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Sample records for japanese encephalitis vaccines

  1. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a significant human health concern in Asia, Indonesia and parts of Australia with more than 3 billion people potentially at risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agent of JE. Given the risk to human health and the theoretical potential for JEV use as a bioweapon, the development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent JEV infection is vital for preserving human health. The development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. These vaccines have been shown to induce a protective immune response and to be very effective. Mouse brain-derived vaccines were still in use until May 2011 when the last lots of the BIKEN® JE-VAX® expired. Development of modern JE vaccines utilizes cell culture-derived viruses and improvements in manufacturing processes as well as removal of potential allergens or toxins have significantly improved vaccine safety. China has developed a live-attenuated vaccine that has proven to induce protective immunity following a single inoculation. In addition, a chimeric vaccine virus incorporating the prM and E structural proteins derived from the live-attenuated JE vaccine into the live-attenuated yellow fever 17D vaccine virus backbone is currently in clinical trials. In this article, we provide a summary of JE vaccine development and on-going clinical trials. We also discuss the potential risk of JEV as a bioweapon with a focus on virus sustainability if used as a weapon. PMID:23125946

  2. Japanese encephalitis: the virus and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus. JEV is prevalent in much of Asia and the Western Pacific, with over 4 billion people living at risk of infection. In the absence of antiviral intervention, vaccination is the only strategy to develop long-term sustainable protection against JEV infection. Over the past half-century, a mouse brain-derived inactivated vaccine has been used internationally for active immunization. To date, however, JEV is still a clinically important, emerging, and re-emerging human pathogen of global significance. In recent years, production of the mouse brain-derived vaccine has been discontinued, but 3 new cell culture-derived vaccines are available in various parts of the world. Here we review current aspects of JEV biology, summarize the 4 types of JEV vaccine, and discuss the potential of an infectious JEV cDNA technology for future vaccine development. PMID:24161909

  3. Travel-acquired Japanese encephalitis and vaccination considerations.

    PubMed

    Pavli, Androula; Maltezou, Helena C

    2015-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a serious arboviral disease caused by a virus of the genus Flavivirus. Japanese encephalitis is the most common vaccine-preventable virus causing encephalitis in Asia, affecting more than 50,000 persons and leading to 15,000 fatalities per year in endemic countries. For most travelers to Asia, the risk of Japanese encephalitis infection is extremely low and depends on destination, duration of travel, season, and activities. This article reviews travel-acquired Japanese encephalitis with a focus on epidemiology and prevention in the light of the newly available options for active immunization against Japanese encephalitis which have become available, and of the increasing popularity of travels to Japanese encephalitis endemic countries. PMID:26409731

  4. Japanese encephalitis and vaccines: past and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus is the main cause of encephalitis in Asia. The vectors are mosquitoes. Every year 30,000 to 50,000 cases and 10,000 deaths from Japanese encephalitis are reported, and estimates go up to 100,000 cases. No effective antiviral therapy exists to treat this flavivirus infection. For prophylaxis vaccines are available. In Asia numerous vaccines are used regionally. The production of the only vaccine that was internationally licensed, JE-VAX, was ceased in 2005. Therefore a shortage of Japanese encephalitis vaccines might occur before new generation vaccines based on cell cultures will be available. An inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine based on the Beijing-1 strain is developed in Japan by Biken and Kaketsuken. Another promising vaccine candidate is the inactivated whole-virus vaccine IC-51 (Strain SA14-14-2) by the Austrian company Intercell. The third interesting vaccine candidate being in the late stages of clinical trials is the genetically engineered, chimeric and live-attenuated vaccine ChimeriVaxtrade mark-JE by the UK/USA-based company Acambis. The new vaccines in the pipeline show promising results and market licensures are expected in the near future. Showing excellent tolerability, these vaccines will not only be used in the population living in endemic areas where the risk of infection is extremely high, but also for travellers and military personnel. PMID:19066766

  5. Japanese Encephalitis Vaccines: WHO position paper, February 2015--Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2016-01-12

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations on the use of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines excerpted from the WHO position paper on Japanese Encephalitis vaccines recently published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1]. This updated position paper on JE vaccines replaces the 2006 position paper on this subject [2]; it focuses on new information concerning the availability, safety, immunogenicity and effectiveness of JE vaccines and the duration of protection they confer. Recent data on global prevalence and burden of disease caused by JE and cost-effectiveness considerations regarding JE vaccination are also summarized. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references including references to grading tables that assess the quality of the scientific evidence. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its October 2014 meeting. Evidence presented at the meeting can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html. PMID:26232543

  6. Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an infectious disease of the central nervous system caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a zoonotic mosquito-borne flavivirus. JEV is prevalent in much of Asia and the Western Pacific, with over 4 billion people living at risk of infection. In the absence of antiviral intervention, vaccination is the only strategy to develop long-term sustainable protection against JEV infection. Over the past half-century, a mouse brain-derived inactivated vaccine has been used internationally for active immunization. To date, however, JEV is still a clinically important, emerging, and re-emerging human pathogen of global significance. In recent years, production of the mouse brain-derived vaccine has been discontinued, but 3 new cell culture-derived vaccines are available in various parts of the world. Here we review current aspects of JEV biology, summarize the 4 types of JEV vaccine, and discuss the potential of an infectious JEV cDNA technology for future vaccine development. PMID:24161909

  7. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Page How long does the Japanese encephalitis vaccination last? The duration of protection is unknown. For ... What are the side effects of Japanese encephalitis vaccination? Pain and tenderness are the most commonly reported ...

  8. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: moving away from the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark P; Webster, Diane E; Martin, Jenny L; Wesselingh, Steven L

    2003-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a severe disease that is widespread throughout Asia and is spreading beyond its traditional boundaries. Three vaccines are currently in use against JE but only one is available internationally, a mouse-brain-derived inactivated vaccine first used in the 1930s. Although this vaccine has been effective in reducing the incidence of JE, it is relatively expensive and has been linked to severe allergic and neurological reactions. Cell-culture-derived inactivated and attenuated vaccines have been developed but are only used in the People's Republic of China. Other vaccines currently in various stages of development are DNA vaccines, a chimeric yellow fever-JE viral vaccine, virus-like particle vaccines and poxvirus-based vaccines. Poxvirus-based vaccines and the chimeric yellow fever-JE vaccine have been tested in Phase I clinical trials. These new vaccines have the potential to significantly reduce the impact of JE in Asia, particularly if used in an oral vaccine delivery strategy. PMID:12903806

  9. Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Nabeshima, T; Buerano, C C

    2015-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an inflammation of the central nervous system in humans and animals, specifically horses and cattle. The disease, which can sometimes be fatal, is caused by the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), of which there are five genotypes (genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). The transmission cycle of the virus involves pigs and wild birds as virus amplifiers and mosquitoes as vectors for transferring the virus between amplifying hosts and to dead- end hosts, i.e. humans, horses and cattle. In horses and cattle the disease is usually asymptomatic, but when clinical signs do occur they include fever, decreased appetite, frothing at the mouth, rigidity of the legs and recumbency, and neurological signs, such as convulsive fits, circling, marked depression and disordered consciousness. In pigs, it can cause abortion and stillbirths. At present, the virus is detected in a wide area covering eastern and southern Asia, Indonesia, northern Australia, Papua New Guinea and Pakistan. JEV RNA has also been detected in Italy, first in dead birds in 1997 and 2000 and then in mosquitoes in 2010. Genotype shift, i.e. a change of genotype from genotype 3 to genotype 1, has occurred in some countries, namely Japan, South Korea, Chinese Taipei and Vietnam. Laboratory methods are available for confirming the causative agent of the disease. There are control measures to prevent or minimise infection and, among them, vaccination is one of the most important and one which should be adopted in endemic and epidemic areas. PMID:26601447

  10. Studies on Japanese B Encephalitis Virus Vaccines from Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balwant; Hammon, W. McD.

    1971-01-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the reliability of and to determine the mechanism involved in an antigen extinction mouse intraperitoneal (ip) challenge test for potency of a cell culture vaccine for Japanese B encephalitis, a modification of a test originated by Sabin for a mouse brain vaccine. Some comparisons were made with the official Japanese test using an intracerebral (ic) challenge after a more prolonged immunization procedure. The Japanese method of using a lyophilized reference vaccine with each test was also employed. It was found that the ip and the ic test appeared to show similar relative differences between lots. The ip test was more quickly and readily performed, gave reasonably consistent results on repetition, and, when used with a suitable reference vaccine, gave promise of being an entirely suitable and reliable test. Immunization by the intramuscular route rather than by the regular ip route appeared to offer no advantage and was less consistent in responses shown. Neutralizing antibody responses of the mice in the standard procedure were very quick to appear, about 4 days after the first dose of vaccine and had a peak titer about the seventh day, the time of challenge. This titer fell quickly unless challenge occurred. The antibody was heat stable, but it was readily inactivated by 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME). Not until the 11th or 15th day did a small amount of immunoglobulin G appear. Challenge on day 7 significantly increased titers, but this antibody was also mostly inactivated by 2-ME. Interferon did not appear to play any significant role in the protection shown by the mice. PMID:4325023

  11. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: current vaccines and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P

    2002-01-01

    Vaccination against JE ideally should be practiced in all areas of Asia where the virus is responsible for human disease. The WHO has placed a high priority on the development of a new vaccine for prevention of JE. Some countries in Asia (Japan, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand, and the PRC) manufacture JE vaccines and practice childhood immunization, while other countries suffering endemic or epidemic disease (India, Nepal, Laos, Cambodia, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines) have no JE vaccine manufacturing or policy for use. With the exception of the PRC, all countries practicing JE vaccination use formalin inactivated mouse brain vaccines, which are relatively expensive and are associated with rare but clinically significant allergic and neurological adverse events. New inactivated JE vaccines manufactured in Vero cells are in advanced preclinical or early clinical development in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the PRC. An empirically derived, live attenuated vaccine (SA14-14-2) is widely used in the PRC. Trials in the PRC have shown SA14-14-2 to be safe and effective when administered in a two-dose regimen, but regulatory concerns over manufacturing and control have restricted international distribution. The genetic basis of attenuation of SA14-14-2 has been partially defined. A new live attenuated vaccine (ChimeriVax-JE) that uses a reliable flavivirus vaccine--yellow fever 17D--as a live vector for the envelope genes of SA14-14-2 virus is in early clinical trials and appears to be well tolerated and immunogenic after a single dose. Vaccinia and avipox vectored vaccines have also been tested clinically, but are no longer being pursued due to restricted effectiveness mediated by anti-vector immunity. Other approaches to JE vaccines--including naked DNA, oral vaccination, and recombinant subunit vaccines--have been reviewed. PMID:12082985

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of currently available Japanese encephalitis vaccines: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing; Ma, Shu-Juan; Liu, Xie; Jiang, Li-Na; Zhou, Jun-Hua; Xiong, Yi-Quan; Ding, Hong; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A number of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines have been used for preventing Japanese encephalitis around the world. We here reviewed the immunogenicity and safety of the currently available Japanese encephalitis vaccines. We searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and other online databases up to March 25, 2014 for studies focusing on currently used JE vaccines in any language. The primary outcomes were the seroconversion rate against JEV and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed for the primary outcome when available. A total of 51 articles were included. Studies were grouped on the basic types of vaccines. This systematic review led to 2 aspects of the conclusions. On one hand, all the currently available JE vaccines are safe and effective. On the other hand, the overall of JE vaccine evaluation is disorganized, the large variation in study designs, vaccine types, schedules, doses, population and few hand-to-hand trails, make direct comparisons difficult. In order to make a more evidence-based decision on optimizing the JE vaccine, it is warranted to standardize the JE vaccine evaluation research. PMID:25668666

  13. The efficacy of Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Henan, China: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Luo, D; Yin, H; Xili, L; Song, J; Wang, Z

    1994-12-01

    A population based case-control study to evaluate Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine efficacy was carried out in Gusi County, Henan Province, China from June to September in 1991. This study showed that the JE vaccine had a strong protective effect. The estimate of the vaccine efficacy was 78% (95% CI = 16-94%). An unimmunized child was at 4.54 times greater risk of developing JE than were fully immunized children during the study period. The present study may have underestimated the vaccine efficacy due to evaluation based on routine vaccination which might have been affected by vaccination management and the local cold chain system. PMID:7667706

  14. Low Protective Efficacy of the Current Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine against the Emerging Genotype 5 Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Li, Minghua; Cui, Shiheng; Li, Xiaolong; Cao, Yuxi; Lei, Wenwen; Lu, Zhi; He, Ying; Wang, Huanyu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Background The current Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine derived from G3 JE virus (JEV) can induce protective immunity against G1–G4 JEV genotypes. However, protective efficacy against the emerging G5 genotype has not been reported. Methods/Principal Findings Using in vitro and in vivo tests, biological phenotype and cross-immunoreactions were compared between G3 JEV and G5 JEV (wild strains). The PRNT90 method was used to detect neutralizing antibodies against different genotypes of JEV in JE vaccine-immunized subjects and JE patients. In JE vaccine-immunized mice, the lethal challenge protection rates against G3 and G5 JEV wild strains were 100% and 50%, respectively. The seroconversion rates (SCRs) of virus antibodies against G3 and G5 JEV among vaccinated healthy subjects were 100% and 35%, respectively. All clinically identified JE patients showed high levels of G3 JEV neutralizing antibodies (≥1:10–1280) with positive serum geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 43.2, while for G5 JEV, neutralizing antibody conversion rates were only 64% with positive serum GMTs of 11.14. Moreover, the positive rate of JEV neutralizing antibodies against G5 JEV in pediatric patients was lower than in adults. Conclusions/Significance Low levels of neutralizing/protective antibodies induced by the current JE vaccine, based on the G3 genotype, were observed against the emerging G5 JEV genotype. Our results demonstrate the need for more detailed studies to reevaluate whether or not the apparent emergence of G5 JEV can be attributed to failure of the current vaccine to induce appropriate immune protectivity against this genotype of JEV. PMID:27139722

  15. A collaborative study of an alternative in vitro potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Do-Keun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Yeonhee; Lim, Jong-Mi; Hong, JiYoung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jaeok

    2016-09-01

    The use of inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines has been ongoing in East Asia for 40 years. A mouse immunogenicity assay followed by a Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN) Test (PRNTest) is currently recommended for each lot release of the vaccine by many national authorities. We developed an alternative in vitro ELISA to determine the E antigen content of the Japanese encephalitis virus to observe the 3Rs strategy. A collaborative study for replacing the in vivo potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with the in vitro ELISA assay was confirmed comparability between these two methods. The study demonstrated that an in vitro assay could perform faster and was more convenient than the established in vivo PRNTest. Moreover, this assay had better precision and reproducibility compared with the conventional in vivo assay. Additionally, the content of antigen determined using the in vitro ELISA correlated well with the potency of the in vivo assay. Furthermore, this method allowed discrimination between individual lots. Thus, we propose a progressive switch from the in vivo assay to the in vitro ELISA for JE vaccine quality control. PMID:27497622

  16. A spatial and temporal analysis of Japanese encephalitis in mainland China, 1963-1975: a period without Japanese encephalitis vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Ren, Zhoupeng; Cao, Yuxi; Wang, Jinfeng; Liang, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    More than a million Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases occurred in mainland China from the 1960s to 1970s without vaccine interventions. The aim of this study is to analyze the spatial and temporal pattern of JE cases reported in mainland China from 1965 to 1973 in the absence of JE vaccination, and to discuss the impacts of climatic and geographical factors on JE during that period. Thus, the data of reported JE cases at provincial level and monthly precipitation and monthly mean temperature from 1963 to 1975 in mainland China were collected. Local Indicators of Spatial Association analysis was performed to identify spatial clusters at the province level. During that period, The epidemic peaked in 1966 and 1971 and the JE incidence reached up to 20.58/100000 and 20.92/100000, respectively. The endemic regions can be divided into three classes including high, medium, and low prevalence regions. Through spatial cluster analysis, JE epidemic hot spots were identified; most were located in the Yangtze River Plain which lies in the southeast of China. In addition, JE incidence was shown to vary among eight geomorphic units in China. Also, the JE incidence in the Loess Plateau and the North China Plain was showed to increase with the rise of temperature. Likewise, JE incidence in the Loess Plateau and the Yangtze River Plain was observed a same trend with the increase of rainfall. In conclusion, the JE cases clustered geographically during the epidemic period. Besides, the JE incidence was markedly higher on the plains than plateaus. These results may provide an insight into the epidemiological characteristics of JE in the absence of vaccine interventions and assist health authorities, both in China and potentially in Europe and Americas, in JE prevention and control strategies. PMID:24911168

  17. Vaccine Strategies for the Control and Prevention of Japanese Encephalitis in Mainland China, 1951–2011

    PubMed Central

    Li, Minghua; Fu, Shihong; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Zhi; Cao, Yuxi; He, Ying; Zhu, Wuyang; Zhang, Tingting; Gould, Ernest A.; Liang, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is arguably one of the most serious viral encephalitis diseases worldwide. China has a long history of high prevalence of Japanese encephalitis, with thousands of cases reported annually and incidence rates often exceeding 15/100,000. In global terms, the scale of outbreaks and high incidence of these pandemics has almost been unique, placing a heavy burden on the Chinese health authorities. However, the introduction of vaccines, developed in China, combined with an intensive vaccination program initiated during the 1970s, as well as other public health interventions, has dramatically decreased the incidence from 20.92/100,000 in 1971, to 0.12/100,000 in 2011. Moreover, in less readily accessible areas of China, changes to agricultural practices designed to reduce chances of mosquito bites as well as mosquito population densities have also been proven effective in reducing local JE incidence. This unprecedented public health achievement has saved many lives and provided valuable experience that could be directly applicable to the control of vector-borne diseases around the world. Here, we review and discuss strategies for promotion and expansion of vaccination programs to reduce the incidence of JE even further, for the benefit of health authorities throughout Asia and, potentially, worldwide. PMID:25121596

  18. Use of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine in US Travel Medicine Practices in Global TravEpiNet

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Bhushan R.; Rao, Sowmya R.; Jentes, Emily S.; Hills, Susan L.; Fischer, Marc; Gershman, Mark D.; Brunette, Gary W.; Ryan, Edward T.; LaRocque, Regina C.

    2014-01-01

    Few data regarding the use of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine in clinical practice are available. We identified 711 travelers at higher risk and 7,578 travelers at lower risk for JE who were seen at US Global TravEpiNet sites from September of 2009 to August of 2012. Higher-risk travelers were younger than lower-risk travelers (median age = 29 years versus 40 years, P < 0.001). Over 70% of higher-risk travelers neither received JE vaccine during the clinic visit nor had been previously vaccinated. In the majority of these instances, clinicians determined that the JE vaccine was not indicated for the higher-risk traveler, which contradicts current recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Better understanding is needed of the clinical decision-making regarding JE vaccine in US travel medicine practices. PMID:25070999

  19. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (IMOJEV®) in children.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, K; Houillon, G; Feroldi, E; Bouckenooghe, A

    2016-01-01

    JE-CV (IMOJEV®, Sanofi Pasteur, France) is a live attenuated virus vaccine constructed by inserting coding sequences of the prM and E structural proteins of the Japanese encephalitis SA14-14-2 virus into the genome of yellow fever 17D virus. Primary immunization with JE-CV requires a single dose of the vaccine. This article reviews clinical trials of JE-CV in children aged up to 6 years conducted in countries across South-East Asia. Strong and persistent antibody responses were observed after single primary and booster doses, with 97% of children seroprotected up to five years after booster vaccination. Models of long-term antibody persistence predict a median duration of protection of approximately 30 years after a booster dose. The safety and reactogenicity profiles of JE-CV primary and booster doses are comparable to other widely used childhood vaccines. PMID:26588242

  20. Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine candidates generated by chimerization with dengue virus type 4.

    PubMed

    Gromowski, Gregory D; Firestone, Cai-Yen; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2014-05-23

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide and vaccination is one of the most effective ways to prevent disease. A suitable live-attenuated JEV vaccine could be formulated with a live-attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine for the control of these viruses in endemic areas. Toward this goal, we generated chimeric virus vaccine candidates by replacing the precursor membrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein structural genes of recombinant dengue virus type 4 (rDEN4) or attenuated vaccine candidate rDEN4Δ30 with those of wild-type JEV strain India/78. Mutations were engineered in E, NS3 and NS4B protein genes to improve replication in Vero cells. The chimeric viruses were attenuated in mice and some elicited modest but protective levels of immunity after a single dose. One particular chimeric virus, bearing E protein mutation Q264H, replicated to higher titer in tissue culture and was significantly more immunogenic in mice. The results are compared with live-attenuated JEV vaccine strain SA14-14-2. PMID:24699473

  1. Comparison of Four Serological Tests for Detecting Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus after Vaccination in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Go Woon; Cho, Jung Eun; Ju, Young Ran; Hong, Young-Jin; Han, Myung Guk; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Eui Yul; Jeong, Young Eui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Several different methods are currently used to detect antibodies to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in serum samples or cerebrospinal fluid. These methods include the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA), and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of each method in detecting vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV. Methods The study included 29 children who had completed a primary immunization schedule with an inactivated vaccine against JEV derived from mouse brain (n = 15) or a live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine (n = 14). Serum samples were collected between 3 months and 47 months after the last immunization. The serum samples were tested by performing the PRNT, HI test, in-house IFA, and commercial ELISA. The antibody detection rates were compared between tests. Results All 29 serum samples were positive with the PRNT, showing antibody titers from 1:20 to 1:2560. The HI test showed positive rates of 86.7% (13/15) and 71.4% (10/14) in the inactivated and live attenuated vaccine groups, respectively. The results of the IFA for immunoglobulin (Ig)G were positive in 53.3% (8/15) of children in the inactivated vaccine group and 35.7% (5/14) in the live attenuated vaccine group. Neither the IFA nor ELISA detected JEV IgM antibodies in any of the 29 children. Conclusion These results show that detection rates of vaccine-induced antibodies to JEV have a wide range (0–100%) depending on the testing method as well as the time since immunization and individual differences between children. These findings are helpful in interpreting serological test results for the diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis in situations where vaccines are widely administered. PMID:25389515

  2. Cross-protection induced by Japanese encephalitis vaccines against different genotypes of Dengue viruses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jieqiong; Gao, Na; Fan, Dongying; Chen, Hui; Sheng, Ziyang; Fu, Shihong; Liang, Guodong; An, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are closely related mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause very high global disease burdens. Although cross-reactivity and cross-protection within flaviviruses have been demonstrated, the effect of JEV vaccination on susceptibility to DENV infection has not been well elucidated. In this study, we found that vaccination with the JEV inactivated vaccine (INV) and live attenuated vaccine (LAV) could induce cross-immune responses and cross-protection against DENV1-4 in mice. Despite the theoretical risk of immune enhancement, no increased mortality was observed in our mouse model. Additionally, low but consistently detectable cross-neutralizing antibodies against DENV2 and DENV3 were also observed in the sera of JEV vaccine-immunized human donors. The results suggested that both JEV-LAV and JEV-INV could elicit strong cross-immunity and protection against DENVs, indicating that inoculation with JEV vaccines may influence the distribution of DENVs in co-circulated areas and that the cross-protection induced by JEV vaccines against DENVs might provide important information in terms of DENV prevention. PMID:26818736

  3. Japanese viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tiroumourougane, S; Raghava, P; Srinivasan, S

    2002-01-01

    One of the leading causes of acute encephalopathy in children in the tropics is Japanese encephalitis (JE). Transmitted by the culex mosquito, this neurotropic virus predominately affects the thalamus, anterior horns of the spinal cord, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. It mainly affects children <15 years and is mostly asymptomatic. The occasional symptomatic child typically presents with a neurological syndrome characterised by altered sensorium, seizures, and features of intracranial hypertension. Aetiological diagnosis is based on virus isolation or demonstration of virus specific antigen or antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid/blood. Though no antiviral drug is available against JE, effective supportive management can improve the outcome. Control of JE involves efficient vector control and appropriate use of vaccines. PMID:11930023

  4. Recombinant Measles AIK-C Vaccine Strain Expressing the prM-E Antigen of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akira; Toriniwa, Hiroko; Komiya, Tomoyoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine, which induces neutralizing antibodies, has been used for many years in Japan. In the present study, the JEV prM-E protein gene was cloned, inserted at the P/M junction of measles AIK-C cDNA, and an infectious virus was recovered. The JEV E protein was expressed in B95a cells infected with the recombinant virus. Cotton rats were inoculated with recombinant virus. Measles PA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. Neutralizing antibodies against JEV developed one week after inoculation, and EIA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. The measles AIK-C-based recombinant virus simultaneously induced measles and JEV immune responses, and may be a candidate for infant vaccines. Therefore, the present strategy of recombinant viruses based on a measles vaccine vector would be applicable to the platform for vaccine development. PMID:26930411

  5. Epidemiological trends and characteristics of Japanese encephalitis changed based on the vaccination program between 1960 and 2013 in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, southern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Liang, Nengxiu; Tan, Yi; Xie, Zhichun

    2016-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most severe kinds of viral encephalitis and is prevalent in Asia and the Western Pacific. In China, JE was first reported in the 1940s and became the main cause of viral encephalitis, including in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. In 1951, JE was included in the Chinese mandatory disease reporting system. In the pre-vaccine era of the 1960s and 1970s, the incidence of JE continued to rise without any vaccine supply. Since JE vaccines became available in the late 1970s (MBD) and 1989 (LAV-SA-14-14-2), and as JE vaccine became freely available to patients beginning in 2008, the incidence of JE has declined significantly. Despite these gains, outbreaks continue to occur among children in rural and suburban areas. Strengthening vaccine delivery models and improving swine vaccine production are important in order to sustain continuous declines in the incidence of JE in Guangxi. PMID:26972041

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of a delta inulin-adjuvanted inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine in pregnant mares and foals.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Prow, Natalie A; Wang, Wenqi; Tan, Cindy S E; Coyle, Mitchell; Douma, Alysha; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Kidd, Lisa; Hall, Roy A; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, following severe flooding in Eastern Australia, an unprecedented epidemic of equine encephalitis occurred in South-Eastern Australia, caused by Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV) and a new variant strain of Kunjin virus, a subtype of West Nile virus (WNVKUN). This prompted us to assess whether a delta inulin-adjuvanted, inactivated cell culture-derived Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine (JE-ADVAX™) could be used in horses, including pregnant mares and foals, to not only induce immunity to JEV, but also elicit cross-protective antibodies against MVEV and WNVKUN. Foals, 74-152 days old, received two injections of JE-ADVAX™. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated and induced a strong JEV-neutralizing antibody response in all foals. MVEV and WNVKUN antibody cross-reactivity was seen in 33% and 42% of the immunized foals, respectively. JE-ADVAX™ was also safe and well-tolerated in pregnant mares and induced high JEV-neutralizing titers. The neutralizing activity was passively transferred to their foals via colostrum. Foals that acquired passive immunity to JEV via maternal antibodies then were immunized with JE-ADVAX™ at 36-83 days of age, showed evidence of maternal antibody interference with low peak antibody titers post-immunization when compared to immunized foals of JEV-naïve dams. Nevertheless, when given a single JE-ADVAX™ booster immunization as yearlings, these animals developed a rapid and robust JEV-neutralizing antibody response, indicating that they were successfully primed to JEV when immunized as foals, despite the presence of maternal antibodies. Overall, JE-ADVAX™ appears safe and well-tolerated in pregnant mares and young foals and induces protective levels of JEV neutralizing antibodies with partial cross-neutralization of MVEV and WNVKUN. PMID:25516480

  7. Bivalent vaccine platform based on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) elicits neutralizing antibodies against JEV and hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Saga, Ryohei; Fujimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Mami; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Nakamura, Noriko; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Konishi, Eiji; Kato, Takanobu; Kohara, Michinori; Takeyama, Haruko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    Directly acting antivirals recently have become available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but there is no prophylactic vaccine for HCV. In the present study, we took advantage of the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) to develop antigens for use in a HCV vaccine. Notably, the surface-exposed JEV envelope protein is tolerant of inserted foreign epitopes, permitting display of novel antigens. We identified 3 positions that permitted insertion of the HCV E2 neutralization epitope recognized by HCV1 antibody. JEV subviral particles (SVP) containing HCV-neutralization epitope (SVP-E2) were purified from culture supernatant by gel chromatography. Sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 inhibited infection by JEV and by trans-complemented HCV particles (HCVtcp) derived from multi-genotypic viruses, whereas sera from mice immunized with synthetic E2 peptides did not show any neutralizing activity. Furthermore, sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 neutralized HCVtcp with N415K escape mutation in E2. As with the SVP-E2 epitope-displaying particles, JEV SVPs with HCV E1 epitope also elicited neutralizing antibodies against HCV. Thus, this novel platform harboring foreign epitopes on the surface of the particle may facilitate the development of a bivalent vaccine against JEV and other pathogens. PMID:27345289

  8. Bivalent vaccine platform based on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) elicits neutralizing antibodies against JEV and hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Ryohei; Fujimoto, Akira; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Matsuda, Mami; Hasegawa, Makoto; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Nakamura, Noriko; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Konishi, Eiji; Kato, Takanobu; Kohara, Michinori; Takeyama, Haruko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryosuke

    2016-01-01

    Directly acting antivirals recently have become available for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but there is no prophylactic vaccine for HCV. In the present study, we took advantage of the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) to develop antigens for use in a HCV vaccine. Notably, the surface-exposed JEV envelope protein is tolerant of inserted foreign epitopes, permitting display of novel antigens. We identified 3 positions that permitted insertion of the HCV E2 neutralization epitope recognized by HCV1 antibody. JEV subviral particles (SVP) containing HCV-neutralization epitope (SVP-E2) were purified from culture supernatant by gel chromatography. Sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 inhibited infection by JEV and by trans-complemented HCV particles (HCVtcp) derived from multi-genotypic viruses, whereas sera from mice immunized with synthetic E2 peptides did not show any neutralizing activity. Furthermore, sera from mice immunized with SVP-E2 neutralized HCVtcp with N415K escape mutation in E2. As with the SVP-E2 epitope-displaying particles, JEV SVPs with HCV E1 epitope also elicited neutralizing antibodies against HCV. Thus, this novel platform harboring foreign epitopes on the surface of the particle may facilitate the development of a bivalent vaccine against JEV and other pathogens. PMID:27345289

  9. Dynamics of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission among Pigs in Northwest Bangladesh and the Potential Impact of Pig Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salah Uddin; Salje, Henrik; Hannan, A.; Islam, Md. Atiqul; Bhuyan, A. A. Mamun; Islam, Md. Ariful; Rahman, M. Ziaur; Nahar, Nazmun; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Luby, Stephen P.; Gurley, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus infection can cause severe disease in humans, resulting in death or permanent neurologic deficits among survivors. Studies indicate that the incidence of JE is high in northwestern Bangladesh. Pigs are amplifying hosts for JE virus (JEV) and a potentially important source of virus in the environment. The objectives of this study were to describe the transmission dynamics of JEV among pigs in northwestern Bangladesh and estimate the potential impact of vaccination to reduce incidence among pigs. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a comprehensive census of pigs in three JE endemic districts and tested a sample of them for evidence of previous JEV infection. We built a compartmental model to describe JEV transmission dynamics in this region and to estimate the potential impact of pig vaccination. We identified 11,364 pigs in the study area. Previous JEV infection was identified in 30% of pigs with no spatial differences in the proportion of pigs that were seropositive across the study area. We estimated that JEV infects 20% of susceptible pigs each year and the basic reproductive number among pigs was 1.2. The model suggest that vaccinating 50% of pigs each year resulted in an estimated 82% reduction in annual incidence in pigs. Conclusions/Significance The widespread distribution of historic JEV infection in pigs suggests they may play an important role in virus transmission in this area. Future studies are required to understand the contribution of pig infections to JE risk in humans and the potential impact of pig vaccination on human disease. PMID:25255286

  10. Establishment of the 3rd national standard for lot release testing of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmi; Moon, Hyungsil; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Do Keun; Chung, Hye Joo; Park, Yong Keun; Oh, Ho Jung

    2016-07-01

    In Korea, 2 inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccines from Nakayama-NIH and Beijing-1 strain have been utilized to date. The 1(st) national standard for lot release testing of the JE vaccine was established in 2002. The 2(nd) national standard, established in 2007, is currently in use for JE vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) potency testing. However, the supply of this standard is expected to be exhausted by 2015, necessitating the establishment of a new national standard with quality equivalent to that of the existing standard. Quality control tests were performed to verify that the new standard candidate material was equivalent to that of the 2(nd) national standard, proving its appropriateness for potency testing of JE vaccine. In addition, based on the results of a collaborative study conducted among 4 institutions including Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, the potency of the new national standard material was determined to be 2.69 neutralizing-antibody titer (log10) per vial. Therefore, the newly established national standard material is expected to be used for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine lot release in Korea. PMID:26890572

  11. Establishment of the 3rd national standard for lot release testing of the Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunmi; Moon, Hyungsil; Kim, Min Gyu; Kim, Do Keun; Chung, Hye Joo; Park, Yong Keun; Oh, Ho Jung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Korea, 2 inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccines from Nakayama-NIH and Beijing-1 strain have been utilized to date. The 1st national standard for lot release testing of the JE vaccine was established in 2002. The 2nd national standard, established in 2007, is currently in use for JE vaccine (Nakayama-NIH strain) potency testing. However, the supply of this standard is expected to be exhausted by 2015, necessitating the establishment of a new national standard with quality equivalent to that of the existing standard. Quality control tests were performed to verify that the new standard candidate material was equivalent to that of the 2nd national standard, proving its appropriateness for potency testing of JE vaccine. In addition, based on the results of a collaborative study conducted among 4 institutions including Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, the potency of the new national standard material was determined to be 2.69 neutralizing-antibody titer (log10) per vial. Therefore, the newly established national standard material is expected to be used for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine lot release in Korea. PMID:26890572

  12. Phase III Clinical Trials Comparing the Immunogenicity and Safety of the Vero Cell-Derived Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Encevac with Those of Mouse Brain-Derived Vaccine by Using the Beijing-1 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Chiaki; Okada, Kenji; Ozaki, Takao; Hirose, Mizuo; Iribe, Kaneshige; Ishikawa, Yuji; Togashi, Takehiro; Ueda, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated cell culture Japanese encephalitis vaccine (CC-JEV) were compared with those of an inactivated mouse brain-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine (MB-JEV) in phase III clinical multicenter trials conducted in children. The vaccines contain the same Japanese encephalitis virus strain, the Beijing-1 strain. Two independent clinical trials (trials 1 and 2) were conducted. Trial 1 was conducted in 468 healthy children. Each subject was injected with 17 μg per dose of either CC-JEV or MB-JEV, and the immunogenicity and safety of the vaccines were investigated. Trial 1 showed that CC-JEV was more immunogenic and reactive than MB-JEV at the same dose. Therefore, to adjust the immunogenicity of CC-JEV to that of MB-JEV, a vaccine that has had a good track record regarding its efficacy for a long time, trial 2 was conducted in 484 healthy children. To improve the stability, CC-JEV was converted from a liquid type to a freeze-dried type of vaccine. Each subject was injected subcutaneously with either 4 μg per dose of CC-JEV, 8 μg per dose of CC-JEV, or 17 μg per dose of MB-JEV twice, at an interval of 2 to 4 weeks, followed by an additional booster immunization 1 to 15 months after the primary immunization. Based on the results of trial 2, 4 μg per dose of the freeze-dried CC-JEV (under the label Encevac) was selected as a substitute for the MB-JEV. Encevac was approved and launched in 2011 and has since been in use as a 2nd-generation Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Japan. (These studies have been registered at the JapicCTI under registration no. JapicCTI-132063 and JapicCTI-080586 for trials 1 and 2, respectively.) PMID:24334689

  13. A novel dengue virus serotype 1 vaccine candidate based on Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huiqiang; Li, Zhushi; Lin, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Lina; Zeng, Xianwu; Wu, Yonglin; Yu, Yongxin; Li, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    To develop a potential dengue vaccine candidate, a full-length cDNA clone of a novel chimeric virus was constructed using recombinant DNA technology, with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as the backbone, with its premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) genes substituted by their counterparts from dengue virus type 1 (DENV1). The chimeric virus (JEV/DENV1) was successfully recovered from primary hamster kidney (PHK) cells by transfection with the in vitro transcription products of JEV/DENV1 cDNA and was identified by complete genome sequencing and immunofluorescent staining. No neuroinvasiveness of this chimeric virus was observed in mice inoculated by the subcutaneous route (s.c.) or by the intraperitoneal route (i.p.), while some neurovirulence was displayed in mice that were inoculated directly by the intracerebral route (i.c.). The chimeric virus was able to stimulate high-titer production of antibodies against DENV1 and provided protection against lethal challenge with neuroadapted dengue virus in mice. These results suggest that the chimeric virus is a promising dengue vaccine candidate. PMID:26976137

  14. Past, Present, and Future of Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Svenja; Keiser, Jennifer; Utzinger, Jürg; Wiedenmayer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE), a vector-borne viral disease, is endemic to large parts of Asia and the Pacific. An estimated 3 billion people are at risk, and JE has recently spread to new territories. Vaccination programs, increased living standards, and mechanization of agriculture are key factors in the decline in the incidence of this disease in Japan and South Korea. However, transmission of JE is likely to increase in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, North Korea, and Pakistan because of population growth, intensified rice farming, pig rearing, and the lack of vaccination programs and surveillance. On a global scale, however, the incidence of JE may decline as a result of large-scale vaccination programs implemented in China and India. PMID:19116041

  15. Japanese encephalitis virus in meningitis patients, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan. PMID:15757569

  16. Development of a small animal peripheral challenge model of Japanese encephalitis virus using interferon deficient AG129 mice and the SA14-14-2 vaccine virus strain.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Delorey, Mark J; Blair, Carol D; Roehrig, John T

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most common cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, and it is increasingly a global public health concern due to its recent geographic expansion. While commercial vaccines are available and used in some endemic countries, JEV continues to be a public health problem, with 50,000 cases reported annually. Research with virulent JEV in mouse models to develop new methods of prevention and treatment is restricted to BSL-3 containment facilities, confining these studies to investigators with access to these facilities. We have developed an adult small animal peripheral challenge model using interferon-deficient AG129 mice and the JEV live-attenuated vaccine SA14-14-2, thus requiring only BSL-2 containment. A low dose of virus (10PFU/0.1ml) induced 100% morbidity in infected mice. Increased body temperatures measured by implantable temperature transponders correlated with an increase in infectious virus and viral RNA in serum, spleen and brain as well as an increase in pro-inflammatory markers measured by a 58-biomarker multi-analyte profile (MAP) constructed during the course of infection. In the future, the MAP measurements can be used as a baseline for comparison in order to better assess the inhibition of disease progression by other prophylactic and therapeutic agents. The use of the AG129/JEV SA14-14-2 animal model makes vaccine and therapeutic studies feasible for laboratories with limited biocontainment facilities. PMID:24252694

  17. Evaluation of Extracellular Subviral Particles of Dengue Virus Type 2 and Japanese Encephalitis Virus Produced by Spodoptera frugiperda Cells for Use as Vaccine and Diagnostic Antigens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Miwa; Konishi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    New or improved vaccines against dengue virus types 1 to 4 (DENV1 to DENV4) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), the causative agents of dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis (JE), respectively, are urgently required. The use of noninfectious subviral extracellular particles (EPs) is an inexpensive and safe strategy for the production of protein-based flavivirus vaccines. Although coexpression of premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins has been demonstrated to produce EPs in mammalian cells, low yields have hindered their commercial application. Therefore, we used an insect cell expression system with Spodoptera frugiperda-derived Sf9 cells to investigate high-level production of DENV2 and JEV EPs. Sf9 cells transfected with the prM and E genes of DENV2 or JEV secreted corresponding viral antigens in a particulate form that were biochemically and biophysically equivalent to the authentic antigens obtained from infected C6/36 mosquito cells. Additionally, equivalent neutralizing antibody titers were induced in mice immunized either with EPs produced by transfected Sf9 cells or with EPs produced by transfected mammalian cells, in the context of coimmunization with a DNA vaccine that expresses EPs. Furthermore, the results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using an EP antigen derived from Sf9 cells correlated significantly with the results obtained by a neutralization test and an ELISA using an EP antigen derived from mammalian cells. Finally, Sf9 cells could produce 10- to 100-fold larger amounts of E antigen than mammalian cells. These results indicate the potential of Sf9 cells for high-level production of flavivirus protein vaccines and diagnostic antigens. PMID:20668137

  18. Antibody to the nonstructural protein NS1 of Japanese encephalitis virus: potential application of mAb-based indirect ELISA to differentiate infection from vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shu, P Y; Chen, L K; Chang, S F; Yueh, Y Y; Chow, L; Chien, L J; Chin, C; Lin, T H; Huang, J H

    2001-02-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect and differentiate the antibody responses to Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus nonstructural protein NS1 between infected and vaccinated individuals. The results showed that all convalescent sera from JE patients contained NS1-specific IgG antibodies, while 65 and 40% of these sera showed detectable NS1-specific IgM and IgA antibodies, respectively. Specificity analysis showed that NS1-specific IgM and IgA antibodies from JE patients do not cross-react to dengue virus NS1 glycoprotein, while IgG antibodies from 10% of JE patients showed significant cross-reaction to dengue virus NS1 glycoprotein. To differentiate infection from vaccination, the immune sera from 24 children vaccinated with inactivated JE vaccine were analyzed. The data showed that none of these immune sera had detectable NS1-specific IgG antibodies. The results demonstrated the potential application of JE NS1-specific indirect ELISA to differentiate infection from vaccination. PMID:11166901

  19. Antiviral activity of luteolin against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenchun; Qian, Suhong; Qian, Ping; Li, Xiangmin

    2016-07-15

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a member of family Flaviviridae, is a neurotropic flavivirus that causes Japanese encephalitis (JE). JEV is one of the most important causative agents of viral encephalitis in humans, and this disease leads to high fatality rates. Although effective vaccines are available, no effective antiviral therapy for JE has been developed. Hence, identifying effective antiviral agents against JEV infection is important. In this study, we found that luteolin was an antiviral bioflavonoid with potent antiviral activity against JEV replication in A549 cells with IC50=4.56μg/mL. Luteolin also showed extracellular virucidal activity on JEV. With a time-of-drug addition assay revealing that JEV replication was inhibited by luteolin after the entry stage. Overall, our results suggested that luteolin can be used to develop an antiviral drug against JEV. PMID:27126774

  20. Estimation of the Impact of a Japanese Encephalitis Immunization Program with Live, Attenuated SA 14-14-2 Vaccine in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Shyam Raj; Janusz, Kristen B.; Schluter, W. William; Bichha, Ram Padarath; Shakya, Geeta; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Shrestha, Murari Man; Sedai, Tika Ram; Fischer, Marc; Gibbons, Robert V.; Shrestha, Sanjaya K.; Hills, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Wider availability of the live, attenuated SA 14-14-2 Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine has facilitated introduction or expansion of immunization programs in many countries. However, information on their impact is limited. In 2006, Nepal launched a JE immunization program, and by 2009, mass campaigns had been implemented in 23 districts. To describe the impact, we analyzed surveillance data from 2004 to 2009 on laboratory-confirmed JE and clinical acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases. The post-campaign JE incidence rate of 1.3 per 100,000 population was 72% lower than expected if no campaigns had occurred, and an estimated 891 JE cases were prevented. In addition, AES incidence was 58% lower, with an estimated 2,787 AES cases prevented, suggesting that three times as many disease cases may have been prevented than indicated by the laboratory-confirmed JE cases alone. These results provide useful information on preventable JE disease burden and the potential value of JE immunization programs. PMID:23358643

  1. Epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis: past, present, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Liang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of severe viral encephalitis that affects individuals in Asia, western Pacific countries, and northern Australia. Although 67,900 JE cases have been estimated among 24 JE epidemic countries annually, only 10,426 have been reported in 2011. With the establishment of JE surveillance and vaccine use in some countries, the JE incidence rate has decreased; however, serious outbreaks still occur. Understanding JE epidemics and identifying the circulating JE virus genotypes will improve JE prevention and control. This review summarizes the current epidemiology data in these countries. PMID:25848290

  2. Tick-borne Encephalitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Axel T; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a disease that is found from western Europe across Asia and into Japan. In recent years the incidence rate has been increasing as has the endemic range of the virus. Tick-borne encephalitis is caused by three genetically distinct sutypes of viruses within a single TBE virus (TBEV) serocomplex. These three subtypes consist of Far-eastern subtype TBEV (TBEV-FE), Siberian subtype (TBEV-Sib) and European subtype (TBEV-Eu). Each of these subtypes cause clinically distinct diseases with varying degrees of severity. Development of the first vaccines for TBEV began in the late 1930s shortly after the first isolation of TBEV-FE in Russia. In the 1970s Austria began large scale vaccine production and a nationalized vaccine campaign that significantly reduced the incidence rate of TBE. Currently there are four licensed TBE vaccines, two in Europe and two in Russia. These vaccines are all quite similar formalin-inactivated virus vaccines but the each use a different virus strain for production. Published studies have shown that European vaccines are cross-protective in rodent studies and elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses in human vaccines. European vaccines have been licensed for a rapid vaccine schedule that could be used in response to a significant outbreak and reasonable neutralizing antibody titers can be achieved after a single dose although a second dose provides nearly complete and long-lasting protection. This review focuses on the current status of licensed TBE vaccines and provides a brief summary of technology currently being developed for new vaccines. PMID:23997980

  3. Formalin Inactivation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Alters the Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of a Neutralization Epitope in Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yi-Chin; Chiu, Hsien-Chung; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Chiou, Shyan-Song

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccines are widely available, but the effects of formalin inactivation on the antigenic structure of JEV and the profile of antibodies elicited after vaccination are not well understood. We used a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to map the antigenic structure of live JEV virus, untreated control virus (UCV), formalin-inactivated commercial vaccine (FICV), and formalin-inactivated virus (FIV). The binding activity of T16 MAb against Nakayama-derived FICV and several strains of FIV was significantly lower compared to live virus and UCV. T16 MAb, a weakly neutralizing JEV serocomplex antibody, was found to inhibit JEV infection at the post-attachment step. The T16 epitope was mapped to amino acids 329, 331, and 389 within domain III (EDIII) of the envelope (E) glycoprotein. When we explored the effect of formalin inactivation on the immunogenicity of JEV, we found that Nakayama-derived FICV, FIV, and UCV all exhibited similar immunogenicity in a mouse model, inducing anti-JEV and anti-EDII 101/106/107 epitope-specific antibodies. However, the EDIII 329/331/389 epitope-specific IgG antibody and neutralizing antibody titers were significantly lower for FICV-immunized and FIV-immunized mouse serum than for UCV-immunized. Formalin inactivation seems to alter the antigenic structure of the E protein, which may reduce the potency of commercially available JEV vaccines. Virus inactivation by H2O2, but not by UV or by short-duration and higher temperature formalin treatment, is able to maintain the antigenic structure of the JEV E protein. Thus, an alternative inactivation method, such as H2O2, which is able to maintain the integrity of the E protein may be essential to improving the potency of inactivated JEV vaccines. PMID:26495991

  4. In vitro and in vivo characterization of chimeric duck Tembusu virus based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Liu, Long; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV), a newly identified flavivirus, has rapidly spread to China, Malaysia and Thailand. The potential threats to public health have been well-highlighted; however its virulence and pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, by using reverse genetics, a recombinant chimeric DTMUV based on Japanese encephalitis live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 was obtained by substituting the corresponding prM and E genes (named ChinDTMUV). In vitro characterization demonstrated that ChinDTMUV replicated efficiently in mammalian cells with small-plaque phenotype in comparison with its parental viruses. Mouse tests showed ChinDTMUV exhibited avirulent phenotype in terms of neuroinvasiveness, while it retained neurovirulence from its parental virus DTMUV. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDTMUV was evidenced to elicit robust IgG and neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Overall, we successfully developed a viable chimeric DTMUV, and these results provide a useful platform for further investigation of the pathogenesis of DTMUV and development of a live attenuated DTMUV vaccine candidate. PMID:27100268

  5. Chimeric Yellow Fever Virus 17D-Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine: Dose-Response Effectiveness and Extended Safety Testing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Monath, T. P.; Levenbook, I.; Soike, K.; Zhang, Z.-X.; Ratterree, M.; Draper, K.; Barrett, A. D. T.; Nichols, R.; Weltzin, R.; Arroyo, J.; Guirakhoo, F.

    2000-01-01

    ChimeriVax-JE is a live, attenuated recombinant virus prepared by replacing the genes encoding two structural proteins (prM and E) of yellow fever 17D virus with the corresponding genes of an attenuated strain of Japanese encephalitis virus (JE), SA14-14-2 (T. J. Chambers et al., J. Virol. 73:3095–3101, 1999). Since the prM and E proteins contain antigens conferring protective humoral and cellular immunity, the immune response to vaccination is directed principally at JE. The prM-E genome sequence of the ChimeriVax-JE in diploid fetal rhesus lung cells (FRhL, a substrate acceptable for human vaccines) was identical to that of JE SA14-14-2 vaccine and differed from sequences of virulent wild-type strains (SA14 and Nakayama) at six amino acid residues in the envelope gene (E107, E138, E176, E279, E315, and E439). ChimeriVax-JE was fully attenuated for weaned mice inoculated by the intracerebral (i.c.) route, whereas commercial yellow fever 17D vaccine (YF-Vax) caused lethal encephalitis with a 50% lethal dose of 1.67 log10 PFU. Groups of four rhesus monkeys were inoculated by the subcutaneous route with 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 log10 PFU of ChimeriVax-JE. All 16 monkeys developed low viremias (mean peak viremia, 1.7 to 2.1 log10 PFU/ml; mean duration, 1.8 to 2.3 days). Neutralizing antibodies appeared between days 6 and 10; by day 30, neutralizing antibody responses were similar across dose groups. Neutralizing antibody titers to the homologous (vaccine) strain were higher than to the heterologous wild-type JE strains. All immunized monkeys and sham-immunized controls were challenged i.c. on day 54 with 5.2 log10 PFU of wild-type JE. None of the immunized monkeys developed viremia or illness and had mild residual brain lesions, whereas controls developed viremia, clinical encephalitis, and severe histopathologic lesions. Immunized monkeys developed significant (≥4-fold) increases in serum and cerebrospinal fluid neutralizing antibodies after i.c. challenge. In a

  6. Knowledge Obtained from an Elderly Case of Japanese Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kyoko; Iwamoto, Kazuhide; Satoh, Yu; Fujita, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kenta; Katano, Harutaka; Hasegawa, Hideki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tando, So; Fushiki, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    The nationwide introduction of a Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine has contributed to a reduction in the annual infection rate of JE in Japan. However, the current neutralizing antibody prevalence ratio in Japan is approximately 20% in children 3-4 years of age and in people in their forties and fifties. We herein report a man with JE who was definitively diagnosed by multi-virus real-time polymerase chain reaction employing biopsied brain tissue and serological examinations. JE should be kept in mind when a patient has severe encephalitis of unknown etiology. In order to protect the susceptible population from JE, vaccination is recommended, especially for children and middle-aged people. PMID:27580555

  7. Induction of protective immunity in animals vaccinated with recombinant vaccinia viruses that express PreM and E glycoproteins of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, A; Kimura-Kuroda, J; Ogimoto, M; Miyamoto, M; Sata, T; Sato, T; Takamura, C; Kurata, T; Kojima, A; Yasui, K

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone representing the genome of structural proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus strains LC16mO and WR under the control of a strong early-late promoter for the vaccinia virus 7.5-kilodalton polypeptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated flow cytometric analysis revealed that the recombinant vaccinia viruses expressed JEV E protein on the membrane surface, as well as in the cytoplasm, of recombinant-infected cells. In addition, the E protein expressed from the JEV recombinants reacted to nine different characteristic monoclonal antibodies, some of which have hemagglutination-inhibiting and JEV-neutralizing activities. Radioimmunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that two major proteins expressed in recombinant-infected cells were processed and glycosylated as the authentic PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. Inoculation of rabbits with the infectious recombinant vaccinia virus resulted in rapid production of antiserum specific for the PreM and E glycoproteins of JEV. This antiserum had both hemagglutination-inhibiting and virus-neutralizing activities against JEV. Furthermore, mice vaccinated with the recombinant also produced JEV-neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to challenge with JEV. Images PMID:2159544

  8. Japanese Encephalitis Complicated with Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Vivek; Panwar, Ajay; Raizada, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Japanese Encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavi-virus, is the most significant aetiology of arboviral encephalitis worldwide. It has resulted in epidemics of encephalitis in the Indian subcontinent. Here, we report a case of 36-year-old female who presented with a short history of fever and headache followed by altered sensorium. Funduscopic examination revealed Papilloedema. Pyogenic or viral meningoencephalitis along with complicated malaria were kept as initial differential diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain revealed involvement of posterior limb of internal capsule and bilateral thalami in the form of haemorrhagic encephalitis along with obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebro Spinal Fluid (CSF) serology (IgM ELISA) showed JE as the causative agent. Despite extensive literature search, we could not find a case of JE reported with hydrocephalus as a complication. This case highlights the typical and atypical features of JE including imaging findings and exemplifies the way, how diversely JE can present and would thus help in preparing management paradigms accordingly. PMID:27042509

  9. Japanese Encephalitis Complicated with Obstructive Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Suman, Vivek; Roy, Ujjawal; Panwar, Ajay; Raizada, Alpana

    2016-02-01

    Japanese Encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a flavi-virus, is the most significant aetiology of arboviral encephalitis worldwide. It has resulted in epidemics of encephalitis in the Indian subcontinent. Here, we report a case of 36-year-old female who presented with a short history of fever and headache followed by altered sensorium. Funduscopic examination revealed Papilloedema. Pyogenic or viral meningoencephalitis along with complicated malaria were kept as initial differential diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain revealed involvement of posterior limb of internal capsule and bilateral thalami in the form of haemorrhagic encephalitis along with obstructive hydrocephalus. Cerebro Spinal Fluid (CSF) serology (IgM ELISA) showed JE as the causative agent. Despite extensive literature search, we could not find a case of JE reported with hydrocephalus as a complication. This case highlights the typical and atypical features of JE including imaging findings and exemplifies the way, how diversely JE can present and would thus help in preparing management paradigms accordingly. PMID:27042509

  10. Recombinant chimeric Japanese encephalitis virus/tick-borne encephalitis virus is attenuated and protective in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Ye, Qing; Li, Shi-Hua; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Xu, Yan-Peng; Ma, Jie; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-02-12

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) represents one of the most dangerous human pathogens circulating in Europe and East Asia. No effective treatment for TBEV infection currently exists, and vaccination is the primary preventive measure. Although several inactivated vaccines have been licensed, the development of novel vaccines against TBEV remains a high priority in disease-endemic countries. In the present study, a live chimeric recombinant TBEV (ChinTBEV) was created by substituting the major structural genes of TBEV for the corresponding regions of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) live vaccine strain SA14-14-2. The resulting chimera had a small-plaque phenotype, replicated efficiently in both mammalian and mosquito cells. The preliminary data from in vitro passaging indicated the potential for stability of ChinTBEV. ChinTBEV also exhibited significantly attenuated neuroinvasiveness in mice upon either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous inoculation in comparison with its parental TBEV. Importantly, a single immunisation with ChinTBEV elicited TBEV-specific IgG and neutralising antibody responses in a dose-dependent manner, providing significant protection against lethal TBEV challenge in mice. Taken together, the results of this proof-of-concept study indicate that ChinTBEV can be further developed as a potential vaccine candidate against TBEV infection. Moreover, the construction of this type of flavivirus chimera using a JEV vaccine strain as the genetic backbone represents a universal vaccine approach. PMID:24394443

  11. Epidemiological situation of Japanese encephalitis in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Bista, M B; Shrestha, J M

    2005-01-01

    A human Japanese encephalitis (JE) case is considered to have elevated temperature (over 380 C) along with altered consciousness or unconsciousness and is generally confirmed serologically by finding of specific anti-JE IgM in the cerebro spinal fluid. No specific treatment for JE is available. Only supportive treatment like meticulous nursing care, introduction of Ryle's tube if the patient is unconscious, dextrose solution if dehydration is present, manitol injection in case of raised cranial temperature and diazepam in case of convulsion. Intra venous fluids, indwelling catheter in conscious patient and corticosteroids unless indicated should be avoided. Pigs, wading birds and ducks have been incriminated as important vertebrate amplifying hosts for JE virus due to viremia in them. Man along with bovines, ovines and caprines is involved in transmission cycle as accidental hosts and plays no role in perpetuating the virus due to the lack of viremia in them. The species Cx tritaeniorhyncus is suspected to be the principal vector of JE in Nepal as the species is abundantly found in the rice-field ecosystem of the endemic areas during the transmission season and JE virus isolates have been obtained from a pool of Cx tritaeniorhyncus females. Mosquito vector become infective 14 days after acquiring the JR virus from the viremic host. The disease was first recorded in Nepal in 1978 as an epidemic in Rupandehi district of the Western Development Region (WDR) and Morang of the Eastern Region (EDR). At present the disease is endemic in 24 districts. Although JE as found endemic mainly in tropical climate areas, existence and proliferation of encephalitis causing viruses in temperate and cold climates of hills and valleys are possible. Total of 26,667 cases and 5,381 deaths have been reported with average case fatality rate of 20.2% in an aggregate since 1978. More than 50% of morbidity and 60% mortality occur in the age group below 15 years. Upsurge of cases take place

  12. A Chimeric Dengue Virus Vaccine using Japanese Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Strain SA14-14-2 as Backbone Is Immunogenic and Protective against Either Parental Virus in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yang, Hui-Qiang; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Yu, Xue-Dong; Li, Shi-Hua; Ye, Qing; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Jie; Yu, Yong-Xin; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Qin, E-De; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2013-01-01

    The development of a safe and efficient dengue vaccine represents a global challenge in public health. Chimeric dengue viruses (DENV) based on an attenuated flavivirus have been well developed as vaccine candidates by using reverse genetics. In this study, based on the full-length infectious cDNA clone of the well-known Japanese encephalitis virus live vaccine strain SA14-14-2 as a backbone, a novel chimeric dengue virus (named ChinDENV) was rationally designed and constructed by replacement with the premembrane and envelope genes of dengue 2 virus. The recovered chimeric virus showed growth and plaque properties similar to those of the parental DENV in mammalian and mosquito cells. ChinDENV was highly attenuated in mice, and no viremia was induced in rhesus monkeys upon subcutaneous inoculation. ChinDENV retained its genetic stability and attenuation phenotype after serial 15 passages in cultured cells. A single immunization with various doses of ChinDENV elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated monkeys were challenged with wild-type DENV, all animals except one that received the lower dose were protected against the development of viremia. Furthermore, immunization with ChinDENV conferred efficient cross protection against lethal JEV challenge in mice in association with robust cellular immunity induced by the replicating nonstructural proteins. Taken together, the results of this preclinical study well demonstrate the great potential of ChinDENV for further development as a dengue vaccine candidate, and this kind of chimeric flavivirus based on JE vaccine virus represents a powerful tool to deliver foreign antigens. PMID:24109223

  13. Japanese encephalitis in two children--United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-03-11

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable encephalitis in Asia and the western Pacific. JEV is maintained in an enzootic cycle involving mosquitoes and amplifying vertebrate hosts, mainly pigs and wading birds. The virus is transmitted to humans primarily by Culex mosquitoes, which breed in flooded rice fields and pools of stagnant water and most often feed outdoors during the evening and night. JEV transmission occurs mainly in rural agricultural areas, but occasional human cases occur in urban areas. Japanese encephalitis (JE) in persons who have traveled or lived overseas is diagnosed infrequently in the United States, with only four cases identified from 1992 (when a JE vaccine was first licensed in the United States) to 2008. This report describes the only cases diagnosed in the United States and reported to CDC since then. The first was a fatal case in a U.S. child who had visited relatives in the Philippines. The other occurred in a refugee who became ill while traveling from Thailand to the United States and whose diagnosis was complicated by concurrent neurocysticercosis. JE should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any patient with an acute neurologic infection who recently has been in a JE-endemic country. Travelers to JE-endemic countries should be advised of the risk for JE and the importance of personal protective measures to prevent mosquito bites. JE vaccine should be considered for travelers who might be at greater risk based on the season, location, and duration of their visit and their planned activities. PMID:21389931

