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Sample records for jasmonate controls late

  1. Jasmonate controls late development stages of petal growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Brioudes, Florian; Joly, Caroline; Szécsi, Judit; Varaud, Emilie; Leroux, Julie; Bellvert, Floriant; Bertrand, Cédric; Bendahmane, Mohammed

    2009-12-01

    In Arabidopsis, four homeotic gene classes, A, B, C and E, are required for the patterning of floral organs. However, very little is known about how the activity of these master genes is translated into regulatory processes leading to specific growth patterns and the formation of organs with specific shapes and sizes. Previously we showed that the transcript variant BPEp encodes a bHLH transcription factor that is involved in limiting petal size by controlling post-mitotic cell expansion. Here we show that the phytohormone jasmonate is required for control of BPEp expression. Expression of BPEp was negatively regulated in opr3 mutant flowers that are deficient in jasmonate synthesis. Moreover, the expression of BPEp was restored in opr3 flowers following exogenous jasmonate treatments. Expression of the second transcript variant BPEub, which originates from the same gene as BPEp via an alternative splicing event, was not affected, indicating that BPEp accumulation triggered by jasmonate occurs at the post-transcriptional level. Consistent with these data, opr3 exhibited an increase in petal size as a result of increased cell size, as well as a modified vein pattern, phenotypes that are similar to those of the bpe-1 mutant. Furthermore, exogenous treatments with jasmonate rescued petal phenotypes associated with loss of function of OPR3. Our data demonstrate that jasmonate signaling downstream of OPR3 is involved in the control of cell expansion and in limiting petal size, and that BPEp is a downstream target that functions as a component mediating jasmonate signaling during petal growth. PMID:19765234

  2. Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, Fanny; Ksas, Brigitte; Havaux, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Under stress conditions that bring about excessive absorption of light energy in the chloroplasts, the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) can be strongly enhanced, triggering programmed cell death. However, the 1O2 signaling pathway can also lead to acclimation to photooxidative stress, when 1O2 is produced in relatively low amounts. This acclimatory response is associated with a strong downregulation of the jasmonate biosynthesis pathway and the maintenance of low jasmonate levels, even under high light stress conditions that normally induce jasmonate synthesis. These findings suggest a central role for this phytohormone in the orientation of the 1O2 signaling pathway toward cell death or acclimation. This conclusion is confirmed here in an Arabidopsis double mutant obtained by crossing the 1O2-overproducing mutant ch1 and the jasmonate-deficient mutant dde2. This double mutant was found to be constitutively resistant to 1O2 stress and to display a strongly stimulated growth rate compared with the single ch1 mutant. However, the involvement of other phytohormones, such as ethylene, cannot be excluded. PMID:24103864

  3. Jasmonates: Emerging Players in Controlling Temperature Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manvi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2016-01-01

    The sedentary life of plants has forced them to live in an environment that is characterized by the presence of numerous challenges in terms of biotic and abiotic stresses. Phytohormones play essential roles in mediating plant physiology and alleviating various environmental perturbations. Jasmonates are a group of oxylipin compounds occurring ubiquitously in the plant kingdom that play pivotal roles in response to developmental and environmental cues. Jasmonates (JAs) have been shown to participate in unison with key factors of other signal transduction pathway, including those involved in response to abiotic stress. Recent findings have furnished large body of information suggesting the role of jasmonates in cold and heat stress. JAs have been shown to regulate C-repeat binding factor (CBF) pathway during cold stress. The interaction between the integrants of JA signaling and components of CBF pathway demonstrates a complex relationship between the two. JAs have also been shown to counteract chilling stress by inducing ROS avoidance enzymes. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest the positive regulation of thermotolerance by JA. The present review provides insights into biosynthesis, signal transduction pathway of jasmonic acid and their role in response to temperature stress. PMID:26779205

  4. Control of Carbon Assimilation and Partitioning by Jasmonate: An Accounting of Growth–Defense Tradeoffs

    PubMed Central

    Havko, Nathan E.; Major, Ian T.; Jewell, Jeremy B.; Attaran, Elham; Browse, John; Howe, Gregg A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth is often constrained by the limited availability of resources in the microenvironment. Despite the continuous threat of attack from insect herbivores and pathogens, investment in defense represents a lost opportunity to expand photosynthetic capacity in leaves and absorption of nutrients and water by roots. To mitigate the metabolic expenditure on defense, plants have evolved inducible defense strategies. The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of many inducible defenses. Synthesis of JA in response to perceived danger leads to the deployment of a variety of defensive structures and compounds, along with a potent inhibition of growth. Genetic studies have established an important role for JA in mediating tradeoffs between growth and defense. However, several gaps remain in understanding of how JA signaling inhibits growth, either through direct transcriptional control of JA-response genes or crosstalk with other signaling pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in uncovering the role of JA in controlling growth-defense balance and its relationship to resource acquisition and allocation. We also discuss tradeoffs in the context of the ability of JA to promote increased leaf mass per area (LMA), which is a key indicator of leaf construction costs and leaf life span. PMID:27135227

  5. Control of Carbon Assimilation and Partitioning by Jasmonate: An Accounting of Growth-Defense Tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Havko, Nathan E; Major, Ian T; Jewell, Jeremy B; Attaran, Elham; Browse, John; Howe, Gregg A

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth is often constrained by the limited availability of resources in the microenvironment. Despite the continuous threat of attack from insect herbivores and pathogens, investment in defense represents a lost opportunity to expand photosynthetic capacity in leaves and absorption of nutrients and water by roots. To mitigate the metabolic expenditure on defense, plants have evolved inducible defense strategies. The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) is a key regulator of many inducible defenses. Synthesis of JA in response to perceived danger leads to the deployment of a variety of defensive structures and compounds, along with a potent inhibition of growth. Genetic studies have established an important role for JA in mediating tradeoffs between growth and defense. However, several gaps remain in understanding of how JA signaling inhibits growth, either through direct transcriptional control of JA-response genes or crosstalk with other signaling pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in uncovering the role of JA in controlling growth-defense balance and its relationship to resource acquisition and allocation. We also discuss tradeoffs in the context of the ability of JA to promote increased leaf mass per area (LMA), which is a key indicator of leaf construction costs and leaf life span. PMID:27135227

  6. Negative feedback control of jasmonate signaling by an alternative splice variant of JAZ10.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier E; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L; Patel, Lalita C; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses. PMID:23632853

  7. Control of storage rot by induction of plant defense mechanisms using jasmonic acid and salicylic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Storage rots contribute to sugarbeet postharvest losses by consuming sucrose and producing carbohydrate impurities that increase sugar loss to molasses. Presently, storage rots are controlled by cooling storage piles. This method of control, however, requires favorable weather conditions for stora...

  8. Negative Feedback Control of Jasmonate Signaling by an Alternative Splice Variant of JAZ101[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier E.; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L.; Patel, Lalita C.; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses. PMID:23632853

  9. Detritivorous crustaceans become herbivores on jasmonate-deficient plants.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Edward E; Dubugnon, Lucie

    2009-01-20

    The jasmonate signal pathway is known to control defenses against herbivores, such as leaf eaters (folivores). Does the reach of the pathway extend to defense against other types of animal? Among the arthropods attracted to seed baits placed below flowering Arabidopsis thaliana plants are 2 largely nocturnal isopod crustaceans generally considered as detritivores: Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare. Parallel laboratory experiments identified the isopods as being capable of predation on intact plants. Isopod feeding was strongly facilitated in jasmonate-deficient Arabidopsis and rice plants. The feeding activity of isopods revealed potentially detritivore-sensitive, jasmonate-protected Achilles' heels in these architecturally different plants (petioles and inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis, and lower stem and mesocotyl in rice). The work addresses the question of what stops 2 detritivores from attacking living plants and provides evidence that it is, in part, the jasmonate signal pathway. Furthermore, senescent leaves from an Arabidopsis jasmonate mutant were consumed more rapidly than senescent wild-type leaves, suggesting that past activity of the jasmonate signal pathway in leaves may slow carbon recycling through detritivory. PMID:19139394

  10. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  11. Gibberellin Acts through Jasmonate to Control the Expression of MYB21, MYB24, and MYB57 to Promote Stamen Filament Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Langtao; Soo, Hui Meng; Cheng, Zhiwei; Xie, Daoxin; Peng, Jinrong

