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Sample records for japanese clinical settings

  1. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  2. Response sets of Japanese and American students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Leonard V.; Kikuchi, Akio

    1970-01-01

    The School Environment Preference Schedule or SEPS measures the extent to which the student accepts those attitudes, values, and behaviors fostered in traditional school environments. Inferences regarding cultural differences must include consideration of response sets. (DB)

  3. Current status of quality in Japanese clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kazuyuki; Kodama, Yasuo; Ono, Shunsuke; Mutoh, Mizue; Kawashima, Susumu; Fujimura, Akio

    2005-08-01

    The changes in the quality of Japanese clinical trials were evaluated by comparing the results of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) audits conducted from April 1997 to March 2000 (fiscal year (FY) 1997-1999) with those from April 2001 to March 2002 (FY2001). During both of the periods inspections were undertaken by the Organization for Pharmaceutical Safety and Research (OPSR). The audit findings in the former period were based on the audits that covered 331 hospitals and 775 trials conducted under the old GCP guideline. The audits in the latter period targeted 147 hospitals and 238 trials conducted under the old or new GCP guideline. The total number of deficiencies detected by GCP audits in the former three-year period (FY 1997-1999) was 1529, and the corresponding number in the latter single year (FY 2001) was 912. Two remarkable changes in OPSR's findings were observed between FY 1997-1999 and FY 2001 as follows; the proportion of protocol deviations increased from 14.7% (225/1529) to 53.1% (484/912), while the proportion of errors in case report forms (CRFs) decreased from 43.6% (666/1529) to 15.4% (140/912). The new GCP guideline sets very high standards for a hospital's qualification: to have sufficient equipment and hospital resources, to have capacity for promptly responding to urgent trial-related problems, to have an IRB, and to have appropriate staff including clinical research coordinators (CRCs) assigned to the clinical trial. Our results suggest that the impact of the regulatory changes of applicable standard is large for a hospital's qualification for conducting clinical trials in Japan. PMID:16054582

  4. [Brain MRI findings in Japanese patients with clinically isolated syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masami; Motoyama, Rie; Tahara, Masayuki; Tanaka, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) with disease modifying drugs including interferon β delays conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). However, CIS patients do not necessarily develop MS even after 20 years. Brain MRI lesions were required for CIS patients to include in clinical trials such as CHAMPS study and BENEFIT study. CIS patients with brain MRI lesions compatible to MS were considered as high risk to convert to MS in western countries. Previously we reported that asymptomatic enhancing brain lesions (AEBLs) were found in 9/23 (39.1%) of MS patients who had suffered at least one relapse in the preceding year or two relapses in the preceding 2 years, and the number of AEBLs per scan was 0.37, suggesting low disease activity of Japanese MS patients. We examined brain MRI findings in Japanese CIS patients and compared with those of Japanese MS patients at the first presentation. We reviewed brain MRI of 23 CIS visited our clinic from December 2007 to October 2010 who fulfilled the criteria proposed by Kappos et al. (2006) and Dalton et al (2002). Thirty two clinically definite MS (CDMS) patients fulfilled the first McDonald criteria (two or more attacks and objective clinical evidence of two or more lesions) proposed by Polman et al. (2005). Patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and patients with NMO spectrum proposed by Wingerchuk et al. (2006) and Wingerchuk et al. (2007), respectively, were excluded. Patients with anti-aquaporin4 antibodies or with contiguous spinal cord lesion extending over three vertebral segments on MRI were also excluded. We could not obtain MRI of 11 patients with CDMS because of very long disease course, and 2 CIS and 13 CDMS patients had not been examined with MRI. So we examined 21 CIS and 8 CDMS patients at the first presentation using Paty criteria and Barkhof criteria. Eleven CIS patients did not meet any of the Barkhof criteria. Seven and 3 CIS patients met one and two of Barkhof

  5. Genetic characteristics of Japanese clinical Listeria monocytogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Miya, Satoko; Takahashi, Hajime; Nakagawa, Miku; Kuda, Takashi; Igimi, Shizunobu; Kimura, Bon

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes causes foodborne illnesses through consumption of ready-to-eat foods. Although 135-201annual listeriosis cases have been estimated in Japan, the details regarding the clinical isolates such as infection source, virulence level, and other genetic characteristics, are not known. In order to uncover the trends of listeriosis in Japan and use the knowledge for prevention measures to be taken, the genetic characteristics of the past human clinical isolates needs to be elucidated. For this purpose, multilocus tandem-repeat sequence analysis (MLTSA) and multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (MVLST) were used in this study. The clinical isolates showed a variety of genetically distant genotypes, indicating they were from sporadic cases. However, the MVLST profiles of 7 clinical isolates were identical to those of epidemic clone (EC) I isolates, which have caused several serious outbreaks in other countries, suggesting the possibility that they have strong virulence potential and originated from a single outbreak. Moreover, 6 Japanese food isolates shared their genotypes with ECI isolates, indicating that there may be risks for listeriosis outbreak in Japan. This is the first investigational study on genetic characteristics of Japanese listeriosis isolates. The listeriosis cases happened in the past are presumably sporadic, but it is still possible that some isolates with strong virulence potential have caused listeriosis outbreaks, and future listeriosis risks also exist. PMID:25826318

  6. Gentamicin in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillers, De-Ann M.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that has been a mainstay in pediatric care for decades. Although new antibiotics are constantly under development, gentamicin continues to play an important role in clinical medicine. Although this may be surprising in the context of evidence of an association with hearing loss, both on a toxicity and a…

  7. Effective Mentoring in the Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Robb, Meigan

    2016-04-01

    This article is one in a series on the roles of adjunct clinical faculty and preceptors, who teach nursing students and new graduates to apply knowledge in clinical settings. This article describes mentoring strategies clinical instructors and preceptors can use to help ease novice nurses' transition to practice. PMID:27011145

  8. Reliability of Japanese clinical trials estimated from GCP audit findings.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Kodama, Y; Ono, S; Maida, C; Fujimura, A; Miyamoto, E

    2008-08-01

    To describe the reliability of Japanese clinical trials, we compared the results of a Good Clinical Practice (GCP) audit conducted between April 1997 and March 2000 (fiscal year (FY) 1997 - 1999) with those from April 2004 - March 2005 (FY2004). The number and proportion of various types of deficiencies described in GCP audit reports were compared between the 2 periods. The audit findings in the former period were based on official audits that covered 331 hospitals and 775 trials. The audits in the latter period targeted 114 hospitals and 189 trials. The inspection of former period was undertaken by the Organization for Pharmaceuticals Safety and Research (OPSR). On the other hand, the latter period was undertaken by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The total number of deficiencies detected in GCP audits was 1,529 in the former 3-year period (FY1997 - 1999) and 819 in the latter period (FY2004). The total number of deficiencies detected and reported was more than 1.5-fold on an annual basis in the latter period. By category of deficiencies, the proportion of protocol deviations increased from 14.7 (225/1,529) to 45.7% (374/819), while the proportion of errors in case report forms (CRFs) decreased from 43.6 (666/ 1,529) to 27.1% (222/819). There were two remarkable changes in audit findings between FY1997 - 1999 and FY2004; the increase in the proportion of protocol deviations and the decrease in the proportion of CRF-related deficiencies. We think that in Japan the improvement of research environments is needed to provide reliable clinical data responsible for the regulatory standard of GCP. PMID:18793583

  9. The communication process in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mathews, J J

    1983-01-01

    The communication of information in clinical settings is fraught with problems despite avowed common aims of practitioners and patients. Some reasons for the problematic nature of clinical communication are incongruent frames of reference about what information ought to be shared, sociolinguistic differences and social distance between practitioners and patients. Communication between doctors and nurses is also problematic, largely due to differences in ideology between the professions about what ought to be communicated to patients about their illness and who is ratified to give such information. Recent social changes, such as the Patient Bill of Rights and informed consent which assure access to information, and new conceptualizations of the nurse's role, warrant continued study of the communication process especially in regard to what constitutes appropriate and acceptable information about a patient's illness and who ought to give such information to patients. The purpose of this paper is to outline characteristics of communication in clinical settings and to provide a literature review of patient and practitioner interaction studies in order to reflect on why information exchange is problematic in clinical settings. A framework for presentation of the problems employs principles from interaction and role theory to investigate clinical communication from three viewpoints: (1) the level of shared knowledge between participants; (2) the effect of status, role and ideology on transactions; and (3) the regulation of communication imposed by features of the institution. PMID:6359453

  10. Preventing Diabetes in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, Deborah L; Elliott, Lorrie D; Quinn, Michael T; Plaut, Andrea J; Schwartz, Mindy A; Chin, Marshall H

    2006-01-01

    Objective Translating lessons from clinical trials on the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes to populations in nonstudy settings remains a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to review, from the perspective of practicing clinicians, available evidence on lifestyle interventions or medication to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. Design A MEDLINE search identified 4 major diabetes prevention trials using lifestyle changes and 3 using prophylactic medications. We reviewed the study design, key components, and outcomes for each study, focusing on aspects of the interventions potentially adaptable to clinical settings. Results The lifestyle intervention studies set modest goals for weight loss and physical activity. Individualized counseling helped participants work toward their own goals; behavioral contracting and self-monitoring were key features, and family and social context were emphasized. Study staff made vigorous follow-up efforts for subjects having less success. Actual weight loss by participants was modest; yet, the reduction in diabetes incidence was quite significant. Prophylactic medication also reduced diabetes risk; however, lifestyle changes were more effective and are recommended as first-line strategy. Cost-effectiveness analyses have shown both lifestyle and medication interventions to be beneficial, especially as they might be implemented in practice. Conclusion Strong evidence exists for the prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes through lifestyle changes. Components of these programs may be adaptable for use in clinical settings. This evidence supports broader implementation and increased reimbursement for provider services related to nutrition and physical activity to forestall morbidity from type 2 diabetes. PMID:16423130

  11. The N-Gram Hypothesis Applied to Matched Sets of Visualized Japanese-English Technical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark; Smith, Michael M.; Uemura, Aya

    1999-01-01

    Shape Recovery Analysis (SHERA), a new visual analytical technique, is applied to the N-Gram hypothesis on matched Japanese-English technical documents. Results reveal compaction in the translation of Japanese subject terms to English subject terms. The biagram approach to the Japanese data yields a remarkable similarity to the matching visualized…

  12. [Causal attribution and conflict resolution in the Japanese language instruction setting].

    PubMed

    Kagami, Tomiyo; Ohbuchi, Ken-ichi

    2004-02-01

    Conflicts sometimes arise between the language teachers and foreign students in the Japanese language instruction setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of causal attribution and selection of conflict resolution strategies in such conflicts, and to explicate the characteristics of intercultural conflicts resolution strategies, especially paying attention to the teacher expectation of student strategy to resolve a conflict. A questionnaire was administered to 84 Japanese teachers, 214 Chinese students, and 154 Korean students. Results indicated that when students attributed the conflict to the teachers, they chose assertive strategies, and that when attributed to themselves, compromising strategies were used. Moreover, while Chinese students tended to use such compromising strategies as cooperation and obedience when they attributed the conflict to cultural differences, Korean students did not tend to use non-confrontational strategies. The teachers did not expect their students to use assertive strategies, and the large gap between teacher and student perception of assertive strategies could be one of reasons for difficulties that arise in such intercultural conflict resolution. PMID:15112508

  13. Nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses’ health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses’ experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with master’s and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses’ perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  14. Impact of Contraceptive Counseling in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Tregear, Stephen J.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Tiller, Marie; Pazol, Karen; Mautone-Smith, Nancy; Gavin, Loretta E.

    2015-01-01

    Context This systematic review evaluated the evidence on the impact of contraceptive counseling provided in clinical settings on reproductive health outcomes to provide information to guide national recommendations on quality family planning services. Evidence acquisition Multiple databases were searched during 2010–2011 for peer-reviewed articles published in English from January 1985 through February 2011 describing studies that evaluated contraceptive counseling interventions in clinical settings. Studies were excluded if they focused primarily on prevention of HIV or sexually transmitted infections, focused solely on men, or were conducted outside the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand. Evidence synthesis The initial search identified 12,327 articles, of which 22 studies (from 23 articles) met the inclusion criteria. Six studies examined the impact of contraceptive counseling among adolescents, with four finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Sixteen studies examined the impact of counseling among adults or mixed populations (adults and adolescents), with 11 finding a significant positive impact on at least one outcome of interest. Conclusions Promising components of contraceptive counseling were identified despite the diversity of interventions and inability to compare the relative effectiveness of one approach versus another. The evidence base would be strengthened by improved documentation of counseling procedures; assessment of intervention implementation and fidelity to put study findings into context; and development and inclusion of more RCTs, studies conducted among general samples of women, and studies with sample sizes sufficient to detect important behavioral outcomes at least 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26190845

  15. Physical Settings and Materials Recommended for Play Therapy with Japanese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Yuanhong; Ramirez, Sylvia Z.; Kranz, Peter L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a number of important issues to consider in play therapy with Japanese children. They include the waiting room and playroom decor, toys, and other materials, as well as terminology that are commonly used in Japan. The layout of the small and large playrooms, use of the "Wa-Shitsu" (a traditional Japanese room style), reading…

  16. English for Content Instruction in a Japanese Higher Education Setting: Examining Challenges, Contradictions and Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    This article examines issues pertaining to content instruction in English in a Japanese higher education institution. It notes that Japan's economic success in the latter part of the twentieth century was achieved with Japanese as the medium of instruction and observes that in terms of ideology and cultural politics at least, there are…

  17. Japanese Encephalitis—A Pathological and Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debapriya; Basu, Anirban

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading form of viral encephalitis in Asia. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. JEV is endemic to many parts of Asia, where periodic outbreaks take hundreds of lives. Despite the catastrophes it causes, JE has remained a tropical disease uncommon in the West. With rapid globalization and climatic shift, JEV has started to emerge in areas where the threat was previously unknown. Scientific evidence predicts that JEV will soon become a global pathogen and cause of worldwide pandemics. Although some research documents JEV pathogenesis and drug discovery, worldwide awareness of the need for extensive research to deal with JE is still lacking. This review focuses on the exigency of developing a worldwide effort to acknowledge the prime importance of performing an extensive study of this thus far neglected tropical viral disease. This review also outlines the pathogenesis, the scientific efforts channeled into develop a therapy, and the outlook for a possible future breakthrough addressing this killer disease. PMID:19787040

  18. Comprehensive screening for a complete set of Japanese-population-specific filaggrin gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; Nomura, T; Ohguchi, Y; Mizuno, O; Suzuki, S; Tsujiuchi, H; Hamajima, N; McLean, W H I; Shimizu, H; Akiyama, M

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in FLG coding profilaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris and are an important predisposing factor for atopic dermatitis. Until now, most case-control studies and population-based screenings have been performed only for prevalent mutations. In this study, we established a high-throughput FLG mutation detection system by real-time PCR with a set of two double-dye probes and conducted comprehensive screening for almost all of the Japanese-population-specific FLG mutations (ten FLG mutations). The present comprehensive screening for all ten FLG mutations provided a more precise prevalence rate for FLG mutations (11.1%, n = 820), which seemed high compared with data of previous reports based on screening for limited numbers of FLG mutations. Our comprehensive screening suggested that population-specific FLG mutations may be a significant predisposing factor for hay fever (odds ratio = 2.01 [95% CI: 1.027-3.936, P < 0.05]), although the sample sizes of this study were too small for reliable subphenotype analysis on the association between FLG mutations and hay fever in the eczema patients and the noneczema individuals, and it is not clear whether the association between FLG mutations and hay fever is due to the close association between FLG mutations and hay fever patients with eczema. PMID:24467288

  19. Evaluation of Students in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elenbaas, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the concepts and procedures of curricular design and student evaluation utilized by the clinical faculty within the PharmD program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City are described. Specific competencies, curriculum objectives, clinical review conferences, and verbal challenge examinations are appended. (LBH)

  20. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  1. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  2. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in a Japanese occupational setting: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, N; Okuyama, Y; Kawakami, Y; Saito, K

    1989-01-01

    We measured the prevalence of depressive symptoms in 2,190 Japanese tax office workers using the Japanese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Score distribution by sex was more symmetrical and the mean score of each sex was higher than in the United States population. A high level of depressive symptoms was found in 15.2 percent of males and 10.6 percent of females by controlling for age and marital status. Males aged 50 years and over had more depressive symptoms than other male age groups. Perceived stress, related both to family life and the workplace, was associated with a high level of depressive symptoms. "Long-distance marriage" ("business bachelorhood"), peculiar to Japanese occupations, had little influence on depressive symptomatology. PMID:2817157

  3. Clinical features of 58 Japanese patients with mosaic neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Tanito, Katsumi; Ota, Arihito; Kamide, Ryoichi; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Niimura, Michihito

    2014-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutation in the NF1 tumor-suppressor gene, and may sometimes manifest in a mosaic form. "Segmental NF1" is generally assumed to be the result of somatic mosaicism for a NF1 mutation, and patients with mosaic NF1 have typical features of NF1 limited to specific body segments. The clinical features of 58 patients (42 females and 16 males; aged 1-69 years; mean age, 23.4 years) with mosaic NF1 seen at the Jikei University Hospital during 2004-2007 and at the Jikei University Daisan Hospital during 2007-2011, were retrospectively studied. Somatic or gonosomal mosaicism was not investigated. Patients were classified into four groups: (i) pigmentary changes (café-au-lait spots and freckling) only (n = 32); (ii) neurofibromas only (n = 5); (iii) neurofibromas and pigmentary changes (n = 13); and (iv) solitary plexiform neurofibromas (n = 8). The area of involvement was variable. The majority of patients were asymptomatic, except patients with plexiform neurofibromas who presented most commonly with pain or tenderness. Lisch nodules were rarely seen. Only four of our 58 patients (6.9%) had specific NF1 complications, including language delay (n = 1) and bone deformity (n = 3). Two patients were ascertained through their children with generalized NF1. Patients with mosaic NF1 are at low risk of developing disease-associated complications, except patients with plexiform neurofibromas. However, they need to be aware of the small risk of having a child with generalized NF1. PMID:25041723

  4. Timed Writing Practice for Japanese University Students in an EFL Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresovich, Brant M.

    1990-01-01

    Timed writing exercises used at the University of the Ryukyus (Japan) to help alleviate common problems in English second language writing are described. It is proposed that Japanese students have difficulty writing in English because of early training in the grammar-translation method, a lack of communication skills, the overuse of bilingual…

  5. Staff Training in a Clinical Setting. Volume II, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangs, Tina E.

    Provided is the script for a presentation of 16 slides on staff training, orientation, and role in a clinical setting providing educational programs for the preschool and primary grade handicapped child. The sixteen slide commentaries cover an introduction to principles and implementation of a staff training program in a clinical setting, staff…

  6. Prospective Lymphedema Surveillance in a Clinic Setting.

    PubMed

    Chance-Hetzler, Janet; Armer, Jane; Van Loo, Maggie; Anderson, Blake; Harris, Robin; Ewing, Rebecca; Stewart, Bob

    2015-01-01

    The potential impact of breast cancer-related lymphedema (LE) is quite extensive, yet it often remains under-diagnosed until the later stages. This project examines the effectiveness of prospective surveillance in post-surgical breast cancer patients. A retrospective analysis of 49 out of 100 patients enrolled in a longitudinal prospective study at a Midwestern breast center evaluates: (1) time required for completion of bilateral limb measurements and Lymphedema Breast Cancer Questionnaire (LBCQ); (2) referral to LE management with limb volume increase (LVI) and/or LBCQ symptoms; and (3) cost of LE management at lower LVI (≥5%-≤10%) versus traditional (≥10%). Findings revealed a visit timeframe mean of 40.3 min (range = 25-60); 43.6% of visits were ≤30-min timeframe. Visit and measurement times decreased as clinic staff gained measurement experience; measurement time mean was 17.9 min (range = 16.9-18.9). LBCQ symptoms and LVI were significantly (p < 0.001) correlated to LE referral; six of the nine patients referred (67%) displayed both LBCQ symptoms/LVI. Visits with no symptoms reported did not result in referral, demonstrating the importance of using both indicators when assessing early LE. Lower threshold referral provides compelling evidence of potential cost savings over traditional threshold referral with reported costs of: $3755.00 and $6353.00, respectively (40.9% savings). PMID:26308061

  7. A comparison of clinical features among Japanese eating-disordered women with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, H; Miyata, A; Iwasaki, Y; Matsui, T; Fujimoto, K; Kiriike, N

    1999-01-01

    Clinical features, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms, were investigated in Japanese women with DSM-III-R eating disorders (EDs) and concurrent OCD in comparison to age-matched women with OCD. Sixteen women with restricting anorexia nervosa (AN), 16 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 16 with both AN and BN (BAN) showed commonality in a more elevated prevalence of OCD symptoms of symmetry and order compared with 18 OCD women. Among the personality disorders (PDs), likewise, obsessive-compulsive PD (OCPD) was more prevalent in each ED group compared with the OCD group. However, aggressive obsessions were more common in both BN and BAN subjects compared with AN subjects. Subjects with bulimic symptoms were also distinguished from AN subjects by impulsive features in behavior and personality. Thus, an elevated prevalence of aggressive obsessions along with an admixture of impulsive and compulsive features specifically characterized the clinical features of bulimic subjects with OCD. PMID:10509614

  8. Historical chronology of basic and clinical research in diabetic nephropathy and contributions of Japanese scientists.

    PubMed

    Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2009-10-01

    The most problematic issue in clinical nephrology worldwide is the relentless and progressive increase in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Diabetic nephropathy has considerable impact on society in the areas of public health and social economy; many scientists are involved in research for the elucidation of the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and for the prevention and cure of the disease. In contrast, diabetic nephropathy was a neglected or ignored disease in the historical era, and few dedicated physicians recognized the disease process of diabetic nephropathy. In this review, we look back on the history of basic and clinical research on diabetic nephropathy and survey the recent progress of the research, especially focusing on the contribution of Japanese scientists. PMID:19363645

  9. Boosting standard order sets utilization through clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Li, Haomin; Zhang, Yinsheng; Cheng, Haixia; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2013-01-01

    Well-designed standard order sets have the potential to integrate and coordinate care by communicating best practices through multiple disciplines, levels of care, and services. However, there are several challenges which certainly affected the benefits expected from standard order sets. To boost standard order sets utilization, a problem-oriented knowledge delivery solution was proposed in this study to facilitate access of standard order sets and evaluation of its treatment effect. In this solution, standard order sets were created along with diagnostic rule sets which can trigger a CDS-based reminder to help clinician quickly discovery hidden clinical problems and corresponding standard order sets during ordering. Those rule set also provide indicators for targeted evaluation of standard order sets during treatment. A prototype system was developed based on this solution and will be presented at Medinfo 2013. PMID:23920727

  10. Cooperation between Japanese and Cambodian Dietitians in Setting up a Hospital Diet Management System.

    PubMed

    Ly, Koung Ry; Saito, Shino; Kusama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia faces a considerably high percentage of the stunted under 5 (Unicef, 2014). Despite the National Nutrition Strategy Launched by the Ministry of Health in cooperation with development partners, nutrition improvement projects have not always been effective. It is generally said these issues are addressed in many other developing nations, and the literature largely documented that successful nutrition programmes are community-based programmes because of their sustainability and the intensive communications between health workers and beneficiaries. Learning from the past experiences, the Foundation for International Development/Relief organized a project team with a Cambodian dietitian and an experienced Japanese dietitian to implement a hospital diet programme for children from April 2006 to March 2014 in the National Pediatric Hospital (NPH) in Cambodia. The project has two objectives: establishing a hospital diet management system, and developing the capacity of NPH staff. Hospital food menus were created paying particular attention to Cambodian culture, eating habits and accessibility to the ingredients for the purpose of continuous supply. We have also put emphasis on the communication between dietitians and family members of the children to let them understand the importance of a nutritious diet. After 8 y of project implementation, the hospital diet management system was established providing 7 types of menu with nutritious diets. The final evaluation of the project showed that NPH staff have the intention to continue hospital food supply with their acquired knowledge and capacity. In practice, a Cambodian dietitian currently takes the initiative for a continuous nutritional diet in NPH. The key to this success is the collaboration between Japanese dietitians with experience and Cambodian dietitians with knowledge of Cambodian eating habits. Taking our experience into account, it is highly recommended to educate Cambodian dietitians, as they are

  11. [Dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and problems in clinical fields].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    In the dietary reference intakes, EAR(estimated average requirement), RDA(recommended dietary allowance), AL(adequate intake), DG(tentative dietary goal for preventing life style related diseases) and UL(tolerable upper intake level) of eight types of trace elements (iron: Fe, zinc: Zn, copper: Cu, manganese: Mn, iodine: I, selenium: Se, chromium: Cr, molybdenum: Mo) have been set. However, in the meals of hospitals, only iron of which has been taken into account. The content of these trace elements in the enteral nutrient released after 2000 was determined by considering the content of dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and considered so not fall into deficiency. However, enteral nutrient must be used considering the content of Zn, Cu and the Zn/Cu ratio, the selenium content, and the route of administration, in order to avoid falling into deficiency. PMID:27455794

  12. Factor Structure of the WPPSI in Mental Health Clinic Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Jack P.; Atkinson, David

    1984-01-01

    Factor-analyzed the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI) scores of emotionally disturbed children (N=181). The results suggested that the structure of intelligence for emotionally disturbed children is similar to that for normal children. WPPSI profile analysis that uses subtest scores may be invalid in clinical settings.…

  13. Effectiveness of Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in a Clinical Outpatient Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deakin, Elisabeth Kuhn; Tiellet Nunes, Maria Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of child psychoanalytic psychotherapy in a clinical outpatient setting in a city in southern Brazil. Three psychological tests (Rorschach, Bender and WISC III) were administered to 23 children, aged 6-11 years old, and the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) was completed by the parents. All…

  14. Collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings: The students' perspective.

    PubMed

    Suikkala, Arja; Kivelä, Eeva; Käyhkö, Pirjo

    2016-03-01

    This study deals with student nurses' experiences of collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings where aged people are involved as age-experts in students' learning processes. The data were collected in 2012 using the contents of students' reflective writing assignments concerning elderly persons' life history interviews and the students' own assessments of their learning experiences in authentic elder care settings. The results, analyzed using qualitative content analysis, revealed mostly positive learning experiences. Interaction and collaborative learning activities in genuine gerontological clinical settings contributed to the students' understanding of the multiple age-related and disease-specific challenges as well as the issues of functional decline that aged patients face. Three types of factors influenced the students' collaborative learning experiences in gerontological clinical settings: student-related, patient-related and learning environment-related factors. According to the results, theoretical studies in combination with collaboration, in an authentic clinical environment, by student nurses, elderly patients, representatives of the elder care staff and nurse educators provide a feasible method for helping students transform their experiences with patients into actual skills. Their awareness of and sensitivity to the needs of the elderly increase as they learn. PMID:26928824

  15. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  16. Clinical characteristics of patients with gender identity disorder at a Japanese gender identity disorder clinic.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Nobuyuki; Sato, Toshiki; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Ido, Yumiko; Terada, Seishi; Kuroda, Shigetoshi

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of patients with gender identity disorder (GID) at a GID clinic in Japan. A total of 603 consecutive patients were evaluated at the GID clinic using clinical information and results of physical and neurological examinations. Using DSM-IV criteria, 579 patients (96.0%) were diagnosed with GID. Four patients were excluded for transvestic fetishism, eight for homosexuality, five for schizophrenia, three for personality disorders, and four for other psychiatric disorders. Among the GID patients, 349 (60.3%) were the female-to-male (FTM) type, and 230 (39.7%) were the male-to-female (MTF) type. Almost all FTM-type GID patients started to feel discomfort with their sex before puberty and were sexually attracted to females. The proportion of FTM patients who had experienced marriage as a female was very low, and very few had children. Therefore, FTM-type GID patients seem to be highly homogeneous. On the other hand, various patterns of age at onset and sexual attraction existed among MTF patients. Among the MTF-type GID patients, 28.3% had married as males and 18.7% had sired children. Thus, MTF-type GID patients seem to be more heterogeneous. PMID:17959255

  17. Comparative genetic characterization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains recovered from clinical and non-clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Gu, Dan-xia; Huang, Yong-lu; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Chen, Gong-Xiang; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), a major causative agent of childhood diarrhea worldwide, remains ill-defined. The objective of this study was to determine the relative prevalence of EAEC in clinical and non-clinical sources and compare their genetic characteristics in order to identify strains that rarely and commonly cause human diarrhea. The virulence gene astA was commonly detectable in both clinical and non-clinical EAEC, while clinical isolates, but not the non-clinical strains, were consistently found to harbor other virulence factors such as aap (32%), aatA (18%) and aggR (11%). MLST analysis revealed the extremely high diversity of EAEC ST types, which can be grouped into three categories including: (i) non-clinical EAEC that rarely cause human infections; (ii) virulent strains recoverable in diarrhea patients that are also commonly found in the non-clinical sources; (iii) organisms causing human infections but rarely recoverable in the non-clinical setting. In addition, the high resistance in these EAEC isolates in particular resistance to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins raised a huge concern for clinical EAEC infection control. The data from this study suggests that EAEC strains were diversely distributed in non-clinical and clinical setting and some of the clinical isolates may originate from the non-clinical setting. PMID:27062991

  18. Opinions on Kampo and reasons for using it – results from a cross-sectional survey in three Japanese clinics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Japanese Medicine (Kampo) is often used in Japan, but very little data on its users are available. We investigated who uses Kampo, the reasons and opinions for its use. Methods Questionnaire survey in three Japanese outpatient clinics offering Kampo in different settings: Kampo only, Kampo and traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo and Western medicine. Before seeing the doctor, patients were asked about socio-demographic data, medical history, experience with Kampo, general health-related opinions and behaviours, opinions about Western medicine and Kampo, and reasons for Kampo utilization. Descriptive statistics and predictors for Kampo use were calculated. Results A total of 354 questionnaires were completed. Participants were 50.97 ± 15.60 (mean ± SD) years of age, 68% were female. Of all patients, 73% (n = 202) were using Kampo currently and 84% (297) had taken Kampo before. Questions on general health-related opinions and behaviour revealed a strong environmental awareness. The most frequent indications for earlier Kampo use were: common cold (36%), gastrointestinal complaints (30%), oversensitivity to cold (“Hi’e-sho”; 29%), stress/anxiety (21%), and shoulder stiffness (20%). Kampo users suffered more often from chronic illnesses (OR 2.88 [1.48-5.58]). Beliefs in underlying philosophy (Wu Xing (adjusted OR 3.08, [1.11-8.55]), Ying and Yang (OR 2.57 [1.15-5.73], a holistic way of seeing the patient (OR 2.17 [1.53-3.08]), and in Kampo efficacy (OR 2.62 [1.66-4.13]) were positively associated with Kampo use. So was, interestingly, conviction of the efficacy of Western medicine (OR 1.87 [1.28-2.74]). Half of the patients had a general preference for a combination of Kampo and Western treatment. Conclusions Most patients visiting a clinic that also provided Kampo had previous experience with Kampo. Usage was associated with beliefs in philosophical Kampo concepts and its efficacy. PMID:23680097

  19. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the surveillance committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010: General view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kadota, Junichi; Aoki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Oguri, Toyoko; Sato, Junko; Ogasawara, Kazuhiko; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Akira; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Watari, Tomohisa; Toyoshima, Eri; Takeuchi, Kenichi; Shiokoshi, Mayumi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Miki, Makoto; Kumagai, Toshio; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Nishiya, Hajime; Kawakami, Sayoko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takasaki, Jin; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Konosaki, Hisami; Aoki, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Shoji, Michi; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Koichiro; Kawana, Akihiko; Saionji, Katsu; Fujikura, Yuji; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kudo, Makoto; Sato, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Tsukada, Hiroki; Imai, Yumiko; Tsukada, Ayami; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Honma, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Toshinobu; Ban, Nobuyoshi; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Sawamura, Haruki; Miyara, Takayuki; Toda, Hirofumi; Sato, Kaori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Mitsuno, Noriko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Sano, Reiko; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Asari, Seishi; Nishi, Isao; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Koguchi, Yutaka; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichirou; Kuwabara, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Masui, Kayoko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Aoki, Yosuke; Fukuoka, Mami; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Suga, Moritaka; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Honda, Junichi; Fujita, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    The nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from patients in Japan, was conducted by Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases and Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010. The isolates were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections during the period from January and April 2010 by three societies. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institutes using maximum 45 antibacterial agents. Susceptibility testing was evaluable with 954 strains (206 Staphylococcus aureus, 189 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4 Streptococcus pyogenes, 182 Haemophilus influenzae, 74 Moraxella catarrhalis, 139 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 160 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Ratio of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was as high as 50.5%, and those of penicillin-intermediate and -resistant S. pneumoniae were 1.1% and 0.0%, respectively. Among H. influenzae, 17.6% of them were found to be β-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediately resistant, 33.5% to be β-lactamase-non-producing ABPC-resistant and 11.0% to be β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant strains. Extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa with metallo β-lactamase were 2.9% and 0.6%, respectively. Continuous national surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of respiratory pathogens is crucial in order to monitor changing patterns of susceptibility and to be able to update treatment recommendations on a regular basis. PMID:25817352

  20. How Cultural Traits Influence the Way Japanese and Americans Interact with Each Other in a Business Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumayama, A.

    An examination of the different cultural traits, values, and business strategies of Americans and Japanese through simulation and role-playing is presented. A Japanese player and an American player, when presented with scripts, have a business conversation about a hypothetical business venture, and then discuss the interaction in interviews. The…

  1. Where Realities Confront Ideals: The Personal, Professional, Philosophical and Political in the Teaching of Academic English in a Japanese Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, Japanese universities have sought to have a greater number of faculty courses taught in English, where traditionally Japanese has been the medium of instruction. This article begins with an overview of the literature discussing Japan's responses to the spread of English, and philosophies and ideologies influencing the…

  2. A one-year longitudinal study of English and Japanese vowel production by Japanese adults and children in an English-speaking setting

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Grace E.; Guion-Anderson, Susan; Aoyama, Katsura; Flege, James E.; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko; Yamada, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of age of acquisition on first- and second-language vowel production was investigated. Eight English vowels were produced by Native Japanese (NJ) adults and children as well as by age-matched Native English (NE) adults and children. Productions were recorded shortly after the NJ participants’ arrival in the USA and then one year later. In agreement with previous investigations [Aoyama, et al., J. Phon. 32, 233–250 (2004)], children were able to learn more, leading to higher accuracy than adults in a year’s time. Based on the spectral quality and duration comparisons, NJ adults had more accurate production at Time 1, but showed no improvement over time. The NJ children’s productions, however, showed significant differences from the NE children’s for English “new” vowels /ɪ/, /ε/, /ɑ/, /ʌ/ and /ʊ/ at Time 1, but produced all eight vowels in a native-like manner at Time 2. An examination of NJ speakers’ productions of Japanese /i/, /a/, /u/ over time revealed significant changes for the NJ Child Group only. Japanese /i/ and /a/ showed changes in production that can be related to second language (L2) learning. The results suggest that L2 vowel production is affected importantly by age of acquisition and that there is a dynamic interaction, whereby the first and second language vowels affect each other. PMID:21603058

  3. Recent Clinical Characteristics of Labors Using Three Japanese Systems of Midwife-Led Primary Delivery Care

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to describe the recent clinical characteristics of labor using 3 systems of Japanese midwife-led primary delivery care, as follows: (1) those intending to give birth at home managed by midwives who do not belong to our hospital, (2) those planning to give birth in our hospital managed by the same midwives, and (3) those planning to give birth managed by midwives who belong to our hospital. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was performed. Results. There were no significant differences in the obstetric or neonatal outcomes among the 3 groups. The rate of transfers during labor with the system involving midwives belonging to our hospital was higher than those with the other 2 systems. In addition, the timing of transfers in the system with the midwives belonging to our hospital was earlier than with the other 2 systems. Among the 3 groups, there were no significant differences in the rate of the main 2 indications for transfers: fetal heart rate abnormality and failure to progress. Conclusion. There were no significant differences in perinatal outcomes among the 3 systems; however, there were some differences in the status of transfers to obstetric shared care. PMID:27034827

  4. Clinical features and outcomes of 139 Japanese patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shinichi; Maruyama, Dai; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Kobayashi, Yukio; Itami, Jun; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-08-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare subtype of malignant lymphoma in Japan, and there are few reports of HL in Japan in recent years. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of 139 patients with HL who were diagnosed and treated at our institution between 1997 and 2011. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years with 83 male. Of these patients, 83 (60 %) were early stage and 56 (40 %) were advanced-stage. Seventy-three patients (88 %) with early stage disease received ABVd followed by irradiation. All of the 56 advanced-stage patients received chemotherapy, mainly ABVd. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates and overall survival rates were 90 and 94 % in patients with early stage disease, and 71 and 90 % in those with advanced-stage disease. The PFS of patients with advanced-stage disease was significantly lower than those with early stage (p = 0.014). In conclusion, the outcomes of Japanese patients with HL in recent years were not improved as compared with the results of previous reports. We confirmed that patients with advanced-stage disease have lower PFS than those with early stage disease. Prospective studies are needed to establish novel treatment strategies to improve the outcome of HL patients, especially those with advanced disease. PMID:27086350

  5. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K.; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E. Yoko; Mis, Frederick W.; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution’s admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  6. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  7. Estimating the re-identification risk of clinical data sets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background De-identification is a common way to protect patient privacy when disclosing clinical data for secondary purposes, such as research. One type of attack that de-identification protects against is linking the disclosed patient data with public and semi-public registries. Uniqueness is a commonly used measure of re-identification risk under this attack. If uniqueness can be measured accurately then the risk from this kind of attack can be managed. In practice, it is often not possible to measure uniqueness directly, therefore it must be estimated. Methods We evaluated the accuracy of uniqueness estimators on clinically relevant data sets. Four candidate estimators were identified because they were evaluated in the past and found to have good accuracy or because they were new and not evaluated comparatively before: the Zayatz estimator, slide negative binomial estimator, Pitman’s estimator, and mu-argus. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the uniqueness estimators on six clinically relevant data sets. We varied the sampling fraction and the uniqueness in the population (the value being estimated). The median relative error and inter-quartile range of the uniqueness estimates was measured across 1000 runs. Results There was no single estimator that performed well across all of the conditions. We developed a decision rule which selected between the Pitman, slide negative binomial and Zayatz estimators depending on the sampling fraction and the difference between estimates. This decision rule had the best consistent median relative error across multiple conditions and data sets. Conclusion This study identified an accurate decision rule that can be used by health privacy researchers and disclosure control professionals to estimate uniqueness in clinical data sets. The decision rule provides a reliable way to measure re-identification risk. PMID:22776564

  8. Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury in the Preclinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Berkner, Justin; Mannix, Rebekah; Qiu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability for people under 45 years of age. Clinical TBI is often the result of disparate forces resulting in heterogeneous injuries. Preclinical modeling of TBI is a vital tool for studying the complex cascade of metabolic, cellular, and molecular post-TBI events collectively termed secondary injury. Preclinical models also provide an important platform for studying therapeutic interventions. However, modeling TBI in the preclinical setting is challenging, and most models replicate only certain aspects of clinical TBI. This chapter details the most widely used models of preclinical TBI, including the controlled cortical impact, fluid percussion, blast, and closed head models. Each of these models replicates particular critical aspects of clinical TBI. Prior to selecting a preclinical TBI model, it is important to address what aspect of human TBI is being sought to evaluate. PMID:27604710

  9. Clinical research in the private office setting--ethical issues.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Alan R.; Klein, Jason E.

    2002-01-01

    A new model for performing clinical investigations has emerged in the United States which utilizes networks of physicians practicing in private office settings. This arrangement has sparked much controversy because of the potential conflicts of interest inherent in the dual roles of physician as clinician and investigator as well as the significant direct financial gains reported by some physicians which might impact on the interests of research subjects. We describe some of the ethical concerns and propose some procedural guidelines to safeguard the interests of research subjects participating in clinical trials in private physician offices. These safeguards include: requiring education of all investigators in research ethics, limiting financial incentives, disclosure to subjects of potential conflicts and financial arrangements, creation of an independent resource available to subjects to discuss concerns and answer questions, and development of educational materials to inform all potential subjects about important issues related to clinical research. PMID:12053705

  10. Bridge to the future: nontraditional clinical settings, concepts and issues.

    PubMed

    Faller, H S; Dowell, M A; Jackson, M A

    1995-11-01

    Healthcare restructuring in the wake of healthcare reform places greater emphasis on primary healthcare. Clinical education in acute care settings and existing community health agencies are not compatible with teaching basic concepts, principles and skills fundamental to nursing. Problems of clients in acute care settings are too complex and clients in the community are often too dispersed for necessary faculty support and supervision of beginning nursing students. Nontraditional learning settings offer the baccalaureate student the opportunity to practice fundamental skills of care and address professional skills of negotiation, assertiveness, organization, collaboration and leadership. An overview of faculty designed clinical learning experiences in nontraditional sites such as McDonald's restaurants, inner city churches, YWCA's, the campus community and homes are presented. The legal, ethical and academic issues associated with nontraditional learning settings are discussed in relation to individual empowerment, decision making and evaluation. Implications for the future address the role of the students and faculty as they interact with the community in which they live and practice. PMID:8558279

  11. Order sets utilization in a clinical order entry system.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Daniel; Barbacioru, Catalin; Kahwash, Eiad; Saltz, Joel

    2003-01-01

    An order set is a predefined template that has been utilized in the standard care of hospitals for many years. While in the past, it took the form of pen and paper, today, it is, indeed, electronic. Within order sets are distinct ordering patterns that may yield fruitful results for clinicians and informaticians, alike. Protocols like there electronic counterpart, order sets, provide an 'indication' identifying the clinical scenario of the patient's condition when the ordering event occurred. This 'indication' is rarely captured by individual orders, and provides difficult challenges to developers of information systems. While mandating an 'indication' be entered for every medication or lab order makes the job much more tasking on the physician provider, it is appealing to researchers and accountants. We have attempted to bypasses that consideration by identifying ordering patterns that predict diagnostic related codes (DRGs) and diagnostic codes which would greatly facilitate the information gathering process and still provide a flexible and user friendly physician interface. PMID:14728324

  12. Bortezomib therapy-related lung disease in Japanese patients with multiple myeloma: Incidence, mortality and clinical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Kazutake; Mukai, Harumi Y; Miyazawa, Michiko; Miyao, Makiko; Ogawa, Yoshimasa; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Katoh, Takao; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Gemma, Akihiko; Sakai, Fumikazu; Sugiyama, Yukihiko; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Fukuda, Yuh; Kudoh, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    Because of the potentially high mortality rate (6.5%) associated with bortezomib-induced lung disease (BILD) in Japanese patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, we evaluated the incidence, mortality and clinical features of BILD in a Japanese population. This study was conducted under the Risk Minimization Action Plan (RMAP), which was collaboratively developed by the pharmaceutical industry and public health authority. The RMAP consisted of an intensive dissemination of risk information and a recommended countermeasure to health-care professionals. All patients treated with bortezomib were consecutively registered in the study within 1 year and monitored for emerging BILD. Of the 1010 patients registered, 45 (4.5%) developed BILD, 5 (0.50%) of whom had fatal cases. The median time to BILD onset from the first bortezomib dose was 14.5 days, and most of the patients responded well to corticosteroid therapy. A retrospective review by the Lung Injury Medical Expert Panel revealed that the types with capillary leak syndrome and hypoxia without infiltrative shadows were uniquely and frequently observed in patients with BILD compared with those with conditions associated with other molecular-targeted anticancer drugs. The incidence rate of BILD in Japan remains high compared with that reported in other countries, but the incidence and mortality rates are lower than expected before the introduction of bortezomib in Japan. This study describes the radiographic pattern and clinical characterization of BILD in the Japanese population. The RMAP seemed clinically effective in minimizing the BILD risk among our Japanese population. PMID:24329927

  13. Educational Preparation for the Clinic Job Setting: Clinical Athletic Trainers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Jim; Combs, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Context: Acquiring input from all stakeholders on the importance of existing competencies and suggestions for new ones is essential to competency-based pedagogical design quality. Objective: To survey athletic trainers (ATs) employed in clinical settings to assess their perceptions of the competencies most pertinent to their settings and whether…

  14. Undergraduate peer-assisted learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Zentz, Suzanne E; Kurtz, Christine P; Alverson, Elise M

    2014-03-01

    Peer-assisted learning was implemented at a private university. Senior nursing students were assigned to assist sophomores during their fundamentals clinical experience. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer-assisted learning in the clinical setting and to ascertain students' perceptions of fulfilling the roles of the professional nurse. During a 2-year period, 342 students participated in peer-assisted learning. Major outcomes identified by sophomores were reduced anxiety and increased confidence. A major benefit for seniors was reflection on their professional development, which strengthened their confidence and facilitated transition into the role of professional nurse. Future research should examine the impact of diversity and learning styles on this strategy and faculty perception of peer-assisted learning at achieving learning outcomes and relieving faculty burden. This study supports peer-assisted learning as an effective teaching strategy for learning nursing skills and implementing the roles of the professional nurse. PMID:24512330

  15. Clinical Pearls in Using Antiarrhythmic Drugs in the Outpatient Setting.

    PubMed

    Parker, Mary H; Sanoski, Cynthia A

    2016-02-01

    A role for oral antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) remains in clinical practice for patients with atrial and ventricular arrhythmias in spite of advances in nonpharmacologic therapy. Pharmacists play a vital role in the appropriate use of AAD dosing, administration, adverse effects, interactions, and monitoring. Pharmacists who are involved in providing care to patients with cardiac arrhythmias must remain updated regarding the efficacy and safety of the most commonly used AADs. This review will address key issues for appropriate initiation and maintenance of commonly selected Vaughan-Williams Class Ic and III agents in the outpatient setting. PMID:26602062

  16. Evidence recognition and collection in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, C A

    1999-05-01

    The critical care nurse encounters victims of violence and abuse in the clinical setting. From these patients or from their visitors, evidence can be collected that, when used in legal proceedings, may interrupt the cycle of violence if a perpetrator is identified and found guilty by a court of law. Evidence may be tangible or intangible, and includes what one hears, smells, sees, and touches. This article discusses proper evidence recognition, collection, and preservation. With an understanding of proper forensic techniques, the critical care nurse can be an outstanding patient advocate. PMID:10646460

  17. Story of a Mediation in the Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Morreim, Haavi

    2016-01-01

    Conflicts in the clinical setting can spiral downward with remarkable speed, as parties become ever more incensed and entrenched in their positions. Productive conversations seem unlikely at best. Nevertheless, such situations can sometimes be turned into collaborative problem solving with equally remarkable speed. For this to happen, those providing conflict-resolution services such as mediation need to bring, not just a set of skills, but also some key norms: the process must be voluntary for all; the mediator must abjure giving advice or taking sides, and must honor the privacy of privately offered thoughts. This article describes a conflict that had reached the point of a hospital's requesting judicial coercion. However, a conflict-resolution process was then initiated that, in the end, led to amicable resolution and mended relationships, obviating the need for court orders. This article describes that conflict and the resolution process in detail, along the way annotating specific strategies that are often highly effective. PMID:27045304

  18. Integrative Nursing: Application of Principles Across Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the “triple aim” in the United States—an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings. PMID:25973268

  19. Integrative nursing: application of principles across clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-04-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the "triple aim" in the United States-an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings. PMID:25973268

  20. A study on task-analysis of clinical pathologists as medical consultants in Nihon University Hospital--a Japanese perspective by comparison with current status in the USA.

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, K; Yanai, M; Hosokawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Hoshino, T; Arashima, Y; Hayashi, K; Murakami, J; Tsuchiya, T; Kawano, K

    2000-07-01

    To identify our role and the customers' satisfaction, the on-call consultation service records of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi Hospital (NUIH), were analyzed. Between 1995 and 1998, 1,789 consultation services were recorded, and approximately 40% were from physicians, and 50% were from medical technologists. During office hours, many physicians made contact with us at the office of clinical pathology, the clinical laboratory and other places in the hospital by various means. They asked us to interpret multidisciplinary laboratory data, and to provide the specific information that might affect clinical management. Medical technologists asked for clinical information of patients with extreme measured values and requested that we contact with physicians. In contrast, on weekends/holidays or after routine working hours, physicians sometimes requested non-automated laboratory tests such as peripheral blood smears/bone marrow smears or Gram stains. The major contents of our responses to medical technologists were concerned with blood banking and handling of instruments not to be operated in routine work. These results reconfirm that we are still required to have clinical competence for common laboratory procedures and to have the capability of interpretation of multidisciplinary laboratory data in the university hospital. Traditionally, most Japanese clinical pathologists have been focused their attention on bench work in research laboratories. However, the present study shows that the clinical pathologists need to bridge the real gap between laboratory technology and patient care. Our on-call service system can enhance the education of clinical pathologists, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but also patient care. In addition, in response to a need for customer access to this service with a shortage of clinical pathologists, a more effective method would be to set up a proactive systemic approach in

  1. Molecular epidemiology and clinical spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia in the Japanese population based on comprehensive mutational analyses.

    PubMed

    Ishiura, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yuji; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Saito, Kayoko; Furuya, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Mitsunori; Murata, Miho; Suzuki, Mikiya; Sugiura, Akira; Sawai, Setsu; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ueda, Naohisa; Ichikawa, Yaeko; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is one of the most genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and pyramidal weakness of lower limbs. Because >30 causative genes have been identified, screening of multiple genes is required for establishing molecular diagnosis of individual patients with HSP. To elucidate molecular epidemiology of HSP in the Japanese population, we have conducted mutational analyses of 16 causative genes of HSP (L1CAM, PLP1, ATL1, SPAST, CYP7B1, NIPA1, SPG7, KIAA0196, KIF5A, HSPD1, BSCL2, SPG11, SPG20, SPG21, REEP1 and ZFYVE27) using resequencing microarrays, array-based comparative genomic hybridization and Sanger sequencing. The mutational analysis of 129 Japanese patients revealed 49 mutations in 46 patients, 32 of which were novel. Molecular diagnosis was accomplished for 67.3% (33/49) of autosomal dominant HSP patients. Even among sporadic HSP patients, mutations were identified in 11.1% (7/63) of them. The present study elucidated the molecular epidemiology of HSP in the Japanese population and further broadened the mutational and clinical spectra of HSP. PMID:24451228

  2. Impact of clinical preventive services in the ambulatory setting

    PubMed Central

    Ogola, Gerald; Mercer, Quay; Fong, Jaclyn; DeVol, Edward; Couch, Carl E.; Ballard, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Indicators of the performance of clinical preventive services (CPS) have been adopted in the ambulatory setting to improve quality of care. The impact of CPS was evaluated in a network of 49 primary care practices providing care to an estimated 245,000 adults in the Dallas–Fort Worth area through a sample chart review to determine delivery of recommended evidence-based CPS combined with medical literature estimates of the effectiveness of CPS. In this population in 2005, CPS were estimated to have prevented 36 deaths and 97 incident cases of cancer; 420 coronary heart disease events (including 66 sudden deaths) and 118 strokes; 816 cases of influenza and pneumonia (including 24 hospital admissions); and 87 osteoporosis-related fractures. Thus, CPS have substantial benefits in preventing deaths and illness episodes. PMID:18628969

  3. [Analysis of an intercultural clinical practice in a judicial setting].

    PubMed

    Govindama, Yolande

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses an intercultural clinical practice in a legal setting from an anthropological and psychoanalytical perspective, demonstrating necessary reorganizations inherent to the framework. The culture of the new country and its founding myth being implicit to the judicial framework, the professional intervening introduces psychoanalytical references particularly totemic principles and the symbolic father by making genealogy, a universal object of transmission as guarantee of fundamental taboos of humanity. The metacultural perspective in this approach integrates ethnopsychoanalytical principles put forth by Devereux as well as the method although this latter has been adapted to the framework. This approach allows to re-question Devereux's ethnopsychoanalytical principles by opening the debate on the perspective of a psychoanalytical as well as psychiatric. PMID:18253668

  4. Short-term operational evaluation of a group-parenting program for Japanese mothers with poor psychological status: adopting a Canadian program into the Asian public service setting.

    PubMed

    Goto, Aya; Yabe, Junko; Sasaki, Hitomi; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-07-01

    Although parenting practices differ across various sociocultural settings, scientific research on parenting intervention in Asia is scarce. We adopted a Canadian multilanguage group-based parenting program (Nobody's Perfect) into the Japanese public health service setting and evaluated its impact. Our program was feasible as a public service; was well-accepted among the participants with low psychological status, many of whom were first-time mothers; and had a potential positive impact on the mood of mothers and the self-evaluation of their abilities in society. Our results may facilitate and provide direction for similar research in Asia. PMID:20526928

  5. Opening clinical encounters in an adult musculoskeletal setting.

    PubMed

    Chester, Emily C; Robinson, Natalie C; Roberts, Lisa C

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication between healthcare professionals and their patients is crucial for successful consultations, and can profoundly affect patients' adherence to treatment. Despite this evidence, communication within the physiotherapy profession is still underexplored, in particular, how 'best' to open clinical encounters. This study explores the issue by seeking the preferences of physiotherapists for opening encounters in the adult musculoskeletal outpatient setting. Initially, 42 consultations and 17 first follow-up encounters were observed between qualified physiotherapists and patients with back pain. These encounters were audio-recorded, analysed and used to develop a questionnaire to determine clinicians' preferences for opening encounters. From these findings, a synopsis of the questionnaire was posted on the four most-relevant professional networks of the national, interactive Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (iCSP) website, to canvass opinion more widely. Among the 43 physiotherapists who responded, the preferred 'key clinical question' for an initial encounter was: "Do you want to just tell me a little bit about [your 'problem presentation'] first of all?"; and for follow-up encounters: 'How have you been since I last saw you?' These results provide an important and novel contribution to the profession, as debate on this issue has not previously been published. Although the sample size in this study is small, the aim of this paper is to generate reflection and debate among clinicians on their preferences for opening patient encounters and optimising the non-specific treatment effects. PMID:24809241

  6. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs. PMID:19265856

  7. Applying Organ Clearance Concepts in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To teach doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students how to apply organ clearance concepts in a clinical setting in order to optimize dose management, select the right drug product, and promote better patient-centered care practices. Design A student-focused 5-hour topic entitled "Organ Clearance Concepts: Modeling and Clinical Applications" was developed and delivered to second-year PharmD students. Active-learning techniques, such as reading assignments and thought-provoking questions, and collaborative learning techniques, such as small groups, were used. Student learning was assessed using application cards and a minute paper. Assessment Overall student responses to topic presentation were overwhelmingly positive. The teaching strategies here discussed allowed students to play an active role in their own learning process and provided the necessary connection to keep them motivated, as mentioned in the application cards and minute paper assessments. Students scored an average of 88% on the examination given at the end of the course. Conclusion By incorporating active-learning and collaborative-learning techniques in presenting material on organ clearance concept, students gained a more thorough knowledge of dose management and drug-drug interactions than if the concepts had been presented using a traditional lecture format. This knowledge will help students in solving critical patient situations in a real-world context. PMID:19214275

  8. Essential content of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for bladder cancer: The Japanese Urological Association 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshinobu; Nakaigawa, Noboru

    2016-08-01

    The Japanese Urological Association revised the clinical practice guidelines for bladder cancer in April 2015. This was the first update carried out in the 6 years since the development of the initial clinical practice guidelines for bladder cancer in 2009. The descriptive content was revised, and additions were made with a focus on new-found evidence and advances in the latest medical practices, and on the basis of the increasingly aging population observed in the underlying social context in Japan. An algorithm for the treatment of bladder cancer has been presented as a new trial. In the present article, we will introduce the essential contents and clinical questions that address the present revisions. PMID:27374472

  9. Japanese nationwide surveillance in 2011 of antibacterial susceptibility patterns of clinical isolates from complicated urinary tract infection cases.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Uehara, Shinya; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Shingo; Hayami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Minamitani, Shinichi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Egawa, Shin; Deguchi, Takashi; Matsumoto, Minori; Tanaka, Kazushi; Arakawa, Soichi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kumon, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Kanao; Matsubara, Akio; Wakeda, Hironobu; Amemoto, Yoshinosuke; Onodera, Shoichi; Goto, Hirokazu; Komeda, Hisao; Yamashita, Masuo; Takenaka, Tadasu; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Tsugawa, Masaya; Takahashi, Yoshito; Maeda, Hiroshi; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Ishitoya, Satoshi; Nishimura, Kazuo; Mitsumori, Kenji; Ito, Toru; Togo, Yoshikazu; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ito, Noriyuki; Kanamaru, Sojun; Hirose, Takaoki; Muranaka, Takashi; Yamada, Daisuke; Ishihara, Satoshi; Oka, Hiroya; Inatomi, Hisato; Matsui, Takashi; Kobuke, Makoto; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Kimura, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Takaharu; Kagara, Ichiro; Matsukawa, Masanori; Takahashi, Koichi; Mita, Koji; Kato, Masao; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Kawanishi, Hiroaki; Hashimura, Takayuki; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Shigeta, Masanobu; Koda, Shuntaro; Taguchi, Keisuke; Matsuda, Yohei

    2015-09-01

    To investigate antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of various bacterial pathogens isolated from complicated urinary tract infection (UTI) cases, the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association of Infectious Disease, and the Japanese Society of Clinical Microbiology conducted the second nationwide surveillance from January to September 2011. With the cooperation of 42 medical institutions throughout Japan, 1036 strains belonging to 8 clinically relevant bacterial species were collected. Among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain, the vancomycin (VCM) MIC for 5.5% (3/55) of the strains was 2 μg/mL. Ampicillin, VCM, and linezolid were relatively active against 209 Enterococcus faecalis strains. The proportion of fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant strains was >20%. The MIC90 of FQs against the 382 Escherichia coli strains was 2-64 mg/L and the proportion resistant to FQs was approximately 30%. However, susceptibility of E. coli to sitafloxacin was still high (MIC90 = 2 mg/L). Fifty-eight (15.2%) of 382 E. coli, 6 (4.5%) of 132 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 1 (2.4%) of 41 Klebsiella oxytoca and 4 (6.8%) of 59 Proteus mirabilis strains were suspected of producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. Of 93 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, the proportions resistant to imipenem, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin were 21.5%, 4.3%, and 20.4%, respectively. Four strains (4.3%) were found to be multidrug-resistant. In complicated UTI cases, all of MRSA and E. faecalis were susceptible to all anti-MRSA agents. Sitafloxacin was active against other FQ-resistant E. coli strains. The isolation of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing and multidrug-resistant strains increased. PMID:26166322

  10. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    PubMed

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses today work in practice settings where the expectation is to "draw upon the best evidence to provide the care most appropriate to each patient" (Olsen, Goolsby, & McGinnis, 2009, p. 10) while caring for patients with high acuity in highly specialized settings. Within the nursing profession, the Magnet Recognition Program® advocates for exemplary professional practice and the generation of new knowledge through research and clinical innovation. Nurses working in a clinical setting are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice, but a lack of resources presents challenges to nurses in fully developing their questions and identifying the most appropriate methods to answer them. These challenges often fall into three broad categories: individual nurse characteristics, organizational characteristics, and environmental characteristics (Dobbins, Ciliska, Cockerill, Barnsley, & DiCenso, 2002). Creating a dedicated partnership between nurses and library staff is one method that can overcome these challenges to use existing resources and support nurses who are asking and answering important clinical questions (DePalma, 2005; Vrabel, 2005). 
. PMID:27541547

  11. Japanese; Japanese Songs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This supplementary textbook for students of Japanese presents a collection of 43 songs--folk songs, nursery songs, lullabies, love songs, wedding songs, graduation songs, the national anthem, drinking songs, school songs, and Christmas carols. With the exception of the carols, the musical scores are presented with their Japanese lyrics. The…

  12. [Clinical experience of primaquine use for treatment of vivax and ovale malaria in Japanese travelers].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Taiichiro; Kato, Yasuyuki; Yamauchi, Yuko; Ujiie, Mugen; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohmagari, Norio

    2013-01-01

    Primaquine phosphate has been used to prevent relapse as a radical cure after the acute-phase treatment of vivax and ovale malaria however. Many vivax malaria relapses have been reported following a standard dose of primaquine (15 mg/day for 14 days). A higher dose of primaquine (30 mg/day for 14 days) decreases the relapse rate, and the concomitant risk of gastrointestinal side effects tends to disappear when the drug is administered with food. G6PD deficiency is rare in the Japanese population. Although the relapsed phenomenon is reported globally, the higher dose of primaquine is currently recommended in Japan only for those returning from Southeast Asia or Papua New Guinea. Cases of 18 Japanese, including 13 vivax malaria and 5 ovale malaria, prescribed primaquine at a referral center in Japan, were analyzed retrospectively from 2007-2011. Data on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were extracted from medical records. Of the 18, 10 with vivax malaria were administered the higher dose of primaquine. We found that only one suffered relapse-a vivax malarial case returning from Brazil and treated with the standard dose of primaquine. No ovale malarial case suffered relapse. None, including the 10 prescribed the higher primaquine dose, experienced any adverse side effects. Based on our findings, we recommend a higher dose of primaquine be used to prevent relapse when treating Japanese suffering from vivax malaria. PMID:23484374

  13. Confocal microendoscope for use in a clinical setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovich, Joshua A.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Tanbakuchi, Anthony; Brewer, Molly A.; Sampliner, Richard; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2007-02-01

    A mobile confocal microendoscope for use in a clinical setting has been developed. This system employs an endoscope consisting of a custom designed objective lens with a fiber optic imaging bundle to collect in-vivo images of patients. Some highlights and features of this mobile system include frame rates of up to 30 frames per second, an automated focus mechanism, automated dye delivery, clinician control, and the ability to be used in an area where there is a single 110V outlet. All optics are self-contained and the entire enclosure and catheter can be moved between surgical suites, sterilized and brought online in under 15 minutes. At this time, all data have been collected with a 488 nm laser, but the system is able to have a second laser line added to provide additional imaging capability. Preliminary in vivo results of images from the ovaries using topical fluorescein as a contrast agent are shown. Future plans for the system include use of acridine orange (AO) or SYTO-16 as a nucleic acid stain.