  14. Japanese encephalitis: Challenges and intervention opportunities in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Shristi; Dhakal, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne zoonotic disease caused by JE virus (JEV). JE has been endemic in Terai region, the lowland plains of Nepal bordering India, since 1978. However, in recent years cases of JE has been continuously reported from high altitude zones of hills and mountains. Irrigated rice farming system, expanded pig husbandry practices, inadequate vaccine coverage, low level of public awareness and climate change favoring mosquito breeding in higher altitudes might be the probable risk factors for emergence and re-emergence of JE in Nepal. Repeated outbreak in endemic areas and geographical expansion to newer areas have created huge challenge for JE prevention and control. At present, JE is one of the major public health concern of Nepal. Expanding vaccine coverage, improving agricultural practices, generating public awareness, supporting for use of mosquito avoiding practices and regional collaboration at border against JE can be helpful in getting better control over it in future. PMID:27046998

  15. Japanese encephalitis: Challenges and intervention opportunities in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Shristi; Dhakal, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne zoonotic disease caused by JE virus (JEV). JE has been endemic in Terai region, the lowland plains of Nepal bordering India, since 1978. However, in recent years cases of JE has been continuously reported from high altitude zones of hills and mountains. Irrigated rice farming system, expanded pig husbandry practices, inadequate vaccine coverage, low level of public awareness and climate change favoring mosquito breeding in higher altitudes might be the probable risk factors for emergence and re-emergence of JE in Nepal. Repeated outbreak in endemic areas and geographical expansion to newer areas have created huge challenge for JE prevention and control. At present, JE is one of the major public health concern of Nepal. Expanding vaccine coverage, improving agricultural practices, generating public awareness, supporting for use of mosquito avoiding practices and regional collaboration at border against JE can be helpful in getting better control over it in future. PMID:27046998

  16. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: Evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F.; Sandhu, Hardeep S.; Hyde, Terri B.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Pallansch, Mark A.; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C.; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A.S.M. Mainul; Bose, Anindya S.; Dietz, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. Methods We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Results Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio–measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio–measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Conclusions Polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. PMID:25597940

  17. A randomized study of the immunogenicity and safety of Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Virus Vaccine (JE-CV) in comparison with SA14-14-2 Vaccine in children in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Houillon, Guy; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Soo-Han; Lee, Jin; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hee Soo; Bang, Joon; Naimi, Zulaikha; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A new live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) has been developed based on innovative technology to give protection against JE with an improved immunogenicity and safety profile. In this phase 3, observer-blind study, 274 children aged 12−24 months were randomized 1:1 to receive one dose of JE-CV (Group JE-CV) or the SA14–14–2 vaccine currently used to vaccinate against JE in the Republic of Korea (Group SA14–14–2). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50 before and 28 days after vaccination. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority of seroconversion rates on D28 was demonstrated in the Per Protocol analysis set as the difference between Group JE-CV and Group SA14–14–2 was 0.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI]: −2.35; 4.68), which was above the required −10%. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates 28 days after administration of a single vaccine dose were 100% in Group JE-CV and 99.1% in Group SA14–14–2; all children except one (Group SA14–14–2) were seroprotected. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased in both groups from D0 to D28; GM of titer ratios were slightly higher in Group JE-CV (182 [95% CI: 131; 251]) than Group SA14–14–2 (116 [95% CI: 85.5, 157]). A single dose of JE-CV was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. In conclusion, a single dose of JE-CV or SA14–14–2 vaccine elicited a comparable immune response with a good safety profile. Results obtained in healthy Korean children aged 12−24 months vaccinated with JE-CV are consistent with those obtained in previous studies conducted with JE-CV in toddlers. PMID:25483480

  18. The smallpox vaccine and postvaccinal encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Roos, Karen L; Eckerman, Nancy L

    2002-03-01

    Smallpox is one of the deadliest infectious diseases in history. The discovery by Edward Jenner that inoculation with a droplet of pus from a cow with cowpox protected a person from smallpox resulted in the successful vaccination of millions of people. There were, however, complications associated with smallpox vaccination; the most serious complication was postvaccinal encephalitis, which was reported to occur with an incidence of 1 in 110,000 vaccinations and a case-fatality rate of 50%. Before we become complacent with the idea that we will respond to a bioterrorism attack with a mass immunization program for smallpox, it is important to be reminded of the risk and clinical manifestations of postvaccinal encephalitis and the efficacy of antivaccinia gamma-globulin in preventing this complication. The first case of postvaccinal encephalitis as a complication of the Jennerian cowpox inoculation was observed in 1905. A century later, there is no effective therapy. PMID:12170398

  19. Virion and soluble antigens of japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Eckels, K H; Hetrick, F M; Russell, P K

    1975-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virions contain a 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope glycoprotein antigen that can be solubilized with sodium lauryl sulfate and separated from other virion structural polypeptides and viral ribonucleic acid by gel filtration chromatography. The 58 X 10-3-molecular-weight envelope protein is the major antigen responsible for cross-reactivity of the virion in complement fixation tests with other closely related arboviruses. A naturally occurring soluble complement-fixing antigen is found in Japanese encephalitis mouse brain preparations after removal of particulate antigens. After partial purification by gel filtration and isoelectric focusing, the 53 X 10-3-molecular weight soluble complement-fixing antigen is more type specific than the Japanese encephalitis envelope antigen in complement fixation tests. Further, the Japanese encephalitis soluble complement-fixing antigen is stable to treatment with sodium lauryl sulfate and 2-mercaptoethanol, whereas virion complement-fixing antigens are unstable after this treatment. Images PMID:47312

  20. Estimating the Burden of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and Other Encephalitides in Countries of the Mekong Region

    PubMed Central

    Tarantola, Arnaud; Goutard, Flavie; Newton, Paul; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Lortholary, Olivier; Cappelle, Julien; Buchy, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Diverse aetiologies of viral and bacterial encephalitis are widely recognized as significant yet neglected public health issues in the Mekong region. A robust analysis of the corresponding health burden is lacking. We retrieved 75 articles on encephalitis in the region published in English or in French from 1965 through 2011. Review of available data demonstrated that they are sparse and often derived from hospital-based studies with significant recruitment bias. Almost half (35 of 75) of articles were on Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) alone or associated with dengue. In the Western Pacific region the WHO reported 30,000–50,000 annual JEV cases (15,000 deaths) between 1966 and 1996 and 4,633 cases (200 deaths) in 2008, a decline likely related to the introduction of JEV vaccination in China, Vietnam, or Thailand since the 1980s. Data on dengue, scrub typhus and rabies encephalitis, among other aetiologies, are also reviewed and discussed. Countries of the Mekong region are undergoing profound demographic, economic and ecological change. As the epidemiological aspects of Japanese encephalitis (JE) are transformed by vaccination in some countries, highly integrated expert collaborative research and objective data are needed to identify and prioritize the human health, animal health and economic burden due to JE and other pathogens associated with encephalitides. PMID:24498443

  1. Development of an in vitro antigen-detection test as an alternative method to the in vivo plaque reduction neutralization test for the quality control of Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Hye-Youn; Kim, Joo-Young; Ye, Michael B; Park, Kee-Bum; Han, Euiri; Kim, Jaeok; Ja Ban, Sang; Hong, Seung Hwa; Park, Yong Keun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) causes diseases that attack the human central nervous system. Traditionally, the quality control for JEV vaccines, in which the plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) titer is measured by the national control laboratories before the vaccine batches are marketed, has required laboratory animal testing. However, classical animal tests have inherent problems, including the very fact that animals are used, ethical issues, and the possibility of error. In this study, JEV antigen was measured in an in vitro assay to assess the feasibility of replacing in vivo assays that measure the PRN titers of JEV vaccines. We constructed a double-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DS-ELISA) that could detect JEV envelope (E). Initially, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the JEV E protein were generated and characterized. We isolated 18 mAbs against JEV E protein, and most were the IgG1 or IgG2a isotype. The mAbs (5F15 and 7D71) were selected as the most suitable mAb pair to detect JEV E protein. DS-ELISA with this pair detected as little as approximately 3 μg/mL JEV E protein and demonstrated a relationship between the amount of JEV E protein and the PRN titer. From these results, we surmise that this DS-ELISA may be useful, not only in terms of measuring the amount of JEV E protein, but also as a substitute for the PRN test for JEV vaccine evaluation. PMID:22486472

  2. Molecular detection and genotyping of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in mosquitoes during a 2010 outbreak in the Republic of Korea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seo, Hyun-Ji; Kim, Heung Chul; Klein, Terry A.; Ramey, Andrew M.; Lee, Ji-Hyee; Kyung, Soon-Goo; Park, Jee-Yong; Cho, In-Soo; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen, is one of the major causes of viral encephalitis. To reduce the impact of Japanese encephalitis among children in the Republic of Korea (ROK), the government established a mandatory vaccination program in 1967. Through the efforts of this program only 0-7 (mean 2.1) cases of Japanese encephalitis were reported annually in the ROK during the period of 1984-2009. However, in 2010 there was an outbreak of 26 confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis, including 7 deaths. This represented a >12-fold increase in the number of confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK as compared to the mean number reported over the last 26 years and a 3.7-fold increase over the highest annual number of cases during this same period (7 cases). Surveillance of adult mosquitoes was conducted during the 2010 outbreak of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK. A total of 6,328 culicine mosquitoes belonging to 12 species from 5 genera were collected at 6 survey sites from June through October 2010 and assayed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of JEV. A total of 34/371 pooled samples tested positive for JEV (29/121 Culex tritaeniorhynchus, 4/64 Cx. pipiens, and 1/26 Cx. bitaeniorhynchus) as confirmed by sequencing of the pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 culicine vectors for Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Cx. pipiens, and Cx. bitaeniorhynchus were 11.8, 5.6, and 2.8, respectively. Sequences of the JEV pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes amplified from the culicine mosquitoes by RT-PCR were compared with those of JEV genotypes I-V. Phylogenetic analyses support the detection of a single genotype (I) among samples collected from the ROK in 2010.

  3. Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Mosquitoes during a 2010 Outbreak in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Terry A.; Ramey, Andrew M.; Lee, Ji-Hye; Kyung, Soon-Goo; Park, Jee-Yong; Cho, Yun Sang; Cho, In-Soo; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen, is one of the major causes of viral encephalitis. To reduce the impact of Japanese encephalitis among children in the Republic of Korea (ROK), the government established a mandatory vaccination program in 1967. Through the efforts of this program only 0–7 (mean 2.1) cases of Japanese encephalitis were reported annually in the ROK during the period of 1984–2009. However, in 2010 there was an outbreak of 26 confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis, including 7 deaths. This represented a >12-fold increase in the number of confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK as compared to the mean number reported over the last 26 years and a 3.7-fold increase over the highest annual number of cases during this same period (7 cases). Surveillance of adult mosquitoes was conducted during the 2010 outbreak of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK. A total of 6,328 culicine mosquitoes belonging to 12 species from 5 genera were collected at 6 survey sites from June through October 2010 and assayed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of JEV. A total of 34/371 pooled samples tested positive for JEV (29/121 Culex tritaeniorhynchus, 4/64 Cx. pipiens, and 1/26 Cx. bitaeniorhynchus) as confirmed by sequencing of the pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 culicine vectors for Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Cx. pipiens, and Cx. bitaeniorhynchus were 11.8, 5.6, and 2.8, respectively. Sequences of the JEV pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes amplified from the culicine mosquitoes by RT-PCR were compared with those of JEV genotypes I-V. Phylogenetic analyses support the detection of a single genotype (I) among samples collected from the ROK in 2010. PMID:23390520

  4. Voltage dependent anion channel is redistributed during Japanese encephalitis virus infection of insect cells.

    PubMed

    Fongsaran, Chanida; Phaonakrop, Narumon; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Thepparit, Chutima; Kuadkitkan, Atichat; Smith, Duncan R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an effective vaccine, Japanese encephalitis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many parts of Asia. Japanese encephalitis is caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito transmitted flavivirus. Many of the details of the virus replication cycle in mosquito cells remain unknown. This study sought to determine whether GRP78, a well-characterized flavivirus E protein interacting protein, interacted with JEV E protein in insect cells, and whether this interaction was mediated at the cell surface. GRP78 was shown to interact with JEV E protein by coimmunoprecipitation, and was additionally shown to interact with voltage dependent anion protein (VDAC) through the same methodology. Antibody inhibition experiments showed that neither GRP78 nor VDAC played a role in JEV internalization to insect cells. Interestingly, VDAC was shown to be significantly relocalized in response to JEV infection, and significant levels of colocalization between VDAC and GRP78 and VDAC and ribosomal L28 protein were seen in JEV infected but not uninfected cells. This is the first report of relocalization of VDAC in response to JEV infection and suggests that this may be a part of the JEV replication strategy in insect cells. PMID:25126612

  5. Ecological Niche Modeling to Estimate the Distribution of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robin H.; Masuoka, Penny; Klein, Terry A.; Kim, Heung-Chul; Somer, Todd; Grieco, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Culex tritaeniorhynchus is the primary vector of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a leading cause of encephalitis in Asia. JEV is transmitted in an enzootic cycle involving large wading birds as the reservoirs and swine as amplifying hosts. The development of a JEV vaccine reduced the number of JE cases in regions with comprehensive childhood vaccination programs, such as in Japan and the Republic of Korea. However, the lack of vaccine programs or insufficient coverage of populations in other endemic countries leaves many people susceptible to JEV. The aim of this study was to predict the distribution of Culex tritaeniorhynchus using ecological niche modeling. Methods/Principal Findings An ecological niche model was constructed using the Maxent program to map the areas with suitable environmental conditions for the Cx. tritaeniorhynchus vector. Program input consisted of environmental data (temperature, elevation, rainfall) and known locations of vector presence resulting from an extensive literature search and records from MosquitoMap. The statistically significant Maxent model of the estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence showed that the mean temperatures of the wettest quarter had the greatest impact on the model. Further, the majority of human Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases were located in regions with higher estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence. Conclusions/Significance Our ecological niche model of the estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence provides a framework for better allocation of vector control resources, particularly in locations where JEV vaccinations are unavailable. Furthermore, this model provides estimates of vector probability that could improve vector surveillance programs and JE control efforts. PMID:22724030

  6. [Recurrent encephalitis following annual influenza vaccine. Case report].

    PubMed

    González, Bernardita; Fica, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Influenza vaccine is rarely associated with neurological adverse effects such as Guillain Barré syndrome, encephalitis or aseptic meningitis. We report the case of a male patient that presented two episodes of acute encephalitis in consecutive years, 16 and 20 days after his annual influenza vaccine shot, respectively. In both instances, patient required ICU admission and evolved with fast recovery and no sequels. The first episode was managed empirically as herpetic encephalitis but an extensive study was performed in the second episode without identifying any microorganism. Neuroimaging studies also discarded acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Mild pleocytosis of mononuclear predominance was detected in both cases in CSF. Naranjo score punctuated 8 points indicating a probable causal relationship. Acute encephalitis is a rare adverse effect of influenza vaccine and occurs several days after immunization. It has a broad differential diagnosis, and appears to be of self-limited duration and associated with good prognosis. PMID:27315001

  7. Japanese encephalitis surveillance and immunization--Asia and the Western Pacific, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-08-23

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is a leading cause of encephalitis in Asia, causing an estimated 67,900 JE cases annually. To control JE, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that JE vaccine be incorporated into immunization programs in all areas where JE is a public health problem. For many decades, progress mainly occurred in a small number of high-income Asian countries. Recently, prospects for control have improved with better disease burden awareness as a result of increased JE surveillance and wider availability of safe, effective vaccines. This report summarizes the status of JE surveillance and immunization programs in 2012 in Asia and the Western Pacific. Data were obtained from the WHO/United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) Joint Reporting Form (JRF), published literature, meeting reports, and websites. In 2012, 18 (75%) of the 24 countries with areas of JE virus transmission risk conducted at least some JE surveillance, and 11 (46%) had a JE immunization program. Further progress toward JE control requires increased awareness of disease burden at the national and regional levels, availability of WHO-prequalified pediatric JE vaccines, and international support for surveillance and vaccine introduction in countries with limited resources. PMID:23965828

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis virus in mosquitoes in Taiwan during 2005-2012.

    PubMed

    Su, Chien-Ling; Yang, Cheng-Fen; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Lu, Liang-Chen; Lin, Cheo; Tsai, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chen, Li-Yu; Chang, Shu-Fen; Shu, Pei-Yun

    2014-10-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Pigs and water birds are the main amplifying and maintenance hosts of the virus. In this study, we conducted a JEV survey in mosquitoes captured in pig farms and water bird wetland habitats in Taiwan during 2005 to 2012. A total of 102,633 mosquitoes were collected. Culex tritaeniorhynchus was the most common mosquito species found in the pig farms and wetlands. Among the 26 mosquito species collected, 11 tested positive for JEV by RT-PCR, including Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Cx. annulus, Anopheles sinensis, Armigeres subalbatus, and Cx. fuscocephala. Among those testing positive, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was the predominant vector species for the transmission of JEV genotypes I and III in Taiwan. The JEV infection rate was significantly higher in the mosquitoes from the pig farms than those from the wetlands. A phylogenetic analysis of the JEV envelope gene sequences isolated from the captured mosquitoes demonstrated that the predominant JEV genotype has shifted from genotype III to genotype I (GI), providing evidence for transmission cycle maintenance and multiple introductions of the GI strains in Taiwan during 2008 to 2012. This study demonstrates the intense JEV transmission activity in Taiwan, highlights the importance of JE vaccination for controlling the epidemic, and provides valuable information for the assessment of the vaccine's efficacy. PMID:25275652

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Mosquitoes in Taiwan during 2005–2012

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chien-Ling; Yang, Cheng-Fen; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Lu, Liang-Chen; Lin, Cheo; Tsai, Kun-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chen, Li-Yu; Chang, Shu-Fen; Shu, Pei-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease caused by the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Pigs and water birds are the main amplifying and maintenance hosts of the virus. In this study, we conducted a JEV survey in mosquitoes captured in pig farms and water bird wetland habitats in Taiwan during 2005 to 2012. A total of 102,633 mosquitoes were collected. Culex tritaeniorhynchus was the most common mosquito species found in the pig farms and wetlands. Among the 26 mosquito species collected, 11 tested positive for JEV by RT-PCR, including Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Cx. annulus, Anopheles sinensis, Armigeres subalbatus, and Cx. fuscocephala. Among those testing positive, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was the predominant vector species for the transmission of JEV genotypes I and III in Taiwan. The JEV infection rate was significantly higher in the mosquitoes from the pig farms than those from the wetlands. A phylogenetic analysis of the JEV envelope gene sequences isolated from the captured mosquitoes demonstrated that the predominant JEV genotype has shifted from genotype III to genotype I (GI), providing evidence for transmission cycle maintenance and multiple introductions of the GI strains in Taiwan during 2008 to 2012. This study demonstrates the intense JEV transmission activity in Taiwan, highlights the importance of JE vaccination for controlling the epidemic, and provides valuable information for the assessment of the vaccine's efficacy. PMID:25275652

  10. Seroprevalence of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in captive Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata).

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Saito, Akatsuki; Noguchi, Keita; Terada, Yutaka; Kuwata, Ryusei; Akari, Hirofumi; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Maeda, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which is transmitted by mosquitoes, infects many animal species and causes serious acute encephalitis in humans and horses. In this study, a serosurvey of JEV in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) reared in Aichi Prefecture was conducted using purified JEV as an antigen for ELISA. The results revealed that 146 of 332 monkeys (44 %) were seropositive for JEV. In addition, 35 of 131 monkeys (27 %) born in the facility were seropositive, and the annual infection rate in the facility was estimated as 13 %. Our results provide evidence of the frequent exposure of many Japanese macaques to JEV, suggesting that there is a risk of JEV transmission to humans by mosquitoes. PMID:24748049

  11. Enhanced immune responses against Japanese encephalitis virus using recombinant adenoviruses coexpressing Japanese encephalitis virus envelope and porcine interleukin-6 proteins in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanyang; Wu, Rui; Liu, Kai; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Zhao, Qin; Wen, Xintian; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-08-15

    Japanese encephalitis is a reproductive disorder caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in swine. Previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) may be a potential vaccine candidate because it can express JEV envelope epitopes and induce immune responses against JEV. Still, it will be necessary to develop an adjuvant that can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses to the recombinant antigen delivered by non-replicating Ad5. In this study, we investigated the systemic immune responses of BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus expressing JEV envelope epitopes in combination with porcine interleukin-6 (rAdE-IL-6).The rAdE-IL-6 immunized group had the highest titers of anti-JEV antibody as detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as well as the highest levels of neutralizing antibody (1:75) as detected by a serum neutralization test. Similarly, higher concentrations of interferon-gamma (834.7pg/ml) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) (229.7pg/ml) were detected in the rAdE-IL-6 group using an ELISA assay. These data indicate that immunized BALB/c induce a strong cellular response against rAdE-IL-6. Furthermore, after challenge with the virulent JEV SCYA201201 strain, the rAdE-IL-6 group generated an immune protective response 70% greater than that of the control group, indicating that rAdE-IL-6 induced a protective immune response against JEV challenge in mice. The results from this study demonstrated that IL-6 is a strong adjuvant that can enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses in mice. Furthermore, a recombinant adenovirus coexpressing JEV envelope epitopes and porcine IL-6 protein may be an effective vaccine in animals. PMID:27235810

  12. Cost-effectiveness of routine immunization to control Japanese encephalitis in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Kilgore, Paul E.; Clemens, John D.; Wei, Liu; Zhi-Yi, Xu

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of inactivated and live attenuated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines given to infants and children in Shanghai. METHODS: A decision-analytical model was constructed in order to compare costs and outcomes for three hypothetical cohorts of 100,000 children followed from birth in 1997 to the age of 30 years who received either no JE vaccine, inactivated JE vaccine (P3), or live attenuated JE vaccine (SA 14-14-2). Cumulative incidences of JE from birth to 30 years of age in the pre-immunization era, i.e. before 1968, were used to estimate expected rates of JE in the absence of vaccination. The economic consequences were measured as cost per case, per death, and per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted for the two JE immunization programmes. FINDINGS: In comparison with no JE immunization, a programme using the P3 vaccine would prevent 420 JE cases and 105 JE deaths and would save 6456 DALYs per 100,000 persons; the use of the SA 14-14-2 vaccine would prevent 427 cases and 107 deaths and would save 6556 DALYs per 100,000 persons. Both kinds of immunization were cost saving but the SA 14-14-2 vaccine strategy resulted in a saving that was 47% greater (512,456 US dollars) than that obtained with the P3 vaccine strategy (348,246 US dollars). CONCLUSION: Both JE immunization strategies resulted in cost savings in comparison with no JE immunization. This provides a strong economic rationale for vaccinating against JE in Shanghai and suggests that vaccination against JE might be economically justifiable in other parts of China and in certain other developing countries of Asia where the disease is endemic. PMID:12856051

  13. Trend of Japanese encephalitis in Uttar Pradesh, India from 2011 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Singh, A K; Khan, D N; Pandey, M; Kumar, R; Garg, R; Jain, A

    2016-01-01

    As indicated by the sporadic Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases reported from the districts of Uttar Pradesh (UP), India, the disease is endemic in the state despite the fact that a JE vaccination programme has been ongoing in the state since 2006. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the annual trend of JE in UP during January 2011 to December 2013. CSF and/or serum samples collected from acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases were referred to the virology laboratory at King George's Medical University, Lucknow and were tested for anti-JEV IgM antibodies by JEV MAC-ELISA kit. The study reveals that 26·9%, 9·9% and 14·8% of AES cases were positive for anti-JEV IgM in the years 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. Of the total JE confirmed cases, 30% were adults. Males were more commonly affected than females. A distinct peak of JE was seen in the monsoon and post-monsoon season, although sporadic cases were also reported in other months. JE vaccination by district in UP is discussed. This study reports that the proportion of JE positives in AES cases is decreasing in UP although the number of AES cases has not decreased. The study also discusses the probable causes of this decrease, including JE vaccination and natural periodicity due to herd immunity. PMID:26112391

  14. Recurrence of Japanese Encephalitis Epidemic in Wuhan, China, 2009–2010

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zerong; Tian, Junhua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Zheng, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) was once epidemic in most areas of China, including Wuhan, a city located in the central part of China. The incidence of JE dramatically decreased due to nationwide immunization with the live attenuated JE virus (JEV) vaccine, and no JE cases were reported during 2005–2008 in Wuhan. In 2009 and 2010, 31 JE cases reoccurred in this area. In this study, we investigated the causes of JE recurrence. Methods and Findings All JE cases were laboratory-confirmed by detecting the JEV-specific IgM antibody with an IgM-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All patients were children between 2 months and 9 years of age with a median age of 2 years. Of the 31 cases, 9 had received one or two doses of the JEV vaccine, 11 had not been immunized previously with the JEV vaccine, and 11 had an unclear immunization history. Through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis, two new strains of JEV were isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus and identified as genotype 1 JEV, rather than genotype 3, which circulated in this area previously. Conclusions Vaccine failure or missed vaccination may have caused JE recurrence. Local centers for disease control and prevention need to improve immunization coverage, and the efficacy of the JE vaccine needs to be reevaluated in a population at risk for disease. PMID:23326348

  15. Origin and evolution of Japanese encephalitis virus in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Tom; Ni, Haolin; Beasley, David W C; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel; Cardosa, Mary Jane; Barrett, Alan D T

    2003-03-01

    Since it emerged in Japan in the 1870s, Japanese encephalitis has spread across Asia and has become the most important cause of epidemic encephalitis worldwide. Four genotypes of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are presently recognized (representatives of genotypes I to III have been fully sequenced), but its origin is not known. We have determined the complete nucleotide and amino acid sequence of a genotype IV Indonesian isolate (JKT6468) which represents the oldest lineage, compared it with other fully sequenced genomes, and examined the geographical distribution of all known isolates. JKT6468 was the least similar, with nucleotide divergence ranging from 17.4 to 19.6% and amino acid divergence ranging from 4.7 to 6.5%. It included an unusual series of amino acids at the carboxy terminus of the core protein unlike that seen in other JEV strains. Three signature amino acids in the envelope protein (including E327 Leu-->Thr/Ser on the exposed lateral surface of the putative receptor binding domain) distinguished genotype IV strains from more recent genotypes. Analysis of all 290 JEV isolates for which sequence data are available showed that the Indonesia-Malaysia region has all genotypes of JEV circulating, whereas only more recent genotypes circulate in other areas (P < 0.0001). These results suggest that JEV originated from its ancestral virus in the Indonesia-Malaysia region and evolved there into the different genotypes which then spread across Asia. Our data, together with recent evidence on the origins of other emerging viruses, including dengue virus and Nipah virus, imply that tropical southeast Asia may be an important zone for emerging pathogens. PMID:12584335

  16. Whooping crane titers to eastern equine encephalitis vaccinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Kolski, E.; Hatfield, J.S.; Docherty, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    In 1984 an epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus killed 7 of 39 (18%) whooping cranes in captivity at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, USA. Since that time whooping cranes have been vaccinated with a human EEE vaccine. This vaccine was unavailable for several years, necessitating use of an equine vaccine in the cranes. This study compared the antibody titers measured for three years using the human vaccine with those measured for two years using the equine form. Whooping cranes developed similarly elevated titers in one year using the human vaccine and both years using the equine vaccine. However, in two years where the human vaccine was used, the whooping cranes developed significantly lower titers compared to other years.

  17. Sero-Molecular Epidemiology of Japanese Encephalitis in Zhejiang, an Eastern Province of China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ju-ying; Zhou, Jia-yue; Tang, Xue-wen; He, Han-qing; Xie, Rong-hui; Mao, Hai-yan; Zhang, Yan-jun; Xie, Shu-yun

    2016-01-01

    Background Sporadic Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases still have been reported in Zhejiang Province in recent years, and concerns about vaccine cross-protection and population-level immunity have been raised off and on within the public health sphere. Genotype I (GI) has replaced GIII as the dominant genotype in Asian countries during the past few decades, which caused considerable concerns about the potential change of epidemiology characteristics and the vaccine effectiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of JE neutralizing antibody and its waning antibody trend after live attenuated JE vaccine immunization. Additionally, this study analyzed the molecular characteristics of the E gene of Zhejiang Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains, and established genetic relationships with other JEV strains. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 570 serum specimens were sampled from community population aged from 0 to 92 years old in Xianju county of Zhejiang Province in 2013–2014. Microseroneutralization test results were analyzed to estimate the population immunity and to observe antibody dynamics in vaccinated children. E genes of 28 JEV strains isolated in Zhejiang Province were sequenced for phylogenetic tree construction and molecular characteristics analysis with other selected strains. Positive JE neutralizing antibody rates were higher in residents ≥35 years old (81%~98%) and lower in residents <35 years old (0~57%). 7 or 8 years after the 2nd live attenuated vaccine dose, the antibodies against for 4 different strains with microseroneutralization test were decreased by 55%~73% on seropositive rates and by 25%~38% on GMTs respectively. JEV strains isolated in recent years were all grouped into GI, while those isolated in the 1980s belonged to GIII. On important amino acid sites related to antigenicity, there was no divergence between the Zhejiang JE virus strains and the vaccine strain (SA14-14-2). Conclusion/Significances JE

  18. A Model Immunization Programme to Control Japanese Encephalitis in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Nguyen Thu; Hanh, Hoang Duc; Chang, Na Yoon; Duong, Tran Nhu; Gibbons, Robert V.; Marks, Florian; Thu, Nghiem Anh; Hong, Nguyen Minh; Park, Jin Kyung; Tuan, Pham Anh; Nisalak, Ananda; Clemens, John D.; Xu, Zhi-yi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Viet Nam, an inactivated, mouse brain-derived vaccine for Japanese encephalitis (JE) has been given exclusively to ≤5 years old children in 3 paediatric doses since 1997. However, JE incidence remained high, especially among children aged 5-9 years. We conducted a model JE immunization programme to assess the feasibility and impact of JE vaccine administered to 1-9 year(s) children in 3 standard-dose regimen: paediatric doses for children aged <3 years and adult doses for those aged ≥3 years. Of the targeted children, 96.2% were immunized with ≥2 doses of the vaccine. Compared to the national immunization programme, JE incidence rate declined sharply in districts with the model programme (11.32 to 0.87 per 100,000 in pre-versus post-vaccination period). The rate of reduction was most significant in the 5-9 years age-group. We recommend a policy change to include 5-9 years old children in the catch-up immunization campaign and administer a 4th dose to those aged 5-9 years, who had received 3 doses of the vaccine during the first 2-3 years of life. PMID:25995736

  19. A Case Series of Three US Adults with Japanese Encephalitis, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Susan L.; Stoltey, Juliet; Martínez, Diana; Kim, Paul Y.; Sheriff, Heather; Zangeneh, Ana; Eilerman, Sally R.; Fischer, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is the leading vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia. Although the risk for JE for most travelers to Asia is low, it varies based on the destination, season, trip duration, and activities. Methods We present case reports for three US adults who were infected with JE virus while traveling or residing in Asia. Results Among the three JE cases, one case had a 10-day trip to mainland China and participated in outdoor activities in a rural area, a second case had been resident in Taiwan for 4 months, and a third, fatal case was an expatriate living in South Korea. Conclusions JE should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any patient with an acute neurologic infection who recently has been in a JE-endemic country. Health-care providers should assess the itineraries of travelers to JE-endemic countries, provide guidance on personal protective measures to prevent vector-borne diseases, and consider recommending JE vaccine for travelers at increased risk for JE virus infection. PMID:24861145

  20. Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are considered to be the main amplifying host for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and their infection can correlate with human cases of disease. Despite their importance in the ecology of the virus as it relates to human cases of encephalitis, the pathogenesis of JEV in pigs remains obscure. In the present study, the localization and kinetics of virus replication were investigated in various tissues after experimental intravenous infection of pigs. The data demonstrate a rapid and broad spreading of the virus to the central nervous system (CNS) and various other organs. A particular tropism of JEV in pigs not only to the CNS but also for secondary lymphoid tissue, in particular the tonsils with the overall highest viral loads, was observed. In this organ, even 11 days post infection, the latest time point of the experiment, no apparent decrease in viral RNA loads and live virus was found despite the presence of a neutralizing antibody response. This was also well beyond the clinical and viremic phase. These results are of significance for the pathogenesis of JEV, and call for further experimental studies focusing on the cellular source and duration of virus replication in pigs. PMID:26911997

  1. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  2. Japanese Encephalitis in Travelers from Non-Endemic Countries, 1973–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Susan L.; Griggs, Anne C.; Fischer, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a severe disease and a risk for travelers who visit JE-endemic countries. We reviewed all published JE cases in travelers from non-endemic areas from 1973 through 2008, and assessed factors related to risk of infection. There were 55 cases that occurred in citizens of 17 countries. Age range of case-patients was 1–91 years (median = 34 years). Ten (18%) persons died and 24 (44%) had mild to severe sequelae. In a detailed risk assessment of 37 case-patients, 24 (65%) had spent ≥ 1 month in JE-endemic areas, and most had factors identified that may have increased infection risk. The estimate of overall JE risk was low, < 1 case/1 million travelers to JE-endemic countries. Nonetheless, for each traveler, a careful assessment of itinerary and activities, a decision on vaccination, and information on mosquito precautions are needed to reduce the risk of this disease. PMID:20439978

  3. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M.; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R.; Pant, Ganesh R.; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K.; Impoinvil, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. PMID:26956778

  4. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    PubMed

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R; Pant, Ganesh R; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K; Impoinvil, Daniel E

    2016-04-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. PMID:26956778

  5. Comparison of Genotypes I and III in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Reveals Distinct Differences in Their Genetic and Host Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Na; Adams, James; Chen, Ping; Guo, Zhen-yang; Zhong, Xiang-fu; Fang, Wei; Li, Na; Wen, Lei; Tao, Xiao-yan; Yuan, Zhi-ming

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arthropod-borne disease associated with the majority of viral encephalitis cases in the Asia-Pacific region. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has been phylogenetically divided into five genotypes. Recent surveillance data indicate that genotype I (GI) is gradually replacing genotype III (GIII) as the dominant genotype. To investigate the mechanism behind the genotype shift and the potential consequences in terms of vaccine efficacy, human cases, and virus dissemination, we collected (i) all full-length and partial JEV molecular sequences and (ii) associated genotype and host information comprising a data set of 873 sequences. We then examined differences between the two genotypes at the genetic and epidemiological level by investigating amino acid mutations, positive selection, and host range. We found that although GI is dominant, it has fewer sites predicted to be under positive selection, a narrower host range, and significantly fewer human isolates. For the E protein, the sites under positive selection define a haplotype set for each genotype that shows striking differences in their composition and diversity, with GIII showing significantly more variety than GI. Our results suggest that GI has displaced GIII by achieving a replication cycle that is more efficient but is also more restricted in its host range. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis is an arthropod-borne disease associated with the majority of viral encephalitis cases in the Asia-Pacific region. The causative agent, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), has been divided into five genotypes based on sequence similarity. Recent data indicate that genotype I (GI) is gradually replacing genotype III (GIII) as the dominant genotype. Understanding the reasons behind this shift and the potential consequences in terms of vaccine efficacy, human cases, and virus dissemination is important for controlling the spread of the virus and reducing human

  6. Neuropathogenesis of Japanese Encephalitis in a Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Kipar, Anja; Jarman, Richard G.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Perng, Guey Chuen; Flanagan, Brian; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Van Gessel, Yvonne; Solomon, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity for which there is no treatment. In addition to direct viral cytopathology, the inflammatory response is postulated to contribute to the pathogenesis. Our goal was to determine the contribution of bystander effects and inflammatory mediators to neuronal cell death. Methodology/Principal Findings Material from a macaque model was used to characterize the inflammatory response and cytopathic effects of JE virus (JEV). Intranasal JEV infection induced a non-suppurative encephalitis, dominated by perivascular, infiltrates of mostly T cells, alongside endothelial cell activation, vascular damage and blood brain barrier (BBB) leakage; in the adjacent parenchyma there was macrophage infiltration, astrocyte and microglia activation. JEV antigen was mostly in neurons, but there was no correlation between intensity of viral infection and degree of inflammatory response. Apoptotic cell death occurred in both infected and non-infected neurons. Interferon-α, which is a microglial activator, was also expressed by both. Tumour Necrosis Factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine were expressed by microglial cells, astrocytes and macrophages. The same cells expressed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 whilst MMP-9 was expressed by neurons. Conclusions/Significance The results are consistent with JEV inducing neuronal apoptotic death and release of cytokines that initiate microglial activation and release of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic mediators with subsequent apoptotic death of both infected and uninfected neurons. Activation of astrocytes, microglial and endothelial cells likely contributes to inflammatory cell recruitment and BBB breakdown. It appears that neuronal apoptotic death and activation of microglial cells and astrocytes play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of JE. PMID:25102067

  7. Phylogeography of Japanese Encephalitis Virus: Genotype Is Associated with Climate

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate. PMID:24009790

  8. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. PMID:24780919

  9. Alteration in plasma glucose levels in Japanese encephalitis patients.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Apurva; Singh, Aditi; Atrishi, Ekta; Saxena, S K; Mathur, Asha

    2002-02-01

    A unique factor, human T cell hypoglycaemic factor (hTCHF), has been shown to produce hypoglycaemia during the convalescent stage in the plasma of patients with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. The present study was undertaken to investigate the ability of T cells from fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of such patients to produce hTCHF. The PBMC, as well as the individual subpopulations, were cultured for 24 h and the culture supernatants (CS) were assayed for hypoglycaemic activity. The activity was observed in the CD8+ T cells. The hypoglycaemia in JE-confirmed patients coincided with the gradual rise in circulating glucagon level, with no significant alterations in insulin, growth hormone and cortisol levels. The hTCHF was purified by ion exchange chromatography and the purified protein was observed as a approximately 25 kDa band on SDS-PAGE. Secretory hTCHF in the sera of patients and T cell CS was present in 88% of convalescent serum samples. We conclude that during the convalescent stage of JEV infection, a unique factor, hTCHF, is secreted by activated CD8+ T cells from patients and that this is responsible for the development of hypoglycaemia. PMID:12059908

  10. THE AUSTRIAN VACCINATION PARADOX: TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VACCINATION VERSUS INFLUENZA VACCINATION.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula; Kunze, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a paradoxical situation in Austria. The vaccination rate against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in the general population is 82%, which is the highest worldwide, whereas the vaccination rate against influenza is about 8% and is among the lowest worldwide. A high awareness of TBE among the Austrian population achieved by an annual social marketing programme and the wide use of effective and well-tolerated vaccines have led to a successful containment of that disease. The vaccination coverage increased from 6% in 1980 to 82% in 2013 and exceeds 90% in some high-risk areas. This has led to a steady decline in the number of TBE cases from several hundred cases to 50 to 100 cases per year. The situation in regard to influenza vaccination is the opposite. Although Austria has issued one of the most extensive recommendations for influenza vaccination worldwide, the vaccination rate of the general population is extremely low. The possible reasons for the failure in the implementation of recommendations are ignorance, lack of social marketing and the predominance of a distinct discordance within the health system in general, and the Austrian medical fraternity in particular. PMID:26615654

  11. Complete genome sequence of two genotype III Japanese encephalitis virus isolates from West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Taraphdar, Debjani; Chatterjee, Shyamalendu

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Japanese encephalitis (JE), caused by a mosquito-borne virus JE virus (JEV), is a serious health problem in West Bengal, India. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of two JEV isolates from West Bengal. The amino acid and nucleotide sequence homology was compared with other Indian strains. Methods: Two JEV isolates (IND-WB-JE1 and IND-WB-JE2) obtained in 2008 and 2010, respectively, from two districts of the State of West Bengal, respectively were analyzed for genetic variations by sequencing the 10934 bp whole genome of the virus. Of these two districts, one was covered under JE vaccination programme in 2007. Results: Phylogenetic analysis showed that both the isolates belonged to the genotype III. A total of 16 mutations were identified in the two isolates studied with respect to Vellore P20778 strain. One unique mutation A3215S was only found in IND-WB-JE2 isolate, but not in the isolate IND-WB-JE1. These two isolates showed maximum homology with P20778 strain of India. Interpretation & conclusions: This study reports on complete gene based phylogenetic analysis of JEV isolates from the State of West Bengal. It was evident from the results that JEV was still under circulation in both vaccine covered and not covered districts of West Bengal. PMID:26261169

  12. Neutralization of Japanese Encephalitis Virus by heme-induced broadly reactive human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nimesh; de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Lecerf, Maxime; Kalia, Manjula; Scheel, Tobias; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Desprès, Philippe; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    Geographical expansion and re-emerging new genotypes of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) require the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we studied a non-conventional approach for antibody therapy and show that, upon exposure to heme, a fraction of natural human immunoglobulins acquires high-affinity reactivity with the antigenic domain-III of JEV E glycoprotein. These JEV-reactive antibodies exhibited neutralizing activity against recently dominant JEV genotypes. This study opens new therapeutic options for Japanese encephalitis. PMID:26542535

  13. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Claire L; Walker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000-175,000, with 25%-30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a "dead-end" host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of "dengue-refractory" mosquito lines. The successful

  14. The Potential Use of Wolbachia-Based Mosquito Biocontrol Strategies for Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Claire L.; Walker, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a zoonotic pathogen transmitted by the infectious bite of Culex mosquitoes. The virus causes the development of the disease Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a small proportion of those infected, predominantly affecting children in eastern and southern Asia. Annual JE incidence estimates range from 50,000–175,000, with 25%–30% of cases resulting in mortality. It is estimated that 3 billion people live in countries in which JEV is endemic. The virus exists in an enzootic transmission cycle, with mosquitoes transmitting JEV between birds as reservoir hosts and pigs as amplifying hosts. Zoonotic infection occurs as a result of spillover events from the main transmission cycle. The reservoir avian hosts include cattle egrets, pond herons, and other species of water birds belonging to the family Ardeidae. Irrigated rice fields provide an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes and attract migratory birds, maintaining the transmission of JEV. Although multiple vaccines have been developed for JEV, they are expensive and require multiple doses to maintain efficacy and immunity. As humans are a “dead-end” host for the virus, vaccination of the human population is unlikely to result in eradication. Therefore, vector control of the principal mosquito vector, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, represents a more promising strategy for reducing transmission. Current vector control strategies include intermittent irrigation of rice fields and space spraying of insecticides during outbreaks. However, Cx. Tritaeniorhynchus is subject to heavy exposure to pesticides in rice fields, and as a result, insecticide resistance has developed. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the potential use of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia for mosquito biocontrol. The successful transinfection of Wolbachia strains from Drosophila flies to Aedes (Stegomyia) mosquitoes has resulted in the generation of “dengue-refractory” mosquito lines

  15. A hospital-based surveillance for Japanese encephalitis in Bali, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Komang; Liu, Wei; Gautama, Kompiang; Mammen, Mammen P; Clemens, John D; Nisalak, Ananda; Subrata, Ketut; Kim, Hyei Kyung; Xu, Zhi-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) is presumed to be endemic throughout Asia, yet only a few cases have been reported in tropical Asian countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. To estimate the true disease burden due to JE in this region, we conducted a prospective, hospital-based surveillance with a catchment population of 599,120 children less than 12 years of age in Bali, Indonesia, from July 2001 through December 2003. Methods Balinese children presenting to any health care facility with acute viral encephalitis or aseptic meningitis were enrolled. A "confirmed" diagnosis of JE required the detection of JE virus (JEV)-specific IgM in cerebrospinal fluid, whereas a diagnosis of "probable JE" was assigned to those cases in which JEV-specific IgM was detected only in serum. Results In all, 86 confirmed and 4 probable JE cases were identified. The annualized JE incidence rate was 7.1 and adjusted to 8.2 per 100,000 for children less than 10 years of age over the 2.5 consecutive years of study. Only one JE case was found among 96,920 children 10–11 years old (0.4 per 100,000). Nine children (10%) died and 33 (37%) of the survivors had neurological sequelae at discharge. JEV was transmitted in Bali year-round with 70% of cases in the rainy season. Conclusion JE incidence and case-fatality rates in Bali were comparable to those of other JE-endemic countries of Asia. Our findings contradict the common wisdom that JE is rare in tropical Asia. Hence, the geographical range of endemic JE is broader than previously described. The results of the study support the need to introduce JE vaccination into Bali. PMID:16603053

  16. Susceptibility of a North American Culex quinquefasciatus to Japanese encephalitis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a flavivirus that is transmitted by Culex (Cx.) tritaeniorhynchus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia. The endemic transmission cycle involves domestic pigs and avian species that serve as amplification hosts; humans are incidental hosts that cannot devel...

  17. Comparison of the antigenic relationship between Japanese encephalitis virus genotypes 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype circulating in Korea has changed from G3 to G1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the antigenic relationship between the two genotypes by using antibody tests. Materials and Methods Blood samples from 42 sows and 216 horses were collected, and their seroprevalence was monitored using the hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralization tests. Antisera against JEV G1 and G3 were isolated and prepared from guinea pigs. The cross-reactivity of these two viruses was then compared using the neutralizing antibody test. Results We found that there was a difference in the seropositive ratios of JEV G1 and G3. However, the difference was dependent on the antibody test used. There was also an observed difference in the antigenicity between the two genotypes, as ascertained using the neutralizing antibody test. Conclusion There is an evident difference in JEV antigenicity between the genotypes G1 and G3. Therefore, we propose monitoring of the seroprevalence of JEV, and reevaluating the antigenicity of the current vaccine by using the relevant tests. PMID:26866021

  18. Susceptibility of a North American Culex quinquefasciatus to Japanese Encephalitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jang S; Harbin, Julie N; Hettenbach, Susan M; Maki, Elin; Cohnstaedt, Lee W; Barrett, Alan D T; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana L

    2015-11-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a flavivirus that is transmitted by Culex (Cx.) tritaeniorhynchus in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia. The endemic transmission cycle involves domestic pigs and avian species that serve as amplification hosts; humans are incidental hosts that cannot develop a high-titer viremia sufficient for mosquito infection. Although vaccination can be an effective strategy for disease prevention and is used extensively in multiple Asian countries, unvaccinated immunologically naïve human populations can suffer from severe neurological sequelae. The potential introduction of JEV into North America would be a major threat to human and animal health. In this study, field-collected Cx. quinquefasciatus from Valdosta, Georgia, were tested for their susceptibility to JEV and their potential to develop a disseminated infection via per os infection. These results demonstrate that North American Cx. quinquefasciatus are susceptible to JEV infection and subsequent dissemination at 14 days post infection (d.p.i.). Detection of viral RNA in saliva from infected mosquitoes also indicates competent vectors for JEV can be found in North America. PMID:26565775

  19. Standardization of serum neutralization assay of Japanese encephalitis virus (Nakayama NIH strain) on BHK-21 (Cl-13) cell line.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Sharma, M; Kumar, S; Gowal, D

    2015-09-01

    Potency testing of Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine has been a complex process since its inception. To overcome difficulties encountered therein, an alternative assay, serum neutralization test (SNT), using Baby Hamster Kidney 21 cell line, has been standardized. The antibody response generated against JE vaccine was quantified and the assay was found to be sensitive and specific enough with significant accuracy and precision. On analysis of cell count, a cell concentration of 1.5 x 104 was selected as the optimum, since concentrations above and below this resulted in problems of confluent monolayer formation and incomplete monolayer formation. Incubation time has also been standardized for measuring cytopathic effect (CPE). Out of the four different time points selected, 90 min was found to be adequate for 50% reduction in the amount of CPE. The accuracy of SNT assay is explained in terms of fiducial limits at 95% level. Inter- and intra-assay reproducibility testing was also performed. A comparison of potency of JE vaccine by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) and SNT method was conducted and it was found that SNT can be a reliable approach for estimating the potency of JE vaccine. The results of this study throw a light on the utility of SNT assay for the potency estimation of JE vaccine in routine practice. PMID:26435146

  20. Yellow Fever/Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Viruses: Construction and Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Thomas J.; Nestorowicz, Ann; Mason, Peter W.; Rice, Charles M.

    1999-01-01

    A system has been developed for generating chimeric yellow fever/Japanese encephalitis (YF/JE) viruses from cDNA templates encoding the structural proteins prM and E of JE virus within the backbone of a molecular clone of the YF17D strain. Chimeric viruses incorporating the proteins of two JE strains, SA14-14-2 (human vaccine strain) and JE Nakayama (JE-N [virulent mouse brain-passaged strain]), were studied in cell culture and laboratory mice. The JE envelope protein (E) retained antigenic and biological properties when expressed with its prM protein together with the YF capsid; however, viable chimeric viruses incorporating the entire JE structural region (C-prM-E) could not be obtained. YF/JE(prM-E) chimeric viruses grew efficiently in cells of vertebrate or mosquito origin compared to the parental viruses. The YF/JE SA14-14-2 virus was unable to kill young adult mice by intracerebral challenge, even at doses of 106 PFU. In contrast, the YF/JE-N virus was neurovirulent, but the phenotype resembled parental YF virus rather than JE-N. Ten predicted amino acid differences distinguish the JE E proteins of the two chimeric viruses, therefore implicating one or more residues as virus-specific determinants of mouse neurovirulence in this chimeric system. This study indicates the feasibility of expressing protective antigens of JE virus in the context of a live, attenuated flavivirus vaccine strain (YF17D) and also establishes a genetic system for investigating the molecular basis for neurovirulence determinants encoded within the JE E protein. PMID:10074160

  1. Surveillance for Japanese encephalitis in villages near Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Mani, T R; Rao, C V; Rajendran, R; Devaputra, M; Prasanna, Y; Hanumaiah; Gajanana, A; Reuben, R

    1991-01-01

    A simple dusk index was developed to monitor the density of recognized vectors of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) based on hand catches around cattlesheds at dusk and parous rates. When used routinely in combination with sentinel animal studies for surveillance in villages with a high prevalence (46.2%) of neutralizing antibodies against JEV in children under 16 years, there was a peak in vector density and virus activity during the north-east monsoon period, October-December. The reasons for an unusual outbreak of cases of encephalitis during the summer months of 1984 are discussed. PMID:1653473

  2. A systematic review of the literature to identify and quantify host and vector competence and abundance of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne arbovirus that causes endemic and epidemic encephalitis in Eastern and Southeastern Asia. Swine and wading birds serve as reservoirs for the virus, which can be transmitted to humans via mosquitos. Currently, there is no specific treatment availa...

  3. A Lentiviral Vector Expressing Japanese Encephalitis Virus-like Particles Elicits Broad Neutralizing Antibody Response in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Souque, Philippe; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Paulous, Sylvie; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Summerfield, Artur; Charneau, Pierre; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the major cause of viral encephalitis in Southeast Asia. Vaccination of domestic pigs has been suggested as a “one health” strategy to reduce viral disease transmission to humans. The efficiency of two lentiviral TRIP/JEV vectors expressing the JEV envelope prM and E glycoproteins at eliciting protective humoral response was assessed in a mouse model and piglets. Methodology/Principal Findings A gene encoding the envelope proteins prM and E from a genotype 3 JEV strain was inserted into a lentiviral TRIP vector. Two lentiviral vectors TRIP/JEV were generated, each expressing the prM signal peptide followed by the prM protein and the E glycoprotein, the latter being expressed either in its native form or lacking its two C-terminal transmembrane domains. In vitro transduction of cells with the TRIP/JEV vector expressing the native prM and E resulted in the efficient secretion of virus-like particles of Japanese encephalitis virus. Immunization of BALB/c mice with TRIP/JEV vectors resulted in the production of IgGs against Japanese encephalitis virus, and the injection of a second dose one month after the prime injection greatly boosted antibody titers. The TRIP/JEV vectors elicited neutralizing antibodies against JEV strains belonging to genotypes 1, 3, and 5. Immunization of piglets with two doses of the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles led to high titers of anti-JEV antibodies, that had efficient neutralizing activity regardless of the JEV genotype tested. Conclusions/Significance Immunization of pigs with the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles is particularly efficient to prime antigen-specific humoral immunity and trigger neutralizing antibody responses against JEV genotypes 1, 3, and 5. The titers of neutralizing antibodies elicited by the TRIP/JEV vector are sufficient to confer protection in domestic pigs against different genotypes of JEV and this could be of a great

  4. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the E. coli-expressed domain III of Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Alka; Bharati, Kaushik; Malik, Y P S; Vrati, Sudhanshu

    2007-12-01

    Domain III of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) envelope protein (E-DIII) was synthesized in E. coli as a fusion protein containing maltose-binding protein (MBP-E-DIII) or six contiguous histidine residues (His-E-DIII) at its N-terminus. MBP-E-DIII was found both in the soluble as well as the insoluble fraction of the bacterial lysate, while His-E-DIII was found exclusively in the inclusion bodies. These purified proteins were examined in mice for their immunogenicity in presence of an aluminium hydroxide based-adjuvant Alhydrogel and Freund's adjuvant. While both proteins generated anti-JEV antibodies that neutralized JEV activity in vitro, His-E-DIII generated higher antibody titers than MBP-E-DIII. Mice immunized with His-E-DIII in presence of Alhydrogel generated antibody titers similar to those induced by the commercial vaccine and protected mice against lethal JEV challenge. PMID:17377815

  5. Malathion Resistance Status and Mutations in Acetylcholinesterase Gene (Ace) in Japanese Encephalitis and Filariasis Vectors from Endemic Area in India.

    PubMed

    Misra, Brij Ranjan; Gore, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) and lymphatic filariasis (LF) are endemic in estern part of Uttar Pradesh in India and transmitted by Culex mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). JE vaccination and mass drug administration for JE and LF management is being undertaken respectively. In addition to this, indoor residual spraying and fogging are used for the control of mosquito vectors. Organophosphate resistance in mosquito is dependent on alteration in acetylcholinesterase (Ace) gene. Hence, it is important to evaluate organophosphate resistance in Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (JE vector) and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LF vector). The current study showed the presence of resistant populations and F331W mutation in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and G119S mutation in Cx. quinquefasciatus insensitive Ace genes. Resistant populations of these two vectors increase the chances of spreading of resistance in the natural population and may cause failure of intervention programs that include organophosphates against these two vectors in future. PMID:26334819

  6. Two Uncommon Causes of Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Hepatitis E and Japanese Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Ganesan, Vijayan; Choudhury, Cankatika; Kar, Suvrendu Sankar; Karmakar, Parthasarathi; Choudhary, Vivek; Banerjee, Prasun; Bhar, Debarati; Hajra, Adrija; Layek, Manas; Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome where it is preceded by hepatitis E virus (HEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, respectively. Our first case is a forty-three-year-old nondiabetic, nonhypertensive female who was initially diagnosed with acute HEV induced viral hepatitis and subsequently developed acute onset ascending quadriparesis with lower motor neuron type of bilateral facial nerve palsies and respiratory failure. Second patient was a 14-year-old young male who presented with meningoencephalitis with acute onset symmetric flaccid paraparesis. After thorough investigations it was revealed as a case of Japanese encephalitis. Our idea of reporting these two cases is to make ourselves aware about this potential complication of these two common infections. PMID:26798531

  7. Change in Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Seroprevalence Rates in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Jeewandara, Chandima; Gomes, Laksiri; Paranavitane, S. A.; Tantirimudalige, Mihiri; Panapitiya, Sumedha Sandaruwan; Jayewardene, Amitha; Fernando, Samitha; Fernando, R. H.; Prathapan, Shamini

    2015-01-01

    Background Sri Lanka has been affected by epidemics of dengue infections for many decades and the incidence and severity of dengue infections have been rising each year. Therefore, we investigated the age stratified seroprevalence of dengue infections in order to facilitate future dengue vaccine strategies. In addition, since the symptomatic dengue infections have increased during the past few decades, we also investigated the possible association with Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) antibody seropositivity with symptomatic dengue in a community cohort in Sri Lanka. Methods 1689 healthy individuals who were attending a primary health care facility were recruited. Dengue and JEV antibody status was determined in all individuals and JEV vaccination status was recorded. Results 1152/1689 (68.2%) individuals were seropositive for dengue and only 133/1152 (11.5%) of them had been hospitalized to due to dengue. A significant and positive correlation was observed for dengue antibody seropositivity and age in children (Spearmans R = 0.84, p = 0.002) and in adults (Spearmans R = 0.96, p = 0.004). We observed a significant rise in the age stratified seroprevalence rates in children over a period of 12 years. For instance, in year 2003 the annual seroconversion rate was 1.5% per annum, which had risen to 3.79% per annum by 2014. We also found that both adults (p<0.001) and in children (p = 0.03) who were hospitalized due to dengue were more likely to be seropositive for JEV antibodies. However, 244 (91.4%) of adults who were seropositive for JEV had not had the JEV vaccine. Conclusions Dengue seroprevalence rates have risen significantly over the last 12 years in Sri Lanka, possibly due to increased transmission. As individuals who were hospitalized due to dengue were more likely to be seropositive for JEV, the possibility of cross-reactive assays and/or of JEV infection on immunity to the DENV and clinical disease severity should be further investigated. PMID:26696417

  8. A case of Japanese encephalitis in a 20 year-old Spanish sportsman, February 2013.

    PubMed

    Doti, P; Castro, P; Martínez, M J; Zboromyrska, Y; Aldasoro, E; Inciarte, A; Requena-Méndez, A; Requena, A; Milisenda, J; Fernández, S; Nicolás, J M; Muñoz, J

    2013-01-01

    We report a severe case of imported Japanese encephalitis (JE) in a healthy young Spanish traveller who developed symptoms after spending three weeks in a touristic area of Thailand. The patient was diagnosed in Thailand and subsequently transferred to Barcelona, Spain, where the Thai laboratory results were confirmed based on IgM serology. Although JE is a rare disease in travellers, this case illustrates the need for seeking travel medical advice before visiting tropical countries. PMID:24008230

  9. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hua, Rong-Hong; Liu, Li-Ke; Chen, Zhen-Shi; Li, Ye-Nan; Bu, Zhi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5)AIDITRK(11), (72)RDELNVL(78), (251)KSKHNRREGY(260), (269)DENGIVLD(276), and (341)DETTLVRS(348). Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays. PMID:23825668

  10. Protective immunity of E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein of Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Huang, Hong-Da; Chen, Wei-June

    2008-02-01

    Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) NS1 proteins generated using DNA vaccines and recombinant viruses have been demonstrated to induce protection in mice against a challenge of JEV at a lethal dose. The West Nile virus NS1 region expressed in E. coli is recognized by these protective monoclonal antibodies and, in this study, we compare immunogenicity and protective immunity of the E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein with another protective immunogen, the envelope domain III (ED3). Pre-challenge, detectable titers of JEV-specific neutralizing antibody were detected in the immunized mice with E. coli-synthesized ED3 protein (PRNT50 = 1:28) and the attenuated JEV strain T1P1 (PRNT50 = 1:53), but neutralizing antibodies were undetectable in the immunized mice with E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein (PRNT50 < 1:10). However, the survival rate of the NS1-immunized mice against the JEV challenge was 87.5% (7/8), showing significantly higher levels of protection than the ED3-immunized mice, 62.5% (5/8) (P = 0.041). In addition, E. coli-synthesized NS1 protein induced a significant increase of anti-NS1 IgG1 antibodies, resulting in an ELISA titer of 100,1000 in the immunized sera before lethal JEV challenge. Surviving mice challenged with the virulent JEV strain Beijing-1 showed a ten-fold or greater rise in IgG1 and IgG2b titers of anti-NS1 antibodies, implying that the Th2 cell activation might be predominantly responsible for antibody responses and mice protection. PMID:17876533

  11. Experimental evidence that RNA recombination occurs in the Japanese encephalitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.-K.; Chen, W.-J.

    2009-11-25

    Due to the lack of a proofreading function and error-repairing ability of genomic RNA, accumulated mutations are known to be a force driving viral evolution in the genus Flavivirus, including the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. Based on sequencing data, RNA recombination was recently postulated to be another factor associated with genomic variations in these viruses. We herein provide experimental evidence to demonstrate the occurrence of RNA recombination in the JE virus using two local pure clones (T1P1-S1 and CJN-S1) respectively derived from the local strains, T1P1 and CJN. Based on results from a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay on the C/preM junction comprising a fragment of 868 nucleotides (nt 10-877), the recombinant progeny virus was primarily formed in BHK-21 cells that had been co-infected with the two clones used in this study. Nine of 20 recombinant forms of the JE virus had a crossover in the nt 123-323 region. Sequencing data derived from these recombinants revealed that no nucleotide deletion or insertion occurred in this region favoring crossovers, indicating that precisely, not aberrantly, homologous recombination was involved. With site-directed mutagenesis, three stem-loop secondary structures were destabilized and re-stabilized in sequence, leading to changes in the frequency of recombination. This suggests that the conformation, not the free energy, of the secondary structure is important in modulating RNA recombination of the virus. It was concluded that because RNA recombination generates genetic diversity in the JE virus, this must be considered particularly in studies of viral evolution, epidemiology, and possible vaccine safety.