    2009-01-01

    Precise coordination between stamen and pistil development is essential to make a fertile flower. Mutations impairing stamen filament elongation, pollen maturation, or anther dehiscence will cause male sterility. Deficiency in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) causes male sterility due to accumulation of DELLA proteins, and GA triggers DELLA degradation to promote stamen development. Deficiency in plant hormone jasmonate (JA) also causes male sterility. However, little is known about the relationship between GA and JA in controlling stamen development. Here, we show that MYB21, MYB24, and MYB57 are GA-dependent stamen-enriched genes. Loss-of-function of two DELLAs RGA and RGL2 restores the expression of these three MYB genes together with restoration of stamen filament growth in GA-deficient plants. Genetic analysis showed that the myb21-t1 myb24-t1 myb57-t1 triple mutant confers a short stamen phenotype leading to male sterility. Further genetic and molecular studies demonstrate that GA suppresses DELLAs to mobilize the expression of the key JA biosynthesis gene DAD1, and this is consistent with the observation that the JA content in the young flower buds of the GA-deficient quadruple mutant ga1-3 gai-t6 rga-t2 rgl1-1 is much lower than that in the WT. We conclude that GA promotes JA biosynthesis to control the expression of MYB21, MYB24, and MYB57. Therefore, we have established a hierarchical relationship between GA and JA in that modulation of JA pathway by GA is one of the prerequisites for GA to regulate the normal stamen development in Arabidopsis. PMID:19325888

  12. The Rise and Fall of Jasmonate Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Thierry; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Widemann, Emilie; Aubert, Yann; Pinot, Franck; Ménard, Rozenn

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) constitute a major class of plant regulators that coordinate responses to biotic and abiotic threats and important aspects of plant development. The core biosynthetic pathway converts linolenic acid released from plastid membrane lipids to the cyclopentenone cis-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) that is further reduced and shortened to jasmonic acid (JA) in peroxisomes. Abundant pools of OPDA esterified to plastid lipids also occur upon stress, mainly in the Arabidopsis genus. Long thought to be the bioactive hormone, JA only gains its pleiotropic hormonal properties upon conjugation into jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile). The signaling pathway triggered when JA-Ile promotes the assembly of COI1-JAZ (Coronatine Insensitive 1-JAsmonate Zim domain) co-receptor complexes has been the focus of most recent research in the jasmonate field. In parallel, OPDA and several other JA derivatives are recognized for their separate activities and contribute to the diversity of jasmonate action in plant physiology. We summarize in this chapter the properties of different bioactive JAs and review elements known for their perception and signal transduction. Much progress has also been gained on the enzymatic processes governing JA-Ile removal. Two JA-Ile catabolic pathways, operating through ω-oxidation (cytochromes P450) or conjugate cleavage (amido hydrolases) shape signal dynamics to allow optimal control on defense. JA-Ile turnover not only participates in signal attenuation, but also impact the homeostasis of the entire JA metabolic pathway. PMID:27023244

  13. The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion.

    PubMed

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Boland, Wilhelm; Heil, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Plants produce nectar in their flowers as a reward for their pollinators and most of our crops depend on insect pollination, but little is known on the physiological control of nectar secretion. Jasmonates are well-known for their effects on senescence, the development and opening of flowers and on plant defences such as extrafloral nectar. Their role in floral nectar secretion has, however, not been explored so far. We investigated whether jasmonates have an influence on floral nectar secretion in oil-seed rape, Brassica napus. The floral tissues of this plant produced jasmonic acid (JA) endogenously, and JA concentrations peaked shortly before nectar secretion was highest. Exogenous application of JA to flowers induced nectar secretion, which was suppressed by treatment with phenidone, an inhibitor of JA synthesis. This effect could be reversed by additional application of JA. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine and its structural mimic coronalon also increased nectar secretion. Herbivory or addition of JA to the leaves did not have an effect on floral nectar secretion, demonstrating a functional separation of systemic defence signalling from reproductive nectar secretion. Jasmonates, which have been intensively studied in the context of herbivore defences and flower development, have a profound effect on floral nectar secretion and, thus, pollination efficiency in B. napus. Our results link floral nectar secretion to jasmonate signalling and thereby integrate the floral nectar secretion into the complex network of oxylipid-mediated developmental processes of plants. PMID:20174464

  14. Low Self-Control and Crime in Late Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Scott E; Reisig, Michael D; Holtfreter, Kristy

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates whether low self-control theory explains self-reported criminal activity in late adulthood. Cross-sectional survey data from telephone interviews conducted with individuals aged 60 years and older in Arizona and Florida (N = 2,000) are used. Regression analyses show that low self-control is related to criminal offending. The relationship between low self-control and offending persists after the introduction of potential mediators (e.g., unstructured socializing, negative emotions, and familial ties) and is even observed across different stages of late adulthood (i.e., young-old, old-old, and oldest-old) characterized by declining physical and cognitive abilities. Robustness checks using alternative measurement and modeling strategies also provide empirical support. Although strong causal inferences are limited by the nature of the data, the findings generally support the notion that low self-control theory partially explains criminal offending in late adulthood. PMID:26355034

  15. JASMONATE-TRIGGERED PLANT IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Marcelo L.; Kang, Jin-Ho; Howe, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) exerts direct control over the production of chemical defense compounds that confer resistance to a remarkable spectrum of plant-associated organisms, ranging from microbial pathogens to vertebrate herbivores. The underlying mechanism of JA-triggered immunity (JATI) can be conceptualized as a multi-stage signal transduction cascade involving: i) pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that couple the perception of danger signals to rapid synthesis of bioactive JA; ii) an evolutionarily conserved JA signaling module that links fluctuating JA levels to changes in the abundance of transcriptional repressor proteins; and iii) activation (de-repression) of transcription factors that orchestrate the expression of myriad chemical and morphological defense traits. Multiple negative feedback loops act in concert to restrain the duration and amplitude of defense responses, presumably to mitigate potential fitness costs of JATI. The convergence of diverse plant- and non-plant-derived signals on the core JA module indicates that JATI is a general response to perceived danger. However, the modular structure of JATI may accommodate attacker-specific defense responses through evolutionary innovation of PRRs (inputs) and defense traits (outputs). The efficacy of JATI as a defense strategy is highlighted by its capacity to shape natural populations of plant attackers, as well as the propensity of plant-associated organisms to subvert or otherwise manipulate JA signaling. As both a cellular hub for integrating informational cues from the environment and a common target of pathogen effectors, the core JA module provides a focal point for understanding immune system networks and the evolution of chemical diversity in the plant kingdom. PMID:24973116

  16. Jasmonic Acid and Its Precursor 12-Oxophytodienoic Acid Control Different Aspects of Constitutive and Induced Herbivore Defenses in Tomato1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Marko; Wright, Louwrance P.; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina; Schaller, Andreas; Stintzi, Annick

    2014-01-01

    The jasmonate family of growth regulators includes the isoleucine (Ile) conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA-Ile) and its biosynthetic precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) as signaling molecules. To assess the relative contribution of JA/JA-Ile and OPDA to insect resistance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), we silenced the expression of OPDA reductase3 (OPR3) by RNA interference (RNAi). Consistent with a block in the biosynthetic pathway downstream of OPDA, OPR3-RNAi plants contained wild-type levels of OPDA but failed to accumulate JA or JA-Ile after wounding. JA/JA-Ile deficiency in OPR3-RNAi plants resulted in reduced trichome formation and impaired monoterpene and sesquiterpene production. The loss of these JA/JA-Ile -dependent defense traits rendered them more attractive to the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta with respect to feeding and oviposition. Oviposition preference resulted from reduced levels of repellant monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Feeding preference, on the other hand, was caused by increased production of cis-3-hexenal acting as a feeding stimulant for M. sexta larvae in OPR3-RNAi plants. Despite impaired constitutive defenses and increased palatability of OPR3-RNAi leaves, larval development was indistinguishable on OPR3-RNAi and wild-type plants, and was much delayed compared with development on the jasmonic acid-insensitive1 (jai1) mutant. Apparently, signaling through JAI1, the tomato ortholog of the ubiquitin ligase CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for defense, whereas the conversion of OPDA to JA/JA-Ile is not. Comparing the signaling activities of OPDA and JA/JA-Ile, we found that OPDA can substitute for JA/JA-Ile in the local induction of defense gene expression, but the production of JA/JA-Ile is required for a systemic response. PMID:25073705

  17. Biological control of post-harvest late blight of potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of US-8 genotypes of Phytophthora infestans has coincided with an increase in severity of potato late blight in North America. As alternatives to chemical fungicides, 18 bacterial strains patented as biological control agents (BCA) of both sprouting and Fusarium dry rot were cultivated...