  14. Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Associated Outcomes in the Clinical Setting.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sarah J; Braunschweig, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia refers to age-associated decrease in muscle mass and function. The condition was originally described in the elderly, but emerging evidence suggests that it is also a concern among the chronically ill nonelderly. Currently there are a number of definitions for diagnosing sarcopenia; however, in the clinical setting, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans completed for diagnostic purposes can be utilized to identify CT-defined sarcopenia. Recent studies suggest that prevalence of CT-defined sarcopenia is high among chronically ill patients, ranging from 15%-50% in patients with cancer, 30%-45% with liver failure, and 60%-70% for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Depleted muscle mass is associated with infectious complications, prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, longer hospitalization, greater need for rehabilitation care after hospital discharge, and higher mortality. In consideration of the growing population of older adults with multiple comorbidities, more research is needed to identify sarcopenia and develop interventions that are directed at attenuating or reversal muscle loss. PMID:26703961

  15. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy in Japanese Patients: Clinical Features, Visual Function, and Factors Affecting Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Saho; Saito, Wataru; Saito, Michiyuki; Hashimoto, Yuki; Mori, Shohei; Noda, Kousuke; Namba, Kenichi; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and investigate their relationship with visual function in Japanese patients with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods Fifty-two eyes of 38 Japanese AZOOR patients (31 female and 7 male patients; mean age at first visit, 35.0 years; median follow-up duration, 31 months) were retrospectively collected: 31 untreated eyes with good visual acuity and 21 systemic corticosteroid-treated eyes with progressive visual acuity loss. Variables affecting the logMAR values of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the mean deviation (MD) on Humphrey perimetry at initial and final visits were examined using multiple stepwise linear regression analysis. Results In untreated eyes, the mean MD at the final visit was significantly higher than that at the initial visit (P = 0.00002). In corticosteroid-treated eyes, the logMAR BCVA and MD at the final visit were significantly better than the initial values (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). The final logMAR BCVA was 0.0 or less in 85% of patients. Variables affecting initial visual function were moderate anterior vitreous cells, myopia severity, and a-wave amplitudes on electroretinography; factors affecting final visual function were the initial MD values, female sex, moderate anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy. Conclusions Our data indicated that visual functions in enrolled patients significantly improved spontaneously or after systemic corticosteroids therapy, suggesting that Japanese patients with AZOOR have good visual outcomes during the follow-up period of this study. Furthermore, initial visual field defects, gender, anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy affected final visual functions in these patients. PMID:25919689

  16. Students' Perceptions of Clinical Attachments across Rural and Metropolitan Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Patricia M.; McLean, Rick; Hyde, Sarah; Hendry, Graham

    2008-01-01

    For many years, medical students at the University of Sydney undertook their clinical clerkships in traditional metropolitan teaching hospitals, which were regarded as the "gold standard" for clinical training. In 2001 the university established a rural clinical school at which increasing numbers of students now complete a significant proportion…

  17. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version Score of Schizophrenic Patients in a Japanese Clinical Sample

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Takayoshi; Aleksic, Branko; Kikuchi, Tsutomu; Banno, Masahiro; Kohmura, Kunihiro; Adachi, Yasunori; Kawano, Naoko; Iidaka, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Cognitive impairment in schizophrenia strongly relates to social outcome and is a good candidate for endophenotypes. When we accurately measure drug efficacy or effects of genes or variants relevant to schizophrenia on cognitive impairment, clinical factors that can affect scores on cognitive tests, such as age and severity of symptoms, should be considered. To elucidate the effect of clinical factors, we conducted multiple regression analysis using scores of the Continuous Performance Test Identical Pairs Version (CPT-IP), which is often used to measure attention/vigilance in schizophrenia. Methods. We conducted the CPT-IP (4-4 digit) and examined clinical information (sex, age, education years, onset age, duration of illness, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) scores) in 126 schizophrenia patients in Japanese population. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of clinical factors. Results. Age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose, and PANSS-negative symptom score were associated with mean d′ score in patients. These three clinical factors explained about 28% of the variance in mean d′ score. Conclusions. As conclusion, CPT-IP score in schizophrenia patients is influenced by age, chlorpromazine-equivalent dose and PANSS negative symptom score. PMID:22966454

  18. The Japanese containerless experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, Hisao

    1990-01-01

    There are three sets of Japanese containerless experiments. The first is Drop dynamics research. It consists of acoustic levitation and large amplitude drop oscillation. The second is Optical materials processing in an acoustic levitation furnace. And the third is Electrostatic levitator development by two different Japanese companies.

  19. Phase II clinical study of eribulin monotherapy in Japanese patients with metastatic breast cancer who had well-defined taxane resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Okubo, Katsuhiko; Kimizuka, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi; Sakurai, Takashi; Ishizuna, Kazuo; Hata, Satoshi; Kai, Toshihiro; Kurosumi, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    No clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of eribulin monotherapy has been obtained by a prospective clinical study in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who had well-defined taxane resistance. The present Phase II, multicenter, single-arm, open-label study aimed to obtain the evidence. Japanese female patients, aged 33-74 years who had the metastasis of taxane-resistant and histopathologically confirmed breast cancer, received eribulin mesylate 1.4 mg/m(2) (equivalent to eribulin 1.23 mg/m(2) [expressed as free base]) as a 2- to 5-min intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day cycle. The primary endpoint was the clinical benefit rate (CBR) [complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and long-term stable disease (LSD) ≥24 weeks]. A total of 51 patients underwent chemotherapy cycles (median 4; range 1-42 cycles). The CBR was 39.2 % (CR 2.0 %; PR 23.5 %; and LSD 13.7 %), and the rate of progressive disease was 49.0 %. The median progression-free survival and the median overall survival were 3.6 months [95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.6-4.6 months] and 11.7 months (95 % CI 9.2-14.2 months), respectively. Grade 3 or greater adverse events were leukopenia (23.5 %), neutropenia (35.3 %), anemia (5.9 %), and febrile neutropenia (7.8 %). The incidences of grade 3 and 4 peripheral sensory neuropathy were 2.0 and 0 %, respectively. Eribulin showed a clinically manageable tolerability profile by dose adjustments or symptomatic treatment. Eribulin was effective and well tolerated in heavily pretreated patients with MBC who had well-defined taxane resistance, thus providing a potential therapeutic option in the clinical settings. PMID:27125669

  20. Cost of Dry Eye Treatment in an Asian Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Waduthantri, Samanthila; Yong, Siew Sian; Tan, Chien Hua; Shen, Liang; Lee, Man Xin; Nagarajan, Sangeetha; Hla, Mynt Htoon; Tong, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the cost and patterns of expenditure of dry eye treatment. Methodology We retrieved data on the type and cost of dry eye treatment in Singapore National Eye Centre from pharmacy and clinic inventory databases over a 2 year period (2008–2009) retrospectively. According to the type of treatment, data were sorted into 7 groups; meibomien gland disease (MGD) treatment, preservative free lubricant eye drops, preserved lubricant eye drops, lubricant ointments and gels, cyclosporine eye drops, oral supplements and non-pharmacological treatments/procedures. Each recorded entry was considered as one patient episode (PE). Comparisons in each group between two years were carried out using Pearson Chi-Square test. Significance level was set at alpha  = 0.05. Results Cost data from 54,052 patients were available for analysis. Total number of recorded PEs was 132,758. Total annual expenditure on dry eye treatment for year 2008 and 2009 were US$1,509,372.20 and US$1,520,797.80 respectively. Total expenditure per PE in year 2008 and 2009 were US$22.11 and US$23.59 respectively. From 2008 to 2009, there was a 0.8% increase in total annual expenditure and 6.69% increase in expenditure per PE. Pharmacological treatment attributes to 99.2% of the total expenditure with lubricants accounting for 79.3% of the total pharmacological treatment expenditure. Total number of units purchased in preservative free lubricants, cyclosporine eye drops and MGD therapy have increased significantly (p<0.001) whereas number of units purchased in preserved lubricants and ointments/gels have reduced significantly (p<0.001) from 2008 to 2009. Conclusion Dry Eye imposes a significant direct burden to health care expenditure even without considering indirect costs. Health care planners should be aware that these direct costs appear to increase over the time and more so for particular types of medications. Given the limitations of socio-economic data, true societal costs of Dry

  1. How to set up a nurse-led clinic.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard

    2016-05-11

    Nurse-led clinics are a vital part of UK health care. They are diverse and are therefore hard to define, but they involve nurses having their own patient caseload and increased autonomy, often using advanced clinical skills such as physical assessment, diagnosis and medicines management. PMID:27206209

  2. Perceptions of Anatomy: Critical Components in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Leong, Shou Ling; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution in undergraduate medical school curricula has significantly impacted anatomy education. This study investigated the perceived role of clinical anatomy and evaluated perceptions of medical students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge in the clinic. The aim of this study was to develop a framework to enhance anatomical educational…

  3. Labor Resource Use for Endoscopic Gastric Cancer Screening in Japanese Primary Care Settings: A Work Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Rei; Arai, Kohei; Kitada, Hirotsugu; Ogoshi, Kazuei; Hamashima, Chisato

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endoscopic gastric cancer is screened in primary care settings, but how much resources are required to deliver this service remains unknown. This study determines how much time and human resources are used for endoscopic gastric cancer and for each component of the procedure. Materials and Methods Upper endoscopic procedures were prospectively observed using a work sampling technique. This study analyzed data from patients who underwent upper endoscopic gastric cancer screening at primary care clinics that provide this service. The main outcome measurements were time intervals and total time intervals that considered the numbers of simultaneously engaged workers and were calculated as the product of time intervals and the number of workers, and the labor cost of individual components of each procedure. Results We observed 44 upper endoscopic procedures at four outpatient clinics. Pre-procedure (preparation and pre-medication), procedure (from intubation to extubation) and post-procedure (recovery and cleaning) accounted for 34.1%, 10.6% and 54.4% of the total time, respectively. Of the overall total time intervals (mean: 4453 person-seconds), 29.3%, 14.4% and 55.7% of the total time was devoted to pre-procedure, procedure and post-procedure, respectively. The post-procedure was the most time- and labor-consuming component from the viewpoints of both total time and labor cost. Conclusions Most of the time taken to complete endoscopic gastric cancer screening is consumed by preparation, pre-medication and post-procedures in which nurses play key roles. PMID:24523875

  4. Placing wireless tablets in clinical settings for patient education

    PubMed Central

    Stribling, Judy C.; Richardson, Joshua E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The authors explored the feasibility and possible benefit of tablet-based educational materials for patients in clinic waiting areas. Methods We distributed eight tablets preloaded with diagnosis-relevant information in two clinic waiting areas. Patients were surveyed about satisfaction, usability, and effects on learning. Technical issues were resolved. Results Thirty-seven of forty patients completed the survey. On average, the patients were satisfied in all categories. Conclusions Placing tablet-based educational materials in clinic waiting areas is relatively easy to implement. Patients using tablets reported satisfaction across three domains: usability, education, and satisfaction. PMID:27076806

  5. Clinical significance of visceral adiposity assessed by computed tomography: A Japanese perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ryo, Miwa; Kishida, Ken; Nakamura, Tadashi; Yoshizumi, Tohru; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal obesity, rather than total amount of fat, is linked to obesity-related disorders. Visceral adiposity is an important component of obesity-related disorders in Japanese individuals with a mild degree of adiposity compared with Western subjects. In 1983, our group reported techniques for body fat analysis using computed tomography (CT) and established the concept of visceral fat obesity in which intra-abdominal fat accumulation is an important factor in the development of obesity-related complications, such as diabetes, lipid disorders, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Our group also established ideal imaging conditions for determining abdominal fat area at the umbilical level CT scan. Visceral fat area (VFA) measured in a single slice at L4 level correlated significantly with the total abdominal visceral fat volume measured on multislice CT scan. In a large-scale study of a Japanese population, the mean number of obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia and/or hypertriglyceridemia, and hyperglycemia) was greater than 1.0 at 100 cm2 of VFA, irrespective of gender, age and body mass index. Our group also demonstrated that reduction of visceral fat accumulation subsequent to voluntary lifestyle modification, “Hokenshido”, correlated with a decrease in the number of obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors. It is important to select the most appropriate subjects from the general population (e.g., non-obese subjects with a cluster of risk factors for the metabolic syndrome) that are most suitable for body weight reduction, with the goal of preventing atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25071881

  6. Provider and clinic cultural competence in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-03-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  7. Provider and Clinic Cultural Competence in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Paez, Kathryn A; Allen, Jerilyn K; Carson, Kathryn A; Cooper, Lisa A

    2008-01-01

    A multilevel approach that enhances the cultural competence of clinicians and healthcare systems is suggested as one solution to reducing racial/ethnic disparities in healthcare. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine if there is a relationship between the cultural competence of primary care providers and the clinics where they work. Forty-nine providers from 23 clinics in Baltimore, Maryland and Wilmington, Delaware, USA. completed an on-line survey which included items assessing provider and clinic cultural competence. Using simple linear regression, it was found that providers with attitudes reflecting greater cultural motivation to learn were more likely to work in clinics with a higher percent of nonwhite staff, and those offering cultural diversity training and culturally adapted patient education materials. More culturally appropriate provider behavior was associated with a higher percent of nonwhite staff in the clinic, and culturally adapted patient education materials. Enhancing provider and clinic cultural competence may be synergistic strategies for reducing healthcare disparities. PMID:18164114

  8. Clinical efficacy of oral risedronate therapy in Japanese patients with Paget's disease of bone.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Masaya; Imanishi, Yasuo; Nagata, Yuki; Ishii, Akira; Kobayashi, Ikue; Mori, Katsuhito; Ito, Manabu; Miki, Takami; Nishizawa, Yoshiki; Inaba, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a chronic disorder characterized by localized bone regions with excessive bone turnover. Although oral risedronate (17.5 mg daily for 8 weeks) was recently approved in Japan, its efficacy is not well understood. We retrospectively examined the efficacy of oral risedronate in PDB patients in a clinical setting. Eleven patients whose serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level exceeded the upper limit of the normal range were treated. Patients whose ALP levels normalized and remained so for 12 months after therapy initiation were defined as responders. Treatment was repeated if bone pain recurred or if serum ALP levels increased at least 25% above the nadir. Six patients (55%) were responsive to the therapy. A higher prevalence of skull lesions, higher serum calcium levels at treatment initiation and antecedent treatments of bisphosphonates were predictors of resistance against the therapy. Fresh frozen serum samples obtained from some treatment sessions were evaluated for metabolic bone markers such as bone-specific ALP (BAP), type I procollagen N-terminal pro-peptide (PINP), N-treminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen and C-treminal crosslinking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX). A significant reduction of P1NP preceded that of serum ALP levels in the responders, which was followed by a similar occurrence for BAP and osteocalcin (BGP) levels. A temporary decrease in CTX levels was noted. No significant changes in markers (including ALP level) were observed in non-responder and repeat-treatment groups. P1NP levels may be more useful than ALP levels in assessing treatment efficacy. Repeat treatment effectiveness for the repeat-treatment group was limited. PMID:25319558

  9. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaw (BRONJ) in Japanese population: a case series of 13 patients at our clinic.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takeshi; Shibahara, Takahiko; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Nobuharu; Shibui, Takeo; Yakushiji, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Ogane, Satoshi; Murayama, Masato; Sekine, Riyo; Nakata, Erika; Fujimoto, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) affects quality of life and is an important problem for dentists. A Japanese position paper on BRONJ was published in 2010. The purpose of this study was to review clinical data on the treatment of BRONJ obtained at the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Tokyo Dental College, Chiba Hospital to further our understanding of this disease. A total of 13 patients (6 men and 7 women) were included. All the patients included in this study had received Bisphosphonate (BP) therapy and had BRONJ. Five of them (38.5%) had received oral BP therapy for osteoporosis, while the remaining 8 (61.5%) had received parenteral BP therapy for bone metastases from breast or prostate cancer. Osteoporosis patients were treated with risedronate or alendronate. Breast or prostate cancer patients were treated with zoledronate. Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated with corticosteroid. Three patients had diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients were treated with antibiotics, while 5 underwent surgical treatment. Discontinuation of BP was recorded in 7 patients during dental treatment. Sequestration was observed in 6 patients during an 11-month follow-up. Eventually, healing and improvement of the oral mucosa were observed in 3 patients. The current standard treatment for BRONJ does not always provide good results. It is necessary to accumulate further clinical data to establish more effective treatment strategies for BRONJ. PMID:23903583

  10. Efficacy and Clinical Characteristics of Liraglutide in Japanese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Iuchi, Takujiro; Kurihara, Susumu; Inoue, Ikuo; Katayama, Shigehiro; Inukai, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Liraglutide was first released in Japan as a long-acting once-daily glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist. The maximum dose in Japan is 0.9 mg/day, which is half of that used in the United States and the European Union (1.8 mg/day). The efficacy of this maximum allowable dose of liraglutide for Japanese patients and the profiles of those patients for whom this agent should be recommended remain unclear. Methods This study aimed to examine the effective use of liraglutide in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. We administered liraglutide to 60 patients, who had been managed with oral hypoglycemic agents or diet and exercise therapy only, during a period of 6 months. Results Though HbA1c levels significantly decreased, by approximately 1.5%, after 6 months of liraglutide administration, no significant changes in body weights were observed. The 0.6 mg dose was effective in approximately 40% of patients. In contrast, the effects of a dose increase from 0.6 mg to 0.9 mg were small. The greatest efficacy, as shown by a 2.5% HbA1c decrease, was achieved in non-obese patients. Thus, efficacy decreased as the degree of obesity increased. In addition, efficacy was higher in patients who had a diabetes duration of less than 10 years and was also higher in the group that had a low sulfonylurea (SU) index, when we define the SU index as mg/glimepiride × years of treatment. Conclusions As appetite suppressions and associated decreases in body weights were not observed in obese patients, the efficacy of liraglutide at 0.9 mg did not appear to be high. Rather, it appeared to be highly effective for patients who were non-obese and for whom amelioration of blood glucose elevations could be anticipated via the stimulation of insulin secretion. Therefore, we found that liraglutide at doses of 0.9 mg was highly effective in non-obese patients who were in the early stages of diabetes and was particularly effective in patients who had not yet been administered SU agents

  11. Chairside Assisting Skill Evaluation (CASE). Clinical Setting. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innovative Programming Systems, Minneapolis, Minn.

    These checklists are designed for use during the dental assistant student's extramural clinical experience assignment. Checklists test students on their knowledge of terminology, equipment, procedures, and patient relations. Objectives are listed outline style with columns to check progress during a first and a second evaluation. Areas included…

  12. [Reflecting on a religious conversion event in a clinical setting].

    PubMed

    Binkowski, Gabriel; Baubet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    What should be the clinical approach to the event represented by a religious conversion, adherence or attraction to extreme groups and ideas? It requires a conceptual analysis, an ethical and epistemological approach at the centre of social situations presenting a high level of ambiguity, tinged even with a certain sense of unreality, as is being experienced in France. PMID:26790594

  13. Preservice Teachers' Planning and Teaching Behaviors in a Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byra, Mark; Marks, Mary C.

    This study investigated selected planning and teaching behaviors in 15 undergraduate physical education-teacher education majors over 8 weeks of clinical teaching experience, examining the effect of databased feedback intervention on their preactive and interactive behaviors. Each preservice teacher planned and taught two 30-minute lessons (in…

  14. A spectrum of clinical presentations in seven Japanese patients with vitamin d deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takuo; Kotani, Tomoo; Miyoshi, Yoko; Santo, Yoko; Hirai, Haruhiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Shima, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kazuo; Nakajima, Shigeo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the reemergence of vitamin D deficiency in developed countries has been pointed out. Vitamin D deficiency is diagnosed based on the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level. However, its normal range is still controversial, making the diagnosis of vitamin D deficiency difficult. Here, we present seven Japanese patients diagnosed with vitamin D deficiency. Three patients complained of leg bowing, and the other four of tetany. The patients with leg bowing were toddlers. Radiographic surveys demonstrated evidence of rickets. Laboratory findings showed decreased levels of serum inorganic phosphorus and increased levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and intact-parathyroid hormone (iPTH). The serum levels of 25OHD were relatively low, ranging from 13 to 15.2 ng/ml. Of the patients with tetany, three were young infants. Laboratory findings showed decreased levels of serum calcium and increased levels of ALP and iPTH. The serum levels of 25OHD were markedly decreased (below 8 ng/ml). Thus, these results indicate that relatively low levels of 25OHD can cause rickets, a symptom of vitamin D deficiency, and that clinicians should therefore carefully evaluate the levels of 25OHD. PMID:24790316

  15. Clinical Guide to Music Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Wong, MT-BC presents tools and information designed to arm the entry-level music therapist (or an experienced MT-BC new to rehabilitation settings) with basic knowledge and materials to develop or work in a music therapy program treating people with stroke, brain injury, and those who are ventilator dependent. Ms. Wong offers goals and…

  16. Best Practices in Assessment for School and Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, H. Booney, Ed.

    This book is designed to provide insight into the ways in which psychologists conduct psychoeducational assessments in a variety of settings. Each contributed chapter gives a detailed and practical discussion of a particular assessment instrument or strategy along with a detailed case study. Chapters have the following titles and authors:…

  17. Bioethics for clinicians: 25. Teaching bioethics in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    McKneally, M F; Singer, P A

    2001-04-17

    Bioethics is now taught in every Canadian medical school. Canada needs a cadre of teachers who can help clinicians learn bioethics. Our purpose is to encourage clinician teachers to accept this important responsibility and to provide practical advice about teaching bioethics to clinicians as an integral part of good clinical medicine. We use 5 questions to focus the discussion: Why should I teach? What should I teach? How should I teach? How should I evaluate? How should I learn? PMID:11338804

  18. Imagery in the clinical setting: a tool for healing.

    PubMed

    Reed, Terry

    2007-06-01

    This article addresses the why and how of imagery and its relation with holistic theories. The description of clinical applications, program development, and research demonstrates successful interventions in virtually every area of nursing. Case examples show the profound healing that is experienced by the patient and the nurse simultaneously through this work. Imagery is harmless, is time- and cost-effective, and creates a healing partnership between the nurse and patient. PMID:17544682

  19. Ongoing evaluation of PACS in a clinical setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefler, Martin; Russell, Edward

    1992-05-01

    The radiology department of Jackson Memorial Hospital processes 255,000 clinical examinations each year -- 65,000 of which are portable x rays. Film transportation and loss are major obstacles to the smooth operation of this department. To assist in the solution of these problems we have designed and begun the piecemeal installation of a clinical PACS. This system is based on a platform of IBM RISC/6000 computers and software developed by Genesys Corporation. The initial installation involved the digitization of the portable x rays from three ICUs. The images (in the form of a matrix of 2048 X 1648 pixels) are then entered into the network and can be viewed simultaneously in the radiology department and in the ICU. The second phase of installation, involving the images from two CT scanners and two MRI scanners is currently underway. We have evaluated the system from several standpoints. The first is user acceptance. The users are the radiologists who must make the diagnosis at the workstation and the referring physicians who need the diagnosis quickly but also require the image. The radiologists must be comfortable with their diagnosis based on the images presented at the two viewer workstation. This is compared to the use of a multiviewer which presents many radiographs simultaneously. The second parameter for evaluation involves the impact on patient care in terms of the time elapsed between the taking of the radiograph and the presentation to the physician of the image and the diagnosis.

  20. Transitioning Pharmacogenomics into the Clinical Setting: Training Future Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Amber; Benton, Cristina S.; Scolaro, Kelly L.; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Bradley, Courtney L.; Suzuki, Oscar T.; Wang, Nan; Wiltshire, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics, once hailed as a futuristic approach to pharmacotherapy, has transitioned to clinical implementation. Although logistic and economic limitations to clinical pharmacogenomics are being superseded by external measures such as preemptive genotyping, implementation by clinicians has met resistance, partly due to a lack of education. Pharmacists, with extensive training in pharmacology and pharmacotherapy and accessibility to patients, are ideally suited to champion clinical pharmacogenomics. This study aimed to analyze the outcomes of an innovative pharmacogenomic teaching approach. Second-year student pharmacists enrolled in a required, 15-week pharmaceutical care lab course in 2015 completed educational activities including lectures and small group work focusing on practical pharmacogenomics. Reflecting the current landscape of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic testing, students were offered 23andMe genotyping. Students completed surveys regarding their attitudes and confidence on pharmacogenomics prior to and following the educational intervention. Paired pre- and post-intervention responses were analyzed with McNemar's test for binary comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for Likert items. Responses between genotyped and non-genotyped students were analyzed with Fisher's exact test for binary comparisons and the Mann-Whitney U-test for Likert items. Responses were analyzed for all student pharmacists who voluntarily completed the pre-intervention survey (N = 121, 83% response) and for student pharmacists who completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys (N = 39, 27% response). Of those who completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys, 59% obtained genotyping. Student pharmacists demonstrated a significant increase in their knowledge of pharmacogenomic resources (17.9 vs. 56.4%, p < 0.0001) and confidence in applying pharmacogenomic information to manage patients' drug therapy (28.2 vs. 48.7%, p = 0.01), particularly if the student

  1. Transitioning Pharmacogenomics into the Clinical Setting: Training Future Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Frick, Amber; Benton, Cristina S; Scolaro, Kelly L; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Bradley, Courtney L; Suzuki, Oscar T; Wang, Nan; Wiltshire, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics, once hailed as a futuristic approach to pharmacotherapy, has transitioned to clinical implementation. Although logistic and economic limitations to clinical pharmacogenomics are being superseded by external measures such as preemptive genotyping, implementation by clinicians has met resistance, partly due to a lack of education. Pharmacists, with extensive training in pharmacology and pharmacotherapy and accessibility to patients, are ideally suited to champion clinical pharmacogenomics. This study aimed to analyze the outcomes of an innovative pharmacogenomic teaching approach. Second-year student pharmacists enrolled in a required, 15-week pharmaceutical care lab course in 2015 completed educational activities including lectures and small group work focusing on practical pharmacogenomics. Reflecting the current landscape of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomic testing, students were offered 23andMe genotyping. Students completed surveys regarding their attitudes and confidence on pharmacogenomics prior to and following the educational intervention. Paired pre- and post-intervention responses were analyzed with McNemar's test for binary comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for Likert items. Responses between genotyped and non-genotyped students were analyzed with Fisher's exact test for binary comparisons and the Mann-Whitney U-test for Likert items. Responses were analyzed for all student pharmacists who voluntarily completed the pre-intervention survey (N = 121, 83% response) and for student pharmacists who completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys (N = 39, 27% response). Of those who completed both pre- and post-intervention surveys, 59% obtained genotyping. Student pharmacists demonstrated a significant increase in their knowledge of pharmacogenomic resources (17.9 vs. 56.4%, p < 0.0001) and confidence in applying pharmacogenomic information to manage patients' drug therapy (28.2 vs. 48.7%, p = 0.01), particularly if the student

  2. Applications of CYP450 testing in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Samer, C F; Lorenzini, K Ing; Rollason, V; Daali, Y; Desmeules, J A

    2013-06-01

    Interindividual variability in drug response is a major clinical problem. Polymedication and genetic polymorphisms modulating drug-metabolising enzyme activities (cytochromes P450, CYP) are identified sources of variability in drug responses. We present here the relevant data on the clinical impact of the major CYP polymorphisms (CYP2D6, CYP2C19 and CYP2C9) on drug therapy where genotyping and phenotyping may be considered, and the guidelines developed when available. CYP2D6 is responsible for the oxidative metabolism of up to 25% of commonly prescribed drugs such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, opioids, antiarrythmics and tamoxifen. The ultrarapid metaboliser (UM) phenotype is recognised as a cause of therapeutic inefficacy of antidepressant, whereas an increased risk of toxicity has been reported in poor metabolisers (PMs) with several psychotropics (desipramine, venlafaxine, amitriptyline, haloperidol). CYP2D6 polymorphism influences the analgesic response to prodrug opioids (codeine, tramadol and oxycodone). In PMs for CYP2D6, reduced analgesic effects have been observed, whereas in UMs cases of life-threatening toxicity have been reported with tramadol and codeine. CYP2D6 PM phenotype has been associated with an increased risk of toxicity of metoprolol, timolol, carvedilol and propafenone. Although conflicting results have been reported regarding the association between CYP2D6 genotype and tamoxifen effects, CYP2D6 genotyping may be useful in selecting adjuvant hormonal therapy in postmenopausal women. CYP2C19 is responsible for metabolising clopidogrel, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and some antidepressants. Carriers of CYP2C19 variant alleles exhibit a reduced capacity to produce the active metabolite of clopidogrel, and are at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. For PPIs, it has been shown that the mean intragastric pH values and the Helicobacter pylori eradication rates were higher in carriers of CYP2C19 variant alleles. CYP2C19 is

  3. Pattern of astigmatism in a clinical setting in Maldives☆

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of refractive errors have never been reported in Maldives. This study aims to dissect astigmatism and provide a general view in context of this island country. Methods A clinic based cross sectional study was designed with 277 patients, aged ≥3.5 years and with a primary astigmatism of ≥−1.00 diopters (D). They underwent complete eye examination and a vector analysis was done. Results Mean age was 28.58 (SD 19.15) years. Astigmatic magnitude depended on age (p < 0.05) but not on gender (p > 0.05). Severity of visual impairment after refractive correction was very less, with only 2.2% having visual acuity ≤6/60. Mean spherical, spherical equivalent and astigmatic refraction were −1.35 (SD 2.94 D), −2.40 (SD 3.04) and −2.12 (SD 1.11 D), respectively. Between fellow eyes, refractive and corneal astigmatism highly correlated (0.83 and 0.73). Fifty eyes (18.1%) had an astigmatic error of ≥−3.00 D which peaked in the second and third decades of life (p < 0.0001) and was corneal in origin (p < 0.0001). Internal J45 and J0 tended to be more negative with increasing age, showing a trend toward against the rule astigmatism. Correlation between corneal and refractive J0 and J45 were 0.88 and 0.62 (p < 0.0001). With the rule astigmatism was more common followed by against the rule and oblique. Conclusion In conclusion, this study inferred that among patients with relatively higher magnitude of astigmatism attending to the clinics in Maldives, younger patients are affected more, which could possibly link to the environment, genetics and nutrition. The probable association between nutrition and astigmatism needs to be investigated to fill the gap in literature. PMID:25800279

  4. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Background Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. Design A survey design was used. Method The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Results Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Conclusion Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Relevance to clinical practice Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. PMID:24460862

  5. Peer Assisted Learning in the Clinical Setting: An Activity Systems Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational…

  6. Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Nabeshima, T; Buerano, C C

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an inflammation of the central nervous system in humans and animals, specifically horses and cattle. The disease, which can sometimes be fatal, is caused by the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), of which there are five genotypes (genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). The transmission cycle of the virus involves pigs and wild birds as virus amplifiers and mosquitoes as vectors for transferring the virus between amplifying hosts and to dead- end hosts, i.e. humans, horses and cattle. In horses and cattle the disease is usually asymptomatic, but when clinical signs do occur they include fever, decreased appetite, frothing at the mouth, rigidity of the legs and recumbency, and neurological signs, such as convulsive fits, circling, marked depression and disordered consciousness. In pigs, it can cause abortion and stillbirths. At present, the virus is detected in a wide area covering eastern and southern Asia, Indonesia, northern Australia, Papua New Guinea and Pakistan. JEV RNA has also been detected in Italy, first in dead birds in 1997 and 2000 and then in mosquitoes in 2010. Genotype shift, i.e. a change of genotype from genotype 3 to genotype 1, has occurred in some countries, namely Japan, South Korea, Chinese Taipei and Vietnam. Laboratory methods are available for confirming the causative agent of the disease. There are control measures to prevent or minimise infection and, among them, vaccination is one of the most important and one which should be adopted in endemic and epidemic areas. PMID:26601447

  7. Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus. JEV is prevalent in much of Asia and the Western Pacific, with over 4 billion people living at risk of infection. In the absence of antiviral intervention, vaccination is the only strategy to develop long-term sustainable protection against JEV infection. Over the past half-century, a mouse brain-derived inactivated vaccine has been used internationally for active immunization. To date, however, JEV is still a clinically important, emerging, and re-emerging human pathogen of global significance. In recent years, production of the mouse brain-derived vaccine has been discontinued, but 3 new cell culture-derived vaccines are available in various parts of the world. Here we review current aspects of JEV biology, summarize the 4 types of JEV vaccine, and discuss the potential of an infectious JEV cDNA technology for future vaccine development. PMID:24161909

  8. Clinical data mining related to the Japanese kampo concept "hie" (oversensitivity to coldness) in men and pre- and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, H; Munakata, K; Katayama, K; Yamaguchi, R; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Watanabe, K

    2014-01-01

    "Hie" is a subjective oversensitivity to cold and a condition experienced in 60% of Japanese citizens. The condition of hie has not been documented in Western medicine. However, in Kampo medicine, hie is an important target of treatment, because it has been considered one of the sources of all kinds of diseases. This study aimed to clarify the symptoms and findings associated with hie and contribute to increased precision in hie diagnosis. During 2005-2006, data from interviews of 1691 patients during their initial visit to the Kampo Clinic of Keio University Hospital were analyzed using a classification and regression tree (CART) analysis, a data mining technique. Symptoms and findings characteristic of each group are follows as, postmenopausal women: fatigability, absence of lower abdominal pain, and absence of hot flashes of feet: women with menstruation: leg swelling, knee pain, and abdominal pain; men: insomnia, leg weakness, and absence of excess saliva. From the perspective of Kampo medicine the result suggested that the feature of hie condition in postmenopausal women, women with menstruation, and men is statistically different. PMID:24707313

  9. Clinical characterization and identification of duplication breakpoints in a Japanese family with Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2.

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Daisuke; Yamada, Kenichiro; Nomura, Noriko; Naiki, Misako; Kimura, Reiko; Yamada, Yasukazu; Kumagai, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Kumiko; Miyake, Yoshishige; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki

    2014-04-01

    Xq28 duplication syndrome including MECP2 is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by axial hypotonia at infancy, severe intellectual disability, developmental delay, mild characteristic facial appearance, epilepsy, regression, and recurrent infections in males. We identified a Japanese family of Xq28 duplications, in which the patients presented with cerebellar ataxia, severe constipation, and small feet, in addition to the common clinical features. The 488-kb duplication spanned from L1CAM to EMD and contained 17 genes, two pseudo genes, and three microRNA-coding genes. FISH and nucleotide sequence analyses demonstrated that the duplication was tandem and in a forward orientation, and the duplication breakpoints were located in AluSc at the EMD side, with a 32-bp deletion, and LTR50 at the L1CAM side, with "tc" and "gc" microhomologies at the duplication breakpoints, respectively. The duplicated segment was completely segregated from the grandmother to the patients. These results suggest that the duplication was generated by fork-stalling and template-switching at the AluSc and LTR50 sites. This is the first report to determine the size and nucleotide sequences of the duplicated segments at Xq28 of three generations of a family and provides the genotype-phenotype correlation of the patients harboring the specific duplicated segment. PMID:24478188

  10. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  11. "Perpetual Problem-Solving": An Ethnographic Study of Clinical Reasoning in a Therapeutic Recreation Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Susan L.; LeBlanc, Adrienne; Booth, Rhonda

    2002-01-01

    Reviews literature on the concept and practice of clinical reasoning, presenting evidence of clinical reasoning in a therapeutic recreation setting. Data from observations of and interviews with recreation therapists and clients in a Canadian rehabilitation hospital provided evidence of therapists' clinical reasoning practices which supported the…

  12. Things Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigeta, Jessie M.

    Presented in this booklet are brief descriptions of items and activities that are symbolic of Japanese culture. Some of the items and activities described include Japanese musical instruments and records, toys and crafts, traditional clothing and accessories, and food utensils. Several recipes for Japanese dishes are provided. Lists of pertinent…

  13. Usage of Multilingual Mobile Translation Applications in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    /39, median=4, IQR=2.5), although the app was perceived as easy-to-use (36/39, median=6, IQR=3) and there were no obvious problems with the usability of the device (36/39, median=6, IQR=2). Conclusions The discrepancy between the expert ratings for xprompt (collected from the App Store and online) and the opinions of the study’s participants can probably be explained by the differing approaches of the two user groups. The experts had clear expectations, whereas, without a more thorough introduction, our study participants perceived using the app as too time consuming in relation to the expected benefit. The introduction of such tools in today’s busy care settings should therefore be more carefully planned to heighten acceptance of new tools. Still, the low return rate of the questionnaires only allows for speculations on the data, and further research is necessary. Trial Registration This study was approved by the local institutional review board (IRB), Trial ID number: 1145-2011. PMID:25100677

  14. Japanese language and Japanese science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2003-08-01

    Japanese mathematical scientists including astronomers, physicists, and mathematicians obtain ideas in Japanese, discuss their problems in Japanese, and arrive at conclusions in Japanese, and yet they write their results in foreign languages such as English. This uncomfortable situation has continued for nearly one hundred years and has had serious effects on Japanese science. In this short report, the author discusses and analyses these effects. In order to put Japanese science on a sound basis, the author proposes to increase the number of articles, reviews and textbooks in Japanese, first by translation and second by the voluntary efforts of scientists themselves. As centers devoted to this activity, the author proposes to construct "Airborne Libraries" which are maintained and accumulate in an electronic form the scientific documents written in Japanese.

  15. Amebiasis in HIV-1-infected Japanese men: clinical features and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koji; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Escueta-de Cadiz, Aleyla; Tanuma, Junko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Shinichi

    2011-09-01

    Invasive amebic diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica are increasing among men who have sex with men and co-infection of ameba and HIV-1 is an emerging problem in developed East Asian countries. To characterize the clinical and epidemiological features of invasive amebiasis in HIV-1 patients, the medical records of 170 co-infected cases were analyzed retrospectively, and E. histolytica genotype was assayed in 14 cases. In this series of HIV-1-infected patients, clinical presentation of invasive amebiasis was similar to that described in the normal host. High fever, leukocytosis and high CRP were associated with extraluminal amebic diseases. Two cases died from amebic colitis (resulting in intestinal perforation in one and gastrointestinal bleeding in one), and three cases died from causes unrelated to amebiasis. Treatment with metronidazole or tinidazole was successful in the other 165 cases. Luminal treatment was provided to 83 patients following metronidazole or tinidazole treatment. However, amebiasis recurred in 6 of these, a frequency similar to that seen in patients who did not receive luminal treatment. Recurrence was more frequent in HCV-antibody positive individuals and those who acquired syphilis during the follow-up period. Various genotypes of E. histolytica were identified in 14 patients but there was no correlation between genotype and clinical features. The outcome of metronidazole and tinidazole treatment of uncomplicated amebiasis was excellent even in HIV-1-infected individuals. Luminal treatment following metronidazole or tinidazole treatment does not reduce recurrence of amebiasis in high risk populations probably due to amebic re-infection. PMID:21931875

  16. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  17. Onset of clinical effects and plasma concentration of fluvoxamine in Japanese patients.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Shinya; Kawai, Masayoshi; Takei, Noriyoshi; Mori, Norio; Kawakami, Junichi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Shizuo; Namiki, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Hisakuni

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) require 2 to 4 weeks of administration before improvements in emotional symptoms of depression are seen. We evaluated whether early monitoring of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) scores in patients treated with the SSRI fluvoxamine could predict antidepressant response, and also assessed the relationship between the onset of clinical response following the start of fluvoxamine administration and its plasma concentration. Twelve depressed patients (baseline HAMD score ≥15) received an initial dose of fluvoxamine (50 mg/d) followed by an optimized maintenance dose according to their clinical symptoms after 7 d. HAMD scores and plasma drug concentrations were determined at 7 and 28 d after the first administration. There were 7 responders and 5 non-responders on day 28, as evaluated by HAMD scores. The HAMD score for the responders was significantly lower than that for the non-responders on day 7 (mean±S.D., 11.6±6.1 vs. 26.6±6.5, p=0.006). Thus, the reduction in HAMD score on day 7 was clearly divided between responders and non-responders. On day 28, the plasma concentration of fluvoxamine in responders was lower than that in non-responders (14.2±10.5 ng/ml vs. 44.2±28.1 ng/ml, p=0.051). Furthermore, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis conducted on day 28 revealed an upper concentration threshold of 28.2 ng/ml (p=0.042), with none in the responder group above that level. Our results suggest that HAMD score after the first week of treatment with fluvoxamine and the upper threshold of plasma drug concentration could predict whether a patient is a non-responder. PMID:21139240

  18. Clinical importance of assessment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with visceral obesity. A Japanese perspective.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders including hyperglycemia and impaired insulin action and/or insulin secretion. Obesity T2DM has become a serious problem in Japan as in Western countries, with over-eating and physical inactivity. Obese Asians have mild degree of adiposity, compared with Western subjects. Unlike total body fat, body fat distribution, especially excess accumulation of visceral fat, correlates with various diabetogenic, atherogenic, prothrombotic and proinflammatory metabolic abnormalities, which increase the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Obese patients with T2DM have poor glycemic control with disordered eating behaviors, and complications of hypertension and dyslipidemia, leading to ACVD. The major therapies in obese T2DM, hyperinsulinemia and low insulin sensitivity, available for weight loss, especially visceral fat reduction, include caloric restriction, physical activity and behavior modification. On the other hand, the major therapies in non-obese T2DM with insufficient insulin secretion, are insulin-secretory agents and injectable insulin. For clinically meaningful prevention/reduction in the rate of future ACVD in T2DM, it may be important to stratify T2DM subjects into those with and without visceral obesity and design specific management protocols for each group. PMID:22309596

  19. Clinical characteristics of functional recovery after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in Japanese octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Tobita, Ryo; Iwata, Kentaro; Kamisaka, Kenta; Yuguchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Masayuki; Oura, Keisuke; Morisawa, Tomoyuki; Ohhashi, Satoko; Kumamaru, Megumi; Hanafusa, Yusuke; Kato, Michitaka; Saitoh, Masakazu; Sakurada, Koji; Takahashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to elucidate characteristics of postoperative physical functional recovery in octogenarians undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. [Subjects and Methods] This was a multi-center, retrospective study. Nine hundred and twenty-seven elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgeries were evaluated (746 males and 181 females, mean age: 68.6 years, range: 31–86 years). Participants were stratified according to age < 80 years (n = 840; mean age, 67.1; range, 31–79) or > 80 years (n = 87; mean age, 82.2; range, 80–86). Patient characteristics and postoperative physical functional recovery outcomes were compared between groups. [Results] There was no significant difference between groups when considering the postoperative day at which patients could sit on the edge of the bed, stand at bedside, or walk around the bed. The postoperative day at which patients could walk 100 m independently was later in octogenarians, when compared with non-octogenarians (6.1 ± 3.2 days vs. 4.9 ± 3.9 days). In octogenarians, the percentage of patients who could walk 100 m independently within 8 days after surgery was 79.5%. [Conclusion] A postoperative target time in octogenarians for independent walking, following coronary artery bypass grafting, can be set at approximately 6 days. PMID:27065553

  20. Gender Differences in In-Hospital Clinical Outcomes after Percutaneous Coronary Interventions: An Insight from a Japanese Multicenter Registry

    PubMed Central

    Numasawa, Yohei; Kohsaka, Shun; Miyata, Hiroaki; Noma, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Shiro; Nakamura, Iwao; Nishi, Yutaro; Ohki, Takahiro; Negishi, Koji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Gender differences in clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) among different age groups are controversial in the era of drug-eluting stents, especially among the Asian population who are at higher risk for bleeding complications. Methods and Results We analyzed data from 10,220 patients who underwent PCI procedures performed at 14 Japanese hospitals from September 2008 to April 2013. A total of 2,106 (20.6%) patients were women. Women were older (72.7±9.7 vs 66.6±10.8 years, p<0.001), and had a lower body mass index (23.4±4.0 vs 24.3±3.5, p<0.001), with a higher prevalence of hypertension (p<0.001), hyperlipidemia (p<0.001), insulin-dependent diabetes (p<0.001), renal failure (p<0.001), and heart failure (p<0.001) compared with men. Men tended to have more bifurcation lesions (p = 0.003) and chronic totally occluded lesions (p<0.001) than women. Crude overall complications (14.8% vs 9.5%, p<0.001) and the rate of bleeding complications (5.3% vs 2.8%, p<0.001) were significantly higher in women than in men. On multivariate analysis in the total cohort, female sex was an independent predictor of overall complications (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.26–1.71; p<0.001) and bleeding complications (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.36–2.24; p<0.001) after adjustment for confounding variables. A similar trend was observed across the middle-aged group (≥55 and <75 years) and old age group (≥75 years). Conclusions Women are at higher risk than men for post-procedural complications after PCI, regardless of age. PMID:25635905

  1. Worldwide Lineages of Clinical Pneumococci in a Japanese Teaching Hospital Identified by DiversiLab System.

    PubMed

    Kashiwaya, Kiyoshi; Saga, Tomoo; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Sakata, Ryuji; Iwata, Morihiro; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Chang, Bin; Ohnishi, Makoto; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network (PMEN) clones are representatives of worldwide-spreading pathogens. DiversiLab system, a repetitive PCR system, has been proposed as a less labor-and time-intensive genotyping platform alternative to conventional methods. However, the utility and analysis parameters of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide lineages was not established. To evaluate and optimize the performance of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide pneumococcal lineages, we examined 245 consecutive isolates of clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae from all age-group patients at a teaching hospital in Japan. The capsular swelling reaction of all isolates yielded 24 different serotypes. Intensive visual observation (VO) of DiversiLab band pattern difference divided all isolates into 73 clusters. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of representative 73 isolates from each VO cluster yielded 51 different STs. Among them, PMEN-related lineages accounted for 63% (46/73). Although the serotype of PMEN-related isolates was identical to that of the original PMEN clone in 70% (32/46), CC156-related PMEN lineages, namely Greece(6B)-22 and Colombia(23F)-26, harbored various capsular types discordant to the original PMEN clones. Regarding automated analysis, genotyping by extended Jaccard (XJ) with a 75% similarity index cutoff (SIC) showed the highest correlation with serotyping (adjusted Rand's coefficient, 0.528). Elevating the SIC for XJ to 85% increased the discriminatory power sufficient for distinguishing two major PMEN-related isolates of Taiwan(19F)-14 and Netherlands(3)-31. These results demonstrated a potential utility of DiversiLab for identifying worldwide lineage of pneumococcus. An optimized parameters of automated analysis should be useful especially for comparison for reference strains by "identification" function of DiversiLab. PMID:27107736

  2. Using systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs) to assess medical students’ skills in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Bergus, George R; Woodhead, Jerold C; Kreiter, Clarence D

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is widely used to assess the clinical performance of medical students. However, concerns related to cost, availability, and validity, have led educators to investigate alternatives to the OSCE. Some alternatives involve assessing students while they provide care to patients – the mini-CEX (mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise) and the Long Case are examples. We investigated the psychometrics of systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs), in which physicians are supplemented by lay trained observers, as a means of assessing the clinical performances of medical students. Methods During the pediatrics clerkship at the University of Iowa, trained lay observers assessed the communication skills of third-year medical students using a communication checklist while the students interviewed and examined pediatric patients. Students then verbally presented their findings to faculty, who assessed students’ clinical skills using a standardized form. The reliability of the combined communication and clinical skills scores was calculated using generalizability theory. Results Fifty-one medical students completed 199 observed patient encounters. The mean combined clinical and communication skills score (out of a maximum 45 points) was 40.8 (standard deviation 3.3). The calculated reliability of the SOCE scores, using generalizability theory, from 10 observed patient encounters was 0.81. Students reported receiving helpful feedback from faculty after 97% of their observed clinical encounters. Conclusion The SOCE can reliably assess the clinical performances of third-year medical students on their pediatrics clerkship. The SOCE is an attractive addition to the other methods utilizing real patient encounters for assessing the skills of learners. PMID:23745065

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines as Instruments for Sound Health Care Priority Setting.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Patrick R; Norheim, Ole F

    2015-11-01

    This editorial discusses the potential role that physician-authored clinical practice guidelines could play in health care priority setting decisions in the United States. We briefly review the challenges associated with increasingly obligate health care priority setting in the United States and discuss accountability for these decisions. We then propose a potential role for clinical practice guidelines in addressing these challenges, while considering the ethical foundations of such a proposal. PMID:26342516

  4. Nurse-led clinics: 10 essential steps to setting up a service.

    PubMed

    Hatchett, Richard

    This article outlines 10 key steps for practitioners to consider when setting up and running a nurse-led clinic. It lays emphasis on careful planning, professional development and the need to audit and evaluate the service to ensure the clinic is measurably effective. PMID:19068891

  5. Screening Mammography: Test Set Data Can Reasonably Describe Actual Clinical Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Warwick; McEntee, Mark F.; Kench, Peter L.; Reed, Warren M.; Heard, Rob; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the extent to which test set reading can represent actual clinical reporting in screening mammography. Materials and Methods: Institutional ethics approval was granted, and informed consent was obtained from each participating screen reader. The need for informed consent with respect to the use of patient materials was waived. Two hundred mammographic examinations were selected from examinations reported by 10 individual expert screen readers, resulting in 10 reader-specific test sets. Data generated from actual clinical reports were compared with three test set conditions: clinical test set reading with prior images, laboratory test set reading with prior images, and laboratory test set reading without prior images. A further set of five expert screen readers was asked to interpret a common set of images in two identical test set conditions to establish a baseline for intraobserver variability. Confidence scores (from 1 to 4) were assigned to the respective decisions made by readers. Region-of-interest (ROI) figures of merit (FOMs) and side-specific sensitivity and specificity were described for the actual clinical reporting of each reader-specific test set and were compared with those for the three test set conditions. Agreement between pairs of readings was performed by using the Kendall coefficient of concordance. Results: Moderate or acceptable levels of agreement were evident (W = 0.69–0.73, P < .01) when describing group performance between actual clinical reporting and test set conditions that were reasonably close to the established baseline (W = 0.77, P < .01) and were lowest when prior images were excluded. Higher median values for ROI FOMs were demonstrated for the test set conditions than for the actual clinical reporting values; this was possibly linked to changes in sensitivity. Conclusion: Reasonable levels of agreement between actual clinical reporting and test set conditions can be achieved, although inflated sensitivity

  6. Clinical nurse leader and clinical nurse specialist role delineation in the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Patricia; Lulham, Kevin

    2007-10-01

    More than 90 members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and 190 practice sites have partnered to develop the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role. The partnership has created synergy between education and practice and nurtured innovation and diffusion of learning on a national basis. In this ongoing department, the editor, Jolene Tornabeni, MA, RN, FAAN, FACHE, showcases a variety of nurse leaders who discuss their new patient care delivery models in preparation for the CNL role and CNLs who highlight partnerships with their clinical colleagues to improve patient care. In this article, the authors explore differences and similarities between the CNL and the clinical nurse specialist roles, describing the working strategies between a CNL and clinical nurse specialist, and role delineations that have resulted from their cooperation, collaboration, and planning. PMID:17914287

  7. Does sensitivity measured from screening test-sets predict clinical performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia R.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Ryan, John; Hung, Wai Tak; Thompson, Graham J.; Heard, Rob; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2014-03-01

    Aim: To examine the relationship between sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set and clinical performance. Background: Although the UK and Australia national breast screening programs have regarded PERFORMS and BREAST test-set strategies as possible methods of estimating readers' clinical efficacy, the relationship between test-set and real life performance results has never been satisfactorily understood. Methods: Forty-one radiologists from BreastScreen New South Wales participated in this study. Each reader interpreted a BREAST test-set which comprised sixty de-identified mammographic examinations sourced from the BreastScreen Digital Imaging Library. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to compare the sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set with screen readers' clinical audit data. Results: Results shown statistically significant positive moderate correlations between test-set sensitivity and each of the following metrics: rate of invasive cancer per 10 000 reads (r=0.495; p < 0.01); rate of small invasive cancer per 10 000 reads (r=0.546; p < 0.001); detection rate of all invasive cancers and DCIS per 10 000 reads (r=0.444; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Comparison between sensitivity measured from the BREAST test-set and real life detection rate demonstrated statistically significant positive moderate correlations which validated that such test-set strategies can reflect readers' clinical performance and be used as a quality assurance tool. The strength of correlation demonstrated in this study was higher than previously found by others.