  12. Monoclonal immunoglobulin M antibody to Japanese encephalitis virus that can react with a nuclear antigen in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, E A; Chanas, A C; Buckley, A; Clegg, C S

    1983-01-01

    An immunoglobulin M (IgM) class monoclonal antibody raised against Japanese encephalitis virus reacted with an epitope on the nonstructural virus protein P74 (NV4 in the old nomenclature) of several flaviviruses and also with an antigen present in the nuclei of a variety of mammalian cell types. This antigen had a characteristic granular distribution by immunofluorescence and may correspond to a polypeptide of molecular weight 56,000 seen in nitrocellulose transfers of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Cross-reactivity with nuclear antigen was also occasionally observed in the IgM antibody fraction of mice early after infection with Japanese encephalitis virus and also in acute sera from some clinical cases of encephalitis containing IgM antibody to Japanese encephalitis virus. Images PMID:6135665

  13. Lot-to-lot consistency of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 Japanese encephalitis vaccine manufactured in a good manufacturing practice facility and non-inferiority with respect to an earlier product.

    PubMed

    Zaman, K; Naser, Abu Mohd; Power, Maureen; Yaich, Mansour; Zhang, Lei; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Luby, Stephen P; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hills, Susan; Bhardwaj, Mukesh; Flores, Jorge

    2014-10-21

    We conducted a four-arm, double-blind, randomized controlled trial among 818 Bangladeshi infants between 10 and 12 months of age to establish equivalence among three lots of live attenuated SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine manufactured by the China National Biotec Group's Chengdu Institute of Biological Products (CDIBP) in a new Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility and to evaluate non-inferiority of the product with a lot of the same vaccine manufactured in CDIBP's original facility. The study took place in two sites in Bangladesh, rural Matlab and Mirpur in urban Dhaka. We collected pre-vaccination (Day 0) and post-vaccination Day 28 (-4 to +14 days) blood samples to assess neutralizing anti-JE virus antibody titers in serum by plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNT). Seroprotection following vaccination was defined as a PRNT titer ≥1:10 at Day 28 in participants non-immune at baseline. Follow-up for reactogenicity and safety was conducted through home visits at Day 7 and monitoring for serious adverse events through Day 28. Seroprotection rates ranged from 80.2% to 86.3% for all four lots of vaccine. Equivalence of the seroprotection rates between pairs of vaccine lots produced in the new GMP facility was satisfied at the pre-specified 10% margin of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for two of the three pairwise comparisons, but not for the third (-4.3% observed difference with 95% CI of -11.9 to 3.3%). Nevertheless, the aggregate seroprotection rate for all three vaccine lots manufactured in the GMP facility was calculated and found to be within the non-inferiority margin (within 10%) to the vaccine lot produced in the original facility. All four lots of vaccine were safe and well tolerated. These study results should facilitate the use of SA 14-14-2 JE vaccine as a routine component of immunization programs in Asian countries. PMID:25239483

  14. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... during a certain season. Encephalitis caused by the herpes simplex virus is the leading cause of more severe cases ... show: Abnormal reflexes Increased intracranial pressure Mental confusion Mouth ulcers Muscle weakness Neck stiffness Signs in other ...

  15. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... from an infected person Contaminated food or drink Mosquito, tick, and other insect bites Skin contact Different ... with anyone who has encephalitis. Controlling mosquitoes (a mosquito bite can transmit some viruses) may reduce the ...

  16. Neutralizing activities of human immunoglobulin derived from donors in Japan against mosquito-borne flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kurosu, Takeshi; Koketsu, Ritsuko Kubota; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and dengue virus (DenV) are causal agents of Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and dengue fever, respectively. JEV is considered to be indigenized and widespread in Japan, whereas WNV and DenV are not indigenized in Japan. Globulin products seem to reflect the status of the donor population according to antivirus neutralization activity. However, the anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralization activities of globulin products derived from donors in Japan have not been clarified. Furthermore, potential candidates for the development of an effective immunotherapeutic drug for encephalitis caused by JEV, WNV, or DenV have also not been identified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the overall status of the donor population in Japan based on globulin products by evaluating anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralizing activities of intravenous immunoglobulin. Overall, intravenous immunoglobulin products showed stable neutralizing activity against JEV but showed no or only weak activity against WNV or DenV. These results suggest that the epidemiological level against WNV and DenV in the donor population of Japan is still low, suggesting that these viruses are not yet indigenized. In addition, JEV vaccinations and/or infections in the donor population do not induce a cross-reactive antibody against WNV. PMID:27462140

  17. Neutralizing activities of human immunoglobulin derived from donors in Japan against mosquito-borne flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kurosu, Takeshi; Koketsu, Ritsuko Kubota; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and dengue virus (DenV) are causal agents of Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and dengue fever, respectively. JEV is considered to be indigenized and widespread in Japan, whereas WNV and DenV are not indigenized in Japan. Globulin products seem to reflect the status of the donor population according to antivirus neutralization activity. However, the anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralization activities of globulin products derived from donors in Japan have not been clarified. Furthermore, potential candidates for the development of an effective immunotherapeutic drug for encephalitis caused by JEV, WNV, or DenV have also not been identified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the overall status of the donor population in Japan based on globulin products by evaluating anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralizing activities of intravenous immunoglobulin. Overall, intravenous immunoglobulin products showed stable neutralizing activity against JEV but showed no or only weak activity against WNV or DenV. These results suggest that the epidemiological level against WNV and DenV in the donor population of Japan is still low, suggesting that these viruses are not yet indigenized. In addition, JEV vaccinations and/or infections in the donor population do not induce a cross-reactive antibody against WNV. PMID:27462140

  18. Japanese encephalitis virus infects neural progenitor cells and decreases their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sulagna; Basu, Anirban

    2008-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a common cause of encephalitis in humans, especially in children, leads to substantial neuronal injury. The survivors of JEV infection have severe cognitive impairment, motor and behavioral disorders. We hypothesize that depletion of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) by the virus culminates in neurological sequelae in survivors of Japanese encephalitis (JE). We utilized both in vivo model of JEV infection and in vitro neurosphere cultures to study progressive JEV infection. Cellular infection and cell death was determined by flow cytometry. BrdU administration in animals and in neurospheres was used to determine the proliferative ability of NPCs. JEV leads to massive loss of actively proliferating NPC population from the subventricular zone (SVZ). The ability of JEV infected subventricular zone cells to form neurospheres is severely compromised. This can be attributed to JEV infection in NPCs, which however do not result in robust death of the resilient NPC cells. Instead, JEV suppresses the cycling ability of these cells, preventing their proliferation. JEV primarily targets at a critical postnatal age and severely diminishes the NPC pool in SVZ, thus impairing the process of recovery after the insult. This arrested growth and proliferation of NPCs might have an effect on the neurological consequences in JE survivors. PMID:18540995

  19. Protective immunity to Japanese encephalitis virus associated with anti-NS1 antibodies in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a major mosquito-borne pathogen that causes viral encephalitis throughout Asia. Vaccination with an inactive JEV particle or attenuated virus is an efficient preventative measure for controlling infection. Flavivirus NS1 protein is a glycoprotein secreted during viral replication that plays multiple roles in the viral life cycle and pathogenesis. Utilizing JEV NS1 as an antigen in viral vectors induces a limited protective immune response against infection. Previous studies using E. coli-expressed JEV NS1 to immunize mice induced protection against lethal challenge; however, the protection mechanism through cellular and humoral immune responses was not described. Results JEV NS1 was expressed in and purified from Drosophila S2 cells in a native glycosylated multimeric form, which induced T-cell and antibody responses in immunized C3H/HeN mice. Mice vaccinated with 1 μg NS1 with or without water-in-oil adjuvant were partially protected against viral challenge and higher protection was observed in mice with higher antibody titers. IgG1 was preferentially elicited by an adjuvanted NS1 protein, whereas a larger load of IFN-γ was produced in splenocytes from mice immunized with aqueous NS1. Mice that passively received anti-NS1 mouse polyclonal immune sera were protected, and this phenomenon was dose-dependent, whereas protection was low or delayed after the passive transfer of anti-NS1 MAbs. Conclusion The purified NS1 subunit induced protective immunity in relation with anti-NS1 IgG1 antibodies. NS1 protein efficiently stimulated Th1-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Protection against lethal challenge was elicited by passive transfer of anti-NS1 antisera, suggesting that anti-NS1 antibodies play a substantial role in anti-viral immunity PMID:22828206

  20. Regional Variation in Pig Farmer Awareness and Actions Regarding Japanese Encephalitis in Nepal: Implications for Public Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Santosh; Joshi, Durga Datt; Ale, Anita; Sharma, Minu; Dahal, Meena; Shah, Yogendra; Pant, Dhan Kumar; Stephen, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease that has pigs as the major amplifying hosts. It is the most important cause of viral encephalitis in people in Nepal and is spreading in its geographic distribution in that country. Pig farming is increasing in Nepal due to reducing cultural biases against pigs and government programs to support pig farming for poverty alleviation. Major strategies for JE prevention and control include education, vector control, and immunization of people and pigs. This study used a survey of 400 pig farmers in 4 areas of Nepal with different JE and pig farming histories to explore regional variations in farmer awareness and actions towards JE, the association of awareness and actions with farm and farmer variables, and the implications of these associations for public health education. Exposure to JE risk factors was common across pig farms and pig farming districts but there were significant district level differences in knowledge and practices related to on-farm JE risk reduction. Social factors such as literacy, gender, and cultural practices were associated with farmer attitudes, knowledge and practices for JE control. JE vaccine uptake was almost non-existent and mosquito control steps were inconsistently applied across all 4 districts. Income was not a determining factor of the differences, but all farmers were very poor. The low uptake of vaccine and lack of infrastructure or financial capacity to house pigs indoors or away from people suggest that farmer personal protection should be a priority target for education in Nepal. This study re-enforces the need to attack root causes of people’s personal disease prevention behaviours and take into account local variation in needs and capacities when designing health or agriculture education programs. PMID:24416402

  1. Regional variation in pig farmer awareness and actions regarding Japanese encephalitis in Nepal: implications for public health education.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Santosh; Joshi, Durga Datt; Ale, Anita; Sharma, Minu; Dahal, Meena; Shah, Yogendra; Pant, Dhan Kumar; Stephen, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease that has pigs as the major amplifying hosts. It is the most important cause of viral encephalitis in people in Nepal and is spreading in its geographic distribution in that country. Pig farming is increasing in Nepal due to reducing cultural biases against pigs and government programs to support pig farming for poverty alleviation. Major strategies for JE prevention and control include education, vector control, and immunization of people and pigs. This study used a survey of 400 pig farmers in 4 areas of Nepal with different JE and pig farming histories to explore regional variations in farmer awareness and actions towards JE, the association of awareness and actions with farm and farmer variables, and the implications of these associations for public health education. Exposure to JE risk factors was common across pig farms and pig farming districts but there were significant district level differences in knowledge and practices related to on-farm JE risk reduction. Social factors such as literacy, gender, and cultural practices were associated with farmer attitudes, knowledge and practices for JE control. JE vaccine uptake was almost non-existent and mosquito control steps were inconsistently applied across all 4 districts. Income was not a determining factor of the differences, but all farmers were very poor. The low uptake of vaccine and lack of infrastructure or financial capacity to house pigs indoors or away from people suggest that farmer personal protection should be a priority target for education in Nepal. This study re-enforces the need to attack root causes of people's personal disease prevention behaviours and take into account local variation in needs and capacities when designing health or agriculture education programs. PMID:24416402

  2. A tropical menace of co-infection of Japanese encephalitis and neurocysticercosis in two children

    PubMed Central

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Thomas, Maya Mary; Yadav, Vikas Kapildeo

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne encephalitis caused by Flavivirus. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system caused by Taenia solium. In this report, we describe the clinical profile, imaging findings, and outcome of two children with JE and coexisting NCC. Eleven and thirteen-year-old boys from the same town of Jharkhand state were brought with history of fever, seizures, altered sensorium, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Dystonia, hypomimia, bradykinesia, and dyskinesia were observed. Meige syndrome observed in one of the children is a novel finding. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed findings suggestive of JE with cysticercal granulomas. There are few reports of coexistence of JE and NCC in children. Both children were treated with ribavirin, and follow-up imaging had shown significant resolution of signal changes. Both the children had shown marked clinical improvement. Ribavirin was found to beneficial in reducing the morbidity in our patients. PMID:27606026

  3. A tropical menace of co-infection of Japanese encephalitis and neurocysticercosis in two children.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Thomas, Maya Mary; Yadav, Vikas Kapildeo

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne encephalitis caused by Flavivirus. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic disease of the central nervous system caused by Taenia solium. In this report, we describe the clinical profile, imaging findings, and outcome of two children with JE and coexisting NCC. Eleven and thirteen-year-old boys from the same town of Jharkhand state were brought with history of fever, seizures, altered sensorium, and extrapyramidal symptoms. Dystonia, hypomimia, bradykinesia, and dyskinesia were observed. Meige syndrome observed in one of the children is a novel finding. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed findings suggestive of JE with cysticercal granulomas. There are few reports of coexistence of JE and NCC in children. Both children were treated with ribavirin, and follow-up imaging had shown significant resolution of signal changes. Both the children had shown marked clinical improvement. Ribavirin was found to beneficial in reducing the morbidity in our patients. PMID:27606026

  4. Vector-free transmission and persistence of Japanese encephalitis virus in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Meret E.; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Nougairede, Antoine; Charrel, Remi N.; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a main cause of severe viral encephalitis in humans, has a complex ecology, composed of a cycle involving primarily waterbirds and mosquitoes, as well as a cycle involving pigs as amplifying hosts. To date, JEV transmission has been exclusively described as being mosquito-mediated. Here we demonstrate that JEV can be transmitted between pigs in the absence of arthropod vectors. Pigs shed virus in oronasal secretions and are highly susceptible to oronasal infection. Clinical symptoms, virus tropism and central nervous system histological lesions are similar in pigs infected through needle, contact or oronasal inoculation. In all cases, a particularly important site of replication are the tonsils, in which JEV is found to persist for at least 25 days despite the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Our findings could have a major impact on the ecology of JEV in temperate regions with short mosquito seasons. PMID:26902924

  5. Vector-free transmission and persistence of Japanese encephalitis virus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; García-Nicolás, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Nougairede, Antoine; Charrel, Remi N; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a main cause of severe viral encephalitis in humans, has a complex ecology, composed of a cycle involving primarily waterbirds and mosquitoes, as well as a cycle involving pigs as amplifying hosts. To date, JEV transmission has been exclusively described as being mosquito-mediated. Here we demonstrate that JEV can be transmitted between pigs in the absence of arthropod vectors. Pigs shed virus in oronasal secretions and are highly susceptible to oronasal infection. Clinical symptoms, virus tropism and central nervous system histological lesions are similar in pigs infected through needle, contact or oronasal inoculation. In all cases, a particularly important site of replication are the tonsils, in which JEV is found to persist for at least 25 days despite the presence of high levels of neutralizing antibodies. Our findings could have a major impact on the ecology of JEV in temperate regions with short mosquito seasons. PMID:26902924

  6. Recommendations for tick-borne encephalitis vaccination from the Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG)

    PubMed Central

    Zavadska, Dace; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Bakir, Mustafa; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Ivaskeviciene, Inga; Mangarov, Atanas; Mészner, Zsófia; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Richter, Darko; Salman, Nuran; Šimurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a viral neurological zoonotic disease transmitted to humans by ticks or by consumption of unpasteurized dairy products from infected cows, goats, or sheep. TBE is highly endemic in areas of Central and Eastern Europe and Russia where it is a major public health concern. However, it is difficult to diagnose TBE as clinical manifestations tend to be relatively nonspecific and a standardized case definition does not exist across the region. TBE is becoming more important in Europe due to the appearance of new endemic areas. Few Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG) member countries have implemented universal vaccination programmes against TBE and vaccination coverage is not considered sufficient to control the disease. When implemented, immunization strategies only apply to risk groups under certain conditions, with no harmonized recommendations available to date across the region. Effective vaccination programmes are essential in preventing the burden of TBE. This review examines the current situation of TBE in CEVAG countries and contains recommendations for the vaccination of children and high-risk groups. For countries at very high risk of TBE infections, CEVAG strongly recommends the introduction of universal TBE vaccination in children > 1 y of age onwards. For countries with a very low risk of TBE, recommendations should only apply to those traveling to endemic areas. Overall, it is generally accepted that each country should be free to make its own decision based on regional epidemiological data and the vaccination calendar, although recommendations should be made, especially for those living in endemic areas. PMID:23291941

  7. Seroprevalence of Cysticercus Antibodies in Japanese Encephalitis Patients in Upper Assam, India: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Himangshu; Saikia, Lahari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Co-infection of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) and Cysticercosis is attributed mainly to the common epidemiological features between the two diseases. Not much is known about the clinical implications of one infection over the other. Aim The study aimed at establishing whether JE-Cysticercosis co-infection is prevalent in the Upper Assam districts and to explore additional details about such co-infections both clinically and epidemiologically. Materials and Methods The present study was a retrospective cross-sectional hospital based study conducted between July 2013 and June 2014 and included 272 Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) patients. Out of this, 137 JE positive and 135 non-JE Acute encephalitis patients were taken as cases and controls respectively. The diagnosis of JE and Cysticercosis was established by ELISA. Statistical Analysis EpiInfo ver. 7 was used for statistical analysis. Chi-square was used and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The association of Cysticercosis with JE was found to be statistically significant (14.6%, p = 0.0019) in the cases with reference to the controls (3.7%). Moreover, the co-infections were found to be more common in case of adults (19.32%, p = 0.0360); with males having a greater odds (5.25, p = 0.0008) of harbouring the parasite as compared to females. Conclusion The study proves that the association of Cysticercosis and JE holds true in this region. PMID:27437215

  8. Encephalitis in dogs associated with a batch of canine distemper (Rockborn) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, H J; Thompson, H; McCandlish, I A; Macartney, L; Nash, A S

    1988-01-16

    During a period of seven months in 1982-83 cases of postvaccinal encephalitis were recorded in dogs in various parts of Britain after the administration of a particular batch of combined distemper/hepatitis vaccine. Detailed investigations of one of these cases revealed that the distemper component was responsible and the vaccine virus was recovered from the brain of an affected dog. PMID:2895528

  9. Characterization of codon usage pattern and influencing factors in Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj K; Tyagi, Anuj; Kaur, Rajinder; Verma, Ramneek; Gupta, Praveen K

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis (JE), caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), have been reported and it has become cause of concern across the world. In this study, detailed analysis of JEV codon usage pattern was performed. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) values along with mean effective number of codons (ENC) value of 55.30 indicated the presence of low codon usages bias in JEV. The effect of mutational pressure on codon usage bias was confirmed by significant correlations of A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, GC3s, ENC values, with overall nucleotide contents (A%, U%, G%, C%, and GC%). The correlation analysis of A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, GC3s, with axis values of correspondence analysis (CoA) further confirmed the role of mutational pressure. However, the correlation analysis of Gravy values and Aroma values with A3s, U3s, G3s, C3s, and GC3s, indicated the presence of natural selection on codon usage bias in addition to mutational pressure. The natural selection was further confirmed by codon adaptation index (CAI) analysis. Additionally, relative dinucleotide frequencies, geographical distribution, and evolutionary processes also influenced the codon usage pattern to some extent. PMID:27189042

  10. Involvement of the Host Cell Nuclear Envelope Membranes in the Replication of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zebovitz, E.; Leong, J. K. L.; Doughty, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The distribution of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) on various cell membrane fractions derived from a porcine kidney cell line infected with Japanese encephalitis virus was investigated. At 40 h postinfection, after virus growth had reached its peak, three viral RNAs, 45S, 27S, and 20S, were associated with the cytoplasmic membranes and intact nuclei. The amount of each RNA associated with the nucleus was two- to fivefold greater than that present with the cytoplasmic membranes. Treatment of washed infected nuclei with 1.0% Triton X-100, which removed the outer nuclear envelope membrane, also removed the viral RNA. When the nucleus was fractionated into nuclear envelope membranes and a large particle fraction which sedimented at 600 × g, nearly all of the viral RNA remained associated with the envelope membranes. The nuclear envelope membranes contained higher viral RNA polymerase activity than the cytoplasmic membranes derived from the same cells. These data suggest that major sites for Japanese encephalitis virus RNA synthesis may be localized on or in very close association with the nuclear envelope membranes. PMID:4842128

  11. The Spatio-temporal Distribution of Japanese Encephalitis Cases in Different Age Groups in Mainland China, 2004 – 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Song, Miao; Li, Minghua; Fu, Shihong; Lv, Zhi; He, Ying; Lei, Wenwen; Wang, Bin; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) is very prevalent in China, but the incidence of JE among children has been greatly reduced by extensive promotion of vaccinations. The incidence of JE among adults, however, has increased in some parts of China. Methods/Principal Findings Data on JE in mainland China, in terms of incidence, gender, and age, were collected between 2004 and 2014. We conducted spatial and temporal analyses on data from different age groups. Generally, children aged 0–15 years still represent the major population of JE cases in China, despite the gradual decrease in incidence over years. However, the incidence of JE among adults in several provinces is notably higher than the national average, especially during the epidemic waves in 2006, 2009, and 2013. The JE cases in the 0–15-year-old group are distributed mainly in the area south of the Yangtze River, with peak incidence occurring from July to September. In the adult group, especially for those over 40 years old, the JE cases are concentrated mainly in the area north of the Yangtze River. JE incidence in the adult group in September and October is significantly greater compared to the other groups. Further analysis using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) reveals that the distribution of adult JE cases in the six provinces north of the Yangtze River, between north 30–35° latitude and east 110–130° longitude, is a hotspot for adult JE cases. Conclusions/Significance The rate of JE case increase for adults is much greater than for children and has become a public health issue. Therefore, studies on the necessity and feasibility of vaccinating adults who live in JE-endemic areas, but have never been vaccinated for JE, should become a new focus of JE prevention in the future. PMID:27050414

  12. Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus among High-Risk Age Groups in South Korea, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Young Ran; Han, Myung Guk; Lee, Won-Ja; Jeong, Young Eui

    2016-01-01

    After an extensive vaccination policy, Japanese encephalitis (JE) was nearly eliminated since the mid-1980s in South Korea. Vaccination in children shifted the affected age of JE patients from children to adults. However, an abrupt increase in JE cases occurred in 2010, and this trend has continued. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to the JE virus (JEV) among high-risk age groups (≥40 years) in South Korea. A plaque reduction neutralization test was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to JEV in 945 subjects within four age groups (30–39, 40–49, 50–59, and 60–69 years) in 10 provinces. Of the 945 enrolled subjects, 927 (98.1%) exhibited antibodies against JEV. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies according to sex, age, or occupation. However, there were significant differences in the plaque reduction rate according to age and occupation; oldest age group had a higher reduction rate, and subjects who were employed in agriculture or forestry also had a higher value than the other occupations. We also found that three provinces (Gangwon, Jeonnam, and Gyeongnam) had a relatively lower plaque reduction rate than the other locations. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were conducted to determine recent viral infections and 12 (2.2%) subjects were found to have been recently infected by the virus. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicated that the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies has been maintained at very high levels among adult age groups owing to vaccination or natural infections, or both. In the future, serosurveillance should be conducted periodically using more representative samples to better understand the population-level immunity to JE in South Korea. PMID:26807709

  13. Review of Climate, Landscape, and Viral Genetics as Drivers of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Le Flohic, Guillaume; Porphyre, Vincent; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), an arthropod-born Flavivirus, is the major cause of viral encephalitis, responsible for 10,000–15,000 deaths each year, yet is a neglected tropical disease. Since the JEV distribution area has been large and continuously extending toward new Asian and Australasian regions, it is considered an emerging and reemerging pathogen. Despite large effective immunization campaigns, Japanese encephalitis remains a disease of global health concern. JEV zoonotic transmission cycles may be either wild or domestic: the first involves wading birds as wild amplifying hosts; the second involves pigs as the main domestic amplifying hosts. Culex mosquito species, especially Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, are the main competent vectors. Although five JEV genotypes circulate, neither clear-cut genotype-phenotype relationship nor clear variations in genotype fitness to hosts or vectors have been identified. Instead, the molecular epidemiology appears highly dependent on vectors, hosts' biology, and on a set of environmental factors. At global scale, climate, land cover, and land use, otherwise strongly dependent on human activities, affect the abundance of JEV vectors, and of wild and domestic hosts. Chiefly, the increase of rice-cultivated surface, intensively used by wading birds, and of pig production in Asia has provided a high availability of resources to mosquito vectors, enhancing the JEV maintenance, amplification, and transmission. At fine scale, the characteristics (density, size, spatial arrangement) of three landscape elements (paddy fields, pig farms, human habitations) facilitate or impede movement of vectors, then determine how the JEV interacts with hosts and vectors and ultimately the infection risk to humans. If the JEV is introduced in a favorable landscape, either by live infected animals or by vectors, then the virus can emerge and become a major threat for human health. Multidisciplinary research is essential to shed light on the

  14. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of economically impor...

  15. Tissue tropism and molecular characterization of a Japanese encephalitis virus strain isolated from pigs in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-04-01

    Since September 2012, an epidemic has been spreading among swine in a pig farm located in Sichuan province, southwest China, which has resulted in abortion, stillbirth, and fetal mummification. The brains of stillborn pigs were collected and a previously unknown Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), namely SCYA201201, was isolated. According to the results of agarose gel diffusion precipitation, indirect immunofluorescence analysis, neutralization testing, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) amplification, and physical and chemical testing, the virus was conformed to have the characteristics of JEV. The virus titer in BHK-21 cells was 10(8.47)PFU/ml and the median lethal dose (LD50) to 3-week-old and 7-day-old mice was 1.99 log10 and 1.02 log10 PFU/LD50, respectively. The results of tissue tropism for mice showed that the viral load in the brain was significantly higher than other organs, indicating that the isolate was strongly neurotropic. Additionally, the complete genome sequence of the isolate was determined and compared with other JEV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate belongs to genotype I and may be an imported virus. The isolate had 88.4% nucleotide identity with the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2. However, there were 69 amino acid substitutions compared with the strain SA14-14-2. Some substitutions indicated that SCYA201201 was highly neurovirulent and infective, in accordance with the results of animal testing. PMID:26851509

  16. Chimeric Alphavirus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice from Intranasal Challenge with Western Equine Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Wang, Eryu; Adams, A. Paige; Plante, Kenneth S.; Ni, Sai; Taylor, Katherine; Miller, Mary E.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    We developed two types of chimeric Sindbis virus (SINV)/western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) alphaviruses to investigate their potential use as live virus vaccines against WEE. The first-generation vaccine candidate, SIN/CO92, was derived from structural protein genes of WEEV strain CO92-1356, and two second-generation candidates were derived from WEEV strain McMillan. For both first- and second-generation vaccine candidates, the nonstructural protein genes were derived from SINV strain AR339. Second-generation vaccine candidates SIN/SIN/McM and SIN/EEE/McM included the envelope glycoprotein genes from WEEV strain McMillan; however, the amino-terminal half of the capsid, which encodes the RNA-binding domain, was derived from either SINV or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) strain FL93-939. All chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in 6-week-old mice. Vaccinated mice developed little or no detectable disease and showed little or no evidence of challenge virus replication; however, all developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon intranasal challenge with high doses of virulent WEEV strains, mice vaccinated with ≥105 PFU of SIN/CO92 or ≥104 PFU of SIN/SIN/McM or SIN/EEE/McM were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these live-attenuated vaccine candidates as safe and effective vaccines against WEE. PMID:19446595

  17. Dynamics of the Emergence and Establishment of a Newly Dominant Genotype of Japanese Encephalitis Virus throughout Asia

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, genotype I (GI) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant virus genotype throughout Asia. In this study, the largest collection of GIII and GI envelope gene-derived viral sequences assembled to date was used to reconstruct the spatiotemporal chronology of genotype displacement throughout Asia and to determine the evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics underlying this significant event. GI consists of two clades, GI-a and GI-b, with the latter being associated with displacement of GIII as the dominant JEV genotype throughout Asia in the 1990s. Phylogeographic analysis indicated that GI-a diverged in Thailand or Cambodia and has remained confined to tropical Asia, whereas GI-b diverged in Vietnam and then dispersed northwards to China, where it was subsequently dispersed to Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. Molecular adaptation was detected by more than one method at one site (residue 15), and coevolution was detected at two pairs of sites (residues 89 to 360 and 129 to 141) within the GI E gene protein alignment. Viral multiplication and temperature sensitivity analyses in avian and mosquito cells revealed that the GI-b isolate JE-91 had significantly higher infectivity titers in mosquito cells from 24 to 48 h postinfection than did the GI-a and GIII isolates. If the JE-91 isolate is indeed representative of GI-b, an increased multiplicative ability of GI-b viruses compared to that of GIII viruses early in mosquito infection may have resulted in a shortened extrinsic incubation period that led to an increased number of GI enzootic transmission cycles and the subsequent displacement of GIII. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, represents the most significant etiology of childhood viral neurological infection in Asia. Despite the existence of effective vaccines, JEV is responsible for an estimated 68,000 human cases and a reported 10,000 to 15,000 deaths annually

  18. Vaccine-associated herpes zoster ophthalmicus [correction of opthalmicus] and encephalitis in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Chouliaras, Giorgos; Spoulou, Vana; Quinlivan, Mark; Breuer, Judith; Theodoridou, Maria

    2010-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus vaccine has diminished the consequences of chicken pox in terms of health and economical burden. The increasing number of doses administered worldwide has revealed rare but important adverse effects that had not occurred during clinical trials. We report here the case of an immunocompetent 3(1/2)-year-old girl who developed encephalitis and herpes zoster opthalmicus 20 months after her immunization with varicella-zoster virus vaccine. Molecular analysis confirmed the vaccine strain as the causative agent. After an intravenous course with acyclovir, the child made a full recovery with no neurologic sequelae. PMID:20194287

  19. Using network analysis to explore if professional opinions on Japanese encephalitis risk factors in Nepal reflect a socio-ecological system perspective.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Kent; El Kurdi, Syliva; Joshi, Durgadatt; Stephen, Craig

    2013-12-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia and a significant public health problem in Nepal. Its epidemiology is influenced by factors affecting its amplifying hosts (pigs), vectors (mosquitoes), and dead-end hosts (including people). While most control efforts target reduced susceptibility to infection either by vaccination of people or pigs or by reduced exposure to mosquitoes; the economic reality of Nepal makes it challenging to implement standard JE control measures. An ecohealth approach has been nominated as a way to assist in finding and prioritizing locally relevant strategies for JE control that may be viable, feasible, and acceptable. We sought to understand if Nepalese experts responsible for JE management conceived of its epidemiology in terms of a socio-ecological system to determine if they would consider ecohealth approaches. Network analysis suggested that they did not conceive JE risk as a product of a socio-ecological system. Traditional proximal risk factors of pigs, mosquitoes, and vaccination predominated experts' conception of JE risk. People seeking to encourage an ecohealth approach or social change models to JE management in Nepal may benefit from adopting social marketing concepts to encourage and empower local experts to examine JE from a socio-ecological perspective. PMID:24052266

  20. Inhibition of Japanese encephalitis virus infection by the sulfated polysaccharide extracts from Ulva lactuca.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Huang; Chan, Yi-Lin; Li, Tsung-Lin; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2012-08-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a neurotropic flavivirus, is one of the major causes of acute encephalitis in humans. After infection, inflammatory reactions and neurological diseases often develop. Still there are no effective drugs available against virus infection. Recently, extracts of algae have been shown to possess a broad range of biological activities including antivirus activity. In this study, we identified that the sulfated polysaccharide extracts from Ulva lactuca can inhibit JEV infection in Vero cells. Mechanistic studies further revealed that the Ulva sulfated polysaccharide extracts can block virus adsorption and thus make the virus unable to enter cells. The Ulva sulfated polysaccharide extracts also effectively decrease the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the JEV-infected primary mixed glia cells. In an animal study, the JEV-infected C3H/HeN mice appeared to have neurobehavioral abnormalities on the fifth day and died on the seventh day post infection. However, the JEV-infected mice pretreated with the Ulva sulfated polysaccharide extracts can delay the onset of hind limb paralysis and thereby prevent mice from death. PMID:22193590

  1. An outbreak of Japanese encephalitis after two decades in Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Dwibedi, Bhagirathi; Mohapatra, Namita; Rathore, Sushil Kumar; Panda, Maheswar; Pati, Satya Sundar; Sabat, Jyotsnamayee; Thakur, Bandana; Panda, Sailendra; Kar, Shantanu Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Sudden deaths in children due to acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) from a tribal dominated district of Malkangiri in Odisha, India, was reported during September-November, 2012. The investigation was carried out to search for the possible viral aetiology that caused this outbreak. Clinico-epidemiological survey and seromolecular investigation were carried out to confirm the viral aetiology. Two hundred seventy two suspected cases with 24 deaths were observed. The patients presented with low to moderate grade fever (87%), headache (43%), vomiting (27%), cold (18%), cough (17%), body ache (15%), joint pain (15%), rash (15%), abdomen pain (9%), lethargy (5%), altered sensorium (8%), convulsion (2%), diarrhoea (3%), and haematemesis (3%). Laboratory investigation showed Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) IgM in 13.8 per cent (13/94) in blood samples and JEV RNA in one of two cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. Paddy fields close to the houses, high pig to cattle ratio, high density (33 per man hour density) of Culex vishnui mosquitoes, low socio-economic status and low health awareness in the tribal population were observed. This report confirmed the outbreak of JEV infection in Odisha after two decades. PMID:26905239

  2. Molecular characterization of Japanese encephalitis virus strains prevalent in Chinese swine herds

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hao; Shan, Tongling; Deng, Yu; Sun, Chunqing; Yuan, Shishan; Yin, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia and domestic pigs serve as the amplifying hosts. In the present study, the full genomic sequences of two JEV strains (HEN0701 and SH0601) isolated from pigs in China were determined and compared with other 12 JEV strains deposited in GenBank. These two strains had an 88.8% nucleotide sequence similarity and 97.9% deduced amino acid sequence homology. HEN0701 had high nucleotide sequence and high amino acid sequence identity with genotype I (GI) strains, while SH0601 had high nucleotide sequence and high amino acid sequence identity with GIII strains at both the gene and full genome levels. Further phylogenetic analysis showed that HEN0701 belonged to the JEV GI group and SH0601 was classified as a GIII strain. Analysis of codon usage showed there were a few differences between the GI and GIII strains in nucleotide composition and codon usage for the open reading frames. PMID:23388434

  3. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus. PMID:27242166

  4. Circulation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Pigs and Mosquito Vectors within Can Tho City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Johanna F.; Ståhl, Karl; Chirico, Jan; Boqvist, Sofia; Thu, Ho Thi Viet; Magnusson, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne, zoonotic flavivirus causing encephalitis in humans and reproductive disorder in pigs. JEV is present in large parts of Asia, where urbanization is high. Households within and outside Can Tho city, South Vietnam, were selected to monitor circulation of JEV. A nested RT-PCR was established to detect the presence of JEV in mosquitoes whereas sera from pigs belonging to households within the province were analyzed for the presence of antibodies to JEV. A total of 7885 mosquitoes were collected and divided into 352 pools whereof seven were JEV-positive, six of which were collected within the city. Fragments from four pools clustered with JEV genotype III and three with genotype I. Of the 43 pigs sampled inside the city 100% had JEV antibodies. Our study demonstrates exposure to JEV in pigs, and co-circulation of JEV genotype I and III in mosquitoes within an urban environment in South Vietnam. Thus, although JEV has mainly been considered a rural disease, the potential for transmission in urban areas cannot be ignored. PMID:23593520

  5. Flaviviruses, an expanding threat in public health: focus on dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Eugenin, Eliseo Alberto

    2014-12-01

    The flaviviruses dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis represent three major mosquito-borne viruses worldwide. These pathogens impact the lives of millions of individuals and potentially could affect non-endemic areas already colonized by mosquito vectors. Unintentional transport of infected vectors (Aedes and Culex spp.), traveling within endemic areas, rapid adaptation of the insects into new geographic locations, climate change, and lack of medical surveillance have greatly contributed to the increase in flaviviral infections worldwide. The mechanisms by which flaviviruses alter the immune and the central nervous system have only recently been examined despite the alarming number of infections, related deaths, and increasing global distribution. In this review, we will discuss the expansion of the geographic areas affected by flaviviruses, the potential threats to previously unaffected countries, the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the potential therapeutic interventions to limit the devastating consequences of these viruses. PMID:25287260

  6. Flaviviruses, an expanding threat in public health: focus on Dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Daep, Carlo Amorin; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Eugenin, Eliseo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The flaviviruses Dengue, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis represent three major mosquito-borne viruses worldwide. These pathogens impact the lives of millions of individuals and potentially could affect non-endemic areas already colonized by mosquito vectors. Unintentional transport of infected vectors (Aedes and Culex sp), traveling within endemic areas, rapid adaptation of the insects into new geographic locations, climate change, and lack of medical surveillance have greatly contributed to the increase in flaviviral infections worldwide. The mechanisms by which flaviviruses alter the immune and the central nervous system have only recently been examined despite the alarming number of infections, related deaths, and increasing global distribution. In this review, we will discuss the expansion of the geographic areas affected by flaviviruses, the potential threats to previously unaffected countries, the mechanisms of pathogenesis, and the potential therapeutic interventions to limit the devastating consequences of these viruses. PMID:25287260

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis in a child with previous history of completed primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Zlamy, Manuela; Haberlandt, Edda; Brunner, Jürgen; Dozcy, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old girl who presented with fever, headache, nausea and pain behind the right ear. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; leukocytes 227/μL), electroencephalogram and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging were indicative of meningoencephalitis. Despite intensive therapy the general condition worsened and the patient was admitted to the intensive care unit. Serological analysis of CSF and serum indicated acute tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infection (IgG and IgM positive). TBEV infection has been reported after incomplete and complete vaccination. TBEV vaccination breakthrough in childhood has been shown to cause severe disease. It has been suggested that immunized patients develop more severe disease due to altered immune response, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In the presence of typical symptoms and a history of vaccination, possible vaccination breakthrough or missing booster vaccination should be considered. PMID:26541246

  8. CHIMERIC SINDBIS/EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VACCINE CANDIDATES ARE HIGHLY ATTENUATED AND IMMUNOGENIC IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Petrakova, Olga; Adams, A. Paige; Aguilar, Patricia V.; Kang, Wenli; Paessler, Slobodan; Volk, Sara M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2007-01-01

    We developed chimeric Sindbis (SINV)/Eastern equine encephalitis (EEEV) viruses and investigated their potential for use as live virus vaccines against EEEV. One vaccine candidate contained structural protein genes from a typical North American EEEV strain, while the other had structural proteins from a naturally attenuated Brazilian isolate. Both chimeric viruses replicated efficiently in mammalian and mosquito cell cultures and were highly attenuated in mice. Vaccinated mice did not develop detectable disease or viremia, but developed high titers of neutralizing antibodies. Upon challenge with EEEV, mice vaccinated with >104PFU of the chimeric viruses were completely protected from disease. These findings support the potential use of these SIN/EEEV chimeras as safe and effective vaccines. PMID:17904699

  9. A chimeric Sindbis-based vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against a lethal aerosol challenge of eastern equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Seymour, Robert L.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Mega, William; Frolov, Ilya; Didier, Peter J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes sporadic, often fatal disease outbreaks in humans and equids, and is also a biological threat agent. Two chimeric vaccine candidates were constructed using a cDNA clone with a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone and structural protein genes from either a North (SIN/NAEEEV) or South American (SIN/SAEEEV) strain of EEEV. The vaccine candidates were tested in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Cynomolgus macaques were either sham-vaccinated, or vaccinated with a single dose of either SIN/NAEEEV or SIN/SAEEEV. After vaccination, animals were challenged by aerosol with a virulent North American strain of EEEV (NA EEEV). The SIN/NAEEEV vaccine provided significant protection, and most vaccinated animals survived EEEV challenge (82%) with little evidence of disease, whereas most SIN/SAEEEV-vaccinated (83%) and control (100%) animals died. Protected animals exhibited minimal changes in temperature and cardiovascular rhythm, whereas unprotected animals showed profound hyperthermia and changes in heart rate post-exposure. Acute inflammation and neuronal necrosis were consistent with EEEV-induced encephalitis in unprotected animals, whereas no encephalitis-related histopathologic changes were observed in the SIN/NAEEEV-vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that the chimeric SIN/NAEEEV vaccine candidate protects against an aerosol EEEV exposure. PMID:23333212

  10. Anti-tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus neutralizing antibodies dynamics in natural infections versus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Remoli, Maria Elena; Marchi, Antonella; Fortuna, Claudia; Benedetti, Eleonora; Minelli, Giada; Fiorentini, Cristiano; Mel, Rosanna; Venturi, Giulietta; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia

    2015-03-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus infection elicits a life-long lasting protection. However, little is known about the neutralizing antibodies titres following natural infection. In this study, subjects with past TBE disease (n = 62) were analysed for the presence and titre of anti-TBE neutralizing antibodies, and compared with a vaccinated cohort (n = 101). Neutralizing antibody titres were higher in individuals with past TBE and did not show an age-dependent decrease when compared with vaccinees. PMID:25722483

  11. A vaccine candidate for eastern equine encephalitis virus based on IRES-mediated attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Jyotsna; Gorchakov, Rodion; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Weaver, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    To develop an effective vaccine against eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), we engineered a recombinant EEE virus (EEEV) that was attenuated and capable of replicating only in vertebrate cells, an important safety feature for live vaccines against mosquito-borne viruses. The subgenomic promoter was inactivated with 13 synonymous mutations and expression of the EEEV structural proteins was placed under the control of an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) derived from encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV). We tested this vaccine candidate for virulence, viremia and efficacy in the murine model. A single subcutaneous immunization with 104 infectious units protected 100% of mice against intraperitoneal challenge with a highly virulent North American EEEV strain. None of the mice developed any signs of disease or viremia after immunization or following challenge. Our findings suggest that the IRES-based attenuation approach can be used to develop a safe and effective vaccine against EEE and other alphaviral diseases. PMID:22222869

  12. Antiviral Activity of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Japanese Encephalitis Virus through Inhibiting Intracellular Calcium Overload.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su-Hua; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Ching-Ying; Ping, Chia-Fong; Lin, Yu-Fong; Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has five genotypes (I, II, III, IV, and V). JEV genotype I circulates widely in some Asian countries. However, current JEV vaccines based on genotype III strains show low neutralizing capacities against genotype I variants. In addition, JE has no specific treatment, except a few supportive treatments. Compound CW-33, an intermediate synthesized derivative of furoquinolines, was investigated for its antiviral activities against JEV in this study. CW-33 exhibited the less cytotoxicity to Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) and human medulloblastoma (TE761) cells. CW-33 dose-dependently reduced the cytopathic effect and apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. Supernatant virus yield assay pinpointed CW-33 as having potential anti-JEV activity with IC50 values ranging from 12.7 to 38.5 μM. Time-of-addition assay with CW-33 indicated that simultaneous and post-treatment had no plaque reduction activity, but continuous and simultaneous treatments proved to have highly effective antiviral activity, with IC50 values of 32.7 and 48.5 μM, respectively. CW-33 significantly moderated JEV-triggered Ca(2+) overload, which correlated with the recovery of mitochondria membrane potential as well as the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals in treated infected cells. Phosphopeptide profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed that CW-33 upregulated proteins from the enzyme modulator category, such as protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2), Rho GTPase-activating protein 35, ARF GTPase-activating protein GIT2, and putative 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 2. These enzyme modulators identified were associated with the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals. Meanwhile, I-2 treatment substantially inhibited the apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. The results demonstrated that CW-33 exhibited a significant potential in the development of anti-JEV agents. PMID:27563890

  13. Characterization of putative Japanese encephalitis virus receptor molecules on microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Thongtan, Thananya; Wikan, Nitwara; Wintachai, Phitchayapak; Rattanarungsan, Chutima; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cheepsunthorn, Poonlarp; Smith, Duncan R

    2012-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) a mosquito-borne flavivirus is a major cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. While the principle target cells for JEV in the central nervous system are believed to be neurons, microglia are activated in response to JEV and have been proposed to act as a long lasting virus reservoir. Viral attachment to a host cell is the first step of the viral entry process and is a critical mediator of tissue tropism. This study sought to identify molecules associated with JEV entry to microglial cells. Virus overlay protein-binding assay (VOPBA) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) identified the 37/67 kDa high-affinity laminin receptor protein and nucleolin as a potential JEV-binding proteins. These proteins were subsequently investigated for a contribution to JEV entry to mouse microglial BV-2 cells together with other possible candidate receptor molecules including Hsp70, Hsp90, GRP78, CD14, and CD4. In antibody mediated inhibition of infection experiments, both anti-laminin receptor and anti-CD4 antibodies significantly reduced virus entry while anti-Hsp70 and 90 antibodies produced a slight reduction. Significant inhibition of virus entry (up to 80%) was observed in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which resulted in a complete down-regulation of CD4 and moderate down-regulation of CD14. These results suggest that multiple receptor proteins may mediate the entry of JEV to microglial cells, with CD4 playing a major role. PMID:22337301

  14. Evidence and rationale for the World Health Organization recommended standards for Japanese encephalitis surveillance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the most important form of viral encephalitis in Asia. Surveillance for the disease in many countries has been limited. To improve collection of accurate surveillance data in order to increase understanding of the full impact of JE and monitor control programs, World Health Organization (WHO) Recommended Standards for JE Surveillance have been developed. To aid acceptance of the Standards, we describe the process of development, provide the supporting evidence, and explain the rationale for the recommendations made in the document. Methods A JE Core Working Group was formed in 2002 and worked on development of JE surveillance standards. A series of questions on specific topics was initially developed. A literature review was undertaken and the findings were discussed and documented. The group then prepared a draft document, with emphasis placed on the feasibility of implementation in Asian countries. A field test version of the Standards was published by WHO in January 2006. Feedback was then sought from countries that piloted the Standards and from public health professionals in forums and individual meetings to modify the Standards accordingly. Results After revisions, a final version of the JE surveillance standards was published in August 2008. The supporting information is presented here together with explanations of the rationale and levels of evidence for specific recommendations. Conclusion Provision of the supporting evidence and rationale should help to facilitate successful implementation of the JE surveillance standards in JE-endemic countries which will in turn enable better understanding of disease burden and the impact of control programs. PMID:20038298

  15. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  16. MicroRNA transcriptome profiling of mice brains infected with Japanese encephalitis virus by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Feng; Cao, Rui-Bing; Luo, Jun; Fan, Jian-Ming; Wang, Jing-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Peng; Gu, Jin-Yan; Feng, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito borne viral disease, caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection producing severe neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) with the associated disruption of the blood brain barrier. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of 21-24 nt small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in gene expression and have critical roles in virus pathogenesis. We examined the potential roles of miRNAs in JEV-infected suckling mice brains and found that JEV infection changed miRNA expression profiles when the suckling mice began showing nervous symptoms. A total of 1062 known and 71 novel miRNAs were detected in JEV-infected group, accompanied with 1088 known and 75 novel miRNAs in mock controls. Among these miRNAs, one novel and 25 known miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed, including 18 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated miRNAs which were further confirmed by real-time PCR. Gene ontology (GO) and signaling pathway analysis of the predicted target mRNAs of the modulated miRNAs showed that they are correlated with the regulation of apoptosis, neuron differentiation, antiviral immunity and infiltration of mouse brain, and the validated targets of 12 differentially expressed miRNAs were enriched for the regulation of cell programmed death, proliferation, transcription, muscle organ development, erythrocyte differentiation, gene expression, plasma membrane and protein domain specific binding. KEGG analysis further reveals that the validated target genes were involved in the Pathways in cancer, Neurotrophin signaling pathway, Toll like receptor signaling pathway, Endometrial cancer and Jak-STAT signaling pathway. We constructed the interaction networks of miRNAs and their target genes according to GO terms and KEGG pathways and the expression levels of several target genes were examined. Our data provides a valuable basis for further studies on the regulatory roles of miRNAs in JE

  17. St. Louis Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Virus Transmission Epidemiology & Geographic Distribution Symptoms & Treatment Arboviral Diagnostic Testing Links & References Technical Fact Sheet Other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes Chikungunya Dengue Eastern Equine Encephalitis Japanese Encephalitis Malaria La Crosse ...

  18. IRES-Based Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Vaccine Candidate Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Guerbois, Mathilde; Gorchakov, Rodion; Plante, Kenneth S.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus that causes periodic outbreaks that impact equine and human populations in the Americas. One of the VEEV subtypes located in Mexico and Central America (IE) has recently been recognized as an important cause of equine disease and death, and human exposure also appears to be widespread. Here, we describe the use of an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus to stably attenuate VEEV, creating a vaccine candidate independent of unstable point mutations. Mice infected with this virus produced antibodies and were protected against lethal VEEV challenge. This IRES-based vaccine was unable to establish productive infection in mosquito cell cultures or in intrathoracically injected Aedes taeniorhynchus, demonstrating that it cannot be transmitted from a vaccinee. These attenuation, efficacy and safety results justify further development for humans or equids of this new VEEV vaccine candidate. PMID:23351391

  19. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  20. Review of tick-borne encephalitis and vaccines: clinical and economical aspects.

    PubMed

    Šmit, Renata; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) disease is an increasing burden not only locally but also globally. In most endemic countries, vaccination coverage is too low to reduce the TBE burden significantly; however, vaccination is the most effective protection against TBE, with various vaccines currently available. In spite of rising awareness of TBE, little attention is directed toward the health economics of the disease. The purpose of the present review is to compile information on TBE and its explicit clinical and economical aspects. Given the scarcity of studies, the authors conclude that more attention is needed for health economics of TBE. Notably, this would help establish guidance on efficient policies for TBE prevention, reduce disease burden and achieve population health benefits. PMID:25427237

  1. Antiviral activity of Rheum palmatum methanol extract and chrysophanol against Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Lin, Ying-Ju; Tsou, Yi-Yun; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Rheum palmatum, Chinese traditional herb, exhibits a great variety of anti-cancer and anti-viruses properties. This study rates antiviral activity of R. palmatum extracts and its components against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in vitro. Methanol extract of R. palmatum contained higher levels of aloe emodin, chrysophanol, rhein, emodin and physcion than water extract. Methanol extract (IC₅₀ = 15.04 μg/ml) exhibited more potent inhibitory effects on JEV plaque reduction than water extract (IC₅₀ = 51.41 μg/ml). Meanwhile, IC₅₀ values determined by plaque reduction assay were 15.82 μg/ml for chrysophanol and 17.39 μg/ml for aloe-emodin, respectively. Virucidal activity of agents correlated with anti-JEV activity, while virucidal IC₅₀ values were 7.58 μg/ml for methanol extract, 17.36 μg/ml for water extract, 0.75 μg/ml for chrysophanol and 0.46 μg/ml for aloe-emodin, respectively. In addition, 10 μg/ml of extract, chrysophanol or aloe emodin caused 90 % inhibition of JEV yields in cells and significantly activated gamma activated sequence-driven promoters. Hence, methanol extract of R. palmatum and chrysophanol with high therapeutic index might be useful for development of antiviral agents against JEV. PMID:24395532

  2. Epidemiological Study of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in Vientiane, Lao PDR, in 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mika; Soukaloun, Douangdao; Phongsavath, Khampe; Phommasack, Bounlay; Makino, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was conducted using core-premembrane and envelope gene sequence data of two strains from Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic, in 1993 and five from Okinawa, Japan, in 2002 and 2003, and previously published strains. The two Vientiane strains designated as LaVS56 and LaVS145 belonged to genotype 1 (G1) and the same subcluster of G1 as Australian strain in 2000, Thai strains in 1982–1985 and 2004-2005, and Vietnamese strain in 2005, but were distinct from the subcluster of recently distributing G1 strains widely in Asia including Okinawan strains and recent Lao strain in 2009. These clusters with own distinct distributions indicated involvements of different mechanisms and routes of spreading viruses and clarified that Australian G1 strain is from Southeast Asia, not from East Asia. Both Vientiane strains were antigenically close to P19-Br (G1, isolate, Thailand), but distinct from Nakayama (G3, prototype strain, Japan), Beijing-1 (G3, laboratory strain, China), and JaGAr#01 (G3, laboratory strain, Japan), demonstrated by cross-neutralization tests using polyclonal antisera. These results together with seroepidemiologic study conducted in Vientiane strongly suggest that diversified JEV cocirculated there in early 1990s. PMID:25695095

  3. Porcine 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetases inhibit Japanese encephalitis virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sheng; Zhu, Dan; Lian, Xue; Liu, Weiting; Cao, Ruibing; Chen, Puyan

    2016-05-01

    The 2', 5'-oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS) are antiviral proteins and several isoforms have been identified as flavivirus-resistance biomarkers in human and mouse. The expression kinetics and antiviral functions of porcine OAS family (OAS1, OAS2, and OASL) in PK-15 cells following infection by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) were evaluated in the present study. The endogenous expression of the three OAS genes was efficiently induced by IFN-α treatment in PK-15 cells. However, expression of pOAS1 and pOAS2 responded more quickly than pOASL. Infection by JEV also induced the expression of the pOAS isoforms, but at a significantly lower level than that observed following IFN-α stimulation. Transient overexpression of pOASL and pOAS1 inhibited JEV replication more efficiently than OAS2 overexpression. Interestingly, knockdown of pOAS2 expression by siRNA treatment led to the highest increase in JEV multiplication. Co-silencing of RNase L and each pOAS revealed that the anti-JEV function of pOAS1 and pOAS2 were RNase L dependent, while the antiviral activity of pOASL was not. In conclusion, all pOAS isoforms play a significant role in the response to JEV infection, and are differentially induced by different stimuli. The alternative pathways of antiviral activity stimulated by OASL require further study. PMID:26437676

  4. How environmental conditions impact mosquito ecology and Japanese encephalitis: an eco-epidemiological approach.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huai-Yu; Bi, Peng; Cazelles, Bernard; Zhou, Sen; Huang, Shan-Qian; Yang, Jing; Pei, Yao; Wu, Xiao-Xu; Fu, Shi-Hong; Tong, Shi-Lu; Wang, Huan-Yu; Xu, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the major vector-borne diseases in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region, posing a threat to human health. In rural and suburban areas, traditional rice farming and intensive pig breeding provide an ideal environment for both mosquito development and the transmission of JEV among human beings. Combining surveillance data for mosquito vectors, human JE cases, and environmental conditions in Changsha, China, 2004-2009, generalized threshold models were constructed to project the mosquito and JE dynamics. Temperature and rainfall were found to be closely associated with mosquito density at 1, and 4month lag, respectively. The two thresholds, maximum temperature of 22-23°C for mosquito development and minimum temperature of 25-26°C for JEV transmission, play key roles in the ecology of JEV. The model predicts that, in the upper regime, a 1g/m(3) increase in absolute humidity would on average increase human cases by 68-84%. A shift in mosquito species composition in 2007 was observed, and possibly caused by a drought. Effective predictive models could be used in risk management to provide early warnings for potential JE transmission. PMID:25771078

  5. A preliminary neuropathological study of Japanese encephalitis in humans and a mouse model.

    PubMed

    German, Allison C; Myint, Khin Saw Aye; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Pomeroy, Ian; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Tzartos, John; Winter, Peter; Collett, Jennifer; Farrar, Jeremy; Barrett, Alan; Kipar, Anja; Esiri, Margaret M; Solomon, Tom

    2006-12-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes approximately 10000 deaths annually in Asia. After a brief viraemia, the virus enters the central nervous system, but the means of crossing the blood-brain barrier is uncertain. We used routine histological staining, immunohistology and electron microscopy to examine brain material from four fatal human cases, and made comparisons with material from a mouse model. In human material there was oedema, perivascular inflammation, haemorrhage, microglial nodules and acellular necrotic foci, as has been described previously. In addition, there was new evidence suggestive of viral replication in the vascular endothelium, with endothelial cell damage; this included occasional viral antigen staining, uneven binding of the vascular endothelial cells to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I and ultrastructural changes. Viral antigen was also found in neurons. There was an active astrocytic response, as shown by glial fibrillary acidic protein staining, and activation of microglial cells was demonstrated by an increase in major histocompatibility complex class II expression. Similar inflammatory infiltrates and a microglial reaction were observed in mouse brain tissue. In addition, beta-amyloid precursor protein staining indicated impaired axonal transport. Whether these findings are caused by viral replication in the vascular endothelium or the immune response merits further investigation. PMID:16814333

  6. Characterization of homologous defective interfering RNA during persistent infection of Vero cells with Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Wook; Lee, Sang-Yong; Won, Sung-Yong; Park, Sun-Hee; Park, Soo-Young; Jeong, Yong Seok

    2006-02-28

    It has been suggested that defective interfering (DI) RNA contributes to the persistence of Japanese en-cephalitis virus (JEV). In this study, we characterized molecular and biological aspects of the DI RNA and its relation to viral persistence. We identified a homolo-gous DI virus intimately associated with JEV persis-tence in Vero cells. The production of DI RNA during undiluted serial passages of JEV coincided with the appearance of cells refractory to acute infection with JEV. We also established a Vero cell clone with a per-sistent JEV infection in which the DI RNA co-replicated efficiently at the expense of helper virus. The infectious virus yield of the clone fluctuated dur-ing its growth depending upon the amount of DI RNA accumulated in the previous replication cycle. Identifi-cation of the corresponding negative-sense RNA of the DI RNA indicated that the DI RNA functioned as a replication unit. Most of the DI RNA molecules re-tained their open reading frames despite a large dele-tion, encompassing most of the prM, the entire E, and the 5' half of the NS1 gene. Taken together, these ob-servations suggest that the generation of homologous DI RNA during successive JEV acute infections in Vero cells probably participates actively in persistent JEV infection. PMID:16511353

  7. Isolation and genetic characterization of Japanese encephalitis virus from equines in India

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Harisankar; Singh, Birendra K.; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an important vector-borne viral disease of humans and horses in Asia. JE outbreaks occur regularly amongst humans in certain parts of India and sporadic cases occur among horses. In this study, JE seroprevalence and evidence of JE virus (JEV) infection among horses in Haryana (India) is described. Antibodies against JEV were detected in 67 out of 637 (10.5%) horses screened between 2006 and 2010. Two foals exhibiting neurological signs were positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR; JEV was isolated from the serum of one of the foals collected on the second day of illness. This is the first report of JEV isolation from a horse in India. Furthermore, a pool of mosquitoes collected from the premises housing these foals was positive for JEV RNA by RT-PCR. Three structural genes, capsid (C), premembrane (prM), and envelope (E) of the isolated virus (JE/eq/India/H225/2009) spanning 2,500 nucleotides (from 134 to 2,633) were cloned and sequenced. BLAST results showed that these genes had a greater than 97% nucleotide sequence identity with different human JEV isolates from India. Phylogenetic analysis based on E- and C/prM genes indicated that the equine JEV isolate belonged to genotype III and was closely related to the Vellore group of JEV isolates from India. PMID:22705732

  8. [Study on Spatial Dispersal and Migration Events of Japanese Encephalitis Virus].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Haiwei; Liu, Hong; Fu, Shihong; Wang, Huanyu; Guo, Zhenyang; Li, Xiaolong; Liang, Guodong

    2015-05-01

    To explore the spatial distribution mechanism of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), PhyML v3.0 was used to build phylogenetic tree using JEV sequences in the dataset. PAUP v4.0 and Migrapyhla softz ware were then used to analyze the migration events. The results showed that a total of 95 migration events were observed during the dispersal of JEV throughout Asia. Further analysis revealed that Thailand, and several Chinese provinces (including Shandong, Shanghai, Sichuan and Yunnan), were the main migration sources of JEV. JEV spread from these migration sources as follows: from Thailand to Australia, Cambodia, Tibet and India; from Shanghai to eastern coastal Asian regions and Yunnan; from Shandong to Korea, Zhejiang, Hubei, Shanxi and Liaoning; from Sichuan mainly to inland regions of China, as well as Vietnam and Japan; and from Yunnan to Zhejiang. This study indicated that frequent migration events occurred during the dispersal of JEV in the Asia and Pacific regions, and that Thailand, Shandong, Shanghai, Sichuan and Yunnan were the sources of JEV dispersal. PMID:26470532

  9. Defective interfering RNAs of Japanese encephalitis virus found in mosquito cells and correlation with persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Tsang, Shih-Fang; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chang, Ruey-Yi

    2007-03-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNAs are deletion mutants of viral genomes that are known in many cases to contribute to persistent infection and modification of viral pathogenesis. Cell type also plays a critical role in the establishment of viral persistence. In this study we have identified for the first time the generation of DI RNAs of Japanese encephalitis virus in C6/36 mosquito cells. A persistent infection was established by replacing growth medium on surviving cells and continued cell passaging. Persistent infection was demonstrated by a continual release of infectious virus, fluorescent antibody staining, and Northern analysis. A population of DI RNAs of approximately 8.2-9.7 kb, not detectable in acutely infected cells, became apparent in the persistently infected cells by 25 days postinfection. Sequence analyses revealed a population of DI RNAs that contained in-frame deletions of 1.3-2.8 kb covering the region of the E gene and some flanking C or prM and NS1 gene sequences. Transcripts from one cDNA clone of a DI RNA replicated in uninfected mosquito cells as demonstrated by RT-PCR. DI RNA-containing virions in supernatant fluids from persistently infected mosquito cells could be used to establish persistent infection in BHK-21 cells. The correlation of DI RNA presence with cell survival suggests that DI RNAs are contributing mechanistically to the establishment of persistent infection in both the mosquito and mammalian cells. PMID:17134784

  10. A KDEL Retrieval System for ER-Golgi Transport of Japanese Encephalitis Viral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Robert YL; Wu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Han-Shan; Chen, Chih-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has emerged that RNA viruses utilize the host secretory pathway for processing and trafficking mature viral particles and for exiting the infected cells. Upon completing the complex assembly process, the viral particles take advantage of the cellular secretory trafficking machinery for their intracellular trafficking toward the Golgi organelle and budding or export of virions. In this study, we showed that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-induced extracellular GRP78 contains no KDEL motif using an anti-KDEL-specific antibody. Overexpression of the KDEL-truncated GRP78 in the GPR78 knocked down cells significantly reduced JEV infectivity, suggesting that the KDEL motif is required for GRP78 function in the release of JE viral particles. In addition, we demonstrated the KDELR protein, an ER-Golgi retrieval system component, is associated with viral envelope proteins and is engaged in the subcellular localization of viral particles in Golgi. More importantly, accumulation of intracellular virions was observed in the KDELR knocked down cells, indicating that the KDELR protein mediated the intracellular trafficking of JE viral particles. Altogether, we demonstrated that intracellular trafficking of JE assembled viral particles was mediated by the host ER-Golgi retrieval system prior to exit by the secretory pathway. PMID:26861384

  11. Susceptibility of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells to Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shih-Cheng; Shen, Ching-I; Lin, Ho; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chang, Chia-Yu; Chen, Sheng-Mei; Lee, Hsiu-Chin; Lai, Ping-Shan; Su, Hong-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be efficiently directed to become immature neuroepithelial precursor cells (NPCs) and functional mature neural cells, including neurotransmitter-secreting neurons and glial cells. Investigating the susceptibility of these hESCs-derived neural cells to neurotrophic viruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), provides insight into the viral cell tropism in the infected human brain. We demonstrate that hESC-derived NPCs are highly vulnerable to JEV infection at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). In addition, glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP)-expressing glial cells are also susceptible to JEV infection. In contrast, only a few mature neurons were infected at MOI 10 or higher on the third day post-infection. In addition, functional neurotransmitter-secreting neurons are also resistant to JEV infection at high MOI. Moreover, we discover that vimentin intermediate filament, reported as a putative neurovirulent JEV receptor, is highly expressed in NPCs and glial cells, but not mature neurons. These results indicate that the expression of vimentin in neural cells correlates to the cell tropism of JEV. Finally, we further demonstrate that membranous vimentin is necessary for the susceptibility of hESC-derived NPCs to JEV infection. PMID:25517725

  12. Second Generation Inactivated Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice against a Lethal Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Honnold, Shelley P.; Bakken, Russell R.; Fisher, Diana; Lind, Cathleen M.; Cohen, Jeffrey W.; Eccleston, Lori T.; Spurgers, Kevin B.; Maheshwari, Radha K.; Glass, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no FDA-licensed vaccines or therapeutics for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) for human use. We recently developed several methods to inactivate CVEV1219, a chimeric live-attenuated eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Dosage and schedule studies were conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of three potential second-generation inactivated EEEV (iEEEV) vaccine candidates in mice: formalin-inactivated CVEV1219 (fCVEV1219), INA-inactivated CVEV1219 (iCVEV1219) and gamma-irradiated CVEV1219 (gCVEV1219). Both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 provided partial to complete protection against an aerosol challenge when administered by different routes and schedules at various doses, while iCVEV1219 was unable to provide substantial protection against an aerosol challenge by any route, dose, or schedule tested. When evaluating antibody responses, neutralizing antibody, not virus specific IgG or IgA, was the best correlate of protection. The results of these studies suggest that both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 should be evaluated further and considered for advancement as potential second-generation inactivated vaccine candidates for EEEV. PMID:25116127

  13. Viral Infection of the Central Nervous System and Neuroinflammation Precede Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption during Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Wang, Yueyun; Yu, Lan; Cao, Shengbo; Wang, Ke; Yuan, Jiaolong; Wang, Chong; Wang, Kunlun; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis is an acute zoonotic, mosquito-borne disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Japanese encephalitis is characterized by extensive inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the BBB disruption are not known. Here, using a mouse model of intravenous JEV infection, we show that virus titers increased exponentially in the brain from 2 to 5 days postinfection. This was accompanied by an early, dramatic increase in the level of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the brain. Enhancement of BBB permeability, however, was not observed until day 4, suggesting that viral entry and the onset of inflammation in the CNS occurred prior to BBB damage. In vitro studies revealed that direct infection with JEV could not induce changes in the permeability of brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. However, brain extracts derived from symptomatic JEV-infected mice, but not from mock-infected mice, induced significant permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Consistent with a role for inflammatory mediators in BBB disruption, the administration of gamma interferon-neutralizing antibody ameliorated the enhancement of BBB permeability in JEV-infected mice. Taken together, our data suggest that JEV enters the CNS, propagates in neurons, and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which result in the disruption of the BBB. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia, resulting in 70,000 cases each year, in which approximately 20 to 30% of cases are fatal, and a high proportion of patients survive with serious neurological and psychiatric sequelae. Pathologically, JEV infection causes an acute encephalopathy accompanied by BBB dysfunction; however, the mechanism is not clear. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of BBB disruption in JEV infection is important

  14. Clinically mild encephalitis with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) after mumps vaccination.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Shiihara, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takayanagi, Masaru; Hara, Munetsugu; Okumura, Akihisa; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2015-02-15

    We retrospectively collected three patients with clinically mild encephalitis with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) after mumps vaccination, and reviewed five patients, including two patients previously reported. The five patients (all males, aged 1 to 9) presented with fever, vomiting, or headache as the initial symptoms (day 0), suggesting meningitis, at 13 to 21 days after mumps vaccination. Consciousness disturbance, delirious behavior, seizures, or dysarthria was observed on days 1 to 3, which had completely resolved before day 11. Hyponatremia was observed in all patients. A cerebrospinal fluid study showed pleocytosis, and confirmed the vaccine strain genome. MRI revealed reduced diffusion in the splenium of the corpus callosum on days 2 to 4, which had completely disappeared on the follow-up studies performed on days 7-15. EEG showed high voltage slow wave in three patients, which later normalized. These findings led to a diagnosis of MERS after mumps vaccination. MERS after mumps vaccination may be more common than previously considered. MERS is suspected when a male patient after mumps vaccination presents with neurological symptoms with hyponatremia, following symptoms of aseptic meningitis, and MRI would be performed to examine the splenium of the corpus callosum. PMID:25542078

  15. Antibody response of sandhill and whooping cranes to an eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.G.; Dein, F.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Carpenter, J.W.; Watts, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a possible strategy to protect whooping cranes (Grus americana) from fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viral infection, studies were conducted to determine the immune response of this species and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to a formalin-inactivated EEE viral vaccine. Viral-specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in both species after intramuscular (IM) vaccination. Subcutaneous and intravenous routes of vaccination failed to elicit detectable antibody in sandhill cranes. Among the IM vaccinated cranes, the immune response was characterized by nondetectable or low antibody titers that waned rapidly following primary exposure to the vaccine. However, one or more booster doses consistently elicited detectable antibody and/or increased antibody titers in the whooping cranes. In contrast, cranes with pre-existing EEE viral antibody, apparently induced by natural infection, exhibited a rapid increase and sustained high-antibody titers. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to determine the protective efficacy of the antibody.