  18. Late-acting dominant lethal genetic systems and mosquito control

    PubMed Central

    Phuc, Hoang Kim; Andreasen, Morten H; Burton, Rosemary S; Vass, Céline; Epton, Matthew J; Pape, Gavin; Fu, Guoliang; Condon, Kirsty C; Scaife, Sarah; Donnelly, Christl A; Coleman, Paul G; White-Cooper, Helen; Alphey, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Background Reduction or elimination of vector populations will tend to reduce or eliminate transmission of vector-borne diseases. One potential method for environmentally-friendly, species-specific population control is the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). SIT has not been widely used against insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes, in part because of various practical difficulties in rearing, sterilization and distribution. Additionally, vector populations with strong density-dependent effects will tend to be resistant to SIT-based control as the population-reducing effect of induced sterility will tend to be offset by reduced density-dependent mortality. Results We investigated by mathematical modeling the effect of manipulating the stage of development at which death occurs (lethal phase) in an SIT program against a density-dependence-limited insect population. We found late-acting lethality to be considerably more effective than early-acting lethality. No such strains of a vector insect have been described, so as a proof-of-principle we constructed a strain of the principal vector of the dengue and yellow fever viruses, Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, with the necessary properties of dominant, repressible, highly penetrant, late-acting lethality. Conclusion Conventional SIT induces early-acting (embryonic) lethality, but genetic methods potentially allow the lethal phase to be tailored to the program. For insects with strong density-dependence, we show that lethality after the density-dependent phase would be a considerable improvement over conventional methods. For density-dependent parameters estimated from field data for Aedes aegypti, the critical release ratio for population elimination is modeled to be 27% to 540% greater for early-acting rather than late-acting lethality. Our success in developing a mosquito strain with the key features that the modeling indicated were desirable demonstrates the feasibility of this approach for improved SIT for disease

  19. Ethylene and jasmonic acid act as negative modulators during mutualistic symbiosis between Laccaria bicolor and Populus roots.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Khachane, Amit; Ouassou, Malika; Sundberg, Björn; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2014-04-01

    The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid have interconnecting roles during the response of plant tissues to mutualistic and pathogenic symbionts. We used morphological studies of transgenic- or hormone-treated Populus roots as well as whole-genome oligoarrays to examine how these hormones affect root colonization by the mutualistic ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N. We found that genes regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid were regulated in the late stages of the interaction between L. bicolor and poplar. Both ethylene and jasmonic acid treatments were found to impede fungal colonization of roots, and this effect was correlated to an increase in the expression of certain transcription factors (e.g. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1) and a decrease in the expression of genes associated with microbial perception and cell wall modification. Further, we found that ethylene and jasmonic acid showed extensive transcriptional cross-talk, cross-talk that was opposed by salicylic acid signaling. We conclude that ethylene and jasmonic acid pathways are induced late in the colonization of root tissues in order to limit fungal growth within roots. This induction is probably an adaptive response by the plant such that its growth and vigor are not compromised by the fungus. PMID:24383411

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Li; Shi, Bao-Lin; Wei, Dong; Chen, Jian-Xin; Wang, Su-Li; Gao, Bao-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB), the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite. PMID:26457083

  1. Simultaneous Determination of Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid, Methyl Salicylate, and Methyl Jasmonate from Ulmus pumila Leaves by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-hong; Wang, Zhi-li; Shi, Bao-lin; Wei, Dong; Chen, Jian-xin; Wang, Su-li; Gao, Bao-jia

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate are important phytohormones and defensive signaling compounds, so it is of great importance to determine their levels rapidly and accurately. The study uses Ulmus pumila leaves infected by Tetraneura akinire Sasaki at different stages as materials; after extraction with 80% methanol and ethyl acetate and purification with primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon blacks (GCB), the contents of signal compounds salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the level of salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, methyl salicylate, and methyl jasmonate increased remarkably in U. pumila once infected by T. akinire Sasaki, but the maximums of these four compounds occurred at different times. Salicylic acid level reached the highest at the early stage, and jasmonic acid level went to the maximum in the middle stage; by contrast, change of content of methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate was the quite opposite. PMID:26457083

  2. Jasmonic acid induced resistance in grapevines to a root and leaf feeder.

    PubMed

    Omer, A D; Thaler, J S; Granett, J; Karban, R

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the effects of induced resistance to the folivore Pacific spider mite, Tetranychus pacificus McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae), as well as the root-feeding grape phylloxera Daktulosphaira vitifoliae (Fitch) (Homoptera: Phylloxeridae) in grapevines using exogenous applications of the natural plant inducer, jasmonic acid. Foliar jasmonic acid application at concentrations that caused no phytotoxicity significantly reduced the performance of both herbivores. There were less than half as many eggs produced by spider mites feeding on the induced leaves compared with control grapevine leaves. Induction reduced the numbers of phylloxera eggs and nymphal instars by approximately threefold and twofold, respectively, on induced compared with control grapevine roots. The negative demographic effects of jasmonic acid application appeared to be caused by changes in fecundity for the Pacific spider mite, and possibly changes in development rate and fecundity for grape phylloxera. PMID:10902339

  3. The Ubiquitin System and Jasmonate Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nagels Durand, Astrid; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin (Ub) system is involved in most, if not all, biological processes in eukaryotes. The major specificity determinants of this system are the E3 ligases, which bind and ubiquitinate specific sets of proteins and are thereby responsible for target recruitment to the proteasome or other cellular processing machineries. The Ub system contributes to the regulation of the production, perception and signal transduction of plant hormones. Jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives, known as jasmonates (JAs), act as signaling compounds regulating plant development and plant responses to various biotic and abiotic stress conditions. We provide here an overview of the current understanding of the Ub system involved in JA signaling. PMID:27135226

  4. Jasmonates: signal transduction components and their roles in environmental stress responses.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Jonas; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Schweizer, Fabian; Goossens, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Jasmonates, oxylipin-type plant hormones, are implicated in diverse aspects of plant growth development and interaction with the environment. Following diverse developmental and environmental cues, jasmonate is produced, conjugated to the amino acid isoleucine and perceived by a co-receptor complex composed of the Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins and an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing the F-box CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1). This event triggers the degradation of the JAZ proteins and the release of numerous transcription factors, including MYC2 and its homologues, which are otherwise bound and inhibited by the JAZ repressors. Here, we will review the role of the COI1, JAZ and MYC2 proteins in the interaction of the plant with its environment, illustrating the significance of jasmonate signalling, and of the proteins involved, for responses to both biotic stresses caused by insects and numerous microbial pathogens and abiotic stresses caused by adverse climatic conditions. It has also become evident that crosstalk with other hormone signals, as well as light and clock signals, plays an important role in the control and fine-tuning of these stress responses. Finally, we will discuss how several pathogens exploit the jasmonate perception and early signalling machinery to decoy the plants defence systems. PMID:27086135

  5. Dietary control of late trypsin gene transcription in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Noriega, F G; Barillas-Mury, C; Wells, M A

    1994-06-01

    In Aedes aegypti the levels of midgut trypsin activity after feeding are directly proportional to the protein concentration in the meal. The mechanisms of this up-regulatory event were investigated by analyzing the expression of the late trypsin gene under different dietary conditions. Transcription of the gene was dependent on both the quality and quantity of protein in the meal. As measured by Northern blot analysis, the levels of late trypsin gene expression increased up to 100-fold 24 h after feeding on gamma-globulin, hemoglobin or albumin (100 mg/ml). In contrast, gelatin, histone, amino acids, saline or agarose were very poor inducers of transcription. The rates of late trypsin transcription induced during the first 24 h were directly proportional to the concentration of protein in the meal. These data further support the suggestion that the primary mechanism that regulates the synthesis of trypsin in the mosquito midgut is transcriptional regulation of the gene. This regulatory mechanism enables the midgut to maintain the appropriate balance between protease synthesis and the protein content of the meal. PMID:7519098

  6. Methyl jasmonate induction of tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots is mediated by JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN repressor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jianlin; Huang, Shengxiong; Wang, Huizhong; Kai, Guoyin

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is an important plant hormone involved in regulation of many aspects of plant growth and development including secondary metabolism and JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are key components in JA signal processes. In this study, two new JAZ genes named SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 were cloned from S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots and characterized. Expression profiles under methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment revealed that SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 were both MJ-responsive. Subcellular localization assay showed that SmJAZ3 was located in nucleus while SmJAZ9 was preferentially in nucleus. Expression of SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots differently affected the production of tanshinone. Over-expression of SmJAZ3 or SmJAZ9 in hairy roots produced lower level of tanshinone compared with the control, tanshinone production was as low as 0.077 mg/g DW in line SmJAZ3-3 and 0.266 mg/g DW in line SmJAZ9-22. Whereas, down-regulation of SmJAZs enhanced tanshione production, the content of tanshinone increased to 2.48 fold in anti-SmJAZ3-3 line, and 1.35-fold in anti-SmJAZ9-23 line. Our work indicated that SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 are involved in regulation of tanshinone biosynthesis and act as repressive transcriptional regulators in the JA signaling pathway, which paves the way to further dissect molecular mechanism in details in the future. PMID:26875847