  8. Comparison of Clinical Teaching by Residents and Attending Physicians in Inpatient and Lecture Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Merlynn R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study examined differences in the clinical teaching of 21 medical residents and 19 attending physicians in 2 settings: inpatient care and lectures. Results indicated that ratings were generally similar for the two groups, but setting was a significant source of variance. Self-assessments were similar. Implications for instruction are discussed.…

  9. Comparing ease-of-processing values of the same set of words for native English speakers and Japanese learners of English.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroomi

    2009-12-01

    Ease of processing of 3,969 English words for native speakers and Japanese learners was investigated using lexical decision and naming latencies taken from the English Lexicon Project (Balota et al. The English Lexicon Project: A web-based repository of descriptive and behavioral measures for 40,481 English words and nonwords, 2002) and accuracy of English word translation by Japanese university students (Takashima, H. Eigo goi chishiki no keisei [The structure of English lexical knowledge of Japanese college students], 2002). Correlations among these ease-of-processing values were all significant, suggesting substantial commonalities between native English speakers and Japanese learners. Regression analyses, however, showed that some factors differentially affect ease of processing for natives and Japanese. Comparison of the predicted and the observed values of translation accuracy revealed specific differences of lexical knowledge between native speakers and Japanese learners. Loanword effect on translation accuracy and translation errors similar to dyslexic/aphasic reading errors were observed, suggesting the possibility of insufficient orthographic/phonological activation and the possibility of the use of first language phonological representations. The implications of these results for the study of second/foreign language lexical processing are discussed. PMID:19484388

  10. Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine: Clinical Research between Modernity and Traditional Medicine—The State of Research and Methodological Suggestions for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenji; Matsuura, Keiko; Gao, Pengfei; Hottenbacher, Lydia; Tokunaga, Hideaki; Nishimura, Ko; Imazu, Yoshihiro; Reissenweber, Heidrun; Witt, Claudia M.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese traditional herbal medicine, Kampo, has gradually reemerged and 148 different formulations (mainly herbal extracts) can be prescribed within the national health insurance system. The objective of this article is to introduce Kampo and to present information from previous clinical studies that tested Kampo formulae. In addition, suggestions on the design of future research will be stated. The literature search was based on a summary, up until January 2009, by the Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine and included only those trials which were also available in either Pubmed or ICHUSHI (Japan Medical Abstracts Society). We included 135 studies, half of these studies (n = 68) used a standard control and 28 a placebo control. Thirty-seven trials were published in English [all randomized controlled trials (RCTs)] and the remaining articles were in Japanese only. The sample size for most studies was small (two-third of the studies included less than 100 patients) and the overall methodological quality appeared to be low. None of the studies used Kampo diagnosis as the basis for the treatment. In order to evaluate Kampo as a whole treatment system, certain aspects should be taken into account while designing studies. RCTs are the appropriate study design to test efficacy or effectiveness; however, within the trial the treatment could be individualized according to the Kampo diagnosis. Kampo is a complex and individualized treatment with a long tradition, and it would be appropriate for further research on Kampo medicine to take this into account. PMID:21687585

  11. Japanese encephalitis (JE). Part I: clinical profile of 1,282 adult acute cases of four epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, N B S; Thacker, A K; Barthwal, S P; Mishra, V K; Prapann, Shiv; Srivastava, Deepak; Sarkari, M

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is numerically the most important global cause of encephalitis and so far confirmed to have caused major epidemics in India. Most of the reported studies have been in children. This largest study involving only adults, belonging to four epidemics, is being reported from Gorakhpur. The aim of this study is to detail the acute clinical profile (not viral) outcome and to classify the sequelae at discharge. This prospective study involved 1,282 adult patients initially diagnosed as JE admitted during the epidemics of 1978, 1980, 1988, and 1989, on identical clinical presentation and CSF examination. In the meantime, the diagnosis of JE was confirmed by serological and/or virological studies in only a representative number of samples (649 of 1,282 cases). Eighty-three left against medical advice (LAMA) at various stages, so 1,199 of 1,282 were available for the study. Peak incidence of [1,061 of 1,282 (83%)] of clinically suspected cases was from September 15 to November 2. Serum IgM and IgG were positive in high titers in 50.87% (330 of 649) and IgM positive in CSF in 88.75% (109 of 123) of the cases. JE virus could be isolated from CSF and brain tissue in 5 of 5 and 4 of 5 samples, respectively. Altered sensorium (AS) in (96%), convulsions (86%), and headache (85%) were the main symptoms for hospitalization by the third day of the onset. Other neurological features included hyperkinetic movements in 593 of 1,282 (46%)-choreoathetoid in 490 (83%) and bizarre, ill-defined in 103 (17%). The features of brain stem involvement consisted of opsoclonus (20%), gaze palsies (16%), and pupillary changes (48%) with waxing and waning character. Cerebellar signs were distinctly absent. Dystonia and decerebrate rigidity was observed in 43 and 6%, respectively, paralytic features in 17% and seizures in 30%. Many non-neurological features of prognostic importance included abnormal breathing patterns (ABP) (45%), pulmonary edema (PO) (33%), and upper

  12. The Japanese Language: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backhouse, A. E.

    This guide provides an overview of the salient features of the Japanese language from the perspective of the beginning-level English-speaking learner. Chapters address these topics: the Japanese language and its historic and cultural setting; phonology (sounds and syllables, word accentuation; loanwords; connected speech); writing (scripts,…

  13. Clinical and no-clinical setting specificities in first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2011-03-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session work with two examined groups: a group of 20 adult women who suffer from mild or moderate forms of unipolar depression and a group of 20 students of the School of Medicine in Zagreb without any psychiatric symptomatology. The results indicate the high importance of having structure in first psychodrama session, of relating it with the previously thoroughly conducted, initial, clinical, interviews, and of the clarity and focus in terms of determining the goals of therapy, especially in a clinical context. This study also confirmed assumptions regarding the need for different approaches of warming-up in psychodrama, both in the clinical and in non-clinical samples. A psychodrama psychotherapist should have good time managing skills and capability to convert the time available into an opportunity for directly boosting the group energy and work on therapeutic alliance. PMID:21661367

  14. Challenges to student learning in the clinical setting: a qualitative descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Killam, Laura A; Heerschap, Corey

    2013-06-01

    Clinical education is used throughout nursing to promote competency. Although this experience can be rewarding, students may face a variety of challenges within this context. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study is to explore senior nursing students' perceptions of challenges to learning within the clinical setting. Three interrelated themes emerged from the data: (a) internal reactions to external limitations; (b) barriers experienced within the clinical environment; and (c) ineffective programme organisation. Findings are meant to guide educators and policy makers during decision making. The goal is advancement towards making the clinical environment a superior form of nursing education. PMID:23141689

  15. Setting up a CLIA-certified laboratory in a student health services clinic.

    PubMed

    Nash, K A; Ross, A

    1999-11-01

    Performing some laboratory tests on site at a student health service clinic may increase efficiency and cut costs for patients. However, with the passage of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) of 1988, many laboratories in physician offices and clinics have shut down because of increased regulatory requirements. The personnel in one SHS laboratory found that the guidelines proposed by CLIA help assure quality care and are not prohibitive. In this article, the process of applying for and receiving a CLIA certificate in the student health clinic setting is explored. PMID:10584449

  16. Peer assisted learning in the clinical setting: an activity systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Deirdre; O'Flynn, Siun; Kelly, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) is a common feature of medical education. Understanding of PAL has been based on processes and outcomes in controlled settings, such as clinical skills labs. PAL in the clinical setting, a complex learning environment, requires fresh evaluation. Socio-cultural theory is proposed as a means to understand educational interventions in ways that are practical and meaningful. We describe the evaluation of a PAL intervention, introduced to support students' transition into full time clinical attachments, using activity theory and activity systems analysis (ASA). Our research question was How does PAL transfer to the clinical environment? Junior students on their first clinical attachments undertook a weekly same-level, reciprocal PAL activity. Qualitative data was collected after each session, and focus groups (n = 3) were held on completion. Data was analysed using ASA. ASA revealed two competing activity systems on clinical attachment; Learning from Experts, which students saw as the primary function of the attachment and Learning with Peers, the PAL intervention. The latter took time from the first and was in tension with it. Tensions arose from student beliefs about how learning takes place in clinical settings, and the importance of social relationships, leading to variable engagement with PAL. Differing perspectives within the group were opportunities for expansive learning. PAL in the clinical environment presents challenges specific to that context. Using ASA helped to describe student activity on clinical attachment and to highlight tensions and contradictions relating PAL in that setting. Planning learning opportunities on clinical placements, must take account of how students learn in workplaces, and the complexity of the multiple competing activity systems related to learning and social activities. PMID:25269766

  17. Clinical Research of Traditional Chinese Medicine Needs to Develop Its Own System of Core Outcome Sets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Junhua; Chen, Jing; Xing, Dongmei; Wang, Jiaying

    2013-01-01

    Currently, quality issues concerning clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have come into the spotlight. It has been recognized that poorly-devised research methodology largely restricted the development of clinical research in TCM. The choice of appropriate outcome measurements is key to the success of clinical research; however, the current procedure for outcomes selection in clinical research of TCM is problematic due to the underdevelopment of clinical methodology. Under this circumstance, we propose the introduction to the concept of Core Outcome Set (COS) and discuss the feasibility of developing a COS system that caters for clinical studies in TCM, in the hope that the outcome evaluation system could be up to international standards. PMID:24312133

  18. Importance of Selected Athletic Trainer Employment Characteristics in Collegiate, Sports Medicine Clinic, and High School Settings

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brent L.; Gansneder, Bruce M.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Szczerba, Joseph E.; Mattacola, Carl G.; Perrin, David H.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: We examined employer importance ratings of 35 employee characteristics in the collegiate, sports medicine clinic, and high school settings and made comparisons among these settings. Design and Setting: All prospective employers were sent a survey. Of the 472 surveys mailed, 282 (60%) were returned, with a sample error rate of 1.9%. Subjects: All prospective employers listed on the NATA position vacancy notices from January 1, 1994 to October 1, 1994. Measurements: Employers were asked to rate 35 employee characteristics as “not important” “ minimally important,” “ important.” or “very important.” Additionally, employers chose 1 of 15 job descriptors that best identified their position vacancy. These 15 descriptors were then categorized into collegiate, sports medicine clinic, and high school settings. Discriminant analysis and analysis of variance procedures were used to determine if the 35 employee characteristics differed across the 3 settings. Results: The discriminant analysis produced 2 significant discriminant functions (P < .05) with 23 of the original 35 characteristics remaining in the analysis. The first function discriminated between the collegiate setting and the other settings, with the collegiate setting scoring the highest. The second function discriminated among all 3 groups, with the sports medicine clinic and high school settings scoring the highest and lowest, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of variance (ANOVAs) revealed that 21 of the characteristics remaining in the discriminant analysis differed across the 3 settings. Conclusions: Employers from all 3 settings rated educational program reputation, written recommendations, job interview performance, and NATA-BOC certification eligibility as important to very important. For the collegiate setting, 7 characteristics were rated above important and included such characteristics as possession of a master's degree and collegiate experience. For the sports medicine

  19. Operationalizing NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) in naturalistic clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Carla; Fowler, J Christopher; Salas, Ramiro; Nielsen, David; Allen, Jon; Oldham, John; Kosten, Thomas; Mathew, Sanjay; Madan, Alok; Frueh, B Christopher; Fonagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) introduced the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative to address two major challenges facing the field of psychiatry: (1) the lack of new effective personalized treatments for psychiatric disorders, and (2) the limitations associated with categorically defined psychiatric disorders. Although the potential of RDoC to revolutionize personalized psychiatric medicine and psychiatric nosology has been acknowledged, it is unclear how to implement RDoC in naturalistic clinical settings as part of routine outcomes research. In this article, the authors present the major RDoC principles and then show how these principles are operationalized in The Menninger Clinic's McNair Initiative for Neuroscience Discovery-Menninger & Baylor College of Medicine (MIND-MB) study. The authors discuss how RDoC-informed outcomes-based assessment in clinical settings can transform personalized clinical care through multimodal treatments. PMID:27583809

  20. Genetic Acquisition of NDM Gene Offers Sustainability among Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate’s NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  1. NIPT in a clinical setting: an analysis of uptake in the first months of clinical availability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joanne B; Chock, Valerie Y; Hudgins, Louanne

    2014-02-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the clinical experience in offering noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for aneuploidy to pregnant patients, highlighting the clinical utility, barriers to acceptance and limitations of this novel test. Data were collected from 961 patients offered NIPT from 3/1/12 to 9/30/12. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Twenty-eight percent of patients elected NIPT and 72 % declined. Women continue to elect less sensitive and less specific screening through biochemical markers and nuchal translucency. Women considering all options at average risk for aneuploidy were less likely to accept NIPT testing than women who had a risk adjustment from an ultrasound marker or routine screening test. In our multi-ethnic population, Filipina women were significantly less likely to elect NIPT compared to other ethnicities. Five percent of NIPT ordered failed analysis. Several chromosome abnormalities were detected through CVS or amniocentesis that would not have been detected by NIPT. Even though NIPT offers a non-invasive, highly sensitive and specific analysis for aneuploidy, the majority of women in our study declined this option. NIPT should be offered in the context of genetic counseling so that women understand the limitations of the testing and make an educated decision about the testing option best suited to their situation. PMID:23723049

  2. Genetic acquisition of NDM gene offers sustainability among clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shweta; Upadhyay, Supriya; Sen, Malay Ranjan; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Choudhury, Debarati; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    New Delhi metallo β-lactamases are one of the most significant emerging resistance determinants towards carbapenem drugs. Their persistence and adaptability often depends on their genetic environment and linkage. This study reports a unique and novel arrangement of blaNDM-1 gene within clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital in north India. Three NDM positive clonally unrelated clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from hospital patients. Association of integron with blaNDM-1 and presence of gene cassettes were assessed by PCR. Genetic linkage of NDM gene with ISAba125 was determined and in negative cases linkage in upstream region was mapped by inverse PCR. In which only one isolate's NDM gene was linked with ISAba125 for mobility, while other two reveals new genetic arrangement and found to be inserted within DNA directed RNA polymerase gene of the host genome detected by inverse PCR followed by sequencing analysis. In continuation significance of this novel linkage was further analyzed wherein promoter site detected by Softberry BPROM software and activity were assessed by cloning succeeding semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicating the higher expression level of NDM gene. This study concluded out that the unique genetic makeup of NDM gene with DNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase favours adaptability to the host in hospital environment against huge antibiotic pressure. PMID:25635921

  3. Cooling an acute muscle injury: can basic scientific theory translate into the clinical setting?

    PubMed

    Bleakley, C M; Glasgow, P; Webb, M J

    2012-03-01

    Ice is commonly used after acute muscle strains but there are no clinical studies of its effectiveness. By comparison, there are a number of basic scientific studies on animals which show that applying ice after muscle injury has a consistent effect on a number of important cellular and physiological events relating to recovery. Some of these effects may be temperature dependant; most animal studies induce significant reductions in muscle temperature at the injury site. The aim of this short report was to consider the cooling magnitudes likely in human models of muscle injury and to discuss its relevance to the clinical setting. Current best evidence shows that muscle temperature reductions in humans are moderate in comparison to most animal models, limiting direct translation to the clinical setting. Further important clinical questions arise when we consider the heterogenous nature of muscle injury in terms of injury type, depth and insulating adipose thickness. Contrary to current practice, it is unlikely that a 'panacea' cooling dose or duration exists in the clinical setting. Clinicians should consider that in extreme circumstances of muscle strain (eg, deep injury with high levels of adipose thickness around the injury site), the clinical effectiveness of cooling may be significantly reduced. PMID:21677317

  4. Support in Clinical Settings as Perceived by Nursing Students in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ashghali Farahani, Mansoureh; Jafarian Amiri, Seyedeh Roghayeh; Varaei, Shokoh

    2016-01-01

    Background Although support is one of the most substantial needs of nursing students during clinical education, it is not clearly defined in the literature. Objectives The current study aimed to explore the concept of support in clinical settings as perceived by nursing students. Materials and Methods A qualitative content analysis was used to explore the meaning of student support in clinical settings. A purposive sampling with maximum variation was used to select the participants among bachelor nursing students in the nursing school of Babol University of Medical Sciences in the north of Iran. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather the perceptions and experiences of seventeen nursing students. Conventional content analysis was applied to analyze the data. Results In the current study, the main theme, nurturance, was emerged with seven subthemes of humanistic behavior with the student, respectful communication with students, accepting the student in the clinical setting, sustaining confidence, need based supervision, accepting the profession in the society and empowerment. Conclusions Nursing students support in the clinical education requires a nurturing care; a care that leads to the sense of worthiness and respectability in students and contributes to the improvement of their clinical abilities. PMID:27331057

  5. The clinical features and prognosis of rhabdomyosarcoma: follow-up studies on pediatric tumors from the Japanese Pediatric Tumor Registry 1971-1980. Part II. Committee of Malignant Tumors, Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Nakada, K

    1990-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on 126 patients with rhabdomyosarcoma enrolled in the Japanese Pediatric Tumor Registry between 1971 and 1980. The age of the patients ranged from less than 1 year to 15 years, and the male to female ratio was 1.3:1.0. Primary sites included the pelvis (37.3 per cent), abdomen (23.8 per cent), head and neck (21.4 per cent), thorax (9.5 per cent), extremities (6.4 per cent) and unknown (1.6 per cent). According to the staging system of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons, the extent of disease was classified into stages Ia (26.2 per cent of the total); Ib (14.6 per cent); II (12.6 per cent), III (29.1 per cent) and IV (17.5 per cent). The clinical stage was significantly correlated with survival outcome in this series (p less than 0.05). Age, sex, histology and primary site per se had no independent prognostic influence on tumor-free survival. With regard to treatment modalities, surgery was performed in 94.0 per cent of the patients, and radiotherapy at a mean dose of 37 Gy, and/or multi-agent chemotherapy in 41.7 per cent and 80.0 per cent, respectively. The patients who underwent total excision had a better survival outcome than those who did not (p less than 0.05). Combination chemotherapy such as VAC was more commonly administered in the latter study period. The overall 2-year tumor-free survival rate (2YTFSR) significantly improved from 24.0 per cent in the former period between 1971 and 1975 to 48.7 per cent in the latter period between 1976 and 1980 (p less than 0.05). PMID:2243442

  6. Women's Health Care Minimum Data Set: pilot test and validation for use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farley, Cindy L; Tharpe, Nell; Miller, Liane; Ruxer, Debbie Jenkins

    2006-01-01

    Basic elements of the structure, process, and outcomes of midwifery practice have not been fully determined, particularly in the areas of women's gynecologic and primary health care. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) supported the development of clinical data sets to describe structure, process, and outcomes of midwifery practice for use by clinical practitioners. The Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set was developed using a panel of expert midwives and other women's health care professionals, as well as literature resources. Students of the Graduate Midwifery Program at Philadelphia University performed pilot testing of the Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set as a service to the profession of midwifery while applying concepts learned in their research methods courses. Each student (n = 19) recruited a midwifery practice in which she had a clinical affiliation, and gathered data sets on the previous 30 consecutive women's health care encounters by CNMs or CMs (n = 569). Item analysis and refinement were done. Criterion-related validity and construct-related validity of the Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set were explored through comparison with the medical record and through the testing of plausible hypotheses. The Woman's Health Care Minimum Data Set has the potential to be an important instrument in documenting and understanding the evolving nature of the practice of primary women's health care by midwives and other women's health care providers. PMID:17081941

  7. I Can Learn Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Michael; Funato, Makiko

    This set of materials for Japanese second language instruction was designed for students who can be taught most effectively through a functional, conversational approach. It is intended as a supplement to the regular course of study so that all students, regardless of ability level, can be provided with an effective instructional program. It…

  8. Development of a provisional core set of response measures for clinical trials of systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, D; Lovell, D J; Giannini, E; Clements, P J; Merkel, P A; Seibold, J R; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Denton, C P; Mayes, M D; Steen, V D; Varga, J; Furst, D E

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a provisional core set of response measures for clinical trials of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods The Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium (SCTC) conducted a structured, 3-round Delphi exercise to reach consensus on a core set of measures for clinical trials of SSc. Round 1 asked the SCTC investigators to list items in 11 pre-defined domains (skin, musculoskeletal, cardiac, pulmonary, cardio-pulmonary, gastrointestinal, renal, Raynaud phenomenon and digital ulcers, health-related quality of life and function, global health, and biomarkers) for SSc clinical trials. Round 2 asked respondents to rate the importance of the chosen items and was followed by a meeting, during which the Steering Committee discussed the feasibility, reliability, redundancy and validity of the items. Round 3 sought to obtain broader consensus on the core set measures. Members also voted on items that had data on feasibility but lacked data on reliability and validity, but may still be useful research outcome measures for future trials. Results A total of 50 SCTC investigators participated in round 1, providing 212 unique items for the 11 domains. In all, 46 (92%) participants responded in round 2 and rated 177 items. The ratings of 177 items were reviewed by the Steering Committee and 31 items from the 11 domains were judged to be appropriate for inclusion in a 1-year multi-centre clinical trial. In total, 40 SCTC investigators completed round 3 and ranked 30 of 31 items as acceptable for inclusion in the core set. The Steering Committee also proposed 14 items for a research agenda. Conclusion Using a Delphi exercise, we have developed a provisional core set of measures for assessment of disease activity and severity in clinical trials of SSc. PMID:17893248

  9. Establishing a psychosomatic clinic in a low resource setting: Process, challenges, and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Vikas; Sarkar, Siddharth; Thomas, Shijo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Specialty psychosomatic clinics are a felt need in low- and middle-income countries, but its benefits and challenges have not been reported so far. Aims: To describe the process, challenges, and opportunities that we encountered in setting up a specialty psychosomatic clinic at a government medical college in South India. Methods: The biweekly psychosomatic clinic was located in the Department of Psychiatry and manned by a multimodal team. Structured questionnaires were used to evaluate all patients. All psychiatric diagnoses were made as per International Classification of Diseases-10, clinical descriptions and diagnostic guidelines. Management comprised both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapeutic interventions. Results: A total of 72 patients registered for services in the 1st year of the clinic. The mean age of the sample was 36.6 years (range 14–60 years). A median of 2 years and 19 visits to various care providers had elapsed before their visit to the clinic. The index contact was a general practitioner in the majority of cases though an overwhelming majority (95.6%) had also sought specialist care. The most common diagnostic cluster was the somatoform group of disorders (50.0%). Antidepressants were the most commonly prescribed medications (70.6%). Conclusion: The specialty psychosomatic clinic provided better opportunities for a more comprehensive evaluation of people with medically unexplained symptoms and better resident training and focused inter-disciplinary research. It describes a scalable model that can be replicated in similar resource constrained settings. PMID:26933373

  10. The Semantics and Pragmatics of Japanese Focus Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasegawa, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese has a rich set of focus particles, several exclusive and additive particles, and, in addition, contrastive particles. This thesis provides a formal description of the meanings of Japanese focus particles and addresses two general questions: "What kinds concepts do Japanese focus particles express?" and "Why does Japanese have a larger…

  11. Conducting clinical research in community mental health settings: Opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tcheremissine, Oleg V; Rossman, Whitney E; Castro, Manuel A; Gardner, Dineen R

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the past decade surrounding the underlying mechanisms and treatment of neuropsychiatric disease. Technological advancements and a broadened research paradigm have contributed to the understanding of the neurochemistry, brain function and brain circuitry involved in neuropsychiatric disorders. The predominant area of unmet medical need in the United States is major psychiatric disorders, and major depressive disorder is the leading cause of disability for ages 15-44. Total spending on research and development by the pharmaceutical industry has grown exponentially during the past decade, but fewer new molecular entities (NME) for the treatment of major psychiatric disorders have received regulatory approvals compared to other therapeutic areas. Though significant expansion has occurred during the “decade of the brain”, the translation of clinical trials outcomes into the community mental health setting is deficient. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been the standard approach to clinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of NMEs for the past 60 years; however, there are significant barriers and skepticism in the implementation of evidence-based outcomes into clinical practice. Recruitment of patients, shortages of experienced clinical researchers, regulatory requirements and later translation of outcomes into clinical practice are ever growing problems faced by investigators. The community mental health setting presents particular barriers in the replication of therapeutic outcomes from RCTs. The diagnostic complexity of major psychiatric diseases and the highly selective patient populations involved in clinical trials lend to the gap in translation from the “bench to the bedside”. The community mental health setting lends to a diverse patient population with numerous co-morbidities and environmental factors that are unaccounted in the average RCT. While we acknowledge the enormous complexity in developing novel

  12. Centers Speak Up: The Clinical Context for Health Information Technology in the Ambulatory Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ming; Webster, Tashonna R.; Curry, Leslie; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Fifield, Judith; Burstin, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinicians in ambulatory care settings are increasingly called upon to use health information technology (health IT) to improve practice efficiency and performance. Successful adoption of health IT requires an understanding of how clinical tasks and workflows will be affected; yet this has not been well described. Objective To describe how health IT functions within a clinical context. Design Qualitative study, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Participants Executives and staff at 4 community health centers, 3 health center networks, and 1 large primary care organization. Approach Transcribed audio-recorded interviews, analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results Systematic characterization of clinical context identified 6 primary clinical domains. These included results management, intra-clinic communication, patient education and outreach, inter-clinic coordination, medication management, and provider education and feedback. We generated clinical process diagrams to characterize these domains. Participants suggested that underlying workflows for these domains must be fully operational to ensure successful deployment of health IT. Conclusions Understanding the clinical context is a necessary precursor to successful deployment of health IT. Process diagrams can serve as the basis for EHR certification, to identify challenges, to measure health IT adoption, or to develop curricular content regarding the role of health IT in clinical practice. PMID:18373132

  13. The Clinical Nurse Specialist in the School Setting: Case Management of Migrant Children with Dental Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Good, Mary Ellen

    This paper presents strategies for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in the school setting to use in case management of migrant children with dental disease. Although dental disease is the major health problem of all school-age children in the nation, the problem is even more severe for children of migrant farmworkers. Leininger's transcultural…

  14. Preceptor Appraisals of Rewards and Student Preparedness in the Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Natalie; Wolf, Kay N.; Bossetti, Brenda; Saddam, Alma

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 430 allied-health preceptors found they were rewarded by seeing students grow in the clinical setting; low student motivation and poor behavior frustrated them; they expected students to have appropriate skills; and health care restructuring is decreasing their internal rewards. (Author/JOW)

  15. Bullying Behaviors and Self Efficacy among Nursing Students at Clinical Settings: Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassem, Awatef Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing students who experienced bullying behaviors feel anger and missing their concentration, their capability to achieve a desired outcome. Also self-efficacy, often referred to as self-confidence, is essential to nursing students' ability and performance in the clinical setting. Aim: Study aimed to examine relation between bullying…

  16. Refining Video Game Use Questionnaires for Research and Clinical Application: Detection of Problematic Response Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Kyle A.; Faust, David; Baker, Aaron M.; Meyer, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Even when relatively infrequent, deviant response sets, such as defensive and careless responding, can have remarkably robust effects on individual and group data and thereby distort clinical evaluations and research outcomes. Given such potential adverse impacts and the widespread use of self-report measures when appraising addictions and…

  17. Help-Seeking Behaviors among Athletic Training Students in the Clinical Education Setting: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Mikiko Aoyagi; Freesemann, Keith W.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Help-seeking is an important self-regulating and proactive strategy that prepares students to be successful learners. It is particularly important in the clinical education setting, in which students must actively engage in learning. Objective: To determine both the type of help-seeking behaviors used by athletic training students in the…

  18. Opening Options: Making Field Education Work in a Private Practice Clinic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooradian, John K.; Knaggs, Constance; Hock, Robert; LaCharite, David

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of social work field placements in a private practice setting to prepare MSW students for clinical work. The authors used "autoethnography", which is personal narrative that explores the writer's experience of life, to describe interpersonal and contextual characteristics, as well as procedures implemented to conduct…

  19. Knowledge Mining from Clinical Datasets Using Rough Sets and Backpropagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Nahato, Kindie Biredagn; Harichandran, Khanna Nehemiah; Arputharaj, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    The availability of clinical datasets and knowledge mining methodologies encourages the researchers to pursue research in extracting knowledge from clinical datasets. Different data mining techniques have been used for mining rules, and mathematical models have been developed to assist the clinician in decision making. The objective of this research is to build a classifier that will predict the presence or absence of a disease by learning from the minimal set of attributes that has been extracted from the clinical dataset. In this work rough set indiscernibility relation method with backpropagation neural network (RS-BPNN) is used. This work has two stages. The first stage is handling of missing values to obtain a smooth data set and selection of appropriate attributes from the clinical dataset by indiscernibility relation method. The second stage is classification using backpropagation neural network on the selected reducts of the dataset. The classifier has been tested with hepatitis, Wisconsin breast cancer, and Statlog heart disease datasets obtained from the University of California at Irvine (UCI) machine learning repository. The accuracy obtained from the proposed method is 97.3%, 98.6%, and 90.4% for hepatitis, breast cancer, and heart disease, respectively. The proposed system provides an effective classification model for clinical datasets. PMID:25821508

  20. Novices in clinical practice settings: student nurses stories of learning the practice of nursing.

    PubMed

    Orland-Barak, Lily; Wilhelem, Dalit

    2005-08-01

    Drawing on 24 stories of clinical practice in an apprenticeship context of training in Israel, this qualitative study examined student nurses' perspectives towards learning to become a nurse, as revealed through the language and content of their written stories of clinical practice. As our findings suggest, student nurses' stories of learning to become a nurse in practice settings, are characterized by procedural language, by medical rather than nursing terminology, and by a focus on actions rather than on interactions. We have learned that, despite the rich content that characterizes clinical practice settings, the apprenticeship orientation of the training program, combined with student nurses' state of being a novice, yielded representations of the experience of learning to nurse which were characterized by an instrumental perspective towards the practice. We interpret these findings through four interrelated insights that emerge from the study: (1) an 'instrumental practice' orientation in the setting of caring, (2) knowledge of clinical facts-not knowledge of clinical principles, (3) the fragmented character of novices' learning to nurse in practice, and (4) rich content of practice alone does not yield rich content of learning. PMID:16005116

  1. How effective is an in-hospital heart failure self-care program in a Japanese setting? Lessons from a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoko P; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Kogure, Asuka; Sakuragi, Fumika; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Wakita, Sanae; Jaarsma, Tiny; Kazuma, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the effectiveness of heart failure (HF) disease management programs has been established in Western countries, to date there have been no such programs in Japan. These programs may have different effectiveness due to differences in health care organization and possible cultural differences with regard to self-care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot HF program in a Japanese setting. Methods We developed an HF program focused on enhancing patient self-care before hospital discharge. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive the new HF program or usual care. The primary outcome was self-care behavior as assessed by the European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale (EHFScBS). Secondary outcomes included HF knowledge and the 2-year rate of HF hospitalization and/or cardiac death. Results A total of 32 patients were enrolled (mean age, 63 years; 31% female). There was no difference in the total score of the EHFScBS between the two groups. One specific behavior score regarding a low-salt diet significantly improved compared with baseline in the intervention group. HF knowledge in the intervention group tended to improve more over 6 months than in the control group (a group-by-time effect, F=2.47, P=0.098). During a 2-year follow-up, the HF program was related to better outcomes regarding HF hospitalization and/or cardiac death (14% vs 48%, log-rank test P=0.04). In Cox regression analysis after adjustment for age, sex, and logarithmic of B-type natriuretic peptide, the program was associated with a reduction in HF hospitalization and/or cardiac death (hazard ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.03–0.90; P=0.04). Conclusion The HF program was likely to increase patients’ HF knowledge, change their behavior regarding a low-salt diet, and reduce HF hospitalization and/or cardiac events. Further improvement focused on the transition of knowledge to self-care behavior is necessary. PMID:26937177

  2. Initial mechanical ventilator settings for pediatric patients: clinical judgement in selection of tidal volume.

    PubMed

    Kanter, R K; Blatt, S D; Zimmerman, J J

    1987-03-01

    Guidelines for selection of initial mechanical ventilator settings for pediatric patients were evaluated. Protocols specifying tidal volume or peak inspiratory pressure are difficult to apply for infants and children because of leaks at uncuffed endotracheal tubes, compression loss in ventilators, and inaccuracy of settings for intended tidal volume. To avoid these difficulties, the selection of tidal volume was based on subjective clinical observations: visible chest excursion and audible air entry at least simulating normal breathing. In 76 consecutive patients, use of the guidelines resulted in satisfactory PaCO2 for 97% and PaO2 for 89% of infants and children with a wide variety of respiratory disorders. Adequacy of gas exchange was not related to the patient's age, type of ventilator, tightness of fit of the endotracheal tube, or presence of spontaneous breathing. These results support a simple, versatile method of teaching selection of initial mechanical ventilator settings, relying on clinical judgment for regulation of tidal volume. PMID:3470010

  3. The attributes of an effective teacher differ between the classroom and the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Haws, Jolene; Rannelli, Luke; Schaefer, Jeffrey P; Zarnke, Kelly; Coderre, Sylvain; Ravani, Pietro; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Most training programs use learners' subjective ratings of their teachers as the primary measure of teaching effectiveness. In a recent study we found that preclinical medical students' ratings of classroom teachers were associated with perceived charisma and physical attractiveness of the teacher, but not intellect. Here we explored whether the relationship between these variables and teaching effectiveness ratings holds in the clinical setting. We asked 27 Internal Medicine residents to rate teaching effectiveness of ten teachers with whom they had worked on a clinical rotation, in addition to rating each teacher's clinical skills, physical attractiveness, and charisma. We used linear regression to study the association between these explanatory variables and teaching effectiveness ratings. We found no association between rating of physical attractiveness and teaching effectiveness. Clinical skill and charisma were independently associated with rating of teaching effectiveness (regression coefficients [95 % confidence interval] 0.73 [0.60, 0.85], p < 0.001 and 0.12 [0.01, 0.23], p = 0.03, respectively). The variables associated with effectiveness of classroom and clinical teachers differ, suggesting context specificity in teaching effectiveness ratings. Context specificity may be explained by differences in the exposure that learners have to teachers in the classroom versus clinical setting-so that raters in the clinical setting may base ratings upon observed behaviours rather than stereotype data. Alternatively, since subjective ratings of teaching effectiveness inevitably incorporate learners' context-specific needs, the attributes that make a teacher effective in one context may not meet the needs of learners in a different context. PMID:26891679

  4. Clinical Trials Express: Fracture Risk Reduction With Denosumab in Japanese Postmenopausal Women and Men With Osteoporosis: Denosumab Fracture Intervention Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial (DIRECT)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Toshio; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Hosoi, Takayuki; Miki, Takami; Gorai, Itsuo; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Tanaka, Sakae; Sone, Teruki; Nakano, Tetsuo; Ito, Masako; Matsui, Shigeyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Ko; Osakabe, Taisuke; Shiraki, Masataka; Fukunaga, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Context: Denosumab 60 mg sc injection every 6 months for 36 months was well tolerated and effective in reducing the incidence of vertebral, nonvertebral, and hip fracture in predominantly Caucasian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Objective: The objective of this phase 3 fracture study was to examine the antifracture efficacy and safety of denosumab 60 mg in Japanese women and men with osteoporosis compared with placebo. Design and Setting: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with an open-label active comparator as a referential arm was conducted. Patients: Subjects were 1262 Japanese patients with osteoporosis aged 50 years or older, who had one to four prevalent vertebral fractures. Intervention: Subjects were randomly assigned to receive denosumab 60 mg sc every 6 months (n = 500), placebo for denosumab (n = 511), or oral alendronate 35 mg weekly (n = 251). All subjects received daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D. Main Outcome Measure: The primary endpoint was the 24-month incidence of new or worsening vertebral fracture for denosumab vs placebo. Results: Denosumab significantly reduced the risk of new or worsening vertebral fracture by 65.7%, with incidences of 3.6% in denosumab and 10.3% in placebo at 24 months (hazard ratio 0.343; 95% confidence interval 0.194–0.606, P = .0001). No apparent difference in adverse events was found between denosumab and placebo during the first 24 months of the study. Conclusion: These results provide evidence of the efficacy and safety of denosumab 60 mg sc every 6 months in Japanese subjects with osteoporosis. PMID:24646104

  5. Best practices sharing: Setting up a professional clinical research unit in India

    PubMed Central

    Divate, Uma; Das, Soma; Bhosale, Neelambari; Divate, Pathik

    2014-01-01

    The Drug Controller General of India has recently come up with very stringent laws to tighten the regulatory framework around clinical trials. One-way of improving the credibility of India and its researchers in the eyes of the regulators, sponsors and the general public is through professional site management team or setting up clinical research unit (CRU). The CRU acts as a bridge between the sponsor and the investigator. The CRU model has been better explained with the help of a good example of a clinical research institute. Since, a successful clinical trial needs high quality data, timeliness and clear communication between all parties, a professional CRU with a team of dedicated and trained professionals and infrastructure with written procedures and policies may be a solution to the pain and agony of poor site performance and investigator insufficiency and pressure. PMID:24551586

  6. Lung cancer staging: the value of PET depends on the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is widely recommended in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing this have demonstrated inconsistent results. We asked whether differences in the clinical context and endpoints could explain these discrepancies. Methods We used realist synthesis methods to analyze how contextual differences among RCTs affected the results. We focused on RCTs to minimize confounding yet permit evaluation of differences by comparing across studies. Results This analysis suggests that the impact of PET depends on the clinical setting. PET is of greatest benefit in identifying M1 disease in patients with a high chance of such involvement and when little traditional imaging [e.g., abdominal/pelvis computed tomography (CT) and bone scan] is used. Identification of N2,3 involvement by PET prior to resection is seen primarily when there is at least a moderate probability of such and the rate of invasive staging is high. The rate of N2 disease not identified preoperatively appears to increase if PET is used to avoid invasive mediastinal staging in clinical settings in which the risk of N2,3 involvement is moderately high. There is both a potential benefit in avoiding stage-inappropriate resection as well as a risk of missed (stage-appropriate) resection if PET findings are not evaluated carefully. Conclusions A blanket recommendation for PET may be too simplistic without considering nuances of the clinical setting. PMID:25589964

  7. Walking Adaptability after a Stroke and Its Assessment in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Chitralakshmi K.; Clark, David J.; Fox, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    Control of walking has been described by a tripartite model consisting of stepping, equilibrium, and adaptability. This review focuses on walking adaptability, which is defined as the ability to modify walking to meet task goals and environmental demands. Walking adaptability is crucial to safe ambulation in the home and community environments and is often severely compromised after a stroke. Yet quantification of walking adaptability after stroke has received relatively little attention in the clinical setting. The objectives of this review were to examine the conceptual challenges for clinical measurement of walking adaptability and summarize the current state of clinical assessment for walking adaptability. We created nine domains of walking adaptability from dimensions of community mobility to address the conceptual challenges in measurement and reviewed performance-based clinical assessments of walking to determine if the assessments measure walking adaptability in these domains. Our literature review suggests the lack of a comprehensive well-tested clinical assessment tool for measuring walking adaptability. Accordingly, recommendations for the development of a comprehensive clinical assessment of walking adaptability after stroke have been presented. Such a clinical assessment will be essential for gauging recovery of walking adaptability with rehabilitation and for motivating novel strategies to enhance recovery of walking adaptability after stroke. PMID:25254140

  8. Clinical assessment of a supplement of Pycnogenol® and L-arginine in Japanese patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiromitsu; Nagao, Junji; Ueda, Taro; Strong, Jeffry M; Schonlau, Frank; Yu-Jing, Song; Lu, Yan; Horie, Shigeo

    2012-02-01

    A double-blind parallel group comparison design clinical study was conducted in Japanese patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction to investigate the efficacy of a supplement containing Pycnogenol® and L-arginine. Subjects were instructed to take a supplement (Pycnogenol® 60 mg/day, L-arginine 690 mg/day and aspartic acid 552 mg/day) or an identical placebo for 8 weeks, and the results were assessed using the five-item erectile domain (IIEF-5) of the International Index of Erectile Function. Additionally, blood biochemistry, urinalysis and salivary testosterone were measured. Eight weeks of supplement intake improved the total score of the IIEF-5. In particular, a marked improvement was observed in 'hardness of erection' and 'satisfaction with sexual intercourse'. A decrease in blood pressure, aspartate transaminase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP), and a slight increase in salivary testosterone were observed in the supplement group. No adverse reactions were observed during the study period. In conclusion, Pycnogenol® in combination with L-arginine as a dietary supplement is effective and safe in Japanese patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction. PMID:21618639

  9. Identifying an Efficient Set of Items Sensitive to Clinical-Range Externalizing Problems in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Isaac T.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    The present study applied item response theory to identify an efficient set of items of the Achenbach Externalizing scale from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; 33 items) and Teacher's Report Form (TRF; 35 items) that were sensitive to clinical-range scores. Mothers and teachers rated children's externalizing problems annually from ages 5 to 13 years in two independent samples (Ns = 585 and 1,199). Item properties for each rater across ages 5–8 and 9–13 were examined with item response theory. We identified 10 mother- and teacher-reported items from both samples based on the items' measurement precision for sub-clinical and clinical levels of externalizing problems: externalizing problems that involve meanness to others, destroying others' things, fighting, lying and cheating, attacking people, screaming, swearing/obscene language, temper tantrums, threatening people, and being loud. Scores on the scales using these items had strong reliability and psychometric properties, capturing nearly as much information as the full Externalizing scale for classifying clinical levels of externalizing problems. Scores on the scale with the 10 CBCL items had moderate accuracy, equivalent to the full Externalizing scale, in classifying diagnoses of conduct disorder based on a research diagnostic interview. Of course, comprehensive clinical assessment would consider additional items, dimensions of behavior, and sources of information, too, but it appears that the behaviors tapped by this select set of items may be core to externalizing psychopathology in children. PMID:26322800

  10. Setting up a Nuchal Translucency Clinic: What Radiologists Need to Know.

    PubMed

    Onyeacholem, Ifeanyi; Kleiner, Beth; Hull, Andrew D; Chibuk, Jason; Romine, Lorene; Anton, Tracy; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to discuss the process of setting up a nuchal translucency (NT) screening clinic in clinical practice, how to interpret the information in combination with other clinical tests, what to do if abnormal results are obtained, and to illustrate some of the fetal anomalies that are associated with an increased NT. The NT was initially implemented to predict the likelihood of a fetus with Down syndrome. Maternal age can be combined with fetal NT and maternal serum biochemistry (free β-hCG and PAPP-A) at 11 to 14 weeks to identify about 90% of affected fetuses. Setting up a clinic to perform the NT screening requires certified physicians and certified sonographers. Certification can be obtained for both physicians and sonographers through Nuchal Translucency Quality Review and Fetal Medicine Foundation. Cell-free DNA testing is now altering what our patients are choosing to evaluate fetuses at risk for chromosomal anomalies and congenital anomalies. Common pitfalls to performing, interpreting, and conveying results of the NT are illustrated in this article. Nasal bone measurement, fetal anatomy examination and fetal echocardiography are tools that add sensitivity to the detection of chromosomal abnormalities. Examples of fetal anomalies discovered during the NT screening are also illustrated. Screening for obstetric complications is an additional benefit to the NT clinic. PMID:25938550

  11. Estimation of maximal oxygen uptake via submaximal exercise testing in sports, clinical, and home settings.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Francesco; Vernillo, Gianluca; de Morree, Helma M; Bonomi, Alberto G; La Torre, Antonio; Kubis, Hans-Peter; Veicsteinas, Arsenio

    2013-09-01

    Assessment of the functional capacity of the cardiovascular system is essential in sports medicine. For athletes, the maximal oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] provides valuable information about their aerobic power. In the clinical setting, the (VO(2max)) provides important diagnostic and prognostic information in several clinical populations, such as patients with coronary artery disease or heart failure. Likewise, VO(2max) assessment can be very important to evaluate fitness in asymptomatic adults. Although direct determination of [VO(2max) is the most accurate method, it requires a maximal level of exertion, which brings a higher risk of adverse events in individuals with an intermediate to high risk of cardiovascular problems. Estimation of VO(2max) during submaximal exercise testing can offer a precious alternative. Over the past decades, many protocols have been developed for this purpose. The present review gives an overview of these submaximal protocols and aims to facilitate appropriate test selection in sports, clinical, and home settings. Several factors must be considered when selecting a protocol: (i) The population being tested and its specific needs in terms of safety, supervision, and accuracy and repeatability of the VO(2max) estimation. (ii) The parameters upon which the prediction is based (e.g. heart rate, power output, rating of perceived exertion [RPE]), as well as the need for additional clinically relevant parameters (e.g. blood pressure, ECG). (iii) The appropriate test modality that should meet the above-mentioned requirements should also be in line with the functional mobility of the target population, and depends on the available equipment. In the sports setting, high repeatability is crucial to track training-induced seasonal changes. In the clinical setting, special attention must be paid to the test modality, because multiple physiological parameters often need to be measured during test execution. When estimating VO(2max), one has

  12. Objective performance of a set of uncorrected 20/20 normal eyes: clinical reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepichín, E.; López-Olazagasti, E.; Sánchez-de-La-Llave, D.; Cruz Félix, Angel S.; Ramírez-Zavaleta, G.; Ibarra, J.

    2011-08-01

    In recent years we have been working in the characterization of the objective average performance of a set of uncorrected human eyes with a 20/20 visual acuity, described as the resultant average wavefront aberration function (WA), point-spread function (PSF), modulation transfer function (MTF), and power refractive maps. This objective performance has been used as our clinical reference to analyze the objective pre- and post-operated performance in laser refractive surgery in different situations. We show some of our current results obtained from the application of our clinical reference.

  13. Clinical, muscle pathological, and genetic features of Japanese facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) patients with SMCHD1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Kohei; Goto, Kanako; Arai, Mami; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Noguchi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2016-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy 2 (FSHD2) is a genetic muscular disorder characterized by DNA hypomethylation on the 4q-subtelomeric macrosatellite repeat array, D4Z4. FSHD2 is caused by heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (SMCHD1). Because there has been no study on FSHD2 in Asian populations, it is not known whether this disease mechanism is widely seen. To identify FSHD2 patients with SMCHD1 mutations in the Japanese population, bisulfite pyrosequencing was used to measure DNA methylation on the D4Z4 repeat array, and in patients with DNA hypomethylation, the SMCHD1 gene was sequenced by the Sanger method. Twenty patients with D4Z4 hypomethylation were identified. Of these, 13 patients from 11 unrelated families had ten novel and one reported SMCHD1 mutations: four splice-site, two nonsense, two in-frame deletion, two out-of-frame deletion, and one missense mutations. One of the splice-site mutations was homozygous in the single patient identified with this. In summary, we identified novel SMCHD1 mutations in a Japanese cohort of FSHD2 patients, confirming the presence of this disease in a wider population than previously known. PMID:27061275

  14. "A golden opportunity": Exploring interprofessional learning and practice in rural clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Judy; Woodroffe, Jessica; Cross, Merylin; Allen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about interprofessional practice (IPP) and interprofessional learning (IPL) in rural health services, despite national funding and continuing emphasis on increasing students' clinical placements in rural areas. This short paper outlines a study in Tasmania, Australia, which investigated how and under what contexts and conditions IPP and IPL occur in rural clinical settings, and the enabling factors and strategies that promote this learning and practice. This study employed a mixed method design comprising focus group discussions and a survey involving health professionals from two rural health services. The findings demonstrate that formal and informal arrangements, the collaborative nature of small, close-knit healthcare teams and patient-centred models of care employed in rural practice settings, provide ideal contexts for IPP and IPL. The study has implications for promoting organisational readiness for IPP and IPL and harnessing the potential of rural services to promote and develop students' interprofessional capability. PMID:25300807

  15. The leadership characteristics of the preceptor in selected clinical practice settings in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Dube, A; Jooste, K

    2006-08-01

    A non-experimental, explorative, descriptive, quantitative study was undertaken. The purpose was to explore and describe the views of preceptors and preceptees regarding the fulfilment of the role of the preceptor in selected clinical nursing practice settings in the Botswana context. The study included 72 preceptors and 200 nursing students/preceptees who voluntary agreed voluntarily to participate in the study. A questionnaire was used to collect data, which was analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings of this study indicated that the preceptor lacked leadership characteristics in the accompaniment of the preceptee. These constraints included the lack of desirable characteristics such as intellectual, emotional, physical and other traits that are common to all good leaders. Recommendations were stated for improvements in selecting preceptors with certain leadership skills for the clinical practice settings. The limitations of this study were highlighted. PMID:17131606

  16. Genetic counsellors in Sweden: their role and added value in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Pestoff, Rebecka; Ingvoldstad, Charlotta; Skirton, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Genetic testing is becoming more commonplace in general and specialist health care and should always be accompanied by genetic counselling, according to Swedish law. Genetic counsellors are members of the multi-disciplinary team providing genetic counselling. This study examined the role and added value of genetic counsellors in Sweden, using a cross-sectional on-line survey. The findings showed that the genetic counsellors added value in the clinical setting by acting as the 'spider-in-the-web' regarding case management, having a more holistic, ethical and psychological perspective, being able to offer continuous support and build a relationship with the patient, and being more accessible than medical geneticists. The main difference between a genetic counsellor and medical geneticist was that the doctor had the main medical responsibility. Thus genetic counsellors in Sweden contribute substantially to the care of patients in the clinical genetic setting. PMID:26014428

  17. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Daley, George Q; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F; Barker, Roger A; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Breuer, Christopher K; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-14

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them. PMID:27185282

  18. Validity of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders Axis I in clinical and research settings.

    PubMed

    Steenks, Michel H; de Wijer, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The lack of standardized diagnostic criteria for defining clinical subtypes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) was the main motive to create the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD), which were provided to allow standardization and replication of research into the most common forms of muscle- and joint-related TMD. The RDC/TMD offered improvement compared to the older literature: the use of one system classifying TMD subgroups and the introduction of a dual-axis classification. The aim of this Focus Article is to appraise the RDC/TMD Axis I (physical findings). Since the original publication in 1992, no modification of the RDC/TMD has taken place, although research has yielded important new findings. The article outlines several concerns, including diagnostic issues in Axis I, classification criteria, feasibility of palpation sites, the myofascial diagnostic algorithm, the lack of joint tests (compression, traction), and missing subgroups. Using a gold standard examiner may improve calibration and offer better reliability; it does not improve any of the diagnostic validity issues. It is also noted that in the 2004 mission statement of the International Consortium For RDC/TMD-Based Research, the RDC/TMD are also advocated for clinical settings. Clinicians may eagerly embrace the RDC/TMD, believing that the clinical use of the RDC/TMD as a diagnostic procedure is already supported by evidence, but its application is not indicated in clinical settings. The article concludes that given the research developments, there is a need to update the RDC/TMD Axis I in the clinical research setting. PMID:19264032

  19. Identifying an efficient set of items sensitive to clinical-range externalizing problems in children.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Isaac T; Bates, John E; Dodge, Kenneth A; Lansford, Jennifer E; Pettit, Gregory S

    2016-05-01

    The present study applied item response theory to identify an efficient set of items of the Achenbach Externalizing scale from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; 33 items) and Teacher's Report Form (TRF; 35 items) that were sensitive to clinical-range scores. Mothers and teachers rated children's externalizing problems annually from ages 5 to 13 years in 2 independent samples (Ns = 585 and 1,199). Item properties for each rater across ages 5-8 and 9-13 were examined with item response theory. We identified 10 mother- and teacher-reported items from both samples based on the items' measurement precision for subclinical and clinical levels of externalizing problems: externalizing problems that involve meanness to others, destroying others' things, fighting, lying and cheating, attacking people, screaming, swearing/obscene language, temper tantrums, threatening people, and being loud. Scores on the scales using these items had strong reliability and psychometric properties, capturing nearly as much information as the full Externalizing scale for classifying clinical levels of externalizing problems. Scores on the scale with the 10 CBCL items had moderate accuracy, equivalent to the full Externalizing scale, in classifying diagnoses of conduct disorder based on a research diagnostic interview. Of course, comprehensive clinical assessment would consider additional items, dimensions of behavior, and sources of information, too, but it appears that the behaviors tapped by this select set of items may be core to externalizing psychopathology in children. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322800

  20. Recommendations for blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Mendis, Shanthi; Abegunde, Dele; Asmar, Ronald; Mieke, Stephan; Murray, Alan; Shengelia, Bakuti; Steenvoorden, Gijs; Van Montfrans, Gert; O'Brien, Eoin

    2005-02-01

    This paper, which summarizes the conclusions of a WHO Expert meeting, is aimed at proposing indications to develop technical specifications for an accurate and affordable blood pressure measuring device for office/clinic use in low resource settings. Blood pressure measuring devices to be used in low resource settings should be accurate, affordable, and easily available worldwide. Given the serious inherent inaccuracy of the auscultatory technique, validated and affordable electronic devices, that have the option to select manual readings, seem to be a suitable solution for low resource settings. The agreement on the technical specifications for automated blood pressure measuring devices for office/clinic use in low resource settings included the following features: high accuracy, adoption of electronic transducers and solar batteries for power supply, standard rates of cuff inflation and deflation, adequate cuff size, digital display powered by solar batteries, facilities for adequate calibration, environmental requirements, no need of memory function, resistance to shock and temperature changes, and low cost. Availability of a device with these features should be accompanied by adequate training of health care personnel, who should guarantee implementation of the procedures recommended in recent European and American Guidelines for accurate blood pressure measurement. PMID:15687867

  1. Capability of Using Clinical Care Classification System to Represent Nursing Practice in Acute Setting in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Chang, Polun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the capability of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) system to represent nursing record data in a medical center in Taiwan. Nursing care records were analyzed using the process of knowledge discovery in data sets. The study data set included all the nursing care plan records from December 1998 to October 2008, totaling 2,060,214 care plan documentation entries. Results show that 75.42% of the documented diagnosis terms could be mapped using the CCC system. A total of 21 established nursing diagnoses were recommended to be added into the CCC system. Results show that one-third of the assessment and care tasks were provided by nursing professionals. This study shows that the CCC system is useful for identifying patterns in nursing practices and can be used to construct a nursing database in the acute setting. PMID:24199066

  2. Bayesian approaches in medical device clinical trials: a discussion with examples in the regulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Bonangelino, Pablo; Irony, Telba; Liang, Shengde; Li, Xuefeng; Mukhi, Vandana; Ruan, Shiling; Xu, Yunling; Yang, Xiting; Wang, Chenguang

    2011-09-01

    Challenging statistical issues often arise in the design and analysis of clinical trials to assess safety and effectiveness of medical devices in the regulatory setting. The use of Bayesian methods in the design and analysis of medical device clinical trials has been increasing significantly in the past decade, not only due to the availability of prior information, but mainly due to the appealing nature of Bayesian clinical trial designs. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has gained extensive experience with the use of Bayesian statistical methods and has identified some important issues that need further exploration. In this article, we discuss several topics relating to the use of Bayesian statistical methods in medical device trials, based on our experience and real applications. We illustrate the benefits and challenges of Bayesian approaches when incorporating prior information to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a medical device. We further present an example of a Bayesian adaptive clinical trial and compare it to a traditional frequentist design. Finally, we discuss the use of Bayesian hierarchical models for multiregional trials and highlight the advantages of the Bayesian approach when specifying clinically relevant study hypotheses. PMID:21830924

  3. The objectivity of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in naturalistic clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Zander, Eric; Willfors, Charlotte; Berggren, Steve; Choque-Olsson, Nora; Coco, Christina; Elmund, Anna; Moretti, Åsa Hedfors; Holm, Anette; Jifält, Ida; Kosieradzki, Renata; Linder, Jenny; Nordin, Viviann; Olafsdottir, Karin; Poltrago, Lina; Bölte, Sven

    2016-07-01

    The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) is a first-choice diagnostic tool in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Excellent interpersonal objectivity (interrater reliability) has been demonstrated for the ADOS under optimal conditions, i.e., within groups of highly trained "research reliable" examiners in research setting. We investigated the spontaneous interrater reliability among clinically trained ADOS users across multiple sites in clinical routine. Forty videotaped administrations of the ADOS modules 1-4 were rated by five different raters each from a pool of in total 15 raters affiliated to 13 different clinical sites. G(q,k) coefficients (analogous to intraclass correlations), kappas (ĸ) and percent agreement (PA) were calculated. The median interrater reliability for items across the four modules was G(q,k) = .74-.83, with the single ADOS items ranging from .23 to .94. G(q,k) for total scores was .85-.92. For diagnostic classification (ASD/non-spectrum), PA was 64-82 % and Fleiss' ĸ .19-.55. Objectivity was lower for pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified and non-spectrum diagnoses as compared to autism. Interrater reliabilities of the ADOS items and domain totals among clinical users across multiple sites were in the same range as previously reported for research reliable users, while the one for diagnostic classification was lower. Differences in sample characteristics, rater skills and statistics compared with previous studies are discussed. Findings endorse the objectivity of the ADOS in naturalistic clinical settings, but also pinpoint its limitations and the need and value of adequate and continuous rater training. PMID:26584575

  4. Creating an optical spectroscopy system for use in a primary care clinical setting (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshein, Adam; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Radosevich, Andrew J.; Gould, Bradley; Wu, Wenli; Konda, Vani; Yang, Leslie W.; Koons, Ann; Feder, Seth; Valuckaite, Vesta; Roy, Hemant K.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    While there are a plethora of in-vivo spectroscopic techniques that have demonstrated the ability to detect a number of diseases in research trials, very few techniques have successfully become a fully realized clinical technology. This is primarily due to the stringent demands on a clinical device for widespread implementation. Some of these demands include: simple operation requiring minimal or no training, safe for in-vivo patient use, no disruption to normal clinic workflow, tracking of system performance, warning for measurement abnormality, and meeting all FDA guidelines for medical use. Previously, our group developed a fiber optic probe-based optical sensing technique known as low-coherence enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (LEBS) to quantify tissue ultrastructure in-vivo. Now we have developed this technique for the application of prescreening patients for colonoscopy in a primary care (PC) clinical setting. To meet the stringent requirements for a viable medical device used in a PC clinical setting, we developed several novel components including an automated calibration tool, optical contact sensor for signal acquisition, and a contamination sensor to identify measurements which have been affected by debris. The end result is a state-of-the-art medical device that can be realistically used by a PC physician to assess a person's risk for harboring colorectal precancerous lesions. The pilot study of this system shows great promise with excellent stability and accuracy in identifying high-risk patients. While this system has been designed and optimized for our specific application, the system and design concepts are universal to most in-vivo fiber optic based spectroscopic techniques.

  5. Haemophilia in a real-world setting: the value of clinical experience in data collection.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Gerry; Iorio, Alfonso; Jokela, Vuokko; Juusola, Kristian; Lassila, Riitta

    2016-02-01

    At the 8th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) held in Helsinki, Finland, in February 2015, Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium entitled: 'Haemophilia in a real-world setting: The value of clinical experience in data collection' Co-chaired by Riitta Lassila (Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland) and Gerry Dolan (Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK); the symposium provided an opportunity to explore the practical value of real-world data in informing clinical decision-making. Gerry Dolan provided an introduction to the symposium by describing what is meant by real-world data (RWD), stressing the role RWD can play in optimising patient outcomes in haemophilia and highlighting the responsibility of all stakeholders to collaborate in continuous data collection. Kristian Juusola (Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland) then provided personal experience as a haemophilia nurse around patient views on adherence to treatment regimes, and how collecting insights into real-world use of treatment can shape approaches to improving adherence. The importance of elucidating pharmacokinetic parameters in a real-world setting was then explored by Vuokko Jokela (Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland). Finally, Alfonso Iorio (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) highlighted the importance of quality data collection in translating clinical reality into scientific advances. PMID:26809546

  6. An innovative system for 3D clinical photography in the resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) is the most frequently occurring cancer in Mozambique among men and the second most frequently occurring cancer among women. Effective therapeutic treatments for KS are poorly understood in this area. There is an unmet need to develop a simple but accurate tool for improved monitoring and diagnosis in a resource-limited setting. Standardized clinical photographs have been considered to be an essential part of the evaluation. Methods When a therapeutic response is achieved, nodular KS often exhibits a reduction of the thickness without a change in the base area of the lesion. To evaluate the vertical space along with other characters of a KS lesion, we have created an innovative imaging system with a consumer light-field camera attached to a miniature “photography studio” adaptor. The image file can be further processed by computational methods for quantification. Results With this novel imaging system, each high-quality 3D image was consistently obtained with a single camera shot at bedside by minimally trained personnel. After computational processing, all-focused photos and measurable 3D parameters were obtained. More than 80 KS image sets were processed in a semi-automated fashion. Conclusions In this proof-of-concept study, the feasibility to use a simple, low-cost and user-friendly system has been established for future clinical study to monitor KS therapeutic response. This 3D imaging system can be also applied to obtain standardized clinical photographs for other diseases. PMID:24929434

  7. What Really Motivates Iranian Nurses to Be Creative in Clinical Settings?: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Isfahani, Sara Shahsavari; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Creativity and innovation are key elements for organization improvement, particularly in nursing, and for finding alternatives for solving nurses’ occupational problems. Nurses’ creativity is affected by motivation. Although, there are many possible sources of motivation, the Iranian nurses’ creativity is seldom clarified, and the most important factors motivating nurses to be creative in clinical settings has rarely been addressed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore Iranian nurses’ experiences regarding the most important factors that motivate their creativity in clinical settings. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis approach. A purposive sample of sixteen nurses was recruited from two educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran and Jahrom Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data were gathered through conducting face-to-face semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by qualitative content analysis approach. Findings: Five main themes emerged from the data analysis, including: (a) Intrinsic motivators, (b) Extrinsic motivators, (c) Achievement motivators, (d) Relational or altruistic motivators, and (e) Spiritual motivators. Conclusions: Study findings indicated that nurses are creative and innovative individuals. So nurse managers and health policy makers should consider creativity as an integral part of all health and clinical strategies and policies. They should support creative and innovative efforts of nurses and provide a climate in which nurses engage in more creative and productive behaviors. PMID:26156918

  8. CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT PSYCHOTROPIC DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN THE PRIMARY CARE SETTING

    PubMed Central

    English, Brett A.; Dortch, Marcus; Ereshefsky, Larry; Jhee, Stanford

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the growing numbers of patients seeking care for a wide range of psychiatric illnesses in the primary care setting has resulted in an increase in the number of psychotropic medications prescribed. Along with the increased utilization of psychotropic medications, considerable variability is noted in the prescribing patterns of primary care providers and psychiatrists. Because psychiatric patients also suffer from a number of additional medical comorbidities, the increased utilization of psychotropic medications presents an elevated risk of clinically significant drug interactions in these patients. While life-threatening drug interactions are rare, clinically significant drug interactions impacting drug response or appearance of serious adverse drug reactions have been documented and can impact long-term outcomes. Additionally, the impact of genetic variability on the psychotropic drug’s pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics may further complicate drug therapy. Increased awareness of clinically relevant psychotropic drug interactions can aid clinicians to achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes in patients in the primary care setting. PMID:22707017

  9. 3D OCT imaging in clinical settings: toward quantitative measurements of retinal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Fuller, Alfred R.; Zhao, Mingtao; Wiley, David F.; Choi, Stacey S.; Bower, Bradley A.; Hamann, Bernd; Izatt, Joseph A.; Werner, John S.

    2006-02-01

    The acquisition speed of current FD-OCT (Fourier Domain - Optical Coherence Tomography) instruments allows rapid screening of three-dimensional (3D) volumes of human retinas in clinical settings. To take advantage of this ability requires software used by physicians to be capable of displaying and accessing volumetric data as well as supporting post processing in order to access important quantitative information such as thickness maps and segmented volumes. We describe our clinical FD-OCT system used to acquire 3D data from the human retina over the macula and optic nerve head. B-scans are registered to remove motion artifacts and post-processed with customized 3D visualization and analysis software. Our analysis software includes standard 3D visualization techniques along with a machine learning support vector machine (SVM) algorithm that allows a user to semi-automatically segment different retinal structures and layers. Our program makes possible measurements of the retinal layer thickness as well as volumes of structures of interest, despite the presence of noise and structural deformations associated with retinal pathology. Our software has been tested successfully in clinical settings for its efficacy in assessing 3D retinal structures in healthy as well as diseased cases. Our tool facilitates diagnosis and treatment monitoring of retinal diseases.