  16. Use of an inactivated eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine in cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Dein, F.J.; Clark, G.G.; Watts, D.M.; Crabbs, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    An unprecedented outbreak of fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus occurred during the late summer and fall of 1984 in endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland. As part of efforts to prevent future epizootics of EEE. studies were conducted to evaluate the antibody response of cranes following vaccination with a formalin-inactivated EEE virus vaccine. Viral specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes following 1M inoculation with the vaccine. Among the 1M-inoculated cranes, peak antibody titers of 1:80 on days 30 to 60 had waned to undetectable levels by days 90 to 120. Although the initial titers were not increased by the first booster dose, the duration of the antibody was extended considerably. Whooping cranes, receiving vaccine 6 months after their first vaccination, developed titers of 1:80 to 1:320 by day 30. At 45 days after the final vaccination, these titers had dropped to 1:10 to 1:160. Cranes with preexisting EEE virus antibody, apparently reflecting natural infection, exhibited an anamnestic response indicated by a rapid increase and sustained high antibody titer. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to assess the significance of this response as a strategy for protecting whooping cranes against natural EEE virus infection. The loss of captive whooping cranes to the EEE virus presented a previously unrecognized risk and obstacle to recovery of this species. Not only was, there a setback in the captive breeding and reintroduction program for the whooping crane, but, because of the susceptibility of the species to the EEE virus. establishment of additional crane populations may be more complicated than initially envisioned. However, through continued surveillance, serological monitoring, and vaccination activities, we are confident that

  17. Bagaza virus inhibits Japanese encephalitis & West Nile virus replication in Culex tritaeniorhynchus & Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Sudeep, A.B.; Bondre, V.P.; George, R.; Ghodke, Y.S.; Aher, R.V.; Gokhale, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies have shown that certain flaviviruses influence susceptibility of mosquitoes by inhibiting/enhancing replication of important flaviviruses. Hence, a study was designed to determine whether Bagaza virus (BAGV), a flavivirus isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes in India, alters susceptibility of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes to Japanese encephalitis (JEV) and West Nile viruses (WNV). Methods: JEV and WNV infection in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in the presence of BAGV was carried out by intrathoracic (IT) inoculation and oral feeding methods. Mosquitoes were infected with BAGV and WNV/JEV either simultaneously or in a phased manner, in which mosquitoes were infected with BAGV by IT inoculation followed by super-infection with JEV/WNV after eight days post-infection (PI). JEV and WNV yield on 7th and 14th day PI after super-infection was determined by 50 per cent tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) method. Results: In Cx. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes, prior infection with BAGV significantly reduced JEV and WNV replication while in Cx. quinquefasciatus, BAGV influence was only seen with WNV. Reduction in virus titre was observed in IT inoculated and oral fed mosquitoes irrespective of the infection mode. JEV replication was also found reduced in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes persistently infected with BAGV at passage four. Interpretation & conclusions: BAGV infection in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes altered their susceptibility to JEV and WNV producing low virus yield. However, the role of BAGV in inhibiting JEV/WNV replication in field mosquitoes needs further investigations. PMID:26905241

  18. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance and Classic Gene Mutations to Japanese Encephalitis Vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus from China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Ming; Chu, Hong-Liang; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Ying-Mei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Dong, Yan-De; Li, Chun-Xiao; Zhao, Tong-Yan

    2016-06-01

    Widespread resistance of insect pests to insecticides has been widely reported in China and there is consequently an urgent need to adjust pest management strategies appropriately. This requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate levels of resistance to 5 insecticides among 12 strains of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, a major vector of Japanese encephalitis in China. Resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur were measured using larval bioassays. The allelic frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) mutations were determined in all strains. Larval bioassay results indicated that the field strains collected from different sites were resistant to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, permethrin, dichlorvos, and propoxur, with resistance ratio values ranging from 1.70- to 71.98-fold, 7.83- to 43.07-fold, 3.54- to 40.03-fold, 291.85- to 530.89-fold, and 51.32- to 108.83-fold, respectively. A polymerase chain reaction amplification of specific alleles method for individual was developed to detect genotypes of the AChE gene mutation F455W in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The frequency of the AChE gene mutation F455W was 100.00% in all strains, making this mutation of no value as a marker of resistance to organophosphorous and carbamate pesticides in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus in China. The kdr allele was present in all strains at frequencies of 10.00-29.55%. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between kdr allele frequencies and levels of resistance to deltamethrin, beta-cypermethrin, and permethrin. These results highlight the need to monitor and map insecticide resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and to adjust pesticide use to minimize the development of resistance in these mosquitoes. PMID:27280353

  19. Reproductive performance in sows in relation to Japanese Encephalitis Virus seropositivity in an endemic area.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Johanna; Boqvist, Sofia; Ståhl, Karl; Thu, Ho Thi Viet; Magnusson, Ulf

    2012-02-01

    Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) is considered an important reproductive pathogen in pigs. Most studies of the reproductive impact of JEV have been conducted in areas where the disease occurs in seasonal epidemics. In this study, the associations between seropositivity for JEV, measured with an IgG ELISA, and the number of piglets born alive and stillborn were investigated in a tropical area endemic for JEV in Vietnam. Sixty percent of sows from four farms in the Mekong delta of Vietnam were seropositive to JEV and the Odds Ratio for a sow being infected was highest (6.4) in sows above 3.5 years (95% confidence interval 2.2-18.3). There was an association between increasing Optical Density (OD) values from the ELISA and the number of stillborn piglets in sows less than 1.5 years, but no effect of seropositivity could be shown when all sows were studied. OD values had an effect (p = 0.04) on the number of piglets born alive in the statistical analysis only when interacting with the effect of the breeds. An increase in mean OD value of the herd was correlated (p < 0.0001) with an increase in the number of piglets born alive. In this study, there was evidence of a negative association between seropositivity for JEV and the reproductive performance only in sows less than 1.5 years in endemic areas. This could be explained by a year-round infection with the virus, which would lead to immunity in many gilts before their first pregnancy. This, in turn, may imply that JEV infection in pigs is of minor importance for the reproductive performance in endemic areas. PMID:22081319

  20. Genetic instability of Japanese encephalitis virus cDNA clones propagated in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuchen; Tong, Wu; Liu, Fei; Liang, Chao; Gao, Fei; Li, Guoxin; Tong, Guangzhi; Zheng, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The genetic instability of Flavivirus cDNA clones in transformed bacteria is a common phenomenon. Herein, a cDNA fragment of the nucleotide (nt) 1-2913 of the genome of a flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), was used to investigate factors that caused the instability of cDNA clones. Several cDNA fragments with different 5'- or 3'-termini of the 2913-nt cDNA were obtained by PCR amplification or restriction enzyme digestion and cloned into a pCR-Blunt II-TOPO vector. All the cDNA fragments were stably propagated at 25 °C. However, the 5'-untranslated region and half of the 3'-E gene could cause the instability of the 2913-nt cDNA at 37 °C. The 5'-terminus sequences of the 2913-nt fragment were subjected to testing of the prokaryotic promoter activity by luciferase assay and Western blot. The sequences of 54-120 nt of the JEV genome exhibited high prokaryotic promoter activity at 37 °C, and the activity declined markedly at 25 °C. These findings revealed that the high prokaryotic promoter activity of the 54-120 nt sequences of the JEV genome together with expression of JEV structural genes determined the instability of a JEV cDNA clone. Growth at room temperature may reduce the prokaryotic promoter activity of 5'-sequences of the JEV genome and could represent an effective way to improve the stability of flavivirus cDNA clones in host bacteria. PMID:26888374

  1. Genetic diversity of Japanese encephalitis virus isolates obtained from the Indonesian archipelago between 1974 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-07-01

    Five genotypes (GI-V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI-III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the tropical climate

  2. Genetic Diversity of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolates Obtained from the Indonesian Archipelago Between 1974 and 1987

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Five genotypes (GI–V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI–III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the

  3. An approach for differentiating echovirus 30 and Japanese encephalitis virus infections in acute meningitis/encephalitis: a retrospective study of 103 cases in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent decades, Echovirus 30 (E30) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been reported to be the common causative agents of acute meningitis among patients in South East Asia. An E30 outbreak in Vietnam in 2001–2002 gained our interest because the initial clinical diagnosis of infected patients was due to JEV infection. There are few clinical insights regarding E30 cases, and there are no reports comparing E30 and JEV acute meningitis/encephalitis cases based on clinical symptoms and case histories. We therefore aimed to identify reliable clinical methods to differentiate E30 and JEV acute meningitis/encephalitis. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted to compare E30 and JEV acute meningitis/encephalitis cases. We collected and analyzed the clinical records of 43 E30 confirmed cases (E30 group) and 60 JEV confirmed cases (JEV group). Clinical data were compared between the E30 and the JEV groups. Differences of clinical parameters were analyzed by certain statistical tests. Results Fever, headache, and vomiting were the most common symptoms in both the E30 and the JEV groups. Combined symptoms of headache and vomiting and the triad of symptoms of fever, headache, and vomiting were observed in more patients in the E30 group (E30 vs. JEV: 19% vs. 0%, p < 0.001; 74% vs. 27%, p < 0.001, respectively). On the other hand, strong neurological symptoms such as seizure (5% vs. 73%, p < 0.001) and altered consciousness (12% vs. 97%, p < 0.001) were manifested primarily in the JEV group. CSF leukocytosis was observed predominantly in the E30 group (80 vs. 18 cells/μL, p = 0.003), whereas decreasing CSF sugar level was observed predominantly in the JEV group (58.7 vs. 46.9 mg/dL, p < 0.001). Conclusion Fever, headache, vomiting, absence of neurological symptoms (seizure, altered consciousness), and presence of CSF leukocytosis are important parameters to consider in differentiating E30 from JEV cases during

  4. Pre-cut Filter Paper for Detecting Anti-Japanese Encephalitis Virus IgM from Dried Cerebrospinal Fluid Spots

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Tehmina; Chanthongthip, Anisone; Phuangpanom, Soumphou; Phonemixay, Ooyanong; Sengvilaipaseuth, Onanong; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Lee, Sue; Newton, Paul N.; Dubot-Pérès, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of filter paper as a simple, inexpensive tool for storage and transportation of blood, ‘Dried Blood Spots’ or Guthrie cards, for diagnostic assays is well-established. In contrast, there are a paucity of diagnostic evaluations of dried cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spots. These have potential applications in low-resource settings, such as Laos, where laboratory facilities for central nervous system (CNS) diagnostics are only available in Vientiane. In Laos, a major cause of CNS infection is Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). We aimed to develop a dried CSF spot protocol and to evaluate its diagnostic performance using the World Health Organisation recommended anti-JEV IgM antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (JEV MAC-ELISA). Methodology and Principal Findings Sample volumes, spotting techniques and filter paper type were evaluated using a CSF-substitute of anti-JEV IgM positive serum diluted in Phosphate Buffer Solution (PBS) to end-limits of detection by JEV MAC-ELISA. A conventional protocol, involving eluting one paper punch in 200μl PBS, did not detect the end-dilution, nor did multiple punches utilising diverse spotting techniques. However, pre-cut filter paper enabled saturation with five times the volume of CSF-substitute, sufficiently improving sensitivity to detect the end-dilution. The diagnostic accuracy of this optimised protocol was compared with routine, neat CSF in a pilot, retrospective study of JEV MAC-ELISA on consecutive CSF samples, collected 2009–15, from three Lao hospitals. In comparison to neat CSF, 132 CSF samples stored as dried CSF spots for one month at 25–30°C showed 81.6% (65.7–92.3 95%CI) positive agreement, 96.8% (91.0–99.3 95%CI) negative agreement, with a kappa coefficient of 0.81 (0.70–0.92 95%CI). Conclusions/Significance The novel design of pre-cut filter paper saturated with CSF could provide a useful tool for JEV diagnostics in settings with limited laboratory access. It has the

  5. [Japanese guidelines for the management of herpes simplex encephalitis; comparison with those from the International Management Herpes Forum].

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is still recognized as a severe sporadic encephalitis, although the mortality and morbidity rates have been decreased to 10% and 30%, respectively. This disease is diagnosed using clinical symptoms, CSF, EEG, CT, MRI, and virologic tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or enzyme immunosorbent assay (EIA). Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for HSE. However, the early symptoms of this disease are various, and the laboratory diagnostic criteria are unclear to the non-specialist. In 2005, Japanese guidelines for the management of HSE have been issued via two sets of Workshops at the Japanese Neuroinfectious Disease Congress. The diagnostic and therapeutic criteria were discussed in comparison with those from the International Management Herpes Forum (IMHF) in 2004. For a definitive diagnosis, CSF PCR for herpes simplex virus (HSV) is recommended, and the detection rate has been reported to be 60 to 80% within the 7th day of the illness. In the IMHF, the PCR method has also been the primary method for early diagnosis and for monitoring the therapy. Further, quantitative real-time PCR has become available for measuring the effectiveness of aciclovir therapy. To measure HSV antibody levels, complement antibody (CF), neutralizing antibody (NT), or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or EIA) are available. Significant elevation of EIA IgG or intrathecal HSV antibody production should be shown, although these antibody responses often appear two weeks after the onset of HSE. Regarding anti-herpesvirus drugs, in both Japanese and IMHF guidelines aciclovir is consistent with the first choice, and it is recommended that its administration would be started as soon as HSE is suspected on the basis of clinical pictures, CT * MRI, EEG, or CSF findings. However, antiviral therapy may be discontinued if a negative CSF HSV PCR is obtained at > 72 hours after onset. A recent Japanese study shows the efficacy of a combination

  6. Inapparent Viral Infection of Cells In Vitro III. Manifestations of Infection of L Mouse Cells by Japanese Encephalitis Virus1

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, D. R.; Scherer, W. F.

    1966-01-01

    Dubbs, D. R. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), and W. F. Scherer. Inapparent viral infection of cells in vitro. III. Manifestations of infection of L mouse cells by Japanese encephalitis virus. J. Bacteriol. 91:2349–2355. 1966.—Nine strains of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus were propagated serially in cultures of L cells reaching titers of 103.5 to 106.3. Although cytopathic effects were not seen in cultures of contiguous L cells after infection with JE virus, cell growth was inhibited. Moreover, cell destruction was readily apparent in infected cultures of sparse, noncontiguous L cells. Differences in the size of cell population of infected and noninfected cultures (i) occurred despite only 0.2 to 3.5% of the cells in infected cultures being associated with infectious virus, (ii) were greater in actively growing cultures than in those kept in maintenance media, and (iii) were probably in part related to an interferon produced in infected cultures. Images PMID:4287589

  7. A Novel Immunochromatographic Test Applied to a Serological Survey of Japanese Encephalitis Virus on Pig Farms in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Go-Woon; Lee, Eun Ju; Lim, Eun-Joo; Sin, Kang Suk; Park, Woo Won; Jeon, Doo Young; Han, Myung Guk; Lee, Won-Ja; Choi, Woo-Young; Jeong, Young Eui

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrate species, pigs are a major amplifying host of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and measuring their seroconversion is a reliable indicator of virus activity. Traditionally, the hemagglutination inhibition test has been used for serological testing in pigs; however, it has several limitations and, thus, a more efficient and reliable replacement test is required. In this study, we developed a new immunochromatographic test for detecting antibodies to JEV in pig serum within 15 min. Specifically, the domain III region of the JEV envelope protein was successfully expressed in soluble form and used for developing the immunochromatographic test. The test was then applied to the surveillance of Japanese encephalitis (JE) in Korea. We found that our immunochromatographic test had good sensitivity (84.8%) and specificity (97.7%) when compared with an immunofluorescence assay used as a reference test. During the surveillance of JE in Korea in 2012, the new immunochromatographic test was used to test the sera of 1,926 slaughtered pigs from eight provinces, and 228 pigs (11.8%) were found to be JEV-positive. Based on these results, we also produced an activity map of JEV, which marked the locations of pig farms in Korea that tested positive for the virus. Thus, the immunochromatographic test reported here provides a convenient and effective tool for real-time monitoring of JEV activity in pigs. PMID:25992769

  8. Differential Diagnosis of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections with the Inbios JE Detect™ and DEN Detect™ MAC-ELISA Kits.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Barbara W; Goodman, Christin H; Jee, Youngmee; Featherstone, David A

    2016-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of pediatric viral neurological disease in Asia. The JEV-specific IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum is the recommended method of laboratory diagnosis, but specificity of JEV MAC-ELISA can be low due to cross-reactivity. To increase the specificity of the commercially available JEDetect™ MAC-ELISA (JEDetect), a differential testing algorithm was developed in which samples tested by JEDetect with positive results were subsequently tested by the DENDetect™ MAC-ELISA (DENDetect) kit, and results of both tests were used to make the final interpretation. The testing algorithm was evaluated with a reference panel of serum and CSF samples submitted for confirmatory testing. In serum, the false Japanese encephalitis (JE) positive rate was reduced, but sequential testing in CSF resulted in reduced JE specificity, as true JEV+ CSF samples had positive results by both JEDetect and DENDetect and were classified as JE- (dengue virus [DENV]+). Differential diagnosis of JE by sequential testing with JEDetect and DENDetect increased specificity for JE in serum, but more data with CSF is needed to make a final determination on the usefulness of this testing algorithm for CSF. PMID:26856911

  9. Cross-protection between West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Bosco-Lauth, Angela M; Bowen, Richard A

    2009-09-01

    Similar to West Nile virus (WNV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has a history of intercontinental spread, and birds are important for the maintenance and transmission of both of these closely related viruses. We examined viremic and serologic responses of blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), with and without immunity to WNV, following experimental inoculation with two strains of JEV. Japanese encephalitis (JE) viremia was detected in only one of 16 (6.3%) WNV-immune birds, while all 16 nonimmune birds had detectable JE viremia. Two weeks after JEV inoculation, all birds without pre-existing WNV immunity had clearly distinguishable anti-JEV antibodies, while in all birds with pre-existing WNV immunity, antibodies to WNV and JEV were either indistinguishable or the anti-WNV antibody titers were significantly higher. As WNV is endemic throughout much of North America, WNV immunity among birds may dampen transmission while complicating the serologic diagnosis of JEV, should this pathogen be introduced to North America. PMID:19848083

  10. Differential Diagnosis of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infections with the Inbios JE Detect™ and DEN Detect™ MAC-ELISA Kits

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Barbara W.; Goodman, Christin H.; Jee, Youngmee; Featherstone, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of pediatric viral neurological disease in Asia. The JEV-specific IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum is the recommended method of laboratory diagnosis, but specificity of JEV MAC-ELISA can be low due to cross-reactivity. To increase the specificity of the commercially available JE Detect™ MAC-ELISA (JE Detect), a differential testing algorithm was developed in which samples tested by JE Detect with positive results were subsequently tested by the DEN Detect™ MAC-ELISA (DEN Detect) kit, and results of both tests were used to make the final interpretation. The testing algorithm was evaluated with a reference panel of serum and CSF samples submitted for confirmatory testing. In serum, the false Japanese encephalitis (JE) positive rate was reduced, but sequential testing in CSF resulted in reduced JE specificity, as true JEV+ CSF samples had positive results by both JE Detect and DEN Detect and were classified as JE− (dengue virus [DENV]+). Differential diagnosis of JE by sequential testing with JE Detect and DEN Detect increased specificity for JE in serum, but more data with CSF is needed to make a final determination on the usefulness of this testing algorithm for CSF. PMID:26856911

  11. Japanese Encephalitis in Assam, India: Need to Increase Healthcare Workers’ Understanding to Improve Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Khan, Muhammad Umair; Gogoi, Lakhya Jyoti; Kalita, Manabendra; Sikdar, Atul Prasad; Pandey, Sureshwar; Dhingra, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a major cause of high morbidity and mortality in several states across India. However, in 2014, a sharp rise was observed in the number of cases of JE in north-eastern Assam state, and 51% of the total cases of JE in India were reported from the Assam in the same year. In this regard, a study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of healthcare workers in Darrang, a district of Assam highly affected by JE. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for 2 months among HCWs in the major district hospital of Darrang, Assam. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the participants. Convenience sampling approach was used to collect data from different departments of the hospitals. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were used to express the results. Results The knowledge of HCWs regarding JE was poor with a mean knowledge score of 11.02±2.39 (out of 17), while their attitudes were positive with a mean attitudes score of 43.16± 2.47 (ranging from 13 to 52). Overall, 40.4% and 74.3% of participants demonstrated good knowledge and positive attitudes respectively. Cut-off score for good knowledge and positive attitudes toward JE was set as ≥12 and >40 respectively. Older participants (40–49 years) and experienced workers (>10 years) were significantly associated with good knowledge as compared to their referent group (p<0.05), while knowledge of nurses and other orderlies were significantly lower than physicians (p<0.01). Similar factors were associated with the positive attitudes of the participants with the exception of experience. Television was the major source of information regarding JE reported by HCWs (79%). Conclusion Although the knowledge was not optimized, HCWs exhibited positive attitudes towards JE. Future research is required to design, implement and evaluate interventions to improve the knowledge of JE among HCWs. PMID:26296212

  12. The Willingness to Pay for Vaccination against Tick-Borne Encephalitis and Implications for Public Health Policy: Evidence from Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Slunge, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in Sweden and several other European countries has sparked a discussion about the need for a public vaccination strategy. However, TBE vaccination coverage is incomplete and there is little knowledge about the factors influencing vaccination behavior. Based on a survey of 1,500 randomly selected respondents in Sweden, we estimate vaccination coverage in areas with different TBE risk levels and analyze the role of vaccine price and other factors influencing the demand for vaccination. First, we find that the average rate of TBE vaccination in Sweden is 33% in TBE risk areas and 18% elsewhere. Income, age and risk-related factors such as incidence of TBE in the area of residence, frequency of visits to areas with TBE risk, and experience with tick bites are positively associated with demand for TBE vaccine. Next, using contingent valuation methodology, we estimate the willingness to pay for TBE vaccination among the unvaccinated respondents and the effect of a possible subsidy. Among the unvaccinated respondents in TBE risk areas, we estimate the mean willingness to pay for the recommended three doses of TBE vaccine to be 465 SEK (approximately 46 euros or 40% of the current market price). We project that a subsidy making TBE vaccines free of charge could increase the vaccination rate in TBE risk areas to around 78%, with a larger effect on low-income households, whose current vaccination rate is only 15% in risk areas. However, price is not the only factor affecting demand. We find significant effects on vaccination behavior associated with trust in vaccine recommendations, perceptions about tick bite-related health risks and knowledge about ticks and tick-borne diseases. Hence, increasing knowledge and trust, as well as ease of access to vaccinations, can also be important measures for public health agencies that want to increase the vaccination rate. PMID:26641491

  13. Dengue encephalitis-associated immunopathology in the mouse model: Implications for vaccine developers and antigens inducer of cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Gil, Lázaro; Izquierdo, Alienys; Suzarte, Edith; Valdés, Iris; Blanco, Aracelys; Ancizar, Julio; Alba, José Suárez; Pérez, Yusleydis de la C; Cobas, Karen; Romero, Yaremis; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G; Hermida, Lisset

    2016-08-01

    Despite the many efforts made by the scientific community in the development of vaccine candidates against dengue virus (DENV), no vaccine has been licensed up to date. Although the immunopathogenesis associated to the disease is a key factor to take into account by vaccine developers, the lack of animal models that reproduce the clinical signs of the disease has hampered the vaccine progress. Non-human primates support viral replication, but they are very expensive and do not show signs of disease. Immunocompromised mice develop viremia and some signs of the disease; however, they are not valuable for vaccine testing. Nowadays, immunocompetent mice are the most used model to evaluate the immunogenicity of vaccine candidates. These animals are resistant to DENV infection; therefore, the intracranial inoculation with neuroadapted virus, which provokes viral encephalitis, represents an alternative to evaluate the protective capacity of vaccine candidates. Previous results have demonstrated the crucial role of cellular immune response in the protection induced by the virus and vaccine candidates in this mouse encephalitis model. However, in the present work we are proposing that the magnitude of the cell-mediated immunity and the inflammatory response generated by the vaccine can modulate the survival rate after viral challenge. We observed that the intracranial challenge of naïve mice with DENV-2 induces the recruitment of immune cells that contribute to the reduction of viral load, but does not increase the survival rate. On the contrary, animals treated with cyclophosphamide, an immunosuppressive drug that affects proliferating lymphocytes, had a higher viral load but a better survival rate than untreated animals. These results suggest that the immune system is playing an immunopathogenic role in this model and the survival rate may not be a suitable endpoint in the evaluation of vaccine candidates based on antigens that induce a strong cellular immune response

  14. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Spackman, Erica; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Fujita, Go; Konishi, Kan; Reed, John A.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Brown, Justin D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the spread of economically important and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Antibodies to AIV were detected in 64 of 105 samples (61%). Of the 64 positives, 95% and 81% inhibited agglutination of two different H5 AIV antigens (H5N1 and H5N9), respectively. Antibodies to JEV and WNV were detected in five (5%) and none of the samples, respectively. Results provide evidence for prior exposure of migrating northern pintails to H5 AIV which couldhave implications for viral shedding and disease occurrence. Results also provide evidence for limited involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of flaviviruses during spring migration.

  15. Griffithsin binds to the glycosylated proteins (E and prM) of Japanese encephalitis virus and inhibit its infection.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Li, Chen; Wang, Fengjuan; Mao, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is a broad-spectrum antiviral protein against several glycosylated viruses. In our previous publication, we have shown that GRFT exerted antiviral activity against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. Herein, we further elucidated the mechanism by which GRFT inhibits JEV infection in BHK-21 cells. In vitro experiments using Pull-down assay and Co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) assay showed that GRFT binds to the JEV glycosylated viral proteins, specifically the enveloped (E) and premature (prM) glycoproteins. The binding of GRFT to the JEV was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of mannose; in turns abolished anti-JEV activity of GRFT. We suggested that, the binding of GRFT to the glycosylated viral proteins may contribute to its anti-JEV activity. Collectively, our data indicated a possible mechanism by which GRFT exerted its anti-JEV activity. This observation suggests GRFT's potentials in the development of therapeutics against JEV or other flavivirus infection. PMID:26820432

  16. Adaptation of BHK-21 Cells to Growth in Shaker Culture and Subsequent Challenge by Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Guskey, Louis E.; Jenkin, Howard M.

    1975-01-01

    Baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells were adapted to grow in shaker culture using Waymouth medium 752/1 containing 20 mM N-2-hydroxyethyl-piperazine-N′-2′-ethanesulfonic acid buffer and supplemented with 2.5% (vol/vol) calf serum, 0.002% (wt/vol) sodium oleate, and 0.2% fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (WO2.5). Infectivity of Japanese encephalitis virus grown in the cells adapted to WO2.5 approached 2 × 108 plaque-forming units per ml. The culture volume of infected cells was reduced fivefold 12 h after infection. This step resulted in a 10-fold increase in infectivity over that obtained from infected cultures not subjected to volume reduction. PMID:1237269

  17. Adaptation of BHK-21 cells to growth in shaker culture and subsequent challenge by Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Guskey, L E; Jenkin, H M

    1975-09-01

    Baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells were adapted to grow in shaker culture using Waymouth medium 752/1 containing 20 mM N-2-hydroxyethyl-piperazine-N'-2'-ethanesulfonic acid buffer and supplemented with 2.5% (vol/vol) calf serum, 0.002% (wt/vol) sodium oleate, and 0.2% fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin (WO2.5). Infectivity of Japanese encephalitis virus grown in the cells adapted to WO2.5 approached 2 x 10(8) plaque-forming units per ml. The culture volume of infected cells was reduced fivefold 12 h after infection. This step resulted in a 10-fold increase in infectivity over that obtained from infected cultures not subjected to volume reduction. PMID:1237269

  18. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates from Intramuscular and Aerosol Challenge with Ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Barth, James F.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Nichols, Donald K.; Zak, Samantha E.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Muhammad, Majidat A.; Bakken, Russell R.; Prugar, Laura I.; Olinger, Gene G.; Groebner, Jennifer L.; Lee, John S.; Pratt, William D.; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Smith, Jonathan F.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2013-01-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine. PMID:23408633

  19. Sampling Design Influences the Observed Dominance of Culex tritaeniorhynchus: Considerations for Future Studies of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Lord, Jennifer S; Al-Amin, Hasan Mohammad; Chakma, Sumit; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Gurley, Emily S; Pulliam, Juliet R C

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito sampling during Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-associated studies, particularly in India, has usually been conducted via aspirators or light traps to catch mosquitoes around cattle, which are dead-end hosts for JEV. High numbers of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, relative to other species, have often been caught during these studies. Less frequently, studies have involved sampling outdoor resting mosquitoes. We aimed to compare the relative abundance of mosquito species between these two previously used mosquito sampling methods. From September to December 2013 entomological surveys were undertaken in eight villages in a Japanese encephalitis (JE) endemic area of Bangladesh. Light traps were used to collect active mosquitoes in households, and resting boxes and a Bina Pani Das hop cage were used near oviposition sites to collect resting mosquitoes. Numbers of humans and domestic animals present in households where light traps were set were recorded. In five villages Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was more likely to be selected from light trap samples near hosts than resting collection samples near oviposition sites, according to log odds ratio tests. The opposite was true for Cx. pseudovishnui and Armigeres subalbatus, which can also transmit JEV. Culex tritaeniorhynchus constituted 59% of the mosquitoes sampled from households with cattle, 28% from households without cattle and 17% in resting collections. In contrast Cx. pseudovishnui constituted 5.4% of the sample from households with cattle, 16% from households with no cattle and 27% from resting collections, while Ar. subalbatus constituted 0.15%, 0.38%, and 8.4% of these samples respectively. These observations may be due to differences in timing of biting activity, host preference and host-seeking strategy rather than differences in population density. We suggest that future studies aiming to implicate vector species in transmission of JEV should consider focusing catches around hosts able to transmit JEV. PMID

  20. Sampling Design Influences the Observed Dominance of Culex tritaeniorhynchus: Considerations for Future Studies of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Jennifer S.; Al-Amin, Hasan Mohammad; Chakma, Sumit; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Gurley, Emily S.; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito sampling during Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)-associated studies, particularly in India, has usually been conducted via aspirators or light traps to catch mosquitoes around cattle, which are dead-end hosts for JEV. High numbers of Culex tritaeniorhynchus, relative to other species, have often been caught during these studies. Less frequently, studies have involved sampling outdoor resting mosquitoes. We aimed to compare the relative abundance of mosquito species between these two previously used mosquito sampling methods. From September to December 2013 entomological surveys were undertaken in eight villages in a Japanese encephalitis (JE) endemic area of Bangladesh. Light traps were used to collect active mosquitoes in households, and resting boxes and a Bina Pani Das hop cage were used near oviposition sites to collect resting mosquitoes. Numbers of humans and domestic animals present in households where light traps were set were recorded. In five villages Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was more likely to be selected from light trap samples near hosts than resting collection samples near oviposition sites, according to log odds ratio tests. The opposite was true for Cx. pseudovishnui and Armigeres subalbatus, which can also transmit JEV. Culex tritaeniorhynchus constituted 59% of the mosquitoes sampled from households with cattle, 28% from households without cattle and 17% in resting collections. In contrast Cx. pseudovishnui constituted 5.4% of the sample from households with cattle, 16% from households with no cattle and 27% from resting collections, while Ar. subalbatus constituted 0.15%, 0.38%, and 8.4% of these samples respectively. These observations may be due to differences in timing of biting activity, host preference and host-seeking strategy rather than differences in population density. We suggest that future studies aiming to implicate vector species in transmission of JEV should consider focusing catches around hosts able to transmit JEV. PMID

  1. Pathogenic and Genotypic Characterization of a Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolate Associated with Reproductive Failure in an Indian Pig Herd

    PubMed Central

    Desingu, P. A.; Ray, Pradeep K.; Patel, B. H. M.; Singh, R.; Singh, R. K.; Saikumar, G

    2016-01-01

    Background India is endemic to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and recurrent outbreaks occur mainly in rice growing areas. Pigs are considered to be the amplifying host for JEV and infection in gestating pigs results in reproductive failure. Most studies conducted on JEV infection in Indian pigs have been serological surveys and very little is known about JEV genotypes circulating in pigs. So the potential risk posed by pigs in JEV transmission and the genetic relationship between viruses circulating in pigs, mosquitoes and humans is poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings This study was conducted in pigs with a history of reproductive failure characterized by stillborn piglets with neuropathological lesions. Japanese encephalitis (JE) suspected brain specimens inoculated intracerebrally into mice and Vero cells resulted in successful isolation of JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014. Clinicopathological observations in infected mice, demonstration of JEV antigen in brain, and analysis of the envelope protein identified the swine isolate as being neurovirulent. Phylogenetic analysis based on prM and E gene sequences showed that it belonged to genotype III. This swine isolate was closely related to JEV associated with the 2005 outbreak in India and JaoArS982 from Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of JEV strains collected between 1956 and 2014 in India categorized the GIII viruses into different clades blurring their spatial distribution, which has been discernible in the previous century. Conclusions/Significance Isolation of JEV from stillborn piglets and its close genetic relationship with viruses detected at least three decades ago in humans and mosquitoes in Japan suggests that the virus may have been circulating among Indian pigs for several decades. The close similarity between the present swine isolate and those detected in humans affected in the 2005 outbreak in Uttar Pradesh, India, suggests the need for more intensive surveillance of pigs and implementation of

  2. MicroRNA-19b-3p Modulates Japanese Encephalitis Virus-Mediated Inflammation via Targeting RNF11

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Usama; Zhu, Bibo; Ye, Jing; Wan, Shengfeng; Nie, Yanru; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Min; Wang, Chong; Duan, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can invade the central nervous system and consequently induce neuroinflammation, which is characterized by profound neuronal cell damage accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis. Albeit microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as major regulatory noncoding RNAs with profound effects on inflammatory response, it is unknown how astrocytic miRNAs regulate JEV-induced inflammation. Here, we found the involvement of miR-19b-3p in regulating the JEV-induced inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The data demonstrated that miR-19b-3p is upregulated in cultured cells and mouse brain tissues during JEV infection. Overexpression of miR-19b-3p led to increased production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, after JEV infection, whereas knockdown of miR-19b-3p had completely opposite effects. Mechanistically, miR-19b-3p modulated the JEV-induced inflammatory response via targeting ring finger protein 11, a negative regulator of nuclear factor kappa B signaling. We also found that inhibition of ring finger protein 11 by miR-19b-3p resulted in accumulation of nuclear factor kappa B in the nucleus, which in turn led to higher production of inflammatory cytokines. In vivo silencing of miR-19b-3p by a specific antagomir reinvigorates the expression level of RNF11, which in turn reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines, abrogates gliosis and neuronal cell death, and eventually improves the survival rate in the mouse model. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-19b-3p positively regulates the JEV-induced inflammatory response. Thus, miR-19b-3p targeting may constitute a thought-provoking approach to rein in JEV-induced inflammation. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the major causes of acute encephalitis in humans worldwide. The pathological features of JEV-induced encephalitis are inflammatory reactions and

  3. [Vaccinations for the travellers].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, Dominique

    2004-03-15

    Immunisations for the traveller include, before specific vaccine, a correct immunisation schedule according to national recommendations with appropriate boosters and hepatitis B immunisation. The yellow fever vaccine is required to entry in countries of endemic area and quadrivalent ACYW135 meningococcal vaccine for entry in Saudi Arabia. Hepatitis A immunisation could be performed at 1 year of age and is recommended for travellers in tropical areas and children vaccination control the disease both in the patient and in the contacts. Meningococcal A+C vaccines are required for travellers in meningitis-prone areas of tropical Africa during the dry season (December to June), and quadrivalent ACYW135 is useful only in Burkina-Faso and Niger. Typhoid and rabies vaccines are required for ambulatory travellers in endemic areas, as Japanese encephalitis in south-west Asia. In central Europe, tick-borne encephalitis vaccination is recommended for patients travelling in forest areas during spring and summer. PMID:15176511

  4. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the NS2A Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Affects Virus Propagation In Vitro but Not In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-01-01

    We identified a unique amino acid of NS2A113, phenylalanine, that affects the efficient propagation of two Japanese encephalitis virus strains, JaTH160 and JaOArS982, in neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells but not in cell lines of extraneural origin. This amino acid did not affect viral loads in the brain or survival curves in mice. These findings suggest that virus propagation in vitro may not reflect the level of virus neuroinvasiveness in vivo. PMID:25787282

  5. Simultaneous detection of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis virus RNA by duplex TaqMan RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Barros, Silvia C; Ramos, Fernanda; Zé-Zé, Líbia; Alves, Maria J; Fagulha, Teresa; Duarte, Margarida; Henriques, Margarida; Luís, Tiago; Fevereiro, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important mosquito-borne viruses of the Flaviviridae family, associated with encephalitis, mainly in humans and horses. WNV is also pathogen for many bird species. The incidence of human and animal WNV infections in Europe has risen, mostly in recent years, and JEV was detected in 2011 in mosquitoes collected in Italy and may emerge in Europe in the same way as other flaviviruses had emerged recently (USUTU and Bagaza virus) and should be regarded as a potential threat to public health. Prompt identification and discrimination between WNV and JEV provides critical epidemiological data for prevalence studies and public and animal health management policies. Here we describe a quantitative one-step duplex TaqMan RT-PCR, targeting non-structural protein 2A gene (NS2A-qRT-PCR), based on only one primer pair and two probes for differential diagnosis of WNV and JEV. Also this assay enables the detection of both WNV lineages (WNV-1 and WNV-2). To access the specificity of NS2A-qRT-PCR a panel of different arboviruses were used. The assay was shown to be specific for both WNV lineages (WNV-1 and WNV-2), WNV related Kunjin virus and JEV, since no cross-reactions were observed with other tested arboviruses. Sensitivity of the assay was determined using serial dilutions of in vitro-transcribed RNA from WNV and JEV. The duplex NS2A-qRT-PCR assay was shown to be very sensitive, being able to detect 10 copies of WNV and JEV RNA. This assay is a suitable tool for the diagnosis of WNV and JEV, and provides a valuable addition to the methods currently available for routine diagnosis of these zoonoses and for surveillance studies. PMID:23892127

  6. A Preliminary Randomized Double Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Intravenous Immunoglobulin for Japanese Encephalitis in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Rayamajhi, Ajit; Nightingale, Sam; Bhatta, Nisha Keshary; Singh, Rupa; Ledger, Elizabeth; Bista, Krishna Prasad; Lewthwaite, Penny; Mahaseth, Chandeshwar; Turtle, Lance; Robinson, Jaimie Sue; Galbraith, Sareen Elizabeth; Wnek, Malgorzata; Johnson, Barbara Wilmot; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus found across Asia that is closely related to West Nile virus. There is no known antiviral treatment for any flavivirus. Results from in vitro studies and animal models suggest intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) containing virus-specific neutralizing antibody may be effective in improving outcome in viral encephalitis. IVIG’s anti-inflammatory properties may also be beneficial. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a pilot feasibility randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of IVIG containing anti-JEV neutralizing antibody (ImmunoRel, 400mg/kg/day for 5 days) in children with suspected JE at two sites in Nepal; we also examined the effect on serum neutralizing antibody titre and cytokine profiles. 22 children were recruited, 13 of whom had confirmed JE; 11 received IVIG and 11 placebo, with no protocol violations. One child (IVIG group) died during treatment and two (placebo) subsequently following hospital discharge. Overall, there was no difference in outcome between treatment groups at discharge or follow up. Passive transfer of anti-JEV antibody was seen in JEV negative children. JEV positive children treated with IVIG had JEV-specific neutralizing antibody titres approximately 16 times higher than those treated with placebo (p=0.2), which was more than could be explained by passive transfer alone. IL-4 and IL-6 were higher in the IVIG group. Conclusions/Significance A trial of IVIG for JE in Nepal is feasible. IVIG may augment the development of neutralizing antibodies in JEV positive patients. IVIG appears an appealing option for JE treatment that warrants further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01856205 PMID:25886645

  7. Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein NS5 Interacts with Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein and Impairs Fatty Acid β-Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Ting; Chang, Bi-Lan; Liang, Jian-Jong; Tsai, Hang-Jen; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cause acute encephalitis in humans. β-oxidation breaks down fatty acids for ATP production in mitochondria, and impaired β-oxidation can induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. To address the role of fatty-acid β-oxidation in JEV infection, we measured the oxygen consumption rate of mock- and JEV-infected cells cultured with or without long chain fatty acid (LCFA) palmitate. Cells with JEV infection showed impaired LCFA β-oxidation and increased interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression. JEV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) interacted with hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase α and β subunits, two components of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) involved in LCFA β-oxidation, and NS5 proteins were detected in mitochondria and co-localized with MTP. LCFA β-oxidation was impaired and higher cytokines were induced in cells overexpressing NS5 protein as compared with control cells. Deletion and mutation studies showed that the N-terminus of NS5 was involved in the MTP association, and a single point mutation of NS5 residue 19 from methionine to alanine (NS5-M19A) reduced its binding ability with MTP. The recombinant JEV with NS5-M19A mutation (JEV-NS5-M19A) was less able to block LCFA β-oxidation and induced lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α than wild-type JEV. Moreover, mice challenged with JEV-NS5-M19A showed less neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness. We identified a novel function of JEV NS5 in viral pathogenesis by impairing LCFA β-oxidation and inducing cytokine expression by association with MTP. PMID:25816318

  8. Seasonal abundance & role of predominant Japanese encephalitis vectors Culex tritaeniorhynchus & Cx. gelidus Theobald in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, D.; Muniaraj, M.; Samuel, P. Philip; Thenmozhi, V.; Venkatesh, A.; Nagaraj, J.; Tyagi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. The first major JE outbreak occurred in 1978 and since 1981 several outbreaks had been reported in the Cuddalore district (erstwhile South Arcot), Tamil Nadu, India. Entomological monitoring was carried out during January 2010 - March 2013, to determine the seasonal abundance and transmission dynamics of the vectors of JE virus, with emphasis on the role of Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus. Methods: Mosquito collections were carried out fortnightly during dusk hours in three villages viz. Soundara Solapuram, Pennadam, Erappavur of Cuddalore district. Mosquitoes were collected during dusk for a period of one hour in and around the cattle sheds using oral aspirator and torch light. The collected mosquitoes were later identified and pooled to detect JE virus (JEV) infection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: A total of 46,343 mosquitoes comprising of 25 species and six genera were collected. Species composition included viz, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (46.26%), Cx. gelidus (43.12%) and other species (10.62%). A total of 17,678 specimens (403 pools) of Cx. gelidus and 14,358 specimens (309 pools) of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were tested, of which 12 pools of Cx. gelidus and 14 pools of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were positive for JE virus antigen. The climatic factors were negatively correlated with minimum infection rate (MIR) for both the species, except mean temperature (P<0.05) for Cx. gelidus. Interpretation & conclusions: High abundance of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus was observed compared to other mosquito species in the study area. Detection of JEV antigen in the two species confirmed the maintenance of virus. Appropriate vector control measures need to be taken to reduce the vector abundance. PMID:26905238

  9. Type-I interferon response affects an inoculation dose-independent mortality in mice following Japanese encephalitis virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The laboratory mouse model is commonly employed to study the pathogenesis of encephalitic flaviviruses such as Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). However, it is known that some strains of these viruses do not elicit a typical mortality dose response curve from this organism after peripheral infection and the reason for it has not yet been fully understood. It is suggested that induction of more vigorous Type-I IFN (IFN-I) response might control early virus dissemination following increasing infectious challenge doses of the virus. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine this suggested role of IFN-I in the mortality of mice infected with various doses of JEV. Methods Inbred 129 mice and their IFNAR KO (A129) mice were subcutaneously inoculated with 100, 102, 104 or 106 pfu of JaOArS982 strain of JEV. Mice were weighed daily and observed for clinical signs. Virus titers in the brains and spleens of JEV-infected mice were determined by plaque forming assays. The upregulated mRNA levels of genes related to IFN-I response of mice were examined by real-time PCR. Results The mortality rates of 129 mice infected with JaOArS982 did not significantly increase despite the increase in inoculation dose and no significant difference of viral loads was observed between their brains. However, there was clear elevation of the mRNA levels of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3, IRF7, IRF9, MDA5 and RIG-I at 24 hours post-infection depending on the inoculation dose. In A129 mice, length of survival days and the viral loads of spleen and brain were observed to be inoculation dose-dependent. Conclusions From these results, it is suggested that early IFN-I response elicited by high inoculation doses of JEV provides an anti-viral effect during the early phase of infection. Accordingly, virus replication is counteracted by IFN-I response at each increasing inoculation dose resulting in the interference of impending severe disease course or fatal outcome; hence, this

  10. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. PMID:26920587

  11. Field evaluation of a sentinel mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) trap system to detect Japanese encephalitis in remote Australia.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Scott A; Pyke, Alyssa T; Smith, Greg A; Northill, Judith A; Hall, Roy A; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Johansen, Cheryl A; Montgomery, Brian L; Mackenzie, John S

    2003-05-01

    Incursions of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus into northern Queensland are currently monitored using sentinel pigs. However, the maintenance of these pigs is expensive, and because pigs are the major amplifying hosts of the virus, they may contribute to JE transmission. Therefore, we evaluated a mosquito-based detection system to potentially replace the sentinel pigs. Single, inactivated JE-infected Culex annulirostris Skuse and C. sitiens Wiedemann were placed into pools of uninfected mosquitoes that were housed in a MosquitoMagnet Pro (MM) trap set under wet season field conditions in Cairns, Queensland for 0, 7, or 14 d. JE viral RNA was detected (cycling threshold [CT] = 40) in 11/12, 10/14, and 2/5 pools containing 200, 1,000, and 5,000 mosquitoes, respectively, using a TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The ability to detect virus was not affected by the length of time pools were maintained under field conditions, although the CT score tended to increase with field exposure time. Furthermore, JE viral RNA was detected in three pools of 1,000 mosquitoes collected from Badu Island using a MM trap. These results indicated that a mosquito trap system employing self-powered traps, such as the MosquitoMagnet, and a real-time PCR system, could be used to monitor for JE in remote areas. PMID:12943100

  12. RNA-protein interactions: involvement of NS3, NS5, and 3' noncoding regions of Japanese encephalitis virus genomic RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C J; Kuo, M D; Chien, L J; Hsu, S L; Wang, Y M; Lin, J H

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of replication of the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is not well known. The structures at the 3' end of the viral genome are highly conserved among divergent flaviviruses, suggesting that they may function as cis-acting signals for RNA replication and, as such, might specifically bind to cellular or viral proteins. UV cross-linking experiments were performed to identify the proteins that bind with the JEV plus-strand 3' noncoding region (NCR). Two proteins, p71 and p110, from JEV-infected but not from uninfected cell extracts were shown to bind specifically to the plus-strand 3' NCR. The quantities of these binding proteins increased during the course of JEV infection and correlated with the levels of JEV RNA synthesis in cell extracts. UV cross-linking coupled with Western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the p110 and p71 proteins were JEV NS5 and NS3, respectively, which are proposed as components of the RNA replicase. The putative stem-loop structure present within the plus-strand 3' NCR was required for the binding of these proteins. Furthermore, both proteins could interact with each other and form a protein-protein complex in vivo. These findings suggest that the 3' NCR of JEV genomic RNA may form a replication complex together with NS3 and NS5; this complex may be involved in JEV minus-strand RNA synthesis. PMID:9094618

  13. Development of electrochemical immunosensors based on different serum antibody immobilization methods for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Quang Huy; Hanh Nguyen, Thi Hong; Mai, Anh Tuan; Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Khue Vu, Quang; Nga Phan, Thi

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the development of electrochemical immunosensors based on human serum antibodies with different immobilization methods for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Human serum containing anti-JEV antibodies was used to immobilize onto the surface of silanized interdigitated electrodes by four methods: direct adsorption (APTES-serum), covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde (APTES-GA-serum), covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde combined with anti-human IgG (APTES-GA-anti-HIgG-serum) and covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde combined with a bioaffinity of protein A (APTES-GA-PrA-serum). Atomic force microscopy was used to verify surface characteristics of the interdigitated electrodes before and after treatment with serum antibodies. The output signal of the immunosensors was measured by the change of conductivity resulting from the specific binding of JEV antigens and serum antibodies immobilized on the electrodes, with the help of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled secondary antibody against JEV. The results showed that the APTES-GA-PrA-serum method provided the highest signal of the electrochemical immunosensor for detection of JEV antigens, with the linear range from 25 ng ml‑1 to 1 μg ml‑1, and the limit of detection was about 10 ng ml‑1. This study shows a potential development of novel electrochemical immunosensors applied for virus detection in clinical samples in case of possible outbreaks.

  14. Japanese Encephalitis Virus exploits the microRNA-432 to regulate the expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 5.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nikhil; Kumawat, Kanhaiya L; Rastogi, Meghana; Basu, Anirban; Singh, Sunit K

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a plus strand RNA virus, which infects brain. MicroRNAs are regulatory non-coding RNAs which regulate the expression of various genes in cells. Viruses modulate the expression of various microRNAs to suppress anti-viral signaling and evade the immune response. SOCS (Suppressor of cytokine signalling) family of proteins are negative regulators of anti-viral Jak-STAT pathway. In this study, we demonstrated the regulatory role of SOCS5 in Jak-STAT signaling and its exploitation by JEV through a microRNA mediated mechanism. JEV infection in human brain microglial cells (CHME3) downregulated the expression of miR-432, and upregulated SOCS5 levels. SOCS5 was validated as a target of miR-432 by using 3'UTR clone of SOCS5 in luciferase vector along with miR-432 mimic. The overexpression of miR-432 prior to JEV infection enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT1 resulting into increased ISRE activity and cellular inflammatory response resulting into diminished viral replication. The knockdown of SOCS5 resulted into increased STAT1 phosphorylation and suppressed viral replication. JEV infection mediated downregulation of miR-432 leads to SOCS5 upregulation, which helps the virus to evade cellular anti-viral response. This study demonstrated that JEV utilizes this microRNA mediated strategy to manipulate cellular immune response promoting JEV pathogenesis. PMID:27282499

  15. Japanese Encephalitis Virus exploits the microRNA-432 to regulate the expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 5

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nikhil; Kumawat, Kanhaiya L.; Rastogi, Meghana; Basu, Anirban; Singh, Sunit K.

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a plus strand RNA virus, which infects brain. MicroRNAs are regulatory non-coding RNAs which regulate the expression of various genes in cells. Viruses modulate the expression of various microRNAs to suppress anti-viral signaling and evade the immune response. SOCS (Suppressor of cytokine signalling) family of proteins are negative regulators of anti-viral Jak-STAT pathway. In this study, we demonstrated the regulatory role of SOCS5 in Jak-STAT signaling and its exploitation by JEV through a microRNA mediated mechanism. JEV infection in human brain microglial cells (CHME3) downregulated the expression of miR-432, and upregulated SOCS5 levels. SOCS5 was validated as a target of miR-432 by using 3′UTR clone of SOCS5 in luciferase vector along with miR-432 mimic. The overexpression of miR-432 prior to JEV infection enhanced the phosphorylation of STAT1 resulting into increased ISRE activity and cellular inflammatory response resulting into diminished viral replication. The knockdown of SOCS5 resulted into increased STAT1 phosphorylation and suppressed viral replication. JEV infection mediated downregulation of miR-432 leads to SOCS5 upregulation, which helps the virus to evade cellular anti-viral response. This study demonstrated that JEV utilizes this microRNA mediated strategy to manipulate cellular immune response promoting JEV pathogenesis. PMID:27282499

  16. Green synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticles fabricated using Anisomeles indica: Mosquitocidal potential against malaria, dengue and Japanese encephalitis vectors.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Veerakumar, Kaliyan; Muthukumaran, Udaiyan; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) represent a key threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating parasites and pathogens. In this scenario, eco-friendly control tools against mosquito vectors are a priority. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using a cheap, aqueous leaf extract of Anisomeles indica by reduction of Ag(+) ions from silver nitrate solution has been investigated. Bio-reduced AgNP were characterized by UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The acute toxicity of A. indica leaf extract and biosynthesized AgNP was evaluated against larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles subpictus, the dengue vector Aedes albopictus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. Both the A. indica leaf extract and AgNP showed dose dependent larvicidal effect against all tested mosquito species. Compared to the leaf aqueous extract, biosynthesized AgNP showed higher toxicity against An. subpictus, Ae. albopictus, and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus with LC50 values of 31.56, 35.21 and 38.08 μg/mL, respectively. Overall, this study firstly shed light on the mosquitocidal potential of A. indica, a potential bioresource for rapid, cheap and effective AgNP synthesis. PMID:26708933

  17. Japanese Encephalitis Risk and Contextual Risk Factors in Southwest China: A Bayesian Hierarchical Spatial and Spatiotemporal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing; Cao, Mingqin; Feng, Hai-Huan; Fan, Heng; Chen, Fei; Feng, Zijian; Li, Xiaosong; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    It is valuable to study the spatiotemporal pattern of Japanese encephalitis (JE) and its association with the contextual risk factors in southwest China, which is the most endemic area in China. Using data from 2004 to 2009, we applied GISmapping and spatial autocorrelation analysis to analyze reported incidence data of JE in 438 counties in southwest China, finding that JE cases were not randomly distributed, and a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal model identified the east part of southwest China as a high risk area. Meanwhile, the Bayesian hierarchical spatial model in 2006 demonstrated a statistically significant association between JE and the agricultural and climatic variables, including the proportion of rural population, the pig-to-human ratio, the monthly precipitation and the monthly mean minimum and maximum temperatures. Particular emphasis was placed on the time-lagged effect for climatic factors. The regression method and the Spearman correlation analysis both identified a two-month lag for the precipitation, while the regression method found a one-month lag for temperature. The results show that the high risk area in the east part of southwest China may be connected to the agricultural and climatic factors. The routine surveillance and the allocation of health resources should be given more attention in this area. Moreover, the meteorological variables might be considered as possible predictors of JE in southwest China. PMID:24739769

  18. A Preliminary Study to Forecast Japanese Encephalitis Vector Abundance in Paddy Growing Area, with the Aid of Radar Satellite Images.