  7. The impact of early bilingualism on controlling a language learned late: an ERP study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Clara D.; Strijkers, Kristof; Santesteban, Mikel; Escera, Carles; Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Costa, Albert

    2013-01-01

    This study asks whether early bilingual speakers who have already developed a language control mechanism to handle two languages control a dominant and a late acquired language in the same way as late bilingual speakers. We therefore, compared event-related potentials in a language switching task in two groups of participants switching between a dominant (L1) and a weak late acquired language (L3). Early bilingual late learners of an L3 showed a different ERP pattern (larger N2 mean amplitude) as late bilingual late learners of an L3. Even though the relative strength of languages was similar in both groups (a dominant and a weak late acquired language), they controlled their language output in a different manner. Moreover, the N2 was similar in two groups of early bilinguals tested in languages of different strength. We conclude that early bilingual learners of an L3 do not control languages in the same way as late bilingual L3 learners –who have not achieved native-like proficiency in their L2– do. This difference might explain some of the advantages early bilinguals have when learning new languages. PMID:24204355

  8. Connectivity controls on the late Miocene eastern Mediterranean fish fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agiadi, Konstantina; Antonarakou, Assimina; Kontakiotis, George; Kafousia, Nefeli; Moissette, Pierre; Cornée, Jean-Jacques; Manoutsoglou, Emmanouil; Karakitsios, Vasileios

    2016-06-01

    Environmental change significantly affects the production of fish resources and their dependent societies. The paleontological record offers unique insight into the effects of long-term paleoenvironmental variability on the fish species' distributions and abundances. In the present study, we investigate the late Miocene (7.5-6.5 Ma) fish assemblages of the Potamida section in western Crete (eastern Mediterranean). The determined fish taxa are examined in a paleobiogeographic context, with regard to their geographic and stratigraphic distribution from the early Miocene (~13 Ma) through today. In addition, present-day ecological data are used to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental conditions in the study area. Planktonic foraminifer biostratigraphy significantly improves the earlier dating of the studied sequence. The late Miocene fish fauna of Potamida includes 35 taxa (seven in open nomenclature) from 13 teleost families. The eastern Mediterranean biostratigraphic and geographic distribution of 32 taxa is significantly expanded into the Tortonian, whereas 13 species are recorded for the first time from the Messinian. Four stages are distinguished in the area's paleoenvironmental evolution. (1) The Potamida area was an open marine environment with depths exceeding 150 m between ~7.5-7.45 Ma. (2) Between 7.45-7.36 Ma, the results suggest depths between 300-400 m. (3) The depositional depth increases between 7.36-7.28 Ma to 400-550 m. (4) Later on, approximately between 6.8-6.6 Ma, the depth is again estimated around 100-150 m.

  9. Exogenous jasmonic acid induces stress tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exposed to imazapic.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Armagan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is one of the important phytohormones, regulating the stress responses as well as plant growth and development. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous JA application on stress responses of tobacco plant exposed to imazapic. In this study, phytotoxic responses resulting from both imazapic and imazapic combined with JA treatment are investigated comparatively for tobacco plants. For plants treated with imazapic at different concentrations (0.030, 0.060 and 0.120mM), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase), carotenoids, glutathione and malondialdehyte (MDA) contents, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid levels as well as herbicide residue amounts on leaves increased in general compared to the control group. In the plants treated with 45µM jasmonic acid, pigment content, antioxidant activity and phytohormone level increased whereas MDA content and the amount of herbicidal residue decreased compared to the non-treated plants. Our findings show that imazapic treatment induces some phytotoxic responses on tobacco leaves and that exogenous jasmonic acid treatment alleviates the negative effects of herbicide treatment by regulating these responses. PMID:26629659

  10. [Content of Osmolytes and Flavonoids under Salt Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Defective in Jasmonate Signaling].

    PubMed

    Yastreb, T O; Kolupaev, Yu E; Lugovaya, A A; Dmitriev, A P

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the salt stress (200 mM NaCl) and exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) on levels of osmolytes and flavonoids in leaves of four-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants of the wild-type (WT) Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the mutant jin1 (jasmonate insensitive 1) with impaired jasmonate signaling were studied. The increase in proline content caused by the salt stress was higher in the Col-0 plants than in the mutant jin1. This difference was especially marked if the plants had been pretreated with exogenous 0.1 µM JA. The sugar content increased in response to the salt stress in the JA-treated WT plants but decreased in the jin1 mutant. Leaf treatment with JA of the WT plants but not mutant defective in jasmonate signaling also enhanced the levels of anthocyanins and flavonoids absorbed in UV-B range. The presence of JA increased salinity resistance of the Col-0 plants, since the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and growth inhibition caused by NaCl were less pronounced. Under salt stress, JA almost did not render a positive effect on the jin1 plants. It is concluded that the protein JIN1/MYC2 is involved in control of protective systems under salt stress. PMID:27266252

  11. Effects of Light and Wounding on Jasmonates in Rice phyAphyC Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Rita; Svyatyna, Katharina; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Reichelt, Michael; Mithöfer, Axel; Takano, Makoto; Kamiya, Yuji; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonates (JA) are lipid-derived plant hormones. They have been shown to be important regulators of photomorphogenesis, a developmental program in plants, which is activated by light through different red and blue light sensitive photoreceptors. In rice, inhibition of coleoptile growth by light is a central event in photomorphogenesis. This growth inhibition is impaired, when jasmonate biosynthesis is knocked out. Previously, we found that JASMONATE RESISTANT 1 (OsJAR1) transcripts were not induced in the phytochrome (phy) mutant phyAphyC. Therefore, in the current study we investigated the regulation of JA and its highly bioactive derivative (+)-7-iso-jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile), as well as the transcriptional regulation of several JA-dependent genes both in wild type and phyAphyC mutant. JA and JA-Ile levels increased in the mutant seedlings in response to blue light. However, in phyAphyC mutant leaves, which were continuously wounded, JA and JA-Ile levels were lower compared to those in the wild type. Hence, the mutation of phyA and phyC has differential effects on jasmonate levels depending on the tissue and developmental stage. Our results suggest that the contribution of JA-Ile to signaling during photomorphogenesis of rice is minor, as coleoptile phenotypes of phyAphyC mutants resemble those of jasmonate-deficient mutants despite the fact that induction by blue light leads to higher levels of JA-Ile compared to the wild type. We postulate that phyA and phyC could control the activity of specific enzymes metabolizing JA to active derivatives. PMID:27135497

  12. Defense signaling among interconnected ramets of a rhizomatous clonal plant, induced by jasmonic-acid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Song; Lei, Ning-Fei; Liu, Qing

    2011-07-01

    Resource sharing between ramets of clonal plants is a well-known phenomenon that allows stoloniferous and rhizomatous species to internally transport water, mineral nutrients and carbohydrates from sites of high supply to sites of high demand. Moreover, vascular ramet connections are likely to provide an excellent means to share substances other than resources, such as defense signals. In a greenhouse experiment, the rhizomatous sedge Carex alrofusca, consisting of integrated ramets of different ages, was used to study the transmission of defense signals through belowground rhizome connections in response to local spray with jasmonic-acid. A feeding preference test with the caterpillar Gynaephora rnenyuanensis was employed to assess benefits of rhizome connections on defense signaling. Young ramets were more responsive to jasmonic-acid treatment than middle-aged or old ramets. Condensed tannin content in the foliage of young ramets showed a significant increase and soluble carbohydrate and nitrogen content showed marginally significant decreases in the 1 mM jasmonic-acid treatment but not in control and/or 0.0001 mM jasmonic-acid treatments. The caterpillar G. rnenyuanensis preferentially grazed young ramets. After a localized spray of 1 mM jasmonic-acid, the leaf area of young ramets consumed by herbivores was greatly reduced. We propose that defense signals may be transmitted through physical connections (stolon or rhizome) among interconnected ramets of clonal plants. Induced resistance to herbivory may selectively enhance the protection of more vulnerable and valuable plant tissues and confer a significant benefit to clonal plants by a modular risk-spreading strategy, equalizing ontogenetic differences of unevenly-aged ramets in chemical defense compounds and nutritional properties of tissue.