  10. Interprofessional education and practice guide No. 5: Interprofessional teaching for prequalification students in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Lie, Désirée A; Forest, Christopher P; Kysh, Lynn; Sinclair, Lynne

    2016-05-01

    The importance of interprofessional education in health professions training is increasingly recognised through new accreditation guidelines. Clinician teachers from different professions may find themselves being asked to teach or supervise learners from multiple health professions, focusing on interprofessional dynamics, interprofessional communication, role understanding, and the values and ethics of collaboration. Clinician teachers often feel prepared to teach learners from their own profession but may feel ill prepared to teach learners from other professions. In this guide, we draw upon the collective experience from two countries: an institution from the United States with experience in guiding faculty to teach in a student-run interprofessional clinic and an institution from Canada that offers interprofessional experiences to students in community and hospital settings. This guide offers teaching advice to clinician educators in all health professions who plan to or already teach in an interprofessional clinical setting. We anticipate that clinician teachers can learn to fully engage learners from different professions, precept effectively, recognise common pitfalls, increase their confidence, reflect, and become role models to deliver effective teaching in interprofessional settings. PMID:27152536

  11. Implementation of Computer-delivered Brief Alcohol Intervention in HIV Clinical Settings: Who Agrees to Participate?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cui; Crane, Heidi M; Cropsey, Karen; Hutton, Heidi; Chander, Geetanjali; Saag, Michael; McCaul, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Addressing alcohol use in primary HIV settings can improve medical outcomes and overall quality of life of persons living with HIV (PLWH). In order to assess the feasibility of computer-delivered brief alcohol intervention (CBI) and to inform future efforts to improve access to CBI, we examined patient-level socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics associated with agreement to participate in CBI among non-treatment seeking PLWH with alcohol misuse. Methods Participants were recruited from two Centres for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) HIV clinics. PLWH completed a clinical assessment of patient-reported measures and outcomes using tablet-based assessments, including socio-demographic and behavioural characteristics. HIV biological indicators, i.e., CD4 count and viral load, were also available from the electronic medical record. Participants were approached for CBI participation based on scores on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT); no incentives were offered for CBI participation. We performed chi-square tests, analysis of variance and multivariate logistic regression to compare socio-demographic, behavioural and clinical factors among participants who agreed to participate compared with those who refused/postponed participation. Results We observed that 42% of non-treatment seeking, non-incentivized PLWH with alcohol misuse provided written agreement to participate in on-site CBI delivered in their HIV primary care clinic. A larger proportion of PLWH who agreed to enrol in CBI had detectable viral loads, heavier weekly alcohol use, and higher DSM-5 alcohol use disorder symptom counts and mental health symptoms. Neither socio-demographic background nor drug use status was associated with CBI enrolment. Conclusion CBI implementation reached those patients most in need of care. The findings of this study may assist HIV-care providers to better identify appropriate patients and

  12. Utilization of Portable Radios to Improve Ophthalmology Clinic Efficiency in an Academic Setting.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander S; Elkeeb, Ahmed M; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Godley, Bernard F

    2016-03-01

    Improvement in clinic efficiency in the ambulatory setting is often looked at as an area for development of lean management strategies to deliver a higher quality of healthcare while reducing errors, costs, and delays. To examine the benefits of improving team communication and its impact on clinic flow and efficiency, we describe a time-motion study performed in an academic outpatient Ophthalmology clinic and its objective and subjective results. Compared to clinic encounters without the use of the portable radios, objective data demonstrated an overall significant decreases in mean workup time (15.18 vs. 13.10), room wait (13.10 vs. 10.47), and decreased the total time needed with an MD per encounter (9.45 vs. 6.63). Subjectively, significant improvements were seen in careprovider scores for patient flow (60.78 vs. 84.29), getting assistance (61.89 vs. 88.57), moving patient charts (54.44 vs. 85.71), teamwork (69.56 vs. 91.0), communications (62.33 vs. 90.43), providing quality patient care (76.22 vs. 89.57), and receiving input on the ability to see walk-in patients (80.11 vs. 90.43). For academic purposes, an improvement in engagement in patient care and learning opportunities was noted by the clinic resident-in-training during the pilot study. Portable radios in our pilot study were preferred over the previous method of communication and demonstrates significant improvements in certain areas of clinical efficiency, subjective perception of teamwork and communications, and academic learning. PMID:26692044

  13. Japanese Characters in Written Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, James H.

    From the sixth to the eighth century A.D., Japan was the recipient of massive cultural infusions from China. This acceptance of the Chinese pattern included, and to a great extent was based on, the acceptance of the Chinese language. The Chinese writing system was applied to Japanese because there was no other model to follow and in spite of the…

  14. Essential processes for cognitive behavioral clinical supervision: Agenda setting, problem-solving, and formative feedback.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jorden A; Ballantyne, Elena C; Scallion, Laura M

    2015-06-01

    Clinical supervision should be a proactive and considered endeavor, not a reactive one. To that end, supervisors should choose supervision processes that are driven by theory, best available research, and clinical experience. These processes should be aimed at helping trainees develop as clinicians. We highlight 3 supervision processes we believe should be used at each supervision meeting: agenda setting, encouraging trainee problem-solving, and formative feedback. Although these are primarily cognitive-behavioral skills, they can be helpful in combination with other supervision models. We provide example dialogue from supervision exchanges, and discuss theoretical and research support for these processes. Using these processes not only encourages trainee development but also models for them how to use the same processes and approaches with clients. PMID:25895121

  15. Five principles for effective cancer clinical trial education within the community setting.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Margo; Blakeney, Natasha; Langford, Aisha T; Ford, Marvella E

    2015-03-01

    Participation in cancer clinical trials (CCTs) is a key measure for delivery of quality cancer care. Yet, adult cancer patient participation in CCTs remains at about 3%, and participation rates are even lower among ethnic and racial minorities and the medically underserved. Social justice demands better representation of all populations in CCTs to ensure equal access to clinical trials and to ensure greater generalizability of trial results. Using a conceptual framework, this paper outlines a set of guiding principles deemed essential for effective and ethical implementation of community-based education in CCTs. Also described are examples of interventions related to this framework that have been used to overcome key barriers to trial enrollment among underserved populations. Application of the key principles, combined with ongoing engagement of cancer care institutions, suggests promise in enhancing trial participation. PMID:25005705

  16. Clinical studies in the second line setting of advanced pancreatic cancer: are we making any progress?

    PubMed

    Ramfidis, Vassilios S; Strimpakos, Alexios S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad W

    2012-07-01

    Despite the enormous advances in clinical research in oncology, the prognosis of pancreatic carcinoma remains poor. The therapeutic options in this type of cancer are very limited, with modest results at present. In the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, four interesting trials on the second line treatment of pancreatic cancer were presented. The first study (Abstract #4017) with a phase II design suggested that maintenance therapy with sunitinib, after a complete course of standard first line treatment, was feasible and effective while the second phase I/II study (Abstract #4034) evaluated the role of trabedersen, an agent that inhibits TGF-β2 expression. Finally, the efficacy and toxicity of lapatinib combined with either FOLFOX (Abstract #e14533) or capecitabine (Abstract #e14569) were examined in the second line setting of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22797389

  17. Routine radiopharmaceutical production for positron emission tomography in a clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-11-01

    With the development of positron emission tomography (PET), many cellular processes can now be investigated in humans. To perform this task, positron-emitting radioisotopes, which decay by emission of coincidence photons externally detected after positron annihilation, are used in PET. Thus, biochemically and pharmacologically active compounds can be labeled with cyclotron-produced positron-emitting radioisotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine to probe enzyme reaction rates, membrane transport, metabolism, synthesis processes, and various pharmacological parameters. The development of PET technology for clinical applications requires not only the development of a minicyclotron technology, but also the targetry and reliable synthetic procedures for labeled compounds, all of which must be finally integrated into automated delivery systems. Although an integrated unit (cyclotron, chemistry, imaging device) specially designed for PET in clinical settings has never been developed, the work in progress in this area indicates that its implementation is immediately possible.

  18. Complex trauma in children and adolescents: evidence-based practice in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Lawson, David M; Quinn, Jamie

    2013-05-01

    Complex trauma (CT) results from exposure to severe stressors that occur within the caregiver system or with another presumably responsible adult, are repetitive, and begin in childhood or adolescence. As a result, many of these children and adolescents experience lifelong difficulties related to self-regulation, relationships, psychological symptoms, alterations in attention and consciousness, self-injury, identity, and cognitive distortions. The aims of this article include the following: (a) to examine several representative approaches identified as treatments for children and adolescents exposed to CT with respect to similarities and differences; (b) to examine representative evidence of model effectiveness; (c) to discuss how these approaches are and/or could be implemented in clinical practice; and (d) to suggest research designs that would facilitate greater translation of effective treatment into clinical settings. PMID:23564579

  19. Clinical experiences and current evidence for therapeutic recombinant factor VIIa treatment in nontrauma settings.

    PubMed

    Grounds, R Michael; Bolan, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The hemostatic properties of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) are established in patients with inherited or acquired hemophilia with inhibitors and in patients with congenital factor VII deficiencies. Emerging clinical evidence suggests that there may be a wider role for rFVIIa in the management of hemorrhage associated with traumatic injury/accident and severe bleeding associated with critical surgery. This article considers recent data from studies in which rFVIIa was used in an attempt to control bleeding in clinical situations as diverse as coagulopathy associated with chronic liver disease, massive perioperative bleeding and bleeding during prostatectomy, organ transplantation and orthopedic surgery, uncontrollable obstetric hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage. In nontrauma settings involving acute and potentially life threatening bleeding, there may be a place for rFVIIa as adjunctive therapy in the control of hemostasis. PMID:16221317

  20. The effect of nursing staff on student learning in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Webster, Alanna; Bowron, Caitlin; Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Patterson, Priscilla

    2016-06-01

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of the influence of nursing staff on their learning and experience in the clinical setting. Method A qualitative description approach was used. Thirty nursing students were interviewed individually or in focus groups. Data were analysed using content analysis. Four researchers analysed the data separately and agreed on the themes. Findings Nursing staff had positive (enabling) and negative (hindering) effects on students' clinical learning and socialisation to nursing. Nursing staff may encourage and excite students when they behave as positive mentors, facilitators and motivators. However, their actions may also have a negative effect on students, decreasing their confidence, learning and desire to continue in the profession. Conclusion Nursing staff influence student learning. Their actions, attitude and willingness to teach are influential factors. The findings have implications for patient safety, nurse retention and recruitment, and preparing students for professional practice. PMID:27275914

  1. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Aachal; Baldwin, Alex; Brookes, John; Foster, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Background This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist. Design and Methods This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS) were low-risk patients with “suspect”, “early”-to-“moderate” glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record. Main outcome measure Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied. Results Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high. Conclusion Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general outpatient model of care. PMID:26508830

  2. Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia in Clinical Settings: Recommendations from a Multidisciplinary Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Kales, Helen C.; Gitlin, Laura N.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Non-cognitive neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of dementia include aggression, agitation, depression, anxiety, delusions, hallucinations, apathy, and disinhibition. These affect dementia patients nearly universally across dementia stages and etiologies. NPS are associated with poor patient and caregiver outcomes including excess morbidity and mortality, increased health care utilization, and earlier nursing home placement, as well as caregiver stress, depression and reduced employment. While there is no FDA-approved pharmacotherapy for NPS, psychotropic medications are frequently used to manage these symptoms. However, in the few cases of proven pharmacologic efficacy, benefit may be off set by significant risk of adverse effects. Non-pharmacologic treatments, typically considered first-line, also show evidence for efficacy as well as a limited potential for adverse effects. However, their uptake as preferred treatments remains inadequate in real-world clinical settings. Thus, the field currently finds itself between a “rock and a hard place” in terms of management of these difficult symptoms. It was in this context that the University of Michigan Program for Positive Aging, working in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and Center for Innovative Care in Aging sponsored and convened a multidisciplinary expert panel in Detroit Michigan in Fall 2011 with three objectives, to: 1) define key elements of care for NPS in dementia; 2) construct an approach describing the sequential and iterative steps of managing NPS in real-world clinical settings that can be used as a basis for integrating non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches; 3) discuss how the approach generated could be implemented in research and clinical care. PMID:24635665

  3. A case of Barber-Say syndrome in a male Japanese newborn

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Kenichi; Shono, Miki; Goji, Aya; Matsuura, Sato; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Takeda, Misa; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We reported a case of Barber-Say syndrome (BSS) in a Japanese newborn. Distinctive features of BSS were found; macrostomia, gingival dysplasia, cup-shaped low-set ears, wrinkling redundant skin, and hypertrichosis. Fundus showed subretinal drusenoid deposits, a novel finding of BSS. Genetic analysis is underway using next-generation genome sequencing and microarray analysis. PMID:25614816

  4. Clinical characteristics of silent myocardial ischemia diagnosed with adenosine stress 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy in Japanese patients with acute cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Kusaba, Tetsuro; Kodama, Naotoshi; Terada, Kensuke; Urakabe, Yota; Nishikawa, Susumu; Keira, Natsuya; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) often complicates patients with cerebral infarction and that stroke patients often die of ischemic heart disease. Therefore, it is considered important to treat myocardial ischemia in stroke patients. This study investigated SMI complicating Japanese patients with fresh stroke, using (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy with pharmacologic stress testing to elucidate their clinical manifestations. This study included 41 patients (26 men, mean age 76.0 ± 10.7 years) with acute cerebral infarction and no history of coronary artery disease. All patients underwent (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin myocardial scintigraphy with intravenous administration of adenosine to diagnose SMI. Of the 41 patients, myocardial ischemia was confirmed in 17 patients (41.5%). Atherosclerotic etiology was the major cause of stroke in the ischemia(+) group and embolic origin was the major cause in the ischemia(-) group. Patients with myocardial ischemia had a higher incidence of diabetes mellitus (52.9 vs 20.8%; P = 0.0323) and more than two conventional cardiovascular risk factors (64.7 vs 25.0%; P = 0.0110) compared with the nonischemic patients. Infarction subtype of atherosclerotic origin was an independent positive predictor of asymptomatic myocardial ischemia in patients with stroke. These findings indicate that the prevalence of asymptomatic myocardial ischemia is relatively high, especially in patients with stroke of atherosclerotic origin. Therefore, it is beneficial for us to narrow the target population who are at the highest risk when screening for SMI in Japanese patients with acute cerebral infarction. PMID:22124530

  5. The results of a survey of physicians about the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2014 and its clinical use.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Masaki; Hasebe, Naoyuki; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    The current study investigated physicians' awareness and use of the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2014 (JSH2014) and is based on the results of a survey performed by the Publicity and Advertisement Committee of JSH. A questionnaire was used to survey physicians' awareness of the JSH2014, their recommended target blood pressure for hypertensive patients with complications and their use of antihypertensive drugs. Physicians who downloaded a PDF version of JSH2014 during the 6 months after its publication (April-September 2014) were asked to complete an online questionnaire. Of the 7872 respondents, 91% were aware of the JSH and complied partially, mostly or completely with it in their practice. With reference to hypertensive patients, ∼70% of physicians who completed the questionnaire recommended a target blood pressure (BP) of 140/90 mm Hg for an office BP value, and 40% recommended 135/85 mm Hg for a home BP value. Physicians recommended target BP levels of 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease (50-63% of physician surveyed) and for elderly patients with diabetes or kidney disease (45-55% of respondents), whereas they recommended 140/90 mm Hg for elderly patients with low cardiovascular disease risk (56-60% of physician surveyed) and for patients with chronic-phase stroke (40-47% of respondents). The most commonly prescribed combination of antihypertensive drugs was angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) with calcium channel blocker. In addition, physicians' first choice of drug for patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease was most often ARB. Overall, the survey results showed that the new recommendations from the JSH2014 accurately reflect daily clinical practices for hypertension management used by Japanese physicians. PMID:27169398

  6. Incremental learning of probabilistic rules from clinical databases based on rough set theory.

    PubMed Central

    Tsumoto, S.; Tanaka, H.

    1997-01-01

    Several rule induction methods have been introduced in order to discover meaningful knowledge from databases, including medical domain. However, most of the approaches induce rules from all the data in databases and cannot induce incrementally when new samples are derived. In this paper, a new approach to knowledge acquisition, which induce probabilistic rules incrementally by using rough set technique, is introduced and was evaluated on two clinical databases. The results show that this method induces the same rules as those induced by ordinary non-incremental learning methods, which extract rules from all the datasets, but that the former method requires more computational resources than the latter approach. PMID:9357616

  7. Awake surgery between art and science. Part I: clinical and operative settings

    PubMed Central

    Talacchi, Andrea; Santini, Barbara; Casagrande, Francesca; Alessandrini, Franco; Zoccatelli, Giada; Squintani, Giovanna M.

    Summary Awake surgery requires coordinated teamwork and communication between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist, as he monitors the patient, the neuroradiologist as he interprets the images for intraoperative confirmation, and the neuropsychologist and neurophysiologist as they evaluate in real-time the patient’s responses to commands and questions. To improve comparison across published studies on clinical assessment and operative settings in awake surgery, we reviewed the literature, focusing on methodological differences and aims. In complex, interdisciplinary medical care, such differences can affect the outcome and the cost-benefit ratio of the treatment. Standardization of intraoperative mapping and related controversies will be discussed in Part II. PMID:24139657

  8. Use of the nursing simulation laboratory in reentry programs: an innovative setting for updating clinical skills.

    PubMed

    Wood, R Y

    1994-01-01

    Nurses who have been inactive for five or more years are deficient in technical skills and have high levels of anxiety regarding these deficiencies. Collegiate school of nursing laboratories are ideal settings to provide skill practice, reduce fear regarding new technology, and restore confidence of returnees. This article describes the laboratory component of a clinical update course that uses principles of adult education and self-pacing through independent learning stations to teach contemporary nursing skills. A description of instructional resources and equipment used to facilitate the practice is included. PMID:8138599

  9. The role of setting for ketamine abuse: clinical and preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Maria Teresa; Meringolo, Maria; Spagnolo, Primavera Alessandra; Badiani, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is often seen as a unitary phenomenon, partly as a result of the discovery over the past three decades of shared mechanisms of action for addictive substances. Yet the pattern of drug taking is often very different from drug to drug. This is particularly evident in the case of 'club drugs', such as ketamine. Although the number of ketamine abusers is relatively small in the general population, it is quite substantial in some settings. In particular, ketamine abuse is almost exclusively limited to clubs and large music parties, which suggests a major role of context in modulating the reward effects of this drug. This review focuses on recent preclinical and clinical findings, including previously unpublished data, that provide evidence that, even under controlled conditions, ketamine reward is a function of the setting of drug taking. PMID:23159868

  10. Supporting generalist nurses in the rural setting with the introduction of a clinical assessment process.

    PubMed

    Rabbetts, Lyn

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the implementation of an assessment process for general nurses involved in providing end-of-life care. A mixed-method, three-phased study was conducted on a medical ward at a regional hospital in a rural setting. Participating nurses completed a questionnaire about their awareness levels of the five validated scales included in the assessment of patients receiving palliative care. Auditing of the completed assessment forms was conducted at the interim and post data collection points and focus groups were conducted in the final phase. Analysis of the data revealed that nurses were able to integrate the use of this assessment process into the care of this group of patients. The author concludes, while nurses working in rural settings require general clinical knowledge of a wide range of patient groups, validated assessment scales can assist them in the provision of evidence-based palliative care. PMID:27018738

  11. Two Japanese siblings affected with Chikungunya fever with different clinical courses: Imported infections from the Cook Islands.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Makoto; Akachi, Shigehiro; Ando, Katsuhiko; Nomura, Tatsuma; Yamanaka, Keiichi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Two Japanese siblings visited the Cook Islands on business and stayed for 2 months. The sister developed a high fever, arthralgia, erythema and leg edema on the day after returning to Japan. The brother also developed neck and joint pain on the day following the sister's onset. Subsequently, his erythematous lesions spread over his whole body. Chikungunya virus was detected from the sister's blood and urine by specific reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, but not in the brother's samples. Retrospectively, his history of Chikungunya fever was confirmed by the presence of the anti-Chikungunya virus immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG antibodies using the specific enzyme-linked immunoassay. In Japan, no autochthonous case of Chikungunya fever was reported previously. We should give attention to the imported infectious diseases for epidemic prevention. This report warns about the danger of the imported infectious diseases, and also suggests that covering the topic of infectious disease in the world is critical to doctors as well as travelers. PMID:26813362

  12. Clinical Profile of Children and Adolescents Attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit OPD in a Tertiary Care Set up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaprakash, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited studies on the clinical profile of children attending child guidance clinic under Paediatric background. Aims: To study clinical profile of Children & adolescents attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit (BPU) OPD under department of Paediatrics in a tertiary care set up. Methods: Monthly average turnover in the OPD…

  13. Tocilizumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a real-world clinical setting: results from 1 year of postmarketing surveillance follow-up of 417 patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shumpei; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Morio, Tomohiro; Origasa, Hideki; Sumitomo, Naokata; Tomobe, Minako; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Minota, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of tocilizumab (TCZ) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) in real-world clinical settings in Japan. Methods Paediatric patients with sJIA initiating TCZ between April 2008 and February 2012 and those previously enrolled in clinical trials who initiated TCZ before April 2008 were enrolled in a Japanese registry surveillance programme. Safety and effectiveness parameters were collected for 52 weeks. Results Of 417 patients enrolled, mean age was 11.2 years and 48.0% were female. TCZ exposure was 407.0 patient-years (PYs). Baseline corticosteroid use was higher than in clinical trials. Rates of total adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 224.3/100 PYs and 54.5/100 PYs, respectively, with SAEs higher than previously reported. The most frequent AEs and SAEs were infections and infestations (69.8/100 PYs and 18.2/100 PYs, respectively). 74 serious infections occurred in 55 patients (18.2/100 PYs); higher than previously reported. 26 macrophage activation syndrome events were reported in 24 patients (6.4/100 PYs). Fever and rash symptoms improved from baseline to week 52 (54.6% to 5.6% and 43.0% to 5.6%, respectively). At 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 52 weeks, 90.5%, 96.2% and 99.0% of patients achieved normal C reactive protein levels (<0.3 mg/dL), respectively. Conclusions These first real-world data demonstrated that TCZ was well tolerated, with acceptable safety and effectiveness in patients with sJIA. Higher incidences of SAEs and serious infections may be due to differences, such as corticosteroid use and concomitant diseases, between patient populations enrolled in previously reported clinical trials and this study. PMID:26644233

  14. Prevalence and clinical characterization of Japanese diabetes mellitus with an A-to-G mutation at nucleotide 3243 of the mitochondrial tRNA{sup Leu (UUR)} gene

    SciTech Connect

    Odawara, Masato; Sasaki, Kayoko; Yamashita, Kamejiro

    1995-04-01

    An A-to-G mutation at nucleotide position 3243 of the mitochondrial genome has been associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) with deafness. We investigated the prevalence of this mutation in Japanese patients with IDDM, NIDDM, and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and in nondiabetic control individuals, and we identified it in 3 of 300 patients with NIDDM or IGT (1.0%). None of these individuals had significant sensorineural hearing loss. None of the 94 IDDM or the 115 nondiabetic control subjects was positive for this mutation. Oral glucose tolerance test revealed that a 57-yr-old male with this mutation was rather hyperinsulinemic in the fasting state. The insulin secretion in this patient decreased with age; he did not complain of any hearing disorder, although audiometry revealed a slight elevation of hearing threshold at high frequencies. In conclusion, we found that a mitochondrial gene mutation at nucleotide position 3243 was present in about 1% of NIDDM patients including those patients with IGT. The subtype of diabetes mellitus with this mutation may have a clinical profile similar to that found in patients with NIDDM commonly seen in outpatient clinics. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Nomenclature and basic concepts in automation in the clinical laboratory setting: a practical glossary.

    PubMed

    Evangelopoulos, Angelos A; Dalamaga, Maria; Panoutsopoulos, Konstantinos; Dima, Kleanthi

    2013-01-01

    In the early 80s, the word automation was used in the clinical laboratory setting referring only to analyzers. But in late 80s and afterwards, automation found its way into all aspects of the diagnostic process, embracing not only the analytical but also the pre- and post-analytical phase. While laboratories in the eastern world, mainly Japan, paved the way for laboratory automation, US and European laboratories soon realized the benefits and were quick to follow. Clearly, automation and robotics will be a key survival tool in a very competitive and cost-concious healthcare market. What sets automation technology apart from so many other efficiency solutions are the dramatic savings that it brings to the clinical laboratory. Further standardization will assure the success of this revolutionary new technology. One of the main difficulties laboratory managers and personnel must deal with when studying solutions to reengineer a laboratory is familiarizing themselves with the multidisciplinary and technical terminology of this new and exciting field. The present review/glossary aims at giving an overview of the most frequently used terms within the scope of laboratory automation and to put laboratory automation on a sounder linguistic basis. PMID:24409653

  16. Do Subjective Measures Improve the Ability to Identify Limited Health Literacy in a Clinical Setting?

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Melody S.; Griffey, Richard T.; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Blanchard, Melvin; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Existing health literacy assessments developed for research purposes have constraints that limit their utility for clinical practice, including time requirements and administration protocols. The Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS) consists of 3 self-administered Single-Item Literacy Screener (SILS) questions and obviates these clinical barriers. We assessed whether the addition of SILS items or the BHLS to patient demographics readily available in ambulatory clinical settings reaching underserved patients improves the ability to identify limited health literacy. Methods We analyzed data from 2 cross-sectional convenience samples of patients from an urban academic emergency department (n = 425) and a primary care clinic (n = 486) in St. Louis, Missouri. Across samples, health literacy was assessed using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Revised (REALM-R), Newest Vital Sign (NVS), and the BHLS. Our analytic sample consisted of 911 adult patients, who were primarily female (62%), black (66%), and had at least a high school education (82%); 456 were randomly assigned to the estimation sample and 455 to the validation sample. Results The analysis showed that the best REALM-R estimation model contained age, sex, education, race, and 1 SILS item (difficulty understanding written information). In validation analysis this model had a sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 81%, a positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 3.26, and a negative likelihood ratio (LR−) of 0.47; there was a 28% misclassification rate. The best NVS estimation model contained the BHLS, age, sex, education and race; this model had a sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 72%, LR+ of 2.75, LR− of 0.32, and a misclassification rate of 25%. Conclusions Findings suggest that the BHLS and SILS items improve the ability to identify patients with limited health literacy compared with demographic predictors alone. However, despite being easier to administer in clinical settings, subjective

  17. Informed consent procedure for clinical trials in emergency settings: the Polish perspective.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, Piotr S

    2007-09-01

    Setting reasonable and fair limits of emergency research acceptability in ethical norms and legal regulations must still adhere to the premise of well-being of the research subject over the interests of science and society. Informed consent of emergency patients to be enrolled in clinical trials is a particularly difficult issue due to impaired competencies of patients' to give consent, short diagnostic and therapeutic windows, as well as the requirement to provide detailed information to participants. Whereas the Declaration of Helsinki, Good Clinical Practice guideline, Additional Protocol to the European Bioethical Convention concerning Biomedical Research, as well as appropriate regulations adopted by the Food and Drugs Administration (USA) allow waivers from participants' consent or deferred consent for emergency research, the regulations of most European Community countries following the Clinical Trial Directive (2001/20/EC) do not give space for a deferred consent or a waiver from consent for adult patients (unless surrogate consent is made use of). This is even more confusing in case of Poland, where conflicting regulations on a waiver from a participant's consent in emergency research exist and the regulations on surrogate consent of temporarily incompetent adults are too restrictive and authorise only the guardianship courts to consent, which is not or hardly feasible in practice. European Community regulations need to be amended to allow for implementation of the deferred consent or waivers from consent for emergency research in order to enable ethical research of emergency conditions that should become a large part of important public health priorities. PMID:18210227

  18. HIV/AIDS and lipodystrophy: Implications for clinical management in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Julia L; Gala, Pooja; Rochford, Rosemary; Glesby, Marshall J; Mehta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a term used to describe a metabolic complication of fat loss, fat gain, or a combination of fat loss and gain, which is associated with some antiretroviral (ARV) therapies given to HIV-infected individuals. There is limited research on lipodystrophy in low- and middle-income countries, despite accounting for more than 95% of the burden of HIV/AIDS. The objective of this review was to evaluate the prevalence, pathogenesis and prognosis of HIV-related lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy and mixed syndrome, to inform clinical management in resource-limited settings. Methods We conducted a structured literature search using MEDLINE electronic databases. Relevant MeSH terms were used to identify published human studies on HIV and lipoatrophy, lipohypertrophy, or mixed syndrome in low-, low-middle- and upper-middle-income countries through 31 March 2014. The search resulted in 5296 articles; after 1599 studies were excluded (958 reviews, 641 non-human), 3697 studies were extracted for further review. After excluding studies conducted in high-income settings (n=2808), and studies that did not meet inclusion criteria (n=799), 90 studies were included in this review. Results and Discussion Of the 90 studies included in this review, only six were from low-income countries and eight were from lower middle-income economies. These studies focused on lipodystrophy prevalence, risk factors and side effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In most studies, lipodystrophy developed after the first six months of therapy, particularly with the use of stavudine. Lipodystrophy is associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic complications. This is disconcerting and anticipated to increase, given the rapid scale-up of ART worldwide, the increasing number and lifespan of HIV-infected patients on long-term therapy, and the emergence of obesity and non-communicable diseases in settings with extensive HIV burden. Conclusions Lipodystrophy is common in resource

  19. An experience in Japanese academic medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, L M

    1994-01-01

    The Japanese health care system has been highly praised for its universal access, freedom of patient choice, maintenance of a private system, and creative funding. Japanese citizens enjoy general good health, low infant mortality, and long life expectancy. Nevertheless, aspects of Japanese medical education, both graduate and undergraduate, and the structure of academic departments differ from those seen in the United States. A sabbatical spent teaching general internal medicine in Japan provided the experience for this review of the Japanese system. I describe the structure and function of departments of medicine and observations made at daily clinical teaching exercises in hospitals throughout the country. PMID:8160464

  20. Injection drug users' perspectives on placing HIV prevention and other clinical services in pharmacy settings.

    PubMed

    Lutnick, Alexandra; Case, Patricia; Kral, Alex H

    2012-04-01

    In their role as a source of sterile syringes, pharmacies are ideally situated to provide additional services to injection drug users (IDUs). Expanding pharmacy services to IDUs may address the low utilization rates of healthcare services among this population. This qualitative study of active IDUs in San Francisco explored perspectives on proposed health services and interventions offered in pharmacy settings, as well as facilitators and barriers to service delivery. Eleven active IDUs participated in one-on-one semistructured interviews at a community field site and at a local syringe exchange site between February and May 2010. Results revealed that most had reservations about expanding services to pharmacy settings, with reasons ranging from concerns about anonymity to feeling that San Francisco already offers the proposed services in other venues. Of the proposed health services, this group of IDUs prioritized syringe access and disposal, clinical testing and vaccinations, and provision of methadone. Pharmacists' and pharmacy staff's attitudes were identified as a major barrier to IDUs' comfort with accessing services. The findings suggest that although IDUs would like to see some additional services offered within pharmacy settings, this is contingent upon pharmacists and their staff receiving professional development trainings that cultivate sensitivity towards the needs and experiences of IDUs. PMID:22231488

  1. QIN. A Feasible High Spatiotemporal Resolution Breast DCE-MRI Protocol for Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Tudorica, Luminita A.; Oh, Karen Y.; Roy, Nicole; Kettler, Mark D.; Chen, Yiyi; Hemmingson, Stephanie L.; Afzal, Aneela; Grinstead, John W.; Laub, Gerhard; Li, Xin; Huang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Three dimensional bilateral imaging is the standard for most clinical breast dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI protocols. Because of high spatial resolution (sRes) requirement, the typical 1–2 min temporal resolution (tRes) afforded by a conventional full-k-space-sampling gradient echo (GRE) sequence precludes meaningful and accurate pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE time-course data. The commercially available, GRE-based, k-space undersampling and data sharing TWIST (time-resolved angiography with stochastic trajectories) sequence was used in this study to perform DCE-MRI exams on thirty one patients (with 36 suspicious breast lesions) before their biopsies. The TWIST DCE-MRI was immediately followed by a single-frame conventional GRE acquisition. Blinded from each other, three radiologist readers assessed agreements in multiple lesion morphology categories between the last set of TWIST DCE images and the conventional GRE images. Fleiss’ κ test was used to evaluate inter-reader agreement. The TWIST DCE time-course data were subjected to quantitative pharmacokinetic analyses. With a four-channel phased-array breast coil, the TWIST sequence produced DCE images with 20 s or less tRes and ~ 1.0×1.0×1.4 mm3 sRes. There were no significant differences in signal-to-noise (P = 0.45) and contrast-to-noise (P = 0.51) ratios between the TWIST and conventional GRE images. The agreements in morphology evaluations between the two image sets were excellent with the intra-reader agreement ranging from 79% for mass margin to 100% for mammographic density and the inter-reader κ value ranging from 0.54 (P < 0.0001) for lesion size to 1.00 (P < 0.0001) for background parenchymal enhancement. Quantitative analyses of the DCE time-course data provided higher breast cancer diagnostic accuracy (91% specificity at 100% sensitivity) than the current clinical practice of morphology and qualitative kinetics assessments. The TWIST sequence may be used in clinical settings to acquire

  2. Risk factor model to predict a missed clinic appointment in an urban, academic, and underserved setting.

    PubMed

    Torres, Orlando; Rothberg, Michael B; Garb, Jane; Ogunneye, Owolabi; Onyema, Judepatricks; Higgins, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the chronic care model, a missed appointment decreases continuity, adversely affects practice efficiency, and can harm quality of care. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of a missed appointment and develop a model to predict an individual's likelihood of missing an appointment. The research team performed a retrospective study in an urban, academic, underserved outpatient internal medicine clinic from January 2008 to June 2011. A missed appointment was defined as either a "no-show" or cancellation within 24 hours of the appointment time. Both patient and visit variables were considered. The patient population was randomly divided into derivation and validation sets (70/30). A logistic model from the derivation set was applied in the validation set. During the period of study, 11,546 patients generated 163,554 encounters; 45% of appointments in the derivation sample were missed. In the logistic model, percent previously missed appointments, wait time from booking to appointment, season, day of the week, provider type, and patient age, sex, and language proficiency were all associated with a missed appointment. The strongest predictors were percentage of previously missed appointments and wait time. Older age and non-English proficiency both decreased the likelihood of missing an appointment. In the validation set, the model had a c-statistic of 0.71, and showed no gross lack of fit (P=0.63), indicating acceptable calibration. A simple risk factor model can assist in predicting the likelihood that an individual patient will miss an appointment. PMID:25299396

  3. Clinical comparison of human and canine atopic dermatitis using human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009): proposal of provisional diagnostic criteria for canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuri; Nagata, Masahiko; Murayama, Nobuo; Nanko, Hiroko; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease encountered in both humans and dogs. Canine AD can be used in the analysis of naturally occurring AD; however, details of clinical comparison have been lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare those clinical features using the human diagnostic criteria (Japanese Dermatological Association, 2009). Fifty-one dogs with canine AD were evaluated by the human criteria. Prior to this study, canine AD was basically diagnosed by the fulfillment of two authentic canine AD criteria and a positive reaction against Dermatophagoides farinae in serum immunoglobulin E levels and/or in intradermal tests. Among the human AD criteria items, behavior corresponding to pruritus was observed in all 51 dogs. Skin lesions corresponding to eczematous dermatitis were seen in 50 dogs, and symmetrical distribution of skin lesions was noted in all 51 dogs. A chronic or chronically relapsing course was observed in 50 dogs. Based on these results, the concordance rate for the criteria was 96% (49/51). Differential diagnoses of AD were also investigated in the same manner. The concordance rate for the criteria was 0% (0/69) in scabies, 2% (1/50) in pyoderma, 0% (0/50) in demodicosis, 0% (0/9) in cutaneous lymphoma, 0% (0/2) in ichthyosis, 25% (2/7) in flea allergy, 48% (24/50) in seborrheic dermatitis and 75% (3/4) in food allergy. Canine AD is thus indicated as a valuable counterpart to human AD in clinical aspects. In addition, the human AD criteria could be applicable, with some modification, as provisional diagnostic criteria for canine AD. PMID:21434981

  4. Clinical-Education-Setting Standards Are Helpful in the Professional Preparation of Employed, Entry-Level Certified Athletic Trainers.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Tim; Weidner, Thomas G

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the helpfulness of clinical-education-setting standards in the professional preparation of entry-level certified athletic trainers. DESIGN AND SETTING: We developed a 22-item questionnaire based on the 12 standards presented by Weidner and Laurent. Subjects used a Likert scale (0 = no help, 5 = very helpful) to indicate their perceptions of the helpfulness of each standard in preparing them for their roles and responsibilities as certified athletic trainers. SUBJECTS: We surveyed employed, entry-level certified athletic trainers who recently completed Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs-accredited athletic training education programs. MEASUREMENTS: Percentage means were computed for the helpfulness ratings of each standard. A percentage mean was computed for the overall contribution of clinical education to professional development. Chi-square analyses were used to assess the differences in helpfulness ratings among respondents. RESULTS: The overall mean score across all standards was 4.17. No significant differences in the helpfulness ratings of any of the respondents were noted regardless of sex, ethnicity, number of clinical-education hours, total semesters of clinical education, settings in which students gained clinical experience, or current employment (P clinical-education settings are helpful and should be applied to all settings. Varying standards do not need to be imposed on our different athletic training clinical-education settings. PMID:12937553

  5. Technical solutions for mitigating security threats caused by health professionals in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Aleman, Jose Luis; Belen Sanchez Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Mateos, Gines; Toval, Ambrosio

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a brief description of technical solutions for health information system security threats caused by inadequate security and privacy practices in healthcare professionals. A literature search was carried out in ScienceDirect, ACM Digital Library and IEEE Digital Library to find papers reporting technical solutions for certain security problems in information systems used in clinical settings. A total of 17 technical solutions were identified: measures for password security, the secure use of e-mail, the Internet, portable storage devices, printers and screens. Although technical safeguards are essential to the security of healthcare organization's information systems, good training, awareness programs and adopting a proper information security policy are particularly important to prevent insiders from causing security incidents. PMID:26736528

  6. Profiles of Risk Among HIV-infected Youth in Clinic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Huszti, Heather C.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Kahana, Shoshana; Nichols, Sharon; Gonin, René; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rising number of new HIV infections among youth, few tailored interventions for youth living with HIV (YLH) have been developed and rigorously tested. Developing tailored interventions necessitates identifying different profiles of YLH and understanding how risk and protective factors cluster together. Obtaining this critical information requires accessing a sufficiently large sample of YLH from diverse geographic settings such as those available through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions (ATN). We recruited a cross-sectional sample of 1,712 YLH from ATN clinics; participants completed a survey on psychosocial and health factors. Using latent class analysis on nine composite variables representing risk factors, we identified five classes distinguished by substance use, sexual behavior, and pregnancy history and differing on health outcomes. Findings suggest a need for tailored interventions addressing multiple risky behaviors of HIV-infected youth and research to clarify how intervention effectiveness may differ by risk profile. PMID:25117556

  7. Deadly Partners: Interdependence of Alcohol and Trauma in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Amanda V.; Crandall, Marie L.

    2009-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans aged 1 to 45. Over a third of all fatal motor vehicle collisions and nearly eighty percent of completed suicides involve alcohol. Alcohol can be both a cause of traumatic injury as well as a confounding factor in the diagnosis and treatment of the injured patient. Fortunately, brief interventions after alcohol-related traumatic events have been shown to decrease both trauma recidivism and long-term alcohol use. This review will address the epidemiology of alcohol-related trauma, the influence of alcohol on mortality and other outcomes, and the role of prevention in alcohol-related trauma, within the confines of the clinical setting. PMID:20049248

  8. Long-term efficacy and safety of a generic atorvastatin in usual clinical care setting.

    PubMed

    Ong, L M; Punithavathi, N; Lena, Y L L; Mahanim, O; Leekha, S

    2011-08-01

    A multicentre study was conducted to assess the long term efficacy and safety of a generic atorvastatin in the treatment of primary hypercholesterolaemia. Eighty five patients who received 10mg or 20 mg of atorvastatin for 8 weeks depending on target cholesterol goal were followed up by their own physicians and had final evaluation at 52 weeks. Reduction in mean low density Lipoprotein (LDL-C) was 36.5%, 37.9% and 32.2% at weeks 4, 8 and 52 respectively. LDL-C target was maintained in 81% and 69% of patients at week 8 and 52 respectively without drug related serious adverse events. Generic atorvastatin is safe and effective in usual clinical care setting. PMID:22111443

  9. Profiles of Risk Among HIV-Infected Youth in Clinic Settings.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Isabel; Huszti, Heather C; Wilson, Patrick A; Kahana, Shoshana; Nichols, Sharon; Gonin, René; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G

    2015-05-01

    Despite the rising number of new HIV infections among youth, few tailored interventions for youth living with HIV (YLH) have been developed and rigorously tested. Developing tailored interventions necessitates identifying different profiles of YLH and understanding how risk and protective factors cluster together. Obtaining this critical information requires accessing a sufficiently large sample of YLH from diverse geographic settings such as those available through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions (ATN). We recruited a cross-sectional sample of 1,712 YLH from ATN clinics; participants completed a survey on psychosocial and health factors. Using latent class analysis on nine composite variables representing risk factors, we identified five classes distinguished by substance use, sexual behavior, and pregnancy history and differing on health outcomes. Findings suggest a need for tailored interventions addressing multiple risky behaviors of HIV-infected youth and research to clarify how intervention effectiveness may differ by risk profile. PMID:25117556

  10. Endophthalmitis Caused by Streptococcal Species: Clinical Settings, Microbiology, Management, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyan, Ajay E.; Weiss, Kathleen D.; Flynn, Harry W.; Smiddy, William E.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Albini, Thomas A.; Miller, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical settings, antibiotic susceptibilities, and outcomes of endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus species. Study Design Retrospective, observational case series. Methods Single-center study evaluating all patients with culture-positive endophthalmitis caused by Streptococcus species between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. Results Study criteria were met by 63 patients. The most common clinical settings were bleb-associated (17, 27%), post-intravitreal injection (16, 25%), and post-cataract surgery (13, 21%). The isolates were S. viridans (47, 71%), S. pneumoniae (13, 21%), and β-hemolytic Streptococci (5, 8%). Sixty (95%) of 63 isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, 47 (98%) of 48 to ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin), and 57 (93%) of 61 to levofloxacin (third generation fluoroquinolone). Between the first and second half of the study period, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics required to inhibit 90% of isolates increased by 1.5-fold for ceftriaxone and 2-fold for levofloxacin, and remained the same for vancomycin. Initial treatment was vitreous tap (49, 78%) or pars plana vitrectomy (14, 22%); all received intravitreal antibiotics. Visual acuity outcomes were variable; best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was ≥20/400 in 16 (25%) patients and <20/400 in 47 (75%) patients. Evisceration/enucleation was performed in 16 (25%) patients. Conclusion Streptococcus isolates generally had high susceptibility rates to commonly used antibiotics. Higher antibiotic MICs were required to inhibit 90% of isolates in vitro in the second half of the study period compared to the first half. Despite prompt treatment, the majority of patients had poor outcomes. PMID:24418264

  11. Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favié, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the

  12. Using the Promise of Sonodynamic Therapy in the Clinical Setting against Disseminated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a form of ultrasound therapy in which specialized chemotherapeutic agents known as sonosensitizers are administered to increase the efficacy of ultrasound-mediated preferential damage of neoplastic cells. Multiple in vitro and in vivo studies have indicated that SDT has the ability to exhibit profound physical and chemical changes on cellular structure. As supportive as the data have been, assessment of this method at the clinical level has been limited to only solid tumors. Although SDT has shown efficacy against multiple adherent neoplastic cell lines, it has also shown particular promise with leukemia-derived cell lines. Potential procedures to administer SDT to leukemia patients are heating the appendages as ultrasound is applied to these areas (Heat and Treat), using an ultrasound probe to scan the body for malignant growths (Target and Destroy), and extracorporeal blood sonication (EBS) through dialysis. Each method offers a unique set of benefits and concerns that will need to be evaluated in preclinical mammalian models of malignancy before clinical examination can be considered. PMID:26380110

  13. Use of a multi-application computer workstation in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hersh, W; Hickam, D

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the usage frequency, user satisfaction, and quality of literature searchers for a multi-application computer workstation in a university-based general medicine clinic. A computer with medical literature searching, textbook searching, and a decision-support program was deployed in the workroom of the clinic and made available for routine use. Data were collected for ten months. More than three quarters of the study participants used the computer, with use increasing by level of medical training. Despite physicians' known preferences for nonjournal sources of information, literature searching was the application used most frequently, followed by textbooks and decision support. The literature searches were replicated by experienced clinician and librarian searchers using first full MEDLINE and then text-word-only searching, to compare the quantities of relevant references retrieved. Novice searchers retrieved a larger number of relevant references than did the experienced searchers, but they also retrieved more nonrelevant references. For both groups of experienced searchers, the full MEDLINE feature set conferred little benefit over searching with only text words. These searching results call into question the value of traditional searching methods for both novice and experienced physicians. PMID:7841907

  14. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver. PMID:26713047

  15. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Xu, Julia Z; Francis, Richard O; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A; Jhang, Jeffrey S; Stotler, Brie A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Nicholas, Stephen W

    2015-10-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8-15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. PMID:26240158

  16. Patients' experiences of dental implant placement for treatment of partial edentulism in a student clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Seferli, Jotta; Michelin, Mattias; Klinge, Björn; Wettergren, Lena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' experiences of oral implant surgery when performed in a student clinic setting and the potential impact on patients'daily life. Patient selection was carried out during a round, to which undergraduate students in semester 9 and 10 could bring patients that they considered eligible for one or two implants. Partial edentulous patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria for implant installation at the student's clinic were consequently enrolled to implant surgery with either Astra Tech or 3i implants. The same surgeon accomplished all implant installations and the students were involved in the treatment, initially by assisting during the surgery and subsequently by performing the prosthetic restoration. After the surgery, a study-specific questionnaire was sent to patients for evaluation of discomfort, pain during the surgical procedure and postoperative symptoms. Thirty-six patients were included in the study, 30 patients answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). When retrospectively assessed, more than half of the patients (60%) perceived discomfort in the course of the implant surgery and 29% reported pain during the surgical procedure. Impact on daily living and postoperative symptoms were rarely reported (most common were pain, swelling and difficulties with chewing) and had a short duration when they occurred. Based on the results of this study conducted at a student's clinic, the impact of implant surgery on daily living appears to be small. However, it is noteworthy that the perception of discomfort and pain during the surgical procedure was frequently reported. Continued research is recommended to expose the patient's experiences of implant surgery in an educational context as well as in general dental practice. PMID:25102718

  17. Clinical Features of Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy and the Detection of Subunit-Specific Autoantibodies to the Ganglionic Acetylcholine Receptor in Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Michiaki; Kanda, Takashi; Murata, Kenya; Suzuki, Takashi; Kurono, Hiroko; Kunimoto, Masanari; Kaida, Ken-ichi; Mukaino, Akihiro; Sakai, Waka; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is a rare acquired channelopathy that is characterized by pandysautonomia, in which autoantibodies to ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (gAChR) may play a central role. Radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) assays have been used for the sensitive detection of autoantibodies to gAChR in the serum of patients with AAG. Here, we developed luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) to diagnose AAG based on IgGs to both the α3 and β4 gAChR subunits in patient serum. We reviewed the serological and clinical data of 50 Japanese patients who were diagnosed with AAG. With the LIPS testing, we detected anti-α3 and -β4 gAChR antibodies in 48% (24/50) of the patients. A gradual mode of onset was more common in the seropositive group than in the seronegative group. Patients with AAG frequently have orthostatic hypotension and upper and lower gastrointestinal tract symptoms, with or without anti-gAChR. The occurrence of autonomic symptoms was not significantly different between the seropositive and seronegative group, with the exception of achalasia in three patients from the seropositive group. In addition, we found a significant overrepresentation of autoimmune diseases in the seropositive group and endocrinological abnormalities as an occasional complication of AAG. Our results demonstrated that the LIPS assay was a useful novel tool for detecting autoantibodies against gAChR in patients with AAG. PMID:25790156

  18. [Retrospective Analysis of the Afatinib Clinical Pathway during the 28-Day Introductory Period-The Japanese Style of Collaborative Drug Therapy Management(J-CDTM)].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Kaori; Ryota, Noriko; Hikita, Ami; Sando, Masumi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Azuma, Yuichiro; Tani, Eriko; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Tanaka, Ayako; Shiroyama, Takayuki; Morishita, Naoko; Okamoto, Norio; Futagami, Sumiko; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2015-08-01

    Afatinib is a newly approved second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibito r(EGFR-TKI). Afatinib has been shown to prolongthe overall survival of patients with non-small cell lungcancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutations compared with the standard chemotherapy. However, Grade 3 or 4 toxicities, includingdiarrhea, rash, paronychia, and stomatitis, have been observed more frequently in patients treated with afatinib than in those treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs. Accordingly, our institution developed an afatinib clinical pathway (the afatinib pathway), which was designed by certified nurses, medical physicians, and certified pharmacists, with the goal of reducing the severity of diarrhea and rash that occur most frequently duringthe 28-day introductory period of afatinib treatment. Between May and October 2014, afatinib was administered accordingto the afatinib pathway to 14 patients with NSCLC and EGFR mutations. Of these patients, only one (7.1%) experienced Grade 3 diarrhea. No other patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The afatinib pathway was effective in reducingthe severities of the diarrhea and rash duringthe 28-day introductory period of the afatinib treatment. Our implementation of the afatinib pathway could be considered the Japanese style of collaborative drugtherapy management (J-CDTM). PMID:26321711

  19. Handling Japanese without a Japanese Operating System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatasa, Kazumi; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Macintosh HyperCard environment has become a popular platform for Japanese language courseware because of its flexibility and ease of programing. This project created Japanese bitmap font files for the JIS Levels 1 and 2, and writing XFCNs for font manipulation, Japanese kana input, and answer correction. (12 references) (Author/LB)

  20. A Review of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Its Presentation in Different Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mufaddel, Amir; Osman, Ossama T.; Almugaddam, Fadwa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric disorder characterized by preoccupations with perceived defects in physical appearance. This review aimed to explore epidemiology, clinical features, comorbidities, and treatment options for BDD in different clinical settings. Data Source and Study Selection: A search of the literature from 1970 to 2011 was performed using the MEDLINE search engine. English-language articles, with no restriction regarding the type of articles, were identified using the search terms body dysmorphic disorder, body dysmorphic disorder clinical settings, body dysmorphic disorder treatment, and body dysmorphic disorder & psychodermatology. Results: BDD occurs in 0.7% to 2.4% of community samples and 13% of psychiatric inpatients. Etiology is multifactorial, with recent findings indicating deficits in visual information processing. There is considerable overlap between BDD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in symptom etiology and response to treatment, which has led to suggestions that BDD can be classified with anxiety disorders and OCD. A recent finding indicated genetic overlap between BDD and OCD. Over 60% of patients with BDD had a lifetime anxiety disorder, and 38% had social phobia, which tends to predate the onset of BDD. Studies reported a high level of comorbidity with depression and social phobia occurring in > 70% of patients with BDD. Individuals with BDD present frequently to dermatologists (about 9%–14% of dermatologic patients have BDD). BDD co-occurs with pathological skin picking in 26%–45% of cases. BDD currently has 2 variants: delusional and nondelusional, and both variants respond similarly to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), which may have effect on obsessive thoughts and rituals. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has the best established treatment results. Conclusions: A considerable overlap exists between BDD and other psychiatric disorders such as OCD, anxiety, and delusional

  1. Bioethics of life programs: Taking seriously moral pluralism in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the more and more globalized world, the experience of moral pluralism (often related to, or based upon, religious pluralism) has become a common issue which ethical importance is undeniable. Potential conflicts between patients' and therapeutic teams' moral views and between moral beliefs of the particular member of this team are being resolved in the light of bioethical theories, among which principlism remains the mainstream approach to biomedical ethics. The question arises, however, whether this approach, in itself, as being strictly bound to the specific and distinct American philosophical tradition, is to be considered the tool for so called 'moral imperialism'. Also architectures of principlism, in particular by elaborating the concept of common morality, defend the applicability of their theory to the pluralistic settings, it should be emphasized that the idea that some norms and standards of moral character are shared by all morally serious people in every culture has attracted criticism both from empirical as well as theoretical backgrounds. Objective This paper aims at reconsidering principlism so that it would be more suitable for resolving moral dilemma in ethically pluralistic clinical settings. Methods Lakatos' sophisticated methodological falsification is used into two different ways: (1) to construct a concept of 'life programs' and (2) to confront a newly elaborated ethical theory with principlism. The reflection is limited to the norms related to the key issue in clinical ethics, i.e., respecting the patient's autonomy. Results The concepts of common morality and particular moralities are interpreted (in the light of Lakatos' philosophy of sciences) as 'hard core' and 'protective belt' of life programs, respectively. Accepting diversity of research programs, Lakatos maintains the idea of the objectivity of truth. Analogously, the plurality of life programs does not put into question the objectivity of moral values. The plurality of

  2. Adherence to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Madeline C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Nunn, Amy S.; Mena, Leandro; Anderson, Peter; Liegler, Teri; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Patel, Rupa; Almonte, Alexi; Chan, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in the United States (US) disproportionately affects gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using co-formulated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) has demonstrated high efficacy in reducing HIV incidence among MSM. However, low adherence was reported in major efficacy trials and may present a substantial barrier to successful PrEP implementation. Rates of adherence to PrEP in “real-world” clinical settings in the US remain largely unknown. Methods We reviewed demographic and clinical data for the first 50 patients to enroll in a clinical PrEP program in Providence, Rhode Island. We analyzed self-reported drug adherence as well as drug concentrations in dried blood spots (DBS) from patients who attended either a three- or six-month follow-up appointment. We further assessed drug concentrations and the resistance profile of a single patient who seroconverted while taking PrEP. Results Of the first 50 patients to be prescribed PrEP, 62% attended a follow-up appointment at three months and 38% at six months. Of those who attended an appointment at either time point (70%, n = 35), 92% and 95% reported taking ±4 doses/week at three and six months, respectively. Drug concentrations were performed on a random sample of 20 of the 35 patients who attended a follow-up appointment. TDF levels consistent with ±4 doses/week were found in 90% of these patients. There was a significant correlation between self-reported adherence and drug concentrations (r = 0.49, p = 0.02). One patient who had been prescribed PrEP seroconverted at his three-month follow-up visit. The patient’s drug concentrations were consistent with daily dosing. Population sequencing and ultrasensitive allele-specific PCR detected the M184V mutation, but no other TDF- or FTC-associated mutations, including those present as minor variants. Conclusion In this clinical PrEP program, adherence was high

  3. Post-hoc analysis showing better clinical response with the loading dose of certolizumab pegol in Japanese patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Eguchi, Katsumi; Watanabe, Akira; Origasa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Mariko; Shoji, Toshiharu; Togo, Osamu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To compare the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP) with and without loading dose (LD) in a post-hoc analysis of two Japanese clinical studies. Methods: Data from the double-blind trials (DBT) J-RAPID and HIKARI, and their open-label extension (OLE) studies, were used. Patients randomized to CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) groups starting with LD (400 mg Weeks 0/2/4; LD group; J-RAPID: n = 82, HIKARI: n = 116) and patients randomized to placebo groups who subsequently started CZP Q2W without LD in the OLEs (No-LD group; J-RAPID: n = 61, HIKARI: n = 99) were analyzed. Efficacy and pharmacokinetics were assessed during 24 weeks. Adverse events were reported from all studies. Results: In both trials, the LD groups showed more rapid initial ACR20/50/70 kinetics, and maintained higher ACR50/70 responses until 24 weeks, compared with the No-LD groups. Anti-CZP antibody development was less frequent in the LD groups (J-RAPID: 1.2% versus 4.9%; HIKARI: 17.2% versus 27.3%). Similar safety profiles were reported between LD and No-LD groups (any AEs: 281.8 versus 315.7 [J-RAPID], 282.6 versus 321.3 [HIKARI] [incidence rate/100 patient-years]). Conclusions: Despite limitations, including comparing DBT and OLE studies, these results suggest that a CZP LD improves clinical response in active rheumatoid arthritis without altering the safety profile. PMID:26472043

  4. Measuring Japanese mothers' perception of child abuse: development of a Japanese version of the child abuse blame scale – physical abuse (CABS-PA-J)

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Masaki; Hirose, Taiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Okawa, Hiroji; Takigawa, Itsurou

    2007-01-01

    Background The Child Abuse Blame Scale – Physical Abuse (CABS-PA) was translated into Japanese and its subscale items modified by the authors according to the Japanese cultural context. The aim of the current study was to investigate the appropriateness, reliability, and clinical applicability of the CABS-PA Japanese version (CABS-PA-J). Modifications were made to enable the determination of child abuse recognition in a Japanese cultural setting and early clinical intervention in child abuse cases. Methods The CABS-PA text was translated into Japanese, then back translated. The appropriateness of scale item translations was verified based on e-mail discussions with the original CABS-PA author. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the validity of CABS-PA-J responses and to confirm the validity of factor structure. Criterion-related validity was also confirmed. The Japanese scale was used to examine the characteristic differences between mothers of premature infants (< 1500 g) and those of other infants (≧ 1500 g). Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses found the factor structure to be similar between the original scale and the translated CABS-PA-J, suggesting adequate factor validity. There was a statistically significant correlation between social support from a spouse or third party and the abuse score on a subscale, partially demonstrating criterion-referenced validity. Similarities and differences were found in the stress reactions of the mothers of premature infants (< 1500 g) and those of other infants (≧ 1500 g). Conclusion CABS-PA-J was shown to be appropriate and reliable. It is an effective tool for determining the recognition of child abuse among Japanese mothers. PMID:17623078

  5. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Butt, A. A.; Yan, P.; Shaikh, O. S.; Freiberg, M. S.; Re, V. Lo; Justice, A. C.; Sherman, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV co-infection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ≥12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  6. A balancing act: a phenomenological exploration of medical students' experiences of using mobile devices in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Rashid-Doubell, F; Mohamed, S; Elmusharaf, K; O'Neill, C S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of senior students using mobile devices in a clinical setting while learning and interacting with clinical teachers, patients and each other, and to identify challenges that facilitated or impeded the use of such devices in the hospital. Design Interpretative phenomenology was chosen to guide our enquiry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine the experiences of five senior medical students using mobile devices in the clinical setting. Setting and participants Senior medical students at an international medical school in the Middle East. Results Three main themes emerged from the data analysis: learning; professional identity and transitioning from student to doctor. The findings showed that using mobile devices in the clinical area as a learning tool was not a formalised process. Rather, it was opportunistic learning at the bedside and on occasion a source of distraction from clinical teaching. Students needed to negotiate relationships between themselves, the clinical teacher and patients in order to ensure that they maintained an acceptable professional image. Participants experienced and negotiated the change from student to doctor making them mindful of using their devices at the bedside. Conclusions Mobile devices are part of daily life for a medical student and there is a need to adapt medical education in the clinical setting, to allow the students to use their devices in a sensitive manner. PMID:27142860

  7. Experience in Strategic Networking to Promote Palliative Care in a Clinical Academic Setting in India

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shoba; Tarey, SD; Barathi, B; Mary, Thiophin Regina; Mathew, Lovely; Daniel, Sudha Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Palliative care in low and middle-income countries is a new discipline, responding to a greater patient need, than in high-income countries. By its very nature, palliative as a specialty has to network with other specialties to provide quality care to patients. For any medical discipline to grow as a specialty, it should be well established in the teaching medical institutions of that country. Data show that palliative care is more likely to establish and grow in an academic health care institution. It is a necessity that multiple networking strategies are adopted to reach this goal. Objectives: (1) To describe a strategic approach to palliative care service development and integration into clinical academic setting. (2) To present the change in metrics to evaluate progress. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive study wherein, the different strategies that are adopted by the Department of Palliative Medicine for networking in an academic health care institution and outside the institution are scrutinized. Measurement: The impact of this networking was assessed, one, at the level of academics and the other, at the level of service. The number of people who attended various training programs conducted by the department and the number of patients who availed palliative care service over the years were assessed. Results: Ten different strategies were identified that helped with networking of palliative care in the institution. During this time, the referrals to the department increased both for malignant diseases (52–395) and nonmalignant diseases (5–353) from 2000 to 2013. The academic sessions conducted by the department for undergraduates also saw an increase in the number of hours from 6 to 12, apart from the increase in a number of courses conducted by the department for doctors and nurses. Conclusion: Networking is an essential strategy for the establishment of a relatively new medical discipline like palliative care in a developing and

  8. Mentoring in the Clinical Setting to Improve Student Decision-Making Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick-Mueller, Misty; Boesch, Ron; Silverman, Steven; Carpenter, Scott; Illingworth, Robert; Countryman, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The physician-intern relationship can be difficult to develop. A new chiropractic intern in a teaching clinic undergoes a major transition from classroom to clinical practice and must learn to turn classroom knowledge into clinical application. The ability to start formulating clinical techniques and apply them on a patient is…

  9. How to protect incompetent clinical research subjects involved in critical care or emergency settings.

    PubMed

    Zamperetti, Nereo; Piccinni, Mariassunta; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Gristina, Giuseppe; Giannini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Clinical research is an essential component of medical activity, and this is also true in intensive care. Adequate information and consent are universally considered necessary for the protection of research subjects. However, in emergency situations, the majority of critical patients are unable to consent and a valid legal representative is often unavailable. The situation is even more complex in Italy, where the relevant legislation fails to specify how investigators should manage research in emergency or critical care setting when it involves incompetent patients who do not have an appointed legal representative. While special measures for the protection of incompetent subjects during emergency research are necessary, not allowing such research at all dooms critically ill patients to receive non-evidence-based treatments without the prospect of improvement. The recently-issued EU Regulation n. 536/2014 will probably help shed light on this situation. Indeed, it specifically addresses the issue of "research in emergency situations" and introduces detailed rules aimed at protecting patients while allowing research. In this article, we argue that obtaining informed consent during emergency research on incompetent subjects in unrealistic, and that in most cases substituted judgment on the part of a proxy carries major flaws. Strict criteria in evaluating the risk-benefit ratio of proposed intervention and a careful evaluation of the trial by a local or national Research Ethics Committee are perhaps the most practicable solution. PMID:26154445

  10. Adoption of Clinical Data Exchange in Community Settings: A Comparison of Two Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Campion, Thomas R.; Vest, Joshua R.; Kern, Lisa M.; Kaushal, Rainu

    2014-01-01

    Adoption of electronic clinical data exchange (CDE) across disparate healthcare organizations remains low in community settings despite demonstrated benefits. To expand CDE in communities, New York State funded sixteen community-based organizations to implement point-to-point directed exchange (n=8) and multi-site query-based health information exchange (HIE) (n=8). We conducted a cross-sectional study to compare adoption of directed exchange versus query-based HIE. From 2008 to 2011, 66% (n=1,747) of providers targeted for directed exchange and 21% (n=5,427) of providers targeted for query-based HIE adopted CDE. Funding per provider adoptee was almost two times greater for directed exchange (median (interquartile range): $25,535 ($17,391–$42,240)) than query-based HIE ($14,649 ($9,897–$28,078)), although the difference was not statistically significant. Because its infrastructure can cover larger populations using similar levels of public funding, query-based HIE may scale more broadly than directed exchange. To our knowledge, this is among the first studies to compare directed exchange versus query-based HIE. PMID:25954339

  11. Blood transcriptomic markers for major depression: from animal models to clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Redei, Eva E; Mehta, Neha S