    PubMed

    Raju, K Hari Kishan; Sabesan, Shanmugavelu; Rajavel, Aladu Ramakrishnan; Subramanian, Swaminathan; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Thenmozhi, Velayutham; Tyagi, Brij Kishore; Jambulingam, Purushothaman

    2016-02-01

    Vector mosquitoes of Japanese encephalitis (JE) breed mostly in rice fields, and human cases occur scattered over extended rural rice-growing areas. From this, one may surmise an ecological connection with the irrigation facilities and paddy cultivation. Furthermore, it has been hypothesized that a particular stage of paddy growth is a premonitory sign that can lead to a markedly increased population of the vector mosquitoes. The present study aimed to forecast the vector abundance by monitoring the paddy growth using remote sensing and geographical information systems. The abundance of the JE vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus peaked when the paddy crop was at its heading stage and dipped when the crop reached the maturing stage. A significant positive correlation was observed between paddy growth and adult density (r = 0.73, p < 0.008). The sigma naught values (σ0) derived from satellite images of paddy fields ranged from -18.3 (during transplantation stage) to approximately -10 (during the noncultivation period). A significant positive correlation was observed between σ0 and paddy growth stages (r = 0.87, p < 0.05) and adult vector density (r = 0.74, p = 0.04). The σ0 value observed during the vegetative and flowering stages of paddy growth ranged from -17.6 to -17.16, at which period the vector density started building up. This could be the spectral signature that denotes the "risk," following which a high vector abundance is expected during heading stage of the paddy. PMID:26824289

  19. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  20. Operational trials of remote mosquito trap systems for Japanese encephalitis virus surveillance in the Torres Strait, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Scott A; van den Hurk, Andrew F; Zborowski, Paul; Kerlin, Tim J; Banks, David; Walker, James A; Lee, Jonathan M; Montgomery, Brian L; Smith, Greg A; Pyke, Alyssa T; Smith, Ina L

    2007-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) appears nearly annually in the Torres Strait in far northern Queensland, Australia, and is a threat to invade the Australian mainland. Surveillance has involved the use of sentinel pigs that develop detectable viremias and antibody titers to JEV. However, pigs are amplifying hosts for JEV, and thus pose a health risk to the public and to pig handlers who bleed the pigs. A remote mosquito trap system would not have these risks. We report on trials using a remote mosquito trap system for the surveillance of JEV in the Torres Strait. The Mosquito Magnet (MM) Pro, MM Liberty Plus, and a novel updraft trap, the NAQS Mozzie Trap, were run at Badu and Moa islands in the Torres Strait and at Bamaga in the northern Cape York Peninsula from 2002-2005. TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect JEV nucleic acid in weekly mosquito collections. Sentinel pigs located at Badu were also bled and the serum processed by reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR for JEV antigen and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-JEV antibodies. JEV was detected in mosquito collections each year but not in each trap. No JEV was detected in trapped mosquitoes before detection in sentinel pigs. The mosquito trap system cost ca. AU$10,000 per site, about AU$5,000 less than a pig-based system. However, trap failures caused by mosquito-clogged motors, electrical faults, and blocked gas lines reduced the efficacy of some mosquito traps. Nonetheless, a remote mosquito trap system, employing stand alone traps and PCR for viral antigen detection, can be a safe, economical way to detect arbovirus activity in remote areas. PMID:18021024

  1. Transcriptional regulation of miR-15b by c-Rel and CREB in Japanese encephalitis virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bibo; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Li, Yunchuan; Chen, Huanchun; Song, Yunfeng; Cao, Shengbo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been well known to play diverse roles in viral infection at the level of posttranscriptional repression. However, much less is understood about the mechanism by which miRNAs are regulated during viral infection. It is likely that both host and virus contain factors to modulate miRNA expression. Here we report the up-regulation of microRNA-15b (miR-15b) in vitro upon infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Analysis of miR-15b precursor, pri-miR-15b and pre-miR-15b, suggest that the regulation occurs transcriptionally. Further, we identified the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-15b that contains consensus binding motif for NF-κB subunit c-Rel and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), which are known as transcription factor to regulate gene expression. By promoter fusion and mutational analyses, we demonstrated that c-Rel and CREB bind directly to the promoter elements of miR-15b, which are responsible for miR-15b transcription in response to JEV infection. Finally, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway blocked induction of miR-15b in JEV infection, suggesting important roles of ERK and NF-κB pathway in the regulation of miR-15b gene. Therefore, our observations indicate that induced expression of miR-15b is modulated by c-Rel and CREB in response to JEV infection. PMID:26931521

  2. Transcriptional regulation of miR-15b by c-Rel and CREB in Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bibo; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Li, Yunchuan; Chen, Huanchun; Song, Yunfeng; Cao, Shengbo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been well known to play diverse roles in viral infection at the level of posttranscriptional repression. However, much less is understood about the mechanism by which miRNAs are regulated during viral infection. It is likely that both host and virus contain factors to modulate miRNA expression. Here we report the up-regulation of microRNA-15b (miR-15b) in vitro upon infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Analysis of miR-15b precursor, pri-miR-15b and pre-miR-15b, suggest that the regulation occurs transcriptionally. Further, we identified the transcriptional regulatory region of miR-15b that contains consensus binding motif for NF-κB subunit c-Rel and cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), which are known as transcription factor to regulate gene expression. By promoter fusion and mutational analyses, we demonstrated that c-Rel and CREB bind directly to the promoter elements of miR-15b, which are responsible for miR-15b transcription in response to JEV infection. Finally, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway blocked induction of miR-15b in JEV infection, suggesting important roles of ERK and NF-κB pathway in the regulation of miR-15b gene. Therefore, our observations indicate that induced expression of miR-15b is modulated by c-Rel and CREB in response to JEV infection. PMID:26931521

  3. Japanese encephalitis (JE). Part I: clinical profile of 1,282 adult acute cases of four epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, N B S; Thacker, A K; Barthwal, S P; Mishra, V K; Prapann, Shiv; Srivastava, Deepak; Sarkari, M

    2012-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is numerically the most important global cause of encephalitis and so far confirmed to have caused major epidemics in India. Most of the reported studies have been in children. This largest study involving only adults, belonging to four epidemics, is being reported from Gorakhpur. The aim of this study is to detail the acute clinical profile (not viral) outcome and to classify the sequelae at discharge. This prospective study involved 1,282 adult patients initially diagnosed as JE admitted during the epidemics of 1978, 1980, 1988, and 1989, on identical clinical presentation and CSF examination. In the meantime, the diagnosis of JE was confirmed by serological and/or virological studies in only a representative number of samples (649 of 1,282 cases). Eighty-three left against medical advice (LAMA) at various stages, so 1,199 of 1,282 were available for the study. Peak incidence of [1,061 of 1,282 (83%)] of clinically suspected cases was from September 15 to November 2. Serum IgM and IgG were positive in high titers in 50.87% (330 of 649) and IgM positive in CSF in 88.75% (109 of 123) of the cases. JE virus could be isolated from CSF and brain tissue in 5 of 5 and 4 of 5 samples, respectively. Altered sensorium (AS) in (96%), convulsions (86%), and headache (85%) were the main symptoms for hospitalization by the third day of the onset. Other neurological features included hyperkinetic movements in 593 of 1,282 (46%)-choreoathetoid in 490 (83%) and bizarre, ill-defined in 103 (17%). The features of brain stem involvement consisted of opsoclonus (20%), gaze palsies (16%), and pupillary changes (48%) with waxing and waning character. Cerebellar signs were distinctly absent. Dystonia and decerebrate rigidity was observed in 43 and 6%, respectively, paralytic features in 17% and seizures in 30%. Many non-neurological features of prognostic importance included abnormal breathing patterns (ABP) (45%), pulmonary edema (PO) (33%), and upper

  4. Japanese encephalitis virus NS2B-NS3 protease induces caspase 3 activation and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Shiu, Su-Lian; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Lin, Ying-Ju; Wan, Lei; Lan, Yu-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2009-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) causes severe neurological diseases with a high fatality rate. Clinical, neurophysiological and radiological features of Japanese encephalitis JE patients showed that JEV infection resulted in widespread involvement of the nervous system, including thalamus, basal ganglia, brainstem, cerebellum, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. In this study, we characterized the apoptotic effect of JEV infection and its viral proteins on the TE671 human medulloblastoma cells. JEV replicated in TE671 cells, inducing caspase 3-mediated apoptosis in MOI- and time-dependent manners. Of viral proteins, co-expression of JEV NS3 protease with NS2B cofactor significantly induced higher degrees of apoptosis and triggered higher caspase 3 activities than single expression of E, NS1, NS2B or NS3 protease in human medulloblastoma cells. Moreover, JEV NS2B-NS3 protease induced reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of mitochondrial cytochrome C, which were responsible for the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. In addition, the production of reactive oxygen species production and activation of ASK1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway might be associated with JEV NS2B-NS3 protease-induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. The results demonstrated that the JEV infection and the co-expression of JEV NS3 protease with NS2B cofactor induced caspase 3 activation and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human medulloblastoma cells, being valuable insight for cellular and molecular levels of JEV pathogenesis. PMID:19463724

  5. A Japanese Encephalitis Virus Genotype 5 Molecular Clone Is Highly Neuropathogenic in a Mouse Model: Impact of the Structural Protein Region on Virulence

    PubMed Central

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains can be separated into 5 genotypes (g1 to g5) based on sequence similarity. JEV g5 strains have been rarely isolated and are poorly characterized. We report here the full characterization of a g5 virus generated using a cDNA-based technology and its comparison with a widely studied g3 strain. We did not observe any major differences between those viruses when their infectious cycles were studied in various cell lines in vitro. Interestingly, the JEV g5 strain was highly pathogenic when inoculated to BALB/c mice, which are known to be largely resistant to JEV g3 infection. The study of chimeric viruses between JEV g3 and g5 showed that there was a poor viral clearance of viruses that express JEV g5 structural proteins in BALB/c mice blood, which correlated with viral invasion of the central nervous system and encephalitis. In addition, using an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, we were able to show that JEV g5 does not have an enhanced capacity for entering the central nervous system, compared to JEV g3. Overall, in addition to providing a first characterization of the understudied JEV g5, our work highlights the importance of sustaining an early viremia in the development of JEV encephalitis. IMPORTANCE Genotype 5 viruses are genetically and serologically distinct from other JEV genotypes and can been associated with human encephalitis, which warrants the need for their characterization. In this study, we characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a JEV g5 strain and showed that it was more neuropathogenic in a mouse model than a well-characterized JEV g3 strain. The enhanced virulence of JEV g5 was associated with poor viral clearance but not with enhanced crossing of the blood-brain barrier, thus providing new insights into JEV pathogenesis. PMID:25787283

  6. Human arboviral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Rust, Robert S

    2012-09-01

    Worldwide, arboviral illnesses constitute the most important international infectious threat to human neurological health and welfare. Before the availability of effective immunizations, approximately 50,000 cases of Japanese encephalitis occurred in the world each year, one-fifth of which cases proved lethal and a much larger number were left with severe neurological handicaps. With global climate change and perhaps other factors, the prevalences of some arboviral illnesses appear to be increasing. Arboviral illnesses, including Japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, Yellow fever, and others, are emerging as possible global health care threats because of biological warfare. This chapter will review ecology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and outcome of the forms of arboviral encephalitis that are of greatest importance in North America, together with some of the most important arboviral encephalitides prevalent in other parts of the world. PMID:22889543

  7. Bioinformatics in New Generation Flavivirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Koraka, Penelope; Martina, Byron E. E.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Flavivirus infections are the most prevalent arthropod-borne infections world wide, often causing severe disease especially among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. In the absence of effective antiviral treatment, prevention through vaccination would greatly reduce morbidity and mortality associated with flavivirus infections. Despite the success of the empirically developed vaccines against yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and tick-borne encephalitis virus, there is an increasing need for a more rational design and development of safe and effective vaccines. Several bioinformatic tools are available to support such rational vaccine design. In doing so, several parameters have to be taken into account, such as safety for the target population, overall immunogenicity of the candidate vaccine, and efficacy and longevity of the immune responses triggered. Examples of how bio-informatics is applied to assist in the rational design and improvements of vaccines, particularly flavivirus vaccines, are presented and discussed. PMID:20467477

  8. Vaccination of travelers: how far have we come and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin H; Hill, David R; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2011-11-01

    Vaccine recommendations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. We review progress made in the past decade regarding vaccines used primarily by persons traveling from high-income countries to low- and middle-income countries. The combined hepatitis A-B vaccine, the recently licensed Vero cell-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine and conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccines are discussed. This article provides updates on yellow fever vaccine-associated visceral and neurologic adverse events, indications for influenza vaccine in travelers, the rapid immunization schedule for tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, schedules for postexposure rabies prophylaxis, and new insights about oral cholera vaccines following the outbreak in Haiti. The future should bring vaccines for serogroup B Neiserria meningitidis, dengue and malaria, as well as an inactivated yellow fever vaccine. PMID:22043959

  9. Experimental Infection of Aedes sollicitans and Aedes taeniorhynchus with Two Chimeric Sindbis/Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nicole C.; Watts, Douglas M.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    Two chimeric vaccine candidates for Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) were developed by inserting the structural protein genes of either a North American (NA) or South American (SA) EEEV into a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone. To assess the effect of chimerization on mosquito infectivity, experimental infections of two potential North American bridge vectors of EEEV, Aedes sollicitans and Ae. taeniorhynchus, were attempted. Both species were susceptible to oral infection with all viruses after ingestion of high titer blood meals of ca. 7.0 log10 plaque-forming units/mL. Dissemination rates for SIN/NAEEEV (0 of 56) and SIN/SAEEEV (1 of 54) were low in Ae. taeniorhynchus and no evidence of transmission potential was observed. In contrast, the chimeras disseminated more efficiently in Ae. sollicitans (19 of 68 and 13 of 57, respectively) and were occasionally detected in the saliva of this species. These results indicate that chimerization of the vaccine candidates reduces infectivity. However, its impact on dissemination and potential transmission is mosquito species-specific. PMID:18187790

  10. A Phase 1 clinical trial of a DNA vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis delivered by intramuscular or intradermal electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hannaman, Drew; Dupuy, Lesley C; Ellefsen, Barry; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2016-06-30

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne alphavirus, causes periodic epizootics in equines and is a recognized biological defense threat for humans. There are currently no FDA-licensed vaccines against VEEV. We developed a candidate DNA vaccine expressing the E3-E2-6K-E1 genes of VEEV (pWRG/VEE) and performed a Phase 1 clinical study to assess the vaccine's safety, reactogenicity, tolerability, and immunogenicity when administered by intramuscular (IM) or intradermal (ID) electroporation (EP) using the Ichor Medical Systems TriGrid™ Delivery System. Subjects in IM-EP groups received 0.5mg (N=8) or 2.0mg (N=9) of pWRG/VEE or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 1.0ml injection. Subjects in ID-EP groups received 0.08mg (N=8) or 0.3mg (N=8) of DNA or a saline placebo (N=4) in a 0.15ml injection. Subjects were monitored for a total period of 360 days. No vaccine- or device-related serious adverse events were reported. Based on the results of a subject questionnaire, the IM- and ID-EP procedures were both considered to be generally acceptable for prophylactic vaccine administration, with the acute tolerability of ID EP delivery judged to be greater than that of IM-EP delivery. All subjects (100%) in the high and low dose IM-EP groups developed detectable VEEV-neutralizing antibodies after two or three administrations of pWRG/VEE, respectively. VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses were detected in seven of eight subjects (87.5%) in the high dose and five of eight subjects (62.5%) in the low dose ID-EP groups after three vaccine administrations. There was a correlation between the DNA dose and the magnitude of the resulting VEEV-neutralizing antibody responses for both IM and ID EP delivery. These results indicate that pWRG/VEE delivered by either IM- or ID-EP is safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in humans at the evaluated dose levels. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT01984983. PMID:27206386

  11. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global TravEpiNet Mobile Apps RSS Feeds Chapter 3 Infectious Diseases Related to Travel Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... and Prevention National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) ...

  12. Development and application of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serological survey of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Inthong, Natnaree; Noguchi, Keita; Terada, Yutaka; Nagao, Yumiko; Shimojima, Masayuki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Rerkamnuaychoke, Worawut; Maeda, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) causes serious acute encephalitis in humans and horses. Although dogs are good sentinels for assessing the risk of JEV infection to humans, a virus neutralization test has been the only method available for measuring the levels of JEV antibody in dogs. In this study, an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using purified viral particles as an antigen, was developed for serological survey of JEV infection in dogs. In dogs inoculated experimentally with JEV, the ELISA detected anti-JEV IgM 3 days after infection, with IgM levels peaking 7 days after infection. Anti-JEV IgG was detected 14 days after infection and peaked on 21-28 days after infection. Virus neutralization titers correlated with anti-JEV immunoglobulins measured by the ELISA. To test the utility of the new assay, the seroprevalence of JEV infection among 102 dogs in Kyushu, Japan, was examined by IgG ELISA and by virus neutralization. The correlation coefficient between the IgG ELISA and virus neutralization was 0.813 (p<0.001); comparison of the IgG ELISA and virus neutralization showed a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 98%, respectively. The IgG ELISA was used to survey dogs in Bangkok, Thailand and 51% of these dogs were found seropositive for JEV. These data suggest that in the capital city of Thailand, the risk of infection with JEV remains high. PMID:23046992

  13. A conserved predicted pseudoknot in the NS2A-encoding sequence of West Nile and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses suggests NS1' may derive from ribosomal frameshifting

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Andrew E; Atkins, John F

    2009-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis, West Nile, Usutu and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses form a tight subgroup within the larger Flavivirus genus. These viruses utilize a single-polyprotein expression strategy, resulting in ~10 mature proteins. Plotting the conservation at synonymous sites along the polyprotein coding sequence reveals strong conservation peaks at the very 5' end of the coding sequence, and also at the 5' end of the sequence encoding the NS2A protein. Such peaks are generally indicative of functionally important non-coding sequence elements. The second peak corresponds to a predicted stable pseudoknot structure whose biological importance is supported by compensatory mutations that preserve the structure. The pseudoknot is preceded by a conserved slippery heptanucleotide (Y CCU UUU), thus forming a classical stimulatory motif for -1 ribosomal frameshifting. We hypothesize, therefore, that the functional importance of the pseudoknot is to stimulate a portion of ribosomes to shift -1 nt into a short (45 codon), conserved, overlapping open reading frame, termed foo. Since cleavage at the NS1-NS2A boundary is known to require synthesis of NS2A in cis, the resulting transframe fusion protein is predicted to be NS1-NS2AN-term-FOO. We hypothesize that this may explain the origin of the previously identified NS1 'extension' protein in JEV-group flaviviruses, known as NS1'. PMID:19196463

  14. Natural survivorship of immature stages of Culex vishnui (Diptera: Culicidae) complex, vectors of Japanese encephalitis virus, in rice fields in southern India.

    PubMed

    Sunish, I P; Reuben, R; Rajendran, R

    2006-03-01

    The development and survival of immatures of Culex vishnui (Diptera: Culicidae) complex, vectors of Japanese encephalitis virus, were studied in transplanted rice, Oryza savita L., fields during three crop growing seasons. The total duration of development from the first instar to adult emergence varied from 6 to 8 d. Survival rate estimates ranged from 0.003 to 0.524, but they generally were <0.1. Unusually high survival rates (0.192-0.524) were observed in summer and long-term monsoon crop seasons during 1993. A multiple regression method using backward elimination was used to analyze the factors responsible for these variations. The model identified nine parameters related with survival rates that explained 99% of the variance. Area of water surface and hardness were negatively related, whereas green algae, notonectid adults, anisopterans, dytiscids, salinity, water depth, and dissolved oxygen were positively associated with immature survival. PMID:16619597

  15. Eco-friendly larvicides from Indian plants: Effectiveness of lavandulyl acetate and bicyclogermacrene on malaria, dengue and Japanese encephalitis mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are a key threat for millions of people and animals worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating pathogens and parasites, including malaria, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, filiariasis and Zika virus. Mosquito young instars are usually targeted using organophosphates, insect growth regulators and microbial agents. Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets are also employed. However, these chemicals have negative effects on human health and the environment and induce resistance in a number of vectors. In this scenario, newer and safer tools have been recently implemented to enhance mosquito control. The concrete potential of screening plant species as sources of metabolites for entomological and parasitological purposes is worthy of attention, as recently elucidated by the Y. Tu's example. Here we investigated the toxicity of Heracleum sprengelianum (Apiaceae) leaf essential oil and its major compounds toward third instar larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles subpictus, the arbovirus vector Aedes albopictus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. GC-MS analysis showed that EO major components were lavandulyl acetate (17.8%) and bicyclogermacrene (12.9%). The EO was toxic to A. subpictus, A. albopictus, and C. tritaeniorhynchus, with LC50 of 33.4, 37.5 and 40.9µg/ml, respectively. Lavandulyl acetate was more toxic to mosquito larvae if compared to bicyclogermacrene. Their LC50 were 4.17 and 10.3µg/ml for A. subpictus, 4.60 and 11.1µg/ml for A. albopictus, 5.11 and 12.5µg/ml for C. tritaeniorhynchus. Notably, the EO and its major compounds were safer to three non-target mosquito predators, Anisops bouvieri, Diplonychus indicus and Gambusia affinis, with LC50 ranging from 206 to 4219µg/ml. Overall, this study highlights that H. sprengelianum EO is a promising source of eco-friendly larvicides against three important mosquito vectors with moderate toxicity against non-target aquatic

  16. N-methylisatin-beta-thiosemicarbazone derivative (SCH 16) is an inhibitor of Japanese encephalitis virus infection in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Liba; Desai, Anita; Shampur, Madhusudana N; Perumal, Yogeeswari; Sriram, D; Vasanthapuram, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    Background During the early and mid part of 20th century, several reports described the therapeutic effects of N-methylisatin-β-Thiosemicarbazone (MIBT) against pox viruses, Maloney leukemia viruses and recently against HIV. However, their ability to inhibit flavivirus replication has not been investigated. Hence the present study was designed to evaluate the antiviral activity of 14 MIBT derivatives against Flaviviruses that are prevalent in India such as Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV), Dengue-2 (Den-2) and West Nile viruses (WNV). Results Amongst the fourteen Mannich bases of MIBT derivatives tested one compound – SCH 16 was able to completely inhibit in vitro Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) replication. However no antiviral activity of SCH 16 was noted against Den-2 virus replication. This compound was able to inhibit 50% of the plaques (IC50) produced by JEV and WNV at a concentration of 16 μgm/ml (0.000025 μM) and 4 μgm/ml (0.000006 μM) respectively. Furthermore, SCH 16 at a concentration of 500 mg/kg body weight administered by oral route twice daily was able to completely (100%) prevent mortality in mice challenged with 50LD50 JEV by the peripheral route. Our experiments to understand the mechanism of action suggest that SCH 16 inhibited JEV replication at the level of early protein translation. Conclusion Only one of the 14 isatin derivatives -SCH 16 exhibited antiviral action on JEV and WNV virus infection in vitro. SCH 16 was also found to completely inhibit JEV replication in vivo in a mouse model challenged peripherally with 50LD50 of the virus. These results warrant further research and development on SCH 16 as a possible therapeutic agent. PMID:18498627

  17. MicroRNA-33a-5p Modulates Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication by Targeting Eukaryotic Translation Elongation Factor 1A1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Ye, Jing; Ashraf, Usama; Li, Yunchuan; Wei, Siqi; Wan, Shengfeng; Zohaib, Ali; Song, Yunfeng; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a typical mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for acute encephalitis and meningitis in humans. However, the molecular mechanism for JEV pathogenesis is still unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that act as gene regulators. They are directly or indirectly involved in many cellular functions owing to their ability to target mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. However, how cellular miRNAs are regulated and their functions during JEV infection are largely unknown. In the present study, we found that JEV infection downregulated the expression of endogenous cellular miR-33a-5p. Notably, artificially transfecting with miR-33a-5p mimics led to a significant decrease in viral replication, suggesting that miR-33a-5p acts as a negative regulator of JEV replication. A dual-luciferase reporter assay identified eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1A1 (EEF1A1) as one of the miR-33a-5p target genes. Our study further demonstrated that EEF1A1 can interact with the JEV proteins NS3 and NS5 in replicase complex. Through this interaction, EEF1A1 can stabilize the components of viral replicase complex and thus facilitates viral replication during JEV infection. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33a-5p is downregulated during JEV infection, which contributes to viral replication by increasing the intracellular level of EEF1A1, an interaction partner of JEV NS3 and NS5. This study provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of JEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE MiRNAs are critical regulators of gene expression that utilize sequence complementarity to bind to and modulate the stability or translation efficiency of target mRNAs. Accumulating data suggest that miRNAs regulate a wide variety of molecular mechanisms in the host cells during viral infections. JEV, a neurotropic flavivirus, is one of the major causes of acute encephalitis in humans worldwide. The roles of cellular mi

  18. [Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and TBE-vaccination in Austria: Update 2014].

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula; Böhm, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    TBE is a public health problem well under control in Austria because of a mass vaccination programme. There have been 50-100 registered cases per year for many years, the vaccination rate of the population is currently 85 %. Special attention has to be given to the "older" generation 40 plus as this is the segment of the population where the majority of cases are observed annually. In comparison of the counties, Tyrol and Upper Austria finished first and second after a long time when Styria and Carynthia had observed most of the cases. For TBE applies the same as for Tetanus, namely the principle of disease control or disease elimination: The virus cannot be eliminated and vaccination provides individual protection. The both available TBE vaccines have proven to be very effective with an effectivity of 96-99 %, also when given irregular vaccinations the protection rate is still very high (>90 %). More than 4000 prevented cases between 2000 and 2011 prove this impressively. PMID:26055812

  19. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, T S; Lashkevich, V A; Gould, E A

    2003-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human infections occurring in Europe and many parts of Asia. The etiological agent Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), is a member of the virus genus Flavivirus, of the family Flaviviridae. TBEV is believed to cause at least 11,000 human cases of encephalitis in Russia and about 3000 cases in the rest of Europe annually. Related viruses within the same group, Louping ill virus (LIV), Langat virus (LGTV) and Powassan virus (POWV), also cause human encephalitis but rarely on an epidemic scale. Three other viruses within the same group, Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV), Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Alkhurma virus (ALKV), are closely related to the TBEV complex viruses and tend to cause fatal hemorrhagic fevers rather than encephalitis. This review describes the clinical manifestations associated with TBEV infections, the main molecular-biological properties of these viruses, and the different factors that define the incidence and severity of disease. The role of ticks and their local hosts in the emergence of new virus variants with different pathogenic characteristics is also discussed. This review also contains a brief history of vaccination against TBE including trials with live attenuated vaccine and modern tendencies in developing of vaccine virus strains. PMID:12615309

  20. Sensitive and specific detection of strains of Japanese encephalitis virus using a one-step TaqMan RT-PCR technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jau-Ling; Lin, Hui-Tsu; Wang, Yu-Ming; Weng, Ming-Hui; Ji, Da-Der; Kuo, Ming-Der; Liu, Huan-Wun; Lin, Chang-Shen

    2004-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate laboratory diagnostic test is needed for distinguishing Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) from other diseases featuring similar clinical symptoms and also for preventing potential outbreaks. In this study, a TaqMan reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for rapid detection and quantification of the viral RNA of various JEV strains. A consensus JEV NS3 region was chosen to design the primers and the TaqMan probe. The JEV TaqMan assay used the EZ-rTtH RT-PCR system featuring advantages such as a one-step, high-temperature RT reaction modality and preventing carry-over contamination. The sensitivity of the JEV TaqMan assay for detecting in vitro-transcribed JEV NS3 RNA was estimated to be one to five copies of RNA per reaction. For cultured JE virions, less than 40 plaque forming unit (PFU)/ml of virus load (corresponding to 0.07 PFU/test) could be detected. In addition, the JEV TaqMan assay could detect all seven strains of JEV tested, but provided negative results for nine other flaviviruses and encephalitis viruses tested. The JEV TaqMan assay demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than traditional RT-PCR methods as has been previously reported. The application of the JEV TaqMan assay herein has been shown to the sensitive detection of the JEV from both mosquito pools and also JEV-spiking human blood. The assay should be of use in diagnostic laboratory conduct and could be used to replace or complement time-consuming viral-culture methods, thus achieving more rapid, sensitive, and highly specific identification of JEV infection. PMID:15484282

  1. Endothelial Japanese encephalitis virus infection enhances migration and adhesion of leukocytes to brain microvascular endothelia via MEK-dependent expression of ICAM1 and the CINC and RANTES chemokines.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Yi; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Chang, Chen-Jung; Liao, Su-Lan; Su, Hong-Lin; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2012-10-01

    Currently, the underlying mechanisms and the specific cell types associated with Japanese encephalitis-associated leukocyte trafficking are not understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells represent a functional barrier and could play key roles in leukocyte central nervous system trafficking. We found that cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells were susceptible to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection with limited amplification. This type of JEV infection had negligible effects on cell viability and barrier integrity. Instead, JEV-infected endothelial cells attracted more leukocytes adhesion onto surfaces and the supernatants promoted chemotaxis of leukocytes. Infection with JEV was found to elicit the elevated production of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1, and regulated-upon-activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted, contributing to the aforementioned leukocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. We further demonstrated that extracellular signal-regulated kinase was a key upstream regulator which stimulated extensive endothelial gene induction by up-regulating cytosolic phospholipase A₂, NF-κB, and cAMP response element-binding protein via signals involving phosphorylation. These data suggest that JEV infection could activate brain microvascular endothelial cells and modify their characteristics without compromising the barrier integrity, making them favorable for the recruitment and adhesion of circulating leukocytes, thereby together with other unidentified barrier-disrupting mechanisms contributing to Japanese encephalitis and associated neuroinflammation. PMID:22845610

  2. Vaccine-preventable disease and immunization in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Bart, K J; Lin, K F

    1990-06-01

    Vaccines have given health care providers control over a substantial portion of the morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Global efforts have immunized two-thirds of the world's children with DTP and polio vaccines; 72% have received BCG and 59% measles vaccine; but only 29% of pregnant women have received two doses of tetanus toxoid. In addition, vaccines against yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, hepatitis B, rubella, and mumps and meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine are being used in specific regions of the world. New vaccine candidates will enhance the vaccine armamentarium over the next decade to include the causes of pneumonia, diarrhea, and meningitis: Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal and meningococcal protein conjugate vaccines, typhoid and rotavirus vaccine. Genetically engineered vaccine vehicles, genetic reassortants, and genetic deletions are being investigated as new vaccine candidates. PMID:2190145

  3. Guiding dengue vaccine development using knowledge gained from the success of the yellow fever vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Huabin; Lee, Min; Jin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise approximately 70 closely related RNA viruses. These include several mosquito-borne pathogens, such as yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which can cause significant human diseases and thus are of great medical importance. Vaccines against both YFV and JEV have been used successfully in humans for decades; however, the development of a DENV vaccine has encountered considerable obstacles. Here, we review the protective immune responses elicited by the vaccine against YFV to provide some insights into the development of a protective DENV vaccine. PMID:26435066

  4. Guiding dengue vaccine development using knowledge gained from the success of the yellow fever vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huabin; Lee, Min; Jin, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Flaviviruses comprise approximately 70 closely related RNA viruses. These include several mosquito-borne pathogens, such as yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which can cause significant human diseases and thus are of great medical importance. Vaccines against both YFV and JEV have been used successfully in humans for decades; however, the development of a DENV vaccine has encountered considerable obstacles. Here, we review the protective immune responses elicited by the vaccine against YFV to provide some insights into the development of a protective DENV vaccine. PMID:26435066

  5. Toxicity of saponin isolated from Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae) against Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) Japanese encephalitis vector mosquito in India.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Kupppusamy; Dhanasekaran, Shanmugan; Krishnappa, Kaliamoorthy

    2012-12-01

    To determine the larvicidal activity of various extracts of Gymnema sylvestre against the Japanese Encephalitis vector, Culex tritaeniorynchus in Tamilnadu, India. To identify the active principle present in the promising fraction obtained in Chlorofom:Methanol extract of Fraction 2. The G. sylvestre leaf extracts were tested, employing WHO procedure against fourth instar larvae of C. tritaeniorhynchus and the larval mortalities were recorded at various concentrations (6.25, 12.5, 25.0, 50 and 100 µg/mL); the 24h LC50 values of the G. Sylvestre leaf extracts were determined following Probit analysis. It was noteworthy that treatment level 100 µg/mL exhibited highest mortality rates for the three different crude extracts and was significantly different from the mean mortalities recorded for the other concentrations. The LC50 values of 34.756 µg/mL (24.475-51.41), 31.351 µg/mL (20.634-47.043) and 28.577 µg/mL (25.159-32.308) were calculated for acetone, chloroform and methanol extract with the chi-square values of 10.301, 31.351 and 4.093 respectively. The present investigation proved that G. Sylvestre could be possibly utilized as an important component in the Vector Control Program. PMID:23152320

  6. N-glycosylation of the premembrane protein of Japanese encephalitis virus is critical for folding of the envelope protein and assembly of virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Zai, J; Mei, L; Wang, C; Cao, S; Fu, Z F; Chen, H; Song, Y

    2013-01-01

    Premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins, the major structural proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) each contain single potential N-glycosylation site. In this study, the role of N-glycosylation of these proteins on their folding and activity were investigated. Three mutant prM and/or E (prM-E) genes lacking N-glycosylation sites were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of the N-glycan on folding, secretion and cytotoxicity of mutant proteins were determined by comparison with their wild type (wt) counterparts. Removal of N-glycan from the prM protein resulted in a complete misfolding of the E protein and failure to form virus-like particles (VLPs). A similar removal of N-glycan from the E protein led to a low efficiency of its folding and VLPs formation. The secretion and cytotoxicity of the E protein was also markedly impaired in case the glycosylation sites in the prM or E or both proteins were removed. These results suggest that the N-glycosylation of the prM protein is critical to the folding of the E protein, which makes it pivotal in the cytotoxicity of JEV particles and their production. PMID:23530821

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Japanese encephalitis Disease and Detection of Disease Hotspots: a Case Study of Gorakhpur District, Uttar Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S.; Gupta, R. D.

    2014-11-01

    In recent times, Japanese Encephalitis (JE) has emerged as a serious public health problem. In India, JE outbreaks were recently reported in Uttar Pradesh, Gorakhpur. The present study presents an approach to use GIS for analyzing the reported cases of JE in the Gorakhpur district based on spatial analysis to bring out the spatial and temporal dynamics of the JE epidemic. The study investigates spatiotemporal pattern of the occurrence of disease and detection of the JE hotspot. Spatial patterns of the JE disease can provide an understanding of geographical changes. Geospatial distribution of the JE disease outbreak is being investigated since 2005 in this study. The JE incidence data for the years 2005 to 2010 is used. The data is then geo-coded at block level. Spatial analysis is used to evaluate autocorrelation in JE distribution and to test the cases that are clustered or dispersed in space. The Inverse Distance Weighting interpolation technique is used to predict the pattern of JE incidence distribution prevalent across the study area. Moran's I Index (Moran's I) statistics is used to evaluate autocorrelation in spatial distribution. The Getis-Ord Gi*(d) is used to identify the disease areas. The results represent spatial disease patterns from 2005 to 2010, depicting spatially clustered patterns with significant differences between the blocks. It is observed that the blocks on the built up areas reported higher incidences.

  9. Dynamic changes in global microRNAome and transcriptome reveal complex miRNA-mRNA regulated host response to Japanese Encephalitis Virus in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Bharti; Jain, Pratistha; Das, Shaoli; Ghosal, Suman; Hazra, Bibhabasu; Trivedi, Ashish Chandra; Basu, Anirban; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-01-01

    Microglia cells in the brain play essential role during Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) infection and may lead to change in microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA profile. These changes may together control disease outcome. Using Affymetrix microarray platform, we profiled cellular miRNA and mRNA expression at multiple time points during viral infection in human microglial (CHME3) cells. In silico analysis of microarray data revealed a phased pattern of miRNAs expression, associated with JEV replication and provided unique signatures of infection. Target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis identified anti correlation between differentially expressed miRNA and the gene expression at multiple time point which ultimately affected diverse signaling pathways including Notch signaling pathways in microglia. Activation of Notch pathway during JEV infection was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The expression of a subset of miRNAs that target multiple genes in Notch signaling pathways were suppressed and their overexpression could affect JEV induced immune response. Further analysis provided evidence for the possible presence of cellular competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) associated with innate immune response. Collectively, our data provide a uniquely comprehensive view of the changes in the host miRNAs induced by JEV during cellular infection and identify Notch pathway in modulating microglia mediated inflammation. PMID:26838068

  10. Effect of fatty acids on growth of Japanese encephalitis virus cultivated in BHK-21 cells and phospholipid metabolism of the infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S; Jenkin, H M

    1975-01-01

    Growth of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in BHK-21 cells was stimulated in the presence of 20 to 40 mug of the sodium salt of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid, 9-18:1) per ml supplemented in Waymouth medium. The stimulatory effect of the salt was highest when 9-18:1 was added after adsorption of the virus. Study of the effect of other fatty acids on growth of JEV showed the following results: the longer the chain length of the saturated fatty acid salt, the higher the stimulatory effect on viral growth. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids had an inhibitory effect on viral growth. The effect of isomeric cis-octadecenoic acids on viral growth was variable, depending upon the position of the double bond. The cis-6-octadecenoic acid had the highest inhibitory effect on growth of JEV compared to other isomeric octadecenoic acids. The sodium salt of (1-14C) cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9-18:1, 20 mug/ml) was rapidly incorporated into control and JEV-infected cells. Specific radioactivity in phosphatidylcholine dropped 12 to 24 h after virus inoculation, whereas synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine increased 12 to 24 h after virus inoculation in infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Results from these studies suggest that phospholipid metabolism of infected cells is markedly changed, which can be associated with altered fatty acid metabolism when using labeled 9-18:1 fatty acid as a marker. PMID:1167607

  11. Short-term effects of floods on Japanese encephalitis in Nanchong, China, 2007-2012: A time-stratified case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feifei; Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Caixia; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-09-01

    This time-stratified case-crossover study aimed to quantify the impact of floods on daily Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases from 2007 to 2012 in Nanchong city of Sichuan Province, China. Using conditional logistic regression analysis, we calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) at different lagged days, adjusting for daily average temperature (AT) and daily average relative humidity (ARH). A total of 370 JE cases were notified during the study period, with the median patient age being 4.2years. The seasonal pattern of JE cases clustered in July and August during the study period. Floods were significantly associated with an increased number of JE cases from lag 23 to lag 24, with the strongest lag effect at lag 23 (OR=2.00, 95% CI: 1.14-3.52). Similarly, AT and ARH were positively associated with daily JE cases from lag 0 to lag 8 and from lag 0 to lag 9, respectively. Floods, with AT and ARH, can be used to forecast JE outbreaks in the study area. Based on the results of this study, recommendations include undertaking control measures before the number of cases increases, especially for regions with similar geographic, climatic, and socio-economic conditions as those in the study area. PMID:27241207

  12. IRES-driven Expression of the Capsid Protein of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus TC-83 Vaccine Strain Increases Its Attenuation and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Guerbois, Mathilde; Volkova, Eugenia; Forrester, Naomi L.; Rossi, Shannan L.; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    The live-attenuated TC-83 strain is the only licensed veterinary vaccine available to protect equids against Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and to protect humans indirectly by preventing equine amplification. However, TC-83 is reactogenic due to its reliance on only two attenuating point mutations and has infected mosquitoes following equine vaccination. To increase its stability and safety, a recombinant TC-83 was previously engineered by placing the expression of the viral structural proteins under the control of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), which drives translation inefficiently in insect cells. However, this vaccine candidate was poorly immunogenic. Here we describe a second generation of the recombinant TC-83 in which the subgenomic promoter is maintained and only the capsid protein gene is translated from the IRES. This VEEV/IRES/C vaccine candidate did not infect mosquitoes, was stable in its attenuation phenotype after serial murine passages, and was more attenuated in newborn mice but still as protective as TC-83 against VEEV challenge. Thus, by using the IRES to modulate TC-83 capsid protein expression, we generated a vaccine candidate that combines efficient immunogenicity and efficacy with lower virulence and a reduced potential for spread in nature. PMID:23675542

  13. Nanoformulation of poly(ethylene glycol) polymerized organic insect repellent by PIT emulsification method and its application for Japanese encephalitis vector control.

    PubMed

    Balaji, A P B; Mishra, Prabhakar; Suresh Kumar, R S; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    The utilization of increased dosage of insect repellents to overcome mosquito resistance has raised environmental concerns globally. In accord to this, we have formulated an efficacious, water-dispersive, nanometric formulation of a poor water-soluble insect repellent, diethylphenylacetamide (DEPA) by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymerization followed by PIT emulsification method. The critical micelle concentration of PEG in the spontaneously emulsified conventional DEPA droplets was determined, based on the droplets physical stability. Subjecting them to PIT emulsification yielded monodispersed polymeric nanomicelles of DEPA (Nano DEPA) with hydrodynamic mean diameter of 153.74 nm. The high-resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopic studies revealed the characteristic core-shell structure of micelle. The comparative efficacy of Bulk DEPA and Nano DEPA was evaluated by larvicidal and WHO cone bioassay against the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. The median lethal concentrations (48 h) for 3rd instars C. tritaeniorhynchus larvae were found to be 0.416 mg/L for Bulk DEPA and 0.052 mg/L for Nano DEPA, respectively. The median knockdown concentrations (60 min) for the two to three-day-old, sucrose-fed, female adult mosquitoes were 5.372% (v/v) and 3.471% (v/v) for Bulk and Nano DEPA, respectively. Further investigation by histopathological and biochemical studies propound that Nano DEPA exerted better bioefficacy as comparative to its bulk form even at minimal exposure concentrations. Hence, Nano DEPA will serve as an effective alternate in controlling the vector expansion with reduced dosage. PMID:25766922

  14. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V. PMID:25451067

  15. Eugenol, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene from Plectranthus barbatus essential oil as eco-friendly larvicides against malaria, dengue and Japanese encephalitis mosquito vectors.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Hoti, S L; Bhattacharyya, Atanu; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. Eco-friendly mosquitocides are a priority. In Ayurvedic medicine, Plectranthus species have been used to treat heart disease, convulsions, spasmodic pain and painful urination. In this research, we evaluated the acute toxicity of essential oil from Plectranthus barbatus and its major constituents, against larvae of the malaria vector Anopheles subpictus, the dengue vector Aedes albopictus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus. The chemical composition of P. barbatus essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Nineteen components were identified. Major constituents were eugenol (31.12%), α-pinene (19.38%) and β-caryophyllene (18.42%). Acute toxicity against early third-instar larvae of An. subpictus, Ae. albopictus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was investigated. The essential oil had a significant toxic effect against larvae of An. subpictus, Ae. albopictus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, with 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values of 84.20, 87.25 and 94.34 μg/ml and 90% lethal concentration (LC90) values of 165.25, 170.56 and 179.58 μg/ml, respectively. Concerning major constituents, eugenol, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene appeared to be most effective against An. subpictus (LC50 = 25.45, 32.09 and 41.66 μg/ml, respectively), followed by Ae. albopictus (LC50 = 28.14, 34.09 and 44.77 μg/ml, respectively) and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50 = 30.80, 36.75 and 48.17 μg/ml, respectively). Overall, the chance to use metabolites from P. barbatus essential oil against mosquito vectors seems promising, since they are effective at low doses and could be an advantageous alternative to build newer and safer mosquito control tools. PMID:26518773

  16. Vaccination in elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Barbara C; Meyer, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Public health vaccination guidelines cannot be easily transferred to elite athletes. An enhanced benefit from preventing even mild diseases is obvious but stronger interference from otherwise minor side effects has to be considered as well. Thus, special vaccination guidelines for adult elite athletes are required. In most of them, protection should be strived for against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and varicella. When living or traveling to endemic areas, the athletes should be immune against tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, poliomyelitis, typhoid fever, and meningococcal disease. Vaccination against pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type b is only relevant in athletes with certain underlying disorders. Rubella and papillomavirus vaccination might be considered after an individual risk-benefit analysis. Other vaccinations such as cholera, rabies, herpes zoster, and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cannot be universally recommended for athletes at present. Only for a very few diseases, a determination of antibody titers is reasonable to avoid unnecessary vaccinations or to control efficacy of an individual's vaccination (especially for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B and, partly, hepatitis A). Vaccinations should be scheduled in a way that possible side effects are least likely to occur in periods of competition. Typically, vaccinations are well tolerated by elite athletes, and resulting antibody titers are not different from the general population. Side effects might be reduced by an optimal selection of vaccines and an appropriate technique of administration. Very few discipline-specific considerations apply to an athlete's vaccination schedule mainly from the competition and training pattern as well as from the typical geographical distribution of competitive sites. PMID:24986118

  17. [WHO recommended pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies using Japanese rabies vaccine].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Naoki; Takayama, Naohide; Suganuma, Akihiko

    2008-09-01

    After severe exposure to suspected rabid animal, WHO recommends a complete vaccine series using a potent effective vaccine that meets WHO criteria, and administration of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). RIG is not available globally, and is not marketed in Japan. If pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies is given, RIG is unnecessary even after severe exposure. It is thus important to give pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies to people who plan to go to rabies-endemic areas. In Japan, pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies consists of 3 doses of cell-culture rabies vaccine. The first two doses are given 4 weeks apart, and the third dose is given 6-12 months after the first dose, all of which are injected subcutaneously (standard regimen). People who plan to travel abroad to rabies-endemic areas may know of their destinations only 1 or 2 months in advance at best. Therefore, it is virtually impossible to complete the 3 dose regimen for rabies in Japan. Pre-exposure prophylaxis recommended by WHO consists of 3 doses given intramuscularly on days 0, 7, and 28, making it possible to complete pre-exposure prophylaxis in one month. This WHO recommended pre-exposure prophylaxis using Japanese cell-cultured rabies vaccine (PCEC-K) has not been studied, so we elected to fill the gap using PCEC-K, administered based on the WHO recommendation and examined its efficacy and safety. Subjects were 26 healthy volunteers with no previous rabies vaccination giving oral and written consent. Vaccine was administered on days 0, 7, and 28, and rabies antibody levels were tested on days 7, 28, and 42. On day 7, every antibody level was negative. On day 28, antibody levels were between 0.7-3.5 EU/ mL, with the exception of 3 cases still negative. On day 42, all cases, including the 3 negative cases, exceeded 1.6 EU/mL, providing sufficient protection against rabies. This result was not inferior compared to the standard regimen. Local adverse effects such as erythema and pain were noted, but none were

  18. Limbic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Teinert, Lynne; Cavanagh, Kathryn; Brennan, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, describing the presenting features, diagnosis and management plan. Limbic encephalitis is one differential of rapidly progressive dementia. We describe a rational approach to the diagnosis of the patient with rapid cognitive decline. PMID:24891487

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, A; Kennedy, P

    2002-01-01

    Acute encephalitis constitutes a medical emergency. In most cases, the presence of focal neurological signs and focal seizures will distinguish encephalitis from encephalopathy. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a non-infective inflammatory encephalitis that may require to be treated with steroids. Acute infective encephalitis is usually viral. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the commonest sporadic acute viral encephalitis in the Western world. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain is the investigation of choice in HSE and the diagnosis may be confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction test for the virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. In this article, we review the diagnosis, investigations, and management of acute encephalitis. With few exceptions (for example, aciclovir for HSE), no specific therapy is available for most forms of viral encephalitis. Mortality and morbidity may be high and long term sequelae are known among survivors. The emergence of unusual forms of zoonotic encephalitis has posed an important public health problem. Vaccination and vector control measures are useful preventive strategies in certain arboviral and zoonotic encephalitis. However, we need better antiviral therapy to meet the challenge of acute viral encephalitis more effectively. PMID:12415078

  20. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. IMPORTANCE The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice

  1. A review of successful flavivirus vaccines and the problems with those flaviviruses for which vaccines are not yet available.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Konishi, Eiji

    2014-03-10

    Genus flavivirus comprises many important human pathogens causing public health problems worldwide. Some flavivirus infections are characterized by a relatively high mortality rate and/or high sequelae rate in survivors. Because most flavivirus life cycles are maintained between arthropod vectors and amplifying/reservoir hosts in the absence of humans, eradication of flaviviruses might be extremely difficult. Flavivirus vaccine development is considered a reasonable method to prevent flavivirus infections. Some vaccines have been successfully developed, but others have not, regardless of much effort. This review article describes currently available flavivirus vaccines against yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis. In addition, the current status of dengue and West Nile virus vaccine development is reviewed and problems regarding their development are discussed. PMID:24486372

  2. Protective efficacies of live attenuated and formaldehyde-inactivated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccines against aerosol challenge in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Stephenson, E H

    1984-01-01

    Although two investigational vaccines are used to immunize humans against Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus, neither had previously been tested for protective efficacy against aerosol exposure. Live attenuated vaccine (TC-83) protected all hamsters challenged by either aerosol or subcutaneous routes with 4.7 to 5.2 log10 PFU of virulent Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus. Formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine (C-84) failed to protect against aerosol challenge but did protect against subcutaneous challenge. Protection elicited by TC-83 vaccine did not depend solely on serum-neutralizing antibody. These studies suggest that TC-83 vaccine is preferable to C-84 vaccine for protecting laboratory workers at risk to aerosol exposure. PMID:6715512

  3. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  4. Current status and future prospects of yellow fever vaccines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew S; Barrett, Alan D T

    2015-11-01

    Yellow fever 17D vaccine is one of the oldest live-attenuated vaccines in current use that is recognized historically for its immunogenic and safe properties. These unique properties of 17D are presently exploited in rationally designed recombinant vaccines targeting not only flaviviral antigens but also other pathogens of public health concern. Several candidate vaccines based on 17D have advanced to human trials, and a chimeric recombinant Japanese encephalitis vaccine utilizing the 17D backbone has been licensed. The mechanism(s) of attenuation for 17D are poorly understood; however, recent insights from large in silico studies have indicated particular host genetic determinants contributing to the immune response to the vaccine, which presumably influences the considerable durability of protection, now in many cases considered to be lifelong. The very rare occurrence of severe adverse events for 17D is discussed, including a recent fatal case of vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease. PMID:26366673

  5. Antibody responses induced by Japanese whole inactivated vaccines against equine influenza virus (H3N8) belonging to Florida sublineage clade2.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Bannai, Hiroshi; Nemoto, Manabu; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2011-04-01

    In 2010, the World Organisation for Animal Health recommended the inclusion of a Florida sublineage clade2 strain of equine influenza virus (H3N8), which is represented by A/equine/Richmond/1/07 (Richmond07), in equine influenza vaccines. Here, we evaluate the antigenic differences between Japanese vaccine strains and Richmond07 by performing hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Ferret antiserum raised to A/equine/La Plata/93 (La Plata93), which is a Japanese vaccine strain, reacted with Richmond07 at a similar titer to La Plata93. Moreover, two hundred racehorses exhibited similar geometric mean HI antibody titers against La Plata93 and Richmond07 (73.1 and 80.8, respectively). Therefore, we can expect the antibody induced by the current Japanese vaccines to provide some protection against Richmond07-like viruses. PMID:21099188

  6. Yellow fever vector live-virus vaccines: West Nile virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, J; Miller, C A; Catalan, J; Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    By combining molecular-biological techniques with our increased understanding of the effect of gene sequence modification on viral function, yellow fever 17D, a positive-strand RNA virus vaccine, has been manipulated to induce a protective immune response against viruses of the same family (e.g. Japanese encephalitis and dengue viruses). Triggered by the emergence of West Nile virus infections in the New World afflicting humans, horses and birds, the success of this recombinant technology has prompted the rapid development of a live-virus attenuated candidate vaccine against West Nile virus. PMID:11516995

  7. CD4+ T cells provide protection against acute lethal encephalitis caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Nadezhda E.; Peng, Bi-Hung; Bertke, Andrea S.; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Smith, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jeanon N.; Poussard, Allison L.; Salazar, Milagros; Judy, Barbara M.; Zacks, Michele A.; Estes, D. Mark; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-01-01

    Studying the mechanisms of host survival resulting from viral encephalitis is critical to the development of vaccines. Here we have shown in several independent studies that high-dose treatment with neutralizing antibody prior to intranasal infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus had an antiviral effect in the visceral organs and prolonged survival time of infected mice, even in the absence of alpha beta T cells. Nevertheless, the antibody treatment did not prevent the development of lethal encephalitis. In contrary, the adoptive transfer of primed CD4+ T cells is necessary to prevent lethal encephalitis in mice lacking alpha beta T cell receptor. PMID:19446933

  8. [Which vaccinations for which travel-destination?].

    PubMed

    De Crom, Susan; Veit, Olivia; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Several vaccinations are recommended to protect international travellers, especially to tropical countries, from diseases in other parts of the world. Firstly, the routine schedule of childhood vaccinations and booster shots according to the Swiss immunisation programme should be checked, updated or even completed. Additional vaccinations against hepatitis A and B, typhoid fever, poliomyelitis, rabies or Japanese encephalitis may be recommended. This will depend on a number of factors including the exact destination and route (developing countries, rural areas), planned activities (backpacker, family visit, business trip), duration of travel, season, age of the traveller and current health status including the current medication and previous vaccinations. Some vaccinations, such as yellow fever, may be required for travellers to certain countries and the international certificate of vaccination may even be required when entering a country from another country where yellow fever is endemic. The international certificate of vaccination (or a letter of exemption when appropriate) is considered valid only if it is administered by an approved vaccination centre. Furthermore, the meningococcal vaccination (A, C, W, Y) is required for pilgrims to Saudi Arabia. It is recommended to start the vaccinations four to six weeks before departure to ensure enough time to administer all the necessary doses for an adequate immune response. All commonly used vaccines can be administered on the same day. The basic health insurance does not usually cover travel vaccines. PMID:27268450

  9. Vaccinations for Neuroinfectious Disease: A Global Health Priority.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Emily C; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Vaccines for neuroinfectious diseases are becoming an ever-increasing global health priority, as neurologic manifestations and sequelae from existing and emerging central nervous system infections account for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. The prevention of neurotropic infections can be achieved through globally coordinated vaccination campaigns, which have successfully eradicated nonzoonotic agents such as the variola viruses and, hopefully soon, poliovirus. This review discusses vaccines that are currently available or under development for zoonotic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including Japanese and tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile, dengue, Zika, encephalitic equine viruses, and chikungunya. Also discussed are nonzoonotic agents, including measles and human herpesviruses, as well as select bacterial, fungal, and protozoal pathogens. While therapeutic vaccines will be required to treat a multitude of ongoing infections of the nervous system, the ideal vaccination strategy is pre-exposure vaccination, with the ultimate goals of minimizing disease associated with zoonotic viruses and the total eradication of nonzoonotic agents. PMID:27365085

  10. Immunogenicity against Far Eastern and Siberian subtypes of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus elicited by the currently available vaccines based on the European subtype: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Domnich, Alexander; Panatto, Donatella; Arbuzova, Eva Klementievna; Signori, Alessio; Avio, Ulderico; Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus, which is usually divided into European, Far Eastern and Siberian subtypes, is a serious public health problem in several European and Asian countries. Vaccination is the most effective measure to prevent TBE; cross-subtype protection elicited by the TBE vaccines is biologically plausible since all TBE virus subtypes are closely related. This manuscript systematically explores available data on the cross-subtype immunogenicity elicited by the currently available Western vaccines based on the European subtype. Completed immunization course of 3 doses of both Western vaccines determined very high seroconversion/seropositivity rates against both Far Eastern and Siberian subtypes among previously flavivirus-naïve subjects. All but one study found no statistically significant difference in titers of neutralizing antibodies against strains belonging to homologous and heterologous subtypes. Pooled analysis of randomized controlled trials on head-to-head comparison of immunogenicity of Western and Russian TBE vaccines did not reveal differences in seroconversion rates against Far Eastern isolates in either hemagglutination inhibition (risk ratio = 0.98, p = 0.83) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent (risk ratio = 0.95, p = 0.44) assays after 2 vaccine doses. This suggests that, in regions where a heterogeneous TBE virus population circulates, vaccines based on the European subtype may be used alongside vaccines based on the Far Eastern subtype. Studies on the field effectiveness of TBE vaccines and investigation of vaccination failures, especially in countries where different subtypes co-circulate, will further elucidate TBE vaccination-induced cross-subtype protection. PMID:25483679

  11. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Günther, Albrecht; Schubert, Julia; Brämer, Dirk; Witte, Otto Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis, an inflammatory disease of the brain, is usually attributed to antibody-mediated damage and dysfunction of neuronal structures. A distinction is made between onconeuronal antibodies (directed against intracellular neuronal antigens with resulting paraneoplastic neurological syndromes) and antibodies directed against neuronal cell surface proteins (with resulting synaptic encephalopathies). Anti-NMDA-Receptor-Encephalitis, the most common form of autoimmune encephalopathy, is characterized by a phased course of disease. Early disease phase involves nonspecific prodromes (fatigue, fever, headache) which lead to family doctor or emergency department consultation. Subsequently, neuropsychiatric behavioural problems, seizures, disturbance of memory and finally coma, dysautonomia and respiratory insufficiency often result in major complications (e.g. status epilepticus) necessitating intensive care treatment. The diagnosis is secured by detection of auto-antibodies in serum or cerebrospinal fluid. An intensive search for tumors is also recommended. The treatment of autoimmune encephalitis comprises of immunomodulatory and immunosuppessive strategies. Tumor therapy is the most important treatment of autoimmune encephalitis by onconeuronal antibodies. PMID:27557073

  12. Recent progress in West Nile virus diagnosis and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a positive-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family, a large family with 3 main genera (flavivirus, hepacivirus and pestivirus). Among these viruses, there are several globally relevant human pathogens including the mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV), yellow fever virus (YFV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), as well as tick-borne viruses such as tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). Since the mid-1990s, outbreaks of WN fever and encephalitis have occurred throughout the world and WNV is now endemic in Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe and the Unites States. This review describes the molecular virology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and highlights recent progress regarding diagnosis and vaccination against WNV infections. PMID:22380523

  13. Supplementation of Elderly Japanese Men and Women with Fucoidan from Seaweed Increases Immune Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination12

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Hirokuni; Mori, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Yamori, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    The elderly are known to have an inadequate immune response to influenza vaccine. Mekabu fucoidan (MF), a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from seaweed, was previously shown to have an immunomodulatory effect. We therefore investigated antibody production after influenza vaccination in elderly Japanese men and women with and without oral MF intake. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted with 70 volunteers >60 y of age. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, consuming either MF (300 mg/d) or placebo for 4 wk, and then given a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine. Serum was sampled at 5 and 20 wk after vaccination to measure the hemagglutination inhibition titer and natural killer cell activity. The MF group had higher antibody titers against all 3 strains contained in the seasonal influenza virus vaccine than the placebo group. Titers against the B/Brisbane/60/2008 (B) strain increased substantially more in the MF group than in the placebo group over the product consumption period. The immune response against B antigen met the European Union Licensure criteria regarding the geometric mean titer ratio in the MF group (2.4), but not in the placebo group (1.7). In the MF group, natural killer cell activity tended to increase from baseline 9 wk after MF intake (P = 0.08). However, in the placebo group no substantial increase was noted at 9 wk, and the activity decreased substantially from 9 to 24 wk. In the immunocompromised elderly, MF intake increased antibody production after vaccination, possibly preventing influenza epidemics. PMID:24005608

  14. Primate encephalization.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Encephalization is a concept that implies an increase in brain or neocortex size relative to body size, size of lower brain areas, and/or evolutionary time. Here, I review 26 large-scale comparative studies that provide robust evidence for five lifestyle correlates of encephalization (group living, a large home range, a high-quality diet, a strong reliance on vision, arboreal and forest dwelling), six cognitive correlates (better performance in captive tests, more tactical deception, innovation, tool use, social learning, all subsumed in part by general intelligence), one life history correlate (a longer lifespan), two evolutionary correlates (a high rate of change in microcephaly genes, an increase in brain size over macroevolutionary time), as well as three trade-offs (a slower juvenile development, a higher metabolic rate, sexually selected dimorphism). Of the 26 different encephalization measures used in these studies, corrected neocortex size, either with a ratio or a residual, is the most popular structural correlate of the functional variables, while residual brain size is the measure associated with the greatest number of them. Controversies remain on corrected or absolute measures of neural structure size, concerted versus mosaic evolution of brain parts and specialized versus domain-general brain structures and cognitive processes. PMID:22230638

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and hepatitis B nonresponders feature different immunologic mechanisms in response to TBE and influenza vaccination with involvement of regulatory T and B cells and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Garner-Spitzer, Erika; Wagner, Angelika; Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Kollaritsch, Herwig; Heinz, Franz X; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Stiasny, Karin; Fischer, Gottfried F; Kundi, Michael; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2013-09-01

    Low responsiveness/nonresponsiveness is characterized by an insufficient immune response upon primary and/or booster vaccination and affects 1-10% of vaccinees. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether nonresponsiveness is an Ag/vaccine-specific phenomenon and to clarify underlying immunological mechanisms. Nonresponders to tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) or hepatitis B Ag with a history of previous TBE vaccinations were booster vaccinated with TBE and influenza vaccine and compared with TBE high responders in terms of humoral and cellular immune response. Postboosters in TBE high responder existing TBE titers increased, and solid humoral responses to influenza vaccine were induced. In TBE nonresponders, low to undetectable prevaccination TBE titers remained low, whereas sufficient influenza Abs were induced. In both TBE groups, a positive correlation of humoral and cellular immune response was seen as high/low TBE titers were associated with sufficient/lack of Ag-specific T cell proliferation. Furthermore, responses to influenza were robust in terms of Abs and cytokine production. In contrast, in hepatitis B nonresponders, sufficient humoral responses to TBE and influenza Ags were induced despite lacking specific IL-2 and IFN-γ production. Importantly, these patients showed high IL-10 baseline levels in vitro. HLA-DR subtypes associated with hepatitis B nonresponsiveness were overrepresented in this group, and high IL-10 levels were linked to these subtypes. Whereas TBE and hepatitis B nonresponders had increased IL-10-producing FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells upon vaccination, only in hepatitis B nonresponders, showing elevated prevaccination IL-10 levels, a prominent population of B regulatory cells was detected. We conclude that immunological pathways of nonresponsiveness follow different patterns depending both on vaccine Ag and genetic predisposition of the vaccinee. PMID:23872054

  16. [Protection against pertussis by Japanese T type acellular pertussis vaccine: household contact study in Kawasaki City].