  13. Jasmonates: Multifunctional Roles in Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Rasool, Saiema; Gul, Alvina; Sheikh, Subzar A.; Akram, Nudrat A.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Kazi, A. M.; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) [Jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonates (MeJAs)] are known to take part in various physiological processes. Exogenous application of JAs so far tested on different plants under abiotic stresses particularly salinity, drought, and temperature (low/high) conditions have proved effective in improving plant stress tolerance. However, its extent of effectiveness entirely depends on the type of plant species tested or its concentration. The effects of introgression or silencing of different JA- and Me-JA-related genes have been summarized in this review, which have shown a substantial role in improving crop yield and quality in different plants under stress or non-stress conditions. Regulation of JAs synthesis is impaired in stressed as well as unstressed plant cells/tissues, which is believed to be associated with a variety of metabolic events including signal transduction. Although, mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important components of JA signaling and biosynthesis pathways, nitric oxide, ROS, calcium, ABA, ethylene, and salicylic acid are also important mediators of plant growth and development during JA signal transduction and synthesis. The exploration of other signaling molecules can be beneficial to examine the details of underlying molecular mechanisms of JA signal transduction. Much work is to be done in near future to find the proper answers of the questions like action of JA related metabolites, and identification of universal JA receptors etc. Complete signaling pathways involving MAPKs, CDPK, TGA, SIPK, WIPK, and WRKY transcription factors are yet to be investigated to understand the complete mechanism of action of JAs. PMID:27379115

  14. Jasmonates: Multifunctional Roles in Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Rasool, Saiema; Gul, Alvina; Sheikh, Subzar A; Akram, Nudrat A; Ashraf, Muhammad; Kazi, A M; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) [Jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonates (MeJAs)] are known to take part in various physiological processes. Exogenous application of JAs so far tested on different plants under abiotic stresses particularly salinity, drought, and temperature (low/high) conditions have proved effective in improving plant stress tolerance. However, its extent of effectiveness entirely depends on the type of plant species tested or its concentration. The effects of introgression or silencing of different JA- and Me-JA-related genes have been summarized in this review, which have shown a substantial role in improving crop yield and quality in different plants under stress or non-stress conditions. Regulation of JAs synthesis is impaired in stressed as well as unstressed plant cells/tissues, which is believed to be associated with a variety of metabolic events including signal transduction. Although, mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important components of JA signaling and biosynthesis pathways, nitric oxide, ROS, calcium, ABA, ethylene, and salicylic acid are also important mediators of plant growth and development during JA signal transduction and synthesis. The exploration of other signaling molecules can be beneficial to examine the details of underlying molecular mechanisms of JA signal transduction. Much work is to be done in near future to find the proper answers of the questions like action of JA related metabolites, and identification of universal JA receptors etc. Complete signaling pathways involving MAPKs, CDPK, TGA, SIPK, WIPK, and WRKY transcription factors are yet to be investigated to understand the complete mechanism of action of JAs. PMID:27379115

  15. How Microbes Twist Jasmonate Signaling around Their Little Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Chini, Andrea; Solano, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Plant immunity relies on a complex network of hormone signaling pathways in which jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role. Successful microbial pathogens or symbionts have developed strategies to manipulate plant hormone signaling pathways to cause hormonal imbalances for their own benefit. These strategies include the production of plant hormones, phytohormone mimics, or effector proteins that target host components to disrupt hormonal signaling pathways and enhance virulence. Here, we describe the molecular details of the most recent and best-characterized examples of specific JA hormonal manipulation by microbes, which exemplify the ingenious ways by which pathogens can take control over the plant’s hormone signaling network to suppress host immunity. PMID:27135229

  16. Ulvan, a sulfated polysaccharide from green algae, activates plant immunity through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  17. Ulvan, a Sulfated Polysaccharide from Green Algae, Activates Plant Immunity through the Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  18. Stress in Fathers of Moderately and Late Preterm Infants: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ingrid Helen; Lindemann, Rolf; Smeby, Nina Aarhus; Bunch, Eli Haugen; Sandvik, Leiv; Smith, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The atypical behaviour of preterm infants can elicit stress in fathers and influence their ability to perceive and interpret infants' cues. This study investigated whether fathers of moderately and late preterm infants were more stressed than fathers of term infants. In a randomised controlled trial, we also studied the effect of the Mother-Infant…

  19. Host perception of jasmonates promotes infection by Fusarium oxysporum formae speciales that produce isoleucine- and leucine-conjugated jasmonates

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stephanie J.; Yoon, Alexander J.; Faull, Kym F.; Diener, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three pathogenic forms, or formae speciales, of Fusarium oxysporum infect the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana belowground, instigating symptoms of wilt disease in leaves aboveground. In prior reports, Arabidopsis mutants that are deficient in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid or salicylic acid or insensitive to ethylene or jasmonates exhibit more or less wilt disease than wild type, implicating the involvement of hormones in the normal host response to F. oxysporum. Our analysis of hormone-related mutants finds no evidence that endogenous hormones contribute to infection in roots. Mutants that are deficient in abscisic acid and insensitive to ethylene have no less infection than wild type, though they exhibit less disease. Whether a mutant that is insensitive to jasmonates affects infection depends on which forma specialis is infecting roots. Insensitivity to jasmonates suppresses infection by F. oxysporum forma specialis conglutinans and F. oxysporum forma specialis matthioli, which produce isoleucine- and leucine-conjugated jasmonate (JA-Ile/Leu) in culture filtrates; whereas, insensitivity to jasmonates has no effect on infection by F. oxysporum forma specialis raphani, which produces no detectable JA-Ile/Leu. Furthermore, insensitivity to jasmonates has no effect on wilt disease of tomato, and the tomato pathogen F. oxysporum forma specialis lycopersici produces no detectable jasmonates. Thus, some but not all F. oxysporum pathogens appear to utilize jasmonates as effectors, promoting infection in roots and/or development of symptoms in shoots. Only when infection of roots is promoted by jasmonates is wilt disease enhanced in a mutant deficient in salicylic acid biosynthesis. PMID:24387225

  20. Functional diversity of jasmonates in rice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Shumin; Sun, Ning; Liu, Hongyun; Zhao, Yanhong; Liang, Yuling; Zhang, Liping; Han, Yuanhuai

    2015-12-01

    Phytohormone jasmonates (JA) play essential roles in plants, such as regulating development and growth, responding to environmental changes, and resisting abiotic and biotic stresses. During signaling, JA interacts, either synergistically or antagonistically, with other hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), gibberellin (GA), ethylene (ET), auxin, brassinosteroid (BR), and abscisic acid (ABA), to regulate gene expression in regulatory networks, conferring physiological and metabolic adjustments in plants. As an important staple crop, rice is a major nutritional source for human beings and feeds one third of the world's population. Recent years have seen significant progress in the understanding of the JA pathway in rice. In this review, we summarize the diverse functions of JA, and discuss the JA interplay with other hormones, as well as light, in this economically important crop. We believe that a better understanding of the JA pathway will lead to practical biotechnological applications in rice breeding and cultivation. PMID:26054241

  1. Integration of Ethylene and Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathways in the Expression of Novel Maize Defense Protein Mir1-CP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, ethylene (ET) and jasmonate (JA) control the defense responses to multiple stressors, including insect predation. Among the defense proteins known to be regulated by ET, is maize insect resistance 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP). This protein is constitutively expressed in the insect resi...

  2. Tectonic control on the Late Quaternary hydrography of the Upper Tiber Basin (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Marco; Bonini, Marco; Moroni, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    We examine the intramontane Upper Tiber Basin in the Northern Apennines (central Italy), where sub-orthogonal fault systems forced river deviation and the abandonment of alluvial fans since the late Middle Pleistocene. Archaeological material, spanning the Middle Palaeolithic-Iron Age, was collected mostly from the surface of the Late Quaternary alluvial landforms and related deposits (MUP and HOL units). This information contributed to the partial dating of seven major stages of drainage development. Normal faults parallel and transverse to the basin trend were active at different times and conditioned the valley pattern of the Middle (MUP1-2)-Late (MUP3) Pleistocene Tiber, Singerna, Sovara and Tignana rivers, which still flow today into the basin. The MUP1 and the MUP3 fans were beheaded by the displacement of their feeder valleys along the basin-transverse Carmine and Montedoglio faults. In some cases, the former feeder rivers underwent stream piracy but their courses mostly deviated in response of the topographic gradient created by faulting, as well as through the incision of new valleys that exploited the lithological contrast along the fault lines. The MUP3 Tignana fan was abandoned mostly due to the activity of the basin-parallel, dip-slip Sansepolcro fault. Subsidence driven by the basin-parallel Anghiari and Sansepolcro fault systems also provided the accommodation space for the MUP3 and HOl1-2 Afra fans between Late Pleistocene and early-mid Holocene. This study exemplifies the interplay between longitudinal and transverse fault systems, and the Late Quaternary hydrographic evolution of an extensional basin settled in the axial zone of an active fold-and-thrust belt. Although the faulting has interacted with the forcing exerted by the Late Quaternary climate fluctuations on the basin drainage systems, the tectonic rates are sufficiently high to represent the prime controller on base-level change and drainage routing patterns.

  3. Effects of methyl jasmonate on accumulation of flavonoids in seedlings of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench).