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a heterogeneous disorder and, similar to other spectrum disorders, its manifestation varies by age of onset, severity, comorbidity, treatment responsiveness, and other factors. A laboratory blood test based on specific biomarkers for major depressive disorder (MDD) and its subgroups could increase diagnostic accuracy and expedite the initiation of treatment. We identified candidate blood biomarkers by examining genome-wide expression differences in the blood of animal models representing both the genetic and environmental/stress etiologies of depression. Human orthologs of the resulting transcript panel were tested in pilot studies. Transcript abundance of 11 blood markers differentiated adolescent subjects with early-onset MDD from adolescents with no disorder (ND). A set of partly overlapping transcripts distinguished adolescent patients who had comorbid anxiety disorders from those with only MDD. In adults, blood levels of nine transcripts discerned subjects with MDD from ND controls. Even though cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) resulted in remission of some patients, the levels of three transcripts consistently signaled prior MDD status. A coexpression network of transcripts seems to predict responsiveness to CBT. Thus, our approach can be developed into clinically valid diagnostic panels of blood transcripts for different manifestations of MDD, potentially reducing diagnostic heterogeneity and advancing individualized treatment strategies. PMID:25823952

  12. Antecedents of ethical decision-making: intercollegiate sporting environments as clinical education and practice settings.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Shane V; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Amanda M; Gould, Trenton E

    2009-01-01

    Unique among allied health care professions, athletic training is predominately practiced amid competitive intercollegiate sports. Competitive sporting environments have been suggested to adversely impact morality, ethical decision-making (EDM), and behavior. The purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the effect of institutional National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) participation level on preferred ethical ideologies and EDM, (2) determine the relationship between professional status (athletic training student [ATS] or certified athletic trainer [ATC]) and ethical ideology preferences and EDM, and (3) examine whether preferred ethical ideology is related to differences in EDM. A nationally representative sample of 610 ATSs and ATCs from 30 athletic training education programs, stratified by NCAA division level, participated in the study. All participants completed a demographic survey, the Ethics Position Questionnaire, and the Dilemmas in Athletic Training Questionnaire. No significant relationships were noted between NCAA participation level and respondents' ethical ideology preferences. However, ATSs and ATCs demonstrated significant preferences for specific ethical ideologies, with students adopting the subjectivist ideology more than expected and the exceptionist ideology less than expected and ATCs adopting the exceptionist ideology more than expected and the situationist ideology less than expected. In contrast to some previous research, our results suggest that competitive sporting environments do not affect ATSs' and ATCs' ethical ideology and EDM abilities at the collegiate level. These findings serve as a baseline for future research examining the ethical ideologies and ethical decision-making levels of athletic training practitioners and other allied health professionals across clinical settings. PMID:19361022

  13. Locating assistive technology research in a clinical setting: an occupational perspective.

    PubMed

    Fowler-Davis, Sally; Evans, Laura; Cudd, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peer research was used to identify the experience and perceptions of assistive technology and telecare adoption in a UK healthcare context. A narrative account of participation and learning is intended to provoke further dialogue. There have been a range of policy and implementation initiatives that are within the direct experience of organisational actors over the last 15 years and this engagement allows for specific reflection on the service achievements and some of the barriers to implementation of technology changes in rehabilitation practice and service design. Insights are presented that suggest a reification of research priorities and a need to align technology, through patient and public engagement, to provider priorities. In addition, an improvement in adoption would be based on sustained capacity building within the Occupational Therapy workforce and a re-focus on specific knowledge sharing and learning about technology. Given the shared desire to promote the sustained adoption of appropriate technology for assistance and rehabilitation it is suggested the voice of practitioners is strengthened through research and knowledge exchange in the clinical setting. PMID:26294543

  14. Clinical efficacy and tolerability of Gosha-jinki-gan, a Japanese traditional herbal medicine, for nocturia

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Nishio, Kojiro; Sato, Ryo; Arai, Gaku; Soh, Shigehiro; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of Gosha-jinki-gan (GJG; 濟生腎氣丸 jì shēng shèn qì wán) in 30 cases of nocturia (夜尿 yè niào) unresponsive to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs. All patients received GJG extract powder (2.5 g) three times a day for 12 weeks as an add-on therapy to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs. Subjective outcomes assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score—quality of life, and the benign prostatic hyperplasia impact index and objective outcomes assessed by urinary frequency and the urine production rate at night showed significant improvement after treatment. Moreover, other objective outcomes assessed by maximum flow rates, postvoid residual, serum human atrial natriuretic peptide levels, and urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine levels did not change. Adverse events were observed in 10% of cases; however, these events were mild. GJG appears to be a safe and effective potential therapeutic alternative for patients with nocturia unresponsive to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs. Further clinical investigations are required to elucidate the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms of GJG in nocturia. PMID:26870690

  15. Clinical efficacy and tolerability of two Japanese traditional herbal medicines, Hachimi-jio-gan and Gosha-jinki-gan, for lower urinary tract symptoms with cold sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Sato, Ryo; Nishio, Kojiro; Arai, Gaku; Soh, Shigehiro; Okada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of Hachimi-jio-gan (HJG; 八味地黃丸 bā wèi dì huáng wán) and Gosha-jinki-gan (GJG; 濟生腎氣丸 jì shēng shèn qì wán), two traditional Japanese medicines, in 60 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) having cold sensitivity unresponsive to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs. All patients received a mixture of HJG or GJG for 12 weeks in addition to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs as add-on therapy. International Prostate Symptom Score, International Prostate Symptom Score–Quality of Life, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Impact Index, and the number of nocturnal voids were statistically much improved. However, there was no change in maximal urinary flow rate and post-void residual urine. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine was statistically greatly improved from baseline after treatment in the HJG group compared to the GJG group. Adverse reactions were observed in 8.3% of patients, but all reactions were mild. Both HJG and GJG mixtures can serve as safe and effective potential therapeutic alternatives in patients with LUTS and cold sensitivity unresponsive to α1-blockers or antimuscarinic drugs. Additionally, HJG mixture was found to have anti-oxidative activity, and therefore further long-term clinical investigations are needed to examine its anti-aging effects in addition to its effect on urinary symptoms. PMID:26587398

  16. Phase III Clinical Trials Comparing the Immunogenicity and Safety of the Vero Cell-Derived Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Encevac with Those of Mouse Brain-Derived Vaccine by Using the Beijing-1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Chiaki; Okada, Kenji; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Iribe, Kaneshige; Ishikawa, Yuji; Togashi, Takehiro; Ueda, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated cell culture Japanese encephalitis vaccine (CC-JEV) were compared with those of an inactivated mouse brain-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine (MB-JEV) in phase III clinical multicenter trials conducted in children. The vaccines contain the same Japanese encephalitis virus strain, the Beijing-1 strain. Two independent clinical trials (trials 1 and 2) were conducted. Trial 1 was conducted in 468 healthy children. Each subject was injected with 17 μg per dose of either CC-JEV or MB-JEV, and the immunogenicity and safety of the vaccines were investigated. Trial 1 showed that CC-JEV was more immunogenic and reactive than MB-JEV at the same dose. Therefore, to adjust the immunogenicity of CC-JEV to that of MB-JEV, a vaccine that has had a good track record regarding its efficacy for a long time, trial 2 was conducted in 484 healthy children. To improve the stability, CC-JEV was converted from a liquid type to a freeze-dried type of vaccine. Each subject was injected subcutaneously with either 4 μg per dose of CC-JEV, 8 μg per dose of CC-JEV, or 17 μg per dose of MB-JEV twice, at an interval of 2 to 4 weeks, followed by an additional booster immunization 1 to 15 months after the primary immunization. Based on the results of trial 2, 4 μg per dose of the freeze-dried CC-JEV (under the label Encevac) was selected as a substitute for the MB-JEV. Encevac was approved and launched in 2011 and has since been in use as a 2nd-generation Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Japan. (These studies have been registered at the JapicCTI under registration no. JapicCTI-132063 and JapicCTI-080586 for trials 1 and 2, respectively.) PMID:24334689

  17. A clinical algorithm for triaging patients with significant lymphadenopathy in primary health care settings in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    El Hag, Imad A.; Elsiddig, Kamal E.; Elsafi, Mohamed E.M.O; Elfaki, Mona E.E.; Musa, Ahmed M.; Musa, Brima Y.; Elhassan, Ahmed M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a major health problem in developing countries. The distinction between tuberculous lymphadenitis, non-specific lymphadenitis and malignant lymph node enlargement has to be made at primary health care levels using easy, simple and cheap methods. Objective To develop a reliable clinical algorithm for primary care settings to triage cases of non-specific, tuberculous and malignant lymphadenopathies. Methods Calculation of the odd ratios (OR) of the chosen predictor variables was carried out using logistic regression. The numerical score values of the predictor variables were weighed against their respective OR. The performance of the score was evaluated by the ROC (Receiver Operator Characteristic) curve. Results Four predictor variables; Mantoux reading, erythrocytes sedimentation rate (ESR), nocturnal fever and discharging sinuses correlated significantly with TB diagnosis and were included in the reduced model to establish score A. For score B, the reduced model included Mantoux reading, ESR, lymph-node size and lymph-node number as predictor variables for malignant lymph nodes. Score A ranged 0 to 12 and a cut-off point of 6 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 90% respectively, whilst score B ranged -3 to 8 and a cut-off point of 3 gave a best sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 76% respectively. The calculated area under the ROC curve was 0.964 (95% CI, 0.949 – 0.980) and -0.856 (95% CI, 0.787 - 0.925) for scores A and B respectively, indicating good performance. Conclusion The developed algorithm can efficiently triage cases with tuberculous and malignant lymphadenopathies for treatment or referral to specialised centres for further work-up.

  18. Preliminary Validation of Angle-Independent Myocardial Elastography Using MR Tagging in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Qian, Zhen; Tosti, Christina L.; Brown, Truman R.; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial Elastography (ME), a radio-frequency (RF) based speckle tracking technique, was employed in order to image the entire two-dimensional (2D) transmural deformation field in full view, and validated against tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tMRI) in normal as well as reperfused (i.e., treated myocardial infarction (MI)) human left ventricles. RF ultrasound and tMRI frames were acquired at the papillary muscle level in 2D short-axis (SA) views at nominal frame rates of 136 (fps; real time) and 33 fps (electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated), respectively. In ultrasound, in-plane, 2D (lateral and axial) incremental displacements were iteratively estimated using one-dimensional (1D) cross-correlation and recorrelation techniques in a 2D search with a 1D matching kernel. In tMRI, cardiac motion was estimated by a template-matching algorithm on a 2D grid-shaped mesh. In both ME and tMRI, cumulative 2D displacements were estimated and then used to estimate 2D Lagrangian finite systolic strains, from which polar (i.e., radial and circumferential) strains, namely angle-independent measures, were further obtained through coordinate transformation. Principal strains, which are angle-independent and less centroid-dependent than polar strains, were also computed and imaged based on the 2D finite strains with a previously established strategy. Both qualitatively and quantitatively, angle-independent ME is shown to be capable of 1) estimating myocardial deformation in good agreement with tMRI estimates in a clinical setting and of 2) differentiating abnormal from normal myocardium in a full left-ventricular view. Finally, the principal strains are suggested to be an alternative diagnostic tool of detecting cardiac disease with the characteristics of their reduced centroid dependence. PMID:18952364

  19. Practicability of Hygienic Wrapping of Touchscreen Operated Mobile Devices in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hammon, Matthias; Kunz, Bernd; Dinzl, Veronika; Kammerer, Ferdinand J.; Schwab, Siegfried A.; Bogdan, Christian; Uder, Michael; Schlechtweg, Philipp M.

    2014-01-01

    Background To prove effectiveness of wrapping tablet computers in order to reduce microbiological contamination and to evaluate whether a plastic bag-covered tablet leads to impaired user satisfaction or touchscreen functionality. Materials and Methods Within a period of 11 days 115 patients were provided with a tablet computer while waiting for their magnetic resonance imaging examination. Every day the contamination of the surface of the tablet was determined before the first and after the final use. Before the device was handed over to a patient, it was enclosed in a customized single-use plastic bag, which was analyzed for bacterial contamination after each use. A questionnaire was applied to determine whether the plastic bag impairs the user satisfaction and the functionality of the touchscreen. Results Following the use by patients the outside of the plastic bags was found to be contaminated with various bacteria (657.5 ± 368.5 colony forming units/day); some of them were potentially pathogenic. In contrast, the plastic bag covered surface of the tablet was significantly less contaminated (1.7 ± 1.9 colony forming units/day). Likewise, unused plastic bags did not show any contamination. 11% of the patients reported problems with the functionality of the touchscreen. These patients admitted that they had never used a tablet or a smartphone before. Conclusions Tablets get severely contaminated during usage in a clinical setting. Wrapping with a customized single-use plastic bag significantly reduces microbiological contamination of the device, protects patients from the acquisition of potentially pathogenic bacteria and hardly impairs the user satisfaction and the functionality of the touchscreen. PMID:25180580

  20. How Iranian Medical Trainees Approach their Responsibilities in Clinical Settings; A Grounded Theory Research

    PubMed Central

    Asemani, Omid; Iman, Mohammad Taghi; Moattari, Marzieh; Khayyer, Mohammad; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin

    2015-01-01

    Background: It seems we are now experiencing “responsibility problems” among medical trainees (MTs) and some of those recently graduated from medical schools in Iran. Training responsible professionals have always been one of the main concerns of medical educators. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of research in the literature on “responsibility” especially from the medical education point of view. Therefore, the present study was carried out with the aim of presenting a theoretical based framework for understanding how MTs approach their responsibilities in educational settings. Method: This qualitative study was conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) using the grounded theory methodology. 15 MTs and 10 clinical experts and professional nurses were purposefully chosen as participants. Data was analyzed using the methodology suggested by Corbin and Strauss, 1998. Results: “Try to find acceptance toward expectations”, “try to be committed to meet the expectations” and “try to cope with unacceptable expectations” were three main categories extracted based on the research data. Abstractly, the main objective for using these processes was “to preserve the integrity of student identity” which was the core category of this research too. Moreover, it was also found that practically, “responsibility” is considerably influenced by lots of positive and negative contextual and intervening conditions. Conclusion: “Acceptance” was the most decisive variable highly effective in MTs’ responsibility. Therefore, investigating the “process of acceptance” regarding the involved contextual and intervening conditions might help medical educators correctly identify and effectively control negative factors and reinforce the constructive ones that affect the concept of responsibility in MTs. PMID:26379351

  1. Effects of ostracism and sex on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Amy K; Cranford, Alexi N; Blumenthal, Heidemarie

    2015-09-01

    Drinking to cope with negative affect is a drinking pattern that leads to problematic alcohol use both in college and after graduation. Despite theory and correlational evidence to this effect, establishing a link between stress and alcohol consumption among college students in the laboratory has yielded both a limited number of studies and, at times, inconsistent results. The present study attempts to resolve these issues through investigating the effects of an ecologically relevant stressor-ostracism-on alcohol consumption in a clinical laboratory setting. Social drinking college students (N = 40; 55% female) completed a 5-min game of Cyberball and were randomly assigned either to be included or excluded in the virtual ball-toss game. The amount (in ml) of beer consumed in a subsequent mock taste test served as our primary dependent variable, with breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) as a secondary dependent variable. Results indicated that excluded participants reported a trend toward an increase in negative affect from pre- to post-Cyberball, and endorsed significantly lower self-esteem, belonging, control, and belief in a meaningful existence compared to included participants. A significant Sex × Condition effect indicated that excluded women consumed less beer than both included women and excluded men, supported by a nonsignificant trend in BrAC. Men did not differ in their consumption of beer as a result of Cyberball condition. Implications of sex and social context on alcohol use are discussed, as well as ostracism as a method for investigating relationships between social stress and alcohol use. PMID:25642585

  2. Application Description and Policy Model in Collaborative Environment for Sharing of Information on Epidemiological and Clinical Research Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Elias César Araujo; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Simkins, Julie; Martins, Henrique; Shah, Jatin; Rajgor, Dimple; Shah, Anand; Rockart, Scott; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Background Sharing of epidemiological and clinical data sets among researchers is poor at best, in detriment of science and community at large. The purpose of this paper is therefore to (1) describe a novel Web application designed to share information on study data sets focusing on epidemiological clinical research in a collaborative environment and (2) create a policy model placing this collaborative environment into the current scientific social context. Methodology The Database of Databases application was developed based on feedback from epidemiologists and clinical researchers requiring a Web-based platform that would allow for sharing of information about epidemiological and clinical study data sets in a collaborative environment. This platform should ensure that researchers can modify the information. A Model-based predictions of number of publications and funding resulting from combinations of different policy implementation strategies (for metadata and data sharing) were generated using System Dynamics modeling. Principal Findings The application allows researchers to easily upload information about clinical study data sets, which is searchable and modifiable by other users in a wiki environment. All modifications are filtered by the database principal investigator in order to maintain quality control. The application has been extensively tested and currently contains 130 clinical study data sets from the United States, Australia, China and Singapore. Model results indicated that any policy implementation would be better than the current strategy, that metadata sharing is better than data-sharing, and that combined policies achieve the best results in terms of publications. Conclusions Based on our empirical observations and resulting model, the social network environment surrounding the application can assist epidemiologists and clinical researchers contribute and search for metadata in a collaborative environment, thus potentially facilitating

  3. Developing a technology for the use of operant extinction in clinical settings: an examination of basic and applied research.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    Extinction of operant behavior, which involves terminating the reinforcement contingency that maintains a response, is important to the development, generalization, and reduction of behavior in clinical settings. We review basic and applied research findings on variables that influence the direct and indirect effects of extinction and discuss the potential value of a general technology for the use of extinction. We suggest that current research findings are not sufficient for the development of a comprehensive, applied technology of extinction and provide extensive guidelines for further studies on factors that may affect the course of extinction in clinical settings. PMID:8926226

  4. Recovery of clinical but not radiographic outcomes by the delayed addition of adalimumab to methotrexate-treated Japanese patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: 52-week results of the HOPEFUL-1 trial

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Naoki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Masaya; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Uchida, Shoji; Akama, Hideto; Kupper, Hartmut; Arora, Vipin; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare efficacy outcomes of initial treatment with adalimumab + MTX vs adalimumab addition following 26 weeks of MTX monotherapy in Japanese early RA patients naive to MTX with high disease activity. Methods. Patients completing the 26-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of adalimumab + MTX were eligible to receive 26 weeks of open-label adalimumab + MTX. Patients were assessed for mean change from baseline in the 28-joint DAS with ESR (DAS28-ESR) and modified total Sharp score (mTSS), and for the proportions of patients achieving clinical, functional or radiographic remission. Results. Of 333 patients assessed, 278 (137 from the initial adalimumab + MTX and 141 from the initial placebo + MTX groups) completed the 52-week study. Significant differences in clinical and functional parameters observed during the 26-week blinded period were not apparent following the addition of open-label adalimumab to MTX. Open-label adalimumab + MTX slowed radiographic progression through week 52 in both groups, but patients who received adalimumab + MTX throughout the study exhibited less radiographic progression than those who received placebo + MTX during the first 26 weeks (mean ΔmTSS at week 52 = 2.56 vs 3.30, P < 0.001). Conclusion. Delayed addition of adalimumab in Japanese MTX-naive early RA patients did not impact clinical and functional outcomes at week 52 compared with the earlier addition of adalimumab. However, the accrual of significant structural damage during blinded placebo + MTX therapy contributed to the persistence of differences between the treatment strategies, suggesting that Japanese patients at risk for aggressive disease should benefit from the early inclusion of adalimumab + MTX combination therapy. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov/), NCT00870467. PMID:24441150

  5. Clinical supervision in the palliative care team setting: a concrete approach to team wellness.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Kyle P; Yeung, Heidi N; Onderdonk, Christopher; Mitchell, William; Thornberry, Kathryn

    2015-03-01

    Clinical supervision is a structured, case-based approach to learning that is used most often in the mental health field. An established palliative care consultation service at a large, academic medical center implemented a modified clinical supervision model in an effort to improve team members' awareness of their own emotions and the way those emotions impact behavior during, primarily, clinical encounters. This report discusses clinical supervision in detail and, by way of a case, illustrates the power of this intervention as a source of self-care and a concrete approach to managing palliative care team well-being. PMID:25517027

  6. The usefulness of holotranscobalamin in predicting vitamin B12 status in different clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Wolfgang; Obeid, Rima; Schorr, Heike; Geisel, Jürgen

    2005-02-01

    Serum concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) and methylmalonic acid (MMA) become increased in B12-deficient subjects and are therefore, considered specific markers of B12 deficiency. Serum level of holotranscobalamin (holoTC) becomes decreased before the development of the metabolic dysfunction. We investigated the usefulness of holoTC in diagnosing B12 deficiency in some clinical settings. We measured serum concentrations of holoTC, MMA, Hcy and total B12 in omnivores, vegetarians, elderly people and haemodialysis patients. Our results indicated that the incidence of holoTC <35 pmol/L was highest in the vegans (76%). Low holoTC and elevated MMA were detected in 64% of the vegans and 43% of the lacto- and lacto-ovovegetarians. An elevated MMA and a low holoTC were found in subjects with total serum B12 as high as 300 pmol/L. The distribution of holoTC in elderly people was similar to that in younger adults (median holoTC 55 pmol/L in both groups). A low holoTC and an elevated MMA were found in 16% of the elderly group. An elevated MMA and a normal holoTC were found in 20% of the elderly group who had a relatively high median serum concentration of creatinine (106.1 micromol/L). Serum concentrations of holoTC in dialysis patients were considerably higher than all other groups (median 100 pmol/L). This was also associated with severely increased serum levels of MMA (median 987 nmol/L). From these results it can be concluded that serum concentration of holoTC is a much better predictor of B12 status than total B12. This was particularly evident in case of dietary B12 deficiency. Serum concentrations of holoTC as well as MMA can be affected by renal dysfunction. Elevated MMA and normal holoTC in patients with renal insufficiency may not exclude vitamin B12 deficiency. HoloTC seems not to be a promising marker in predicting B12 status in renal patients. PMID:15720207

  7. Reinspiring Japanese Educational Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wada, Shuji

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the history of modern Japanese education, its early modernization, and the policy of intertwining the Japanese ideology with Western technology. Proposes the establishment of a new Buddhist-inspired philosophy of education. (GLR)

  8. Best strategies to implement clinical pathways in an emergency department setting: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical pathway is a tool that operationalizes best evidence recommendations and clinical practice guidelines in an accessible format for ‘point of care’ management by multidisciplinary health teams in hospital settings. While high-quality, expert-developed clinical pathways have many potential benefits, their impact has been limited by variable implementation strategies and suboptimal research designs. Best strategies for implementing pathways into hospital settings remain unknown. This study will seek to develop and comprehensively evaluate best strategies for effective local implementation of externally developed expert clinical pathways. Design/methods We will develop a theory-based and knowledge user-informed intervention strategy to implement two pediatric clinical pathways: asthma and gastroenteritis. Using a balanced incomplete block design, we will randomize 16 community emergency departments to receive the intervention for one clinical pathway and serve as control for the alternate clinical pathway, thus conducting two cluster randomized controlled trials to evaluate this implementation intervention. A minimization procedure will be used to randomize sites. Intervention sites will receive a tailored strategy to support full clinical pathway implementation. We will evaluate implementation strategy effectiveness through measurement of relevant process and clinical outcomes. The primary process outcome will be the presence of an appropriately completed clinical pathway on the chart for relevant patients. Primary clinical outcomes for each clinical pathway include the following: Asthma—the proportion of asthmatic patients treated appropriately with corticosteroids in the emergency department and at discharge; and Gastroenteritis—the proportion of relevant patients appropriately treated with oral rehydration therapy. Data sources include chart audits, administrative databases, environmental scans, and qualitative interviews. We will

  9. The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh: Preparing Students for Transition to Professional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    The Nonprofit Clinic at the University of Pittsburgh gives graduate students the opportunity to serve as management consultants to nonprofit organizations. This article describes the learning objectives, logistics, and outcomes of the Nonprofit Clinic. Bloom's 1956 taxonomy of learning objectives is employed to assess learning outcomes.

  10. Cognitive Set and Clinical Inference: Referral Information May Not (Always) Affect Psychosocial Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ivo L.

    1986-01-01

    Studied the effects of general referral information about a client on subsequent clinical inferences. Nursing students (N=54) were randomly assigned to "referral information" or "no referral information" conditions before being presented with additional data. Clinical inferential tasks included the assessment of maladjustment, client stress,…

  11. Diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder: Examination of How Clinical Indicators Are Used by Professionals in the Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treloar, Amanda Jane Commons; Lewis, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the recognition of borderline personality disorder as a clinical disorder, followed by a review of the contemporary practice of diagnosing borderline personality disorder in psychiatric settings. Many researchers have cautioned against the conflation of difficult patients with the diagnostic category of borderline…

  12. 77 FR 38634 - Request for Information: Collection and Use of Patient Work Information in the Clinical Setting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Patient Work Information in the Clinical Setting: Electronic Health Records AGENCY: The National Institute... the inclusion of work information in the electronic health record (EHR). NIOSH requests input on these... public health professionals' understanding of work-related conditions so they can identify...

  13. Development of Guidelines Related to Riverside Community College Nursing Student Mandatory Assignment to AIDS Patients in the Clinical Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    The purpose of this study was to develop Associate Degree nursing program guidelines for Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, regarding mandatory nursing student assignment to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients, and student refusal of such assignments in a clinical setting. During the 1990 fall semester, RCC's Nursing…

  14. Marine Biodiversity in Japanese Waters

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Katsunori; Lindsay, Dhugal; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Nishida, Shuhei; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    To understand marine biodiversity in Japanese waters, we have compiled information on the marine biota in Japanese waters, including the number of described species (species richness), the history of marine biology research in Japan, the state of knowledge, the number of endemic species, the number of identified but undescribed species, the number of known introduced species, and the number of taxonomic experts and identification guides, with consideration of the general ocean environmental background, such as the physical and geological settings. A total of 33,629 species have been reported to occur in Japanese waters. The state of knowledge was extremely variable, with taxa containing many inconspicuous, smaller species tending to be less well known. The total number of identified but undescribed species was at least 121,913. The total number of described species combined with the number of identified but undescribed species reached 155,542. This is the best estimate of the total number of species in Japanese waters and indicates that more than 70% of Japan's marine biodiversity remains un-described. The number of species reported as introduced into Japanese waters was 39. This is the first attempt to estimate species richness for all marine species in Japanese waters. Although its marine biota can be considered relatively well known, at least within the Asian-Pacific region, considering the vast number of different marine environments such as coral reefs, ocean trenches, ice-bound waters, methane seeps, and hydrothermal vents, much work remains to be done. We expect global change to have a tremendous impact on marine biodiversity and ecosystems. Japan is in a particularly suitable geographic situation and has a lot of facilities for conducting marine science research. Japan has an important responsibility to contribute to our understanding of life in the oceans. PMID:20689840

  15. The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Roger J., Ed.; Ikeno, Osamu, Ed.

    This collection of essays offers an overview of contemporary Japanese culture, and can serve as a resource for classes studying Japan. The 28 essays offer an informative, accessible look at the values, attitudes, behavior patterns, and communication styles of modern Japan from the unique perspective of the Japanese people. Filled with examples…

  16. Clinical Resting-state fMRI in the Preoperative Setting: Are We Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Lee, Megan H; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M; Benzinger, Tammie L; Marcus, Daniel S; Hacker, Carl D; Leuthardt, Eric C; Shimony, Joshua S

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an introduction to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) and to review the current application of this new and powerful technique in the preoperative setting using our institute's extensive experience. RS-fMRI has provided important insights into brain physiology and is an increasingly important tool in the clinical setting. As opposed to task-based functional MRI wherein the subject performs a task while being scanned, RS-fMRI evaluates low-frequency fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal while the subject is at rest. Multiple resting state networks (RSNs) have been identified, including the somatosensory, language, and visual networks, which are of primary importance for presurgical planning. Over the past 4 years, we have performed over 300 RS-fMRI examinations in the clinical setting and these have been used to localize eloquent somatosensory and language cortices before brain tumor resection. RS-fMRI is particularly useful in this setting for patients who are unable to cooperate with the task-based paradigm, such as young children or those who are sedated, paretic, or aphasic.Although RS-fMRI is still investigational, our experience indicates that this method is ready for clinical application in the presurgical setting. PMID:26848556

  17. Bullying in Japanese Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Futoshi

    Noting that although many Western educators praise the Japanese educational system because of its students' academic achievements, schools in Japan have developed severe and prevalent problems with student bullying. This paper examines the problem of bullying in Japanese schools. Part 1 of the paper reviews bullying incidents in Japanese schools…

  18. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  19. International clinical trials setting for rare cancers: organisational and regulatory constraints-the EORTC perspective.

    PubMed

    Shash, Emad; Negrouk, Anastassia; Marreaud, Sandrine; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Lacombe, Denis; Meunier, Francoise

    2013-01-01

    Rare diseases are a serious public health problem that presents unique challenges to many countries. There is no internationally accepted definition for rare diseases. Patients suffering from rare cancers often face challenges, including late or incorrect diagnoses, difficulties finding clinical expertise and accessing appropriate treatments, and uncertainty in clinical decision making, with difficult and rare access for these patients to clinical trials. Treatment choice is difficult as little information is available in the literature. In such situations, clinicians will base treatment decisions on retrospective data or case report series with a lower scientific level of evidence than that obtained from randomised controlled clinical trials. The only way forward is clinical trials organisation, but to perform it within rare indications we are always faced with many methodological, regulatory, and organisational challenges, besides stakeholders' different views, which are not usually concurrent. The aims of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) are to develop, conduct, coordinate, and stimulate translational and clinical research in Europe to improve the management of cancer and related problems by increasing survival but also patient quality of life. In particular, extensive and comprehensive research in the field of rare cancers is beyond the means of individual European hospitals and can be best accomplished through the multidisciplinary multinational efforts of basic scientists and clinicians. In this paper, we will present an overview of the clinical research scene for rare cancers and will try to propose possible steps to improve the current situation. PMID:23717342

  20. Care zoning. A pragmatic approach to enhance the understanding of clinical needs as it relates to clinical risks in acute in-patient unit settings.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kris; Guy, Stuart; Stewart, Linda; Ayling, Mark; Miller, Graham; Anthony, Anne; Bajuk, Anne; Brun, Jo Le; Shearer, Dianne; Gregory, Rebecca; Thomas, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The process of risk assessment which should inform and help identify clinical needs is often seen as a tick box and task-focussed approach. While on the surface this provides a sense of security that forms have been completed, we often fail to communicate in a meaningful manner about the clinical needs identified, which would assist in supporting the care planning delivery processes. A clinical practice improvement (CPI) project implemented a care zoning framework as an evidenced-based process that provides pragmatic support to nurses who are required to continually assess, implement, and evaluate plans to address clinical need across three acute mental health inpatient settings. Risk descriptors informed by the New South Wales (NSW) Mental Health Assessment & Outcome Tools (MHAOT) criteria were developed and described in behavioural contexts in order to improve the project's reliability and translation. A pragmatic traffic light tool was used to share clinical information across three agreed care zones, red (high clinical need), amber (medium clinical need), and green (low clinical need). Additionally nurses were asked to utilise a shift review form in the context of supporting the recording of care zoning and promoting action-orientated note writing. The introduction of care zoning has enthused the nursing teams and the mental health service to adopt care zoning as a supervisory framework that increases their capacity to communicate clinical needs, share information, and gain invaluable support from one another in addressing clinical needs. This includes increased opportunities for staff to feel supported in asking for assistance in understanding and addressing complex clinical presentations. PMID:21574845

  1. High Diagnostic Yield of Whole Exome Sequencing in Participants with Retinal Dystrophies in a Clinical Ophthalmology Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kristy; Berg, Jonathan S.; Milko, Laura; Crooks, Kristy; Lu, Mei; Bizon, Chris; Owen, Phillips; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.; Weck, Karen E.; Evans, James P.; Garg, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the diagnostic yield and the practicality of implementing whole exome sequencing within a clinical ophthalmology setting. Design Evaluation of a diagnostic protocol. Methods Setting Patient participants were enrolled during clinical appointments in a university based Ophthalmic Genetics clinic. Patient Population Twenty-six patients with a variety of presumed hereditary retinal dystrophies. Intervention: Participants were offered whole exome sequencing in addition to clinically available sequencing gene panels between July 2012 and January 2013 to determine the molecular etiology of their retinal dystrophy. Main Outcome Measures Diagnostic yield and acceptability of whole exome sequencing in patients with retinal disorders. Results Twenty-six of 29 (~90%) eligible patients who were approached opted to undergo molecular testing. Each participant chose whole exome sequencing in addition to, or in lieu of, clinically available sequencing gene panels. Time to obtain informed consent was manageable in the clinical context. Whole exome sequencing successfully identified known pathogenic mutations or suspected deleterious variants in 57.7% of participants. Additionally, one participant had 2 autosomal dominant medically actionable incidental findings (unrelated to retinopathy) that were reported to enable the participant to take preventive action and reduce risk for future disease. Conclusions In this study, we identified the molecular etiology for more than half of all participants. Additionally, we found that participants were widely accepting of whole exome sequencing and the possibility of being informed about medically actionable incidental findings. PMID:25910913

  2. HIV prevalence and sexual behaviour changes measured in an antenatal clinic setting in northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Urassa, M; Kumogola, Y; Isingo, R; Mwaluko, G; Makelemo, B; Mugeye, K; Boerma, T; Calleja, T; Slaymaker, E; Zaba, B

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of collecting sexual behaviour data during HIV surveillance in antenatal care (ANC) clinics, and to establish whether these data can provide information about the correlates of HIV infection in this population. Methods Sexual behaviour surveys were conducted in the context of two HIV sentinel surveillance rounds in 11 ANC clinics in north west Tanzania between 2000 and 2002. Responses of individual women were anonymously linked to their HIV status. Three clinic catchment areas overlapped with a community based longitudinal study, which provided independent estimates of HIV prevalence and sexual behaviour. Changes between rounds and differentials between clinics were assessed and a two level logistic regression model used to identify behavioural and contextual correlates of HIV in 3689 women under 25 years of age. Results Women attending clinics were willing to participate in the study. The sexual behaviour data obtained were internally consistent and tallied reasonably well with sexual behaviour data collected in the community overlapping the clinic catchment. Clear relations emerged between HIV infection and measures of sexual exposure: OR 1.20 (95% CL 1.12 to 1.28) for each year of premarital exposure and 1.09 (1.04 to 1.16) for each year after first marriage; background prevalence OR 1.15 (1.04 to 1.26) associated with each percentage point increase in background prevalence at the clinic; and certain partnership variables such as partner's age OR 0.58 (0.45 to 0.76) if partner less than 10 years older. Conclusion Conducting sexual behaviour surveys in the context of ANC clinics surveillance is feasible and yields useful data. PMID:16877579

  3. Laboratory approach for diagnosis of toluene-based inhalant abuse in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Raka; Verma, Arpita

    2016-01-01

    The steady increase of inhalant abuse is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. This review describes an overview of inhalant abuse including the extent of the problem, types of products abused, modes of administration, pharmacology and effects of inhalants, the role of laboratory, interpretation of laboratory results and clinical considerations. Regular laboratory screening for inhalant abuse as well as other substance abuse and health risk behaviors must be a part of standard clinical care. PMID:26957863

  4. The Necessity of a Systematic Approach for the Use of MSCs in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Christophe Michel; Rafii, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Cell therapy has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy in regenerative disease. Among different cell types, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have been wildly studied in vitro, in vivo in animal models and even used in clinical trials. However, while clinical applications continue to increase markedly, the understanding of their physiological properties and interactions raises many questions and drives the necessity of more caution and supervised strategy in their use. PMID:23864866

  5. Gaining entry-level clinical competence outside of the acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne; Taper, Janette

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, an emphasis has been placed on dietetic interns' attainment of entry-level clinical competence in acute care facilities. The perceived risks and benefits of acquiring entry-level clinical competence within long-term and acute care clinical environments were examined. The study included a purposive sample of recent graduates and dietitians (n=14) involved in an integrated internship program. Study subjects participated in in-depth individual interviews. Data were thematically analyzed with the support of data management software QSR N6. Perceived risks and benefits were associated with receiving clinical training exclusively in either environment; risks in one area surfaced as benefits in the other. Themes that emerged included philosophy of care, approach to practice, working environment, depth and breadth of experience, relationships (both client and professional), practice outcomes, employment opportunities, and attitude. Entry-level clinical competence is achievable in both acute and long-term care environments; however, attention must be paid to identified risks. Interns who consider gaining clinical competence exclusively in one area can reduce risks and better position themselves for employment in either practice area by incorporating an affiliation in the other area into their internship program. PMID:18334052

  6. Considerations in Applying the Results of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials to the Care of Older Adults With Kidney Disease in the Clinical Setting: The SHARP Trial.

    PubMed

    Butler, Catherine R; O'Hare, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    The Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) found that treatment with ezetemibe and low-dose simvastatin reduced the incidence of major atherosclerotic events in patients with kidney disease. Due to the paucity of evidence-based interventions that lower cardiovascular morbidity in this high-risk population, the SHARP trial will likely have a large impact on clinical practice. However, applying the results of clinical trials conducted in select populations to the care of individual patients in real-world settings can be fraught with difficulty. This is especially true when caring for older adults with complex comorbidity and limited life expectancy. These patients are often excluded from clinical trials, frequently have competing health priorities, and may be less likely to benefit and more likely to be harmed by medications. We discuss key considerations in applying the results of the SHARP trial to the care of older adults with CKD in real-world clinical settings using guiding principles set forth by the American Geriatrics Society's Expert Panel on the Care of Older Adults with Multimorbidity. Using this schema, we emphasize the importance of evaluating trial results in the unique context of each patient's goals, values, priorities, and circumstances. PMID:26709060

  7. Vascular Plug Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (PARTO) for Gastric Varix Bleeding Patients in the Emergent Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heechul; Lee, Chun Kyon; Kim, Gun Bea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the technical feasibility and safety of vascular plug assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) for bleeding gastric varix performed in the emergent clinical setting and describe the mid-term clinical results. Materials and Methods From April 2012 to January 2015, emergent PARTO was tried in total 9 patients presented with active gastric varix bleeding. After initial insufficient or failure of endoscopic approach, they underwent PARTO in the emergent clinical setting. Gelatin sponge embolization of both gastrorenal (GR) shunt and gastric varix was performed after retrograde transvenous placement of a vascular plug in GR shunt. Coil assisted RTO (CARTO) was performed in one patient who had challenging GR shunt anatomy for vascular plug placement. Additional embolic materials, such as microcoils and NBCA glue-lipiodol mixture, were required in three patients to enhance complete occlusion of GR shunt or obliteration of competitive collateral vessels. Clinical success was defined as no variceal rebleeding and disappearance of gastric varix. Results All technical and clinical success–i.e., complete GR shunt occlusion and offending gastric varix embolization with immediate bleeding control–was achieved in all 9 patients. There was no procedure-related complication. All cases showed successful clinical outcome during mean follow up of 17 months (12–32 months), evidenced by imaging studies, endoscopy and clinical data. In 4 patients, mild worsening of esophageal varices or transient ascites was noted as portal hypertensive related change. Conclusion Emergent PARTO is technically feasible and safe, with acceptable mid-term clinical results, in treating active gastric varix bleeding. PMID:27189294

  8. Pharmacy Students’ Preference for Using Mobile Devices in a Clinical Setting for Practice-Related Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Justine F.; Bryant, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine pharmacy students’ ownership of, use of, and preference for using a mobile device in a practice setting. Methods. Eighty-one pharmacy students were recruited and completed a pretest that collected information about their demographics and mobile devices and also had them rank the iPhone, iPad mini, and iPad for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. Students used the 3 devices to perform pharmacy practice-related tasks and then completed a posttest to again rank the devices for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. Results. The iPhone was the most commonly owned mobile device (59.3% of students), and the iPad mini was the least commonly owned (18.5%). About 70% of the students used their mobile devices at least once a week in a pharmacy practice setting. The iPhone was the most commonly used device in a practice setting (46.9% of students), and the iPod Touch was the least commonly used device (1.2%). The iPad mini was the most preferred device for use in a pharmacy practice setting prior to performing pharmacy practice-related tasks (49.4% of students), and was preferred by significantly more students after performing the tasks (70.4%). Conclusion. Pharmacy students commonly use their mobile devices in pharmacy practice settings and most selected the iPad mini as the preferred device for use in a practice setting even though it was the device owned by the fewest students. PMID:25861103

  9. Regular clinic attendance in two large San Francisco HIV primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jenny K; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Moss, Nicholas J; Coffin, Phillip O; Block, Nikolas; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Although poor clinic attendance is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected individuals, less is known about predictors of retention and the acceptability of targeted interventions to increase regular clinic attendance. To better understand which patients are at risk for irregular clinic attendance and to explore interventions to aid in retention to care, we surveyed patients attending two outpatient HIV clinics affiliated with the University of California, San Francisco. A total of 606 participants were surveyed, and the analysis was restricted to the 523 male respondents. Of this group, 45% (N = 299) reported missing at least one visit a year. Missing a clinic visit was associated with being African American (aOR = 1.99; 95%CI 1.12-3.52), being a man who has sex with both men and women (aOR=2.72; 95%CI 1.16-6.37), and reporting at least weekly methamphetamine use (aOR=5.79; 95%CI 2.47-13.57). Participants who reported a monthly income greater than $2000 were less likely to miss an appointment (aOR = 0.56; 95%CI 0.34-0.93). Regarding possible retention interventions, most patients preferred phone calls over other forms of support. These findings support the need for ongoing engagement support with particular attention to at-risk sub-groups. PMID:26654093

  10. Biomarkers in Type 1 diabetes: Application to the clinical trial setting

    PubMed Central

    Tooley, James E.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Biomarkers of type 1 diabetes are important for assessing risk of developing disease, monitoring disease progression, and determining responses to clinical treatments. Here we review recent advances in the development of biomarkers of type 1 diabetes with a focus on their utility in clinical trials. Recent Findings Measurements of auto antibodies and metabolic outcomes have been the foundation of monitoring type 1 diabetes for the past 20 years. Recent advancements have lead to improvements in T cell specific assays that have been used in large-scale clinical trials to measure antigen specific T cell responses. Additionally, new tools are being developed for the measurement of β cell mass and death that will allow for more direct measurement of disease activity. Lastly, recent studies have used both immunologic and non-immunologic biomarkers to identify responders to treatments in clinical trials. Summary Use of biomarkers in the study of type 1 diabetes have largely not changed over the past 20 years, however recent advancements in the field are establishing new techniques that allow for more precise monitoring of disease progression. These new tools will ultimately lead to an improvement in understanding of disease and will be utilized in clinical trials. PMID:24937037

  11. Clinical decision making in response to performance validity test failure in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Marcopulos, Bernice A; Caillouet, Beth A; Bailey, Christopher M; Tussey, Chriscelyn; Kent, Julie-Ann; Frederick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of a performance validity test (PVT) for screening consecutive referrals (N = 436) to a neuropsychology service at a state psychiatric hospital treating both civilly committed and forensic patients. We created a contingency table with Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) pass/fail (355/81) and secondary gain present/absent (181/255) to examine pass rates associated with patient demographic, clinical and forensic status characteristics. Of the 81 failed PVTs, 48 had secondary gain defined as active criminal legal charges; 33 failed PVTs with no secondary gain. These individuals tended to be older, female, Caucasian, and civilly committed compared with the group with secondary gain who failed. From estimations of TOMM False Positive Rate and True Positive Rate we estimated base rates of neurocognitive malingering for our clinical population using the Test Validation Summary (TVS; Frederick & Bowden, 2009 ). Although PVT failure is clearly more common in a group with secondary gain (31%), there were a number of false positives (11%). Clinical ratings of patients without gain who failed suggested cognitive deficits, behavioral issues, and inattention. Low scores on PVTs in the absence of secondary gain provide useful information on test engagement and can inform clinical decisions about testing. PMID:24678658

  12. Evaluation of RSA set-up from a clinical biplane fluoroscopy system for 3D joint kinematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    BONANZINGA, TOMMASO; SIGNORELLI, CECILIA; BONTEMPI, MARCO; RUSSO, ALESSANDRO; ZAFFAGNINI, STEFANO; MARCACCI, MAURILIO; BRAGONZONI, LAURA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose dinamic roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA), a technique currently based only on customized radiographic equipment, has been shown to be a very accurate method for detecting three-dimensional (3D) joint motion. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the applicability of an innovative RSA set-up for in vivo knee kinematic analysis, using a biplane fluoroscopic image system. To this end, the Authors describe the set-up as well as a possible protocol for clinical knee joint evaluation. The accuracy of the kinematic measurements is assessed. Methods the Authors evaluated the accuracy of 3D kinematic analysis of the knee in a new RSA set-up, based on a commercial biplane fluoroscopy system integrated into the clinical environment. The study was organized in three main phases: an in vitro test under static conditions, an in vitro test under dynamic conditions reproducing a flexion-extension range of motion (ROM), and an in vivo analysis of the flexion-extension ROM. For each test, the following were calculated, as an indication of the tracking accuracy: mean, minimum, maximum values and standard deviation of the error of rigid body fitting. Results in terms of rigid body fitting, in vivo test errors were found to be 0.10±0.05 mm. Phantom tests in static and kinematic conditions showed precision levels, for translations and rotations, of below 0.1 mm/0.2° and below 0.5 mm/0.3° respectively for all directions. Conclusions the results of this study suggest that kinematic RSA can be successfully performed using a standard clinical biplane fluoroscopy system for the acquisition of slow movements of the lower limb. Clinical relevance a kinematic RSA set-up using a clinical biplane fluoroscopy system is potentially applicable and provides a useful method for obtaining better characterization of joint biomechanics. PMID:27602352

  13. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a significant human health concern in Asia, Indonesia and parts of Australia with more than 3 billion people potentially at risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of JE. Given the risk to human health and the theoretical potential for JEV use as a bioweapon, the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent JEV infection is vital for preserving human health. The development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to induce a protective immune response and to be very effective. Mouse brain-derived vaccines were still in use until May 2011 when the last lots of the BIKEN® JE-VAX® expired. Development of modern JE vaccines utilizes cell culture-derived viruses and improvements in manufacturing processes as well as removal of potential allergens or toxins have significantly improved vaccine safety. China has developed a live-attenuated vaccine that has proven to induce protective immunity following a single inoculation. In addition, a chimeric vaccine virus incorporating the prM and E structural proteins derived from the live-attenuated JE vaccine into the live-attenuated yellow fever 17D vaccine virus backbone is currently in clinical trials. In this article, we provide a summary of JE vaccine development and on-going clinical trials. We also discuss the potential risk of JEV as a bioweapon with a focus on virus sustainability if used as a weapon. PMID:23125946

  14. Re-engineering Opportunities in Clinical Research using Workflow Analysis in Community Practice Settings

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharib A.; Kukafka, Rita; Bigger, J. Thomas; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we examine frequently performed clinical research activities with the objective of identifying aspects of workflow that could be amenable to informatics-based re-engineering. This paper is part of a series of studies under the NIH Roadmap initiative, which examines workflow of clinical research in community practices. We describe three common work activities, detailing the main actors involved, the tools used and the challenges faced. These activities illustrate inefficiencies in the clinical research workflow which include: a) lack of supporting tools to perform routine work activities, b) redundancy, low reuse of data and poor interoperability between systems and c) the fragmented and distributed nature of the workflow. We identify opportunities for re-engineering at both a micro (activity) and macro level (organization). PMID:18999299

  15. Priority-setting in healthcare: a framework for reasonable clinical judgements.

    PubMed

    Baerøe, K

    2009-08-01

    What are the criteria for reasonable clinical judgements? The reasonableness of macro-level decision-making has been much discussed, but little attention has been paid to the reasonableness of applying guidelines generated at a macro-level to individual cases. This paper considers a framework for reasonable clinical decision-making that will capture cases where relevant guidelines cannot reasonably be followed. There are three main sections. (1) Individual claims on healthcare from the point of view of concerns about equity are analysed. (2) The demands of responsibility and equity on professional clinical performance are discussed, and how the combination of these demands emerges into seven requirements that constitute the framework is explored. Since this framework is developed to assist in reasonable clinical decision-making, practical implications of all these requirements are also suggested. (3) Challenges concerning the framework are discussed. First, a crucial presumption that the framework relies upon is considered-namely, clinicians' willingness to justify their decisions as requested. Then how public deliberation may influence clinical decision-making is discussed. Next is a consideration of how clinicians' need to have confidence in their own judgements in order to perform in a manner worthy of trust would be compatible with adherence to the framework supported by public deliberation. It is concluded that fair distribution in the interplay between macro- and micro-level considerations can be secured by legitimising procedures on each level, by ensuring well-organised and continuing public debate and by basing individual clinical judgements upon well-justified and principled normative bases. PMID:19644007

  16. Automated discovery of medical expert system rules from clinical databases based on rought sets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumoto, Shusaku; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1996-12-31

    Automated knowledge acquisition is an important research issue to solve the bottleneck problem in developing expert systems. Although many inductive learning methods have been proposed for this purpose, most of the approaches focus only on inducing classification rules. However, medical experts also learn other information important for diagnosis from clinical cases. In this paper, a rule induction method is introduced, which extracts not only classification rules but also other medical knowledge needed for diagnosis. This system is evaluated on a clinical database of headache, whose experimental results show that our proposed method correctly induces diagnostic rules and estimates the statistical measures of rules.

  17. Space, structure and social dynamics within the clinical setting: two case studies of assisted reproduction in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    González-Santos, Sandra P

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on the concept of therapeutic environments and comparing two case studies, this paper explores the interaction between the spatial factors of the clinical setting, the structural elements of the health system, and the specific treatment requirements of assisted reproduction in order to see the type and degree of privacy and accessibility, as well as the particular social dynamics (i.e. patient-physician and among patients) fostered in two Mexico City fertility clinics. Both cases suggest that certain types of therapeutic environments encourage the formation of spontaneous support groups while others favour the patient-physician relationship. PMID:20961798

  18. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients’ lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we present the treatment of a patient with Type III FGM/C in an ambulatory urology clinic in the United States. PMID:27333917

  19. Female genital mutilation management in the ambulatory clinic setting: a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Craven, Spencer; Kavanagh, Alex; Khavari, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A 31-year-old patient with obstructive voiding symptoms and apareunia in the setting of Type III female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) is presented. The patient underwent ambulatory clinic defibulation to relieve her symptoms. FGM has been shown to have serious immediate complications and many chronic complications that greatly impact patients' lives. Several case series have been published describing center-specific experience with defibulation procedures for Type III FGM/C. Here, we present the treatment of a patient with Type III FGM/C in an ambulatory urology clinic in the United States. PMID:27333917

  20. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K.; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K.; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M.; Young, Lauren E.; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R.; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M.; Brennan, Kristina W.; Donahue, Amy L.; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T.; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A.; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J.; Miller, Vincent A.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Otto, Geoff A.; Lipson, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments–certified College of American Pathologists–accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  1. Integrated genomic DNA/RNA profiling of hematologic malignancies in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Nahas, Michelle K; Wang, Kai; Rampal, Raajit K; Intlekofer, Andrew M; Patel, Jay; Krivstov, Andrei; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Lauren E; Zhong, Shan; Bailey, Mark; White, Jared R; Roels, Steven; Deffenbaugh, Jason; Fichtenholtz, Alex; Brennan, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Mark; Pelak, Kimberly; Knapp, Kristina M; Brennan, Kristina W; Donahue, Amy L; Young, Geneva; Garcia, Lazaro; Beckstrom, Selmira T; Zhao, Mandy; White, Emily; Banning, Vera; Buell, Jamie; Iwanik, Kiel; Ross, Jeffrey S; Morosini, Deborah; Younes, Anas; Hanash, Alan M; Paietta, Elisabeth; Roberts, Kathryn; Mullighan, Charles; Dogan, Ahmet; Armstrong, Scott A; Mughal, Tariq; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Labrecque, Elaine; Erlich, Rachel; Vietz, Christine; Yelensky, Roman; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Otto, Geoff A; Lipson, Doron; Levine, Ross L

    2016-06-16

    The spectrum of somatic alterations in hematologic malignancies includes substitutions, insertions/deletions (indels), copy number alterations (CNAs), and a wide range of gene fusions; no current clinically available single assay captures the different types of alterations. We developed a novel next-generation sequencing-based assay to identify all classes of genomic alterations using archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded blood and bone marrow samples with high accuracy in a clinically relevant time frame, which is performed in our Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified College of American Pathologists-accredited laboratory. Targeted capture of DNA/RNA and next-generation sequencing reliably identifies substitutions, indels, CNAs, and gene fusions, with similar accuracy to lower-throughput assays that focus on specific genes and types of genomic alterations. Profiling of 3696 samples identified recurrent somatic alterations that impact diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. This comprehensive genomic profiling approach has proved effective in detecting all types of genomic alterations, including fusion transcripts, which increases the ability to identify clinically relevant genomic alterations with therapeutic relevance. PMID:26966091

  2. A Clinical Study of Vitiligo in a Rural Set up of Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Rita V.; Patel, Bhumi B.; Chaudhary, Arvind H.; Mehta, Malay J.; Pilani, Abhishek P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary condition caused by inactivation or destruction of melanocytes in epidermis and hair follicle. Worldwide incidence of 1% has been reported; similar to various dermatological clinics in India. Widespread prejudice, ignorance, taboos, lack of scientific appraisal, and confusion of vitiligo with leprosy makes it an immense psychological stress. Aim: To know the clinical profile of vitiligo patient with associated cofactors. Materials and Methods: Total 1,010 patients of vitiligo attended in outpatient department at Shree Krishna Hospital (SKH) and Matar camp, Gujarat over 1 year period from August 2011 to July 2012 were included in this study. Detail history and clinical examination of patients were done. Results: Out of 1,010 patients 57.3% were females and 42.7 % were males. Most cases developed vitiligo by 2nd decade of life. Progressive course was found in 60.9 % of patients. Vitiligo vulgaris (57.8%) was most common morphological type. Most common site of onset (41.5%) and involvement (75.7%) was lower limb. Family history was present in 20.4%. Conclusions: Vitiligo constitutes important dermatological disease especially in India. The data suggest that local epidemiological behavior of vitiligo need not be the same across different regions. Vitiligo differs substantially in various clinical aspects. PMID:25136154

  3. How to Set Up an Educational Intervention Program in a Pediatric Clinic Playroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Anne G.

    This paper discusses the rationale and implementation procedures for a cognitively oriented intervention program for parents of preschoolers aged 2-3 based in a pediatric clinic playroom. The manual outlines guidelines for establishing such a service starting with recruitment of clients, maintaining the program for parents, organizing the play…

  4. An Evidence-Based Practice Model across the Academic and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Julie A.; Corbin-Lewis, Kim; Self, Trisha; Elsweiler, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is designed to provide academic communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, with a comprehensive instructional model on evidence-based practice (EBP). The model was designed to help students view EBP as an ongoing process needed in all clinical decision making. The three facets…

  5. Cleveland Clinic's Center for personalized healthcare: setting the stage for value-based care.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kathryn; DiPiero, Jennifer; Meese, Thad; Doerr, Megan; Leonard, Mandy; Daly, Thomas; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Chalmers, Jeff; Stowe, David; Knoer, Scott; Hicks, J Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic (OH, USA) launched the Center for Personalized Healthcare in 2011 to establish an evidence-based system for individualizing care by incorporating unique patient characteristics, including but not limited to genetic and family health history information, into the standard medical decision-making process. Using MyFamily, a web-based tool integrated into our electronic health record, a patient's family health history is used as a surrogate for genetic, environmental and behavioral risks to identify those with an elevated probability of developing disease. Complementing MyFamily, the Personalized Medication Program was created for the purpose of identifying gene-drug pairs for integration into clinical practice and developing the implementation tools needed to incorporate pharmacogenomics into the clinical workflow. We have successfully implemented the gene-drug pairs HLA-B*57:01-abacavir and TPMT-thiopurines into patient care. Our efforts to establish personalized medical care at Cleveland Clinic may serve as a model for large-scale integration of personalized healthcare. PMID:24798715

  6. A Tool To Evaluate How to Learn from Experience in Clinical Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Louise; Villeneuve, Jean; Chevrier, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation tool for the process of learning from experience in a clinical practicum at baccalaureate nursing level was developed and validated. This reflective type of process evaluation helps students link theory to practice and think critically. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  7. Setting up the On-Site Marriage and Family Therapy Clinical Training Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Ghafoori, Bita

    2009-01-01

    The first clinical training experience or practicum for graduate students in a Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program is one of the most important aspects of the entire training program. After a year-long journey through textbook and classroom knowledge, students have the opportunity to finally apply their skills to real life environments with…

  8. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  9. Reflective Observation in the Clinical Education Setting: A Way to Promote Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences help athletic training students gain real-time learning experiences by engaging in patient care. Observational learning has been identified as important to athletic training student development, yet little is known about its effectiveness. Objective: To explore the athletic training students' perspectives on their…

  10. The Affective Reactivity Index: A Concise Irritability Scale for Clinical and Research Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert; Ferdinando, Sumudu; Razdan, Varun; Muhrer, Eli; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Irritable mood has recently become a matter of intense scientific interest. Here, we present data from two samples, one from the United States and the other from the United Kingdom, demonstrating the clinical and research utility of the parent- and self-report forms of the Affective Reactivity Index (ARI), a concise dimensional measure…

  11. Use of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in a Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molloy, Cynthia A.; Murray, Donna S.; Akers, Rachel; Mitchell, Terry; Manning-Courtney, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) as it is commonly used in clinical practice. ADOS classifications were compared to final diagnoses given by a multidisciplinary team to 584 children referred for evaluation for possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical…

  12. Effectiveness of Computer-Based Treatment for Dyslexia in a Clinical Care Setting: Outcomes and Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijms, Jurgen

    2011-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of a treatment for children with dyslexia was examined, as well as the moderating impact of plausible cognitive and socio-economic factors on treatment success. Results revealed that the treatment group accrued significant greater gains than the control group in reading and spelling skills. The treatment group obtained a…

  13. Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case–control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated ‘hotspots') from 24 loci in 31 516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13 696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

  14. Treatment of pediatric overweight: an examination of feasibility and effectiveness in an applied clinical setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness and feasibility of an evidence-based treatment for weight loss in children. METHODS: A total of 41 children who were overweight and their families were provided a modified version of the Traffic Light Diet (TLD) in an applied setting. Children who received tr...