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Matsuyoshi, S; Goshima, T; Nakajima, N; Yamamoto, H; Arimoto, Y; Kaku, H; Hayashi, F

    1989-09-01

    To evaluate the vaccine efficacy of acellular pertussis vaccine which has been in clinical use in Japan since 1981, a retrospective study was made by a questionnaire from secondary pertussis attack through family contact in 149 children with pertussis diagnosed in the period from January 1981 through May 1988. In this study, Takeda's acellular vaccine which contains a high level of FHA, low level of PT and a small amount of agglutinogen, was evaluated. Secondary pertussis attacks through family contact were found in 17 of 29 siblings (58.6%) not immunized with pertussis vaccine. On the other hand of the siblings immunized with Takeda's acellular vaccine 27 were exposed to pertussis through family contact and a secondary attack was seen in only one of them (3.4%). The present study revealed an efficacy rate of 94.2% for the Takeda's acellular pertussis vaccine. PMID:2509597

  17. Overview of currently available Japanese acellular pertussis vaccines and future problems.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, H; Nii, R

    1988-01-01

    Acellular pertussis diphtheria, tetanus vaccine (APDT) was licensed in 1981 in Japan. This vaccine contains pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) and agglutinogen (AGG) as the main protective antigens. The new APDT vaccine produced by each company differs slightly in composition. There are two representative types of vaccine. One vaccine (B type) contains PT and FHA in a ratio of 1 to 1 and the other one (T type) contains PT and FHA in a ratio of 4 to 1 or 9 to 1 and also contains different amounts of AGG. We have been comparing the effectiveness of these two types of vaccine. The adverse reactions of APDT were local reactions such as redness and swelling, with a few febrile cases. No central nervous system adverse reactions were observed. The antibody protective level of this vaccine is also being investigated. After we changed from conventional vaccine to APDT, the frequency of serious adverse reactions was reduced and the number of pertussis infections also gradually decreased. This vaccine should be used for the children world-wide. PMID:3273618

  18. Paradoxical role of antibodies in dengue virus infections: considerations for prophylactic vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Eliana G; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Highly effective prophylactic vaccines for flaviviruses including yellow fever virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus and Japanese encephalitis virus are currently in use. However, the development of a dengue virus (DENV) vaccine has been hampered by the requirement of simultaneous protection against four distinct serotypes and the threat that DENV-specific antibodies might either mediate neutralization or, on the contrary, exacerbate disease through the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection. Therefore, understanding the cellular, biochemical and molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization and ADE are fundamental for the development of a safe DENV vaccine. Here we summarize current structural and mechanistic knowledge underlying these phenomena. We also review recent results demonstrating that the humoral immune response triggered during natural DENV infection is able to generate neutralizing antibodies binding complex quaternary epitopes only present on the surface of intact virions. PMID:26577689

  19. 78 FR 52535 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Initial Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in Cambodia, Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) CK14-001, initial... evaluation of applications received in response to ``Impact of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in...

  20. Towards the conservation of endangered avian species: a recombinant West Nile Virus vaccine results in increased humoral and cellular immune responses in Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Young, Jay A; Young, Joanne A; Jefferies, Wilfred

    2013-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) arrived in North America in 1999 and is now endemic. Many families of birds, especially corvids, are highly susceptible to WNV and infection often results in fatality. Avian species susceptible to WNV infection also include endangered species, such as the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropbasianuts) and the Eastern Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus migrans). The virus has been shown to contribute towards the likelihood of their extinction. Although a clear and present threat, there exists no avian WNV vaccine available to combat this lethal menace. As a first step in establishing an avian model for testing candidate WNV vaccines, avian antibody based reagents were assessed for cross-reactivity with Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) T cell markers CD4 and CD8; the most reactive were found to be the anti-duck CD8 antibody, clone Du-CD8-1, and the anti-chicken/turkey CD4 antibody, clone CT4. These reagents were then used to assess vaccine performance as well as to establish T cell populations in quail, with a novel population of CD4/CD8 double positive T cells being identified in Japanese quail. Concurrently, non-replicating recombinant adenoviruses, expressing either the WNV envelope or NS3 'genes' were constructed and assessed for effectiveness as avian vaccines. Japanese Quail were selected for testing the vaccines, as they provide an avian model that parallels the population diversity of bird species in the wild. Both the level of WNV specific antibodies and the number of T cells in vaccinated birds were increased compared to unvaccinated controls. The results indicate the vaccines to be effective in increasing both humoral and cellular immune responses. These recombinant vaccines therefore may find utility as tools to protect and maintain domestic and wild avian populations. Their implementation may also arrest the progression towards extinction of endangered avian species and reduce the viral reservoir that potentiates infection

  1. Immunization coverage and natural infection rates of vaccine-preventable diseases among children by questionnaire survey in 2005 in Japan.

    PubMed

    Baba, Koichi; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Tanaka-Taya, Keiko; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We performed questionnaire survey in 2005, just before the introduction of the MR vaccine, concerning child vaccination and/or infection history for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, influenza, diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT), BCG, and Japanese encephalitis. The vaccination rate against measles and rubella did not exceed 95% at any age levels. As a result, children who had contracted measles and/or rubella were observed at all age levels. The vaccination rate was 95% or higher only for BCG and DPT. The vaccination rates for influenza, mumps, and varicella, although vaccination against which diseases was being performed voluntarily, were low, and outbreaks of these diseases were expected to persist. The vaccination rates at a low level for these infectious diseases might be one of the most possible risk factors to the high prevalence of the diseases in nursery schools (daycare centers), kindergartens, and elementary schools all over Japan. PMID:20870055

  2. Dismantling the Taboo against Vaccines in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinating pregnant women in order to protect them, the fetus, and the child has become universal in no way at all. Prejudice in health professionals add to fears of women and their families. Both these feelings are not supported by even the smallest scientific data. Harmlessness for the mother and the child has been observed for seasonal, pandemic, or quadrivalent influenza, mono, combined polysaccharide or conjugated meningococcal or pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid, acellular pertussis, human papillomavirus, cholera, hepatitis A, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, anthrax, smallpox, yellow fever, mumps, measles and rubella combined, typhoid fever, inactivated or attenuated polio vaccines, and Bacillus Calmétte Guerin vaccines. Instead, the beneficial effects of influenza vaccine for the mother and the child as well as of pertussis vaccine for the child have been demonstrated. Obstetrician-gynecologists, general practitioners, and midwives must incorporate vaccination into their standard clinical care. Strong communication strategies effective at reducing parental vaccine hesitancy and approval of regulatory agencies for use of vaccines during pregnancy are needed. It must be clear that the lack of pre-licensure studies in pregnant women and, consequently, the lack of a statement about the use of the vaccine in pregnant women does not preclude its use in pregnancy. PMID:27338346

  3. Dismantling the Taboo against Vaccines in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinating pregnant women in order to protect them, the fetus, and the child has become universal in no way at all. Prejudice in health professionals add to fears of women and their families. Both these feelings are not supported by even the smallest scientific data. Harmlessness for the mother and the child has been observed for seasonal, pandemic, or quadrivalent influenza, mono, combined polysaccharide or conjugated meningococcal or pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid, acellular pertussis, human papillomavirus, cholera, hepatitis A, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, anthrax, smallpox, yellow fever, mumps, measles and rubella combined, typhoid fever, inactivated or attenuated polio vaccines, and Bacillus Calmétte Guerin vaccines. Instead, the beneficial effects of influenza vaccine for the mother and the child as well as of pertussis vaccine for the child have been demonstrated. Obstetrician-gynecologists, general practitioners, and midwives must incorporate vaccination into their standard clinical care. Strong communication strategies effective at reducing parental vaccine hesitancy and approval of regulatory agencies for use of vaccines during pregnancy are needed. It must be clear that the lack of pre-licensure studies in pregnant women and, consequently, the lack of a statement about the use of the vaccine in pregnant women does not preclude its use in pregnancy. PMID:27338346

  4. Yellow Fever Vaccine Booster Doses: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015.

    PubMed

    Staples, J Erin; Bocchini, Joseph A; Rubin, Lorry; Fischer, Marc

    2015-06-19

    On February 26, 2015, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) voted that a single primary dose of yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting protection and is adequate for most travelers. ACIP also approved recommendations for at-risk laboratory personnel and certain travelers to receive additional doses of yellow fever vaccine (Box). The ACIP Japanese Encephalitis and Yellow Fever Vaccines Workgroup evaluated published and unpublished data on yellow fever vaccine immunogenicity and safety. The evidence for benefits and risks associated with yellow fever vaccine booster doses was evaluated using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) framework. This report summarizes the evidence considered by ACIP and provides the updated recommendations for yellow fever vaccine booster doses. PMID:26086636

  5. Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bien, Christian G; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The term autoimmune encephalitis is used to describe a group of disorders characterised by symptoms of limbic and extra-limbic dysfunction occurring in association with antibodies against synaptic antigens and proteins localised on the neuronal cell surface. In recent years there has been a rapidly expanding knowledge of these syndromes resulting in a shift in clinical paradigms and new insights into pathogenic mechanisms. Since many patients respond well to immunosuppressive treatment, the recognition of these disorders is of utmost importance. In general, there are no brain-imaging modalities or biomarkers specific of these disorders other than the demonstration of the neuronal antibodies. A disease classification based on these antibodies provides information on prognosis and paraneoplastic aetiology. This article focuses on recent clinical advances, newly characterised antibodies and treatment approaches to these disorders. PMID:27330568

  6. Applications of pox virus vectors to vaccination: an update.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E

    1996-10-15

    Recombinant pox viruses have been generated for vaccination against heterologous pathogens. Amongst these, the following are notable examples. (i) The engineering of the Copenhagen strain of vaccinia virus to express the rabies virus glycoprotein. When applied in baits, this recombinant has been shown to vaccinate the red fox in Europe and raccoons in the United States, stemming the spread of rabies virus infection in the wild. (ii) A fowlpox-based recombinant expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion and hemagglutinin glycoproteins has been shown to protect commercial broiler chickens for their lifetime when the vaccine was administered at 1 day of age, even in the presence of maternal immunity against either the Newcastle disease virus or the pox vector. (iii) Recombinants of canarypox virus, which is restricted for replication to avian species, have provided protection against rabies virus challenge in cats and dogs, against canine distemper virus, feline leukemia virus, and equine influenza virus disease. In humans, canarypox virus-based recombinants expressing antigens from rabies virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and HIV have been shown to be safe and immunogenic. (iv) A highly attenuated vaccinia derivative, NYVAC, has been engineered to express antigens from both animal and human pathogens. Safety and immunogenicity of NYVAC-based recombinants expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, a polyprotein from Japanese encephalitis virus, and seven antigens from Plasmodium falciparum have been demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic in early human vaccine studies. PMID:8876138

  7. The present situation of prophylactic vaccination in Japan for travel abroad.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takashi

    2008-11-01

    The current situation of vaccination in Japan is reviewed from a viewpoint of overseas travelers. Vaccinations before travel to developing countries, where the risk of infection is high, are recommended for two reasons: "individual protection" and "prevention of communicable disease importation". However, there are problems in Japan; some vaccines available commonly in foreign nations are not approved in Japan and the vaccination schedule is not convenient for travelers. Vaccination is sometimes needed also for travel to Europe and North America. This is because certain vaccinations are required for entering school or studying abroad. In Japan, there is no regulation which recommends vaccination as an entrance requirement. Compared with other nations, Japanese children receive fewer vaccines routinely. On the other hand, there are different features from other industrialized nations, such as routine childhood BCG vaccination and immunization against Japanese encephalitis in Japan. Compared with foreign nations, awareness as regards "travel medicine" is lower in Japan. Recognizing this situation will lead to improvement of vaccination of travelers. PMID:18984478

  8. Expanding poliomyelitis and measles surveillance networks to establish surveillance for acute meningitis and encephalitis syndromes--Bangladesh, China, and India, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    2012-12-14

    Quality surveillance is critical to the control and elimination of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). A key strategy for enhancing VPD surveillance, outlined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Framework for Immunization Monitoring and Surveillance (GFIMS), is to expand and link existing VPD surveillance systems (particularly those developed for polio eradication and measles elimination) to include other priority VPDs. Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, the incidence of polio has decrease by 99% worldwide. A cornerstone of this success is a sensitive surveillance system based on the rapid and timely reporting of all acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases in children aged <15 years, with confirmatory diagnostic testing performed by laboratories that are part of a global network. As countries achieve polio-free status, many have expanded syndromic surveillance to include persons with rash and fever, and have built measles diagnostic capacity in existing polio reference laboratories. Acute meningitis/encephalitis syndrome (AMES) and acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) are candidates for expanded surveillance because they are most often caused by VPDs of public health importance for which confirmatory laboratory tests exist. Vaccine-preventable cases of encephalitis include approximately 68,000 Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases, resulting in 13,000-20,000 deaths each year in Asia. Moreover, although bacterial meningitis incidence in Asia is not as well-documented, pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis outbreaks have been reported in Bangladesh and China, and the incidence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis in children aged <5 years in India has been estimated to be 7.1 per 100,000 population, similar to that in European countries before the introduction of vaccine. This report describes a prototype for expanding existing polio and measles surveillance networks in Bangladesh, China, and India to include

  9. Analysis of the temperature sensitivity of Japanese rubella vaccine strain TO-336.vac and its effect on immunogenicity in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kiyoko; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Sakata, Masafumi; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2016-04-01

    The marker of Japanese domestic rubella vaccines is their lack of immunogenicity in guinea pigs. This has long been thought to be related to the temperature sensitivity of the viruses, but supporting evidence has not been described. In this study, we generated infectious clones of TO-336.vac, a Japanese domestic vaccine, TO-336.GMK5, the parental virus of TO-336.vac, and their mutants, and determined the molecular bases of their temperature sensitivity and immunogenicity in guinea pigs. The results revealed that Ser(1159) in the non-structural protein-coding region was responsible for the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac dominantly, while the structural protein-coding region affected the temperature sensitivity subordinately. The findings further suggested that the temperature sensitivity of TO-336.vac affected the antibody induction in guinea pigs after subcutaneous inoculation. PMID:26878651

  10. Japanese encephalitis virus induces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression via a ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent AP-1 pathway in rat brain astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection is a major cause of acute encephalopathy in children, which destroys central nervous system (CNS) cells, including astrocytes and neurons. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has been shown to degrade components of the basal lamina, leading to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to contribute to neuroinflammatory responses in many neurological diseases. However, the detailed mechanisms of JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1 cells) are largely unclear. Methods In this study, the effect of JEV on expression of MMP-9 was determined by gelatin zymography, western blot analysis, RT-PCR, and promoter assay. The involvement of AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K/Akt, and MAPKs in these responses were investigated by using the selective pharmacological inhibitors and transfection with siRNAs. Results Here, we demonstrate that JEV induces expression of pro-form MMP-9 via ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs-dependent, AP-1 activation in RBA-1 cells. JEV-induced MMP-9 expression and promoter activity were inhibited by pretreatment with inhibitors of AP-1 (tanshinone), c-Src (PP1), PDGFR (AG1296), and PI3K (LY294002), and by transfection with siRNAs of c-Jun, c-Fos, PDGFR, and Akt. Moreover, JEV-stimulated AP-1 activation was inhibited by pretreatment with the inhibitors of c-Src, PDGFR, PI3K, and MAPKs. Conclusion From these results, we conclude that JEV activates the ROS/c-Src/PDGFR/PI3K/Akt/MAPKs pathway, which in turn triggers AP-1 activation and ultimately induces MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells. These findings concerning JEV-induced MMP-9 expression in RBA-1 cells imply that JEV might play an important role in CNS inflammation and diseases. PMID:22251375

  11. Role of amphotericin B upon enhancement of protective immunity elicited by oral administration with liposome-encapsulated-Japanese encephalitis virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Shun; Chuang, Chuan-Chang; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Liu, Yu-Tien; Lin, Wen-Po; Liang, Chung-Chih; Liu, Wen-Tssann

    2010-09-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is an antifungal antibiotic the activity of which has been associated with modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in cultured cells. Herein we reveal that co-administration with AmB enhances the immunogenicity of oral Lip-JENS1 vaccine which derived from liposomes functionalized with DSPC (distearoylphosphatidylcholine) and cholesterol (2:1, molar ratio)-bearing JE virus NS1 protein (600 microg ml(-1)). Oral single dose of Lip-JENS1 elicited a detectable serum NS1-specific IgG antibody response from a mouse model. Remarkably, the addition of AmB (125 microg per mouse), particularly, 2 h prior to, but not simultaneously with, the administration of Lip-JENS1 significantly enhanced the systemic antigen-specific antibody response, providing superior protection against lethal JEV challenges. Further, we observed AmB-induced the transcription of cytokine expression and translocation of transcriptional factor NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus for the murine macrophage J774A.1. Moreover, Peyer's-patch lymphocytes (PPL) from AmB-treated mice produced high levels of IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha expression compared to the corresponding control of cells from non-treated mice. Taken together, the results suggest that AmB exerts a profound influence upon mucosal vaccination with Lip-JENS1, possibly playing an adjuvant-augmented role to "fine-tune" humoral as well as cellular immune response, thus conferring enhanced protective immunity for immunising individuals against JE infection. PMID:20412849

  12. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  13. Estimation of nationwide vaccination coverage and comparison of interview and telephone survey methodology for estimating vaccination status.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung; Lee, Yeon-Kyeng; Cho, Lisa Y; Go, Un Yeong; Yang, Jae Jeong; Ma, Seung Hyun; Choi, Bo-Youl; Lee, Moo-Sik; Lee, Jin-Seok; Choi, Eun Hwa; Lee, Hoan Jong; Park, Sue K

    2011-06-01

    This study compared interview and telephone surveys to select the better method for regularly estimating nationwide vaccination coverage rates in Korea. Interview surveys using multi-stage cluster sampling and telephone surveys using stratified random sampling were conducted. Nationwide coverage rates were estimated in subjects with vaccination cards in the interview survey. The interview survey relative to the telephone survey showed a higher response rate, lower missing rate, higher validity and a less difference in vaccination coverage rates between card owners and non-owners. Primary vaccination coverage rate was greater than 90% except for the fourth dose of DTaP (diphtheria/tetanus/pertussis), the third dose of polio, and the third dose of Japanese B encephalitis (JBE). The DTaP4: Polio3: MMR1 fully vaccination rate was 62.0% and BCG1:HepB3:DTaP4:Polio3:MMR1 was 59.5%. For age-appropriate vaccination, the coverage rate was 50%-80%. We concluded that the interview survey was better than the telephone survey. These results can be applied to countries with incomplete registry and decreasing rates of landline telephone coverage due to increased cell phone usage and countries. Among mandatory vaccines, efforts to increase vaccination rate for the fourth dose of DTaP, the third dose of polio, JBE and regular vaccinations at recommended periods should be conducted in Korea. PMID:21655054

  14. [Anti-rabies antibody titers among subjects who received rabies post-exposure prophylaxis with foreign-made rabies vaccines at the beginning and followed with Japanese rabies vaccine].

    PubMed

    Takayama, Naohide; Suganuma, Akihiko; Kasai, Daisuke; Kurai, Daisuke

    2002-10-01

    Recently travelers who were bitten by possibly rabid animals in rabies endemic regions and returned to Japan have increased in number. About half of them received rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (RPEP) with one or more doses of foreign-made rabies vaccines (FRV) in the local medical institutions. FRV, however, are not available in Japan so we have to continue the RPEP with Japanese rabies vaccine (JRV). It has not been demonstrated that an anti-rabies antibody induced with JRV following Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV) or chick embryo cell rabies vaccine (PCEC) could be high enough to prevent clinical rabies. We examined anti-rabies antibody (ARA) titers among the subjects visited our vaccine clinic to receive RPEP and obtained results as follows: the ARA titers after a total of 5 doses of PCEC or PVRV and JRV were high enough to prevent clinical rabies as after 5 doses of JRV. However, ARA titers obtained after receiving one dose of PVRV and 2 doses of JRV seemed lower than those produced after one dose of PCEC and 2 doses of JRV or 3 doses of JRV. To accelerate antibody production, consequently, the simultaneous intradermal and subcutaneous injection method of rabies vaccine may be applied to those who were bitten in their hands or head by possibly rabid animals and received only one dose of PVRV in rabies endemic regions. PMID:12448848

  15. Four new vaccines for routine immunization in India: what about hemophilus influenza B and pneumococcal vaccine?

    PubMed

    Paul, Sourabh; Sahoo, Jyotiranjan

    2015-01-01

    Immunization is the process whereby a person is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically by the administration of a vaccine. The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) was flagged off in India in 1978. According to the recommendation of National technical advisory group of India (NATGI), Government of India is going to include four new vaccines in the UIP for whole India. The four new vaccines are Inactivated Poliomyelitis Vaccine (IPV) for polio, rota viral vaccine, vaccine against rubella, and Japanese encephalitis vaccine (179 districts in India). Here, authors have tried to show a comparative descriptive analysis of the hemophilus influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia with rota virus, so that in near future Government of India can also consider their inclusion in the national UIP. In India, 39.2% of all diarrheal death are due to rota virus, whereas 0.72 million deaths are due to hemophilus influenza B and 1.3 million are due to pneumococcal pneumonia in <5 years age-group. India's indigenous developed rota viral vaccine's (Rotavac) efficacy is 56% in 1(st) year compared to H influenza B (Hib) efficacy 95% and PCV13 vaccine "3 + 1" dose efficacy 100% (South Africa). Rotarix incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is US $21.4 to US $34 per disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) compared to Hib US $ 819 per DALYs in India. In case of pneumococcal vaccine, India needs more trails on the serotype specificity, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness but there is enough evidence that hemophilus influenza burden is high in India and the present Hib vaccine is safe and highly effective. In future with the help of donor agencies, India should include the hemophilus influenza B and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine in national UIP which will save millions of poor children's life. PMID:25810981

  16. Establishment of an Algorithm Using prM/E- and NS1-Specific IgM Antibody-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays in Diagnosis of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Infections in Humans.

    PubMed

    Galula, Jedhan U; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Chuang, Shih-Te; Chao, Day-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The front-line assay for the presumptive serodiagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) infections is the premembrane/envelope (prM/E)-specific IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Due to antibody cross-reactivity, MAC-ELISA-positive samples may be confirmed with a time-consuming plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). In the present study, we applied a previously developed anti-nonstructural protein 1 (NS1)-specific MAC-ELISA (NS1-MAC-ELISA) on archived acute-phase serum specimens from patients with confirmed JEV and WNV infections and compared the results with prM/E containing virus-like particle-specific MAC-ELISA (VLP-MAC-ELISA). Paired-receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses revealed no statistical differences in the overall assay performances of the VLP- and NS1-MAC-ELISAs. The two methods had high sensitivities of 100% but slightly lower specificities that ranged between 80% and 100%. When the NS1-MAC-ELISA was used to confirm positive results in the VLP-MAC-ELISA, the specificity of serodiagnosis, especially for JEV infection, was increased to 90% when applied in areas where JEV cocirculates with WNV, or to 100% when applied in areas that were endemic for JEV. The results also showed that using multiple antigens could resolve the cross-reactivity in the assays. Significantly higher positive-to-negative (P/N) values were consistently obtained with the homologous antigens than those with the heterologous antigens. JEV or WNV was reliably identified as the currently infecting flavivirus by a higher ratio of JEV-to-WNV P/N values or vice versa. In summary of the above-described results, the diagnostic algorithm combining the use of multiantigen VLP- and NS1-MAC-ELISAs was developed and can be practically applied to obtain a more specific and reliable result for the serodiagnosis of JEV and WNV infections without the need for PRNT. The developed algorithm should provide great

  17. Establishment of an Algorithm Using prM/E- and NS1-Specific IgM Antibody-Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays in Diagnosis of Japanese Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.

    2015-01-01

    The front-line assay for the presumptive serodiagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) infections is the premembrane/envelope (prM/E)-specific IgM antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Due to antibody cross-reactivity, MAC-ELISA-positive samples may be confirmed with a time-consuming plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). In the present study, we applied a previously developed anti-nonstructural protein 1 (NS1)-specific MAC-ELISA (NS1-MAC-ELISA) on archived acute-phase serum specimens from patients with confirmed JEV and WNV infections and compared the results with prM/E containing virus-like particle-specific MAC-ELISA (VLP-MAC-ELISA). Paired-receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses revealed no statistical differences in the overall assay performances of the VLP- and NS1-MAC-ELISAs. The two methods had high sensitivities of 100% but slightly lower specificities that ranged between 80% and 100%. When the NS1-MAC-ELISA was used to confirm positive results in the VLP-MAC-ELISA, the specificity of serodiagnosis, especially for JEV infection, was increased to 90% when applied in areas where JEV cocirculates with WNV, or to 100% when applied in areas that were endemic for JEV. The results also showed that using multiple antigens could resolve the cross-reactivity in the assays. Significantly higher positive-to-negative (P/N) values were consistently obtained with the homologous antigens than those with the heterologous antigens. JEV or WNV was reliably identified as the currently infecting flavivirus by a higher ratio of JEV-to-WNV P/N values or vice versa. In summary of the above-described results, the diagnostic algorithm combining the use of multiantigen VLP- and NS1-MAC-ELISAs was developed and can be practically applied to obtain a more specific and reliable result for the serodiagnosis of JEV and WNV infections without the need for PRNT. The developed algorithm should provide great

  18. Profiling of Viral Proteins Expressed from the Genomic RNA of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Using a Panel of 15 Region-Specific Polyclonal Rabbit Antisera: Implications for Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Yun, Gil-Nam; Byun, Sung-June; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is closely related to West Nile (WN), yellow fever (YF), and dengue (DEN) viruses. Its plus-strand genomic RNA carries a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein that is cleaved into three structural (C, prM/M, and E) and at least seven nonstructural (NS1/NS1', NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5) proteins, based on previous work with WNV, YFV, and DENV. Here, we aimed to profile experimentally all the viral proteins found in JEV-infected cells. We generated a collection of 15 JEV-specific polyclonal antisera covering all parts of the viral protein-coding regions, by immunizing rabbits with 14 bacterially expressed glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins (for all nine viral proteins except NS2B) or with a chemically synthesized oligopeptide (for NS2B). In total lysates of JEV-infected BHK-21 cells, immunoblotting with these antisera revealed: (i) three mature structural proteins (~12-kDa C, ~8-kDa M, and ~53-kDa E), a precursor of M (~24-kDa prM) and three other M-related proteins (~10-14 kDa); (ii) the predicted ~45-kDa NS1 and its frameshift product, ~58-kDa NS1', with no evidence of the predicted ~25-kDa NS2A; (iii) the predicted but hardly detectable ~14-kDa NS2B and an unexpected but predominant ~12-kDa NS2B-related protein; (iv) the predicted ~69-kDa NS3 plus two major cleavage products (~34-kDa NS3N-term and ~35-kDa NS3C-term), together with at least nine minor proteins of ~16-52 kDa; (v) the predicted ~14-kDa NS4A; (vi) two NS4B-related proteins (~27-kDa NS4B and ~25-kDa NS4B'); and (vii) the predicted ~103-kDa NS5 plus at least three other NS5-related proteins (~15 kDa, ~27 kDa, and ~90 kDa). Combining these data with confocal microscopic imaging of the proteins’ intracellular localization, our study is the first to provide a solid foundation for the study of JEV gene expression, which is crucial for elucidating the regulatory mechanisms of JEV genome replication and pathobiology

  19. Efficacy of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine (GARDASIL) in Japanese women aged 18-26 years.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Ebihara, Keiko; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kiichiro

    2013-04-01

    A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a prophylactic quadrivalent vaccine targeting the human papillomavirus (HPV) types most frequently associated with cervical cancer (types 16/18) and genital warts (types 6/11) in Japanese women aged 18-26 years. Participants were randomly assigned to either quadrivalent HPV (types 6/11/16/18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine (GARDASIL) (n = 509) or placebo (n = 512). Participants underwent regular gynecological examinations, cervicovaginal sampling for HPV DNA, testing for serum neutralizing antibodies to HPV and Papanicolau testing. The primary end-point was the combined incidence of persistent infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16 or 18 and cervical or external genital disease (i.e. cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, cervical cancer or external genital lesions related to HPV 6, 11, 16 or 18. Primary analyses were done per protocol. Combined incidence of persistent infection or disease with HPV 6, 11, 16 or 18 fell by 87.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59.2-97.6; P < 0.001), with HPV 6 or 11 by 73.1% (95% CI, -1.1-97.3; P = 0.0756) and with HPV 16 or 18 by 94.5% (95% CI, 65.2-99.9; P < 0.001) in those assigned vaccine compared with those assigned placebo. The median duration of follow up after month 7 in subjects was 23 months. In addition, the vaccine was well tolerated in Japanese women aged 18-26 years. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine could significantly reduce the acquisition of infection and clinical disease caused by HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18. PMID:23331518

  20. Characterization of two recent Japanese field isolates of canine distemper virus and examination of the avirulent strain utility as an attenuated vaccine.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Akiko; Yoneda, Misako; Seki, Takahiro; Uema, Masashi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Nishi, Toshiya; Fujita, Kentaro; Miura, Ryuichi; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2014-12-01

    Recently, several new strains of canine distemper virus (CDV) have been isolated in Japan. To investigate their pathogenesis in dogs, the Yanaka and Bunkyo-K strains were investigated by infecting dogs and determining clinical signs, amount of virus, and antibody responses. The Yanaka strain is avirulent and induced an antibody response. The Bunkyo-K strain induced typical CDV clinical signs in infected dogs and virulence was enhanced by brain passage. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of H genes demonstrated the Bunkyo-K strains were of a different lineage from Asia-1 group including the Yanaka strain and Asia-2 group that contain recent Japanese isolates, which were recently identified as major prevalent strains worldwide but distinct from old vaccine strains. Based on these data, we tested the ability of the Yanaka strain for vaccination. Inoculation with the Yanaka strain efficiently induced CDV neutralizing antibodies with no clinical signs, and the protection effects against challenge with either old virulent strain or Bunkyo-K strain were equal or greater when compared with vaccination by an original vaccine strain. Thus, the Yanaka strain is a potential vaccine candidate against recent prevalent CDV strains. PMID:25465179

  1. Acute nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis in childhood: a case series in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2010-09-01

    Limbic encephalitis not associated with malignancy was investigated in Japanese children, with particular focus on clinical features distinct from adult cases. Clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings were studied in pediatric nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis, based on a literature review and questionnaire-based analyses. Analysis of 14 cases revealed the predominance of seizure occurrence, disturbance in consciousness, and frequent extralimbic signs. The majority manifested antecedent febrile illnesses, suggesting the involvement of infection-induced autoimmunity targeted to neuronal antigens. These clinical observations indicate a child-specific phenotype of limbic encephalitis. Further studies on its immunopathogenesis are needed to determine whether childhood limbic encephalitis is a distinct subcategory. PMID:20691937

  2. Protection of Mice from Fatal Measles Encephalitis by Vaccination with Vaccinia Virus Recombinants Encoding Either the Hemagglutinin or the Fusion Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drillien, Robert; Spehner, Daniele; Kirn, Andre; Giraudon, Pascale; Buckland, Robin; Wild, Fabian; Lecocq, Jean-Pierre

    1988-02-01

    Vaccinia virus recombinants encoding the hemagglutinin or fusion protein of measles virus have been constructed. Infection of cell cultures with the recombinants led to the synthesis of authentic measles proteins as judged by their electrophoretic mobility, recognition by antibodies, glycosylation, proteolytic cleavage, and presentation on the cell surface. Mice vaccinated with a single dose of the recombinant encoding the hemagglutinin protein developed antibodies capable of both inhibiting hemagglutination activity and neutralizing measles virus, whereas animals vaccinated with the recombinant encoding the fusion protein developed measles neutralizing antibodies. Mice vaccinated with either of the recombinants resisted a normally lethal intracerebral inoculation of a cell-associated measles virus subacute sclerosing panencephalitis strain.

  3. Ethnic differences in immune responses to hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, L C; Lin, S R; Hsu, H M; Chao, W H; Hsieh, J T; Wang, M C; Lu, C F; Chang, Y H; Ho, M S

    1996-04-01

    A national vaccination program against hepatitis B virus (HBV) to immunize every newborn was initiated in Taiwan in 1986. A serologic survey of 1,812 fully vaccinated children residing in four aboriginal villages and four adjacent nonaboriginal Han Chinese rural villages was conducted in 1993. Children in three of the four aboriginal villages had significantly lower titers of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) than did children in the nonaboriginal villages. Evaluation of cold chain operation for vaccine storage and transport suggested that cold chain failure was not responsible for the fact that children residing in the more remote aboriginal villages had lower mean titers of anti-HBs. However, children whose parents were both aborigines had lower anti-HBs mean titer than did children whose parents were both ethnic Han Chinese. Children of mixed parental origins had intermediate mean titer of anti-HBs. Serologic responses to Japanese encephalitis virus and diphtheria vaccines did not show such correlation with ethnic groups, indicating that the determinant for HBV hyporesponsiveness among the aboriginal children is distinct from that of other childhood vaccines. It was therefore concluded that host factors pertaining to ethnic origin might be responsible for the hyporesponsiveness to HBV vaccine in the aboriginal populations. This finding, if substantiated with further prospective studies, might provide possible means for more targeted trials to improve vaccine response and to reduce vaccine failure among these well-defined ethnic groups. PMID:8651234

  4. The history of vaccination and current vaccination policies in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There may be many reasons for the significant decrease in the incidence of the pediatric infectious diseases in modern Korea; this could be due to the improvement of sanitary facilities, significant growth of Korean economy, improvement of nutrition, development and dissemination of antibiotics and implantation of vaccination, and overall improvement of medical technology. The development of vaccination has been highlighted as a striking achievement of the modern medical sciences with new technologies in many fields of medicine. Since 1876, the method for vaccination has opened its new era by Suk-Young Jee, known as the Jenner in Korea who wrote a book about smallpox vaccination, and it led an opportunity to propagate the needs for the vaccination in Korea. There was a time when pediatric wards were full of patients with parasitic diseases and many vaccine-preventable diseases such as diphtheria, pertussis, Japanese B encephalitis, and poliomyelitis in 1950s-1960s. We do not see those infectious diseases that often any more in recent years. However, we still have patients with water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases related to increasing international travels. We just experienced the first pandemic influenza of the 21st century in 2009 and avian influenza is still a threat to humans in other parts of the world with an unpredictable potential of pandemicity. In addition, we have tough battles with emerging antibiotic resistance in many strains of bacteria and increased opportunistic infections due to improvement of medical technology involving more aggressive treatment modality and use of medical devices. Researches in many areas are under way and we hope that some of them may be preventable and decreased with a development of new vaccines in the future. PMID:23596573

  5. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  6. Biomarkers in Japanese Encephalitis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kant Upadhyay, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    JE is a flavivirus generated dreadful CNS disease which causes high mortality in various pediatric groups. JE disease is currently diagnosed by measuring the level of viral antigens and virus neutralization IgM antibodies in blood serum and CSF by ELISA. However, it is not possible to measure various disease-identifying molecules, structural and molecular changes occurred in tissues, and cells by using such routine methods. However, few important biomarkers such as cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, neuro-imaging, brain mapping, immunotyping, expression of nonstructural viral proteins, systematic mRNA profiling, DNA and protein microarrays, active caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, levels of stress-associated signaling molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines could be used to confirm the disease at an earlier stage. These biomarkers may also help to diagnose mutant based environment specific alterations in JEV genotypes causing high pathogenesis and have immense future applications in diagnostics. There is an utmost need for the development of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable physiological, immunological, biochemical, biophysical, molecular, and therapeutic biomarkers to confirm the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Hence, the present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of JE disease and its related disorders in the future. PMID:24455705

  7. Biomarkers in Japanese encephalitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Kant Upadhyay, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    JE is a flavivirus generated dreadful CNS disease which causes high mortality in various pediatric groups. JE disease is currently diagnosed by measuring the level of viral antigens and virus neutralization IgM antibodies in blood serum and CSF by ELISA. However, it is not possible to measure various disease-identifying molecules, structural and molecular changes occurred in tissues, and cells by using such routine methods. However, few important biomarkers such as cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, neuro-imaging, brain mapping, immunotyping, expression of nonstructural viral proteins, systematic mRNA profiling, DNA and protein microarrays, active caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, levels of stress-associated signaling molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines could be used to confirm the disease at an earlier stage. These biomarkers may also help to diagnose mutant based environment specific alterations in JEV genotypes causing high pathogenesis and have immense future applications in diagnostics. There is an utmost need for the development of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable physiological, immunological, biochemical, biophysical, molecular, and therapeutic biomarkers to confirm the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Hence, the present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of JE disease and its related disorders in the future. PMID:24455705

  8. Immunogenicity and safety of the 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) co-administered with DTPa vaccine in Japanese children: A randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Satoshi; Kawamura, Naohisa; Kuroki, Haruo; Tokoeda, Yasunobu; Miyazu, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Asayuki; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sato, Tomohide; Suyama, Akari; François, Nancy; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Ruiz-Guiñazú, Javier; Borys, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    This phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter study (NCT01027845) conducted in Japan assessed the immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV, given intramuscularly) co-administered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTPa, given subcutaneously). Infants (N=360 ) were randomized (2:1) to receive either PHiD-CV and DTPa (PHiD-CV group) or DTPa alone (control group) as 3-dose primary vaccination (3–4–5 months of age) and booster vaccination (17–19 months of age). Immune responses were measured before and one month after primary/booster vaccination and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Post-primary immune responses were non-inferior to those in pivotal/efficacy European or Latin American pneumococcal protein D-conjugate vaccine studies. For each PHiD-CV serotype, at least 92.6% of infants post-primary vaccination and at least 97.7% of children post-booster had pneumococcal antibody concentrations ≥0.2 μg/ml, and at least 95.4% post-primary and at least 98.1% post-booster had opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers ≥8 . Geometric mean antibody concentrations and OPA titers (except OPA titer for 6B) were higher post-booster than post-priming for each serotype. All PHiD-CV-vaccinated children had anti-protein D antibody concentrations ≥100 EL.U/ml one month post-primary/booster vaccination and all were seroprotected/seropositive against each DTPa antigen. Redness and irritability were the most common solicited AEs in both groups. Incidences of unsolicited AEs were comparable between groups. Serious AEs were reported for 47 children (28 in PHiD-CV group); none were assessed as vaccine-related. In conclusion, PHiD-CV induced robust immune responses and was well tolerated when co-administered with DTPa in a 3-dose priming plus booster regimen to Japanese children. PMID:25830489

  9. Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 2: Updating vaccinations.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide, for family physicians without access to a travel clinic, evidence-based recommendations on vaccinating infants and children, adults, pregnant women, and immunocompromised patients traveling to non-Western countries. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Searches were undertaken of MEDLINE from 1990 to November 1998 (372 articles); the Cochrane Collaboration Library; publications of the National Action Committee on Immunization and the Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel in Canada Communicable Disease Reports; the Canadian Immunization Guide; and Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, United States Centres for Disease Control, and World Health Organization websites. Evidence-based statements, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were selected. Vaccination recommendations are based on this evidence. MAIN MESSAGE: Physicians should complete vaccination schedules for children whose primary series is incomplete and vaccinate unvaccinated adults. Hepatitis A is widespread, and travelers to areas where it is endemic should be vaccinated. The elderly should be vaccinated against influenza and pneumococcal disease. Pregnant women should receive vaccines appropriate to their trimester. Immunocompromised patients should be vaccinated, but BCG and live vaccines are contraindicated. Travelers to areas where meningitis, typhoid, cholera, Japanese encephalitis, and rabies are endemic should be vaccinated if they are likely to be exposed. Those traveling to areas where tuberculosis is endemic should take precautions and should have skin tests before traveling and 2 to 4 months after return. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians can administer all necessary vaccinations. They can advise pregnant women and immunocompromised people about the balance of risk of disease and benefits of vaccination. PMID:10752003

  10. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  11. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4+ T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  12. CryJ-LAMP DNA Vaccines for Japanese Red Cedar Allergy Induce Robust Th1-Type Immune Responses in Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Connolly, Michael; Marketon, Anthony; Heiland, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Allergies caused by Japanese Red Cedar (JRC) pollen affect up to a third of Japanese people, necessitating development of an effective therapeutic. We utilized the lysosomal targeting property of lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) to make DNA vaccines that encode LAMP-1 and the sequences of immunodominant allergen CryJ1 or CryJ2 from the JRC pollen. This novel strategy is designed to skew the CD4 T cell responses to the target allergens towards a nonallergenic Th1 response. CryJ1-LAMP and CryJ2-LAMP were administrated to BALB/c mice and antigen-specific Th1-type IgG2a and Th2-type IgG1 antibodies, as well as IgE antibodies, were assayed longitudinally. We also isolated different T cell populations from immunized mice and adoptively transferred them into naïve mice followed by CryJ1/CryJ2 protein boosts. We demonstrated that CryJ-LAMP immunized mice produce high levels of IFN-γ and anti-CryJ1 or anti-CryJ2 IgG2a antibodies and low levels of IgE antibodies, suggesting that a Th1 response was induced. In addition, we found that CD4(+) T cells are the immunological effectors of DNA vaccination in this allergy model. Together, our results suggest the CryJ-LAMP Vaccine has a potential as an effective therapeutic for JRC induced allergy by skewing Th1/Th2 responses. PMID:27239481

  13. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... No. 04-4840 Back to Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page See a list of all NINDS Disorders Publicaciones en Español Meningitis y Encefalitis Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  14. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Image of Culiseta melanura mosquito, photo taken by Jason Williams, reproduced by permission from the Virginia Mosquito Control Association. Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is ...

  15. Outcome after childhood encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Rantala, H; Uhari, M; Uhari, M; Saukkonen, A; Sorri, M

    1991-10-01

    The prognosis for 73 children treated for encephalitis between 1973 and 1983 was evaluated. 70 children participated in a follow-up examination 2.4 to 12.9 years after the acute phase of the disease. The 61 school-aged children had lower performance and full-scale IQs than their randomly selected, age- and sex-matched controls. Visual acuity was more often reduced, and they more often had focal slowing on EEG and electronystagmogram abnormalities. Clinically, these differences were not significant. Encephalitis with a poor prognosis occurred seldom, the incidence being 3.5 cases per one million children at risk annually. These results show that the prognosis for childhood encephalitis is much better than anticipated on the basis of experience mainly with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. PMID:1743408

  16. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  17. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  18. Auto-immune encephalitis as differential diagnosis of infectious encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the main types of autoimmune encephalitis with special emphasis on those associated with antibodies against neuronal cell surface or synaptic proteins, and the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Recent findings There is a continuous expansion of the number of cell surface or synaptic proteins that are targets of autoimmunity. The most recently identified include the mGluR5, DPPX, and the GABAAR. In these and previously known autoimmune encephalitis (NMDAR, AMPAR, GABABR, LGI1, CASPR2), the prodromal symptoms or types of presentations often suggest a viral encephalitis. We review here clues that help in the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Moreover, recent investigations indicate that viral encephalitis (e.g., herpes simplex) can trigger synaptic autoimmunity. In all these disorders immunotherapy is usually effective. Summary Autoimmune encephalitis comprises an expanding group of potentially treatable disorders that should be included in the differential diagnosis of any type of encephalitis. PMID:24792345

  19. Protection against morbillivirus-induced encephalitis by immunization with a rationally designed synthetic peptide vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, O E; Partidos, C D; Howard, C R; Steward, M W

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing T- and B-cell epitopes from the fusion (F) protein of measles virus (MV) were tested for their ability to induce a protective immune response against intracerebral challenge with neuroadapted strains of MV and canine distemper virus (CDV) in mice. Of the panel of peptides tested, only a chimeric peptide consisting of two copies of a promiscuous T-cell epitope (representing residues 288 to 302 of MV F protein) synthesized at the amino terminus of a B-cell epitope (representing residues 404 to 414 of MV F protein) was able to induce a protective response against challenge with MV and CDV in inbred mice. The protective response induced by this peptide (TTB) was associated with a significant reduction in mortality, histological absence of acute encephalitis, and greatly reduced titers of virus in the brains of TTB-immune mice following challenge compared with the results for nonimmunized controls. A chimeric peptide comprising one copy of the T-cell epitope and one copy of the B-cell epitope (TB) did not induce a protective response. A comparison of the antibody responses induced by the two chimeras suggested that differences in protective efficacy following immunization may be a result of the higher affinity of the antibody induced by the TTB peptide than that of the antibody induced by the TB peptide. In addition, differences in the immunoglobulin G subclass of the antipeptide antibody responses were observed, and these may play a role in the differences in protection observed. These results indicate that appropriately designed synthetic peptides have potential as vaccines for the induction of cross-reactive protection against morbilliviruses. PMID:7531779

  20. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  1. ChimeriVax-West Nile Virus Live-Attenuated Vaccine: Preclinical Evaluation of Safety, Immunogenicity, and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Juan; Miller, Chuck; Catalan, John; Myers, Gwendolyn A.; Ratterree, Marion S.; Trent, Dennis W.; Monath, Thomas P.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of ChimeriVax vaccine technology for delivery of flavivirus protective antigens at the time West Nile (WN) virus was first detected in North America in 1999 contributed to the rapid development of the vaccine candidate against WN virus described here. ChimeriVax-Japanese encephalitis (JE), the first live- attenuated vaccine developed with this technology has successfully undergone phase I and II clinical trials. The ChimeriVax technology utilizes yellow fever virus (YF) 17D vaccine strain capsid and nonstructural genes to deliver the envelope gene of other flaviviruses as live-attenuated chimeric viruses. Amino acid sequence homology between the envelope protein (E) of JE and WN viruses facilitated targeting attenuating mutation sites to develop the WN vaccine. Here we discuss preclinical studies with the ChimeriVax-WN virus in mice and macaques. ChimeriVax-WN virus vaccine is less neurovirulent than the commercial YF 17D vaccine in mice and nonhuman primates. Attenuation of the virus is determined by the chimeric nature of the construct containing attenuating mutations in the YF 17D virus backbone and three point mutations introduced to alter residues 107, 316, and 440 in the WN virus E protein gene. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the ChimeriVax-WN02 vaccine in the macaque model indicate the vaccine candidate is expected to be safe and immunogenic for humans. PMID:15507637

  2. Spectrum of movement disorders in encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J

    2010-12-01

    To study the frequency and type of movement disorders and correlate these with MRI findings and outcome. Consecutive patients having encephalitis with movement disorders were included. The encephalitides were categorized into Japanese encephalitis (JE), herpes simplex, dengue, mumps, measles and nonspecific, depending on respective ELISA or CSF PCR. The movement disorders were recorded and severity was graded into mild, moderate, severe and markedly severe. Cranial MRI was done on a 1.5 T scanner acquiring T1, T2 and FLAIR sequence, and the location of MRI changes was noted. Outcome was defined at 6 months on the basis of functional status into complete, partial or poor. The type and severity of movement disorders and their relation to outcome was evaluated. Seventy-four out of 209 encephalitis patients had movement disorders; 67.6% of the patients had JE, 51.2% nonspecific and 11.3% dengue encephalitis. Their median age was 19 years and 16 were females. Parkinsonian features were present in 36, dystonia in six and both in 32 patients. The severity of movement disorders ranged between 2 and 4 (scale: none = 0, mild = 1, moderate = 2, severe = 3, markedly severe = 4). Movement disorders were common in males (P = 0.0001), and more frequent in JE (P = 0.03) and those having substantia nigra involvement on MRI (P = 0.03). Dystonia was associated with worse outcome than parkinsonian features only (P = 0.01). Movement disorders are common and severe in JE and are related to typical anatomical involvement. PMID:20640577

  3. The Effect of Guidance regarding Home Exercise and ADL on Adolescent Females Suffering from Adverse Effects after HPV Vaccination in Japanese Multidisciplinary Pain Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ushida, Takahiro; Shibata, Masahiko; Kitahara, Masaki; Yabuki, Shoji; Sumitani, Masahiko; Murakami, Takanori; Iseki, Masako; Hosoi, Masako; Shiokawa, Hiroaki; Tetsunaga, Tomoko; Nishie, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Sei; Kawasaki, Motohiro; Inoue, Sinsuke; Nishihara, Makoto; Aono, Shuichi; Ikemoto, Tatunori; Kawai, Takashi; Arai, Young-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Two prophylactic papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been available for primary prevention of cervical cancer. Although serious adverse effects (AE) were rare, more than 230 women have been suffering from severe AEs such as persistent pain and headache in Japan. Our research group started to treat adolescent females suffering from the AEs. Objective. To survey the characteristics of and the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy on adolescent female suffering from the AEs in Japanese multidisciplinary pain centers. Methods. One hundred and forty-five patients suffering from the AEs were reviewed retrospectively and 105 patients of them were provided guidance on home exercise and activities of daily living based partially on a cognitive-behavioral approach. The intensity of pain was rated by the patients using a numerical rating scale (NRS). Furthermore, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) were used. Results. Eighty out of the 105 patients who received the guidance were followed up, 10 displayed a marked improvement, and 43 showed some improvement. Conclusions. Guidance on home exercise and activities of daily living based on a cognitive-behavioral approach alleviated the AEs that women suffered from after HPV vaccination in Japan.

  4. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis following Vaccination against Hepatitis B in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jun-Liang; Wang, Shuang-Kun; Guo, Xiao-Juan; Hu, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which has been associated with several vaccines such as rabies, diphtheria-tetanus-polio, smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, Japanese B encephalitis, pertussis, influenza, and the Hog vaccine. Here, we presented a case of 12-year-old child who suffered from ADEM three weeks after hepatitis B vaccination. He was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of weakness of limbs, high fever, and alteration of consciousness. Some abnormalities were also found in CSF. Treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin had significant effect, with marked improvement of the clinical symptoms and the results of CSF. The findings of MRI also detected some abnormal lesions located in both brain and spinal cord. The clinical features, the findings of CSF and MRI, and therapeutic effect may contribute to such diagnosis of ADEM. PMID:27478662

  5. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis following Vaccination against Hepatitis B in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jun-liang; Wang, Shuang-kun; Guo, Xiao-juan

    2016-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which has been associated with several vaccines such as rabies, diphtheria-tetanus-polio, smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, Japanese B encephalitis, pertussis, influenza, and the Hog vaccine. Here, we presented a case of 12-year-old child who suffered from ADEM three weeks after hepatitis B vaccination. He was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of weakness of limbs, high fever, and alteration of consciousness. Some abnormalities were also found in CSF. Treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin had significant effect, with marked improvement of the clinical symptoms and the results of CSF. The findings of MRI also detected some abnormal lesions located in both brain and spinal cord. The clinical features, the findings of CSF and MRI, and therapeutic effect may contribute to such diagnosis of ADEM. PMID:27478662

  6. Specificities of human CD4+ T cell responses to an inactivated flavivirus vaccine and infection: correlation with structure and epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Julia; Aberle, Judith H; Stiasny, Karin; Knapp, Bernhard; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Fae, Ingrid; Fischer, Gottfried; Scheinost, Ondrej; Chmelik, Vaclav; Heinz, Franz X

    2014-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Central and Eastern Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to the mosquito-borne yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and West Nile viruses, and vaccination with an inactivated whole-virus vaccine can effectively prevent clinical disease. Neutralizing antibodies are directed to the viral envelope protein (E) and an accepted correlate of immunity. However, data on the specificities of CD4(+) T cells that recognize epitopes in the viral structural proteins and thus can provide direct help to the B cells producing E-specific antibodies are lacking. We therefore conducted a study on the CD4(+) T cell response against the virion proteins in vaccinated people in comparison to TBE patients. The data obtained with overlapping peptides in interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assays were analyzed in relation to the three-dimensional structures of the capsid (C) and E proteins as well as to epitope predictions based on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II peptide affinities. In the C protein, peptides corresponding to two out of four alpha helices dominated the response in both vaccinees and patients, whereas in the E protein concordance of immunodominance was restricted to peptides of a single domain (domain III). Epitope predictions were much better for C than for E and were especially erroneous for the transmembrane regions. Our data provide evidence for a strong impact of protein structural features that influence peptide processing, contributing to the discrepancies observed between experimentally determined and computer-predicted CD4(+) T cell epitopes. Importance: Tick-borne encephalitis virus is endemic in large parts of Europe and Asia and causes more than 10,000 annual cases of neurological disease in humans. It is closely related to yellow fever, dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis associated with consumption of raw goat milk, Slovenia, 2012.

    PubMed

    Hudopisk, Neda; Korva, Miša; Janet, Evgen; Simetinger, Marjana; Grgič-Vitek, Marta; Gubenšek, Jakob; Natek, Vladimir; Kraigher, Alenka; Strle, Franc; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2013-05-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) developed in 3 persons in Slovenia who drank raw milk; a fourth person, who had been vaccinated against TBE, remained healthy. TBE virus RNA was detected in serum and milk of the source goat. Persons in TBE-endemic areas should be encouraged to drink only boiled/pasteurized milk and to be vaccinated. PMID:23697658

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 2 Japanese Reference and Vaccine Strain KZ-91CP

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Asuka; Kameyama, Ken-ichiro; Tateishi, Kentaro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Todaka, Reiko; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 Japanese reference strain KZ-91CP. The complete genome comprises 12,654 nucleotides and one open reading frame with 4,020 amino acids. A 369-nucleotide-long insertion encoding the chaperone protein DnaJ is found in the nonstructural 2 (NS2) coding region. PMID:25676770

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 2 Japanese Reference and Vaccine Strain KZ-91CP.

    PubMed

    Sato, Asuka; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Nagai, Makoto; Tateishi, Kentaro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Todaka, Reiko; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 Japanese reference strain KZ-91CP. The complete genome comprises 12,654 nucleotides and one open reading frame with 4,020 amino acids. A 369-nucleotide-long insertion encoding the chaperone protein DnaJ is found in the nonstructural 2 (NS2) coding region. PMID:25676770

  10. Infection and transmission of live recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccines in Rock Pigeons, European House Sparrows, and Japanese Quail

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In China and Mexico, engineered recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) strains are used as live vaccines for the control of Newcastle disease and as vectors to express the avian influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene to control avian influenza in poultry. In this study, non-target species wer...