    PubMed

    Horbowicz, M; Wiczkowski, W; Koczkodaj, Danuta; Saniewski, M

    2011-09-01

    The jasmonates, which include jasmonic acid and its methyl ester (MJ), play a central role in regulating the biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, and also are signaling molecules in environmental stresses. Synthesis of anthocyanins pigments is a final part of flavonoids pathway route. Accumulation of the pigments in young seedlings is stimulated by various environmental stresses, such as high-intensity light, wounding, pathogen attack, drought, sugar and nutrient deficiency. The anthocyanins take part in defense system against excess of light and UV-B light, and therefore it is probably main reason why young plant tissues accumulate enlarged levels of the pigments. The effects of exogenously applied MJ on level of anthocyanins, glycosides of apigenin, luteolin, quercetin and proanthocyanidins in seedlings of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) were studied. MJ decreased contents of all the found cyanidin glycosides and its aglycone in hypocotyls of buckwheat seedlings. However contents of particular anthocyanins in cotyledons of buckwheat seedlings treated with the plant hormone were not significantly different from the control. Applied doses of MJ did not affect levels of quercetin, apigenin and luteolin glycosides in the analyzed parts of buckwheat seedlings: cotyledons and hypocotyls. On the other hand, treatment of buckwheat seedlings with MJ clearly stimulated of proanthocyanidins biosynthesis in hypocotyls. We suggest that methyl jasmonate induces in hypocotyls of buckwheat seedlings the leucocyanidin reductase or anthocyanidin reductase, possible enzymes in proanthocyanidins synthesis, and/or inhibits anthocyanidin synthase, which transforms leucocyanidin into cyanidin. According to our knowledge this is the first report regarding the effect of methyl jasmonate on enhancing the accumulation of proanthocyanidins in cultivated plants. PMID:21840829

  4. Synergistic effect of cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate on taxane production in Taxus x media cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Sabater-Jara, Ana-Belén; Onrubia, Miriam; Moyano, Elisabeth; Bonfill, Mercedes; Palazón, Javier; Pedreño, María A; Cusidó, Rosa M

    2014-10-01

    Methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins are proven effective inducers of secondary metabolism in plant cell cultures. Cyclodextrins, which are cyclic oligosaccharides, can form inclusion complexes with nonhydrophilic secondary products, thus increasing their excretion from the producer cells to the culture medium. In the present work, using a selected Taxus x media cell line cultured in a two-stage system, the relationship between taxane production and the transcript profiles of several genes involved in taxol metabolism was studied to gain more insight into the mechanism by which these two elicitors regulate the biosynthesis and excretion of taxol and related taxanes. Gene expression was not clearly enhanced by the presence of cyclodextrins in the culture medium and variably induced by methyl jasmonate, but when the culture was supplemented with both elicitors, a synergistic effect on transcript accumulation was observed. The BAPT and DBTNBT genes, which encode the last two transferases involved in the taxol pathway, appeared to control limiting biosynthetic steps. In the cell cultures treated with both elicitors, the produced taxanes were found mainly in the culture medium, which limited retroinhibition processes and taxane toxicity for the producer cells. The expression level of a putative ABC gene was found to have increased, suggesting it played a role in the taxane excretion. Taxol biosynthesis was clearly increased by the joint action of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, reaching production levels 55 times higher than in nonelicited cultures. PMID:24909837

  5. The late preterm infant and the control of breathing, sleep, and brainstem development: a review.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Robert A; Ariagno, Ronald L; Kinney, Hannah C

    2006-12-01

    The brainstem development of infants born between 33 and 38 weeks' gestation is less mature than that of a full-term infant. During late gestation, there are dramatic and nonlinear developmental changes in the brainstem. This translates into immaturity of upper airway and lung volume control, laryngeal reflexes, chemical control of breathing, and sleep mechanisms. Ten percent of late preterm infants have significant apnea of prematurity and they frequently have delays in establishing coordination of feeding and breathing. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of clinical, physiologic, neuroanatomic, and neurochemical data in this specific group of infants. Research focused on this group of infants will not only further our understanding of brainstem maturation during this high risk period, but will help develop focused plans for their management. PMID:17148011

  6. Unmatched Case-Control Study on Late Presentation of HIV Infection in Santiago, Cape Verde (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Moreira, António L; Fronteira, Inês; Figueiredo Augusto, Gonçalo; Martins, Maria Rosario O

    2016-03-01

    Access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Sub-Saharan Africa has been steadily increasing over the past decade. However, the success of large-scale ART programmes depends on timely diagnosis and early initiation of HIV care. This study characterizes late presenters to HIV care in Santiago (Cape Verde) between 2004 and 2011, and identifies factors associated with late presentation for care. We defined late presentation as persons presenting to HIV care with a CD4 count below 350 cells/mm³. An unmatched case-control study was conducted using socio-demographic and behavioural data of 368 individuals (191 cases and 177 controls) collected through an interviewer-administered questionnaire, comparing HIV patients late and early presented to care. Logistic regression was performed to estimate odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Results show that 51.9% were late presenters for HIV. No differences were found in gender distribution, marital status, or access to health services between cases and controls. Participants who undertook an HIV test by doctor indication were more likely to present late compared with those who tested for HIV by their own initiative. Also, individuals taking less time to initiate ART are more likely to present late. This study highlights the need to better understand reasons for late presentation to HIV care in Cape Verde. People in older age groups should be targeted in future approaches focused on late presenters to HIV care. PMID:26999167

  7. Unmatched Case-Control Study on Late Presentation of HIV Infection in Santiago, Cape Verde (2004–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, António L.; Fronteira, Inês; Augusto, Gonçalo Figueiredo; Martins, Maria Rosario O.

    2016-01-01

    Access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Sub-Saharan Africa has been steadily increasing over the past decade. However, the success of large-scale ART programmes depends on timely diagnosis and early initiation of HIV care. This study characterizes late presenters to HIV care in Santiago (Cape Verde) between 2004 and 2011, and identifies factors associated with late presentation for care. We defined late presentation as persons presenting to HIV care with a CD4 count below 350 cells/mm3. An unmatched case-control study was conducted using socio-demographic and behavioural data of 368 individuals (191 cases and 177 controls) collected through an interviewer-administered questionnaire, comparing HIV patients late and early presented to care. Logistic regression was performed to estimate odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals. Results show that 51.9% were late presenters for HIV. No differences were found in gender distribution, marital status, or access to health services between cases and controls. Participants who undertook an HIV test by doctor indication were more likely to present late compared with those who tested for HIV by their own initiative. Also, individuals taking less time to initiate ART are more likely to present late. This study highlights the need to better understand reasons for late presentation to HIV care in Cape Verde. People in older age groups should be targeted in future approaches focused on late presenters to HIV care. PMID:26999167

  8. Exploring the impact of wounding and jasmonates on ascorbate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Suza, Walter P; Avila, Carlos A; Carruthers, Kelly; Kulkarni, Shashank; Goggin, Fiona L; Lorence, Argelia

    2010-05-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate, AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants. Ascorbate provides the first line of defense against damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and helps protect plant cells from many factors that induce oxidative stress, including wounding, ozone, high salinity, and pathogen attack. Plant defenses against these stresses are also dependent upon jasmonates (JAs), a class of plant hormones that promote ROS accumulation. Here, we review evidence showing that wounding and JAs influence AsA accumulation in various plant species, and we report new data from Arabidopsis and tomato testing the influence of JAs on AsA levels in wounded and unwounded plants. In both species, certain mutations that impair JA metabolism and signaling influence foliar AsA levels, suggesting that endogenous JAs may regulate steady-state AsA. However, the impact of wounding on AsA accumulation was similar in JA mutants and wild type controls, indicating that this wound response does not require JAs. Our findings also indicate that the effects of wounding and JAs on AsA accumulation differ between species; these factors both enhanced AsA accumulation in Arabidopsis, but depressed AsA levels in tomato. These results underscore the importance of obtaining data from more than one model species, and demonstrate the complexity of AsA regulation. PMID:20346686

  9. Exploring the impact of wounding and jasmonates on ascorbate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suza, Walter P.; Avila, Carlos A.; Carruthers, Kelly; Kulkarni, Shashank; Goggin, Fiona L.; Lorence, Argelia

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate, AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants. Ascorbate provides the first line of defense against damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), and helps protect plant cells from many factors that induce oxidative stress, including wounding, ozone, high salinity, and pathogen attack. Plant defenses against these stresses are also dependent upon jasmonates (JAs), a class of plant hormones that promote ROS accumulation. Here, we review evidence showing that wounding and JAs influence AsA accumulation in various plant species, and we report new data from Arabidopsis and tomato testing the influence of JAs on AsA levels in wounded and unwounded plants. In both species, certain mutations that impair JA metabolism and signaling influence foliar AsA levels, suggesting that endogenous JAs may regulate steady-state AsA. However, the impact of wounding on AsA accumulation was similar in JA mutants and wild type controls, indicating that this wound response does not require JAs. Our findings also indicate that the effects of wounding and JAs on AsA accumulation differ between species; these factors both enhanced AsA accumulation in Arabidopsis, but depressed AsA levels in tomato. These results underscore the importance of obtaining data from more than one model species, and demonstrate the complexity of AsA regulation. PMID:20346686