  15. Language Interaction in Clinical and Educational Settings. ASHA Monographs No. 30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovarsky, Dana, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of papers focuses on how adults communicate with children in institutional settings such as public schools and day care centers, and how professionals in the field of communication disorders communicate among themselves. Papers include: "Introduction: Linguistic Theories and Language Interaction" (Madeline M. Maxwell); "Inuit…

  16. Teaching Reflective Practice in Practice Settings: Students' Perceptions of Their Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trede, Franziska; Smith, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice…

  17. Clinical Effectiveness of Mupirocin for Preventing Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Nonsurgical Settings: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajeshwari; Perencevich, Eli N; Blevins, Amy E; Goto, Michihiko; Nelson, Richard E; Schweizer, Marin L

    2016-03-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was performed to identify effectiveness of mupirocin decolonization in prevention of Staphylococcus aureus infections, among nonsurgical settings. Of the 15 662 unique studies identified up to August 2015, 13 randomized controlled trials, 22 quasi-experimental studies, and 1 retrospective cohort study met the inclusion criteria. Studies were excluded if mupirocin was not used for decolonization, there was no control group, or the study was conducted in an outbreak setting. The crude risk ratios were pooled (cpRR) using a random-effects model. We observed substantial heterogeneity among included studies (I(2) = 80%). Mupirocin was observed to reduce the risk for S. aureus infections by 59% (cpRR, 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], .36-.48) and 40% (cpRR, 0.60; 95% CI, .46-.79) in both dialysis and nondialysis settings, respectively. Mupirocin decolonization was protective against S. aureus infections among both dialysis and adult intensive care patients. Future studies are needed in other settings such as long-term care and pediatrics. PMID:26503378

  18. Giving feedback to learners in clinical and academic settings: practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle L; Walter, Garry

    2010-04-01

    In this column, we outline key points about feedback for staff to consider in everyday practice, with a view to making the task less daunting. In turn, we address the meaning of feedback, elements of good feedback, placement objectives, setting, frequency, identifying areas of weakness, recognition and praise, dealing with unfavorable reactions, and dissatisfaction with the feedback process. PMID:20411885

  19. Standardized, App-Based Disinfection of iPads in a Clinical and Nonclinical Setting: Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the use of highly mobile tools like tablet PCs in clinical settings, an effective disinfection method is a necessity. Since manufacturers do not allow cleaning methods that make use of anything but a dry fleece, other approaches have to be established to ensure patient safety and to minimize risks posed by microbiological contamination. Objective The ability of isopropanol wipes to decontaminate iPads was evaluated prospectively in a observer blinded, comparative analysis of devices used in a clinical and a nonclinical setting. Methods 10 new iPads were randomly deployed to members of the nursing staff of 10 clinical wards, to be used in a clinical setting over a period of 4 weeks. A pre-installed interactive disinfection application (deBac-app, PLRI MedAppLab, Germany) was used on a daily basis. Thereafter, the number and species of remaining microorganisms on the surface of the devices (13 locations; front and back) was evaluated using contact agar plates. Following this, the 10 iPads were disinfected and randomly deployed to medical informatics professionals who also used the devices for 4 weeks but were forbidden to use disinfecting agents. The quality of a single, standardized disinfection process was then determined by a final surface disinfection process of all devices in the infection control laboratory. No personal data were logged with the devices. The evaluation was performed observer blinded with respect to the clinical setting they were deployed in and personnel that used the devices. Results We discovered a 2.7-fold (Mann-Whitney U test, z=-3.402, P=.000670) lower bacterial load on the devices used in the clinical environment that underwent a standardized daily disinfection routine with isopropanol wipes following the instructions provided by “deBac-app”. Under controlled conditions, an average reduction of the mainly Gram-positive normal skin microbiological load of 99.4% (Mann-Whitney U test, z=-3.1798, P=.001474) for the

  20. Clinical problem solving ability of BSc and diploma nursing students in Indian setting--a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ezhilarasu, Punitha

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Problem Solving Ability (CPSA) is an important skill essential for nurses to achieve professional excellence which is developed during the educational process. A sample of 215 students from BSc and Diploma nursing educational programmes were studied to determine their CPSA and the differences were compared. A written simulation instrument (Ezhilarasu, 2000) with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.81 was used to measure the CPSA. BSc students scored significantly higher than Diploma students (p = 0). Final year students from both the programmes scored higher than the first year students (p = 0.01). The least commonly used step in clinical problem solving is evaluation. Along with other studies, this study also supports the influence of the educational process in the development of CPSA. Appropriate teaching strategies and role modelling by faculty should become an essential part in all nursing educational institutions. PMID:24597097

  1. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    PubMed

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation. PMID:22382800

  2. Preparing culturally and linguistically diverse nursing students for clinical practice in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Theresa; Robinson, Carolyn; Frohman, Rena

    2013-07-01

    The number of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students seeking enrollment in higher education courses in Western countries where English is the predominant language has grown considerably in the past decade, especially in undergraduate health care courses. When enrolled in nursing courses, students are required to complete clinical placements. Such experiences can create significant challenges for CALD students where language, cultural differences, and interpretation of cultural norms complicate the learning process. To assist CALD nursing students to transition successfully, an extracurricular integrated curriculum program was developed and implemented at a university in Queensland, Australia. The program is a series of interactive workshops based on the principles of caring pedagogy and student-centered learning. The program applies strategies that combine small-group discussions with peers, role-plays, and interactions with final-year nursing student volunteers. Evaluation of the program suggests it has assisted most of the students surveyed to be successful in their clinical studies. PMID:23721071

  3. A Prospective comparison of new Japanese criteria for disseminated intravascular coagulation: new Japanese criteria versus ISTH criteria.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Mineji; Gando, Satoshi; Hoshino, Hirokatsu

    2007-04-01

    In Japan, early diagnosis and early treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) based on the old Japanese criteria have greatly improved the outcomes of DIC patients with hematopoietic malignancy. However, the prognoses of critically ill patients with DIC have remained poor. To overcome this situation, new Japanese DIC criteria for critically ill patients were established in 2002. The new Japanese DIC criteria adopted a concept of coagulopathy associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. In the present study, we prospectively investigated the relationships between the new criteria and organ failure, prognosis, and other sets of DIC criteria. This study included 74 patients whose platelet counts were below 150 x 10(9)/L. Daily DIC scores and sequential organ failure assessment scores were recorded from days 0 to 4 once the patient was included in the study. The new Japanese DIC criteria diagnosed DIC earlier than both the non-overt DIC and the old Japanese criteria did (P = .0005). The new Japanese criteria diagnosed more DIC patients prior to the establishment of multiple organ failure than the other sets (P = .023). The new Japanese criteria tended also to predict prognoses more efficiently than the other two sets. In conclusion, the diagnostic sensitivity of the new Japanese criteria was as high as that of the non-overt DIC criteria. Furthermore, the new Japanese criteria provided the earliest detection and most accurate outcome prediction of DIC among the DIC criteria sets. PMID:17456627

  4. Effect of Transmission Setting and Mixed Species Infections on Clinical Measures of Malaria in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Marian C.; Macheso, Allan; Kelly-Hope, Louise A.; Nkhoma, Standwell; McConnachie, Alex; Molyneux, Malcolm E.

    2008-01-01

    Background In malaria endemic regions people are commonly infected with multiple species of malaria parasites but the clinical impact of these Plasmodium co-infections is unclear. Differences in transmission seasonality and transmission intensity between endemic regions have been suggested as important factors in determining the effect of multiple species co-infections. Principal Findings In order to investigate the impact of multiple-species infections on clinical measures of malaria we carried out a cross-sectional community survey in Malawi, in 2002. We collected clinical and parasitological data from 2918 participants aged >6 months, and applied a questionnaire to measure malaria morbidity. We examined the effect of transmission seasonality and intensity on fever, history of fever, haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and parasite density, by comparing three regions: perennial transmission (PT), high intensity seasonal transmission (HIST) and low intensity seasonal transmission (LIST). These regions were defined using multi-level modelling of PCR prevalence data and spatial and geo-climatic measures. The three Plasmodium species (P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale) were randomly distributed amongst all children but not adults in the LIST and PT regions. Mean parasite density in children was lower in the HIST compared with the other two regions. Mixed species infections had lower mean parasite density compared with single species infections in the PT region. Fever rates were similar between transmission regions and were unaffected by mixed species infections. A history of fever was associated with single species infections but only in the HIST region. Reduced mean [Hb] and increased anaemia was associated with perennial transmission compared to seasonal transmission. Children with mixed species infections had higher [Hb] in the HIST region. Conclusions Our study suggests that the interaction of Plasmodium co-infecting species can have protective effects against

  5. Sharing raw data from clinical trials: what progress since we first asked "Whose data set is it anyway?".

    PubMed

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Ten years ago, one of the first papers published in Trials was a commentary entitled "Whose data set is it anyway?" The commentary pointed out that trialists routinely refused requests for data sharing and argued that this attitude was a community standard that had no rational basis. At the time, there had been few calls for clinical trial data sharing and certainly no institutional support. Today the situation could not be more different. Numerous organizations now recommend or require raw data to be made available, including the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, which recently proposed that clinical trial data sharing be a "condition of … publication." Furthermore, the literature is replete with papers covering an enormously wide variety of topics on data sharing. But despite a tectonic shift in attitudes, we are yet to see clinical trial data sharing become an unquestioned norm, where a researcher can readily download a data set from a trial almost as easily as they can now download a copy of the published paper. The battle over the next few years is to go beyond changing minds to ensuring that real data sets are routinely made available. PMID:27142986

  6. Evaluating clinical teaching in the medicine clerkship: relationship of instructor experience and training setting to ratings of teaching effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, P G; Gillmore, G M; Irby, D M

    1988-01-01

    A clinical teaching assessment form was used to evaluate the teaching by faculty and residents in the required third-year medicine clerkship over a two-year period. Data from 1,627 forms were analyzed for differences between groups of teachers at different experience levels and for comparison of teaching programs at different training sites. The level of involvement of instructor with student correlated with ratings by the students. Among groups of instructors, chief medical residents received the highest overall ratings. Faculty were rated higher than first-, second-, and third-year residents when degree of involvement of instructor with student was high. Ratings among faculty of different academic ranks were not significantly different. Analysis of data from different clinical settings showed that the teaching efforts by clinical faculty members in the ambulatory setting received the highest ratings from students. Although increased involvement of instructors with students or other factors may have led to the higher ratings in the ambulatory setting, the results are encouraging for the use of ambulatory teaching sites for the basic medicine clerkship. PMID:3404296

  7. Task–Technology Fit of Video Telehealth for Nurses in an Outpatient Clinic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Stanley M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Incorporating telehealth into outpatient care delivery supports management of consumer health between clinic visits. Task–technology fit is a framework for understanding how technology helps and/or hinders a person during work processes. Evaluating the task–technology fit of video telehealth for personnel working in a pediatric outpatient clinic and providing care between clinic visits ensures the information provided matches the information needed to support work processes. Materials and Methods: The workflow of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) care coordination provided via telephone and video telehealth was described and measured using a mixed-methods workflow analysis protocol that incorporated cognitive ethnography and time–motion study. Qualitative and quantitative results were merged and analyzed within the task–technology fit framework to determine the workflow fit of video telehealth for APRN care coordination. Results: Incorporating video telehealth into APRN care coordination workflow provided visual information unavailable during telephone interactions. Despite additional tasks and interactions needed to obtain the visual information, APRN workflow efficiency, as measured by time, was not significantly changed. Analyzed within the task–technology fit framework, the increased visual information afforded by video telehealth supported the assessment and diagnostic information needs of the APRN. Conclusions: Telehealth must provide the right information to the right clinician at the right time. Evaluating task–technology fit using a mixed-methods protocol ensured rigorous analysis of fit within work processes and identified workflows that benefit most from the technology. PMID:24841219

  8. Setting high-impact clinical research priorities for the Society for Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kraiss, Larry W; Conte, Michael S; Geary, Randolph L; Kibbe, Melina; Ozaki, C Keith

    2013-02-01

    With the overall goal of enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of vascular care, the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) recently completed a process by which it identified its top clinical research priorities to address critical gaps in knowledge guiding practitioners in prevention and treatment of vascular disease. After a survey of the SVS membership, a panel of SVS committee members and opinion leaders considered 53 distinct research questions through a structured process that resulted in identification of nine clinical issues that were felt to merit immediate attention by vascular investigators and external funding agencies. These are, in order of priority: (1) define optimal management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis, (2) compare the effectiveness of medical vs invasive treatment (open or endovascular) of vasculogenic claudication, (3) compare effectiveness of open vs endovascular infrainguinal revascularization as initial treatment of critical limb ischemia, (4) develop and compare the effectiveness of clinical strategies to reduce cardiovascular and other perioperative complications (eg, wound) after vascular intervention, (5) compare the effectiveness of strategies to enhance arteriovenous fistula maturation and durability, (6) develop best practices for management of chronic venous ulcer, (7) define optimal adjunctive medical therapy to enhance the success of lower extremity revascularization, (8) identify and evaluate medical therapy to prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm growth, and (9) evaluate ultrasound vs computed tomographic angiography surveillance after endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:23337859

  9. Epidemiological and clinical data of amniotic fluid embolism in forensic settings.

    PubMed

    Busardo, Francesco P; Frati, Paola; Karch, Steven B; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a serious obstetric emergency, burdened with a high rate of mortality and morbidity and possible permanent neurological sequelae for those women who survive. The clinical presentation commonly includes: acute hypotension or cardiac arrest, acute hypoxia (dyspnea, cyanosis or respiratory arrest) and coagulopathy (intravascular coagulation or severe haemorrhage), which usually occur during labour, caesarean section or within 30 minutes of delivery. Some cases for the rapidity of clinical presentation, which can result in fatal outcome, run the risk of not being recognized, therefore a proper post mortem examination and histological investigation is fundamental in case of maternal death in order to make the diagnosis and should not be underestimated the incidence of this serious pathological condition. In this paper, firstly the Authors investigated the fatality rates in AFE patients and its incidence in pregnancy related deaths, extrapolating epidemiological data regarding the role of this pathology among the leading causes of maternal mortality. Secondly the contribution of autopsy has been evaluated and further investigation performed on post mortem in order to confirm or make the diagnosis of AFE to better understand this clinical entity that still remains unclear under numerous aspects. PMID:24804727

  10. Development of clinical practice guidelines for urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrea R

    2014-01-01

    This study developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the urinary continence care of adult stroke survivors in acute and rehabilitation settings. The research team conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on urinary continence interventions and outcomes. The team then developed a set of recommendations outlined in the resulting clinical practice guidelines titled Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the Urinary Continence Care of Stroke Survivors in Acute and Rehabilitation Settings. The evaluation of the CPGs consisted of a two-part assessment and pilot implementation. An expert panel of 25 local and regional experts in stroke and continence care assessed the proposed CPGs. This assessment consisted of two stages: a) evaluating the guidelines using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) Instrument (http://www. agreetrust.org); and, b) conducting focus groups to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of the guidelines using the Ottawa Model of Research Use (OMRU). Results from the expert panel assessments/feedback contributed to the refinement of the CPGs as well as identification and construction of implementation strategies. Two sites conducted a three-month pilot implementation of three recommendations from the CPGs as selected by each site. The two inpatient sites were a rehabilitation setting and a mixed acute and rehabilitation setting. The implementation of the CPGs included the development of learning strategies tailored to the needs of each site and in addition to the creation of an online self-learning portal. This study assessed nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding urinary continence challenges using a survey before and after the pilot. Chart reviews before and after the pilot implementation audited the nurses' urinary continence practices for patients and uptake of the selected guidelines' recommendations. Study findings suggested the implementation of the CPGs

  11. Strategies for Conducting Adolescent Health Research in the Clinical Setting: The Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center HPV Experience

    PubMed Central

    Braun-Courville, Debra K.; Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Burk, Robert D.; Strickler, Howard D.; Rojas, Mary; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Nucci-Sack, Anne; Hollman, Dominic; Linares, L. Oriana; Diaz, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical research with adolescents can be challenging due to issues of informed consent, parental involvement, institutional review board requirements, and adolescent psychosocial development. This presents a dilemma, particularly in the area of sexual health research, as adolescents are disproportionately affected by sexually transmitted infections such as human papillomavirus (HPV). To successfully conduct adolescent research in the clinical setting, one requires an awareness of state statutes regarding adolescent confidentiality and consent for medical care, and a close partnership with the IRB. Case Study In 2007, the Mount Sinai Adolescent Health Center (MSAHC) in collaboration with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine developed a longitudinal research study to examine the natural history of oral, cervical, and anal HPV in an adolescent female population engaged in high-risk sexual behaviors. We use this research project as a case study to explore the ethical, methodological, and clinical issues related to conducting adolescent health research. Summary and Conclusions Several strategies were identified to promote adolescent study participation, including: (1) building a research team that is motivated to work with adolescents; (2) combining research and patient care visits to avoid duplication of services; and (3) establishing a personalized communication network with participants. Using these methods, adolescent sexual health research can successfully be integrated into the clinical setting. While retaining a prospective cohort of adolescents has its challenges, a persistent and multi-disciplinary approach can help improve recruitment, sustain participation, and acquire critical data that will lead to improved healthcare knowledge applicable to understudied populations of adolescents. PMID:24332677

  12. [How to Understand "Clinical Ethics" and "Research Ethics" in Clinical Settings--Incorporation of IRB, REC, and CEC in Hospital Organizations].

    PubMed

    Ita, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    As the traditional definition of "medical ethics" has recently changed markedly with advances in medical knowledge and technology, medical doctors and researchers in Japan are required to understand and apply both research and clinical ethics. Quite frequently, ethical problems in clinical settings cannot be addressed by the simple application of good will, hard work, and perseverance by medical personnel. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) have jointly published "Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Studies;" however, clear guidelines (legal, ministerial, or governmental) outlining the expectations regarding clinical ethics do not exist. All medical personnel face deep ethical dilemmas. In these instances, if the fulfillment of 'ethics' relies solely on the capacity of personnel to apply their own individual moral efforts, the result will be burn-out among these workers who have a strong sense of responsibility. In order to avoid this, a system which comprises multiple physicians, nurses, and other personnel must be established, allowing collaboration when an appropriate response is required. A major factor supporting this approach is the offering of Clinical Ethics Consultations. PMID:27311285

  13. Diagnosis of paediatric HIV infection in a primary health care setting with a clinical algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Blaauw, D.; Cassol, S.; Qazi, S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of an algorithm used by primary care health workers to identify children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This HIV algorithm is being implemented in South Africa as part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy that aims to improve childhood morbidity and mortality by improving care at the primary care level. As AIDS is a leading cause of death in children in southern Africa, diagnosis and management of symptomatic HIV infection was added to the existing IMCI algorithm. METHODS: In total, 690 children who attended the outpatients department in a district hospital in South Africa were assessed with the HIV algorithm and by a paediatrician. All children were then tested for HIV viral load. The validity of the algorithm in detecting symptomatic HIV was compared with clinical diagnosis by a paediatrician and the result of an HIV test. Detailed clinical data were used to improve the algorithm. FINDINGS: Overall, 198 (28.7%) enrolled children were infected with HIV. The paediatrician correctly identified 142 (71.7%) children infected with HIV, whereas the IMCI/HIV algorithm identified 111 (56.1%). Odds ratios were calculated to identify predictors of HIV infection and used to develop an improved HIV algorithm that is 67.2% sensitive and 81.5% specific in clinically detecting HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Children with symptomatic HIV infection can be identified effectively by primary level health workers through the use of an algorithm. The improved HIV algorithm developed in this study could be used by countries with high prevalences of HIV to enable IMCI practitioners to identify and care for HIV-infected children. PMID:14997238

  14. Prognostic and Predictive Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer. From the Preclinical Setting to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Joan; Postigo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second largest cause of cancer mortality in Western countries, mostly due to metastasis. Understanding the natural history and prognostic factors in patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) is essential for the optimal design of clinical trials. The main prognostic factors currently used in clinical practice are related to tumor behavior (e.g., white blood counts, levels of lactate dehydrogenase, levels of alkaline phosphatase) disease extension (e.g., presence of extrahepatic spread, number of organs affected) and general functional status (e.g., performance status as defined by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group). However, these parameters are not always sufficient to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. First-line therapy in mCRC combines conventional chemotherapy (CHT) (e.g., FOLFOX, FOLFIRI, CAPOX) with a number of agents targeted to specific signaling pathways (TA) (e.g., panitumumab and cetuximab for cases KRAS/NRAS WT, and bevacizumab). Although the response rate to this combination regime exceeds 50%, progression of the disease is almost universal and only less than 10% of patients are free of disease at 2 years. Current clinical trials with second and third line therapy include new TA, such as tyrosin-kinase receptors inhibitors (MET, HER2, IGF-1R), inhibitors of BRAF, MEK, PI3K, AKT, mTORC, NOTCH and JAK1/JAK2, immunotherapy modulators and check point inhibitors (anti-PD-L1 and anti- PD1). Despite the identification of multiple prognostic and predictive biomarkers and signatures, it is still unclear how expression of many of these biomarkers is modulated by CHT and/or TA, thus potentially affecting response to treatment. In this review we analyzed how certain biomarkers in tumor cells and microenvironment influence the response to new TA and immune-therapies strategies in mCRC pre-treated patients. PMID:26452385

  15. RIPC for multiorgan salvage in clinical settings: evolution of concept, evidences and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is an intrinsic process in which preconditioning ischemia (ischemia of shorter duration) protects the organs against the subsequent index ischemia (sustained ischemia). Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an innovative treatment approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia followed by reperfusion to a remote organ (other than target organ) protect the target organ against index ischemia and reperfusion-induced injury. RIPC of various organs to provide multi-organ salvage became a successful approach in numerous species of animals. Consequently, the concept of RIPC evolved in clinical setups, and provided beneficial effects in alleviating ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury in various remote organs, including myocardium. Clinically, RIPC stimulus is generally delivered by inflating the blood pressure cuff tied on the upper arm 20 mm greater than the systolic blood pressure, rendering the forearm ischemic for 5 min, followed 5 min reperfusion by deflating the cuff. This cycle is repeated for 3-4 consecutive periods to precondition the tissue and improve the survival. The institution of RIPC is beneficial in mitigating myocardial injury in patients undergoing various surgical interventions including coronary artery bypass graft surgery, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, percutaneous coronary intervention, heart valve surgery, drug-eluting stent implantation, kidney transplantation, elective decompression surgery. The involvement of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), ATP-sensitive potassium channels, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), matrix metalloproteinases, O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) levels, autonomous nervous system in mediating RIPC-induced cardioprotective effects has been explored clinically. However, comprehensive studies are required to elucidate the other possible mechanisms responsible for producing multi-organ protection during RIPC. PMID:25176179

  16. Evaluation of Clinical Diagnosis of Fetal Distress and Perinatal Outcome in a Low Resource Nigerian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Perpetus Chudi; Onu, Fidelis Agwu; Onwe, Ogah Emeka; Ezeonu, Thecla Chinonyelum; Omeje, Innocent

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fetal distress has been shown to contribute to the increasing caesarean section rate. There has been controversy on the usefulness of clinical diagnosis of fetal distress using only the intermittent counting of the fetal heart rate and/or passage of meconium-stained liquor. Aim To evaluate the clinical diagnosis of fetal distress and the perinatal outcome. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study in which the case records of the patients, who were diagnosed of fetal distress at Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Nigeria, from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2014, were collated. The statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA). Results Out of the 15,640 deliveries carried out within the study period, 3,761 (24.05%) deliveries were through caesarean section. A total of 326 (8.9%) of the 3,761 caesarean sections were due to fetal distress within the study period. More so, a total of 227 (70.9%) babies were born with ≥ 7 Apgar score at the 1st minute of delivery. The perinatal mortality rate was 31.25 per 1000 deliveries. Though birth asphyxia was recorded more on babies of mothers that had fresh meconium-stained liquor and whose decision-intervention interval was more than 30 minutes when compared with those without any of the two conditions, there was no statistical significant difference between them. Conclusion The clinical diagnosis of fetal distress is accurate in 29.1% of the cases. However, it has led to an unnecessary caesarean section in the remaining 70.9% of the parturients. In order to reduce this high trend of unnecessary caesarean sections due to clinical diagnosis of fetal distress in this environment, antepartum fetal assessment with non-stress test or biophysical profile and intrapartum use of continuous electronic fetal monitoring should be used to confirm or refute the fetal distress before any surgical intervention. Fetal blood sampling

  17. Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps) that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two United States academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. Methods: In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100%) were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text) and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%). The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2%) was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44 (33.0%, P<0.001). The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1%) than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%, P=0.035), and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6%) in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%, P= 0.001). The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5%) than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P=0.044). Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use. Conclusion: Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. PMID:26582632

  18. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  19. Prevalence of vitreomacular adhesion: an optical coherence tomography analysis in the retina clinic setting

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Elias; Jaffe, Glenn J; Sadda, Srinivas R; Schuman, Stefanie; Hariri, Amir H; Skidmore, Keegan; Duker, Jake

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) in a random sample of clinical patients at three US retina clinics and to assess comorbid retinal conditions, ocular diseases, prior treatment history, and other medical histories. Patients and methods This observational, retrospective cohort study was based on patients from the Doheny Eye Centers, Duke Eye Center, and Tufts Medical Center who received a bilateral spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scan (one scan/eye) for clinical evaluation with available medical records. The study had three phases: 1) collection of retrospective patient data; 2) review of OCT scans at a reading center to assess VMA and associated conditions; and 3) analyses and reporting of data on the prevalence of VMA, patient demographics, and comorbid conditions. Data were obtained from electronic health records and OCT grading forms. Outcome measures from bilateral SD-OCT scans and medical records included OCT evaluation of VMA and retinal comorbid conditions. Results In 719 patients with 1,483 reviewable OCT scans, the prevalence of VMA was estimated at 14.74% (90% CI, 12.58%–16.92%). The prevalence of unilateral VMA was estimated at 12.39%, while bilateral VMA was 2.36%. In patients with VMA, 34 out of 123 eyes with VMA (27.64%) also had fovea deformed by vitreomacular traction. Macular hole (MH) was significantly more prevalent in VMA-diagnosed eyes versus non-VMA-diagnosed eyes (6.5% versus 1.9%; P=0.02). There was a significantly higher incidence of full-thickness MH (P=0.008), operculum/flaps (P<0.0001), and lamellar or pseudo-holes (P=0.048) in VMA-diagnosed versus non-VMA-diagnosed eyes. Age, MH as a comorbid condition, full-thickness MH, lamellar or pseudo-holes, and operculum were predictive of a VMA diagnosis. Conclusion The prevalence of VMA was estimated at 14.74% in a random sample of patients from three retina clinics. VMA diagnosis can be predicted by factors

  20. Midwifery student exposure to workplace violence in clinical settings: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Evidence indicates that nurses regularly experience bullying within the workplace which has the potential for health and social effects, as well as worker attrition. Literature suggests that nursing students are exposed to workplace violence during clinical placements including from health professionals and mentors, however little is known about midwifery students. This study sought to examine undergraduate midwifery students' experiences of workplace violence during clinical placements. A cross-sectional approach using a paper-based survey, the Paramedic Workplace Questionnaire, was used to solicit the information. Students were exposed to workplace violence with the main act being intimidation (30%), verbal abuse (17%), physical abuse (3%), and sexual harassment (3%). In more than three-quarters of the incidents the students had some level of apprehension or were frightened as a result of the violence. Students responded to the acts of violence with changes to emotions, self-confidence, and a desire to "give up". This paper demonstrates ways in which midwifery students are vulnerable to potential workplace violence from various sources. Support mechanisms need to be developed to ensure this can be minimised. PMID:26672901

  1. The phallic child: its emergence and meaning in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J

    1995-01-01

    The nature of the drive toward forming and maintaining intense attachments with other human beings has been examined in the light of case material from the play therapy sessions of a ten-year-old boy. The primary question addressed concerns the relationship of the attachment drive to other drive systems. Freudian theory, object relations theory, and attachment theory present competing paradigms for understanding the relationship between the drives. The Freudian paradigm sees human attachment as derivative from other drives, especially the sexual drive. In developing his attachment theory, Bowlby broke from the classical Freudian view. He postulated attachment as a primary and autonomous drive. Object relations theory, by contrast, sees sexuality as one manifestation of a more fundamental drive that is intrinsically relationship seeking. Each of these traditions has contributed to our understanding of human reality. A careful examination of the clinical material, however, strongly suggests that a drive toward relationship is intrinsic to libidinal energy. It is therefore concluded that the understanding of the relationship between the drives based on object relations theory provides us with the most adequate framework within which to understand the clinical material. PMID:8546239

  2. Nursing education in gerontological clinical settings: What do elderly patients think of student-rendered care?

    PubMed

    Mossop, Margaret; Wilkinson, Tim

    2006-06-01

    Gerontological units are commonly used as clinical placements for first year nursing students, but the ethics of sending novice nursing students to gerontological units for their first clinical placement is often challenged. Although this environment allows student learning at a slower pace, some believe that students are practicing on a captive population and that this undervalues the specialist knowledge and skills required to care for older patients. This qualitative study explores the perspectives of 12 older patients in long-term care hospitals who had first-year nursing students involved in their care. Data were gathered using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis of data then identified themes and patterns used by older adults to describe their perspectives of student-rendered care. Findings revealed that with the exception of one patient, this group of older patients found first-year student-nurse-rendered care to be a positive experience. The emergent themes indicated that patients enjoyed the extra care, attention, and the increased social opportunities the students provided. The patients also demonstrated an interest in participating in student learning. The findings are discussed in relation to social exchange theory and the concept of reciprocity. PMID:16773863

  3. Variance of Standardized Uptake Values for FDG-PET/CT Greater in Clinical Practice than Under Ideal Study Settings

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virendra; Nath, Kavindra; Berman, Claudia G.; Kim, Jongphil; Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Chiappori, Alberto A; Gatenby, Robert A.; Gillies, Robert J.; Eikman, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Measurement variance affects the clinical effectiveness of PET-based measurement as a semi-quantitative imaging biomarker for cancer response in individual patients and for planning clinical trials. In this study, we measured test-retest reproducibility of SUV measurements under clinical practice conditions, and recorded recognized deviations from protocol compliance. Methods Instrument performance calibration, display and analyses conformed to manufacture recommendations. Baseline clinical 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT examinations were performed and then repeated at 1 – 7 days. Intended scan initiation uptake period was to repeat the examinations at the same time for each study after injection of 12 mCi FDG tracer. Avidity of uptake was measured in 62 tumors in 21 patients as standardized uptake value for maximum voxel (SUVmax) and for a mean of sampled tumor voxels (SUVmean). Results The range of SUVmax and SUVmean was 1.07–21.47 and 0.91–14.69, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between log of SUVmax and log of SUVmean was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88–0.95) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87–0.95), respectively. Correlation analysis failed to show an effect on uptake period variation on SUV measurements between the two examinations, suggesting additional sources of noise. The threshold criteria for relative difference from baseline for the 95% confidence interval were ±49% or ±44% for SUVmax or SUVmean, respectively. Conclusion Variance of SUV for FDG-PET/CT in current clinical practice in a single institution was greater than expected when compared to benchmarks reported under stringent efficacy study settings. Under comparable clinical practice conditions, interpretation of changes in tumor avidity in individuals, and assumptions in planning clinical trials may be affected. PMID:23354032

  4. Development and Validation of a Hypertension Prevalence Estimator Tool For Use in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Matthew; Yuan, Keming; Gillespie, Cathleen; Zhang, Guangyu; Ostchega, Yechiam

    2016-08-01

    Health systems are well positioned to identify and control hypertension among their patients. However, almost one third of US adults with uncontrolled hypertension are currently receiving medical care and are unaware of being hypertensive. This study describes the development and validation of a tool that health systems can use to compare their reported hypertension prevalence with their expected prevalence. Tool users provide the number of patients aged 18 to 85 years treated annually, stratified by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, and comorbidity status. Each stratum is multiplied by stratum-specific national prevalence estimates and the amounts are summed to calculate the number of expected hypertensive patients. The tool's validity was assessed by applying samples from cohorts with known hypertension prevalence; small differences in expected vs actual prevalence were identified (range, -3.3% to 0.6%). This tool provides clinically useful hypertension prevalence estimates that health systems can use to help inform hypertension management quality improvement efforts. PMID:26729615

  5. Clinical scenarios: enhancing the skill set of the nurse as a vigilant guardian.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Therese; Belcher, Erin; Sarr, Barbara; Riutta, Emily; Ferrier, Jennifer Douglas; Botten, Mary A

    2010-08-01

    Patient safety is enhanced when nursing staff recognize and respond to subtle changes in a patient's condition. In this quality improvement project, simulated clinical scenarios were conducted with staff nurses on a multi-specialty surgical unit. Scenarios were developed from actual patient situations as well as from calls to the rapid response team. Nurses were given the opportunity to practice assessment, critical thinking, and communication skills. Pre- and post-project surveys were used to assess nurses' perceived level of confidence and skill in handling emergency situations. Post-project survey data showed that nurses perceived that the scenario exercises improved their confidence and skill in managing critical patient situations. In addition, the findings supported the continued use of the scenarios as a teaching strategy. The scenarios have increased nurses' awareness of early signs of patients' conditions deteriorating and have the potential to decrease the number of patient situations that escalate to emergencies. PMID:20666355

  6. Herpes Zoster Vaccine in the Long-Term Care Setting: A Clinical and Logistical Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Katherine Montag; Reidt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster (shingles) infection and latent effects such as postherpetic neuralgia. The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended in those 60 years of age and older and has been shown to prevent both the primary disease and associated complications. While this recommendation applies to those living in long-term care facilities, there is little clinical evidence to support use in this population. Additionally, there are logistical barriers that may complicate the use of the vaccine. The article examines the evidence for vaccinating residents in long-term care facilities and discusses logistical barriers to vaccination. Pharmacists and providers may consider life expectancy and other factors when evaluating which patients should receive the vaccination. PMID:26803085

  7. Bevacizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Chinese patients in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Kwok, Alvin Kwan-Ho; Tong, Justin Man-Kit; Chan, Clement Wai-Nang; Li, Walton Wai-Tat

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the outcome of non-investigational treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. METHODS Retrospective chart review of 81 eyes with neovascular AMD followed-up for at least 12mo and received 3-monthly loading IVB injections. Re-treat was based upon the individual clinician's judgment. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and optical coherence tomography measurements of central foveal thickness outcomes were evaluated at 12, 24mo. RESULTS Eighty-one eyes (of 75 patients) completed 12mo of follow-up and 44 eyes (of 41 patients) completed 24mo of follow-up. The mean baseline logMAR BCVA significantly improved from 0.94±0.69 to 0.85±0.68 at 12mo (P<0.001) and from 0.91±0.65 to 0.85±0.60 (P=0.004) at 24mo. The proportion of eyes that lost <15 logMAR letters at 12mo was 90.1% and at 24mo was 81.8%. IVB was effective in improving visual acuity in both treatment naïve and previous photodynamic therapy (PDT)-treated subgroups. Treatment naive patients required significantly fewer injections than patients with prior PDT. Multiple regression analysis identified that poorer baseline visual acuity was associated with greater improvement in visual acuity (P=0.015). CONCLUSION Fewer injections in clinical practice may result in suboptimal visual outcomes compared with clinical trials of IVB in neovascular AMD patients. Poor baseline visual acuity and prior PDT treatment may also improve vision after IVB. The safety and durability of effect was maintained at 24mo. PMID:27158614

  8. Degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx in clinical settings: searching for the sheddases.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bernhard F; Jacob, Matthias; Leipert, Stephanie; Salmon, Andrew H J; Chappell, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx has a profound influence at the vascular wall on the transmission of shear stress, on the maintenance of a selective permeability barrier and a low hydraulic conductivity, and on attenuating firm adhesion of blood leukocytes and platelets. Major constituents of the glycocalyx, including syndecans, heparan sulphates and hyaluronan, are shed from the endothelial surface under various acute and chronic clinical conditions, the best characterized being ischaemia and hypoxia, sepsis and inflammation, atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal disease and haemorrhagic viral infections. Damage has also been detected by in vivo microscopic techniques. Matrix metalloproteases may shed syndecans and heparanase, released from activated mast cells, cleaves heparan sulphates from core proteins. According to new data, not only hyaluronidase but also the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, proteinase 3 and plasminogen, as well as cathepsin B lead to loss of hyaluronan from the endothelial surface layer, suggesting a wide array of potentially destructive conditions. Appropriately, pharmacological agents such as inhibitors of inflammation, antithrombin and inhibitors of metalloproteases display potential to attenuate shedding of the glycocalyx in various experimental models. Also, plasma components, especially albumin, stabilize the glycocalyx and contribute to the endothelial surface layer. Though symptoms of the above listed diseases and conditions correlate with sequelae expected from disturbance of the endothelial glycocalyx (oedema, inflammation, leukocyte and platelet adhesion, low reflow), therapeutic studies to prove a causal connection have yet to be designed. With respect to studies on humans, some clinical evidence exists for benefits from application of sulodexide, a preparation delivering precursors of the glycocalyx constituent heparan sulphate. At present, the simplest option for protecting the glycocalyx seems to be to ensure an adequate level of

  9. Degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx in clinical settings: searching for the sheddases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Bernhard F; Jacob, Matthias; Leipert, Stephanie; Salmon, Andrew H J; Chappell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx has a profound influence at the vascular wall on the transmission of shear stress, on the maintenance of a selective permeability barrier and a low hydraulic conductivity, and on attenuating firm adhesion of blood leukocytes and platelets. Major constituents of the glycocalyx, including syndecans, heparan sulphates and hyaluronan, are shed from the endothelial surface under various acute and chronic clinical conditions, the best characterized being ischaemia and hypoxia, sepsis and inflammation, atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal disease and haemorrhagic viral infections. Damage has also been detected by in vivo microscopic techniques. Matrix metalloproteases may shed syndecans and heparanase, released from activated mast cells, cleaves heparan sulphates from core proteins. According to new data, not only hyaluronidase but also the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, proteinase 3 and plasminogen, as well as cathepsin B lead to loss of hyaluronan from the endothelial surface layer, suggesting a wide array of potentially destructive conditions. Appropriately, pharmacological agents such as inhibitors of inflammation, antithrombin and inhibitors of metalloproteases display potential to attenuate shedding of the glycocalyx in various experimental models. Also, plasma components, especially albumin, stabilize the glycocalyx and contribute to the endothelial surface layer. Though symptoms of the above listed diseases and conditions correlate with sequelae expected from disturbance of the endothelial glycocalyx (oedema, inflammation, leukocyte and platelet adhesion, low reflow), therapeutic studies to prove a causal connection have yet to be designed. With respect to studies on humans, some clinical evidence exists for benefits from application of sulodexide, a preparation delivering precursors of the glycocalyx constituent heparan sulphate. At present, the simplest option for protecting the glycocalyx seems to be to ensure an adequate level of

  10. The Impact of Iterative Reconstruction on Computed Tomography Radiation Dosimetry: Evaluation in a Routine Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Moorin, Rachael E.; Gibson, David A. J.; Forsyth, Rene K.; Fox, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of introduction of iterative reconstruction as a mandated software upgrade on radiation dosimetry in routine clinical practice over a range of computed tomography examinations. Methods Random samples of scanning data were extracted from a centralised Picture Archiving Communication System pertaining to 10 commonly performed computed tomography examination types undertaken at two hospitals in Western Australia, before and after the introduction of iterative reconstruction. Changes in the mean dose length product and effective dose were evaluated along with estimations of associated changes to annual cancer incidence. Results We observed statistically significant reductions in the effective radiation dose for head computed tomography (22–27%) consistent with those reported in the literature. In contrast the reductions observed for non-contrast chest (37–47%); chest pulmonary embolism study (28%), chest/abdominal/pelvic study (16%) and thoracic spine (39%) computed tomography. Statistically significant reductions in radiation dose were not identified in angiographic computed tomography. Dose reductions translated to substantial lowering of the lifetime attributable risk, especially for younger females, and estimated numbers of incident cancers. Conclusion Reduction of CT dose is a priority Iterative reconstruction algorithms have the potential to significantly assist with dose reduction across a range of protocols. However, this reduction in dose is achieved via reductions in image noise. Fully realising the potential dose reduction of iterative reconstruction requires the adjustment of image factors and forgoing the noise reduction potential of the iterative algorithm. Our study has demonstrated a reduction in radiation dose for some scanning protocols, but not to the extent experimental studies had previously shown or in all protocols expected, raising questions about the extent to which iterative reconstruction achieves dose

  11. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practise. We elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. Methods A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within ten emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practise, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use, and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff, and user friendliness were facilitators. Conclusions This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  12. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  13. Setting the agenda: an analysis of negotiation strategies in clinical talk.

    PubMed

    Manning, Philip; Ray, George B

    2002-01-01

    This article analyzes the process whereby physicians and patients set the agenda for medical interviews. Applying a conversation analytic perspective to the analysis of 22 videotapes of primary care interviews at a large, urban, teaching and research hospital, a 3-stage model is developed, consisting of (a) an opening sequence, (b) an initial statement of concerns by the patient, and (c) the negotiation process. The analysis illustrates the critical function of the opening verbal exchanges, showing how patient responses to the physician's first question and subsequent queries and summaries by the physician are intricately interwoven. The interaction at the very beginning of the interview is shown to significantly alter the ensuing interaction. The analysis provides a discursive framework for analyzing problematic communication during the primary care interview. PMID:12375771

  14. A novel approach to fit testing the N95 respirator in real time in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Or, Peggy; Chung, Joanne; Wong, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The instant measurements provided by the Portacount fit-test instrument have been used as the gold standard in predicting the protection of an N95 respirator in a laboratory environment. The conventional Portacount fit-test method, however, cannot deliver real-time measurements of face-seal leakage when the N95 respirator is in use in clinical settings. This research was divided into two stages. Stage 1 involved developing and validating a new quantitative fit-test method called the Personal Respiratory Sampling Test (PRST). In Stage 2, PRST was evaluated in use during nursing activities in clinical settings. Eighty-four participants were divided randomly into four groups and were tested while performing bedside nursing procedures. In Stage 1, a new PRST method was successfully devised and validated. Results of Stage 2 showed that the new PRST method could detect different concentrations and different particle sizes inside the respirator while the wearer performed different nursing activities. This new fit-test method, PRST, can detect face seal leakage of an N95 respirator being worn while the wearer performs clinical activities. Thus, PRST can help ensure that the N95 respirator actually fulfils its function of protecting health-care workers from airborne pathogens. PMID:24828795

  15. Organ and tissue donation in clinical settings: a systematic review of the impact of interventions aimed at health professionals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In countries where presumed consent for organ donation does not apply, health professionals (HP) are key players for identifying donors and obtaining their consent. This systematic review was designed to verify the efficacy of interventions aimed at HPs to promote organ and tissue donation in clinical settings. CINAHL (1982 to 2012), COCHRANE LIBRARY, EMBASE (1974 to 2012), MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), PsycINFO (1960 to 2012), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses were searched for papers published in French or English until September 2012. Studies were considered if they met the following criteria: aimed at improving HPs’ practices regarding the donation process or at increasing donation rates; HPs working in clinical settings; and interventions with a control group or pre-post assessments. Intervention behavioral change techniques were analyzed using a validated taxonomy. A risk ratio was computed for each study having a control group. A total of 15 studies were identified, of which only 5 had a control group. Interventions were either educational, organizational or a combination of both, and had a weak theoretical basis. The most common behavior change technique was providing instruction. Two sets of interventions showed a significant risk ratio. However, most studies did not report the information needed to compute their efficacy. Therefore, interventions aimed at improving the donation process or at increasing donation rates should be based on sound theoretical frameworks. They would benefit from more rigorous evaluation methods to ensure good knowledge translation and appropriate organizational decisions to improve professional practices. PMID:24628967

  16. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

  17. Exploring the dimensions of doctor-patient relationship in clinical practice in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBiharilal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

    2014-05-01

    The Doctor-Patient Relationship (DPR) is a complex concept in the medical sociology in which patients voluntarily approach a doctor and thus become a part of a contract in which they tends to abide with the doctor's guidance. Globally, the DPR has changed drastically over the years owing to the commercialization and privatization of the health sector. Furthermore, the dynamics of the DPR has shown a significant change because of the formulation of consumer protection acts; clauses for professional misconduct and criminal negligence; establishment of patient forums and organizations; massive expansion of the mass media sector leading to increase in health awareness among people; and changes in the status of the doctors. Realizing the importance of DPR in the final outcome and quality of life of the patient, multiple measures have been suggested to make a correct diagnosis and enhance healing. To conclude, good DPR is the crucial determinant for a better clinical outcome and satisfaction with the patients, irrespective of the socio-cultural determinants. PMID:24847480

  18. Feasibility and cost analysis of implementing high intensity aphasia clinics within a sub-acute setting.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Rachel; Lawrie, Melissa; Hobson, Tania; Comben, Wendy; Romano, Michelle; Ward, Elizabeth; Cardell, Elizabeth

    2014-06-01

    The current study explored the clinical feasibility and costs of embedding three different intensive service delivery models for aphasia treatment (computer, group therapy, and therapy with a speech pathology therapy assistant) within three sub-acute facilities. The study employed a two cohort comparison design, with the first cohort (n = 22) receiving the standard service of treatment currently offered. This treatment was delivered by a speech-language pathologist and involved on average 3 hours of treatment/week over 8 weeks. Participants in the second cohort (n = 31) received one of the three intensive treatment models providing up to 9 hours of therapy/week for 11 weeks. Organizational data was collected throughout treatment, with participant, caregiver, and clinician satisfaction with the intensive models also being measured. Participants completed the spoken language production sub-tests and the Disability Questionnaire of the Comprehensive Aphasia Test (CAT) pre- and post-treatment. All intensive models yielded high participant attendance, satisfaction, and significant improvements to the CAT sub-tests. The pro-rata cost of providing treatment per hour per client for the computer and group therapy models was found to be ˜ 30% cheaper compared to the standard service. The outcomes support the potential feasibility of embedding the different models into sub-acute facilities to enhance client access to intensive treatment for aphasia. PMID:24597463

  19. Education leadership in the clinical health care setting: A framework for nursing education development.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Lynda; Horsfall, Janine; O'Callaghan, Wendy

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes how a new framework for clinical nursing education was introduced at Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB), New Zealand. The project was initiated in response to the significant legislative and post registration nursing education changes within New Zealand. The journey of change has been a significant undertaking, and has required clear management, strong leadership, perseverance and understanding of the organisation's culture. The approach taken to managing the change had four stages, and reflects various change management models. The first stage, the identification process, identified the impetus for change. Creating the vision is the second stage and identified what the change would look like within the organisation. To ensure success and to guide the process of change a realistic and sustainable vision was developed. Implementing the vision was the third stage, and discusses the communication and pilot phase of implementing the nursing education framework. Stage four, embedding the vision, explores the process and experiences of changing an education culture and embedding the vision into an organisation. The paper concludes by discussing the importance of implementing robust, consistent, strategic and collaborative processes - that reflect and evaluate best educational nursing practice. PMID:19040908

  20. Education leadership in the clinical health care setting: a framework for nursing education development.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Lynda; Horsfall, Janine; O'Callaghan, Wendy

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes how a new framework for clinical nursing education was introduced at Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMDHB), New Zealand. The project was initiated in response to the significant legislative and post registration nursing education changes within New Zealand. The journey of change has been a significant undertaking, and has required clear management, strong leadership, perseverance and understanding of the organisation's culture. The approach taken to managing the change had four stages, and reflects various change management models. The first stage, the identification process, identified the impetus for change. Creating the vision is the second stage and identified what the change would look like within the organisation. To ensure success and to guide the process of change a realistic and sustainable vision was developed. Implementing the vision was the third stage, and discusses the communication and pilot phase of implementing the nursing education framework. Stage four, embedding the vision, explores the process and experiences of changing an education culture and embedding the vision into an organisation. The paper concludes by discussing the importance of implementing robust, consistent, strategic and collaborative processes--that reflect and evaluate best educational nursing practice. PMID:17028073

  1. Experiences with Capnography in Acute Care Settings: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Clinical Staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.; Riera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While capnography is being incorporated into clinical guidelines, it is not used to it's full potential. We investigated reasons for limited implementation of capnography in acute care areas and explored facilitators and barriers to its implementation. Methods A purposeful sample of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (ED) and intensive care units (ICU) participated in semistructured interviews. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to analyze the data to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Nineteen providers were interviewed from five hospitals. Six themes were identified: variability in use of capnography among acute care units, availability and accessibility of capnography equipment, the evidence behind capnography use, the impact of capnography on patient care, personal experiences impacting use of capnography, and variable knowledge about capnography. Barriers and facilitators to use were found within each theme. Conclusions We observed varied responsiveness to capnography and identified factors that work to foster or discourage its use. This data can guide future implementation strategies. A deliberate strategy to foster utilization, mitigate barriers and broadly accelerate implementation has the potential to profoundly impact use of capnography in acute care areas with the goal of improving patient care. PMID:25129575

  2. [The effects of increased intracranial pressure on respiratory functions in clinical setting].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, N; Ono, K; Sasaki, M; Tsutsumi, H; Aruga, T; Mii, K; Toyooka, H; Takakura, K

    1984-06-01

    Respiratory insufficiency following acutely elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may occur as a result of pulmonary edema which is supposed to be caused by increased sympathetic discharge from the central nervous system. Supporting experimental studies have been reported concerning this immediate respiratory consequence, while delayed respiratory consequences with an elevated ICP remain poorly characterized clinically. We studied delayed effects of an increased ICP on respiratory functions (pulmonary shunt ratio (Qs/Qt), respiratory index (A-aDO2/PaO2), oxygenation index (PaO2/FIO2) ), extravascular lung water (EVLW), and hemodynamics [cardiac index (CI), mean arterial pressure (MAP), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), systemic vascular resistance (SVR), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR)] in 15 cases with head injury, 4 with cerebrovascular diseases, and one with hypoxic brain damage. Ten cases had either aspiration, long bone fractures (the syndrome of fat embolism), or pneumonia, and the 10 cases without these pulmonary insults were defined as the cases without pulmonary complications and studied further. Pulmonary functions deteriorated as the ICP rose in the total cases, but in the cases without pulmonary complications, the correlations between the pulmonary functions and the ICP were not significant. None of the hemodynamic parameters correlated with the ICP in both the total cases and the cases without pulmonary complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6466502

  3. Development and validation of a questionnaire to evaluate medical students’ and residents’ responsibility in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Asemani, Omid; Iman, Mohammad Taghi; Khayyer, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Moattari, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    There is a shortage of quantitative measures for assessing the concept of responsibility as a fundamental construct in medical education, ethics and professionalism in existing literature. This study aimed to develop an instrument for measuring responsibility in both undergraduate and graduate medical students during clinical training. Instrument content was based on literature review and mainly qualitative data obtained from a published grounded theory research. The draft questionnaire (Persian version) was then validated and revised with regard to face and content validity. The finalized 41-item questionnaire consists of four domains that were identified using factor analysis. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency were also assessed. Test-retest reliability was rather high, ranging between 0.70 and 0.75 for all domains. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients were 0.75 – 0.76 for all domains and 0.90 for the composite scale of the whole questionnaire. Correlations between the four domains of the instrument were also satisfactory (r ≤ 0.47 for most domains). The correlation between each domain and the composite scale was higher than its correlation with other domains (r ≥ 0.79 for most domains). The instrument demonstrated good construct and internal validity, and can be suitable for measuring the concept of responsibility in practice in different groups of undergraduate and graduate medical trainees (MTs). PMID:25512836

  4. Facilitating research within clinical settings: the development of a beginner's guide.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Freeman, Adele

    2005-09-01

    Increased consumer participation, clinical governance, accreditation, and occupational health and safety requirements have contributed to considerable changes in the demands placed upon mental health staff, and many are now expected to undertake or participate in research. However, many staff have not received formal training in research design and methodology, and the multitude of policies, procedures, and committees, designed to protect research participants, can seem like insurmountable barriers to clinicians new to the field. In response to this, a guide was developed based on self-directed learning principles, to compliment other resource material and promote effective research work. It was considered important to clarify some of the issues surrounding research development, ethics, and scholarly integrity, and to educate staff as to the appropriate approval processes, which must be followed before embarking on research work. This paper seeks to describe the process of developing a guide for novice researchers, its key characteristics, and its implications for practice. The guide 'Undertaking research: a guide for the beginner' described in this paper, provides a helpful resource that can be readily adapted and developed for a variety of workplaces and professional backgrounds. It is a strategy intended to encourage research and ongoing education and narrow the research-practice gap while placing minimum demand upon existing organizational infrastructure. PMID:16181158

  5. An integrated clinical pharmacology approach for deriving dosing recommendations in a regulatory setting: review of recent cases in psychiatry drugs.

    PubMed

    Younis, Islam R; Rogers, Hobart; Zhang, Huixia; Zhu, Hao; Uppoor, Ramana S; Mehta, Mehul U

    2013-10-01

    Clinical pharmacology as an interdisciplinary science is unique in its capacity and the diversity of the methods and approaches it can provide to derive dosing recommendations in various subpopulations. This article illustrates cases where an integrated clinical pharmacology approach was used to derive dosing recommendations for psychiatry drugs within regulatory settings. The integrated approach is based on the view that once a drug is shown to be effective in the general population, it is reasonable to take into consideration other relevant findings and the use of alternative scientific tools and analysis to derive dosing recommendations in specific populations. The method provides useful means to solve the challenges of the paucity of available data and lead to clear dosing instructions. This in turn expands the benefits of any given drug to all individuals in which the drug is likely to be effective. PMID:23842865

  6. Can we teach core clinical obstetrics and gynaecology skills using low fidelity simulation in an interprofessional setting?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arunaz; Gilmour, Carole; Nestel, Debra; Aldridge, Robyn; McLelland, Gayle; Wallace, Euan

    2014-12-01

    Core clinical skills acquisition is an essential component of undergraduate medical and midwifery education. Although interprofessional education is an increasingly common format for learning efficient teamwork in clinical medicine, its value in undergraduate education is less clear. We present a collaborative effort from the medical and midwifery schools of Monash University, Melbourne, towards the development of an educational package centred around a core skills-based workshop using low fidelity simulation models in an interprofessional setting. Detailed feedback on the package was positive with respect to the relevance of the teaching content, whether the topic was well taught by task trainers and simulation models used, pitch of level of teaching and perception of confidence gained in performing the skill on a real patient after attending the workshop. Overall, interprofessional core skills training using low fidelity simulation models introduced at an undergraduate level in medicine and midwifery had a good acceptance. PMID:25308468

  7. A rigorous approach for selection of optimal variant sets for carrier screening with demonstration of clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Breton, Benjamin; Hallam, Stephanie; Greger, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    Carrier screening for certain diseases is recommended by major medical and Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) societies. Most carrier screening panels test only for common, ethnic-specific variants. However, with formerly isolated ethnic groups becoming increasingly intermixed, this approach is becoming inadequate. Our objective was to develop a rigorous process to curate all variants, for relevant genes, into a database and then apply stringent clinical validity classification criteria to each in order to retain only those with clear evidence for pathogenicity. The resulting variant set, in conjunction with next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS), then affords the capability for an ethnically diverse, comprehensive, highly specific carrier-screening assay. The clinical utility of our approach was demonstrated by screening a pan-ethnic population of 22,864 individuals for Bloom syndrome carrier status using a BLM variant panel comprised of 50 pathogenic variants. In addition to carriers of the common AJ founder variant, we identified 57 carriers of other pathogenic BLM variants. All variants reported had previously been curated and their clinical validity documented, or were of a type that met our stringent, preassigned validity criteria. Thus, it was possible to confidently report an increased number of Bloom's syndrome carriers compared to traditional, ethnicity-based screening, while not reducing the specificity of the screening due to reporting variants of unknown clinical significance. PMID:26247052

  8. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings.