  11. The vaccine data link in Nha Trang, Vietnam: a progress report on the implementation of a database to detect adverse events related to vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; Canh, Do Gia; Clemens, John D; Park, Jin-Kyung; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Thiem, Vu Dinh; Tho, Le Huu; Trach, Dang Duc

    2003-04-01

    Real, perceived and unknown adverse events secondary to vaccinations are a source of concern for care providers of children. In the USA large linked databases have provided helpful information regarding the safety of vaccines. Very little prospectively collected data on vaccine safety is available from resource poor countries, but safety concerns may be even more relevant in such settings. Vaccine manufacturers do not have to pass the same rigorous safety standards as vaccine manufacturers in rich countries. Vaccines, which protect against cholera, Japanese encephalitis, rabies or typhoid fever are predominantly used in resource poor, tropical countries and frequently do not undergo vigorous post marketing surveillance. New vaccines specifically suited for resource poor countries are sometimes marketed without the scrutiny of vigilant, independent regulatory authorities. We describe here the design and implementation of a large linked database for a semi-rural province in central Vietnam. The design overcomes several problems inherent in data bases of medical events and vaccinations in developing countries. Assigning a permanent identification (ID) number to each resident avoids the ambiguities of ID numbers based on the address. The distribution and use of medical identification cards with a permanent ID number assists in the unambiguous identification of vaccinees and patients. Medical records of all admissions are coded according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) and transcribed into a computer system. Because these processes are novel the data collected by the study will be validated. Project staff will check records on vaccinations and hospital admissions through household visits at regular intervals. Data describing vaccinations and medical events are linked to the data collected by the project staff in a computer system. Based on the validation of the data we hope to optimize this model. Once we find the model working it is planned export

  12. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  13. Raccoon roundworm encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Murray, William J; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2004-11-15

    The raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, is increasingly recognized as a cause of zoonotic visceral, ocular, and neural larva migrans and, in particular, of devastating encephalitis in young children. Exposure occurs mainly at raccoon latrines, where large numbers of infective eggs may be accidentally ingested. Risk factors for infection include contact with raccoon latrines, pica/geophagia, age of <4 years, and male sex. The severity of central nervous system (CNS) disease depends on the number of eggs ingested, the extent and location of larval migration, and the severity of ensuing inflammation and necrosis. Diagnosis of Baylisascaris encephalitis is based on clinical CNS disease, peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia, deep white matter lesions visible by magnetic resonance imaging, and positive results of serologic tests. Treatment efficacy in clinical cases is poor, but albendazole prevents disease if given promptly after infection. Considering the seriousness of this disease and limitations of diagnosis and treatment, prevention of infection with eggs is of utmost importance. PMID:15546085

  14. Nipah encephalitis - an update.

    PubMed

    Sherrini, B A; Chong, T T

    2014-08-01

    Between September 1998 to May 1999, Malaysia and Singapore were hit by an outbreak of fatal encephalitis caused by a novel virus from the paramyxovirus family. This virus was subsequently named as Nipah virus, after the Sungei Nipah village in Negeri Sembilan, where the virus was first isolated. The means of transmission was thought to be from bats-topigs and subsequently pigs-to-human. Since 2001, almost yearly outbreak of Nipah encephalitis has been reported from Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. These outbreaks were characterized by direct bats-to-human, and human-to-human spread of infection. Nipah virus shares many similar characteristics to Hendra virus, first isolated in an outbreak of respiratory illness involving horses in Australia in 1994. Because of their homology, a new genus called Henipavirus (Hendra + Nipah) was introduced. Henipavirus infection is a human disease manifesting most often as acute encephalitis (which may be relapsing or late-onset) or pneumonia, with a high mortality rate. Pteropus bats act as reservoir for the virus, which subsequently lead to human spread. Transmission may be from consumption of food contaminated by bats secretion, contact with infected animals, or human-to-human spread. With wide geographical distribution of Pteropus bats, Henipavirus infection has become an important emerging human infection with worldwide implication. PMID:25417957

  15. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  16. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  17. Japanese; Japanese Songs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This supplementary textbook for students of Japanese presents a collection of 43 songs--folk songs, nursery songs, lullabies, love songs, wedding songs, graduation songs, the national anthem, drinking songs, school songs, and Christmas carols. With the exception of the carols, the musical scores are presented with their Japanese lyrics. The…

  18. The impact of new vaccine introduction on immunization and health systems: A review of the published literature

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Terri B.; Dentz, Holly; Wang, Susan A.; Burchett, Helen E.; Mounier-Jack, Sandra; Mantel, Carsten F.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to examine the impact of new vaccine introduction on countries’ immunization and broader health systems. Six publication databases were searched using 104 vaccine and health system-related search terms. The search yielded 15,795 unique articles dating from December 31, 1911 to September 29, 2010. Based on review of the title and abstract, 654 (4%) of these articles were found to be potentially relevant and were referred for full review. After full review, 130 articles were found to be relevant and included in the analysis. These articles represented vaccines introduced to protect against 10 different diseases (hepatitis A, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b disease, human papilloma virus infection, influenza, Japanese encephalitis, meningococcal meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae disease, rotavirus diarrhea and typhoid), in various formulations and combinations. Most reviewed articles (97 [75%]) reported experiences in high-income countries. New vaccine introduction was most efficient when the vaccine was introduced into an existing delivery platform and when introduced in combination with a vaccine already in the routine childhood immunization schedule (i.e., as a combination vaccine). New vaccine introduction did not impact coverage of vaccines already included in the routine childhood immunization schedule. The need for increased cold chain capacity was frequently reported. New vaccines facilitated the introduction and widespread use of auto-disable syringes into the immunization and the broader health systems. The importance of training and education for health care workers and social mobilization was frequently noted. There was evidence in high-income countries that new vaccine introduction was associated with reduced health-care costs. Future evaluations of new vaccine introductions should include the systematic and objective assessment of the impacts on a country’s immunization system

  19. Enveloped virus-like particles as vaccines against pathogenic arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Pijlman, Gorben P

    2015-05-01

    Arthropod-borne arboviruses form a continuous threat to human and animal health, but few arboviral vaccines are currently available. Advances in expression technology for complex, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) create new opportunities to develop potent vaccines against pathogenic arboviruses. In this short review, I highlight the successes and challenges in eVLP production for members of the three major arbovirus families: Flaviviridae (e.g., dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis); Bunyaviridae (e.g., Rift Valley fever); and Togaviridae (e.g., chikungunya). The results from pre-clinical testing will be discussed as well as specific constraints to the large-scale manufacture and purification of eVLPs, which are complex assemblies of membranes and viral glycoproteins. Insect cells emerge as ideal substrates for correct arboviral glycoprotein folding and posttranslational modification to yield high quality eVLPs. Furthermore, baculovirus expression in insect cell culture is scalable and has a proven safety record in industrial human and veterinary vaccine manufacturing. In conclusion, eVLPs produced in insect cells using modern biotechnology have a realistic potential to be used in novel vaccines against arboviral diseases. PMID:25692281

  20. Live virus vaccines based on a yellow fever vaccine backbone: standardized template with key considerations for a risk/benefit assessment.

    PubMed

    Monath, Thomas P; Seligman, Stephen J; Robertson, James S; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B; Condit, Richard C; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called "chimeric virus vaccines"). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus, Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were exchanged for the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  1. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  2. [Vaccination therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi

    2009-11-01

    Since AN-1792 vaccine induced autoimmune encephalitis, several pharmaceutical companies are now concentrated in developing antibody therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Each antibody has own characteristics. Thus, it is unpredictable at present which antibody is the most beneficial until we see the result of clinical trials. If disease modifying antibodies were found, they will be widely used for treatment of AD in near future. As a candidate of such antibodies, we have developed TAPIR-like antibody with much higher affinity to Abeta42 than Abeta40, and it effectively deleted senile plaque amyloid and Abeta oligomers without increasing microhemorrhages. Although passive immunization can avoid autoimmune encephalitis, it is expensive and it is not suitable for prevention. Thus, safe vaccines by active immunization would be better. Vaccines that induce Th2 type immune responses such as oral vaccine or per-nasal vaccine would be promising. PMID:20030228

  3. Vaccination for safe travel to India.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bharti; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Kumar, Vijay; Singh Choudhary, Satvinder

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide more than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year. India is one of the favorite tourist destinations around the world. International travel exposes travelers to a range of health risks. Traveling to India possess a threat to travelers with waterborne diseases like bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever; vector borne diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, and malaria; animal contact disease like rabies. Furthermore diseases spreading through behavior aspects cannot be ruled out hence posing a risk for hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C as well. Hence, before travel the travelers are advised about the risk of disease in the country or countries they plan to visit and the steps to be taken to prevent illness. Vaccination offers the possibility of avoiding a number of infectious diseases that may be countered abroad. There is no single vaccination schedule that fits all travelers. Each schedule must be individualized according to the traveler's previous immunizations, countries to be visited, type and duration of travel, and the amount of time available before departure. PMID:24284411

  4. Vaccination for safe travel to India

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Choudhary, Satvinder

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide more than 900 million international journeys are undertaken every year. India is one of the favorite tourist destinations around the world. International travel exposes travelers to a range of health risks. Traveling to India possess a threat to travelers with waterborne diseases like bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A and E, and typhoid fever; vector borne diseases like dengue fever, Japanese encephalitis, and malaria; animal contact disease like rabies. Furthermore diseases spreading through behavior aspects cannot be ruled out hence posing a risk for hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C as well. Hence, before travel the travelers are advised about the risk of disease in the country or countries they plan to visit and the steps to be taken to prevent illness. Vaccination offers the possibility of avoiding a number of infectious diseases that may be countered abroad. There is no single vaccination schedule that fits all travelers. Each schedule must be individualized according to the traveler’s previous immunizations, countries to be visited, type and duration of travel, and the amount of time available before departure. PMID:24284411

  5. No Evidence of Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Viruses in Live Attenuated Human Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Zheng, HaoQiang; Simmons, Graham; Zhou, Yanchen; Tang, Shaohua; Shankar, Anupama; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric L.; Heneine, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Background The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents. Results All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) (SA-14-14-2), varicella (Varivax), measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II), measles (Attenuvax), rubella (Meruvax-II), rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix), and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells. Conclusions We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans. PMID:22216219

  6. Live Virus Vaccines Based on a Yellow Fever Vaccine Backbone: Standardized Template with Key Considerations for a Risk/Benefit Assessment*

    PubMed Central

    Monath, Thomas P.; Seligman, Stephen J.; Robertson, James S.; Guy, Bruno; Hayes, Edward B.; Condit, Richard C.; Excler, Jean Louis; Mac, Lisa Marie; Carbery, Baevin; Chen, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    The Brighton Collaboration Viral Vector Vaccines Safety Working Group (V3SWG) was formed to evaluate the safety of live, recombinant viral vaccines incorporating genes from heterologous viruses inserted into the backbone of another virus (so-called “chimeric virus vaccines”). Many viral vector vaccines are in advanced clinical trials. The first such vaccine to be approved for marketing (to date in Australia, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines) is a vaccine against the flavivirus Japanese encephalitis (JE), which employs a licensed vaccine (yellow fever 17D) as a vector. In this vaccine, two envelope proteins (prM-E) of YF 17D virus were replaced by the corresponding genes of JE virus, with additional attenuating mutations incorporated into the JE gene inserts. Similar vaccines have been constructed by inserting prM-E genes of dengue and West Nile into YF 17D virus and are in late stage clinical studies. The dengue vaccine is, however, more complex in that it requires a mixture of four live vectors each expressing one of the four dengue serotypes. This vaccine has been evaluated in multiple clinical trials. No significant safety concerns have been found. The Phase 3 trials met their endpoints in terms of overall reduction of confirmed dengue fever, and, most importantly a significant reduction in severe dengue and hospitalization due to dengue. However, based on results that have been published so far, efficacy in preventing serotype 2 infection is less than that for the other three serotypes. In the development of these chimeric vaccines, an important series of comparative studies of safety and efficacy were made using the parental YF 17D vaccine virus as a benchmark. In this paper, we use a standardized template describing the key characteristics of the novel flavivirus vaccine vectors, in comparison to the parental YF 17D vaccine. The template facilitates scientific discourse among key stakeholders by increasing the transparency and comparability of

  7. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  8. Systematic review of economic evaluations of vaccination programs in mainland China: Are they sufficient to inform decision making?

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-Fei; Griffiths, Ulla K; Pennington, Mark; Yu, Hongjie; Jit, Mark

    2015-11-17

    The purpose of the study was to systematically review economic evaluations of vaccine programs conducted in mainland China. We searched for economic evaluations of vaccination in China published prior to August 3, 2015 in eight English-language and three Chinese-language databases. Each article was appraised against the 19-item Consensus on Health Economic Criteria list (CHEC-list). We found 23 papers evaluating vaccines against hepatitis B (8 articles), Streptococcus pneumoniae (5 articles), human papillomavirus (3 articles), Japanese encephalitis (2 articles), rotavirus (2 articles), hepatitis A (1 article), Enterovirus 71 (1 article) and influenza (1 article). Studies conformed to a mean of 12 (range: 6-18) items in the CHEC-list criteria. Five of six Chinese-language articles conformed to fewer than half of the 19 criteria items. The main criteria that studies failed to conform to included: inappropriate measurement (20 articles) and valuation (18 articles) of treatment and/or vaccination costs, no discussion about distributional implications (18 articles), missing major health outcomes (14 articles), no discussion about generalizability to other contexts (14 articles), and inadequate sensitivity analysis (13 articles). In addition, ten studies did not include major cost components of vaccination programs, and nine did not report outcomes in terms of life years even in cases where QALYs or DALYs were calculated. Only 13 studies adopted a societal perspective for analysis. All studies concluded that the appraised vaccination programs were cost-effective except for one evaluation of universal 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) in children. However, three of the five studies on PCV-7 showed poor overall quality, and the number of studies on vaccines other than hepatitis B vaccine and PCV-7 was limited. In conclusion, major methodological flaws and reporting problems exist in current economic evaluations of vaccination programs in China. Local

  9. Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    May, Fiona J.; Li, Li; Zhang, Shuliu; Guzman, Hilda; Beasley, David W. C.; Tesh, Robert B.; Higgs, Stephen; Raj, Pushker; Bueno, Rudy; Randle, Yvonne; Chandler, Laura; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2008-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has been regularly isolated throughout the Americas since 1933. Previous phylogenetic studies involving 62 isolates have defined seven major lineages (I–VII), further divided into 14 clades. In this study, 28 strains isolated in Texas in 1991 and 2001–2003, and three older, previously unsequenced strains from Jamaica and California were sequenced over the envelope protein gene. The inclusion of these new sequences, and others published since 2001, has allowed better delineation of the previously published SLEV lineages, in particular the clades of lineage II. Phylogenetic analysis of 106 isolates identified 13 clades. All 1991 and 2001–2003 isolates from Nueces, Jefferson and Harris Counties (Texas Gulf Coast) group in clade IIB with other isolates from these counties isolated during the 1980s and 1990s. This lack of evidence for introduction of novel strains into the Texas Gulf Coast over a long period of time is consistent with overwintering of SLEV in this region. Two El Paso isolates, both from 2002, group in clade VA with recent Californian isolates from 1998–2001 and some South American strains with a broad temporal range. Overall, these data are consistent with multiple introductions of SLEV from South America into North America, and provide support for the hypothesis that in most situations, SLEV circulates within a locality, with occasional incursions from other areas. Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid). PMID:18632961

  10. [Tick-borne encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, R

    2016-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most important viral infections of the human central nervous system. Approximately 10,000 cases of TBE are referred to hospitals in Europe and Asia each year. The TBE virus (TBEV) is mainly transmitted by tick bites but also occasionally by unpasteurized goat's milk. As in endemic areas on average only 1-3 % of ticks are infected with the TBEV and the clinical manifestation rate is approximately 33 %, only approximately 1 in every 100-300 tick bites leads to disease. The incubation period varies from 5-28 days and typically has a biphasic course of fever. The TBE manifests as meningitis in approximately 50 % of patients, as meningoencephalitis in 40 % and as encephalomyelitis in 10 %. The suspected diagnosis is confirmed by the demonstration of TBEV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies in serum and the presence of elevated cell counts in cerebrospinal fluid. No specific treatment for TBE is known but it can be successfully prevented by active immunization. PMID:27225401

  11. Infectious Causes of Encephalitis and Meningoencephalitis in Thailand, 2003–2005

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Angela P.; Supawat, Krongkaew; Liamsuwan, Sahas; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Laptikulthum, Somsak; Viriyavejakul, Akravudh; Tantirittisak, Tasanee; Tunlayadechanont, Supoch; Visudtibhan, Anannit; Vasiknanonte, Punnee; Janjindamai, Supachai; Boonluksiri, Pairoj; Rajborirug, Kiatsak; Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Khetsuriani, Nino; Dowell, Scott F.

    2015-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is a severe neurologic syndrome. Determining etiology from among ≈100 possible agents is difficult. To identify infectious etiologies of encephalitis in Thailand, we conducted surveillance in 7 hospitals during July 2003–August 2005 and selected patients with acute onset of brain dysfunction with fever or hypothermia and with abnormalities seen on neuroimages or electroencephalograms or with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were tested for >30 pathogens. Among 149 case-patients, median age was 12 (range 0–83) years, 84 (56%) were male, and 15 (10%) died. Etiology was confirmed or probable for 54 (36%) and possible or unknown for 95 (64%). Among confirmed or probable etiologies, the leading pathogens were Japanese encephalitis virus, enteroviruses, and Orientia tsutsugamushi. No samples were positive for chikungunya, Nipah, or West Nile viruses; Bartonella henselae; or malaria parasites. Although a broad range of infectious agents was identified, the etiology of most cases remains unknown. PMID:25627940

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis: A review of epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management

    PubMed Central

    Bogovic, Petra; Strle, Franc

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis is an infection of central nervous system caused by tick-borne encephalitis virus transmitted to humans predominantly by tick bites. During the last few decades the incidence of the disease has been increasing and poses a growing health problem in almost all endemic European and Asian countries. Most cases occur during the highest period of tick activity, in Central Europe mainly from April to November. Tick-borne encephalitis is more common in adults than in children. Clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from mild meningitis to severe meningoencephalitis with or without paralysis. Rare clinical manifestations are an abortive form of the disease and a chronic progressive form. A post-encephalitic syndrome, causing long-lasting morbidity that often affects the quality of life develops in up to 50% of patients after acute tick-borne encephalitis. Clinical course and outcome vary by subtype of tick-borne encephalitis virus (the disease caused by the European subtype has milder course and better outcome than the disease caused by Siberian and Far-Easter subtypes), age of patients (increasing age is associated with less favorable outcome), and host genetic factors. Since clinical features and laboratory results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid are nonspecific, the diagnosis must be confirmed by microbiologic findings. The routine laboratory confirmation of the tick-borne encephalitis virus infection is based mainly on the detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies in serum (and cerebrospinal fluid), usually by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There is no specific antiviral treatment for tick-borne encephalitis. Vaccination can effectively prevent the disease and is indicated for persons living in or visiting tick-borne encephalitis endemic areas. PMID:25984517

  13. Things Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shigeta, Jessie M.

    Presented in this booklet are brief descriptions of items and activities that are symbolic of Japanese culture. Some of the items and activities described include Japanese musical instruments and records, toys and crafts, traditional clothing and accessories, and food utensils. Several recipes for Japanese dishes are provided. Lists of pertinent…

  14. Japanese language and Japanese science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Kiyotaka

    2003-08-01

    Japanese mathematical scientists including astronomers, physicists, and mathematicians obtain ideas in Japanese, discuss their problems in Japanese, and arrive at conclusions in Japanese, and yet they write their results in foreign languages such as English. This uncomfortable situation has continued for nearly one hundred years and has had serious effects on Japanese science. In this short report, the author discusses and analyses these effects. In order to put Japanese science on a sound basis, the author proposes to increase the number of articles, reviews and textbooks in Japanese, first by translation and second by the voluntary efforts of scientists themselves. As centers devoted to this activity, the author proposes to construct "Airborne Libraries" which are maintained and accumulate in an electronic form the scientific documents written in Japanese.

  15. Efficacy of eastern encephalitis immunization in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Turell, M.J.; Pagac, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    An epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC), Laurel, Maryland (USA), in 1989 provided an opportunity to determine if EEE immunization protected whooping cranes (Grus americana). Based on seroconversion of 31 % of sympatric hatch-year sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, and a previous 35% case fatality rate in whooping cranes, 17 (37%) of the 46 susceptible whooping cranes should have been exposed to virus and six should have died. As there were no deaths in these birds, the EEE vaccination program appeared to be efficacious in this whooping crane population.

  16. Diagnosis and management of acute encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arun; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Encephalitis results in considerable morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. Neurologists are often consulted or directly care for patients with encephalitis admitted to the hospital and must be able to discriminate between encephalitis and the many conditions that mimic it. Moreover, neurologists must be familiar with the myriad causes of encephalitis in order to develop a practical approach to diagnostic testing and treatment. An understanding of recent advances in management, particularly with respect to autoimmune etiologies and critical care approaches, is equally important. Here, we summarize a general approach to the care of adult patients with encephalitis. PMID:25110619

  17. [Autoimmune Associated Encephalitis and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies against various neural surface antigens induce cognitive impairments. Anti-VGKC (voltage gated potassium channel) complex antibodies are well known as one of the causative autoantibodies. An anti-VGKC antibody was identified as the autoantibody in acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), which causes muscle cramps and difficulty in opening the palm of the hands. However, this antibody also tests positive in autoimmune limbic encephalitis, which has a subacute progress and causes poor memory or epilepsy attacks. Typical cases have a distinctive adult-onset, frequent, brief dystonic seizure semiology that predominantly affects the arms and ipsilateral face. It has now been termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures. In recent years, the true target antigens of the anti-VGKC antibody of this VGKC limbic encephalitis have been recognized as leucine rich glioma inactivated protein (LGI)-1 and others. These antibodies to amnesia-related LGI-1 in limbic encephalitis neutralize the LGI-1-ADAM22 (an anchor protein) interaction and reduce synaptic AMPA receptors. There have been reports of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC complex antibodies mimicking Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Less than 2% of the patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD) develop serum anti-VGKC complex antibodies and, when positive, only at low titres. Low titres of these antibodies occur only rarely in suspected patients with sCJD, and when present, should be interpreted with caution. PMID:27056852

  18. Atypical Cogan's syndrome mimicking encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lepur, Dragan; Vranjican, Zoran; Himbele, Josip; Barsić, Bruno; Klinar, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune multisystem disease. The main clinical features of typical Cogan's syndrome are vestibuloauditory dysfunction and interstitial keratitis. The authors present a case of atypical Cogan's syndrome with headache, fever, deafness, trigeminal neuralgia and electroencephalographic abnormality which mimicked viral encephalitis. PMID:15307593

  19. [Update on Herpes Simplex Encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), which is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV), is a severe neuro-infectious disease characterized by high mortality and morbidity. We reviewed the pathomechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of HSE based on recent progress in the field. The highlighted mechanism of HSE in this review is immune-mediated tissue damage caused by host immunity. Major symptoms of HSE include psychiatric alteration, Klüver-Bucy syndrome, and amnesia, caused by frequent involvement of the limbic system. An important differential diagnosis of HSE is autoimmune limbic encephalitis, including anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis, and anti-voltage-gated K+ channel encephalitis. HSE is definitely diagnosed based on the detection of HSV-DNA by polymerase chain reaction and/or the detection of HSV-IgG antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Repeated CSF examinations are required for the accurate diagnosis of HSE. Acyclovir (ACV) plays a central role in the treatment of HSE, and its early initiation is essential for good outcome in patients with HSE. Acute administration of corticosteroids for HSE is controversial; a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of add-on corticosteroids to ACV is ongoing. PMID:26160820

  20. Andhra Pradesh builds a model immunization system Indian state protects millions and shows what new vaccines and technologies can do.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Andhra Pradesh has built a model immunization program over the last few years. Main accomplishments include the state's adoption of hepatitis B for all its newborns and now, for the first time, the Indian government is offering universal coverage of all Indian infants with Hepatitis B vaccine. The AP government, working in partnership with PATH, an international, nonprofit organization based out of Seattle, Washington, USA, has made a series of improvements to the health system. The partnership fostered widespread adoption of safe injection practices and technologies, and improved immunization systems through responsive, supportive management. Japanese encephalitis (JE) control was greatly enhanced through the AP government partnership with PATH, resulting in a 90 percent reduction in cases of JE within the first year of joint efforts. PMID:15709588

  1. Post-vaccination MDEM associated with MOG antibody in a subclinical Chlamydia infected boy.

    PubMed

    Azumagawa, Kohji; Nomura, Shohei; Shigeri, Yasushi; Jones, Leslie Sargent; Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Nakashima, Ichiro; Kashiwagi, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Takuya; Shimakawa, Shuichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of post-vaccination acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) has been hypothesized as resulting from vaccination-injected antigens cross-reacting with myelin components, however, a precise etiology has been uncertain. In this report, we describe the case of a 6-year-old Japanese boy who had multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and was positive for both anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies and Chlamydophila pneumoniae antibodies. After vaccinations that were the second one for measles and rubella, and the booster immunization for Japanese encephalitis, the patient presented with fever, headache, vomiting, and a change in personality. He was treated with a high-dose of intravenous methylprednisolone in the diagnosis of ADEM. However, these symptoms recurred with different magnetic resonance imaging lesion, and he was diagnosed as MDEM. Retrospective testing for pathogens revealed C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies, and it was considered that he was infected with C. pneumoniae subclinically. The patient's serum indicated a positive response for the anti-MOG antibody from the onset of the ADEM diagnosis and in all recurrent episodes. Chlamydia species infection has been known to play a role in demyelinating diseases. It is also known that the anti-MOG antibody may be present but not exhibit its pathogenesis in the absence of a cell-mediated inflammatory response; however, the precise mechanism of action of the anti-MOG antibodies is not yet determined. We propose the possibility that post-vaccination demyelinating disease may result from the synergistic effects of a preceding anti-MOG antibody, possibly produced in response to a subclinical Chlamydia species infection. PMID:26922251

  2. Henipavirus Encephalitis: Recent Developments and Advances.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2015-09-01

    The genus Henipavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae includes the Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) which were discovered in the 1990s in Australia and Malaysia, respectively, after emerging to cause severe and often fatal outbreaks in humans and animals. While HeV is confined to Australia, more recent NiV outbreaks have been reported in Bangladesh, India and the Philippines. The clinical manifestations of both henipaviruses in humans appear similar, with a predominance of an acute encephalitic syndrome. Likewise, the pathological features are similar and characterized by disseminated, multi-organ vasculopathy comprising endothelial infection/ulceration, vasculitis, vasculitis-induced thrombosis/occlusion, parenchymal ischemia/microinfarction, and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system (CNS), lung, kidney and other major organs. This unique dual pathogenetic mechanism of vasculitis-induced microinfarction and neuronal infection causes severe tissue damage in the CNS. Both viruses can also cause relapsing encephalitis months and years after the acute infection. Many animal models studied to date have largely confirmed the pathology of henipavirus infection, and provided the means to test new therapeutic agents and vaccines. As the bat is the natural host of henipaviruses and has worldwide distribution, spillover events into human populations are expected to occur in the future. PMID:26276024

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulins protects against West Nile virus encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Ramakrishna, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), an important global human pathogen, targets neurons to cause lethal encephalitis, primarily in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Currently, there are no approved therapeutic agents or vaccines to treat WNV encephalitis. Recent studies have suggested that inflammation is a major contributor to WNV encephalitis morbidity. In this study we evaluated the use of IVIG (intravenous immunoglobulins – a clinical product comprising pooled human IgG) as an anti-inflammatory treatment in a model of lethal WNV infection. We report here that IVIG and pooled human WNV convalescent sera (WNV-IVIG) inhibited development of lethal WNV encephalitis by suppressing central nervous system (CNS) infiltration by CD45high leukocytes. Pathogenic Ly6Chigh CD11b+ monocytes were the major infiltrating subset in the CNS of infected control mice, whereas IVIG profoundly reduced infiltration of these pathogenic Ly6Chigh monocytes into the CNS of infected mice. Interestingly, WNV-IVIG was more efficacious than IVIG in controlling CNS inflammation when mice were challenged with a high-dose inoculum (105 versus 104 p.f.u.) of WNV. Importantly, adsorption of WNV E-glycoprotein neutralizing antibodies did not abrogate IVIG protection, consistent with virus neutralization not being essential for IVIG protection. These findings confirmed the potent immunomodulatory activity of generic IVIG, and emphasized its potential as an effective immunotherapeutic drug for encephalitis and other virus induced inflammatory diseases. PMID:25667322

  4. Imaging of cerebritis, encephalitis, and brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Rath, Tanya J; Hughes, Marion; Arabi, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of brain abscess, pyogenic infection, and encephalitis. The role of CT and MRI in the diagnosis and management of pyogenic brain abscess and its complications is reviewed. The imaging appearances of several common and select uncommon infectious encephalitides are reviewed. Common causes of encephalitis in immunocompromised patients, and their imaging appearances, are also discussed. When combined with CSF, serologic studies and patient history, imaging findings can suggest the cause of encephalitis. PMID:23122258

  5. Acute Measles Encephalitis in an Immigrant Syrian Child: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qayoudhi, Abdullah; Al-Kindi, Hanan; Meki, Nabil; Al-Maani, Amal

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of measles vaccination programs and broad coverage worldwide has meant this infection a rare encounter for pediatricians. In Oman, with almost 100% measles vaccination coverage for children, this infection disappeared from the list of fever and rash differential diagnoses. Encephalitis is a well-known complication of measles infection and sometimes can be the only manifestation especially in adults. We report a seven-year-old Syrian immigrant who was admitted to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, with acute encephalitis secondary to wild measles infection. Although she had a classical presentation of measle infection, the diagnosis was missed in the private and regional hospital she attended before getting referred to Royal Hospital. She was later identified to be exposed to an outbreak of the infection in an unvaccinated population. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity of both basal ganglia suggestive of measles encephalitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of measles virus from her urine and blood, and a throat swab. The isolated measles virus was D8 serotype, which was prevalent in Syria around the same time. The child was treated with steroids and vitamin A. She achieved full recovery despite her severe presentation. A high degree of suspicion for measles infection should be maintained in unvaccinated children with a compatible presentation of the infection or its complications. There might be a role for steroid use in cases of acute measles encephalitis. PMID:27168928

  6. Acute Measles Encephalitis in an Immigrant Syrian Child: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Al-Qayoudhi, Abdullah; Al-Kindi, Hanan; Meki, Nabil; Al-Maani, Amal

    2016-03-01

    The introduction of measles vaccination programs and broad coverage worldwide has meant this infection a rare encounter for pediatricians. In Oman, with almost 100% measles vaccination coverage for children, this infection disappeared from the list of fever and rash differential diagnoses. Encephalitis is a well-known complication of measles infection and sometimes can be the only manifestation especially in adults. We report a seven-year-old Syrian immigrant who was admitted to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, with acute encephalitis secondary to wild measles infection. Although she had a classical presentation of measle infection, the diagnosis was missed in the private and regional hospital she attended before getting referred to Royal Hospital. She was later identified to be exposed to an outbreak of the infection in an unvaccinated population. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal intensity of both basal ganglia suggestive of measles encephalitis. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of measles virus from her urine and blood, and a throat swab. The isolated measles virus was D8 serotype, which was prevalent in Syria around the same time. The child was treated with steroids and vitamin A. She achieved full recovery despite her severe presentation. A high degree of suspicion for measles infection should be maintained in unvaccinated children with a compatible presentation of the infection or its complications. There might be a role for steroid use in cases of acute measles encephalitis. PMID:27168928

  7. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition. PMID:27325034

  8. Surveillance for Western Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, and West Nile Viruses Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah S; Ball, Cameron S; Langevin, Stanley A; Fang, Ying; Coffey, Lark L; Meagher, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized public health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance. PMID:26807734

  9. Surveillance for Western equine encephalitis St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile viruses using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meagher, Robert J.; Ball, Cameron Scott; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Wheeler, Sarah S.; Coffey, Lark L.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized publicmore » health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance.« less

  10. Surveillance for Western Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, and West Nile Viruses Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Ball, Cameron S.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Coffey, Lark L.; Meagher, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized public health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance. PMID:26807734

  11. Autoimmune encephalitis and its relation to infection.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun; Benavides, David R

    2015-03-01

    Encephalitis, an inflammatory condition of the brain that results in substantial morbidity and mortality, has numerous causes. Over the past decade, it has become increasingly recognized that autoimmune conditions contribute significantly to the spectrum of encephalitis causes. Clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of autoimmune etiologies are of particular importance due to the need for early institution of immune suppressive therapies to improve outcome. Emerging clinical observations suggest that the most commonly recognized cause of antibody-mediated autoimmune encephalitis, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, may in some cases be triggered by herpes virus infection. Other conditions such as Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) and febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome (FIRES) have also been posited to be autoimmune conditions triggered by infectious agents. This review focuses on emerging concepts in central nervous system autoimmunity and addresses clinical and mechanistic findings linking autoimmune encephalitis and infections. Particular consideration will be given to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and its relation to herpes simplex encephalitis. PMID:25637289

  12. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  13. [Complicated febrile convulsion vs herpes-encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Millner, M

    1993-01-01

    Since Acyclovir is available a sufficient treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis exists. Febrile convulsions may occur as the initial manifestation of an encephalitis, particularly of an HSV encephalitis. Within 25 months out of 151 children with febrile convulsions five children with complicated febrile convulsions were admitted at the pediatric department of Graz. In all children HSV antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were negative and the diagnosis of an HSV encephalitis was made by positive CSF HSV polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, in any suspected case, i.e. in any case of a complicated febrile convulsion, CSF should be investigated including a HSV PCR to rapidly confirm or exclude HSV encephalitis. PMID:8386831

  14. Viral Etiology of Encephalitis in Children in Southern Vietnam: Results of a One-Year Prospective Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Le Van; Qui, Phan Tu; Ha, Do Quang; Hue, Nguyen Bach; Bao, Lam Quoi; Cam, Bach Van; Khanh, Truong Huu; Hien, Tran Tinh; Vinh Chau, Nguyen Van; Tram, Tran Tan; Hien, Vo Minh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Schultsz, Constance; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; de Jong, Menno D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute encephalitis is an important and severe disease in children in Vietnam. However, little is known about the etiology while such knowledge is essential for optimal prevention and treatment. To identify viral causes of encephalitis, in 2004 we conducted a one-year descriptive study at Children's Hospital Number One, a referral hospital for children in southern Vietnam including Ho Chi Minh City. Methodology/Principal Findings Children less than 16 years of age presenting with acute encephalitis of presumed viral etiology were enrolled. Diagnostic efforts included viral culture, serology and real time (RT)-PCRs. A confirmed or probable viral causative agent was established in 41% of 194 enrolled patients. The most commonly diagnosed causative agent was Japanese encephalitis virus (n = 50, 26%), followed by enteroviruses (n = 18, 9.3%), dengue virus (n = 9, 4.6%), herpes simplex virus (n = 1), cytomegalovirus (n = 1) and influenza A virus (n = 1). Fifty-seven (29%) children died acutely. Fatal outcome was independently associated with patient age and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) on admission. Conclusions/Significance Acute encephalitis in children in southern Vietnam is associated with high mortality. Although the etiology remains unknown in a majority of the patients, the result from the present study may be useful for future design of treatment and prevention strategies of the disease. The recognition of GCS and age as predictive factors may be helpful for clinicians in managing the patient. PMID:21049060

  15. Recent vaccine technology in industrial animals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunil; Lee, Yoo-Kyoung; Kang, Sang Chul; Han, Beom Ku; Choi, Ki Myung

    2016-01-01

    Various new technologies have been applied for developing vaccines against various animal diseases. Virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine technology was used for manufacturing the porcine circovirus type 2 and RNA particle vaccines based on an alphavirus vector for porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). Although VLP is classified as a killed-virus vaccine, because its structure is similar to the original virus, it can induce long-term and cell-mediated immunity. The RNA particle vaccine used a Venezuela equine encephalitis (VEE) virus gene as a vector. The VEE virus partial gene can be substituted with the PED virus spike gene. Recombinant vaccines can be produced by substitution of the target gene in the VEE vector. Both of these new vaccine technologies made it possible to control the infectious disease efficiently in a relatively short time. PMID:26866019

  16. Recent vaccine technology in industrial animals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Various new technologies have been applied for developing vaccines against various animal diseases. Virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine technology was used for manufacturing the porcine circovirus type 2 and RNA particle vaccines based on an alphavirus vector for porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED). Although VLP is classified as a killed-virus vaccine, because its structure is similar to the original virus, it can induce long-term and cell-mediated immunity. The RNA particle vaccine used a Venezuela equine encephalitis (VEE) virus gene as a vector. The VEE virus partial gene can be substituted with the PED virus spike gene. Recombinant vaccines can be produced by substitution of the target gene in the VEE vector. Both of these new vaccine technologies made it possible to control the infectious disease efficiently in a relatively short time. PMID:26866019

  17. Human-like antibodies neutralizing Western equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hülseweh, Birgit; Rülker, Torsten; Pelat, Thibaut; Langermann, Claudia; Frenzel, Andrè; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of the first neutralizing antibodies against Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), a member of the genus Alphavirus. WEEV is transmitted by mosquitoes and can spread to the human central nervous system, causing symptoms ranging from mild febrile reactions to life-threatening encephalitis. WEEV has been classified as a biological warfare agent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No anti-WEEV drugs are currently commercially available. Neutralizing antibodies are useful for the pre- and post-exposure treatment of WEEV infections. In this study, two immune antibody gene libraries were constructed from two macaques immunized with inactivated WEEV. Four antibodies were selected from these libraries and recloned as scFv-Fc, with a human Fc part. These antibodies bound WEEV specifically in ELISA with little or no cross-reaction with other alphaviruses. They were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. All binders were suitable for the intracellular detection of WEEV particles. Neutralizing activity was determined in vitro. Three of the four antibodies were found to be neutralizing; about 1 ng/mL of the best antibody (ToR69–3A2) neutralized 50% of 5x104 TCID50/mL. Due to its human-like nature with a germinality index of 89% (VH) and 91% (VL), the ToR69–3A2 antibody is a promising candidate for future passive vaccine development. PMID:24518197

  18. Encephalitis, Ontario, Canada, 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Parpia, Alyssa S.; Li, Ye; Chen, Cynthia; Dhar, Badal

    2016-01-01

    Encephalitis, a brain inflammation leading to severe illness and often death, is caused by >100 pathogens. To assess the incidence and trends of encephalitis in Ontario, Canada, we obtained data on 6,463 Ontario encephalitis hospitalizations from the hospital Discharge Abstract Database for April 2002–December 2013 and analyzed these data using multiple negative binomial regression. The estimated crude incidence of all-cause encephalitis in Ontario was ≈4.3 cases/100,000 persons/year. Incidence rates for infants <1 year of age and adults >65 years were 3.9 and 3.0 times that of adults 20–44 years of age, respectively. Incidence peaks during August–September in 2002 and 2012 resulted primarily from encephalitis of unknown cause and viral encephalitis. Encephalitis occurred more frequently in older age groups and less frequently in women in Ontario when compared to England, but despite differences in population, vector-borne diseases, climate, and geography, the epidemiology was overall remarkably similar in the two regions. PMID:26890626

  19. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases. PMID:22640219

  20. Case Definitions, Diagnostic Algorithms, and Priorities in Encephalitis: Consensus Statement of the International Encephalitis Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, A.; Tunkel, A. R.; Bloch, K. C.; Lauring, A. S.; Sejvar, J.; Bitnun, A.; Stahl, J-P.; Mailles, A.; Drebot, M.; Rupprecht, C. E.; Yoder, J.; Cope, J. R.; Wilson, M. R.; Whitley, R. J.; Sullivan, J.; Granerod, J.; Jones, C.; Eastwood, K.; Ward, K. N.; Durrheim, D. N.; Solbrig, M. V.; Guo-Dong, L.; Glaser, C. A.; Sheriff, Heather; Brown, David; Farnon, Eileen; Messenger, Sharon; Paterson, Beverley; Soldatos, Ariane; Roy, Sharon; Visvesvara, Govinda; Beach, Michael; Nasci, Roger; Pertowski, Carol; Schmid, Scott; Rascoe, Lisa; Montgomery, Joel; Tong, Suxiang; Breiman, Robert; Franka, Richard; Keuhnert, Matt; Angulo, Fred; Cherry, James

    2013-01-01

    Background.Encephalitis continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in diagnosis and management have been limited, in part, by a lack of consensus on case definitions, standardized diagnostic approaches, and priorities for research. Methods.In March 2012, the International Encephalitis Consortium, a committee begun in 2010 with members worldwide, held a meeting in Atlanta to discuss recent advances in encephalitis and to set priorities for future study. Results.We present a consensus document that proposes a standardized case definition and diagnostic guidelines for evaluation of adults and children with suspected encephalitis. In addition, areas of research priority, including host genetics and selected emerging infections, are discussed. Conclusions.We anticipate that this document, representing a synthesis of our discussions and supported by literature, will serve as a practical aid to clinicians evaluating patients with suspected encephalitis and will identify key areas and approaches to advance our knowledge of encephalitis. PMID:23861361

  1. Development of a human live attenuated West Nile infectious DNA vaccine: Suitability of attenuating mutations found in SA14-14-2 for WN vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Yamshchikov, Vladimir; Manuvakhova, Marina; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2016-01-01

    Direct attenuation of West Nile (WN) virus strain NY99 for the purpose of vaccine development is not feasible due to its high virulence and pathogenicity. Instead, we created highly attenuated chimeric virus W1806 with the serological identity of NY99. To further attenuate W1806, we investigated effects of mutations found in Japanese encephalitis virus vaccine SA14-14-2. WN viruses carrying all attenuating mutations lost infectivity in mammalian, but not in mosquito cells. No single reversion restored infectivity in mammalian cells, although increased infectivity in mosquito cells was observed. To identify a subset of mutations suitable for further attenuation of W1806, we analyzed effects of E138K and K279M changes on virulence, growth properties, and immunogenicity of derivatized W956, from which chimeric W1806 inherited its biological properties and attenuation profile. Despite strong dominant attenuating effect, introduction of only two mutations was not sufficient for attenuating W1806 to the safety level acceptable for human use. PMID:26545140

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  3. Universal varicella vaccine immunization in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    In 1974, Japanese scientists developed a live attenuated varicella vaccine based on the Oka strain. The efficacy of the vaccine for the prevention of varicella has been primarily demonstrated in studies conducted in the United States following the adoption of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in 1996. Although the vaccine was developed by Japanese scientists, until recently, the vaccine has been administered on a voluntary basis in Japan resulting in a vaccine coverage rate of approximately 40%. Therefore, Japan initiated universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in November 2014. Given the transition from voluntary to universal immunization in Japan, it will also be important to monitor the epidemiology of varicella and herpes zoster. The efficacy and safety of co-administration of the varicella vaccine and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine have been demonstrated in many countries; however, there was no data from Japan. In order to adopt the practice of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in Japan, data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of co-administration of varicella vaccine and measles and rubella (MR) vaccine were required. Additionally, we needed to elucidate the appropriate time interval between the first and second administrations of the vaccine. It is also important to differentiate between wild type and Oka vaccine type strains in herpes zoster patient with past history of varicella vaccine. Thus, there are many factors to consider regarding the adoption of universal immunization in Japan to control varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections. PMID:26944711

  4. [Toxoplasmosis encephalitis in patients with AIDS].

    PubMed

    Enzensberger, W; Helm, E B; Hopp, G; Stille, W; Fischer, P A

    1985-01-18

    Toxoplasmosis encephalitis developed in three male homosexuals with AIDS. Clinical symptoms of encephalitis began with a nonspecific organic mental syndrome. In two cases there developed late focal symptoms. There were light to moderately severe generalized EEG changes with additional focal signs. CSF findings and toxoplasmosis titres were not diagnostically altered. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple areas of decreased density in cortex and cerebellum. Administration of pyrimethamine and sulfamethoxydiazine to the three patients brought about clinical improvement within a few days and regression of abnormal CT changes within a few weeks of onset of treatment. One patient died after an encephalitis recurrence: autopsy demonstrated toxoplasma pseudocysts in immediate proximity to small necrotic foci in the brain. The possibility of toxoplasma encephalitis should be considered in AIDS patients who develop an organic mental syndrome. Often the diagnosis can only be made after response to a trial of toxoplasmosis treatment. PMID:3967592

  5. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Pin, Jean-Christophe; Pierre, Fabrice; Ciron, Jonathan; Iljicsov, Anna; Lamy, Matthias; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-MMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated encephalitis mainly affecting young women. We describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who developed a classical form of anti-NMDAR encephalitis during the 10th week of gestation. The patient had been treated with methylpredinsolone and intravenous immunoglobulins. Birth history of the child was normal, with normal APGAR score. The clinical symptoms of the patient have improved after a few months. This rare occurrence during pregnancy (only 9 other cases described) presents an opportunity to highlight the importance of making the earliest possible diagnosis of this treatable and potentially reversible encephalitis, and to educate gynecologists, psychiatrists, anesthetists, and neurologists on this potential cause of psychiatric and neurological manifestations during pregnancy. PMID:26131809

  6. [Saint Louis encephalitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Carballo, Carolina; Cabana, Magdalena; Ledezma, Francisca; Pascual, Carolina; Cazes, Claudia; Mistchenko, Alicia; López, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes. In Argentina sporadic cases are registered. Symptomatic illness is unusual in children. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by an uncommon viral infection. The clinical signs and symptoms are unusual for pediatric patients and the bilateral thalamic compromise showed on magnetic resonance has not been described previously. An 8-year-old girl consulted due to fever, behavior disorders and ataxia. Clonus and neck stiffness were detected at physical exam. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed mononuclear leukocytosis; bilateral ischemic compromise was observed in thalamus by magnetic resonance. Saint Louis virus was confirmed by serology: serum and cerebrospinal fluid IgM were positive during the acute phase of the disease and serum IgG was positive four weeks later. Most of the signs and symptoms of the disease were resolved, however mild behavior disorders were observed as acute sequelae up to 45 days after hospital discharge. PMID:27399031

  7. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Autoimmune Encephalitis in Postpartum Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Bergink, Veerle; Armangue, Thaís; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Markx, Sander; Dalmau, Josep; Kushner, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Significant immunological alterations have been observed in women with first-onset affective psychosis during the postpartum period. Recent studies have highlighted the possibility that a subset of patients with first-onset severe psychiatric episodes might suffer from undiagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. Therefore, the authors performed a three-step immunohistochemistry-based screening for CNS autoantibodies in a large cohort of patients with postpartum psychosis and matched postpartum comparison subjects. Method Ninety-six consecutive patients with postpartum psychosis and 64 healthy postpartum women were included. Screening for antibodies in patient serum was performed using immunohistochemistry. Samples showing any staining were further examined by immunocytochemistry using live hippocampal neurons and cell-based assays to test for anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibodies. Cell-based assays for all other known CNS antigens were performed in those samples with immunocytochemistry labeling but negative for NMDA receptor antibodies. Results Four patients (4%) with neuropil labeling suggestive for extracellular antigen reactivity were identified. Serum samples from all four patients showed clear extracellular labeling of live hippocampal neurons. Two women had the specific staining pattern characteristic for anti-NMDA receptor antibody positivity, which was confirmed by cell-based assays. Neither patient with anti-NMDA receptor antibody positivity had evidence of an ovarian teratoma. The other two patients tested negative by cell-based assays for all known CNS antigens. None of the matched postpartum comparison subjects had confirmed neuronal surface antibodies. The two patients with anti-NMDA receptor antibodies both showed extrapyramidal symptoms following initiation of treatment with low-dose haloperidol. Conclusions In patients with acute psychosis during the postpartum period, systematic screening for anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies

  9. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Sykes, Lisa K.; Geier, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments. PMID:26834565

  10. Studying avian encephalization with geometric morphometrics.

    PubMed

    Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Watanabe, Akinobu; Kawabe, Soichiro

    2016-08-01

    Encephalization is a core concept in comparative neurobiology, aiming to quantify the neurological capacity of organisms. For measuring encephalization, many studies have employed relative brain sizes corrected for expected allometric scaling to body size. Here we highlight the utility of a multivariate geometric morphometric (GM) approach for visualizing and analyzing neuroanatomical shape variation associated with encephalization. GM readily allows the statistical evaluation of covariates, such as size, and many software tools exist for visualizing their effects on shape. Thus far, however, studies using GM have not attempted to translate the meaning of encephalization to shape data. As such, we tested the statistical relationship between size and encephalization quotients (EQs) to brain shape utilizing a broad interspecific sample of avian endocranial data. Although statistically significant, the analyses indicate that allometry accounts for <10% of total neuroanatomical shape variation. Notably, we find that EQs, despite being corrected for allometric scaling based on size, contain size-related neuroanatomical shape changes. In addition, much of what is traditionally considered encephalization comprises clade-specific trends in relative forebrain expansion, particularly driven by landbirds. EQs, therefore, fail to capture 90% of the total neuroanatomical variation after correcting for allometry and shared phylogenetic history. Moving forward, GM techniques provide crucial tools for investigating key drivers of this vast, largely unexplored aspect of avian brain morphology. PMID:27112986

  11. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  12. Concentrated Protein Body Product Derived from Rice Endosperm as an Oral Tolerogen for Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy—A New Mucosal Vaccine Formulation against Japanese Cedar Pollen Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Wakasa, Yuhya; Takagi, Hidenori; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kitamura, Noriko; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Ogo, Yuko; Hayashi, Shimpei; Yang, Lijun; Ohta, Masaru; Thet Tin, Wai Wai; Sekikawa, Kenji; Takano, Makoto; Ozawa, Kenjirou; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I) from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1) and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation. PMID:25774686

  13. Japanese Characters in Written Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, James H.

    From the sixth to the eighth century A.D., Japan was the recipient of massive cultural infusions from China. This acceptance of the Chinese pattern included, and to a great extent was based on, the acceptance of the Chinese language. The Chinese writing system was applied to Japanese because there was no other model to follow and in spite of the…

  14. Tick-borne encephalitis--a notifiable disease: report of the 15th Annual Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2013-09-01

    The 15th Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)--a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicans, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists--was held under the title "Tick-Borne Encephalitis--a notifiable disease". With the inclusion of TBE in the list of notifiable diseases, an important measure was established to continue improving the level of evidence on TBE in Europe to better help guide policies and methods to lower the burden of this disease. Due to differences in diagnosis, case definition, and reporting in European countries, the overall epidemiology and burden of TBE remains unclear. During the meeting, important issues regarding epidemiology, risk areas, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. A poster session provided an overview of the epidemiological situation 2012 in 13 European countries. PMID:23831368

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map: Report of the 18th annual meeting of the international scientific working group on tick-borne encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-07-01

    The 18th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)-a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians and epidemiologists-was held under the title 'Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map'. The conference agenda was divided into six sessions: 'National Implementation of EU notifiable disease status', 'Virology', 'Epidemiology and Risk areas & Poster Walk Epidemiological Update', 'Clinic', 'Environmental Factors' and 'New Findings and Diagnosis'. Key topics such as 'TBE as a notifiable disease-results of the third European survey', 'TBE vaccines over the years', 'Overview of flaviviruses', 'TBE virus phylogenetics', 'Current epidemiological developments and investigations', 'Clinical aspects', 'TBE in veterinary medicine', 'Laboratory diagnostic', 'Occupational risk', 'Allergy, obesity, and vaccination' were presented and extensively discussed. PMID:27189584

  16. Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--Status quo and the way forward. Report of the 17th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The 17th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE), a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists, was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--status quo and the way forward". The conference agenda was divided into three parts on the first day: "Epidemiology & Risk areas", "Poster Walk: Epidemiological Update in Europe", and "News in TBE Research". On the second day, a World Café Working Session took place where the participants could choose three tables out of six to join for discussion. Key topics on current epidemiological developments and investigations, risk areas, cases, travel and mobility, TBE in children, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. PMID:26025269

  17. Status of immunodiagnosis and immunocontraceptive vaccines in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S K

    2003-01-01

    The article focuses on the Indian initiative of making kits for diagnosis of various infectious and non-infectious diseases as well as reproductive hormones and hormones in various other endocrine disorders. Indigenous diagnostic kits for the detection of various infections such as filariasis, typhoid, amebiasis, Japanese encephalitis, hepatitis, HIV, dengue, leishmaniasis, malaria, rabies, toxoplasmosis, rotavirus, and group A streptococci have been developed. Agreements to transfer the know-how of some of these leads to industries have been signed. The know-how of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of hepatitis C has been successfully transferred to industry and is being commercially produced. For detection of HIV-1 and HIV-2, indigenous diagnostic kits based on three different formats, namely ELISA, Western blot and rapid test have been developed and are being commercially produced by Indian industries. The factors influencing the successful transfer of laboratory-scale diagnostic assays from academia to industry and their commercial exploitation have been discussed. Indian scientists have made seminal contributions in exploring the possibility to develop an effective and safe contraceptive vaccine to control the increasing human population of India. Achieving contraception by means of vaccine is a novel approach, which entails generation of a specific antibody response against antigens critically involved in the process of mammalian reproduction. In India, three major programs on contraceptive vaccines based on the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin ((beta)hCG) for women, ovine follicle stimulating hormone (oFSH) for men, and riboflavin carrier protein for both males and females have been initiated. The work at the National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi on contraceptive vaccine for women, based on (beta)hCG, has demonstrated, for the first time, that it is feasible to regulate fertility by such an approach. Basic research

  18. Encephalization of Australian and New Guinean marsupials.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-01-01

    Encephalization of Australian marsupials was analyzed using the endocranial volume (ECV) of 52 species of Dasyuromorphia and Notoryctemorphia, 14 species of Peramelemorphia and 116 species of Diprotodontia from Australia and New Guinea and compared with 16 species of Ameridelphian marsupials and 3 species of native and recently introduced Australian eutherian carnivores (dingo, feral cat and feral fox). Linear regression analysis of the relationship between ECV and body weight for marsupials revealed that allometric parameters for these groups are different from those previously derived for samples of (mainly eutherian) mammals, with higher slopes for Dasyuromorphia and Diprotodontia and lower slopes for Ameridelphians and Peramelemorphia. Absolute ECV for small Australian and New Guinea marsupial carnivores (Antechinus and Sminthopsis) were found to be comparable to eutherians of similar body weight, but large marsupial carnivores such as the Tasmanian devil and thylacine had substantially smaller ECVs than eutherian carnivores of similar body weight. Similarly, members of some superfamilies within Diprotodontia (Burramyoidea, Petauroidea, Tarsipedoidea) had ECVs comparable to prosimians, whereas bandicoots, bilbies and many macropods were found to be poorly encephalized. When both encephalization quotient (EQ) and residuals from regression analysis were used to compare relative ECV of extinct/threatened species with common species there were no significant differences for any of the orders of Australian marsupials, suggesting that encephalization is not a major factor in the current extinction crisis for Australian marsupials. Similarly there were no consistent differences in relative ECV between marsupials from New Guinea and associated islands compared to Australia or between arid and non-arid Australian regions for any of the marsupial orders. The results indicate that marsupials are not uniformly poorly encephalized and that small marsupial carnivores and

  19. PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS GENERATED BY AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALITIS (CLINICAL CASE).

    PubMed

    Craciun, Georgiana; Cucoş, Liliana; Ungureanu, Elena; Pendefunda, L; Petrariu, F D; Nechita, Petronela

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a brain inflammation, which could involve also the meninges. The etiology of encephalitis could be: viral, bacterial, fungal or autoimmune. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an immune disorder, easy to diagnose and is a treatable condition. Most patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis develop a multistage illness that progresses from psychosis, memory deficits, seizures, to catatonic state and breathing instability. We present a case report of a 20-year old woman, who presented: amnesia, visual hallucination, illusions, seizures after that occurred following autoimmune encephalitis. The exact incidence of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is unknown, but it seems to be more frequent than any other known paraneoplastic encephalitis. The present case is important considering that autoimmune encephalitis is a rare frequency disorder in Romania, with patients presenting resounding psychiatric and neurological manifestations. PMID:26793848

  20. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of theE-gene to confirm the virus identity and completeE-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites. PMID:26313538

  1. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis causes subacute deficits of memory and cognition, often followed by suppressed level of consciousness or coma. A careful history and examination may show early clues to particular autoimmune causes, such as neuromyotonia, hyperekplexia, psychosis, dystonia, or the presence of particular tumors. Ancillary testing with MRI and EEG may be helpful for excluding other causes, managing seizures, and, rarely, for identifying characteristic findings. Appropriate autoantibody testing can confirm specific diagnoses, although this is often done in parallel with exclusion of infectious and other causes. Autoimmune encephalitis may be divided into several groups of diseases: those with pathogenic antibodies to cell surface proteins, those with antibodies to intracellular synaptic proteins, T-cell diseases associated with antibodies to intracellular antigens, and those associated with other autoimmune disorders. Many forms of autoimmune encephalitis are paraneoplastic, and each of these conveys a distinct risk profile for various tumors. Tumor screening and, if necessary, treatment is essential to proper management. Most forms of autoimmune encephalitis respond to immune therapies, although powerful immune suppression for weeks or months may be needed in difficult cases. Autoimmune encephalitis may relapse, so follow-up care is important. PMID:26754777

  2. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kari L; Kay, Richard F

    2012-02-22

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The 'expensive-tissue hypothesis' (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  3. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elaine R.; Moro, Pedro L.; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are rigorously tested and monitored and are among the safest medical products we use. Millions of vaccinations are given to children and adults in the United States each year. Serious adverse reactions are rare. However, because of the high volume of use, coincidental adverse events including deaths, that are temporally associated with vaccination, do occur. When death occurs shortly following vaccination, loved ones and others might naturally question whether it was related to vaccination. A large body of evidence supports the safety of vaccines, and multiple studies and scientific reviews have found no association between vaccination and deaths except in rare cases. During the US multi-state measles outbreak of 2014–2015, unsubstantiated claims of deaths caused by measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine began circulating on the Internet, prompting responses by public health officials to address common misinterpretations and misuses of vaccine safety surveillance data, particularly around spontaneous reports submitted to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We summarize epidemiologic data on deaths following vaccination, including examples where reasonable scientific evidence exists to support that vaccination caused or contributed to deaths. Rare cases where a known or plausible theoretical risk of death following vaccination exists include anaphylaxis, vaccine-strain systemic infection after administration of live vaccines to severely immunocompromised persons, intussusception after rotavirus vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome after inactivated influenza vaccine, fall-related injuries associated with syncope after vaccination, yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease or associated neurologic disease, serious complications from smallpox vaccine including eczema vaccinatum, progressive vaccinia, postvaccinal encephalitis, myocarditis, and dilated cardiomyopathy, and vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis from oral

  4. Deaths following vaccination: What does the evidence show?

    PubMed

    Miller, Elaine R; Moro, Pedro L; Cano, Maria; Shimabukuro, Tom T

    2015-06-26

    Vaccines are rigorously tested and monitored and are among the safest medical products we use. Millions of vaccinations are given to children and adults in the United States each year. Serious adverse reactions are rare. However, because of the high volume of use, coincidental adverse events including deaths, that are temporally associated with vaccination, do occur. When death occurs shortly following vaccination, loved ones and others might naturally question whether it was related to vaccination. A large body of evidence supports the safety of vaccines, and multiple studies and scientific reviews have found no association between vaccination and deaths except in rare cases. During the US multi-state measles outbreak of 2014-2015, unsubstantiated claims of deaths caused by measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine began circulating on the Internet, prompting responses by public health officials to address common misinterpretations and misuses of vaccine safety surveillance data, particularly around spontaneous reports submitted to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We summarize epidemiologic data on deaths following vaccination, including examples where reasonable scientific evidence exists to support that vaccination caused or contributed to deaths. Rare cases where a known or plausible theoretical risk of death following vaccination exists include anaphylaxis, vaccine-strain systemic infection after administration of live vaccines to severely immunocompromised persons, intussusception after rotavirus vaccine, Guillain-Barré syndrome after inactivated influenza vaccine, fall-related injuries associated with syncope after vaccination, yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease or associated neurologic disease, serious complications from smallpox vaccine including eczema vaccinatum, progressive vaccinia, postvaccinal encephalitis, myocarditis, and dilated cardiomyopathy, and vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis from oral

  5. [Fisher Syndrome and Bickerstaff Brainstem Encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Fisher syndrome has been regarded as a peculiar inflammatory neuropathy with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia, whereas Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis has been considered a pure central nervous system disease characterized by ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and consciousness disturbance. Both disorders share common features including preceding infection, albumin-cytological dissociation, and association with Guillain-Barré syndrome. The discovery of anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies further supports the view that the two disorders represent a single disease spectrum. The lesions in Fisher syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis are presumably determined by the expression of ganglioside GQ1b in the human peripheral and central nervous systems. Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis is likely to represent a variant of Fisher syndrome with central nervous system involvement. PMID:26560952

  6. Autism spectrum disorder secondary to enterovirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Marques, Filipa; Brito, Maria João; Conde, Marta; Pinto, Mónica; Moreira, Ana

    2014-05-01

    Millions of children are infected by enteroviruses each year, usually exhibiting only mild symptoms. Nevertheless, these viruses are also associated with severe and life-threatening infections, such as meningitis and encephalitis. We describe a 32-month-old patient with enteroviral encephalitis confirmed by polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid, with unfavorable clinical course with marked developmental regression, autistic features, persistent stereotypes and aphasia. She experienced slow clinical improvement, with mild residual neurologic and developmental deficits at follow-up. Viral central nervous system infections in early childhood have been associated with autism spectrum disorders but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. This case report is significant in presenting a case of developmental regression with autistic features and loss of language improving on follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of enterovirus encephalitis leading to an autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24782421

  7. Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christine; Gottlieb, Sami L; Wald, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and -2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent global pathogens which commonly cause recurrent oral and genital ulcerations. Less common but more serious complications include meningitis, encephalitis, neonatal infection, and keratitis. HSV-2 infection is a significant driver of the HIV epidemic, increasing the risk of HIV acquisition 3 fold. As current control strategies for genital HSV-2 infection, including antiviral therapy and condom use, are only partially effective, vaccines will be required to reduce infection. Both preventive and therapeutic vaccines for HSV-2 are being pursued and are in various stages of development. We will provide an overview of efforts to develop HSV-2 vaccines, including a discussion of the clinical need for an HSV vaccine, and status of research and development with an emphasis on recent insights from trials of vaccine candidates in clinical testing. In addition, we will touch upon aspects of HSV vaccine development relevant to low and middle income countries. PMID:26973067

  8. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans. PMID:24937089

  9. Functional hemispherectomy: radical treatment for Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lilly, D J

    2000-04-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a progressive, debilitating disease that usually appears in the pediatric population but also may affect adults. Uncontrolled seizures, cognitive decline, and a progressive hemiparesis accompany this disorder. Treatment options are limited and consist of medical management, which is somewhat experimental and ineffective; the use of either intravenous antiviral agents or steroids; or surgical resection of the affected hemisphere. Patients undergoing hemispherectomy for Rasmussen's encephalitis are complex. Nurses caring for these patients require a high degree of knowledge and specialized skills. Patient outcome is highly affected by the knowledge and skill of the entire team of healthcare professionals needed to manage these patients. PMID:10826294

  10. Handling Japanese without a Japanese Operating System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatasa, Kazumi; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The Macintosh HyperCard environment has become a popular platform for Japanese language courseware because of its flexibility and ease of programing. This project created Japanese bitmap font files for the JIS Levels 1 and 2, and writing XFCNs for font manipulation, Japanese kana input, and answer correction. (12 references) (Author/LB)

  11. Enteroviral encephalitis in children: clinical features, pathophysiology, and treatment advances

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shikha; Patel, Bhupeswari; Bhatt, Girish Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) have emerged as one of the important etiological agents as a causative organism for encephalitis, especially in children and adults. After the first report of EV encephalitis cases in 1950s, there have been increasing reports of regular outbreaks of EV encephalitis worldwide. Enteroviruses are RNA viruses of the family Picornaviridae that consists of more than 100 serotypes, which are characterized by a single positive-strand genomic RNA. The clinical features are pleomorphic and can be accompanied by mucocutaneous manifestations or isolated encephalitis only. The incidence of encephalitis in EV infection is reported to be about 3% and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. A number of newer therapeutic agents have been used in EV encephalitis with variable results. This review will focus on clinical features, pathophysiology, and newer treatment modality in EV encephalitis. PMID:25175874

  12. INDUCTION OF NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES TO HENDRA AND NIPAH GLYCOPROTEINS USING A VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS IN VIVO EXPESSION SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Defang, Gabriel N.; Khetawat, Dimple; Broder, Christopher C.; Quinnan, Gerald V.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of Hendra Virus (HeV) and Nipah Virus (NiV) which can cause fatal infections in both animals and humans has triggered a search for an effective vaccine. Here, we have explored the potential for generating an effective humoral immune response to these zoonotic pathogens using an alphavirus-based vaccine platform. Groups of mice were immunized with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) encoding the attachment or fusion glycoproteins of either HeV or NiV. We demonstrate the induction of highly potent cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to both viruses using this approach. Preliminary study suggested early enhancement in the antibody response with use of a modified version of VRP. Overall, these data suggest that the use of an alphavirus-derived vaccine platform might serve as a viable approach for development of an effective vaccine against the henipaviruses. PMID:21050901

  13. Polio Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... inactive polio vaccine OPV=oral polio vaccine Polio Vaccination Pronounced [PO-lee-oh] Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... handling and storage Related Pages Global Vaccines and Immunization Global Polio Also Known As & Abbreviations Polio=poliomyelitis ...