  10. Functional Analysis of Jasmonates in Rice through Mutant Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Dhakarey, Rohit; Kodackattumannil Peethambaran, Preshobha; Riemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid, one of the major plant hormones, is, unlike other hormones, a lipid-derived compound that is synthesized from the fatty acid linolenic acid. It has been studied intensively in many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, in which most of the enzymes participating in its biosynthesis were characterized. In the past 15 years, mutants and transgenic plants affected in the jasmonate pathway became available in rice and facilitate studies on the functions of this hormone in an important crop. Those functions are partially conserved compared to other plant species, and include roles in fertility, response to mechanical wounding and defense against herbivores. However, new and surprising functions have also been uncovered by mutant approaches, such as a close link between light perception and the jasmonate pathway. This was not only useful to show a phenomenon that is unique to rice but also helped to establish this role in plant species where such links are less obvious. This review aims to provide an overview of currently available rice mutants and transgenic plants in the jasmonate pathway and highlights some selected roles of jasmonate in this species, such as photomorphogenesis, and abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:27135235

  11. Functional Analysis of Jasmonates in Rice through Mutant Approaches.

    PubMed

    Dhakarey, Rohit; Kodackattumannil Peethambaran, Preshobha; Riemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid, one of the major plant hormones, is, unlike other hormones, a lipid-derived compound that is synthesized from the fatty acid linolenic acid. It has been studied intensively in many plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, in which most of the enzymes participating in its biosynthesis were characterized. In the past 15 years, mutants and transgenic plants affected in the jasmonate pathway became available in rice and facilitate studies on the functions of this hormone in an important crop. Those functions are partially conserved compared to other plant species, and include roles in fertility, response to mechanical wounding and defense against herbivores. However, new and surprising functions have also been uncovered by mutant approaches, such as a close link between light perception and the jasmonate pathway. This was not only useful to show a phenomenon that is unique to rice but also helped to establish this role in plant species where such links are less obvious. This review aims to provide an overview of currently available rice mutants and transgenic plants in the jasmonate pathway and highlights some selected roles of jasmonate in this species, such as photomorphogenesis, and abiotic and biotic stress. PMID:27135235

  12. Tectonic control on past circulation of the Mediterranean Sea: A model study of the Late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, P. Th.; Slingerland, R.; Wortel, M. J. R.

    2004-03-01

    We examine the effect of Late Miocene paleogeography on the circulation and water properties of the Mediterranean Sea by using an ocean circulation model. Results obtained for the past are compared to a control experiment with the present-day geometry. To focus on paleogeography, atmospheric forcing is always based on the present-day climatology. We seek insight that allows us to test ideas based on observations and to formulate new working hypotheses. The Late Miocene is examined first, since it represents an important stage in the evolution of the Mediterranean. The present-day model reproduces the main aspects of the surface to intermediate depth circulation and water properties. The model does not capture the deep circulation known to occur at present in both subbasins. When the subbasins are reconstructed to their Late Miocene shape (keeping intervening sills at present-day levels) the overall nature of the surface/intermediate depth circulation proves unaffected. The model, however, predicts intense deep circulation in the eastern Mediterranean, most likely due to the greater surface area of the reconstructed Adriatic Sea. Using the first paleoexperiment as a starting point several additional paleogeographical aspects are examined.

  13. Late Pliocene Greenland glaciation controlled by a decline in atmospheric CO2 levels.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Daniel J; Foster, Gavin L; Haywood, Alan M; Stone, Emma J

    2008-08-28

    It is thought that the Northern Hemisphere experienced only ephemeral glaciations from the Late Eocene to the Early Pliocene epochs (about 38 to 4 million years ago), and that the onset of extensive glaciations did not occur until about 3 million years ago. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this increase in Northern Hemisphere glaciation during the Late Pliocene. Here we use a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and an ice-sheet model to assess the impact of the proposed driving mechanisms for glaciation and the influence of orbital variations on the development of the Greenland ice sheet in particular. We find that Greenland glaciation is mainly controlled by a decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide during the Late Pliocene. By contrast, our model results suggest that climatic shifts associated with the tectonically driven closure of the Panama seaway, with the termination of a permanent El Niño state or with tectonic uplift are not large enough to contribute significantly to the growth of the Greenland ice sheet; moreover, we find that none of these processes acted as a priming mechanism for glacial inception triggered by variations in the Earth's orbit. PMID:18756254

  14. What controls early or late onset of tropical North Atlantic hurricane season?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Heng; Li, Tim; Liu, Jia; Peng, Melinda

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of first hurricane in early summer signifies the onset of an active Atlantic hurricane season. The interannual variation of this hurricane onset date is examined for the period 1979-2013. It is found that the onset date has a marked interannual variation. The standard deviation of the interannual variation of the onset day is 17.5 days, with the climatological mean onset happening on July 23. A diagnosis of tropical cyclone (TC) genesis potential index (GPI) indicates that the major difference between an early and a late onset group lies in the maximum potential intensity (MPI). A further diagnosis of the MPI shows that it is primarily controlled by the local SST anomaly (SSTA). Besides the SSTA, vertical shear and mid-tropospheric relative humidity anomalies also contribute significantly to the GPI difference between the early and late onset groups. It is found that the anomalous warm (cold) SST over the tropical Atlantic, while uncorrelated with the Niño3 index, persists from the preceding winter to concurrent summer in the early (late) onset group. The net surface heat flux anomaly always tends to damp the SSTA, which suggests that ocean dynamics may play a role in maintaining the SSTA in the tropical Atlantic. The SSTA pattern with a maximum center in northeastern tropical Atlantic appears responsible for generating the observed wind and moisture anomalies over the main TC development region. A further study is needed to understand the initiation mechanism of the SSTA in the Atlantic.

  15. Management of postural sensory conflict and dynamic balance control in late-stage Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Colnat-Coulbois, S; Gauchard, G C; Maillard, L; Barroche, G; Vespignani, H; Auque, J; Perrin, P P

    2011-10-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is known to affect postural control, especially in situations needing a change in balance strategy or when a concurrent task is simultaneously performed. However, few studies assessing postural control in patients with PD included homogeneous population in late stage of the disease. Thus, this study aimed to analyse postural control and strategies in a homogeneous population of patients with idiopathic advanced (late-stage) PD, and to determine the contribution of peripheral inputs in simple and more complex postural tasks, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic tasks. Twenty-four subjects with advanced PD (duration: median (M)=11.0 years, interquartile range (IQR)=4.3 years; Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS): M "on-dopa"=13.5, IQR=7.8; UPDRS: M "off-dopa"=48.5, IQR=16.8; Hoehn and Yahr stage IV in all patients) and 48 age-matched healthy controls underwent static (SPT) and dynamic posturographic (DPT) tests and a sensory organization test (SOT). In SPT, patients with PD showed reduced postural control precision with increased oscillations in both anterior-posterior and medial-lateral planes. In SOT, patients with PD displayed reduced postural performances especially in situations in which visual and vestibular cues became predominant to organize balance control, as was the ability to manage balance in situations for which visual or proprioceptive inputs are disrupted. In DPT, postural restabilization strategies were often inefficient to maintain equilibrium resulting in falls. Postural strategies were often precarious, postural regulation involving more hip joint than ankle joint in patients with advanced PD than in controls. Difficulties in managing complex postural situations, such as sensory conflicting and dynamic situations might reflect an inadequate sensory organization suggesting impairment in central information processing. PMID:21627979

  16. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival

  17. Jasmonate-mediated induced volatiles in the American cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon: from gene expression to organismal interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonates, i.e., jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), are signaling hormones that regulate a large number of defense responses in plants which in turn affect the plants’ interactions with herbivores and their natural enemies. Here, we investigated the effect of jasmonates on the emissio...