    PubMed

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Baddigam, Ramya; Wajahn, Jennifer; Sipes, Angela C; Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Gastaldo, Nicholas; Bergese, Sergio D

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and, therefore, the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care. PMID:27493935

  9. A rigorous approach for selection of optimal variant sets for carrier screening with demonstration of clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Davie, Jocelyn; Breton, Benjamin; Hallam, Stephanie; Greger, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Carrier screening for certain diseases is recommended by major medical and Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) societies. Most carrier screening panels test only for common, ethnic-specific variants. However, with formerly isolated ethnic groups becoming increasingly intermixed, this approach is becoming inadequate. Our objective was to develop a rigorous process to curate all variants, for relevant genes, into a database and then apply stringent clinical validity classification criteria to each in order to retain only those with clear evidence for pathogenicity. The resulting variant set, in conjunction with next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS), then affords the capability for an ethnically diverse, comprehensive, highly specific carrier-screening assay. The clinical utility of our approach was demonstrated by screening a pan-ethnic population of 22,864 individuals for Bloom syndrome carrier status using a BLM variant panel comprised of 50 pathogenic variants. In addition to carriers of the common AJ founder variant, we identified 57 carriers of other pathogenic BLM variants. All variants reported had previously been curated and their clinical validity documented, or were of a type that met our stringent, preassigned validity criteria. Thus, it was possible to confidently report an increased number of Bloom’s syndrome carriers compared to traditional, ethnicity-based screening, while not reducing the specificity of the screening due to reporting variants of unknown clinical significance. PMID:26247052

  10. The Gap Between Clinical Research and Standard of Care: A Review of Frailty Assessment Scales in Perioperative Surgical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Baddigam, Ramya; Wajahn, Jennifer; Sipes, Angela C.; Arias-Morales, Carlos E.; Gastaldo, Nicholas; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2016-01-01

    The elderly population in the United States is increasing exponentially in tandem with risk for frailty. Frailty is described by a clinically significant state where a patient is at risk for developing complications requiring increased assistance in daily activities. Frailty syndrome studied in geriatric patients is responsible for an increased risk for falls, and increased mortality. In efforts to prepare for and to intervene in perioperative complications and general frailty, a universal scale to measure frailty is necessary. Many methods for determining frailty have been developed, yet there remains a need to define clinical frailty and, therefore, the most effective way to measure it. This article reviews six popular scales for measuring frailty and evaluates their clinical effectiveness demonstrated in previous studies. By identifying the most time-efficient, criteria comprehensive, and clinically effective scale, a universal scale can be implemented into standard of care and reduce complications from frailty in both non-surgical and surgical settings, especially applied to the perioperative surgical home model. We suggest further evaluation of the Edmonton Frailty Scale for inclusion in patient care. PMID:27493935

  11. Transpapillary selective bile duct cannulation technique: Review of Japanese randomized controlled trials since 2010 and an overview of clinical results in precut sphincterotomy since 2004.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-04-01

    In 1970, a Japanese group reported the first use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), which is now carried out worldwide. Selective bile duct cannulation is a mandatory technique for diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP. Development of the endoscope and other devices has contributed to the extended use of ERCP, which has become a basic procedure to diagnose and treat pancreaticobiliary diseases. Various techniques related to selective bile duct cannulation have been widely applied. Although the classical contrast medium injection cannulation technique remains valuable, use of wire-guided cannulation has expanded since the early 2000s, and the technique is now widely carried out in the USA and Europe. Endoscopists must pay particular attention to a patient's condition and make an attendant choice about the most effective technique for selective bile duct cannulation. Some techniques have the potential to shorten procedure time and reduce the incidence of adverse events, particularly post-ERCP pancreatitis. However, a great deal of experience is required and endoscopists must be skilled in a variety of techniques. Although the development of the transpapillary biliary cannulation approach is remarkable, it is important to note that, to date, there have been no reports of transpapillary cannulation preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. In the present article, selective bile duct cannulation techniques in the context of recent Japanese randomized controlled trials and cases of precut sphincterotomy are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26825609

  12. Effects of polysaccharide derived from black currant on relieving clinical symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dejima, Kenji; Ohshima, Akihiro; Yanai, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Reiko; Takata, Ryoji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the efficacy of the polysaccharide derived from black currant, named cassis polysaccharide (CAPS), for inhibiting Japanese cedar pollinosis symptoms and improving quality of life by a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 2006. A total of 28 subjects were enrolled in the study, and 10 subjects in each group completed the trial. Although there was no significant difference between the CAPS and placebo group in the weekly mean value of any symptom in the daily symptom diary at any time, a smaller degree of final symptom aggravation was found in the CAPS group. Significant aggravation of the score was finally observed in the placebo group with inferior conch swelling and with sneezing, itchy nose, itchy eye and watery eye in the Japan rhino-conjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire assessment, while the changes observed in the CAPS group were not significant. In conclusion, our findings clearly indicate that CAPS would be useful as a food supplement in assisting the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis. PMID:18071252

  13. Melatonin-dopamine interactions: from basic neurochemistry to a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Zisapel, N

    2001-12-01

    To review the interaction between melatonin and the dopaminergic system in the hypothalamus and striatum and its potential clinical use in dopamine-related disorders in the central nervous system. Medline-based search on melatonin-dopamine interactions in mammals. Melatonin. the hormone produced by the pineal gland at night. influences circadian and seasonal rhythms, most notably the sleep-wake cycle and seasonal reproduction. The neurochemical basis of these activities is not understood yet. Inhibition of dopamine release by melatonin has been demonstrated in specific areas of the mammalian central nervous system (hypothalamus, hippocampus, medulla-pons, and retina). Antidopaminergic activities of melatonin have been demonstrated in the striatum. Dopaminergic transmission has a pivotal role in circadian entrainment of the fetus, in coordination of body movement and reproduction. Recent findings indicate that melatonin may modulate dopaminergic pathways involved in movement disorders in humans. In Parkinson patients melatonin may, on the one hand, exacerbate symptoms (because of its putative interference with dopamine release) and, on the other, protect against neurodegeneration (by virtue of its antioxidant properties and its effects on mitochondrial activity). Melatonin appears to be effective in the treatment of tardive dyskinesia. a severe movement disorder associated with long-term blockade of the postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor by antipsychotic drugs in schizophrenic patients. The interaction of melatonin with the dopaminergic system may play a significant role in the nonphotic and photic entrainment of the biological clock as well as in the fine-tuning of motor coordination in the striatum. These interactions and the antioxidant nature of melatonin may be beneficial in the treatment of dopamine-related disorders. PMID:12043836

  14. Liver function in Huntington's disease assessed by blood biochemical analyses in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Signe Marie Borch; Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nørremølle, Anne; Hasholt, Lis; Hjermind, Lena E; Josefsen, Knud

    2016-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurological disorder caused by a CAG repeat elongation in the huntingtin gene. In addition to motor-, psychiatric- and cognitive dysfunction, peripheral disease manifestations in the form of metabolic changes and cellular dysfunction are seen. Blood levels of a wide range of hormones, metabolites and proteins have been analyzed in HD patients, identifying several changes associated with the disease. However, a comprehensive panel of liver function tests (LFT) has not been performed. We investigated a cohort of manifest and premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and controls, using a clinically applied panel of LFTs. Here, we demonstrate that the level of alkaline phosphatase is increased in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers compared to premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and correlate with increased disease severity indicated by the Unified Huntington's disease rating scale-Total Functional Capacity Score (UHDRS-TFC). For gamma-glutamyl transferase, elevated levels were more frequent in the manifest groups than in both the HD gene-expansion negative controls and premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers. Finally, the manifest HD gene-expansion carriers displayed moderate increases in total cholesterol and blood glucose relative to the premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers, as well as increased C-reactive protein relative to HD gene-expansion negative controls. Our results show that LFT values are elevated more frequently in manifest compared to premanifest HD gene-expansion carriers and controls. The majority of the manifest HD gene-expansion carriers receive medication, and it is possible that this can influence the liver function tests performed in this study. PMID:26944172

  15. A Degenerate Primer MOB Typing (DPMT) Method to Classify Gamma-Proteobacterial Plasmids in Clinical and Environmental Settings

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible plasmids are responsible for the spread of genetic determinants, such as antibiotic resistance or virulence traits, causing a large ecological and epidemiological impact. Transmissible plasmids, either conjugative or mobilizable, have in common the presence of a relaxase gene. Relaxases were previously classified in six protein families according to their phylogeny. Degenerate primers hybridizing to coding sequences of conserved amino acid motifs were designed to amplify related relaxase genes from γ-Proteobacterial plasmids. Specificity and sensitivity of a selected set of 19 primer pairs were first tested using a collection of 33 reference relaxases, representing the diversity of γ-Proteobacterial plasmids. The validated set was then applied to the analysis of two plasmid collections obtained from clinical isolates. The relaxase screening method, which we call “Degenerate Primer MOB Typing” or DPMT, detected not only most known Inc/Rep groups, but also a plethora of plasmids not previously assigned to any Inc group or Rep-type. PMID:22792321

  16. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  17. [Clinical Characteristics of Metronidazole-induced Encephalopathy: A Report of Two Cases and a Review of 32 Japanese Cases in the Literature].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideaki; Sosa, Hiroko; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Metronidazole is an antibiotic classically used against most anaerobic bacteria and protozoa. Because an intravenous form of metronidazole has recently entered the market, the use of this antibiotic is attracting renewed interest in many clinical settings in Japan. However, neurotoxicity is a major adverse event: in the central nervous system metronidazole-induced encephalopathy is a rare but serious condition. We performed a literature review of 34 cases including 2 of our cases, 25 from domestic conference abstracts, and 7 cases presented in full research papers. The mean patient age was 64.7 years. The conditions most commonly treated with metronidazole were brain abscess (35.3%), liver abscess (17.6%), and Clostridium difficile infection (14.7%). The most common predisposing conditions were liver dysfunction (26.5%), diabetes and other metabolic disorders (20.6%), and hematologic or solid organ malignancy (14.7%). The mean period of administration before the onset of encephalopathy symptoms was 61.3 days, and the mean total dose was 95.9g. The initial chief complaints were dysarthria (in 70.6% of the cases) and ataxia (61.8%); 82.4% of the cases were diagnosed on the basis of MRI (T2-weighted or FLAIR imaging). The key imaging finding was high intensity in the dentate nucleus bilaterally (82.4%). Stopping the metronidazole led to symptom remission within 8.5 days, but the MRI changes remained longer than the clinical symptoms. Two patients (6.0%) developed irreversible disturbance of consciousness. Although the mechanisms of this type of encephalopathy have not yet been elucidated, localized nerve-cell edema is likely caused by decreased metronidazole metabolism associated with liver and metabolic dysfunction. Careful observation for neurologic signs should be conducted during the treatment of brain abscesses associated with metronidazole administration, because patients with brain abscesses are naturally at high risk of metronidazole-induced encephalopathy

  18. Utilization of fecal occult blood test in the acute hospital setting and its impact on clinical management and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghi, S; Ren, H; Catungal, J; Yen, I; Liu, B; Wong, RJ; Bhuket, T

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite lack of evidence supporting the use of fecal occult blood test (FOBT) in the acute hospital setting, FOBT is commonly used in the inpatient setting for reasons other than colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Aims: To evaluate practice trends in utilizing FOBT on inpatients and its impact on affecting clinical management and outcomes. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients undergoing FOBT from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011 during an acute medical admission at a large urban safety net hospital was performed. Indications for FOBT, and the impact of FOBT results on endoscopic procedures performed and clinical outcomes were assessed. The number of inpatient endoscopic procedures before and after discontinuing inpatient FOBT was also assessed. Results: A total of 207 inpatient FOBTs were performed in 2011. The most common reason cited for FOBT was anemia (36%, n = 74) followed by gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (27%, n = 55). Interestingly, 23% (n = 47) of the patients undergoing inpatient FOBT had overt GI bleeding. As expected, patients with positive FOBT were significantly more likely to undergo endoscopic examinations (P < 0.01). After discontinuing the availability of inpatient FOBT, patients were less likely to undergo endoscopic examinations [odds ratio (OR) 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75-0.85]. Conclusion: Inappropriate utilization of FOBT in the inpatient setting is common, even when the indication does not support its use. Setting limitations on inpatient FOBT may reduce the inappropriate utilization of inpatient FOBT. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to educate clinicians on the appropriate use of FOBT, which is primarily for average risk CRC screening. PMID:27089107

  19. Japanese Media in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  20. Japanese Quality Control Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishiyama, Kazuo

    In recent years, United States scholars with an interest in international business and organizational communication have begun to notice the success of Japanese "quality control circles." These are small groups, usually composed of seven to ten workers, who are organized at the production levels within most large Japanese factories. A typical…

  1. The Japanese American Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukei, Budd

    This book presents a view of the Japanese American experience from the time of their immigration to this country in the 1800s to their acculturation into American society in the 1970s. Topics dealt with include the prejudice and mistrust experienced by the Japanese immigrants in this country, particularly their evacuation and internment in…

  2. Japanese Elementary School Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Harold W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the development of Japanese elementary education in the context of three periods of its history. Considers salient characteristics of Japanese elementary schools and teaching procedures; these include curriculum; social and moral education; classroom environment; teachers; afterschool classes; college entrance examinations; the kyoiku…

  3. Extensive Reading in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitosugi, Claire Ikumi; Day, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how we incorporated an extensive reading (ER) program into a second semester Japanese course at the University of Hawai'i using Japanese children's literature. After summarizing the ten principles of ER, we describe how we addressed six critical issues faced while introducing ER into the course. We also discuss the outcomes…

  4. A recently developed MRI scoring system for hand osteoarthritis: its application in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Ramonda, Roberta; Favero, Marta; Vio, Stefania; Lacognata, Carmelo; Frallonardo, Paola; Belluzzi, Elisa; Campana, Carla; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Angelini, Federico; Piccoli, Antonio; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to apply the recently proposed Oslo hand osteoarthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system to evaluate MRI findings in a cohort of patients affected by long-standing erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA). Eleven female EHOA patients (median 59 [interquartile range 62-52] years, disease duration 9.5 [interquartile range 13-3.75] years) underwent MRI (1.5 T) of the dominant hand, and synovitis, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), joint space narrowing, osteophytes, cysts, malalignment, and erosions were scored using the Oslo scoring system. Intra- and inter-reader reliability were assessed. The patients also underwent X-ray examination, and bone features were evaluated using the same scoring system. Pain and tenderness were assessed during a physical examination. Spearman's non-parametric test was used to analyze the correlations between variables. MRI intra- and inter-reader reliability were found between good and moderate for many features. No statistical differences were found between the radiographs and MRI with regard to detection of JSN, malalignment, and bone erosions. Synovitis was detected in 39.8 % of the 80 joints examined (in a mild form in 80 %), erosions were found in 51.1 %, and BMLs were identified in 20.5 and 23.9 % at the distal and the proximal side, respectively. BMLs at both the proximal and distal ends were correlated with tender joints (BML distal p = 0.0013, BML proximal p = 0.012). The presence of synovitis was correlated with tenderness (p = 0.004) and erosions at both the distal and proximal joints (p = 0.004). The presence of erosions correlated with tender joints (p < 0.01) and the mean visual analog scale (VAS) score (distal p = 0.03, proximal p = 0.01). Synovitis and BMLs were correlated with clinical symptoms in our patients affected with long-standing EHOA. PMID:27236512

  5. Improving service delivery by evaluation of the referral pattern and capacity in a clinical genetics setting.

    PubMed

    McCann, Emma; Baines, Elizabeth A; Gray, Jonathon R; Procter, Annie M

    2009-08-15

    Quality improvement in specialist services such as clinical genetics is challenging largely due to the complexity of the service and the difficulty in obtaining accurate, reproducible, and measurable data. The objectives were to evaluate the pattern of referrals to the All Wales Medical Genetics Service (AWMGS) North Wales Genetics team based in three separate hospitals, define the capacity of the team and implement change to improve equity, timeliness and efficiency of care delivery to patients. The methodology required collating the monthly referral rates retrospectively for each center over a 2.5-year period and plotting on statistical process control charts. Process mapping of the referral process in each center was undertaken, differences documented and a common pathway implemented. "Did not attend" and "time to first appointment" rates were also measured in one center. PDSA methodology was used to implement "patient focused booking." The results show that the range for referral rates in any given month for each center was 3-33 referrals. The range for referral rate for the whole team was 18-64 per month. Since January 2004 the average number of monthly referrals to the North Wales service has increased by 50%. The potential range in monthly referrals varies between centers and the range of the variability has also increased also in two out of the three centers. Introduction of Patient Focused Booking reduced the "Failed to Attend" rate and 100% of patients were offered a choice of appointments. In addition 100% had a first face-to-face contact within 6 weeks if they chose. The measurement of improvement involved firstly introducing a series of continuous measures to provide a baseline for the process prior to the implementation of any changes and secondly to indicate the impact of the changes following implementation. The measures implemented included process (referrals numbers, percentage of patients offered a choice of appointments), outcome (percentage of

  6. How information systems should support the information needs of general dentists in clinical settings: suggestions from a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A major challenge in designing useful clinical information systems in dentistry is to incorporate clinical evidence based on dentists' information needs and then integrate the system seamlessly into the complex clinical workflow. However, little is known about the actual information needs of dentists during treatment sessions. The purpose of this study is to identify general dentists' information needs and the information sources they use to meet those needs in clinical settings so as to inform the design of dental information systems. Methods A semi-structured interview was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 general dentists in the Pittsburgh area during clinical hours. One hundred and five patient cases were reported by these dentists. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis with a constant comparative method to identify categories and themes regarding information needs and information source use patterns. Results Two top-level categories of information needs were identified: foreground and background information needs. To meet these needs, dentists used four types of information sources: clinical information/tasks, administrative tasks, patient education and professional development. Major themes of dentists' unmet information needs include: (1) timely access to information on various subjects; (2) better visual representations of dental problems; (3) access to patient-specific evidence-based information; and (4) accurate, complete and consistent documentation of patient records. Resource use patterns include: (1) dentists' information needs matched information source use; (2) little use of electronic sources took place during treatment; (3) source use depended on the nature and complexity of the dental problems; and (4) dentists routinely practiced cross-referencing to verify patient information. Conclusions Dentists have various information needs at the point of care. Among them, the needs for better visual

  7. Efficacy of tolvaptan in patients with refractory ascites in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Takamasa; Sato, Koki; Yamada, Tomoharu; Yamagami, Mari; Ito, Daisaku; Kawanishi, Koki; Kojima, Kentaro; Seki, Michiharu; Toda, Nobuo; Tagawa, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the efficacies of tolvaptan (TLV) as a treatment for refractory ascites compared with conventional treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively enrolled 120 refractory ascites patients between January 1, 2009 and September 31, 2014. Sixty patients were treated with oral TLV at a starting dose of 3.75 mg/d in addition to sodium restriction (> 7 g/d), albumin infusion (10-20 g/wk), and standard diuretic therapy (20-60 mg/d furosemide and 25-50 mg/d spironolactone) and 60 patients with large volume paracentesis in addition to sodium restriction (less than 7 g/d), albumin infusion (10-20 g/wk), and standard diuretic therapy (20-120 mg/d furosemide and 25-150 mg/d spironolactone). Patient demographics and laboratory data, including liver function, were not matched due to the small number of patients. Continuous variables were analyzed by unpaired t-test or paired t-test. Fisher’s exact test was applied in cases comparing two nominal variables. We analyzed factors affecting clinical outcomes using receiver operating characteristic curves and multivariate regression analysis. We also used multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard regression analysis to elucidate the risk factors that contributed to the increased incidence of ascites. RESULTS: TLV was effective in 38 (63.3%) patients. The best cut-off values for urine output and reduced urine osmolality as measures of refractory ascites improvement were > 1800 mL within the first 24 h and > 30%, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that > 25% reduced urine osmolality [odds ratio (OR) = 20.7; P < 0.01] and positive hepatitis C viral antibodies (OR = 5.93; P = 0.05) were positively correlated with an improvement of refractory ascites, while the total bilirubin level per 1.0 mg/dL (OR = 0.57; P = 0.02) was negatively correlated with improvement. In comparing the TLV group and controls, only the serum sodium level was significantly lower in the TLV group (133 mEq/L vs 136 mEq/L; P = 0

  8. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Nicola; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Design Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). Setting UK tertiary care centre. Participants All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012–2014 (n=47 585). Primary outcome measure Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. Secondary outcome measures 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Results Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). Conclusions The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will

  9. Organizational development trajectory of a large academic radiotherapy department set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial: the MAASTRO experience

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, L; Dekker, A; Hermanns, E; Houben, R; Govers, M; van Merode, F; Lambin, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To simultaneously improve patient care processes and clinical research activities by starting a hypothesis-driven reorganization trajectory mimicking the rigorous methodology of a prospective clinical trial. Methods: The design of this reorganization trajectory was based on the model of a prospective trial. It consisted of (1) listing problems and analysing their potential causes, (2) defining interventions, (3) defining end points and (4) measuring the effect of the interventions (i.e. at baseline and after 1 and 2 years). The primary end point for patient care was the number of organizational root causes of incidents/near incidents; for clinical research, it was the number of patients in trials. There were several secondary end points. We analysed the data using two sample z-tests, χ2 test, a Mann–Whitney U test and the one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. Results: The number of organizational root causes was reduced by 27% (p < 0.001). There was no effect on the percentage of patients included in trials. Conclusion: The reorganizational trajectory was successful for the primary end point of patient care and had no effect on clinical research. Some confounding events hampered our ability to draw strong conclusions. Nevertheless, the transparency of this approach can give medical professionals more confidence in moving forward with other organizational changes in the same way. Advances in knowledge: This article is novel because managerial interventions were set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial. This study is the first of its kind in radiotherapy, and this approach can contribute to discussions about the effectiveness of managerial interventions. PMID:25679320

  10. Twenty years of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings: we hope you will enjoy the show.

    PubMed

    Rozensky, Ronald H; Tovian, Steven M; Sweet, Jerry J

    2014-03-01

    The 20th anniversary of the Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings is celebrated by highlighting the scientist-practitioner philosophy on which it was founded. The goal of the Journal-to provide an outlet for evidence-based approaches to healthcare that underscore the important scientific and clinical contributions of psychology in medical settings-is discussed. The contemporary relevance of this approach is related to the current implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care and its focus on accountability and the development of an interprofessional healthcare workforce; both of which have been foci of the Journal throughout its history and will continue to be so into the future. Several recommendations of future topic areas for the Journal to highlight regarding scientific, practice, policy, and education and training in professional health service psychology are offered. Successfully addressing these topics will support the growth of the field of psychology in the ever evolving healthcare system of the future and continue ensure that the Journal is a key source of professional information in health service psychology. PMID:24492915

  11. 2D harmonic filtering of MR phase images in multicenter clinical setting: toward a magnetic signature of cerebral microbleeds.

    PubMed

    Kaaouana, Takoua; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Samaille, Thomas; Thiery, Nathalie; Dufouil, Carole; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; Chupin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) have emerged as a new imaging marker of small vessel disease. Composed of hemosiderin, CMBs are paramagnetic and can be detected with MRI sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility (typically, gradient recalled echo T2* weighted images). Nevertheless, their identification remains challenging on T2* magnitude images because of confounding structures and lesions. In this context, T2* phase image may play a key role in better characterizing CMBs because of its direct relationship with local magnetic field variations due to magnetic susceptibility difference. To address this issue, susceptibility-based imaging techniques were proposed, such as Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI) and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM). But these techniques have not yet been validated for 2D clinical data in multicenter settings. Here, we introduce 2DHF, a fast 2D phase processing technique embedding both unwrapping and harmonic filtering designed for data acquired in 2D, even with slice-to-slice inconsistencies. This method results in internal field maps which reveal local field details due to magnetic inhomogeneity within the region of interest only. This technique is based on the physical properties of the induced magnetic field and should yield consistent results. A synthetic phantom was created for numerical simulations. It simulates paramagnetic and diamagnetic lesions within a 'brain-like' tissue, within a background. The method was evaluated on both this synthetic phantom and multicenter 2D datasets acquired in standardized clinical setting, and compared with two state-of-the-art methods. It proved to yield consistent results on synthetic images and to be applicable and robust on patient data. As a proof-of-concept, we finally illustrate that it is possible to find a magnetic signature of CMBs and CMCs on internal field maps generated with 2DHF on 2D clinical datasets that give consistent results with CT-scans in a subsample of 10 subjects

  12. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    PubMed

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 and ≥10 years), and age (<35 and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the 6-month follow-up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p < 0.0001). There was variation between the age, gender, and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance, and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the necessary neurocognitive normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers. PMID:26733457

  13. The Role of the Occupational Therapist in the Management of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Dementia in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fraker, Joyce; Kales, Helen C.; Blazek, Mary; Kavanagh, Janet; Gitlin, Laura N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) of dementia include aggression, agitation, depression, anxiety, delusions, hallucinations, apathy, and disinhibition. NPS affect dementia patients nearly universally across dementia stages and etiologies. They are associated with poor patient and caregiver outcomes including increased health care utilization, excess morbidity and mortality, and earlier nursing home placement, as well as caregiver stress, depression and reduced employment. There are no FDA-approved medications for NPS, but it is common clinical practice to use psychotropic medications such as antipsychotics to control symptoms; however, antipsychotics show only modest efficacy in improving NPS and have significant risks for patients, including side effects and mortality. Non-pharmacologic treatments are considered first-line by multiple medical bodies and expert consensus, show evidence for efficacy and have limited potential for adverse effects. Ideally, non-pharmacological management of NPS in clinical settings occurs in multidisciplinary teams where occupational therapists (OTs) play an important collaborative role in the care of the person with dementia. Our group has articulated an evidence-informed structured approach to the management of NPS that can be integrated into diverse practice settings and used by providers of various disciplines. The “DICE” (Describe, Investigate, Create, and Evaluate) approach is inherently patient- and caregiver- centered as patient and caregiver concerns are integral to each step of the process. DICE offers a clinical reasoning approach through which providers can more efficiently and effectively choose optimal treatment plans. The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the OT in using the DICE approach for NPS management. PMID:24354328

  14. Addressing Social Determinants of Health in a Clinic Setting: The WellRx Pilot in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Page-Reeves, Janet; Kaufman, Will; Bleecker, Molly; Norris, Jeffrey; McCalmont, Kate; Ianakieva, Veneta; Ianakieva, Dessislava; Kaufman, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that the social determinants of health have a larger influence on health outcomes than health care, there currently is no structured way for primary care providers to identify and address nonmedical social needs experienced by patients seen in a clinic setting. We developed and piloted WellRx, an 11-question instrument used to screen 3048 patients for social determinants in 3 family medicine clinics over a 90-day period. Results showed that 46% of patients screened positive for at least 1 area of social need, and 63% of those had multiple needs. Most of these needs were previously unknown to the clinicians. Medical assistants and community health workers then offered to connect patients with appropriate services and resources to address the identified needs. The WellRx pilot demonstrated that it is feasible for a clinic to implement such an assessment system, that the assessment can reveal important information, and that having information about patients' social needs improves provider ease of practice. Demonstrated feasibility and favorable outcomes led to institutionalization of the WellRx process at a university teaching hospital and influenced the state department of health to require managed care organizations to have community health workers available to care for Medicaid patients. PMID:27170801

  15. Efficient and scalable expansion of human pluripotent stem cells under clinically compliant settings: a view in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Cheng, Linzhao; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for revolutionizing regenerative medicine for their potential applications in disease modeling, drug discovery, and cellular therapy. Many their applications require robust and scalable expansion of hPSCs, even under settings compliant to good clinical practices. Rapid evolution of media and substrates provided safer and more defined culture conditions for long-term expansion of undifferentiated hPSCs in either adhesion or suspension. With well-designed automatic systems or fully controlled bioreactors, production of a clinically relevant quantity of hPSCs could be achieved in the near future. The goal is to find a scalable, xeno-free, chemically defined, and economic culture system for clinical-grade expansion of hPSCs that complies the requirements of current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). This review provides an updated overview of the current development and challenges on the way to accomplish this goal, including discussions on basic principles for bioprocess design, serum-free media, extracellular matric or synthesized substrate, microcarrier- or cell aggregate-based suspension culture, and scalability and practicality of equipment. PMID:24132657

  16. Use of CHROMagar Candida for the presumptive identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Sayyada Ghufrana; Hakim, Shazia Tabassum; Kazmi, Shahana Urooj

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of yeast isolated from clinical specimens to the species level has become increasingly important. Ever-increasing numbers of immuno-suppressed patients, a widening range of recognized pathogens, and the discovery of resistance to antifungal drugs are contributing factors to this necessity. Material and methods A total of 487 yeast strains were studied for the primary isolation and presumptive identification, directly from clinical specimen. Efficacy of CHROMagar Candida has been evaluated with conventional methods including morphology on Corn meal–tween 80 agar and biochemical methods by using API 20 C AUX. Results The result of this study shows that CHROMagar Candida can easily identify three species of Candida on the basis of colonial color and morphology, and accurately differentiate between them i.e. Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. The specificity and sensitivity of CHROMagar Candida for C. albicans calculated as 99%, for C. tropicalis calculated as 98%, and C. krusei it is 100%. Conclusion The data presented supports the use of CHROMagar Candida for the rapid identification of Candida species directly from clinical specimens in resource-limited settings, which could be very helpful in developing appropriate therapeutic strategy and management of patients. PMID:21483597

  17. Invasive candidiasis in critical care setting, updated recommendations from “Invasive Fungal Infections-Clinical Forum”, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elhoufi, Ashraf; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Asnaashari, Amir Mohammad Hashem; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Bidgoli, Behrooz Farzanegan; Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Abbasi, Saeed; El-Sobky, Malak; Ghaziani, Ali; Jarrahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Shahrami, Reza; Shirazian, Farzad; Soltani, Farhad; Yazdinejad, Homeira; Zand, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis (IC) bears a high risk of morbidity and mortality in the intensive care units (ICU). With the current advances in critical care and the use of wide-spectrum antibiotics, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and IC in particular, have turned into a growing concern in the ICU. Further to blood cultures, some auxiliary laboratory tests and biomarkers are developed to enable an earlier detection of infection, however these test are neither consistently available nor validated in our setting. On the other hand, patients’ clinical status and local epidemiology data may justify the empiric antifungal approach using the proper antifungal option. The clinical approach to the management of IC in febrile, non-neutropenic critically ill patients has been defined in available international guidelines; nevertheless such recommendations need to be customized when applied to our local practice. Over the past three years, Iranian experts from intensive care and infectious diseases disciplines have tried to draw a consensus on the management of IFI with a particular focus on IC in the ICU. The established IFI-clinical forum (IFI-CF), comprising the scientific leaders in the field, has recently come up with and updated recommendation on the same (June 2014). The purpose of this review is to put together literature insights and Iranian experts’ opinion at the IFI-CF, to propose an updated practical overview on recommended approaches for the management of IC in the ICU. PMID:25374806

  18. Efficient and scalable expansion of human pluripotent stem cells under clinically compliant settings: a view in 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Cheng, Linzhao; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for revolutionizing regenerative medicine for their potential applications in disease modeling, drug discovery, and cellular therapy. Many their applications require robust and scalable expansion of hPSCs, even under settings compliant to good clinical practices. Rapid evolution of media and substrates provided safer and more defined culture conditions for long-term expansion of undifferentiated hPSCs in either adhesion or suspension. With well-designed automatic systems or fully controlled bioreactors, production of a clinically relevant quantity of hPSCs could be achieved in the near future. The goal is to find a scalable, xeno-free, chemically defined, and economic culture system for clinical-grade expansion of hPSCs that complies the requirements of current good manufacturing practices. This review provides an updated overview of the current development and challenges on the way to accomplish this goal, including discussions on basic principles for bioprocess design, serum-free media, extracellular matric or synthesized substrate, microcarrier- or cell aggregate-based suspension culture, and scalability and practicality of equipment. PMID:24132657

  19. Development and validation of an app-based cell counter for use in the clinical laboratory setting

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Alexander C.; Davis, Jessica L.; Jan, Max; McCulloch, Charles E.; Buelow, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: For decades cellular differentials have been generated exclusively on analog tabletop cell counters. With the advent of tablet computers, digital cell counters – in the form of mobile applications (“apps”) – now represent an alternative to analog devices. However, app-based counters have not been widely adopted by clinical laboratories, perhaps owing to a presumed decrease in count accuracy related to the lack of tactile feedback inherent in a touchscreen interface. We herein provide the first systematic evidence that digital cell counters function similarly to standard tabletop units. Methods: We developed an app-based cell counter optimized for use in the clinical laboratory setting. Paired counts of 188 peripheral blood smears and 62 bone marrow aspirate smears were performed using our app-based counter and a standard analog device. Differences between paired data sets were analyzed using the correlation coefficient, Student's t-test for paired samples and Bland–Altman plots. Results: All counts showed excellent agreement across all users and touch screen devices. With the exception of peripheral blood basophils (r = 0.684), differentials generated for the measured cell categories within the paired data sets were highly correlated (all r ≥ 0.899). Results of paired t-tests did not reach statistical significance for any cell type (all P > 0.05), and Bland–Altman plots showed a narrow spread of the difference about the mean without evidence of significant outliers. Conclusions: Our analysis suggests that no systematic differences exist between cellular differentials obtained via app-based or tabletop counters and that agreement between these two methods is excellent. PMID:25722942

  20. Obtaining Valid Laboratory Data in Clinical Trials Conducted in Resource Diverse Settings: Lessons Learned from a Microbicide Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crucitti, Tania; Fransen, Katrien; Maharaj, Rashika; Tenywa, Tom; Massinga Loembé, Marguerite; Murugavel, Kailapuri Gangatharan; Mendonca, Kevin; Abdellati, Said; Beelaert, Greet; Van Damme, Lut

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS) [1]. Methodology In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL), responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL. Results Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented. Conclusions Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity of final study data

  1. Are more endodontic consultations needed in dental school clinic settings? A study of treatment decisions at one school.

    PubMed

    Aminoshariae, Anita; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim; Demko, Catherine; Galsterer, Mark; Montagnese, Thomas A; Mickel, Andre

    2015-04-01

    With no previous studies of the occurrence of interdisciplinary consultations for tooth extraction in a dental school clinic setting, the aim of this cross-sectional descriptive investigation was to measure and compare the consultation process that occurred among departments at one U.S. dental school for making treatment decisions on tooth extraction. A comprehensive computerized retrieval (Crystal Reports) was used to identify and gather data from patient records from July 1, 2007, to July 1, 2011. Treatment plans and progress notes were analyzed to determine why each tooth had been extracted and which department had recommended the extraction. Results showed that the clinical departments involved in treatment planning decisions were the DMD dental student clinic, Department of Periodontics, and Department of Endodontics. The narrative records of 227 patients who had 516 teeth extracted were examined. About three-fourths (73.26%) of the extracted teeth were extracted based on the recommendation of only one department. Of these extracted teeth, 22.0% (n=114) were previously endodontically treated, and only four were recommended for endodontic consultation prior to extraction. The study found that most extractions were performed without specialty consultations and that the Department of Endodontics was consulted the least of all departments. To foster interdisciplinary collaboration in dental school clinics and help students develop expertise in such collaborations, more specialty consultations are needed for teeth that are treatment planned for extraction in order to preclude needless extraction of potentially salvageable teeth. Doing so will provide benefits for both patient care and students' education. PMID:25838010

  2. Measuring the quality and quantity of professional intrapartum support: testing a computerised systematic observation tool in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuous support in labour has a significant impact on a range of clinical outcomes, though whether the quality and quantity of support behaviours affects the strength of this impact has not yet been established. To identify the quality and quantity of support, a reliable means of measurement is needed. To this end, a new computerised systematic observation tool, the ‘SMILI’ (Supportive Midwifery in Labour Instrument) was developed. The aim of the study was to test the validity and usability of the ‘Supportive Midwifery in Labour Instrument’ (SMILI) and to test the feasibility and acceptability of the systematic observation approach in the clinical intrapartum setting. Methods Systematic observation was combined with a postnatal questionnaire and the collection of data about clinical processes and outcomes for each observed labour. The setting for the study was four National Health Service maternity units in Scotland, UK. Participants in this study were forty five midwives and forty four women. The SMILI was used by trained midwife observers to record labour care provided by midwives. Observations were undertaken for an average of two hours and seventeen minutes during the active first stage of labour and, in 18 cases, the observation included the second stage of labour. Content validity of the instrument was tested by the observers, noting the extent to which the SMILI facilitated the recording of all key aspects of labour care and interactions. Construct validity was tested through exploration of correlations between the data recorded and women’s feelings about the support they received. Feasibility and usability data were recorded following each observation by the observer. Internal reliability and construct validity were tested through statistical analysis of the data. Results One hundred and four hours of labour care were observed and recorded using the SMILI during forty nine labour episodes. Conclusion The SMILI was found to be a valid

  3. Learning from Analysis of Japanese EFL Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, George R. S.; Ozasa, Toshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Japan has a long tradition of teaching English as a foreign language (EFL). A common feature of EFL courses is reliance on specific textbooks as a basis for graded teaching, and periods in Japanese EFL history are marked by the introduction of different textbook series. These sets of textbooks share the common goal of taking students from…

  4. Clinical excellence: evidence on the assessment of senior doctors' applications to the UK Advisory Committee on Clinical Excellence Awards. Analysis of complete national data set

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To inform the rational deployment of assessor resource in the evaluation of applications to the UK Advisory Committee on Clinical Excellence Awards (ACCEA). Setting ACCEA are responsible for a scheme to financially reward senior doctors in England and Wales who are assessed to be working over and above the standard expected of their role. Participants Anonymised applications of consultants and senior academic GPs for awards were considered by members of 14 regional subcommittees and 2 national assessing committees during the 2014–2015 round of applications. Design It involved secondary analysis of complete anonymised national data set. Primary and secondary outcome measures We analysed scores for each of 1916 applications for a clinical excellence award across 4 levels of award. Scores were provided by members of 16 subcommittees. We assessed the reliability of assessments and described the variance in the assessment of scores. Results Members of regional subcommittees assessed 1529 new applications and 387 renewal applications. Average scores increased with the level of application being made. On average, applications were assessed by 9.5 assessors. The highest contributions to the variance in individual assessors' assessments of applications were attributable to assessors or to residual variance. The applicant accounted for around a quarter of the variance in scores for new bronze applications, with this proportion decreasing for higher award levels. Reliability in excess of 0.7 can be attained where 4 assessors score bronze applications, with twice as many assessors being required for higher levels of application. Conclusions Assessment processes pertaining in the competitive allocation of public funds need to be credible and efficient. The present arrangements for assessing and scoring applications are defensible, depending on the level of reliability judged to be required in the assessment process. Some relatively minor reconfiguration in

  5. HIV and infant feeding in resource-rich settings: considering the clinical significance of a complicated dilemma.

    PubMed

    Yudin, Mark H; Kennedy, V Logan; MacGillivray, S Jay

    2016-08-01

    With advances in the care of HIV-positive pregnant women, the likelihood of perinatal transmission is now less than 1%. In resource-rich settings women are instructed to abstain from breastfeeding, as studies have shown that breastfeeding increases the likelihood of infant acquisition of HIV. As practitioners caring for HIV-positive parents, we are now facing growing tension about the complex issues that inform decisions about infant feeding. In the face of changing guidelines and global immigration patterns, simply telling women that breastfeeding is contraindicated may no longer be good enough. We must fully open the lines of communication regarding this important and evolving issue. This commentary will review the clinical, social and cultural considerations that impact decisions regarding infant feeding in the context of HIV. PMID:26881474

  6. How the Japanese work.

    PubMed

    Chambers, D W

    1998-01-01

    The Japanese do not work harder or even use different approaches so much as they aim for a different result--one that balances process and results and extends the definition of quality beyond the product itself to include cost and convenience to the customer as well. Ten methods of the Japanese kaizen culture of work are presented with applications and contrasts to American dentistry. PMID:9929991

  7. Resting-state functional MRI in an intraoperative MRI setting: proof of feasibility and correlation to clinical outcome of patients.

    PubMed

    Roder, Constantin; Charyasz-Leks, Edyta; Breitkopf, Martin; Decker, Karlheinz; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively. METHODS Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)-fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed. RESULTS iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge. CONCLUSIONS The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes. PMID:26722852

  8. Clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high HIV prevalence setting in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schaftenaar, E; Peters, R P H; Baarsma, G S; Meenken, C; Khosa, N S; Getu, S; McIntyre, J A; Osterhaus, A D M E; Verjans, G M G M

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the clinical and corneal microbial profile of infectious keratitis in a high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence setting in rural South Africa. Data in this cross-sectional study were collected from patients presenting with symptoms of infectious keratitis (n = 46) at the ophthalmology outpatient department of three hospitals in rural South Africa. Corneal swabs were tested for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV) and adenovirus DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for bacteria and fungi by culture. Based on clinical history, disease characteristics and laboratory results, 29 (63 %) patients were diagnosed as viral keratitis, including 14 (48 %) viral keratitis cases complicated by bacterial superinfection, and 17 (37 %) as bacterial keratitis. VZV and HSV-1 DNA was detected in 11 (24 %) and 5 (11 %) corneal swabs, respectively. Among clinically defined viral keratitis cases, a negative viral swab was predominantly (93 %) observed in cases with subepithelial inflammation and was significantly associated with an increased duration of symptoms (p = 0.003). The majority of bacteria cultured were Gram-positive (24/35), including Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus. Viral aetiology was significantly associated with a history of herpes zoster ophthalmicus (p < 0.001) and a trend was observed between viral aetiology and HIV infection (p = 0.06). Twenty-one (47 %) keratitis cases were complicated by anterior uveitis, of which 18 (86 %) were HIV-infected cases with viral keratitis. The data implicate a high prevalence of herpetic keratitis, in part complicated by bacterial superinfection and/or uveitis, in HIV-infected individuals presenting with infectious keratitis in rural South Africa. PMID:27236644

  9. Exemplary Care and Learning Sites: A Model for Achieving Continual Improvement in Care and Learning in the Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ogrinc, Greg; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Stevenson, Katherine M.; Shalaby, Marc; Beard, Albertine S.; Thörne, Karin E.; Coleman, Mary T.; Baum, Karyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Current models of health care quality improvement do not explicitly describe the role of health professions education. The authors propose the Exemplary Care and Learning Site (ECLS) model as an approach to achieving continual improvement in care and learning in the clinical setting. Approach From 2008–2012, an iterative, interactive process was used to develop the ECLS model and its core elements—patients and families informing process changes; trainees engaging both in care and the improvement of care; leaders knowing, valuing, and practicing improvement; data transforming into useful information; and health professionals competently engaging both in care improvement and teaching about care improvement. In 2012–2013, a three-part feasibility test of the model, including a site self-assessment, an independent review of each site’s ratings, and implementation case stories, was conducted at six clinical teaching sites (in the United States and Sweden). Outcomes Site leaders reported the ECLS model provided a systematic approach toward improving patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. Most sites found it challenging to incorporate the patients and families element. The trainee element was strong at four sites. The leadership and data elements were self-assessed as the most fully developed. The health professionals element exhibited the greatest variability across sites. Next Steps The next test of the model should be prospective, linked to clinical and educa tional outcomes, to evaluate whether it helps care delivery teams, educators, and patients and families take action to achieve better patient (and population) outcomes, system performance, and professional development. PMID:26760058

  10. Installation of a Neuromate Robot for Stereotactic Surgery: Efforts to Conform to Japanese Specifications and an Approach for Clinical Use—Technical Notes

    PubMed Central

    KAJITA, Yasukazu; NAKATSUBO, Daisuke; KATAOKA, Hirotada; NAGAI, Toshiya; NAKURA, Takahiro; WAKABAYASHI, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The neuromate is a commercially available, image-guided robotic system for use in stereotactic surgery and is employed in Europe and North America. In June 2015, this device was approved in accordance with the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law in Japan. The neuromate can be specified to a wide range of stereotactic procedures in Japan. The stereotactic X-ray system, developed by a Japanese manufacturer, is normally attached to the operating table that provides lateral and anteroposterior images to verify the positions of the recording electrodes. The neuromate is designed to be used with the patient in the supine position on a flat operating table. In Japan, deep brain stimulation surgery is widely performed with the patient's head positioned upward so as to minimize cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The robot base where the patient's head is fixed has an adaptation for a tilted head position (by 25 degrees) to accommodate the operating table at proper angle to hold the patient's upper body. After these modifications, the accuracy of neuromate localization was examined on a computed tomography phantom preparation, showing that the root mean square error was 0.12 ± 0.10 mm. In our hospital, robotic surgeries, such as those using the Da Vinci system or neuromate, require operative guidelines directed by the Medical Risk Management Office and Biomedical Research and Innovation Office. These guidelines include directions for use, procedural manuals, and training courses. PMID:26511113

  11. Epidemiology and clinical characteristics of traumatic brain injuries in a rural setting in Maharashtra, India. 2007–2009

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Amit; Galwankar, Sagar; Kapil, Vikas; Coronado, Victor; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; McGuire, Lisa C; Joshi, Rajnish; Quazi, Syed Z; Dwivedi, Sankalp

    2012-01-01

    Context: Though some studies have described traumatic brain injuries in tertiary care, urban hospitals in India, very limited information is available from rural settings. Aims: To evaluate and describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with traumatic brain injury and their clinical outcomes following admission to a rural, tertiary care teaching hospital in India. Settings and Design: Retrospective, cross-sectional, hospital-based study from January 2007 to December 2009. Materials and Methods: Epidemiological and clinical data from all patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) admitted to the neurosurgery service of a rural hospital in district Wardha, Maharashtra, India, from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. The medical records of all eligible patients were reviewed and data collected on age, sex, place of residence, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, mechanism of injury, severity of injury, concurrent injuries, length of hospital stay, computed tomography (CT) scan results, type of management, indication and type of surgical intervention, and outcome. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was performed using STATA version 11.0. Results: The medical records of 1,926 eligible patients with TBI were analyzed. The median age of the study population was 31 years (range <1 year to 98 years). The majority of TBI cases occurred in persons aged 21 - 30 years (535 or 27.7%), and in males (1,363 or 70.76%). Most patients resided in nearby rural areas and the most frequent external cause of injury was motor vehicle crash (56.3%). The overall TBI-related mortality during the study period was 6.4%. From 2007 to 2009, TBI-related mortality significantly decreased (P < 0.01) during each year (2007: 8.9%, 2008: 8.5%, and 2009: 4.9%). This decrease in mortality could be due to access and availability of better health care facilities. Conclusions: Road traffic crashes are the leading cause of TBI in rural Maharashtra ffecting mainly young adult males. At least 10

  12. Entry-Level Athletic Trainers' Self-Confidence in Clinical Skill Preparedness for Treating Athletic and Emergent Settings Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Gary E.; Misasi, Sharon; Davis, Charles; Hannah, Corey; Rothbard, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical education is an important component of athletic training education. Concern exists regarding whether clinical experience adequately prepares students to perform professional skills after graduation, particularly with patients in emerging settings. Objective: To determine the confidence levels of athletic training graduates in…

  13. Application of empirically supported treatments to clinical settings. In: Jelalian, E., Steele, R.G., editors. Handbook of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter identifies treatments for pediatric obesity that have been shown to be effective in research settings and discusses how these treatments can be implemented in an applied clinical setting. Behavior-based treatments have demonstrated the best outcomes. Commonly used behavioral strate...

  14. Biological therapy increases the health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Holdam, Anne Sofie Krogh; Bager, Palle; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik

    2016-06-01

    Objective Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) have a considerable impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients. We aimed to investigate the effect of biological therapy on HRQoL in IBD patients followed in an out-patient clinical setting and to compare the HRQoL scores to that of IBD patients without disease activity. Materials Observational and retrospective study in patients treated with biologics. A Short Health Scale (SHS) questionnaire on HRQoL consisting of four items (bowel symptoms, interference in daily life, worry, and general well-being) was completed and registered in each patient's medical journal. Data on HRQoL was collected at the beginning of treatment and every 3 months thereafter. The biologically treated group was compared with a control group of IBD patients without disease activity. Results We identified 114 patients who began a new round of biological treatment. These were either naïve to biologics or had a break in treatment for more 3 months. After 3 months of therapy, significant improvements in HRQoL compared to baseline were observed for every item on the SHS (p value < 0.01). Subgroup analysis showed a poorer HRQoL performance in women, patients with Crohn's disease, and smokers. The median HRQoL score regarding bowel symptoms and interference in daily life was similar to the control group after 6 months of treatment. Conclusion Treatment with biological therapy leads to a statistically and clinically significant improvement in HRQoL in all parameters. After 6 months of treatment, bowel symptoms and interference in daily life were similar to patients without disease activity. PMID:26794211

  15. Comparing hepatic 2D and 3D magnetic resonance elastography methods in a clinical setting – Initial experiences

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Mikael F.; Norén, Bengt; Kihlberg, Johan; Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof; Kechagias, Stergios; Lundberg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continuous monitoring of liver fibrosis progression in patients is not feasible with the current diagnostic golden standard (needle biopsy). Recently, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has emerged as a promising method for such continuous monitoring. Since there are different MRE methods that could be used in a clinical setting there is a need to investigate whether measurements produced by these MRE methods are comparable. Hence, the purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the measurements of the viscoelastic properties produced by 2D (stiffness) and 3D (elasticity and ‘Gabs,Elastic’) MRE are comparable. Materials and methods Seven patients with diffuse or suspect diffuse liver disease were examined in the same day with the two MRE methods. 2D MRE was performed using an acoustic passive transducer, with a 1.5 T GE 450 W MR system. 3D MRE was performed using an electromagnetic active transducer, with a 1.5 T Philips Achieva MR system. Finally, mean viscoelastic values were extracted from the same anatomical region for both methods by an experienced radiologist. Results Stiffness correlated well with the elasticity, R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 1.08, intercept = 0.61 kPa), as well as with ‘Gabs,Elastic’ R2 = 0.96 (P < 0.001; slope = 0.95, intercept = 0.28 kPa). Conclusion This pilot study shows that different MRE methods can produce comparable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of the liver. The existence of such comparable measurements is important, both from a clinical as well as a research perspective, since it allows for equipment-independent monitoring of disease progression. PMID:26937438

  16. Comparison of postmenopausal endogenous sex hormones among Japanese, Japanese Brazilians, and non-Japanese Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Differences in sex hormone levels among populations might contribute to the variation in breast cancer incidence across countries. Previous studies have shown higher breast cancer incidence and mortality among Japanese Brazilians than among Japanese. To clarify the difference in hormone levels among populations, we compared postmenopausal endogenous sex hormone levels among Japanese living in Japan, Japanese Brazilians living in the state of São Paulo, and non-Japanese Brazilians living in the state of São Paulo. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a control group of case-control studies in Nagano, Japan, and São Paulo, Brazil. Participants were postmenopausal women older than 55 years of age who provided blood samples. We measured estradiol, estrone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), testosterone and free testosterone by radioimmunoassay; bioavailable estradiol by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method; and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) by immunoradiometric assay. A total of 363 women were included for the present analyses, comprising 185 Japanese, 44 Japanese Brazilians and 134 non-Japanese Brazilians. Results Japanese Brazilians had significantly higher levels of estradiol, bioavailable estradiol, estrone, testosterone and free testosterone levels, and lower SHBG levels, than Japanese. Japanese Brazilians also had significantly higher levels of bioavailable estradiol, estrone and DHEAS and lower levels of SHBG and androstenedione than non-Japanese Brazilians. Levels of estradiol, testosterone and free testosterone, however, did not differ between Japanese Brazilians and non-Japanese Brazilians. These differences were observed even after adjustment for known breast cancer risk factors. We also found an increase in estrogen and androgen levels with increasing body mass index, but no association for most of the other known risk factors. Conclusions We found higher levels of estrogens and androgens in

  17. A model for managing and monitoring the quality of glucometers used in a high-volume clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Aykal, Güzin; Yegin, Ayşenur; Tekeli, Özgür; Yilmaz, Necat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to present a model for assuring the quality of a large number of glucometers being used in a high-volume hospital clinical setting. Materials and methods Internal quality-control samples and blood samples from two patients were used to determine the accuracy of 83 glucometers used at our hospital. On each glucometer three levels of control were used for glucose concentrations determination. In addition, the difference between the results from patient samples obtained with the glucometers and the hexokinase reference method were compared. The differences were assessed based on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 15197) standards. Results The glucose concentrations were as follows: 2.51 ± 0.34 mmol/L for the hypo-control samples; 5.12 ± 0.32 mmol/L for the low-control samples; and 16.11 ± 1.03 mmol/L for high-control samples. All results were within the expected ranges. For Patient I, the result with the first group of 52 glucometers was 11.56 ± 0.5 mmol/L, while the result for Patient II with the second group of 31 glucometers was 10.52 ± 0.62 mmol/L. All data points of the study complied with the requirements of the Clarke error grid. Conclusion All quality-control and comparison assay results were appropriate for evaluating glucometers used in a high-volume hospital setting. The method used in this study can be suggested as a model for laboratory managers, especially in similar high-volume hospitals. PMID:27346965

  18. Treatment of hereditary angioedema with icatibant: efficacy in clinical trials versus effectiveness in the real-world setting.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Marcus; Longhurst, Hilary J; Fabien, Vincent; Li, H Henry; Lumry, William R

    2014-01-01

    Icatibant was efficacious and generally well tolerated for type I or II hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks in adults in the phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled For Angioedema Subcutaneous Treatment (FAST)-3 trial. The Icatibant Outcome Survey (IOS) is an international, observational study assessing icatibant treatment of HAE attacks. We conducted a posthoc analysis to compare for the first time the treatment of HAE type I or II attacks in patients prescribed icatibant in real-world (IOS) versus controlled trial settings (FAST-3). In FAST-3, patients received icatibant administered by health care professionals (HCPs). In IOS, patients self-administered icatibant or were treated by HCPs. Median time to treatment, time to resolution (almost complete resolution [FAST-3] or complete resolution [IOS]), and attack duration in patients who were treated by an HCP were compared between IOS and FAST-3. Descriptive statistical methods compared nonlaryngeal attacks treated less than 12 hours from attack onset. Analysis included 102 patients (376 attacks) from IOS and 43 patients (43 attacks) from FAST-3 (controlled phase). All endpoints were significantly longer for patients in FAST-3 (HCP administration) versus IOS (HCP administration) (p < .001; all comparisons). For FAST-3 (HCP administered) versus IOS (HCP administered), median time from attack onset to treatment was 6.5 versus 2.0 hours, median time to symptom resolution was 8.0 versus 3.5 hours, and median attack duration was 16.9 versus 7.3 hours, respectively. For combined HCP and self-administration in IOS, these endpoints were 1.6, 4.4, and 7.8 hours, respectively. This posthoc analysis showed for the first time that type I and II HAE attacks were treated earlier with icatibant in a real-world versus a phase III setting, with a shortened time to symptom resolution and attack duration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00912093 (FAST-3); NCT01034969 (IOS). PMID:25198193

  19. Community-acquired diarrhea among children and adults in urban settings in Senegal: clinical, epidemiological and microbiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Only limited data are available relating to the etiology of diarrhea in children and adults in Senegal. The aim of this prospective study was to describe the epidemiology and etiology of community-acquired diarrheal infections in children and adults living in urban settings. Methods A prospective study was carried out from March 2009 to December 2010, in the urban region of Dakar, Senegal. Patients with acute diarrhea were enrolled, interviewed to collect their clinical history, and their stools were tested for bacteria, virus and parasites. Results A total of 223 patients (including 112 children younger than five years old) with diarrhea were included. At least one enteropathogen was detected in 81% (180/223) of the patients: 29% (64/223) had bacterial infections (mainly diarrheagenic E. coli and Shigella spp), 21% (39/185) viral infections (mainly rotavirus) and 14% (31/223) parasitic infections. Co-infection was identified in 17.8% (32/180) of the patients. Viral infection was significantly more frequent in children under five years old during the dry season. Bacteria and parasites were equally frequent in all age groups. There was a seasonal variation of bacterial infections during the study period, with a higher proportion of infections being bacterial, and due to Salmonella spp. in particular, during the rainy season. Conclusion Our study suggests that in urban settings in Senegal, rotavirus is the principal cause of pediatric diarrhea during the dry season and that the proportion of bacterial infections seems to be higher during the rainy season. Further work is needed to document the burden of diarrheal diseases in sub-Saharan urban communities and to identify risk factors, including those linked to the rapid and unplanned urbanization in Africa. PMID:24321175

  20. The GOCCLES® medical device is effective in detecting oral cancer and dysplasia in dental clinical setting. Results from a multicentre clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Moro, A; De Waure, C; Di Nardo, F; Spadari, F; Mignogna, M D; Giuliani, M; Califano, L; Giannì, A B; Cardarelli, L; Celentano, A; Bombeccari, G; Pelo, S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that the GOCCLES® medical device allows proper autofluorescence examination of the oral mucosa in a dental care setting. This is a non-randomised multicentre clinical trial on consecutive patients at risk for oral cancer. Patients underwent a classical naked eye inspection of the oral cavity followed by autofluorescence examination wearing the GOCCLES® spectacles while the light from a dental curing light irradiated the oral mucosa. Lesions were defined as visible potentially malignant lesions and/or fluorescence loss areas. All persisting lesions underwent excisional or incisional biopsy. Sixty-one patients were enrolled. Data from 64 biopsies were analysed. Of the 62 lesions identified by the device, 31 were true positives. The device identified 31 of 32 true positive lesions. One lesion (an invasive carcinoma) was not visible to the naked eye. The device identified all lesions classified as moderate dysplasia to invasive cancer. In 56.7% of cases, true positive lesions showed greater extension when observed through the device. The GOCCLES® medical device allowed the direct visualisation of fluorescence loss in patients suffering from mild to severe dysplasia and in situ to invasive oral cancer. It allowed autofluorescence examination with each source of light used during the study. These results suggest that the role of the autofluorescence visualisation is that of a complementary inspection following naked eye examination when dealing with patients at risk for oral cancer. The device allows detection of otherwise invisible lesions and otherwise impossible complete resections. PMID:26900252

  1. A Systematic Investigation on Barriers and Critical Success Factors for Clinical Information Systems in Integrated Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Clinical Information Systems (CIS) have ever since the introduction of information technology in healthcare played an important role to support healthcare professionals and the process of treatment. With the rise of the concept of integrated care organizational borders, the sole focus on data aggregation or healthcare professionals as users disappear more and more. The manuscript discusses the concept of CISs and investigates critical success factors for CISs in the context of integrated care and in the course of time. Methods In order to identify critical success factors and barriers for CISs a systematic literature review was conducted based on the results from PubMed and Cochrane, using MaxQDA. Search results were thereby limited to reviews or meta-analysis. Results We have found 1919 references of which 40 met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the manuscripts resulted in a comprehensive list of success factors and barriers related to CISs in integrated care settings. Most barriers were user-related whereas for the success factors an even distribution of organizational, technical and user-related factors was observed. The vast majority of publications was focused on healthcare professionals. Conclusion It is important to incorporate experiences made/collected over time, as the problems encountered seem to remain almost unvaried. In order to support further systematic investigations on the topic it is necessary to rethink existing concepts and definitions to realign them with the ideas of integrated care. PMID:26293853

  2. Robot-assisted upper-limb therapy in acute rehabilitation setting following stroke: Department of Veterans Affairs multisite clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Burgar, Charles G; Lum, Peter S; Scremin, A M Erika; Garber, Susan L; Van der Loos, H F Machiel; Kenney, Deborah; Shor, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This randomized, controlled, multisite Department of Veterans Affairs clinical trial assessed robot-assisted (RA) upper-limb therapy with the Mirror Image Movement Enabler (MIME) in the acute stroke rehabilitation setting. Hemiparetic subjects (n = 54) received RA therapy using MIME for either up to 15 hours (low-dose) or 30 hours (high-dose) or received up to 15 hours of additional conventional therapy in addition to usual care (control). The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). The secondary outcome measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Wolf Motor Function Test, Motor Power, and Ashworth scores at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Mean duration of study treatment was 8.6, 15.8, and 9.4 hours for the low-dose, high-dose, and control groups, respectively. Gains in the primary outcome measure were not significantly different between groups at follow-up. Significant correlations were found at discharge between FMA gains and the dose and intensity of RA. Intensity also correlated with FMA gain at 6 months. The high-dose group had greater FIM gains than controls at discharge and greater tone but no difference in FIM changes compared with low-dose subjects at 6 months. As used during acute rehabilitation, motor-control changes at follow-up were no less with MIME than with additional conventional therapy. Intensity of training with MIME was positively correlated with motor-control gains. PMID:21674393

  3. Comparison between a linear versus a macrocyclic contrast agent for whole body MR angiography in a clinical routine setting

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Achim; Kramer, Ulrich; Fenchel, Michael; Grimm, Florian; Bretschneider, Christiane; Döring, Jörg; Klumpp, Bernhard; Tepe, Gunnar; Rittig, Kilian; Seidensticker, Peter R; Claussen, Claus D; Miller, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous experiences of whole body MR angiography are predominantly available in linear 0.5 M gadolinium-containing contrast agents. The aim of this study was to compare image quality on a four-point scale (range 1–4) and diagnostic accuracy of a 1.0 M macrocyclic contrast agent (gadobutrol, n = 80 patients) with a 0.5 M linear contrast agent (gadopentetate dimeglumine, n = 85 patients) on a 1.5 T whole body MR system. Digital subtraction angiography served as standard of reference. Results All examinations yielded diagnostic image quality. There was no significant difference in image quality (3.76 ± 0.3 versus 3.78 ± 0.3, p = n.s.) and diagnostic accuracy observed. Sensitivity and specificity of the detection of hemodynamically relevant stenoses was 93%/95% in the gadopentetate dimeglumine group and 94%/94% in the gadobutrol group, respectively. Conclusion The high diagnostic accuracy of gadobutrol in the clinical routine setting is of high interest as medical authorities (e.g. the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products) recommend macrocyclic contrast agents especially to be used in patients with renal failure or dialysis. PMID:19116027

  4. A continuous-flow, high-throughput, high-pressure parahydrogen converter for hyperpolarization in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Bär, Sébastien; Leupold, Jochen; Jenne, Klaus; Leibfritz, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; Duckett, Simon B; von Elverfeldt, Dominik

    2013-02-01

    Pure parahydrogen (pH(2) ) is the prerequisite for optimal pH(2) -based hyperpolarization experiments, promising approaches to access the hidden orders of magnitude of MR signals. pH(2) production on-site in medical research centers is vital for the proliferation of these technologies in the life sciences. However, previously suggested designs do not meet our requirements for safety or production performance (flow rate, pressure or enrichment). In this article, we present the safety concept, design and installation of a pH(2) converter, operated in a clinical setting. The apparatus produces a continuous flow of four standard liters per minute of ≈98% enriched pH(2) at a pressure maximum of 50 bar. The entire production cycle, including cleaning and cooling to 25 K, takes less than 5 h, only ≈45 min of which are required for actual pH(2) conversion. A fast and simple quantification procedure is described. The lifetimes of pH(2) in a glass vial and aluminum storage cylinder are measured to be T(1C) (glass vial) =822 ± 29 min and T(1C) (Al cylinder) =129 ± 36 days, thus providing sufficiently long storage intervals and allowing the application of pH(2) on demand. A dependence of line width on pH(2) enrichment is observed. As examples, (1) H hyperpolarization of pyridine and (13) C hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate are presented. PMID:22833391

  5. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Page How long does the Japanese encephalitis vaccination last? The duration of protection is unknown. For ... What are the side effects of Japanese encephalitis vaccination? Pain and tenderness are the most commonly reported ...