  14. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sunil; Bhatia, Rohan; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) encephalitis is an uncommon illness, with about 2 cases per 250,000 per year. Most are caused by HSV-1, with 10% having HSV-2 as the aetiologic factor. We present a case of Herpes simplex type1encephalitis in a 70 year old male with an uncommon presentation. The patient was a known case of endogenous depression with no medical records and on no treatment for the same, reported with acute changes in mental state for the past five days. He was talking irrelevantly, had hallucinations and was unduly aggressive and violent. He was subjected to a thorough clinical and diagnostic work-up which included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, CT head and MRI brain. MRI brain was suggestive of mild subdural effusion which hinted towards infectious cause of encephalitis. The cerebrospinal fluid viral serology panel detected herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV1) that was later confirmed by CSF Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique. Hence, acyclovir was initiated by intravenous route at a dosage of 10mg/kg body weight and continued for two weeks. This case holds significance in view of the fact that organic causes must be excluded in suspected cases of psychiatric illness especially in the absence of fever. Also, CSF-PCR testing plays a pivotal role in diagnosing herpes simplex encephalitis. PMID:27437286

  15. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: An Uncommon Presentation.

    PubMed

    Kaeley, Nidhi; Bansal, Sunil; Bhatia, Rohan; Ahmad, Sohaib

    2016-05-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) encephalitis is an uncommon illness, with about 2 cases per 250,000 per year. Most are caused by HSV-1, with 10% having HSV-2 as the aetiologic factor. We present a case of Herpes simplex type1encephalitis in a 70 year old male with an uncommon presentation. The patient was a known case of endogenous depression with no medical records and on no treatment for the same, reported with acute changes in mental state for the past five days. He was talking irrelevantly, had hallucinations and was unduly aggressive and violent. He was subjected to a thorough clinical and diagnostic work-up which included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, CT head and MRI brain. MRI brain was suggestive of mild subdural effusion which hinted towards infectious cause of encephalitis. The cerebrospinal fluid viral serology panel detected herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV1) that was later confirmed by CSF Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique. Hence, acyclovir was initiated by intravenous route at a dosage of 10mg/kg body weight and continued for two weeks. This case holds significance in view of the fact that organic causes must be excluded in suspected cases of psychiatric illness especially in the absence of fever. Also, CSF-PCR testing plays a pivotal role in diagnosing herpes simplex encephalitis. PMID:27437286

  16. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical structures and…

  17. Migrating Birds and Tickborne Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lundkvist, Åke; Falk, Kerstin I.; Garpmo, Ulf; Bergström, Sven; Lindegren, Gunnel; Sjöstedt, Anders; Mejlon, Hans; Fransson, Thord; Haemig, Paul D.; Olsen, Björn

    2007-01-01

    During spring and autumn 2001, we screened 13,260 migrating birds at Ottenby Bird Observatory, Sweden, and found 3.4% were infested with ticks. Four birds, each a different passerine species, carried tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV)–infected ticks (Ixodes ricinus). Migrating birds may play a role in the geographic dispersal of TBEV-infected ticks. PMID:17953095

  18. Vaccines for fish in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Sommerset, Ingunn; Krossøy, Bjørn; Biering, Eirik; Frost, Petter

    2005-02-01

    Vaccination plays an important role in large-scale commercial fish farming and has been a key reason for the success of salmon cultivation. In addition to salmon and trout, commercial vaccines are available for channel catfish, European seabass and seabream, Japanese amberjack and yellowtail, tilapia and Atlantic cod. In general, empirically developed vaccines based on inactivated bacterial pathogens have proven to be very efficacious in fish. Fewer commercially available viral vaccines and no parasite vaccines exist. Substantial efficacy data are available for new fish vaccines and advanced technology has been implemented. However, before such vaccines can be successfully commercialized, several hurdles have to be overcome regarding the production of cheap but effective antigens and adjuvants, while bearing in mind environmental and associated regulatory concerns (e.g., those that limit the use of live vaccines). Pharmaceutical companies have performed a considerable amount of research on fish vaccines, however, limited information is available in scientific publications. In addition, salmonids dominate both the literature and commercial focus, despite their relatively small contribution to the total volume of farmed fish in the world. This review provides an overview of the fish vaccines that are currently commercially available and some viewpoints on how the field is likely to evolve in the near future. PMID:15757476

  19. The impact of eastern equine encephalitis virus on efforts to recover the endangered whooping crane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Clark, G.G.; Watts, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The whooping crane (Grus americana), although never abundant in North America, became endangered primarily because of habitat modification and destruction. To help recovery, a captive propagation and reintroduction program was initiated at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in 1966. However, in 1984, 7 of 39 whooping cranes at PWRC died from infection by eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus, an arbovirus that infects a wide variety of indigenous bird species, although mortality is generally restricted to introduced birds. Following identification of the aetiological agent, surveillance and control measures were implemented, including serological monitoring of both wild and captive birds for EEE viral antibody and assay of locally-trapped mosquitoes for virus. In addition, an inactivated EEE virus vaccine developed for use in humans was evaluated in captive whooping cranes. Results so far suggest that the vaccine will afford protection to susceptible birds.

  20. Vaccine hesitancy

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  1. Current Strategic Thinking for the Development of a Trivalent Alphavirus Vaccine for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Daniel N.; Heppner, D. Gray; Gardner, Shea N.; Jaing, Crystal; Dupuy, Lesley C.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Carlton, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinations against the encephalitic alphaviruses (western, eastern, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus) are of significant interest to biological defense, public health, and agricultural communities alike. Although vaccines licensed for veterinary applications are used in the Western Hemisphere and attenuated or inactivated viruses have been used under Investigational New Drug status to protect at-risk personnel, there are currently no licensed vaccines for use in humans. Here, we will discuss the need for a trivalent vaccine that can protect humans against all three viruses, recent progress to such a vaccine, and a strategy to continue development to Food and Drug Administration licensure. PMID:24842880

  2. Major vaccine project: largest AIDS research grants ever to two "most promising" approaches.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-12-01

    The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) has awarded more than $9 million in grants to develop two vaccines. These two vaccines were chosen by experts as the most promising in development. One program, led by Oxford University and the University of Nairobi, will combine two vaccines to investigate if they work well together. A second project will fund development of an HIV vaccine using a non-virulent form of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE). In exchange for investing money into such technologies, IAVI has negotiated for the results to be available in developing countries. Additional information is available on the IAVI web site. PMID:11366075

  3. CHIMERIC ALPHAVIRUS VACCINE CANDIDATES FOR CHIKUNGUNYA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eryu; Volkova, Eugenia; Adams, A. Paige; Forrester, Naomi; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Frolov, Ilya; Weaver, Scott C.

    2008-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging alphavirus that has caused major epidemics in India and islands off the east coast of Africa since 2005. Importations into Europe and the Americas, including one that led to epidemic transmission in Italy during 2007, underscore the risk of endemic establishment elsewhere. Because there is no licensed human vaccine, and an attenuated Investigational New Drug product developed by the U.S. Army causes mild arthritis in some vaccinees, we developed chimeric alphavirus vaccine candidates using either Venezuelan equine encephalitis attenuated vaccine strain TC-83, a naturally attenuated strain of eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), or Sindbis virus as a backbone and the structural protein genes of CHIKV. All vaccine candidates replicated efficiently in cell cultures, and were highly attenuated in mice. All of the chimeras also produced robust neutralizing antibody responses, although the TC-83 and EEEV backbones appeared to offer greater immunogenicity. Vaccinated mice were fully protected against disease and viremia after CHIKV challenge. PMID:18692107

  4. Development of Novel Vaccines against Enterovirus-71.

    PubMed

    Yee, Pinn Tsin Isabel; Poh, Chit Laa

    2016-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease is caused by a group of Enteroviruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus CV-A5, CV-A8, and CV-A16. Mild symptoms of EV-A71 infection in children range from high fever, vomiting, rashes and ulcers in mouth but can produce more severe symptoms such as brainstem and cerebellar encephalitis, leading up to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The lack of vaccines and antiviral drugs against EV-A71 highlights the urgency of developing preventive and treatment agents against EV-A71 to prevent further fatalities. Research groups have developed experimental inactivated vaccines, recombinant Viral Protein 1 (VP1) vaccine and virus-like particles (VLPs). The inactivated EV-A71 vaccine is considered the safest viral vaccine, as there will be no reversion to the infectious wild type strain. The recombinant VP1 vaccine is a cost-effective immunogen, while VLPs contain an arrangement of epitopes that can elicit neutralizing antibodies against the virus. As each type of vaccine has its advantages and disadvantages, increased studies are required in the development of such vaccines, whereby high efficacy, long-lasting immunity, minimal risk to those vaccinated, safe and easy production, low cost, dispensing the need for refrigeration and convenient delivery are the major goals in their design. PMID:26729152

  5. Development of Novel Vaccines against Enterovirus-71

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Pinn Tsin Isabel; Poh, Chit Laa

    2015-01-01

    The hand, foot and mouth disease is caused by a group of Enteroviruses such as Enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and Coxsackievirus CV-A5, CV-A8, and CV-A16. Mild symptoms of EV-A71 infection in children range from high fever, vomiting, rashes and ulcers in mouth but can produce more severe symptoms such as brainstem and cerebellar encephalitis, leading up to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The lack of vaccines and antiviral drugs against EV-A71 highlights the urgency of developing preventive and treatment agents against EV-A71 to prevent further fatalities. Research groups have developed experimental inactivated vaccines, recombinant Viral Protein 1 (VP1) vaccine and virus-like particles (VLPs). The inactivated EV-A71 vaccine is considered the safest viral vaccine, as there will be no reversion to the infectious wild type strain. The recombinant VP1 vaccine is a cost-effective immunogen, while VLPs contain an arrangement of epitopes that can elicit neutralizing antibodies against the virus. As each type of vaccine has its advantages and disadvantages, increased studies are required in the development of such vaccines, whereby high efficacy, long-lasting immunity, minimal risk to those vaccinated, safe and easy production, low cost, dispensing the need for refrigeration and convenient delivery are the major goals in their design. PMID:26729152

  6. May early intervention with high dose intravenous immunoglobulin pose a potentially successful treatment for severe cases of tick-borne encephalitis?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viral encephalitis of diverse origins shows similar clinical symptoms, histopathology and magnetic resonance imaging, indicating that the patho mechanisms may be similar. There is no specific therapy to date. However, vaccination remains the best prophylaxis against a selected few. Regardless of these shortcomings, there are an increasing number of case reports that successfully treat arboviral encephalitis with high doses of intravenous immunoglobulins. Discussion To our knowledge, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin has not been tested systematically for treating severe cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Antibody-dependent enhancement has been suspected, but not proven, in several juvenile cases of tick-borne encephalitis. Although antibody-dependent enhancement during secondary infection with dengue virus has been documented, no adverse effects were noticed in a controlled study of high dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for dengue-associated thrombocytopenia. The inflammation-dampening therapeutic effects of generic high dose intravenous immunoglobulins may override the antibody-dependent enhancement effects that are potentially induced by cross-reactive antibodies or by virus-specific antibodies at sub-neutralizing levels. Summary Analogous to the increasing number of case reports on the successful treatment of other arboviral encephalitides with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins, we postulate whether it may be possible to also treat severe cases of tick-borne encephalitis with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins as early in the course of the disease as possible. PMID:23822550

  7. Tick-borne encephalitis--a European health challenge. Conference report of the 8th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2006-06-01

    The annual 2006 meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE) raised the topic "Tick-borne Encephalitis--a European Health Challenge". TBE incidence has more or less increased in all European countries with a TBE risk in the last years (excepting Austria). Additionally, TBE has become an international public health problem because of increasing mobility of people travelling to risk areas. TBE vaccination should be recommended when people travel to endemic regions and come into contact with nature, regardless of the duration of the stay. As no clear recommendations for travellers exist, it will be one of the major future challenges of the ISW TBE to increase problem awareness outside endemic regions and create general recommendations, which are valid for at least all European countries. PMID:16944370

  8. [Pathogenetic mechanisms of tick-borne encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Panov, A G; Il'enko, V I; Komandenko, N I

    1977-01-01

    The main cause of progressive forms of tickborne encephalitis is a prolonged persistence of certain viral strains in the brain. Although there are no virals with a selective capability to lead only to an acute or chronic encephalitis, nevertheless in the epidemiological process there is a selection of virals capable of bringing on chronic forms of the disease. In cases of an incapacity of immunological factors bor a defence during the initial phase of the infectious process there may be prerequisites to a fixation of the virals in the brain and a chronic development of the neuroinfections. It is necessary to differentiate active neuroinfectious processes due to persistent virals and postencephalitic reparative-dystrophical syndromes. This permits to avoid a hyperdiagnosis and more reasonably select therapeutical measures in the evaluation of their effectivity. PMID:402756

  9. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis. PMID:22761210

  10. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27609293

  11. Sarcocystis calchasi encephalitis in a rock pigeon

    PubMed Central

    USHIO, Nanako; WATANABE, Ken-ichi; CHAMBERS, James K.; SHIBATO, Tokuhiro; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    A rock pigeon (Columba livia) caught in Akihabara, Tokyo, showed neurological symptoms, such as head tilt and circling. Pathological examinations revealed abundant Sarcocystic cysts in the skeletal muscle and myocardium with mild myositis, and numerous schizonts and sarcocysts with severe multifocal granulomatous T-lymphocytic infiltration in the central nervous system. A Sarcocystis calchasi-specific gene was detected in the muscle and brain. This case indicates S. calchasi was distributed in Japan and caused severe encephalitis to rock pigeons. PMID:26062567

  12. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    2011-12-01

    We propose consideration of at least two possible evolutionary paths for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization. The first is the path via encephalization of homeothermic animals; the second is the path to swarm intelligence of so-called superorganisms, in particular the social insects. The path to each appears to be facilitated by environmental change: homeothermic animals by decreased climatic temperature and for swarm intelligence by increased oxygen levels.

  13. Sarcocystis calchasi encephalitis in a rock pigeon.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Nanako; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Chambers, James K; Shibato, Tokuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    A rock pigeon (Columba livia) caught in Akihabara, Tokyo, showed neurological symptoms, such as head tilt and circling. Pathological examinations revealed abundant Sarcocystic cysts in the skeletal muscle and myocardium with mild myositis, and numerous schizonts and sarcocysts with severe multifocal granulomatous T-lymphocytic infiltration in the central nervous system. A Sarcocystis calchasi-specific gene was detected in the muscle and brain. This case indicates S. calchasi was distributed in Japan and caused severe encephalitis to rock pigeons. PMID:26062567

  14. EV-A71 vaccine licensure: a first step for multivalent enterovirus vaccine to control HFMD and other severe diseases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qunying; Wang, Yiping; Bian, Lianlian; Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are the most common viral agents in humans. Although most infections are mild or asymptomatic, there is a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that may be caused by EV infections with varying degrees of severity. Among these viruses, EV-A71 and coxsackievirus (CV) CV-A16 from group A EVs attract the most attention because they are responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Other EV-A viruses such as CV-A6 and CV-A10 were also reported to cause HFMD outbreaks in several countries or regions. Group B EVs such as CV-B3, CV-B5 and echovirus 30 were reported to be the main pathogens responsible for myocarditis and encephalitis epidemics and were also detected in HFMD patients. Vaccines are the best tools to control infectious diseases. In December 2015, China's Food and Drug Administration approved two inactivated EV-A71 vaccines for preventing severe HFMD.The CV-A16 vaccine and the EV-A71-CV-A16 bivalent vaccine showed substantial efficacy against HFMD in pre-clinical animal models. Previously, research on EV-B group vaccines was mainly focused on CV-B3 vaccine development. Because the HFMD pathogen spectrum has changed, and the threat from EV-B virus-associated severe diseases has gradually increased, it is necessary to develop multivalent HFMD vaccines. This study summarizes the clinical symptoms of diseases caused by EVs, such as HFMD, myocarditis and encephalitis, and the related EV vaccine development progress. In conclusion, developing multivalent EV vaccines should be strongly recommended to prevent HFMD, myocarditis, encephalitis and other severe diseases. PMID:27436364

  15. Reinspiring Japanese Educational Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wada, Shuji

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the history of modern Japanese education, its early modernization, and the policy of intertwining the Japanese ideology with Western technology. Proposes the establishment of a new Buddhist-inspired philosophy of education. (GLR)

  16. 1,5-Iodonaphthyl azide-inactivated V3526 protects against aerosol challenge with virulent venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Sharma, Anuj; Spurgers, Kevin B; Bakken, Russell R; Eccleston, Lori T; Cohen, Jeffrey W; Honnold, Shelley P; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-05-27

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a New World alphavirus. VEEV is highly infectious in aerosolized form and has been identified as a bio-terrorism agent. There is no licensed vaccine for prophylaxis against VEEV. The current IND vaccine is poorly immunogenic and does not protect against an aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. We have previously shown that VEEV inactivated by 1,5-iodonaphthyl azide (INA) protects against footpad challenge with virulent VEEV. In this study, we inactivated an attenuated strain of VEEV, V3526, with INA and evaluated its protective efficacy against aerosol challenge with wild type VEEV. We demonstrated that among three routes of immunization, intramuscular immunization with INA-inactivate V3526 (INA-iV3526) provided complete protection against aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. Our data suggests that INA-iV3526 can be explored further for development as an effective vaccine candidate against aerosol challenge of virulent VEEV. PMID:27129427

  17. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, a mimicker of acute infectious encephalitis and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Darren; Fries, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis has become an increasingly recognized etiology of acute psychosis in young patients. The diverse constellation of symptoms allows for misdiagnosis as an infectious, psychological, or toxicological entity resulting in delays in treatment with increasing morbidity. We describe a case of anti-NMDAR encephalitis that was a particular challenge to diagnose. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for anti-NMDAR and related neuroautoimmune syndromes, especially in young patients that present with acute mental status decline or dyskinesia. PMID:26839775

  18. The Japanese Mind: Understanding Contemporary Japanese Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Roger J., Ed.; Ikeno, Osamu, Ed.

    This collection of essays offers an overview of contemporary Japanese culture, and can serve as a resource for classes studying Japan. The 28 essays offer an informative, accessible look at the values, attitudes, behavior patterns, and communication styles of modern Japan from the unique perspective of the Japanese people. Filled with examples…

  19. Bullying in Japanese Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Futoshi

    Noting that although many Western educators praise the Japanese educational system because of its students' academic achievements, schools in Japan have developed severe and prevalent problems with student bullying. This paper examines the problem of bullying in Japanese schools. Part 1 of the paper reviews bullying incidents in Japanese schools…

  20. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  1. Vaccine Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Frequently Asked Questions about Vaccine Recalls Historical Vaccine Safety Concerns FAQs about GBS and Menactra ... CISA Resources for Healthcare Professionals Evaluation Current Studies Historical Background 2001-12 Publications Technical Reports Vaccine Safety ...

  2. Smallpox Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters Events Also Known As Smallpox = Vaccinia Smallpox Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The smallpox ... like many other vaccines. For that reason, the vaccination site must be cared for carefully to prevent ...

  3. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... and Gynecologists. Committee Opinion No. 588: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2014;123(3):712-8. PMID: ...

  4. Development of a serodiagnostic multi-species ELISA against tick-borne encephalitis virus using subviral particles.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Eri; Sakai, Mizuki; Hirano, Minato; Muto, Memi; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Kariwa, Hiroaki; Yoshii, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a zoonotic agent causing severe encephalitis in humans. A wide range of animal species could be infected with TBEV in endemic areas. A serological survey of wild animals is effective in identifying TBEV-endemic areas. Safe, simple, and reliable TBEV serodiagnostic tools are needed to test animals. In this study, ELISA was developed to detect anti-TBEV specific antibodies in multi-species of animals, using recombinant subviral particles (SPs) with an affinity tag and protein A/G. A Strep-tag was fused at the N terminus of the E protein of the plasmid coding TBEV prME. The E proteins with Strep-tag were secreted as SPs, of which Strep-tag was exposed on the surface. The tagged E proteins were associated with prM. The SPs with Strep-tag were applied as the antigen of ELISA, and TBEV-specific antibodies were detected by the protein A/G. Compared to neutralization test results, the ELISA showed 96.8% sensitivity and 97.7% specificity in rodents and 95.1% sensitivity and 96.0% specificity in humans, without cross-reactivity with antibodies to Japanese encephalitis virus. These results indicate that our ELISA would be useful to detect TBE-specific antibodies in a wide range of animal species. PMID:26969490

  5. [Tick-borne encephalitis (FSME)--how great is the danger really?].

    PubMed

    Lademann, M; Wild, B; Reisinger, E C

    2003-04-10

    Tick-borne encephalitis is a neurotropic viral disease transmitted by ticks, and occasionally by the drinking of milk. Its incidence in Central and Eastern Europe has increased sharply, supposedly due--among other things--to climate warming and changes in leisure activities. The probability of contracting the disease following viral infection is about 30%. Some 70% of victims manifest a biphasic course with two fever peaks. Some 10% will have lasting, sometimes severe, neurological deficits, and 1 to 2% will die. The diagnosis is based on confirmed exposure to ticks in a high-risk area, a tick bite within the previous three weeks, clinical symptomatology, infected CSF, and FSME-specific IgM and IgG antibodies in the serum. Causal treatment is not possible, but the disease can be effectively avoided by prophylactic (anti-exposure) measures and vaccination. The vaccines currently available in Germany are highly effective and well tolerated, and a vaccine for children became available in 2002. Medical counselling of travellers should give consideration to vaccination against the condition--in particular for destinations in the south east or east of Europe. PMID:15104266

  6. Vaccines in development against West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Brandler, Samantha; Tangy, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    West Nile encephalitis emerged in 1999 in the United States, then rapidly spread through the North American continent causing severe disease in human and horses. Since then, outbreaks appeared in Europe, and in 2012, the United States experienced a new severe outbreak reporting a total of 5,387 cases of West Nile virus (WNV) disease in humans, including 243 deaths. So far, no human vaccine is available to control new WNV outbreaks and to avoid worldwide spreading. In this review, we discuss the state-of-the-art of West Nile vaccine development and the potential of a novel safe and effective approach based on recombinant live attenuated measles virus (MV) vaccine. MV vaccine is a live attenuated negative-stranded RNA virus proven as one of the safest, most stable and effective human vaccines. We previously described a vector derived from the Schwarz MV vaccine strain that stably expresses antigens from emerging arboviruses, such as dengue, West Nile or chikungunya viruses, and is strongly immunogenic in animal models, even in the presence of MV pre-existing immunity. A single administration of a recombinant MV vaccine expressing the secreted form of WNV envelope glycoprotein elicited protective immunity in mice and non-human primates as early as two weeks after immunization, indicating its potential as a human vaccine. PMID:24084235

  7. Footrot vaccines and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dhungyel, Om; Hunter, James; Whittington, Richard

    2014-05-30

    Research on footrot in small ruminants, which is caused by Dichelobacter nodosus, has led to development of vaccines and their application for control, treatment and eradication of the disease in sheep. Footrot vaccines have evolved over decades to contain monovalent whole cell, multivalent recombinant fimbrial, and finally mono or bivalent recombinant fimbrial antigens. Initially whole cell vaccines made against the few known serogroups of D. nodosus were found to be inefficient in control of the disease in the field, which was attributed to the presence of other unidentified serogroups and also the use of inefficient adjuvants. Fimbriae or pili, which are the basis for antigenic variation, were found to be the major protective and also curative antigens but they are not cross protective between the different serogroups. Multivalent vaccines incorporating all the known serogroups have been proven to be of limited efficacy due to the phenomenon of antigenic competition. Recent studies in Nepal, Bhutan and Australia have shown that outbreak-specific vaccination which involves targeting identified serogroups with mono- or bivalent recombinant fimbrial vaccines, can be very effective in sheep and goats. Where multiple serogroups are present in a flock, antigenic competition can be overcome by sequentially targeting the serogroups with different bivalent vaccines every 3 months. A common antigen which would confer immunity to all serogroups would be the ideal immunogen but the initial studies were not successful in this area. Until universal antigen/s are available, flock specific mono or bivalent fimbrial vaccines are likely to be the most effective tool for control and eradication of footrot in sheep and goats. Future research in footrot vaccines should be focused on improving the duration of prophylaxis by incorporating new and emerging immunomodulators or adjuvants with modified delivery vehicles, discovering a common antigen and understanding the mechanisms of

  8. [Vaccination perspectives].

    PubMed

    Saliou, P; Plotkin, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of vaccinology is to improve the available vaccines and to develop new ones in the light of progress in immunology, molecular biology and biotechnologies. But it must go beyond this, and aim to protect all populations and control diseases, even eradicate them where possible. New vaccine strategies must be developed taking into account the epidemiology of diseases and the inherent logistic problems of implementing these strategies under local conditions. There are three major thrusts to the progress of the discipline. The improvement of the vaccines available. One of the drives of vaccinology is not only to deliver vaccines of increasing safety (replacement of the current vaccine for whooping cough with an acellular vaccine for example), but also to improve vaccine efficacy and immunogenicity (in particular for flu, tuberculosis, cholera and rabies vaccines). The optimisation of vaccination programmes and strategies for vaccinations. The ideal is to protect against the greatest possible number of diseases with the smallest number of vaccinations. The development of combinations of vaccines is central to this goal. The objective for the year 2000 is a hexavalent vaccine DTPP Hib HB. The development of new vaccines. Classic techniques continue to be successfully used (inactivated hepatitis A vaccine; attenuated live vaccines for chicken pox and dengue fever; conjugated polyosidic bacterial vaccines for meningococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae). However, it will become possible to prepare vaccines against most transmissible diseases using genetic engineering techniques.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921696

  9. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact. PMID:26541249

  10. Mumps and mumps vaccine: a global review.

    PubMed Central

    Galazka, A. M.; Robertson, S. E.; Kraigher, A.

    1999-01-01

    Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus. Although the disease is usually mild, up to 10% of patients can develop aseptic meningitis; a less common but more serious complication is encephalitis, which can result in death or disability. Permanent deafness, orchitis, and pancreatitis are other untoward effects of mumps. Based on data reported to WHO up to April 1998, mumps vaccine is routinely used by national immunization programmes in 82 countries/areas: 23 (92%) of 25 developed countries, 19 (86%) of 22 countries with economies in transition (mainly the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union), and 40 (24%) of 168 developing countries. Countries that have achieved high coverage have shown a rapid decline in mumps morbidity. Furthermore, in many of these countries, mumps-associated encephalitis and deafness have nearly vanished. This review considers the disease burden due to mumps; summarizes studies on the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of different strains of mumps vaccine; and highlights lessons learned about implementing mumps immunization in different countries. Countries already using mumps vaccine should monitor immunization coverage and establish routine mumps surveillance with investigation of outbreaks. Where mumps is targeted for elimination, countries need to add a second dose of mumps vaccine for children, keeping in mind that the disease may still occur in susceptible adults. PMID:10063655

  11. Fatal West Nile Virus Encephalitis in a Heart Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Adam J.; Waggoner, Jesse J.; Itoh, Megumi; Hollander, Seth A.; Gutierrez, Kathleen M.; Budvytiene, Indre; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of encephalitis is particularly challenging in immunocompromised patients. We report here a case of fatal West Nile virus encephalitis confounded by the presence of budding yeast in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from a patient who had undergone heart transplantation for dilated cardiomyopathy 11 months prior to presentation of neurologic symptoms. PMID:25994169

  12. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V.; Chong, Victor H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection, PMID:26488420

  13. Nominal dysphasia and euphoria caused by EBV encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Carman, Kursat Bora; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Isikay, Sedat

    2013-01-01

    Encephalitis is an uncommon neurological complication of Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and usually presents with confusion, decreased level of consciousness, fever, epileptic seizure, emotional instability and chorea. We present a patient with EBV encephalitis, characterised by nominal dysphasia, euphoria and personality changes. PMID:23307455

  14. Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Encephalitis in Woman, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aristine; Kuo, Kuei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report an unusual case of pandemic (H1N1) 2009–related encephalitis in an immunocompetent woman. Although rare cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 associated with encephalitis have been reported previously, in this patient, direct viral invasion of the central nervous system was shown by simultaneous detection of viral RNA and pleocytosis. PMID:22000373

  15. Temporal Lobe Encephalitis Need not Always be Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: Think of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gowtham; Stanley, Weena; Prabu, Mukhyaprana

    2016-01-01

    Historically, temporal lobe encephalitis is considered as a pathognomonic feature of Herpes simplex encephalitis. This rule may not always be true and we believe that clinicians should keep their differential open. We here report once such. Case of a 36-year-old Indian male who developed altered sensorium following a prodrome of headache and fever. Examination and imaging suggested Temporal Lobe Encephalitis (TLE). Herpes encephalitis was considered and he was started on anti-virals awaiting lumbar puncture reports. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis for Herpes Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) turned out to be negative. Later, to our surprise PCR for tuberculosis (TB) was positive. CSF was 100% lymphocytic and Adenosine deaminase was 12. He was started on 5 drug anti-tuberculosis regimen following which he showed a significant clinical improvement. Given the prevalence of tuberculosis in the sub-continent, clinicians must be aware of this diagnostic possibility when a patient with TLE does not respond to anti-virals. Apart from disease specific therapy, multi-disciplinary approach involving speech therapy is warranted. An early aetiological characterization of TLE has both diagnostic and prognostic implications, failing which patient may succumb. PMID:27437274

  16. Encephalitis Surveillance through the Emerging Infections Program, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a devastating illness that commonly causes neurologic disability and has a case fatality rate >5% in the United States. An etiologic agent is identified in <50% of cases, making diagnosis challenging. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) Encephalitis Project established syndromic surveillance for encephalitis in New York, California, and Tennessee, with the primary goal of increased identification of causative agents and secondary goals of improvements in treatment and outcome. The project represents the largest cohort of patients with encephalitis studied to date and has influenced case definition and diagnostic evaluation of this condition. Results of this project have provided insight into well-established causal pathogens and identified newer causes of infectious and autoimmune encephalitis. The recognition of a possible relationship between enterovirus D68 and acute flaccid paralysis with myelitis underscores the need for ongoing vigilance for emerging causes of neurologic disease. PMID:26295485

  17. A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Graus, Francesc; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balu, Ramani; Benseler, Susanne; Bien, Christian G; Cellucci, Tania; Cortese, Irene; Dale, Russell C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Geschwind, Michael; Glaser, Carol A; Honnorat, Jerome; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Irani, Sarosh R; Lancaster, Eric; Leypoldt, Frank; Prüss, Harald; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Rostásy, Kevin; Saiz, Albert; Venkatesan, Arun; Vincent, Angela; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Waters, Patrick; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Encephalitis is a severe inflammatory disorder of the brain with many possible causes and a complex differential diagnosis. Advances in autoimmune encephalitis research in the past 10 years have led to the identification of new syndromes and biomarkers that have transformed the diagnostic approach to these disorders. However, existing criteria for autoimmune encephalitis are too reliant on antibody testing and response to immunotherapy, which might delay the diagnosis. We reviewed the literature and gathered the experience of a team of experts with the aims of developing a practical, syndrome-based diagnostic approach to autoimmune encephalitis and providing guidelines to navigate through the differential diagnosis. Because autoantibody test results and response to therapy are not available at disease onset, we based the initial diagnostic approach on neurological assessment and conventional tests that are accessible to most clinicians. Through logical differential diagnosis, levels of evidence for autoimmune encephalitis (possible, probable, or definite) are achieved, which can lead to prompt immunotherapy. PMID:26906964

  18. Encephalitis Surveillance through the Emerging Infections Program, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Karen C; Glaser, Carol A

    2015-09-01

    Encephalitis is a devastating illness that commonly causes neurologic disability and has a case fatality rate >5% in the United States. An etiologic agent is identified in <50% of cases, making diagnosis challenging. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) Encephalitis Project established syndromic surveillance for encephalitis in New York, California, and Tennessee, with the primary goal of increased identification of causative agents and secondary goals of improvements in treatment and outcome. The project represents the largest cohort of patients with encephalitis studied to date and has influenced case definition and diagnostic evaluation of this condition. Results of this project have provided insight into well-established causal pathogens and identified newer causes of infectious and autoimmune encephalitis. The recognition of a possible relationship between enterovirus D68 and acute flaccid paralysis with myelitis underscores the need for ongoing vigilance for emerging causes of neurologic disease. PMID:26295485

  19. 75 FR 9423 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Impact of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Impact of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccination in Cambodia, Funding... Vaccination in Cambodia, FOA CK10-003.'' Contact Person for More Information: Gregory Anderson, M.S.,...

  20. Eastern Equine Encephalitis in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Naomi; Wang, Eryu; Vittor, Amy Y.; Haddow, Andrew D.; López-Vergès, Sandra; Abadía, Ivan; Castaño, Elizabeth; Sosa, Nestor; Báez, Carmen; Estripeaut, Dora; Díaz, Yamilka; Beltrán, Davis; Cisneros, Julio; Cedeño, Hector G.; da Rosa, Amelia P. Travassos; Hernandez, Humberto; Martínez-Torres, Alex O.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viruses are pathogens that infect humans and horses in the Americas. Outbreaks of neurologic disease in humans and horses were reported in Panama from May through early August 2010. METHODS We performed antibody assays and tests to detect viral RNA and isolate the viruses in serum samples from hospitalized patients. Additional cases were identified with enhanced surveillance. RESULTS A total of 19 patients were hospitalized for encephalitis. Among them, 7 had confirmed EEE, 3 had VEE, and 1 was infected with both viruses; 3 patients died, 1 of whom had confirmed VEE. The clinical findings for patients with EEE included brain lesions, seizures that evolved to status epilepticus, and neurologic sequelae. An additional 99 suspected or probable cases of alphavirus infection were detected during active surveillance. In total, 13 cases were confirmed as EEE, along with 11 cases of VEE and 1 case of dual infection. A total of 50 cases in horses were confirmed as EEE and 8 as VEE; mixed etiologic factors were associated with 11 cases in horses. Phylogenetic analyses of isolates from 2 cases of equine infection with the EEE virus and 1 case of human infection with the VEE virus indicated that the viruses were of enzootic lineages previously identified in Panama rather than new introductions. CONCLUSIONS Cases of EEE in humans in Latin America may be the result of ecologic changes that increased human contact with enzootic transmission cycles, genetic changes in EEE viral strains that resulted in increased human virulence, or an altered host range. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Secretaría Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación, Panama.) PMID:23964935

  1. SiRNA Inhibits Replication of Langat Virus, a Member of the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Complex in Organotypic Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Maffioli, Carola; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Engler, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the causative agent of tick-borne encephalitis, a potentially fatal neurological infection. Tick-borne encephalitis virus belongs to the family of flaviviruses and is transmitted by infected ticks. Despite the availability of vaccines, approximately 2000–3000 cases of tick-borne encephalitis occur annually in Europe for which no curative therapy is available. The antiviral effects of RNA mediated interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was evaluated in cell culture and organotypic hippocampal cultures. Langat virus, a flavivirus highly related to Tick-borne encephalitis virus exhibits low pathogenicity for humans but retains neurovirulence for rodents. Langat virus was used for the establishment of an in vitro model of tick-borne encephalitis. We analyzed the efficacy of 19 siRNA sequences targeting different regions of the Langat genome to inhibit virus replication in the two in vitro systems. The most efficient suppression of virus replication was achieved by siRNA sequences targeting structural genes and the 3′ untranslated region. When siRNA was administered to HeLa cells before the infection with Langat virus, a 96.5% reduction of viral RNA and more than 98% reduction of infectious virus particles was observed on day 6 post infection, while treatment after infection decreased the viral replication by more than 98%. In organotypic hippocampal cultures the replication of Langat virus was reduced by 99.7% by siRNA sequence D3. Organotypic hippocampal cultures represent a suitable in vitro model to investigate neuronal infection mechanisms and treatment strategies in a preserved three-dimensional tissue architecture. Our results demonstrate that siRNA is an efficient approach to limit Langat virus replication in vitro. PMID:22984545

  2. The investigation of an arbovirus encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    A definition of an arbovirus and a broad idea of the groups and the numbers isolated and causing human infection are given. The small incidence of clinical disease compared with overall infection rates is stressed. The conditions for the successful survival of arboviruses is outlined. The investigation of the illness and origin of infection is described. The role of viral antibody in the development of encephalitis and the use of cortisone in treatment is discussed. The over-wintering of arboviruses and their capacity for latency is considered in relationship to the perpetuation of virus and the pathogenic effects on the hosts involved. PMID:5816343

  3. Long term neurological outcome of herpes encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, E; Barr, J; Barkai, G; Paret, G; Brand, N; Barzilai, A

    1999-01-01

    Twenty eight children with herpes simplex encephalitis were followed up for a mean of 5.5 years. Two children died and 26survived, of whom 16 were left with no neurological sequelae and 10 had persistent neurological sequelae. Mean (SD) Glasgow coma score was significantly lower in the patients with neurological sequelae (7.7 (1.5)) and the patients who died (4.5 (0.7)), compared with the patients without neurological sequelae (11 (1.7)).

 PMID:10325763

  4. [Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis after upper respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Locht, Linda J; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2016-07-01

    Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis (BE) is a very rare neurological condition with subacute onset of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and altered sensorium, often postinfectious. The condition is associated with the anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome and is part of the spectrum of diseases including Miller Fisher syndrome and Guillain-Barré syndrome. In this case, we report the history, workup, treatment and follow-up of a 48-year-old woman with probable BE without anti-GQ1b antibodies in relation to the international diagnostic criteria. PMID:27406055

  5. Will the current measles vaccines ever eradicate measles?

    PubMed

    Stephenson, John

    2002-10-01

    Measles virus is the most infectious transmissible agent causing human disease and has probably been responsible for the deaths of more children than any other single cause. In addition, infection with the natural virus causes many severe complications, including encephalitis, deafness and pneumonia. The introduction of live attenuated vaccines, either singly or as the measles-mumps-rubella combined vaccine, has dramatically reduced the occurrence of disease and in countries where vaccine uptake is high, indigenous disease has been virtually eliminated. Even though the current vaccines are very efficient, they do have their limitations. Children are most at risk during the first year of life and for most of this period, maternal antibodies prevent effective immunization. In addition, the current measles vaccines are relatively heat labile which causes difficulty in tropical areas. In recent years, vaccination rates in some industrial countries have been adversely affected by fears that measles vaccines are linked to inflammatory bowel diseases and autism. Although there is no conclusive evidence to support these fears, they still remain and probably contribute to poor vaccine uptake in some regions and sections of society. Although severe complications from vaccination are extremely rare, mild local reactions are more common. Consequently, in countries where measles is declining or has been eliminated, the fear of side effects of vaccination may encourage the development of vaccines that do not rely on virus replication to take effect. PMID:12901574

  6. The Ubiquitin Proteasome System Plays a Role in Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Moushimi; Keck, Forrest; Lindquist, Michael; Voss, Kelsey; Scavone, Lauren; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Roberts, Brian; Bailey, Charles; Schmaljohn, Connie; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses have been implicated in utilizing or modulating the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) to enhance viral multiplication and/or to sustain a persistent infection. The mosquito-borne Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) belongs to the Togaviridae family and is an important biodefense pathogen and select agent. There are currently no approved vaccines or therapies for VEEV infections; therefore, it is imperative to identify novel targets for therapeutic development. We hypothesized that a functional UPS is required for efficient VEEV multiplication. We have shown that at non-toxic concentrations Bortezomib, a FDA-approved inhibitor of the proteasome, proved to be a potent inhibitor of VEEV multiplication in the human astrocytoma cell line U87MG. Bortezomib inhibited the virulent Trinidad donkey (TrD) strain and the attenuated TC-83 strain of VEEV. Additional studies with virulent strains of Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) demonstrated that Bortezomib is a broad spectrum inhibitor of the New World alphaviruses. Time-of-addition assays showed that Bortezomib was an effective inhibitor of viral multiplication even when the drug was introduced many hours post exposure to the virus. Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the VEEV capsid protein is ubiquitinated in infected cells, which was validated by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation assays. Subsequent studies revealed that capsid is ubiquitinated on K48 during early stages of infection which was affected by Bortezomib treatment. This study will aid future investigations in identifying host proteins as potential broad spectrum therapeutic targets for treating alphavirus infections. PMID:25927990

  7. Attenuation of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Using Large-Scale Random Codon Re-encoding

    PubMed Central

    de Fabritus, Lauriane; Nougairède, Antoine; Aubry, Fabien; Gould, Ernest A; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale codon re-encoding (i.e. introduction of a large number of synonymous mutations) is a novel method of generating attenuated viruses. Here, it was applied to the pathogenic flavivirus, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) which causes febrile illness and encephalitis in humans in forested regions of Europe and Asia. Using an infectious clone of the Oshima 5–10 strain ("wild-type virus"), a cassette of 1.4kb located in the NS5 coding region, was modified by randomly introducing 273 synonymous mutations ("re-encoded virus"). Whilst the in cellulo replicative fitness of the re-encoded virus was only slightly reduced, the re-encoded virus displayed an attenuated phenotype in a laboratory mouse model of non-lethal encephalitis. Following intra-peritoneal inoculation of either 2.105 or 2.106 TCID50 of virus, the frequency of viraemia, neurovirulence (measured using weight loss and appearance of symptoms) and neuroinvasiveness (detection of virus in the brain) were significantly decreased when compared with the wild-type virus. Mice infected by wild-type or re-encoded viruses produced comparable amounts of neutralising antibodies and results of challenge experiments demonstrated that mice previously infected with the re-encoded virus were protected against subsequent infection by the wild-type virus. This constitutes evidence that a mammalian species can be protected against infection by a virulent wild-type positive-stranded RNA virus following immunisation with a derived randomly re-encoded strain. Our results demonstrate that random codon re-encoding is potentially a simple and effective method of generating live-attenuated vaccine candidates against pathogenic flaviviruses. PMID:25734338

  8. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): an underestimated risk…still: report of the 14th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Today, the risk of getting tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is still underestimated in many parts of Europe and worldwide. Therefore, the 14th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists - was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis: an underestimated risk…still". Among the discussed issues were: TBE, an underestimated risk in children, a case report in two Dutch travelers, the very emotional report of a tick victim, an overview of the epidemiological situation, investigations to detect new TBE cases in Italy, TBE virus (TBEV) strains circulation in Northern Europe, TBE Program of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), efforts to increase the TBE vaccination rate in the Czech Republic, positioning statement of the World Health Organization (WHO), and TBE in dogs. To answer the question raised above: Yes, the risk of getting TBE is underestimated in children and adults, because awareness is still too low. It is still underestimated in several areas of Europe, where, for a lack of human cases, TBEV is thought to be absent. It is underestimated in travelers, because they still do not know enough about the risk, and diagnostic awareness in non-endemic countries is still low. PMID:22765977

  9. The International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW TBE): Review of 17 years of activity and commitment.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) has been a growing public health problem in Europe and other parts of the world for the past 20 years. In 1999, in order to encourage the control of TBE, international experts created a new body: The International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE). This Working Group has been composed of internationally recognized scientific experts from tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEv)-endemic and non-endemic regions with extensive personal expertise in the field and a high level of commitment to improve the knowledge of TBE and to increase the public awareness of TBE. Since the foundation of the Working Group, ISW-TBE members meet annually. Every meeting is dedicated to a specific topic, and since 2004 a yearly conference report has been published to inform the scientific community about the latest developments. Among the specific issues that have been extensively discussed over the years were the following: clinical aspects of the disease, TBE in children and golden agers, epidemiology, possible causes for the increase in TBE incidence in Europe, TBE and awareness, TBE and travel, (low) vaccination rates, and the cooperation with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). This paper gives an overview of the most important activities and achievements of the ISW-TBE over the past 17 years. PMID:26795231

  10. Inflammatory Biomarkers Associated with Lethal Rift Valley Fever Encephalitis in the Lewis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Amy L.; Kujawa, Michael R.; Oury, Tim D.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging viral disease that causes significant human and veterinary illness in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Encephalitis is one of the severe complications arising from RVF virus (RVFV) infection of people, and the pathogenesis of this form of RVF is completely unknown. We use a novel reproducible encephalitic disease model in rats to identify biomarkers of lethal infection. Lewis rats were infected with RVFV strain ZH501 by aerosol exposure, then sacrificed daily to determine the course of infection and evaluation of clinical, virological, and immunological parameters. Weight loss, fever, and clinical signs occurred during the last 1–2 days prior to death. Prior to onset of clinical indications of disease, rats displayed marked granulocytosis and thrombocytopenia. In addition, high levels of inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1, MCS-F, Gro/KC, RANTES, and IL-1β) were detected first in serum (3–5 dpi) followed by brain (5–7 dpi). The results of this study are consistent with clinical data from human RVF patients and validate Lewis rats as an appropriate small animal model for RVF encephalitis. The biomarkers we identified here will be useful in future studies evaluating the efficacy of novel vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26779164

  11. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  12. Astrocyte response to St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Adriano Lara; Barros, Heber Leão Silva; de Mattos Silva Oliveira, Thelma Fátima; Chávez-Pavoni, Juliana Helena; Zanon, Renata Graciele

    2016-06-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), a flavivirus transmitted to humans by Culex mosquitoes, causes clinical symptoms ranging from acute febrile disorder to encephalitis. To reach the central nervous system (CNS) from circulating blood, the pathogen must cross the blood-brain barrier formed by endothelial cells and astrocytes. Because astrocytes play an essential role in CNS homeostasis, in this study these cells were infected with SLEV and investigated for astrogliosis, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I-dependent immune response, and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation. Cultures of Vero cells were used as a positive control for the viral infection. Cytopathic effects were observed in both types of cell cultures, and the cytotoxicity levels of the two were compared. Astrocytes infected with a dilution of 1E-01 (7.7E+08 PFU/mL) had a reduced mortality rate of more than 50% compared to the Vero cells. In addition, the astrocytes responded to the flavivirus infection with increased MHC-I expression and astrogliosis, characterized by intense glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and an increase in the number and length of cytoplasmic processes. When the astrocytes were exposed to higher viral concentrations, a proportional increase in caspase-3 expression was observed, as well as nuclear membrane destruction. SLEV immunostaining revealed a perinuclear location of the virus during the replication process. Together, these results suggest that mechanisms other than SLEV infection in astrocytes must be associated with the development of the neuroinvasive form of the disease. PMID:26975980

  13. Balint's syndrome in subacute HIV encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Schnider, A; Landis, T; Regard, M

    1991-01-01

    A 45 year old patient with AIDS is described in whom Balint's syndrome developed over several days without other higher cognitive defects. Radiological findings were typical of subacute HIV encephalitis involving mainly the white matter of the occipital lobes with extension into the parietal and temporal lobe on the left side and into the temporal lobe on the right side. While the patient could usually recognise only one single component within her visual field, her performance in reading much improved if she was allowed to observe the examiner writing. This finding is attributed to well preserved movement perception in our patient, which may have helped her in directing her visual attention. The preservation of movement perception despite damage to the lateral temporo-occipital area may be due to the distinct pathology of subacute HIV encephalitis, which leaves the cortex and adjacent subcortical white matter virtually intact and therefore allows information transfer between primary visual areas in the occipital lobe and movement specific areas in the lateral temporo-occipital area through U-fibres. Images PMID:1955902

  14. Vaccines: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... every day. That is now the case for teens, as well. Children encounter many infectious diseases, especially in ... such as encephalitis and deafness. Rubella, also known as the German measles, ... overview of what childhood and teen vaccines to take, when to take them, and ...

  15. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease. PMID:26160819

  16. Evaluation of intradermal vaccination at the anti rabies vaccination OPD.

    PubMed

    Mankeshwar, R; Silvanus, V; Akarte, S

    2014-09-01

    Rabies is a virtually 100% fatal acute viral encephalitis caused by an RNA virus belonging to family Rhabdoviridae and genus Lyssavirus. The virus can infect all warm blooded animals. The disease is transmitted to humans by the bite, lick or scratch of an infected animal. More than 99% of all human rabies deaths occur in the developing world. It is preventable with timely and proper usage of modern immunobiologicals (vaccines and immunoglobulins). Once exposure occurs, modern prophylaxis entails immediate wound care, local infiltration of rabies immune globulin and parenteral administration of modern cell culture vaccines in multiple doses. The annual medicinal (vaccines and other drugs) cost for animal bite treatment is Rs. 2 billion approximately (2004). The objective of the present study is to evaluate the performance of the Intradermal (i.d.) route visa vis the Intramuscular (i.m.) route in our clinical setting the Antirabies Vaccination (ARV) OPD, Sir J.J. Hospital, Mumbai. A total of 1460 patients were administered the Antirabies vaccine by the Intradermal route over the 1 year period as compared to 1075 patients who were administered the Antirabies vaccine by the Intramuscular route in the previous year. 1230 (84.2) of the patients who were administered the vaccine by the i.d. route completed the schedule and 230 (15.8%) partially completed the schedule. Four hundred thirty two (40%) of the patients who were administered the vaccine by the Intramuscular route completed the schedule and 643 (59.8%) partially completed the schedule. The vaccine cost for i.d. was Rs. 2,80,600. The vaccine cost for the intramuscular (i.m.) assuming 84% compliance was estimated as Rs. 15, 64, 000. Assuming 40% compliance the cost was estimated as Rs. 7, 82, 230. Thus a saving of Rs. 5, 01, 630 to Rs. 12, 83, 400 was effected. In our setting, the Intradermal regime was cost effective and increased patient adherence and enrolment. It has now been routinely adopted at the clinic

  17. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  18. FDG-PET hyperactivity pattern in anti-NMDAr encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Novy, Jan; Allenbach, Gilles; Bien, Christian G; Guedj, Eric; Prior, John O; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2016-08-15

    FDG-PET can show anteroposterior glucose metabolism gradient in anti-NMDAr encephalitis, but there are also suggestions that basal ganglia are involved. We examined FDG-PET scans in 5 consecutive episodes of serologically proven anti-NMDAr encephalitis, compared with healthy controls. We confirmed the anteroposterior metabolic gradient and found a significant FDG uptake increase in the caudate nuclei in episodes of varying intensity and delay from the onset of the symptoms. FDG-PET can be useful in the work-up of suspected anti-NMDAr encephalitis disclosing a characteristic cortical and sub-cortical metabolism pattern. PMID:27397089

  19. Japanese Media in English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Sachiko Oda

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of English in the media in Japan, focusing on the role and history of English-language newspapers, radio, and television programs, as well as the proliferation of English-language films shown in Japanese cinemas. Discusses the implications of English in the Japanese media. (20 references) (MDM)

  20. Japanese Quality Control Circles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishiyama, Kazuo

    In recent years, United States scholars with an interest in international business and organizational communication have begun to notice the success of Japanese "quality control circles." These are small groups, usually composed of seven to ten workers, who are organized at the production levels within most large Japanese factories. A typical…

  1. The Japanese containerless experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azuma, Hisao

    1990-01-01

    There are three sets of Japanese containerless experiments. The first is Drop dynamics research. It consists of acoustic levitation and large amplitude drop oscillation. The second is Optical materials processing in an acoustic levitation furnace. And the third is Electrostatic levitator development by two different Japanese companies.

  2. The Japanese American Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukei, Budd

    This book presents a view of the Japanese American experience from the time of their immigration to this country in the 1800s to their acculturation into American society in the 1970s. Topics dealt with include the prejudice and mistrust experienced by the Japanese immigrants in this country, particularly their evacuation and internment in…

  3. Japanese Elementary School Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Harold W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the development of Japanese elementary education in the context of three periods of its history. Considers salient characteristics of Japanese elementary schools and teaching procedures; these include curriculum; social and moral education; classroom environment; teachers; afterschool classes; college entrance examinations; the kyoiku…

  4. Extensive Reading in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitosugi, Claire Ikumi; Day, Richard R.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how we incorporated an extensive reading (ER) program into a second semester Japanese course at the University of Hawai'i using Japanese children's literature. After summarizing the ten principles of ER, we describe how we addressed six critical issues faced while introducing ER into the course. We also discuss the outcomes…

  5. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  6. Virus meningo-encephalitis in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, J. D.; van Tongeren, H. A. E.; Pattyn, S. R.; Rosenzweig, A.

    1955-01-01

    Two virus strains were isolated from the central nervous systems of two fatal human cases during an epidemic of encephalomyelitis in Austria. Monkeys, mice, and chick embryos proved susceptible; rabbits and guinea-pigs were refractory. The experimental disease in monkeys was characterized by acute meningo-encephalomyelitis, which was localized particularly in the grey matter of the brain stem, the cerebellum, the medulla, and the anterior horns of the spinal cord. The virus produced discrete lesions on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In monkeys, viraemia was demonstrated for a period of at least 6-8 days before the development of the clinical illness. The virus was shown to be closely related to that of Russian spring-summer encephalitis. Neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies could be demonstrated in patients' sera. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12 PMID:14378999

  7. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, José G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Freier, Jerome E.; Cordova, Dionicio; Clements, Tamara; Moncayo, Abelardo; Kang, Wenli; Gomez-Hernandez, Carlos; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Gabriela; Ludwig, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Equine epizootics of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) occurred in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas in 1993 and Oaxaca in 1996. To assess the impact of continuing circulation of VEE virus (VEEV) on human and animal populations, serologic and viral isolation studies were conducted in 2000 to 2001 in Chiapas State. Human serosurveys and risk analyses indicated that long-term endemic transmission of VEEV occurred among villages with seroprevalence levels of 18% to 75% and that medical personnel had a high risk for VEEV exposure. Seroprevalence in wild animals suggested cotton rats as possible reservoir hosts in the region. Virus isolations from sentinel animals and genetic characterizations of these strains indicated continuing circulation of a subtype IE genotype, which was isolated from equines during the recent VEE outbreaks. These data indicate long-term enzootic and endemic VEEV circulation in the region and continued risk for disease in equines and humans. PMID:15663847

  8. Clinical predictors of outcome in encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, C R; Duffy, S W; Smith, R; Robinson, R O

    1987-01-01

    Twenty five patients with encephalitis were studied prospectively, and their clinical and virological features compared with outcome. Among 22 patients with laboratory confirmation of virus infection, evidence of direct effect on the central nervous system by the virus occurred significantly more often both in those with a monophasic illness compared with those with a biphasic illness, and in those with focal neurological signs localising in the cerebral hemispheres compared with those without such signs. Young age at presentation, low score on the Glasgow coma scale, disruption of oculocephalic responses, and laboratory evidence of virus infection within the central nervous system were significantly associated with poor outcome. Computed tomography results, concentrations of creatine phosphokinase BB isoenzyme in cerebrospinal fluid, and procoagulant activity in cerebrospinal fluid were not predictive of outcome. PMID:3688920

  9. Milrinone in Enterovirus 71 Brain Stem Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Min

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) was implicated in a widespread outbreak of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) across the Asia Pacific area since 1997 and has also been reported sporadically in patients with brain stem encephalitis. Neurogenic shock with pulmonary edema (PE) is a fatal complication of EV71 infection. Among inotropic agents, milrinone is selected as a therapeutic agent for EV71- induced PE due to its immunopathogenesis. Milrinone is a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor that has both inotropic and vasodilator effects. Its clinical efficacy has been shown by modulating inflammation, reducing sympathetic over-activity, and improving survival in patients with EV71-associated PE. Milrinone exhibits immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in the management of systemic inflammatory responses in severe EV71 infection. PMID:27065870

  10. Asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy after acute enteroviral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vitaszil, Edina; Kamondi, Anita; Csillik, Anita; Velkey, Imre; Szirmai, Imre

    2005-07-01

    We report on a 13-year-old male who had acute enteroviral encephalitis causing cerebellar symptoms at the age of 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities. Clinically he appeared to be recovered completely after 6 months. Twenty-three months after the recovery, MRI was performed because he presented with slight lower-limb and truncal ataxia experienced as lack of foot coordination while playing football or riding a bicycle. MRI demonstrated severe cerebellar atrophy. Clinically he recovered completely in 10 days. Only sophisticated electrophysiological methods revealed cerebellar dysfunction. The case provides evidence for the plasticity of cerebellar regulatory structures involved in the coordination of fine movements. It seems that in childhood the slow, isolated disintegration of cerebellar systems can be compensated for by upper thalamic or telencephalic connections, in a similar way to a congenital deficit of the cerebellum. PMID:15991870

  11. A biometeorological model of an encephalitis vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Multiple linear regression techniques and seven years of data were used to build a biometeorological model of Winnipeg's mean daily levels of Culex tarsalis Coquillett. An eighth year of data was used to test the model. Hydrologic accounting of precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff provided estimates of wetness while the warmness of the season was gauged in terms of the average temperature difference from normal and a threshold antecedent temperature regime. These factors were found to be highly correlated with the time-series of Cx. tarsalis counts. The impact of mosquito adulticiding measures was included in the model via a control effectiveness parameter. An activity-level adjustment, based on mean daily temperatures, was also made to the counts. This model can, by monitoring the weather, provide forecasts of Cx. tarsalis populations for Winnipeg with a lead-time of three weeks, thereby, contributing to an early warning of an impending Western Equine Encephalitis outbreak.

  12. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; Cervarix; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer ... HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are several types of HPV. ...

  13. Diphtheria Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... and adults - Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular Pertussis vaccine Diphtheria Vaccination Pronounced (dif-THEER-ee-a) Recommend on Facebook ... Related Pages Pertussis Tetanus Feature Story: Adults Need Immunizations, Too Abbreviations DTaP=Pediatric - Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis ...

  14. Tracking the global spread of vaccine sentiments: The global response to Japan's suspension of its HPV vaccine recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Heidi J; Wilson, Rose; Hanley, Sharon; Parys, Astrid; Paterson, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    In June 2013 the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) suspended its HPV vaccination recommendation after a series of highly publicized alleged adverse events following immunization stoked public doubts about the vaccine's safety. This paper examines the global spread of the news of Japan's HPV vaccine suspension through online media, and takes a retrospective look at non-Japanese media sources that were used to support those claiming HPV vaccine injury in Japan. Methods: Two searches were conducted. One searched relevant content in an archive of Google Alerts on vaccines and vaccine preventable diseases. The second search was conducted using Google Search on January 6th 2014 and on July 18th 2014, using the keywords, “HPV vaccine Japan” and “cervical cancer vaccine Japan.” Both searches were used as Google Searches render more (and some different) results than Google Alerts. Results: Online media collected and analyzed totalled 57. Sixty 3 percent were published in the USA, 23% in Japan, 5% in the UK, 2% in France, 2% in Switzerland, 2% in the Philippines, 2% in Kenya and 2% in Denmark. The majority took a negative view of the HPV vaccine, the primary concern being vaccine safety. Discussion: The news of Japan's suspension of the HPV vaccine recommendation has traveled globally through online media and social media networks, being applauded by anti-vaccination groups but not by the global scientific community. The longer the uncertainty around the Japanese HPV vaccine recommendation persists, the further the public concerns are likely to travel. PMID:25483472

  15. Giardia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Olson, M E; Ceri, H; Morck, D W

    2000-05-01

    Recently, a Giardia vaccine has become commercially available in the U