of geodesics, it is often useful to determine an effective potential like in classical mechanics. For several metrics, we followed the Euler-Lagrangian approach as described by Rindler [10] and implemented an effective potential for a specific situation. As an example, consider the Lagrangian L=-αt˙+α-1r˙+r2φ˙ for timelike geodesics in the ϑ=π/2 hypersurface in the Schwarzschild spacetime with α=1-2m/r. The Euler-Lagrangian equations lead to the energy balance equation r˙+V(r)=k2 with the effective potential V(r)=(r-2m)(r2+h2)/r3 and the constants of motion k=αt˙ and h=r2φ˙. The constants of motion for a timelike geodesic that starts at (r=10m,φ=0) with initial direction ξ=π/4 with respect to the black hole direction and with initial velocity β=0.7 read k≈1.252 and h≈6.931. Then, from the energy balance equation we immediately obtain the radius of closest approach r≈5.927.Beside a standard Runge-Kutta fourth-order integrator and the integrators of the Gnu Scientific Library (GSL), we also implemented a standard Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.Running time: The test runs provided with the distribution require only a few

  9. Preface: phys. stat. sol. (b) 241/9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawetz, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    Modelling and Simulation in Molecular Systems, Mesoscopic Structures, and Material Science was the title of a workshop held at the University of Technology in Chemnitz from 21 to 23 April 2004. This workshop coincided with the 50th birthday of Michael Schreiber. Therefore, the idea to publish a special issue is supported by two good reasons. First, a topical collection is appropriate for giving an overview about a field and to initiate further studies. This is one intention of the present issue. Second, the birthday is a suitable occasion for reflecting on the status of the different fields where Michael Schreiber has been active himself. Motivated by the characteristic name of the workshop (MS4), which expresses the broad range of his activities, the contributions are grouped into three main chapters: Disorder and Interaction, Phase Transitions and Criticality, and Transport Properties.The first part starts with the currently intensively discussed topic of composite Fermions in the paper by B. Kramer et al. This method of rewriting correlations as new quasiparticles has amongst other things the merit of explaining such exciting phenomena as the fractional quantum Hall effect. The methodological questions of Ward identities, causality, and conservation laws are the focus of the systematic investiga-tion in the second article by V. Janis et al. which concentrates on the problem of disorder and configura-tional averaging. The interplay between disorder and correlation is treated in the third contribution by C. Schuster et al., where different theoretical methods are tested on the problem of Friedel oscillations within the one-dimensional Heisenberg and Hubbard model. In the next contribution, M. Berciu et al. focus on localization as one consequence of disorder. The localized and extended electronic states are treated, together with the magnetic degrees of freedom, like spin waves. One of the astonishing consequence of localiza-tion is the observation of resonant

  10. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    began the session by explaining his new models which trace the diffusive cooling of an initial supernova shock. His team has created an open source code, the SuperNova Explosion Code or SNEC, to allow others to explore a variety of explosion properties.Janie De La Rosa then spoke about her work on observing Type IIn supernovae (those with narrow emission lines in their spectra) at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths. These wavelengths are sensitive to progenitor models and the geometry of the surrounding material.Composite image of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, using data from the Chandra X-ray telescope, NASAs Spitzer Space Telescope, and ground-based facilities. [NASA/CXC/SAO]Following the exploration of progenitor geometry, Douglas C. Leonard spoke about his work in hunting for polarization in type IIP supernovae (those with long, plateaued light curves). A high degree of polarization implies asymmetry in the explosion itself, and he has been able to find such asymmetry in a number of type IIP supernovae. He pointed out that bubble-like structure (like what we see in the beautiful supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) might explain the polarization as well. Switching gears, Karri Kolijonen spoke about an interesting X-ray binary (a binary consistent of a compact object and star that emits strongly in X-rays) known as GS 1354-64. This pair has an extremely short orbital period of just two and a half days! He explained how an instability in the black holes accretion disk might explain a recent outburst in the system.Thomas Pannuti explained the basic morphologies of supernova remnants: shell, composite, and mixed. He has taken extensive, multiwavelength images of a mixed remnant known as W28 from radio through X-ray wavelengths. He notes that the radio masers in the remnant are offset from the X-ray light, although the significance of this is still an open question.Finally, Maria Dainotti wrapped up the session with a discussion of long duration GRBs as standard