  6. New Frontiers for Japanese Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    Japanese literature, television, movies, and school texts from 1935 to 1955 are analyzed for their influence and contribution to Japanese youths' pioneering spirit and frontiermindedness. "Asian Affairs" is published by the American-Asian Educational Exchange, New York. (DE)

  7. The views of doctors on registration trials in a Japanese rural area: a survey of medical institutions registered to the Tokushima Network for Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, H; Irahara, M; Kawashima, S; Kagawa, S

    2008-01-01

    Tokushima University Hospital has established the Tokushima Network for Clinical Trials (TNCT) to promote clinical trials in the area in collaboration with the Tokushima Medical Association. The present study investigated the views of doctors towards registration trials in the TNCT. A questionnaire was provided to 49 clinics/hospitals registered to the TNCT in 2006 and 38 (78%) responded. It revealed that 48% of doctors were aware of registration trials and 87% were favourable towards participating as investigators in them. They considered close contact with developmental drugs, advancement of therapy and the opportunity to learn about state-of-the-art treatment as benefits of participation. The main areas of difficulty included management of adverse reactions and patients' refusal to take part. Many doctors wanted more opportunity to learn about trial-related issues such as regulations. The survey indicates that the TNCT needs to develop the infrastructure and enlighten participants to promote registration trials in this rural regional area. PMID:18831909

  8. Cultural Competence in Business Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koike, Shohei

    Cultural competence in business Japanese requires more than superficial knowledge of business etiquette. One must truly understand why Japanese people think and act differently from their American counterparts. For example, instruction in the use of Japanese taxis must be accompanied by instruction in the concept and implications of seating order…

  9. Tips for teaching evidence-based medicine in a clinical setting: lessons from adult learning theory. Part two

    PubMed Central

    Malick, Sadia; Das, Kausik; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-01-01

    Summary Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is the clinical use of current best available evidence from relevant, valid research. Provision of evidence-based healthcare is the most ethical way to practise as it integrates up-to-date patient-oriented research into the clinical decision-making to improve patients' outcomes. This article provides tips for teachers to teach clinical trainees the final two steps of EBM: integrating evidence with clinical judgement and bringing about change. PMID:19029354

  10. Interrater reliability of the modified Monitoring of Side Effects Scale for assessment of adverse effects of psychiatric medication in clinical and research settings.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Katie L; Spahr, Erin; Toroney, Jaimie; Mojtabai, Ramin; Nettles, Carrie; Turner, Lydia W; Fenton, Ashley; Spivak, Amethyst; Cullen, Bernadette A; Everett, Anita; Eaton, William W

    2015-06-01

    The assessment of adverse effects of psychiatric medications is important in clinical and research settings because they are often associated with medication discontinuation, symptom exacerbation, and reduced quality of life. Currently available assessment tools are either limited with regard to the number and variety of included adverse effects or are not practical for use in most clinical or research settings owing to specialized rater training required and administration length. This report describes a modification of the Monitoring of Side Effects Scale (MOSES), an established adverse effect rating scale, by adding severity anchors to improve its reliability and ease of use. Interrater reliability was good for 7 of the 8 bodily adverse effects assessed, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.76 to 0.91 in a sample of patients with severe mental illness. This modified version of the Monitoring of Side Effects Scale holds promise as a useful tool for assessing medication adverse effects in clinical and research settings. PMID:25928700

  11. Lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations associated with dog body condition score; effect of recommended fasting duration on sample concentrations in Japanese private clinics

    PubMed Central

    USUI, Shiho; YASUDA, Hidemi; KOKETSU, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey clinics’ guidance about recommended fasting duration (FD) prior to lipoprotein analysis, and to characterize lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in obese and overweight dogs categorized on the basis of the 5-point body condition score (BCS) scale. A dataset was created from lipoprotein analysis medical records of 1,538 dogs from 75 breeds in 354 clinics from 2012 to 2013. A phone survey was conducted to obtain the clinics’ FD. Two-level linear mixed-effects models were applied to the data. Over 50% of the clinics said they recommended fasting for 12 hr or more. Dogs in clinics with FD 12 hr or more had lower chylomicron triglyceride concentrations than those in clinics with FD less than 8 hr (P=0.05). Mean (± SEM) BCS at sampling was 3.7 ± 0.02. Obese and overweight dogs had higher very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations than ideal dogs (P<0.05), but no such difference was found for low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (P≥0.07). Across all BCS, as dog age rose from 0 to 8 years old, HDL cholesterol concentrations decreased by 13.5 mg/dl, whereas VLDL triglyceride concentrations increased by 81.7 mg/dl (P<0.05). In conclusion, FD of 8 hr or less may affect lipoprotein lipid concentrations. Obese and overweight dogs were characterized as having high VLDL and HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. PMID:25866404

  12. An investigation of general predictors for cognitive–behavioural therapy outcome for anxiety disorders in a routine clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sara Kerstine Kaya; Vangkilde, Signe; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Hageman, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective for treating anxiety disorders and is offered in most mental health services around the world. However, a relatively large number of patients with anxiety disorders do not benefit from CBT, experience relapses or drop out. Reliable predictors of treatment effects are lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate the predictive value of emotion regulation and attentional control for CBT outcome in a routine setting. Methods and analysis In this prospective and practice-based study, 112 patients with anxiety disorders referred for manual-based group CBT at two psychiatric outpatient clinics will be recruited. Emotion regulation, severity of anxiety and attentional control will be assessed with self-report measures and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task at baseline, post-treatment and at a 6-month follow-up. Emotion regulation will be measured with Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Questionnaire, severity of anxiety will be assessed with Beck Anxiety Inventory and attentional control will be measured with the self-report questionnaire, Attention Control Scale, and with an experimental computer-based attentional control task based on theory of visual attention. Data will be analysed using multilevel mixed-effects modelling. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the Danish National Ethical Board, the Department of Psychology Ethical Board, University of Copenhagen and by the Danish Data Protection Agency. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journal publications and conference presentations. The Danish Committee System on Health Research Ethics has been notified about the project. Trial registration number NCT02638363. PMID:27016248

  13. Feasibility of activity-promoting video games among obese adolescents and young adults in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Fürbeck, Barbara; Thomas, Silke; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Nowak, Dennis; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    One component of the recent obesity epidemic is the sedentary behaviour of children and adolescents e.g., use of video games consoles. The new generation of video games requires body movements and might thus increase activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such games could have an effect on physical activity in obese adolescents in a clinical setting. Between March and May 2007 activity-promoting video games ("apvg") were offered to all 84 inpatients (aged 13-28 years) registered in a long-term rehabilitation programme on a voluntary base. Reasons for (non-)attendance were assessed. Frequency and duration of use of the activity-promoting video game sessions were documented. Furthermore, heart rate and activity counts during use of "apvg", endurance training, and strength training were measured. Of 84 inpatients, 51 used the "apvg" at least once (69%) over the study period. The median weekly use of the intervention was 27 min during the first week (range 0-182 min), declining to zero (range 0-74 min) in week four. Mean heart rate during the sessions (mean 115 bpm; 95% confidence interval 108-122 bpm) was similar to the heart rate during strength training (106 bpm; 101-112 bpm). The results indicate that the video games could have an impact on the activity of obese adolescents and young adults. However, as the interest in the devices seems to be too low the suitability of them for weight reduction programmes in young people cannot be ensured. PMID:20837400

  14. Contemporary issues concerning informed consent in Japan based on a review of court decisions and characteristics of Japanese culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since Japan adopted the concept of informed consent from the West, its inappropriate acquisition from patients in the Japanese clinical setting has continued, due in part to cultural aspects. Here, we discuss the current status of and contemporary issues surrounding informed consent in Japan, and how these are influenced by Japanese culture. Discussion Current legal norms towards informed consent and information disclosure are obscure in Japan. For instance, physicians in Japan do not have a legal duty to inform patients of a cancer diagnosis. To gain a better understanding of these issues, we present five court decisions related to informed consent and information disclosure. We then discuss Japanese culture through reviews of published opinions and commentaries regarding how culture affects decision making and obtaining informed consent. We focus on two contemporary problems involving informed consent and relevant issues in clinical settings: the misuse of informed consent and persistence in obtaining consent. For the former issue, the phrase "informed consent" is often used to express an opportunity to disclose medical conditions and recommended treatment choices. The casual use of the expression "informed consent" likely reflects deep-rooted cultural influences. For the latter issue, physicians may try to obtain a signature by doing whatever it takes, lacking a deep understanding of important ethical principles, such as protecting human dignity, serving the patient’s best interest, and doing no harm in decision-making for patients. There is clearly a misunderstanding of the concept of informed consent and a lack of complete understanding of ethical principles among Japanese healthcare professionals. Although similar in some respects to informed consent as it originated in the United States, our review makes it clear that informed consent in Japan has clear distinguishing features. Summary Japanese healthcare professionals should aim to understand

  15. Nucleus Course in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, Nobuo; Flamm, Carol S.

    The "Nucleus Course in Japanese," based on the Institute of Modern Languages'"Situational Reinforcement" approach, is designed for 80 to 100 hours of instruction. Each lesson has several sections--Response drills, Appropriate Response Sequence, and Reading. Most of the lessons also include optional sections with Sentences for Repetition or a…

  16. Reflexives in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Maki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconsider reflexives in Japanese through the following three steps: (a) separation of genuine reflexive elements from elements that are confounded as reflexives, (b) classification of reflexive anaphors into subtypes based on their semantic difference, and (c) classification of predicates that occur with…

  17. Reciprocal Predicates in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishii, Yasuo

    A study of reciprocals in Japanese compares two kinds: (1) a verbal suffix "aw"; and (2) an NP argument "otagai." Although "otagai" appears to be taken care of by syntactic binding theory, it is proposed that there is no evidence for the existence of a syntactic position of the object NP in the case of "aw." The suffix can be characterized as…

  18. Japanese Temple Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Jill; Vincent, Claire

    2004-01-01

    Between the 17th and 19th centuries, the Japanese government closed its borders to the outside world in an attempt to become more powerful. Foreign books were banned, people could not travel, and foreigners were not allowed to enter the country. One result of this isolation was the flourishing of sangaku--wooden tablets inscribed with intricately…

  19. Japanese Experiences: "Hentai" Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kama, Amit

    2011-01-01

    For those acquainted with Japanese lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues, "Queer Voices from Japan" can be good reading. But with only 1 of its 22 chapters informative for researchers, those interested in LGBT youth studies will only indirectly gain insight into a non-Western perspective on youth and sexuality.

  20. Postoperative rescue closure of patent foramen ovale in the clinical setting of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Gómez, José L.; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Mordecai, Monica; Moss, John; Agnew, Richard C.; Oken, Keith R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of intraoperative diagnosis and successful deferred percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the clinical setting of acute refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure and new-onset ischemic stroke in an elderly patient after coronary artery bypass graft. Perioperative morbidity (i.e. severe hypoxemia, worsening right ventricular dysfunction, and embolic stroke) that is potentially related to intraoperatively diagnosed PFO during cardiac surgery can complicate management in the Intensive Care Unit and perhaps affect the patient's outcome. Although the PFO closure can be challenging in the clinical setting of hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following cardiac surgery, it can be a reasonable perioperative option. PMID:25566718

  1. Associations between deepness of response and clinical outcomes among Japanese patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with second-line FOLFIRI plus cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Osumi, Hiroki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Shinozaki, Eiji; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background In the FIRE-3 trial, overall survival (OS) was significantly longer in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab (C-mab) than in those treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab (Bev), but progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different. This may be associated with the deepness of response (DpR) in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between clinical outcome and DpR in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with second-line FOLFIRI plus C-mab. Methods A total of 112 patients with histopathologically confirmed mCRC treated with second-line FOLFIRI in combination with C-mab (N=42) or Bev (N=70) were retrospectively enrolled between October 2008 and June 2013. The relationship between DpR and clinical outcome in patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab or Bev was determined. Results Forty-two patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab had a mean DpR of 6.1% (inter-quartile range: −13.7%, 20.8%) and a minimum DpR of −62.7%. On the other hand, 70 patients treated with FOLFIRI plus Bev had a mean DpR of 0% (interquartile range: −16%, 10%) and a minimum DpR of −111%. DpR ≥30% was associated with significantly longer OS and PFS when compared with DpR ≤30% in patients given FOLFIRI plus C-mab. DpR (≥30%) was independently associated with prolongation of OS and PFS. In patients treated with FOLFIRI plus C-mab, there was a moderate positive correlation between DpR and clinical outcomes (OS: r=0.51, P<0.001; PFS: r=0.54, P<0.001). Conclusion FOLFIRI plus C-mab yielded a stronger correlation between DpR and clinical outcomes. These results indicate the potential of DpR as a new measure of efficacy in mCRC patients treated with second-line chemotherapy plus C-mab. PMID:26273206

  2. Implementation of a PACS for radiography training and clinical service in a university setting through a multinational effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Yuen Y.; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Hai L.; Chang, Tony; Matsuda, Koyo; Cao, Fei

    2001-08-01

    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has a Radiography Division under the Development of Optometry and Radiography. The Division trains both diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers with 60 students/year and offers a B.Sc. degree. In addition the Division together with the University Health Service operates a radiography clinic with radiology consultation from radiologists from other hospitals and clinics. This paper describers the implementation of a PACS in the Division for radiography training, and for clinical service.

  3. The Effectiveness of Peer Taught Group Sessions of Physiotherapy Students within the Clinical Setting: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Dee; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether learning from peers, learning from a clinical educator, or being the peer teacher during clinical group sessions was more effective at enhancing student learning outcomes for different health conditions. A secondary aim was to determine which method students found more satisfactory. Physiotherapy students at…

  4. The Impact of Structured Inter-professional Education on Health Care Professional Students' Perceptions of Collaboration in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sam; Lombardo, Samantha; Salama, Mariam; Ellis, Sandi; Kay, Theresa; Davies, Robyn; Landry, Michel D.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To examine how a structured inter-professional education (IPE) clinical placement influences health care professional (HCP) students' perceptions of inter-professional collaboration (IPC) relative to that of students in a traditional clinical placement. Methods: This study used a mixed-methods design. The Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was administered to HCP students (n=36) in two Toronto hospitals before and after a structured 5-week IPE clinical placement to examine changes in their perceptions of IPC. Students in a traditional clinical placement (n=28) were used as a control group. Focus groups were then conducted with seven students who took part in the structured IPE clinical placement. A coding framework was devised a priori, and the qualitative results were used to explain the quantitative findings. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups after the structured IPE clinical placement, but the intervention group showed a greater positive trend in total IEPS scores from baseline to follow-up. Qualitative data suggest that students valued the knowledge and skills gained through the structured IPE clinical placement. Conclusions: Findings suggest that structured IPE clinical placements may provide students with valuable collaborative learning opportunities, enhanced respect for other professionals, and insight into the value of IPC in healthcare delivery. More research is needed to explore other factors that influence specific perceptions among physical therapy students. PMID:23450044

  5. What's Stopping Them? A Study of Teachers' Use of Formative Feedback with Students Learning in the Clinical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Acknowledging the powerful that role formative feedback plays in learning, students who are training for professions in the clinical setting and learn while working alongside professionals in their field report that they receive limited feedback. Formative feedback helps students gauge progress, identify weaknesses, and improve performance as well…

  6. Novel GUCY2D Gene Mutations in Japanese Male Twins with Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Hosono, Katsuhiro; Harada, Yuko; Kurata, Kentaro; Hikoya, Akiko; Sato, Miho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease, is the earliest onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and is the most severe of hereditary retinal dystrophies. This study was conducted to investigate genetic and clinical features of LCA in a set of Japanese male twins with LCA. Methods. To identify causative mutations, 74 genes known to cause RP or LCA were examined by targeted-next generation sequencing (NGS). Targeted-NGS was performed using a custom designed Agilent HaloPlex target enrichment kit with Illumina Miseq sequencer. Identified potential pathogenic mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. Clinical analyses were based on ophthalmic examination, fundus photography, and electroretinography (ERG). Results. Compound heterozygous GUCY2D mutations of novel splicing mutation c.2113+2_2113+3insT and novel missense mutation p.L905P were detected in both twins. Their father and mother were heterozygous for c.2113+2_2113+3insT and p.L905P, respectively. The twins had phenotypic features similar to those previously reported in patients with GUCY2D mutations. This included early childhood onset of visual loss, nystagmus, unrecordable ERG, photophobia, and hyperopia. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of genetic and clinical features of Japanese LCA twins with GUCY2D mutation, which were detected using targeted-NGS. PMID:26097748

  7. How Can We Improve Outcomes for Patients and Families Under Palliative Care? Implementing Clinical Audit for Quality Improvement in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Lucy; Harding, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach). The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step. PMID:20859465

  8. Chemomechanical caries removal method versus mechanical caries removal methods in clinical and community-based setting: A comparative in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. V. K. Santosh; Prasad, M. Ghanashyam; Sandeep, R. Venkata; Reddy, S. Pavani; Divya, D.; Pratyusha, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of various caries removal techniques in mandibular primary molars using Smart Burs, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) (mechanical caries removal) and Carie-care (chemomechanical caries removal [CMCR]) among primary school children in clinical and community-based settings. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 carious primary mandibular molars were selected for the study from the dental clinic and community. They were equally assigned to four groups according to caries removal technique and also by the operating site. In Group 1, caries was removed using Carie-care in the dental clinic and in Group 2, with Smart Burs in the dental clinic. In Group 3, caries was removed using Carie-care in the field and in Group 4, with the ART in the field. The time taken for caries removal, the efficacy of caries removal and patient acceptance were evaluated with different caries removal techniques. Statistical Analysis: The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis by ANOVA test. Results: In clinical settings, Carie-care was time-consuming but was more efficient with increased acceptance than Smart Burs and the result was found to be significant statistically (P < 0.05). In community-based settings, Carie-care was more efficient, less time consuming, and showed an increased acceptance when compared to atraumatic restorative treatment and the result was found to be significant statistically (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The CMCR technique was superior to the mechanical caries removal technique in primary teeth among school children in terms of time, efficacy, and acceptance in both clinical- and community-based settings. PMID:27403059

  9. Patterns of self-cutting: a preliminary study on differences in clinical implications between wrist- and arm-cutting using a Japanese juvenile detention center sample.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Chiba, Yasuhiko; Asami, Takeshi; Iseki, Eizo; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2004-08-01

    The present study was aimed to clarify the differences in clinical implications between wrist- and arm-cutting. Subjects were 201 delinquent adolescents (178 males and 23 females) who had been admitted to a detention center from February to March 2003. A self-reporting questionnaire and the Adolescent Dissociative Experience Scale (ADES) were given. Traumatic events and other self-injurious behavior were compared among four groups. In total, 33 (16.4%) subjects reported wrist- and/or arm-cutting. Of the females, 60.9% (n = 14) had experienced self cutting behaviors compared to 10.7% of males (n = 19). Subjects were divided into four groups; 'non-cutting' (NC: n = 168, 83.6%), 'wrist-cutting' (WC: n = 5, 2.5%), 'arm-cutting' (AC: n = 19, 9.5%), and 'wrist- and arm-cutting' (WAC: n = 9, 4.5%). WC, AC, and WAC groups reported early separation, bulling in school, and histories of sexual/physical abuse more frequently than NC group. WC and WAC groups reported suicidal ideation and suicide attempts more frequently than NC and AC groups. The ADES scores in AC and WAC groups were significantly higher than in those in NC group (P < 0.001), while the scores in WC were not different from NC groups. WC and WAC groups self-cut due to suicide idea more frequently than the AC group, while AC group self-cut due to anger expression more frequently than WC or WAC groups. Self-cutters experienced early separation, bullying in school, and sexual/physical abuse more frequently than-non-self-cutters. Arm-cutting behavior may predict dissociation, while wrist-cutting may involve with suicidality. PMID:15298650

  10. Flowering of Japanese astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozai, Y.

    1988-06-01

    A development history is presented for Japanese astronomy from the 6th century to the present day, together with a status report and account of future plans. About 500 professionals currently belong to the Astronomical Society of Japan. Tokyo's Mitaka Observatory employs a staff of about 70 astronomers; most modern astronomical instruments, however, have been installed at sites outside the Tokyo area. The limitations of present instruments are notably severe for astronomers working in the visible and IR wavelengths.

  11. Tips for teaching evidence-based medicine in a clinical setting: lessons from adult learning theory. Part one

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kausik; Malick, Sadia; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-01-01

    Summary Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an indispensable tool in clinical practice. Teaching and training of EBM to trainee clinicians is patchy and fragmented at its best. Clinically integrated teaching of EBM is more likely to bring about changes in skills, attitudes and behaviour. Provision of evidence-based health care is the most ethical way to practice, as it integrates up-to-date, patient-oriented research into the clinical decision making process, thus improving patients' outcomes. In this article, we aim to dispel the myth that EBM is an academic and statistical exercise removed from practice by providing practical tips for teaching the minimum skills required to ask questions and critically identify and appraise the evidence and presenting an approach to teaching EBM within the existing clinical and educational training infrastructure. PMID:18840865

  12. Factors that influence the clinical decision-making of rehabilitation professionals in long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Susan Flannery; McGinnis, Patricia Quinn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to evaluate the reasoning of clinicians practicing in long-term care facilities and to explore factors influencing their professional development. Eighteen participants were recruited from eight clinical sites and included seven occupational therapists, eight physical therapists, and three speech therapists distributed across three groups relative to experience. Nonparticipant observation and videotape of therapist-patient interactions were used in semi-structured interviews with each participant. Qualitative data analysis software was used during a process of open and axial coding, followed by thematic analysis. The facilitory and inhibitory factors that affect clinical reasoning and professional development were identified. Rehabilitation professionals in long-term care demonstrated clinical reasoning within the context of patient-centered goals. Well-developed and explicit programs for mentorship, professional development, and continuing education fostered their clinical reasoning abilities. Participants perceived that these factors were vital to achieving optimal patient outcomes. PMID:19753425

  13. Suicide of Japanese Youth.

    PubMed

    Iga, M

    1981-01-01

    The uniquely intense stress due to the Examination Hell (shiken jigoku) not only generates a basic drive for Japan's economic success but also contributes to a high rate of young people's suicide. This paper discusses the major factors in the intensity of Japanese stress on both institutional and psychological levels. The social structural factors which convert stress to suicide are analyzed in terms of weak ego; restraint on aggression; a lack of social resources; and views of life, death and suicide. Japanese views of life, death and suicide are treated in terms of Absolute phenomenalism, the original form of Shintoism, to which Buddhism and Confucianism have been adjusted in Japan. Japanese phenomenalism affects suicide through its three aspects: animism, present-time oriented small groupism, and the absolute acceptance of the established social order. Confusion and conflict since World War II have increased anomic suicides; however, elements of fatalistic suicide (due to excessive formal or informal social regulations) and altruistic suicide (due to excessive formal or informal social regulations) and altruistic suicide (due to strong social integration) are evident. Suicide is still a highly institutionalized adjustment mechanism in Japan. PMID:7233479

  14. Body mass index and survival after diagnosis of invasive breast cancer: a study based on the Japanese National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Masaaki; Tomotaki, Ai; Miyata, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Niikura, Naoki; Anan, Keisei; Hayashi, Naoki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Ishida, Takanori; Masuoka, Hideji; Iijima, Kotaro; Masuda, Shinobu; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Seigo; Tokuda, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Few studies have reported the association between body mass index (BMI) and outcome among Asian breast cancer patients. We analyzed data for 20,090 female invasive breast cancer patients who had been followed-up for a median period of 6.7 years entered in the National Clinical Database-Breast Cancer Registry between 2004 and 2006. We used mainly the WHO criteria for BMI (kg/m(2) ) categories; <18.5 (underweight), ≥18.5-<21.8 (reference), ≥21.8-<25, ≥25-<30 (overweight), and ≥30 (obese). We divided normal weight patients into two subgroups because this category includes many patients compared to others. The timing of BMI measurement was not specified. The Cox proportional hazards model and cubic spline regression were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Smoking, alcohol, and physical activity were not controlled. A total of 1418 all-cause, 937 breast cancer-specific deaths, and 2433 recurrences were observed. Obesity was associated with an increased risk of all-cause (HR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.16-1.83) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.11-1.93) for all patients, and with all-cause (HR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.13-1.92) and breast cancer-specific death (HR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.13-2.20) for postmenopausal patients. Being underweight was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death for all (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.16-1.71) and for postmenopausal patients (HR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.15-1.84). With regard to subtype and menopausal status, obesity was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer-specific death for all cases of luminal B tumor (HR: 2.59; 95% CI: 1.51-4.43; Pheterogeneity of Luminal B vs. Triple negative = 0.016) and for postmenopausal patients with luminal B tumor (HR: 3.24; 95% CI: 1.71-6.17). Being obese or underweight is associated with a higher risk of death among female breast cancer patients in Japan. PMID:26923549

  15. Homicide attempt with a Japanese samurai sword.

    PubMed

    Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Berthelon, Laurent; Geraut, Annie; Tracqui, Antoine; Ludes, Bertrand

    2003-07-01

    The use of Japanese swords for homicidal attempts is rare. A Japanese samurai sword is a sharp and cutting object. When faced with the use of this weapon, one must distinguish between stabs and incised wounds. Incised wounds can rarely lead to death, but because of the size of the weapon, stabs usually cause much more serious injuries. Stabs also imply a penetrating movement, whereas incised wounds can be the consequence of protective circular blows. Therefore, it is important to distinguish clinically between these two kinds of wounds. We report a case where the perpetrator argued he had given a circular blow, unfortunately hitting the victim. The pieces of evidence are discussed. PMID:12877304

  16. How effective is bibliotherapy-based self-help cognitive behavioral therapy with Internet support in clinical settings? Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Högdahl, Louise; Birgegård, Andreas; Björck, Caroline

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy-based guided self-help (CBT-GSH) via the Internet has been shown to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and similar eating disorders (EDs), but it is rarely offered, and little is known about the effects, in clinical settings. The present study investigated the effects of a bibliotherapy-based CBT-GSH with Internet support in a clinical setting. Participants were 48 adult outpatients who were recruited without randomization from a specialized ED clinic, diagnosed with BN or similar eating disorder. Forty-eight patients in an intensive day patient program (DPP) were used as comparison group. The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and the Eating Disorder Inventory 2 measured pre- and post treatment symptoms. Results showed that both groups attained significant improvements in core- as well as related ED symptoms in both instruments. As expected, treatment effects were larger in the more intensive DPP. Nonetheless, bibliotherapy CBT-GSH appears to be a cost-effective treatment that represents a new way to provide more CBT in clinical settings. PMID:23757249

  17. Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers’ Experiences and Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions. PMID:24556792

  18. Validation of an optimized SPM procedure for FDG-PET in dementia diagnosis in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Perani, Daniela; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Cerami, Chiara; Gallivanone, Francesca; Fallanca, Federico; Vanoli, Emilia Giovanna; Panzacchi, Andrea; Nobili, Flavio; Pappatà, Sabina; Marcone, Alessandra; Garibotto, Valentina; Castiglioni, Isabella; Magnani, Giuseppe; Cappa, Stefano F.; Gianolli, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy in FDG-PET imaging highly depends on the operating procedures. In this clinical study on dementia, we compared the diagnostic accuracy at a single-subject level of a) Clinical Scenarios, b) Standard FDG Images and c) Statistical Parametrical (SPM) Maps generated via a new optimized SPM procedure. We evaluated the added value of FDG-PET, either Standard FDG Images or SPM Maps, to Clinical Scenarios. In 88 patients with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's Disease—AD, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration—FTLD, Dementia with Lewy bodies—DLB and Mild Cognitive Impairment—MCI), 9 neuroimaging experts made a forced diagnostic decision on the basis of the evaluation of the three types of information. There was also the possibility of a decision of normality on the FDG-PET images. The clinical diagnosis confirmed at a long-term follow-up was used as the gold standard. SPM Maps showed higher sensitivity and specificity (96% and 84%), and better diagnostic positive (6.8) and negative (0.05) likelihood ratios compared to Clinical Scenarios and Standard FDG Images. SPM Maps increased diagnostic accuracy for differential diagnosis (AD vs. FTD; beta 1.414, p = 0.019). The AUC of the ROC curve was 0.67 for SPM Maps, 0.57 for Clinical Scenarios and 0.50 for Standard FDG Images. In the MCI group, SPM Maps showed the highest predictive prognostic value (mean LOC = 2.46), by identifying either normal brain metabolism (exclusionary role) or hypometabolic patterns typical of different neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25389519

  19. High prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients with schizophrenia: a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Takuro; Suzuki, Yutaro; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Ozeki, Yuji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Minami, Yoshitake; Okamoto, Kurefu; Sagae, Toyoaki; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the prevalence of underweight and overweight/obesity, and laboratory data for nutritional status in Japanese outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A questionnaire conducted in inpatient and outpatient facilities in Japan. Participants The population of adult patients with schizophrenia in Japan (N=23 116). Main outcome measures The prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients and outpatients with schizophrenia. Results We conducted a large-scale investigation of the prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in 520 outpatient facilities and 247 inpatient facilities belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospitals Association between January 2012 and July 2013. There were 7655 outpatients and 15 461 inpatients with schizophrenia. There was a significant difference in the distribution of three body mass index levels between outpatients and inpatients (p<0.001). The proportion of underweight inpatients with schizophrenia was significantly higher than that among outpatients (p<0.001). Age-specific analysis revealed that the proportion of underweight individuals aged ≥40 years was higher in inpatients than in outpatients and in the general Japanese population. The proportion of individuals with hypocholesterolaemia was significantly higher in inpatients with schizophrenia than in outpatients (p<0.001). There was a significant difference in the severity of underweight between outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia; the proportion of severe underweight in inpatients was twofold higher than in outpatients. Conclusions The prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients with schizophrenia was higher than in outpatients and the general population. Therefore, the physical risk of inpatients should be carefully considered in clinical practice. PMID:26656016

  20. The Japanese Education System is a Failure, Say Some Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1997-01-01

    A Japanese editorial in an English-language daily harshly criticized Japanese education's failure to enhance students' spirit of independence; develop critical and artistic thinking skills; and promote social awareness and an international viewpoint. The United States finished fourth out of 60 in the (unpublicized) International Math Olympiad.…

  1. Group-Based Preference Assessment for Children and Adolescents in a Residential Setting: Examining Developmental, Clinical, Gender, and Ethnic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Jennifer L. Resetar; Cook, Clayton R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred…

  2. Patients' Perceptions of Dehumanization of Patients in Dental School Settings: Implications for Clinic Management and Curriculum Planning.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Shah, Raveena; Hamad, Judy; Van Kanegan, Mona; Kupershmidt, Alexandra; Kruthoff, Mariela

    2015-10-01

    Although the importance of empathy, rapport, and anxiety/pain awareness in dentist-patient relations has been well documented, these factors continue to be an issue with patients in many dental school clinics. The aim of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of how patients at an urban, university-affiliated medical center and its dental school's clinic experienced oral health care and to generate ideas for improving the dental school's clinical curriculum and management of the clinic. Although patient satisfaction surveys are common, in-depth patient narratives are an underutilized resource for improving dental education. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 uninsured or underinsured dental patients at these sites, and the results were analyzed using content analysis. Major phenomena that participants discussed were the importance of empathy and good rapport with their oral health providers and provider awareness of dental pain and anxiety. Many patients also discussed feeling dehumanized during dental visits. Based on their positive and negative experiences, the participants made suggestions for how oral health professionals can successfully engage patients in treatment. PMID:26427779

  3. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas (intentionality,…

  4. Subgroup analysis of Japanese patients in a phase 3 study of lenvatinib in radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Naomi; Schlumberger, Martin; Muro, Kei; Ando, Yuichi; Takahashi, Shunji; Kawai, Yasukazu; Wirth, Lori; Robinson, Bruce; Sherman, Steven; Suzuki, Takuya; Fujino, Katsuki; Gupta, Anubha; Hayato, Seiichi; Tahara, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Lenvatinib significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC) in the phase 3 Study of (E7080) Lenvatinib in Differentiated Cancer of the Thyroid (SELECT) trial. This subanalysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of lenvatinib in Japanese patients who participated in SELECT. Outcomes for Japanese patients (lenvatinib, n = 30; placebo, n = 10) were assessed in relationship to the SELECT population (lenvatinib, n = 261; placebo, n = 131). The primary endpoint was PFS; secondary endpoints included overall survival, overall response rate, and safety. Lenvatinib PFS benefit was shown in Japanese patients (median PFS: lenvatinib, 16.5 months; placebo, 3.7 months), although significance was not reached, presumably due to sample size (hazard ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-1.57; P = 0.067). Overall response rates were 63.3% and 0% for lenvatinib and placebo, respectively. No significant difference was found in overall survival. The lenvatinib safety profile was similar between the Japanese and overall SELECT population, except for higher incidences of hypertension (any grade: Japanese, 87%; overall, 68%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 80%; overall, 42%), palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome (any grade: Japanese, 70%; overall, 32%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 3%; overall, 3%), and proteinuria (any grade: Japanese, 63%; overall, 31%; grade ≥3: Japanese, 20%; overall, 10%). Japanese patients had more dose reductions (Japanese, 90%; overall, 67.8%), but fewer discontinuations due to adverse events (Japanese, 3.3%; overall, 14.2%). There was no difference in lenvatinib exposure between the Japanese and overall SELECT populations after adjusting for body weight. In Japanese patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer, lenvatinib showed similar clinical outcomes to the overall SELECT population. Some differences in adverse event frequencies and dose

  5. Immigrant Children from Latin America at Japanese Schools: Homogeneity, Ethnicity, Gender and Language in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Vazquez, Genaro

    2009-01-01

    An ethnographic study conducted between 2003 and 2006 followed three children from Latin America attending three different public Japanese primary schools. The investigation concerned a Japanese-language tutoring programme for foreign children, which was evaluated by participant observation and a set of in-depth interviews with officials, school…

  6. Chunk Learning and the Development of Spoken Discourse in a Japanese as a Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the development of spoken discourse among L2 learners of Japanese who received extensive practice on grammatical chunks. Participants in this study were 22 college students enrolled in an elementary Japanese course. They received instruction on a set of grammatical chunks in class through communicative drills and the…

  7. International Studies of Broadcasting; With Special Reference to the Japanese Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eguchi, H., Ed.; Ichinohe, H., Ed.

    A set of 10 articles which first appeared in the Japanese periodical "Studies in Broadcasting" comprises this collection. Of the four essays dealing with Japan, one covers the historical changes in its broadcasting policies, treats the legal character of the Japanese public broadcasting company (Nippon Hoso Kyokai), and also reports on the social…

  8. Suicide Risk Protocols: Addressing the Needs of High Risk Youths Identified through Suicide Prevention Efforts and in Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbron, Nicole; Goldston, David; Walrath, Christine; Rodi, Michael; McKeon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several agencies have emphasized the importance of establishing clear protocols or procedures to address the needs of youths who are identified as suicidal through suicide prevention programs or in emergency department settings. What constitutes optimal guidelines for developing and implementing such protocols, however, is unclear. At the request…

  9. ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer: Do the Categories Discriminate Among Clinically Relevant Subgroups of Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschiesner, Uta; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Cieza, Alarcos

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary assessment of functioning in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) according to the "ICF Core Set for Head and Neck Cancer" (ICF-HNC) was developed in an international and multi-disciplinary approach. The ICF-HNC is an application of the ICF that was adopted by the World Health Organization. The objective of this study was…

  10. Implementation of a Contingency Management-Based Intervention in a Community Supervision Setting: Clinical Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotman, Adria J.; Taxman, Faye S.

    2011-01-01

    A cognitive-behaviorally based substance abuse treatment program was implemented within a community supervision setting. This program included a goals group that used a contingency management component and included the probation agent as a part of the treatment. In this article, the authors describe the contingency management component of the…

  11. Introducing an online community into a clinical education setting: a pilot study of student and staff engagement and outcomes using blended learning

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are growing reasons to use both information and communication functions of learning technologies as part of clinical education, but the literature offers few accounts of such implementations or evaluations of their impact. This paper details the process of implementing a blend of online and face-to-face learning and teaching in a clinical education setting and it reports on the educational impact of this innovation. Methods This study designed an online community to complement a series of on-site workshops and monitored its use over a semester. Quantitative and qualitative data recording 43 final-year medical students' and 13 clinical educators' experiences with this blended approach to learning and teaching were analysed using access, adoption and quality criteria as measures of impact. Results The introduction of the online community produced high student ratings of the quality of learning and teaching and it produced student academic results that were equivalent to those from face-to-face-only learning and teaching. Staff had mixed views about using blended learning. Conclusions Projects such as this take skilled effort and time. Strong incentives are required to encourage clinical staff and students to use a new mode of communication. A more synchronous or multi-channel communication feedback system might stimulate increased adoption. Cultural change in clinical teaching is also required before clinical education can benefit more widely from initiatives such as this. PMID:20100354

  12. The Body as a Site of Gender-Related Distress: Ethical Considerations for Gender Variant Youth in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Roen, Katrina

    2016-03-01

    The present article maps out understandings about embodied distress among gender-nonconforming youth. Feminist bioethics and queer-inflected clinical perspectives are used to inform thinking about ethical, nonpathologizing health care in the case of gender-related distress. Specific attention is directed at self-harming among gender variant and trans youth. This is contextualized in relation to the role that self-harm plays for some LGBT youth, where it may be seen as a rite of passage or as reasonable and inevitable way of coping. The particular complexities of self-harm among trans youth seeking clinical intervention are examined. Queer bioethics is proposed as potentially facilitating productive uncertainty with regard to the diverse imagined futures of gender variant and trans youth. PMID:26644176

  13. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. PMID:27168257

  14. The use of human amnion/chorion membrane in the clinical setting for lower extremity repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Zelen, Charles M; Snyder, Robert J; Serena, Thomas E; Li, William W

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful healing represents a significant medical dilemma for both patients and clinicians and create a financial burden on the health care system. Despite the efforts of physicians, many injuries fail to heal with standard care alone. For decades human amniotic membrane composed of both amnion and chorion has shown remarkable therapeutic potential, but only recent preservation methods have allowed its widespread use. Variations in configurations and the ability to micronize the material allow clinical uses that were previously not possible. Although there are limited data available regarding most amniotic membrane-based products, there is substantial preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the rationale and effectiveness of dHACM allograft as a treatment modality. The rapidly growing body of evidence suggests that the properties inherent in dHACM promote tissue regeneration and healing, recruiting patients' own stem cells into the wounded area. Randomized controlled trials evaluating dHACM now include more than 200 patients collectively and the results consistently show improved healing. Use of dHACM has been shown to be more clinically effective and cost-effective than other frequently used advanced wound care products. This cost-effectiveness results from dHACM showing higher healing rates and more rapid healing than other advanced wound care products. Cost-effectiveness is also enhanced through the availability of grafts of multiple sizes, which reduces wastage, and through ease of handling and storage for clinical use. Ongoing and future studies will further define and establish the value of amniotic membrane for chronic tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:25440424

  15. The clinical features of burns resulting from two aerial devices set off in a public fireworks display: 149 case reports.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaosheng; Sun, Dongjie; Zhong, Xiaochun; Liu, Maolin; Ni, Youdi

    2014-12-01

    We report the clinical features of 149 cases with aerial devices burns in a public fireworks display. The characteristic features included sudden onset, masses of terrified burn victims, small and deep wounds, mild disease conditions, and favorable prognosis. Unlike in home or illegal fireworks displays, the body areas most often involved were the extremity, chest, abdomen, and back, and most of the victims were adults in these public fireworks displays. PMID:24957358

  16. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts. PMID:24712504

  17. Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer in a clinical setting: essential elements of a screening program.

    PubMed

    McKee, Brady J; McKee, Andrea B; Kitts, Andrea Borondy; Regis, Shawn M; Wald, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review clinical computed tomography (CT) lung screening program elements essential to safely and effectively manage the millions of Americans at high risk for lung cancer expected to enroll in lung cancer screening programs over the next 3 to 5 years. To optimize the potential net benefit of CT lung screening and facilitate medical audits benchmarked to national quality standards, radiologists should interpret these examinations using a validated structured reporting system such as Lung-RADS. Patient and physician educational outreach should be enacted to support an informed and shared decision-making process without creating barriers to screening access. Programs must integrate smoking cessation interventions to maximize the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of screening. At an institutional level, budgets should account for the necessary expense of hiring and/or training qualified support staff and equipping them with information technology resources adequate to enroll and track patients accurately over decades of future screening evaluation. At a national level, planning should begin on ways to accommodate the upcoming increased demand for physician services in fields critical to the success of CT lung screening such as diagnostic radiology and thoracic surgery. Institutions with programs that follow these specifications will be well equipped to meet the significant oncoming demand for CT lung screening services and bestow clinical benefits on their patients equal to or beyond what was observed in the National Lung Screening Trial. PMID:25658476

  18. Evaluating the health of compromised tissues using a near-infrared spectroscopic imaging system in clinical settings: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Lorenzo; Sowa, Michael G.; Hewko, Mark D.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Payette, Jeri R.; Hastings, Michelle; Posthumus, Trevor B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2003-07-01

    The present and accepted standard for determining the status of tissue relies on visual inspection of the tissue. Based on the surface appearance of the tissue, medical personnel will make an assessment of the tissue and proceed to a course of action or treatment. Visual inspection of tissue is central to many areas of clinical medicine, and remains a cornerstone of dermatology, reconstructive plastic surgery, and in the management of chronic wounds, and burn injuries. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging holds the promise of being able to monitor the dynamics of tissue physiology in real-time and detect pathology in living tissue. The continuous measurement of metabolic, physiological, or structural changes in tissue is of primary concern in many clinical and biomedical domains. A near infrared hyperspectral imaging system was constructed for the assessment of burn injuries and skin flaps or skin grafts. This device merged basic science with engineering and integrated manufacturing to develop a device suitable to detect ischemic tissue. This device has the potential of providing measures of tissue physiology, oxygen delivery and tissue hydration during patient screening, in the operating room or during therapy and post-operative/treatment monitoring. Results from a pre-clinical burn injury study will be presented.

  19. Issei: Japanese Immigrants in Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Yukiko

    Coming to Hawaii before July 1, 1924, when the Japanese Exclusion Act became effective, the experiences of the Issei or first generation are described. Divided into four parts, this book examines the experiences of Japanese immigrants in Hawaii from 1885 through 1970. Part 1, "The Formation and Stabilization of the Issei Community," explores the…

  20. Asian Pacific Perspectives: Japanese Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA.

    These instructional materials on Japanese Americans for elementary students were developed through the K.E.Y.S. project (Knowledge of English Yields Success). Information is included on early immigrants, their historical and cultural background, and current problems of Japanese Americans. Resource guides describe the purpose of the unit, how to…

  1. A GLOSSARY OF JAPANESE NEOLOGISMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAILEY, DON C.

    THIS GLOSSARY COMPRISES A LIST OF USEFUL NEW WORDS AND PHRASES IN CURRENT USE NOT FOUND IN JAPANESE-ENGLISH DICTIONARIES, SPECIFICALLY KENKYUSHA'S NEW JAPANESE-ENGLISH DICTIONARY, 1954 EDITION, WHICH HAS SERVED AS THE MODEL IN MOST RESPECTS FOR THE FORMAT AND STYLE. ROMANIZATION OF THE ORTHOGRAPHY FOLLOWS A MODIFIED HEPBURN SYSTEM AND THE JAPANESE…

  2. Counseling Japanese Men on Fathering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seto, Atsuko; Becker, Kent W.; Akutsu, Motoko

    2006-01-01

    The authors review an article (J. Yamamoto & F. Tagami, 2004) published in the "Japanese Journal of Counseling Science" that described changes in contemporary Japanese family structures and illustrated a therapy process with a father to enhance the father-son relationship. Implications for the counseling profession in working with men on…

  3. International guidelines for the in vivo assessment of skin properties in non-clinical settings: Part 2. transepidermal water loss and skin hydration

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Johan; Stefaniak, Aleksandr; Eloff, Fritz; John, Swen; Agner, Tove; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Nixon, Rosemary; Steiner, Markus; Franken, Anja; Kudla, Irena; Holness, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Background There is an emerging perspective that it is not sufficient to just assess skin exposure to physical and chemical stressors in workplaces, but that it is also important to assess the condition, i.e. skin barrier function of the exposed skin at the time of exposure. The workplace environment, representing a non-clinical environment, can be highly variable and difficult to control, thereby presenting unique measurement challenges not typically encountered in clinical settings. Methods An expert working group convened a workshop as part of the 5th International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Exposure of Skin to Chemicals (OEESC) to develop basic guidelines and best practices (based on existing clinical guidelines, published data, and own experiences) for the in vivo measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin hydration in non-clinical settings with specific reference to the workplace as a worst-case scenario. Results Key elements of these guidelines are: (i) to minimize or recognize, to the extent feasible, the influences of relevant endogenous-, exogenous-, environmental- and measurement/instrumentation-related factors; (ii) to measure TEWL with a closed-chamber type instrument; (iii) report results as a difference or percent change (rather than absolute values); and (iv) accurately report any notable deviations from this guidelines. Conclusion It is anticipated that these guidelines will promote consistent data reporting, which will facilitate inter-comparison of study results. PMID:23331328

  4. Clinical Survey of Dengue Virus Circulation in the Republic of Djibouti between 2011 and 2014 Identifies Serotype 3 Epidemic and Recommends Clinical Diagnosis Guidelines for Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Le Gonidec, Erwan; Maquart, Marianne; Duron, Sandrine; Savini, Hélène; Cazajous, Geraldine; Vidal, Pierre-Olivier; Chenilleau, Marie-Caroline; Roseau, Jean-Baptiste; Benois, Alain; Dehan, Céline; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Védy, Serge

    2016-06-01

    Dengue virus is endemic globally, throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions. While the number of epidemics due to the four DENV serotypes is pronounced in East Africa, the total number of cases reported in Africa (16 million infections) remained at low levels compared to Asia (70 million infections). The French Armed forces Health Service provides epidemiological surveillance support in the Republic of Djibouti through the Bouffard Military hospital. Between 2011 and 2014, clinical and biological data of suspected dengue syndromes were collected at the Bouffard Military hospital and analyzed to improve Dengue clinical diagnosis and evaluate its circulation in East Africa. Examining samples from patients that presented one or more Dengue-like symptoms the study evidenced 128 Dengue cases among 354 suspected cases (36.2% of the non-malarial Dengue-like syndromes). It also demonstrated the circulation of serotypes 1 and 2 and reports the first epidemic of serotype 3 infections in Djibouti which was found in all of the hospitalized patients in this study. Based on these results we have determined that screening for Malaria and the presence of the arthralgia, gastro-intestinal symptoms and lymphopenia < 1,000cell/ mm3 allows for negative predictive value and specificity of diagnosis in isolated areas superior to 80% up to day 6. This study also provides evidence for an epidemic of Dengue virus serotype 3 previously not detected in Djibouti. PMID:27322644

  5. Clinical Survey of Dengue Virus Circulation in the Republic of Djibouti between 2011 and 2014 Identifies Serotype 3 Epidemic and Recommends Clinical Diagnosis Guidelines for Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Sandrine; Savini, Hélène; Cazajous, Geraldine; Vidal, Pierre-Olivier; Chenilleau, Marie-Caroline; Roseau, Jean-Baptiste; Benois, Alain; Dehan, Céline; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Védy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus is endemic globally, throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions. While the number of epidemics due to the four DENV serotypes is pronounced in East Africa, the total number of cases reported in Africa (16 million infections) remained at low levels compared to Asia (70 million infections). The French Armed forces Health Service provides epidemiological surveillance support in the Republic of Djibouti through the Bouffard Military hospital. Between 2011 and 2014, clinical and biological data of suspected dengue syndromes were collected at the Bouffard Military hospital and analyzed to improve Dengue clinical diagnosis and evaluate its circulation in East Africa. Examining samples from patients that presented one or more Dengue-like symptoms the study evidenced 128 Dengue cases among 354 suspected cases (36.2% of the non-malarial Dengue-like syndromes). It also demonstrated the circulation of serotypes 1 and 2 and reports the first epidemic of serotype 3 infections in Djibouti which was found in all of the hospitalized patients in this study. Based on these results we have determined that screening for Malaria and the presence of the arthralgia, gastro-intestinal symptoms and lymphopenia < 1,000cell/ mm3 allows for negative predictive value and specificity of diagnosis in isolated areas superior to 80% up to day 6. This study also provides evidence for an epidemic of Dengue virus serotype 3 previously not detected in Djibouti. PMID:27322644

  6. Adaptive Noise Suppression of Pediatric Lung Auscultations With Real Applications to Noisy Clinical Settings in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Emmanouilidou, Dimitra; McCollum, Eric D.; Park, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Goal Chest auscultation constitutes a portable low-cost tool widely used for respiratory disease detection. Though it offers a powerful means of pulmonary examination, it remains riddled with a number of issues that limit its diagnostic capability. Particularly, patient agitation (especially in children), background chatter, and other environmental noises often contaminate the auscultation, hence affecting the clarity of the lung sound itself. This paper proposes an automated multiband denoising scheme for improving the quality of auscultation signals against heavy background contaminations. Methods The algorithm works on a simple two-microphone setup, dynamically adapts to the background noise and suppresses contaminations while successfully preserving the lung sound content. The proposed scheme is refined to offset maximal noise suppression against maintaining the integrity of the lung signal, particularly its unknown adventitious components that provide the most informative diagnostic value during lung pathology. Results The algorithm is applied to digital recordings obtained in the field in a busy clinic in West Africa and evaluated using objective signal fidelity measures and perceptual listening tests performed by a panel of licensed physicians. A strong preference of the enhanced sounds is revealed. Significance The strengths and benefits of the proposed method lie in the simple automated setup and its adaptive nature, both fundamental conditions for everyday clinical applicability. It can be simply extended to a real-time implementation, and integrated with lung sound acquisition protocols. PMID:25879837

  7. Predicting violent behavior in clinical settings: a case-control study of a mental health inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kristen E; Benden, Mark E; Shipp, Eva M; Pickens, Adam W; Wendel, Monica L; Pronovost, Peter J; Watts, B Vince

    2016-01-01

    In order to assist staff in recognizing patients prone to violence and guide their clinical decision-making, this study summarizes mental health inpatient unit incidents over a one-year period. Results describe demographic and clinical information for patients, and evaluate risk assessment tools currently used to predict risk. A retrospective analysis included data on patients involved in incidents and frequency matched controls. There were a total of 44 incidents, caused by 38 unique patients. A constructed model to estimate patient characteristics and risk of violent incidents included involuntary admittance (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.05-6.11, p = 0.039), more than one admission at the facility (OR 4.18, 95% CI 1.71-10.22, p = 0.002) and Global Subjective Irritability on day one (OR 4.24, 95% CI 1.77-10.16, p = 0.001). Violent incidents on the mental inpatient unit threaten safety and disrupt the therapeutic environment. The findings may be useful in aiding clinicians to quickly recognize patients that are prone to violence. PMID:26978965

  8. Implementation of a Contingency Management-Based Intervention in a Community Supervision Setting: Clinical Issues and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    TROTMAN, ADRIA J.; TAXMAN, FAYE S.

    2011-01-01

    A cognitive-behaviorally based substance abuse treatment program was implemented within a Community Supervision setting. This program included a goals group that included a contingency management component and included the probation agent as a part of treatment. This paper describes the contingency management component of the treatment and discusses, in detail, issues that arose throughout the course of the study. Possible causes and solutions to the issues are discussed from a contingency management perspective that can result in improved reinforcements to achieve better probationer outcomes. PMID:22235164

  9. Physical therapy for young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders-clinical frameworks model in an israeli setting.

    PubMed

    Atun-Einy, Osnat; Lotan, Meir; Harel, Yael; Shavit, Efrat; Burstein, Shimshon; Kempner, Gali

    2013-01-01

    Recent research findings suggest that many children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) demonstrate delayed and atypical motor achievements. It has now become clear that a more holistic, integrative and multi-disciplinary intervention is required to effectively address the motor-related impairments of this population. It is also crucial to ensure that this group of clients has access to early physical therapy (PT) interventions. Despite accumulating research on physical interventions, little is known about intervention model for implementation at a national level. This report introduces a model that uniquely illustrates implementation of PT services for a large number of children with ASD. The model has been operating for the past 2 years in one country (Israel), and includes an optional implementation model of PT practice settings for young children diagnosed with ASD. The Israeli setting offers a unique opportunity for implementing PT services for a multitude of children with ASD on a regular basis as an accepted/needed service. The initial outcomes of the present implementation suggest that an intensive PT intervention program might enhance therapeutic outcomes for this population, and contribute to our knowledge on the potential of PT for individuals with ASD. PMID:24400265

  10. The Japanese society of alcohol-related problems.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Katsuya; Higuchi, Susumu

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents an outline of the Japanese Society of Alcohol-Related Problems. The precursor of the Society was the Japan Alcoholism Treatment Research Group, inaugurated in 1979, by merging two local research groups in the Tokyo and Osaka areas, both of which were exclusive gatherings of psychiatrists associated with alcoholism clinics. The Research Group developed into the Society in 1992, as the number of participants including those from other medical professions increased yearly, and the subjects of the group widened to include all addictive behaviours. In reflecting the process of establishment, it is unique in many aspects as a scientific society. The Society is not a science-orientated body for presentation of new research findings. The main programme of the annual meeting is therefore a set of symposia in which members participate and discuss clinical and/or social problems arising from dependency on alcohol or drugs. Perhaps because of its content, the annual meeting is attended each year by the largest number of participants among all the societies in Japan concerned with alcohol and drugs. For the next several years, the Society's activities will be directed at (1) establishment of guidelines for early identification of and intervention in alcohol-related problems; (2) expansion of its membership to include those in related fields of medicine and non-medical professions; (3) improvement of the system of journal publication; and (4) creation of a system for timely adequate response to social problems associated with drugs and alcohol. PMID:15049741

  11. Statin-Induced Cardioprotection Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: Potential Drug-Drug Interactions. Lesson to be Learnt by Translating Results from Animal Models to the Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, Gilad D; Birnbaum, Itamar; Ye, Yumei; Birnbaum, Yochai

    2015-10-01

    Numerous interventions have been shown to limit myocardial infarct size in animal models; however, most of these interventions have failed to have a significant effect in clinical trials. One potential explanation for the lack of efficacy in the clinical setting is that in bench models, a single intervention is studied without the background of other interventions or modalities. This is in contrast to the clinical setting in which new medications are added to the "standard of care" treatment that by now includes a growing number of medications. Drug-drug interaction may lead to alteration, dampening, augmenting or masking the effects of the intended intervention. We use the well described model of statin-induced myocardial protection to demonstrate potential interactions with agents which are commonly concomitantly used in patients with stable coronary artery disease and/or acute coronary syndromes. These interactions could potentially explain the reduced efficacy of statins in the clinical trials compared to the animal models. In particular, caffeine and aspirin could attenuate the infarct size limiting effects of statins; morphine could delay the onset of protection or mask the protective effect in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction, whereas other anti-platelet agents (dipyridamole, cilostazol and ticagrelor) may augment (or mask) the effect due to their favorable effects on adenosine cell reuptake and intracellular cAMP levels. We recommend that after characterizing the effects of new modalities in single intervention bench research, studies should be repeated in the background of standard-of-care medications to assure that the magnitude of the effect is not altered before proceeding with clinical trials. PMID:26303765

  12. Distribution of guidance models for cardiac resynchronization therapy in the setting of multi-center clinical trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajchl, Martin; Abhari, Kamyar; Stirrat, John; Ukwatta, Eranga; Cantor, Diego; Li, Feng P.; Peters, Terry M.; White, James A.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-center trials provide the unique ability to investigate novel techniques across a range of geographical sites with sufficient statistical power, the inclusion of multiple operators determining feasibility under a wider array of clinical environments and work-flows. For this purpose, we introduce a new means of distributing pre-procedural cardiac models for image-guided interventions across a large scale multi-center trial. In this method, a single core facility is responsible for image processing, employing a novel web-based interface for model visualization and distribution. The requirements for such an interface, being WebGL-based, are minimal and well within the realms of accessibility for participating centers. We then demonstrate the accuracy of our approach using a single-center pacemaker lead implantation trial with generic planning models.

  13. [Japanese guidelines for the management of herpes simplex encephalitis; comparison with those from the International Management Herpes Forum].

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is still recognized as a severe sporadic encephalitis, although the mortality and morbidity rates have been decreased to 10% and 30%, respectively. This disease is diagnosed using clinical symptoms, CSF, EEG, CT, MRI, and virologic tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA). Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for HSE. However, the early symptoms of this disease are various, and the laboratory diagnostic criteria are unclear to the non-specialist. In 2005, Japanese guidelines for the management of HSE have been issued via two sets of Workshops at the Japanese Neuroinfectious Disease Congress. The diagnostic and therapeutic criteria were discussed in comparison with those from the International Management Herpes Forum (IMHF) in 2004. For a definitive diagnosis, CSF PCR for herpes simplex virus (HSV) is recommended, and the detection rate has been reported to be 60 to 80% within the 7th day of the illness. In the IMHF, the PCR method has also been the primary method for early diagnosis and for monitoring the therapy. Further, quantitative real-time PCR has become available for measuring the effectiveness of aciclovir therapy. To measure HSV antibody levels, complement antibody (CF), neutralizing antibody (NT), or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or EIA) are available. Significant elevation of EIA IgG or intrathecal HSV antibody production should be shown, although these antibody responses often appear two weeks after the onset of HSE. Regarding anti-herpesvirus drugs, in both Japanese and IMHF guidelines aciclovir is consistent with the first choice, and it is recommended that its administration would be started as soon as HSE is suspected on the basis of clinical pictures, CT * MRI, EEG, or CSF findings. However, antiviral therapy may be discontinued if a negative CSF HSV PCR is obtained at > 72 hours after onset. A recent Japanese study shows the efficacy of a combination

  14. Understanding the digital divide in the clinical setting: the technology knowledge gap experienced by US safety net patients during teleretinal screening.

    PubMed

    George, Sheba; Moran, Erin; Fish, Allison; Ogunyemi, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Differential access to everyday technology and healthcare amongst safety net patients is associated with low technological and health literacies, respectively. These low rates of literacy produce a complex patient "knowledge gap" that influences the effectiveness of telehealth technologies. To understand this "knowledge gap", six focus groups (2 African-American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screenings in U.S. urban safety-net settings. Findings indicate that patients' "knowledge gap" is primarily produced at three points: (1) when patients' preexisting personal barriers to care became exacerbated in the clinical setting; (2) through encounters with technology during screening; and (3) in doctor-patient follow-up. This "knowledge gap" can produce confusion and fear, potentially affecting patients' confidence in quality of care and limiting their disease management ability. In rethinking the digital divide to include the consequences of this knowledge gap faced by patients in the clinical setting, we suggest that patient education focus on both their disease and specific telehealth technologies deployed in care delivery. PMID:23920720

  15. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Japanese familial Alzheimer's disease and FTDP-17.

    PubMed

    Kasuga, Kensaku; Kikuchi, Masataka; Tokutake, Takayoshi; Nakaya, Akihiro; Tezuka, Toshiyuki; Tsukie, Tamao; Hara, Norikazu; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Ikeuchi, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 as the genetic causes of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) have been found in various ethnic populations. A substantial number of FAD pedigrees with mutations have been reported in the Japanese population; however, it remains unclear whether the genetic and clinical features of FAD in the Japanese population differ from those in other populations. To address this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of Japanese FAD and frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) by literature search. Using this analysis, we identified 39 different PSEN1 mutations in 140 patients, 5 APP mutations in 35 patients and 16 MAPT mutations in 84 patients. There was no PSEN2 mutation among Japanese patients. The age at onset in Japanese FAD patients with PSEN1 mutations was significantly younger than that in patients with APP mutations. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with MAPT mutations showed a shorter survival than patients with PSEN1 or APP mutations. Patients with mutations in different genes exhibit characteristic clinical presentations, suggesting that mutations in causative genes may modify the clinical presentations. By collecting and cataloging genetic and clinical information on Japanese FAD and FTDP-17, we developed an original database designated as Japanese Familial Alzheimer's Disease Database, which is accessible at http://alzdb.bri.niigata-u.ac.jp/. PMID:25694106

  16. Patient-Provider Communications in Outpatient Clinic Settings: A Clinic-Based Evaluation of Mobile Device and Multimedia Mediated Communications for Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Benjamin; San Nicolas-Rocca, Tonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have provided evidence of the importance of quality provider-patient communications and have suggested improvements to patient understanding by using video-based instruction. Objective The objective of this study was to understand how mobile information technology assisted video and three-dimensional (3D) image instruction, provided by a health care worker, influences two categories of outcome: (1) patient understanding of information about their condition and detailed medical discharge instructions; and (2) patient perceptions and attitudes toward their health care providers, which included physicians, nurses, and staff. We hypothesize that video and 3D image instruction, provided on a mobile, tablet hardware platform, will improve patient understanding about the diagnostic testing, diagnoses, procedures, medications, and health topics provided to them. We also propose that use of the tablet/video combination will result in improved attitudinal evaluation by patients of their providers and the treatment plan. Methods This study evaluated a hospital clinic-based trial (patient N=284) of video and 3D image instruction, provided on a mobile, tablet hardware platform, and its potential to improve patient understanding about the diagnostic testing, diagnoses, procedures, medications, and health topics provided to them. Results Results showed strong evidence that the system was perceived as helpful for improving patient understanding, and that it improved communication between physicians and patients (P<.001). The advanced age of some patients had no effect on their perceptions of the tablet-based mediation. Physician comments provided useful insights on effective use of such systems in the future. Implications for further development and future research are discussed. Conclusions This study added to the body of evidence that computer-assisted video instructional systems for patients can improve patient understanding of medical instructions from

  17. Japanese viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tiroumourougane, S; Raghava, P; Srinivasan, S

    2002-01-01

    One of the leading causes of acute encephalopathy in children in the tropics is Japanese encephalitis (JE). Transmitted by the culex mosquito, this neurotropic virus predominately affects the thalamus, anterior horns of the spinal cord, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. It mainly affects children <15 years and is mostly asymptomatic. The occasional symptomatic child typically presents with a neurological syndrome characterised by altered sensorium, seizures, and features of intracranial hypertension. Aetiological diagnosis is based on virus isolation or demonstration of virus specific antigen or antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid/blood. Though no antiviral drug is available against JE, effective supportive management can improve the outcome. Control of JE involves efficient vector control and appropriate use of vaccines. PMID:11930023

  18. Japanese Experiment Module (JEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) pressure module is removed from its shipping crate and moved across the floor of the Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to a work stand. A research laboratory, the pressurized module is the first element of the JEM, named 'Kibo' (Hope) to arrive at KSC. Japan's primary contribution to the International Space Station, the module will enhance unique research capabilities of the orbiting complex by providing an additional environment in which astronauts will conduct experiments. The JEM also includes an exposed facility or platform for space environment experiments, a robotic manipulator system, and two logistics modules. The various JEM components will be assembled in space over the course of three Shuttle missions.

  19. Performance and Logistical Challenges of Alternative HIV-1 Virological Monitoring Options in a Clinical Setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Bronze, Michelle; Wellington, Maureen; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Manting, Corry; Steegen, Kim; Luethy, Rudi; Rinke de Wit, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA) on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24). The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0, served as the gold standard. Using a cutoff of 5,000 copies/mL, the plasma VFA had a sensitivity of 94.5% and specificity of 92.7% and was largely superior to the VFA on DBS (sensitivity = 61.9%; specificity = 99.0%) or to the p24 (sensitivity = 54.3%; specificity = 82.3%) when tested on 302 HIV treated and untreated patients. However, among the 202 long-term ART-exposed patients, the sensitivity of the VFA decreased to 72.7% and to 35.7% using a threshold of 5,000 and 1,000 RNA copies/mL, respectively. We show that the VFA (either on plasma or on DBS) and the p24 are not reliable to monitor long-term treated, HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, achieving acceptable assay sensitivity using DBS proved technically difficult in a less-experienced laboratory. Importantly, the high level of virological suppression (93%) indicated that quality care focused on treatment adherence limits virological failure even when PCR-based viral load monitoring is not available. PMID:25025031

  20. Clinical Assessment of Self-Reported Acute Flaccid Paralysis in a Population-Based Setting in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Arvelo, Wences; Padilla, Norma; Pringle, Kimberly; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Farnon, Eileen; Schonberger, Lawrence B.; Dueger, Erica

    2010-01-01

    Historically, poliovirus infection has been an important cause of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) worldwide; however, successful elimination of wild-type poliovirus in much of the world has highlighted the importance of other causes of AFP. Despite the evolving etiology, AFP surveillance in most developing countries still focuses on poliovirus detection and fails to detect many AFP cases, particularly among adults. We assessed 41 subjects self-reporting symptoms suggestive of AFP during a population-based health survey in the Department of Santa Rosa, Guatemala. Thirty-five (85%) of the suspected cases were not hospitalized. Most subjects (37) did not have features consistent with AFP or had other diagnoses explaining weakness. We identified two adults who had not received medical attention for a clinical illness consistent with Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most important cause of non-poliovirus AFP. Usual surveillance methods for AFP, particularly in developing countries, may underestimate the true burden of non-poliovirus AFP. PMID:20348524