  18. Comparative transcript profiling by SuperSAGE identifies novel candidate genes for controlling potato quantitative resistance to late blight not compromised by late maturity

    PubMed Central

    Draffehn, Astrid M.; Li, Li; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Ding, Jia; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Muktar, Meki S.; Walkemeier, Birgit; Rotter, Björn; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to pathogens is essential for survival of wild and cultivated plants. Pathogen susceptibility causes major losses of crop yield and quality. Durable field resistance combined with high yield and other superior agronomic characters are therefore, important objectives in every crop breeding program. Precision and efficacy of resistance breeding can be enhanced by molecular diagnostic tools, which result from knowledge of the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility. Breeding uses resistance conferred by single R genes and polygenic quantitative resistance. The latter is partial but considered more durable. Molecular mechanisms of plant pathogen interactions are elucidated mainly in experimental systems involving single R genes, whereas most genes important for quantitative resistance in crops like potato are unknown. Quantitative resistance of potato to Phytophthora infestans causing late blight is often compromised by late plant maturity, a negative agronomic character. Our objective was to identify candidate genes for quantitative resistance to late blight not compromised by late plant maturity. We used diagnostic DNA-markers to select plants with different field levels of maturity corrected resistance (MCR) to late blight and compared their leaf transcriptomes before and after infection with P. infestans using SuperSAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) technology and next generation sequencing. We identified 2034 transcripts up or down regulated upon infection, including a homolog of the kiwi fruit allergen kiwellin. 806 transcripts showed differential expression between groups of genotypes with contrasting MCR levels. The observed expression patterns suggest that MCR is in part controlled by differential transcript levels in uninfected plants. Functional annotation suggests that, besides biotic and abiotic stress responses, general cellular processes such as photosynthesis, protein biosynthesis, and degradation play a role in MCR. PMID

  19. Jasmonate-dependent plant defense restricts thrips performance and preference

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Jun; Kugimiya, Soichi; Narusaka, Mari; Seo, Shigemi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Tsuda, Shinya; Kobayashi, Masatomo

    2009-01-01

    Background The western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis [Pergande]) is one of the most important insect herbivores of cultivated plants. However, no pesticide provides complete control of this species, and insecticide resistance has emerged around the world. We previously reported the important role of jasmonate (JA) in the plant's immediate response to thrips feeding by using an Arabidopsis leaf disc system. In this study, as the first step toward practical use of JA in thrips control, we analyzed the effect of JA-regulated Arabidopsis defense at the whole plant level on thrips behavior and life cycle at the population level over an extended period. We also studied the effectiveness of JA-regulated plant defense on thrips damage in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis). Results Thrips oviposited more on Arabidopsis JA-insensitive coi1-1 mutants than on WT plants, and the population density of the following thrips generation increased on coi1-1 mutants. Moreover, thrips preferred coi1-1 mutants more than WT plants. Application of JA to WT plants before thrips attack decreased the thrips population. To analyze these important functions of JA in a brassica crop plant, we analyzed the expression of marker genes for JA response in B. rapa. Thrips feeding induced expression of these marker genes and significantly increased the JA content in B. rapa. Application of JA to B. rapa enhanced plant resistance to thrips, restricted oviposition, and reduced the population density of the following generation. Conclusion Our results indicate that the JA-regulated plant defense restricts thrips performance and preference, and plays an important role in the resistance of Arabidopsis and B. rapa to thrips damage. PMID:19635132

  20. Modification and translocation of Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins of Scoparia dulcis in response to stimulation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Toshiaki; Yamamura, Yoshimi; Kurosaki, Fumiya

    2011-01-01

    Translocation of two Rac/Rop guanosine 5'-triphosphate-binding proteins from Scoparia dulcis, Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2, was examined employing transformed belladonna which overproduces these proteins as glutathione-S-transferase-tagged forms. The transferase activities of the fused proteins in microsomal fraction of belladonna markedly increased by the incubation with methyl jasmonate either in Sdrac-1 or Sdrac-2 transformant, while low and constant activities were observed in the untreated control. Recombinant Sdrac-2 protein was found to bind to prenyl chain in the presence of cell extracts prepared from methyl jasmonate-treated S. dulcis, however, Sdrac-1 was palmitoylated by the addition of the cell extracts. These results suggest that both Sdrac-1 and Sdrac-2 translocate to plant membranes by the stimulation with methyl jasmonate, however, targeting of these proteins is triggered by the independent modification mechanisms, palmitoylation for Sdrac-1 and prenylation for Sdrac-2. PMID:21628882

  1. Benefits of jasmonate-dependent defenses against vertebrate herbivores in nature.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ricardo Ar; McClure, Mark; Hervé, Maxime R; Baldwin, Ian T; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous jasmonates are important regulators of plant defenses. If and how they enable plants to maintain their reproductive output when facing community-level herbivory under natural conditions, however, remains unknown. We demonstrate that jasmonate-deficient Nicotiana attenuata plants suffer more damage by arthropod and vertebrate herbivores than jasmonate-producing plants in nature. However, only damage by vertebrate herbivores translates into a significant reduction in flower production. Vertebrate stem peeling has the strongest negative impact on plant flower production. Stems are defended by jasmonate-dependent nicotine, and the native cottontail rabbit Sylvilagus nuttallii avoids jasmonate-producing N. attenuata shoots because of their high levels of nicotine. Thus, endogenous jasmonates enable plants to resist different types of herbivores in nature, and jasmonate-dependent defenses are important for plants to maintain their reproductive potential when facing vertebrate herbivory. Ecological and evolutionary models on plant defense signaling should aim at integrating arthropod and vertebrate herbivory at the community level. PMID:27352734

  2. Ehancing disease resistance in peach fruit with methyl jasmonate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) on postharvest diseases caused by P. expansum, B. cinerea and R. stolonifer in peach fruit (Prunus persica Batsch cv Dahebai) and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. Peaches were harvested at the firm-mature stage and treated with 1 or 500 µmol/L...

  3. Distribution history and climatic controls of the Late Miocene Pikermian chronofauna

    PubMed Central

    Eronen, Jussi T.; Ataabadi, Majid Mirzaie; Micheels, Arne; Karme, Aleksis; Bernor, Raymond L.; Fortelius, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    The Late Miocene development of faunas and environments in western Eurasia is well known, but the climatic and environmental processes that controlled its details are incompletely understood. Here we map the rise and fall of the classic Pikermian fossil mammal chronofauna between 12 and 4.2 Ma, using genus-level faunal similarity between localities. To directly relate land mammal community evolution to environmental change, we use the hypsodonty paleoprecipitation proxy and paleoclimate modeling. The geographic distribution of faunal similarity and paleoprecipitation in successive timeslices shows the development of the open biome that favored the evolution and spread of the open-habitat adapted large mammal lineages. In the climate model run, this corresponds to a decrease in precipitation over its core area south of the Paratethys Sea. The process began in the latest Middle Miocene and climaxed in the medial Late Miocene, about 7–8 million years ago. The geographic range of the Pikermian chronofauna contracted in the latest Miocene, a time of increasing summer drought and regional differentiation of habitats in Eastern Europe and Southwestern Asia. Its demise at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary coincides with an environmental reversal toward increased humidity and forestation, changes inevitably detrimental to open-adapted, wide-ranging large mammals. PMID:19571012

  4. [THE IMPROVEMENT OF CITIES AND SANITARY CONTROL IN RUSSIA IN LATE XIX--EARLY XX CENTURIES].

    PubMed

    Sherstneva, E V

    2015-01-01

    The article considers activity of municipal self-governments of Russia concerning support of sanitary epidemiological well-being of cities in the late XIX--early XX centuries. The acuteness of problem of sanitary conditions of urban settlements particularly became visible in post-reform period due to increasing of number of urban population, alteration of setup and rhythm of life in cities, appearance of new forms of worker's daily chores. Al this, against the background of underdevelopment of communal sphere aggravated epidemiological situation in cities. The impulse to improvement and development of sanitary control was made by the city regulations of 1870 presenting to town authorities the right to deal with sanitary issues. The significant input into improvement of cities was made first of all at the expense of construction of water supplies and sewerage and support of sanitary control of these spheres of municipal economy. Under town councils of many cities the sanitary commissions were organized to support permanent sanitary control in town. The development of town sanitation followed the way of specialization. The housing and communal, trade and food, school and sanitary and sanitary and veterinary control were organized. PMID:26399074

  5. Continuous exposure to the deterrents cis-jasmone and methyl jasmonate does not alter the behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Barbara; Spangl, Bernhard; Koschier, Elisabeth Helene

    2016-01-01

    Behavioural responses of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), a generalist, cell sap-feeding insect species with piercing-sucking mouthparts, after continuous exposure to two deterrent secondary plant compounds are investigated. We compared in choice assays on bean leaf discs, the settling, feeding, and oviposition preferences of F. occidentalis females that had no experience with the two fatty acid derivatives methyl jasmonate and cis-jasmone before testing (naïve thrips) vs. females that had been exposed to the deterrent compounds before testing (experienced thrips). The thrips were exposed to the deterrents at low or high concentrations for varied time periods and subsequently tested on bean leaf discs treated with the respective deterrent at either a low or a high concentration. Frankliniella occidentalis females avoided settling on the deterrent-treated bean leaf discs for an observation period of 6 h, independent of their previous experience. Our results demonstrate that feeding and oviposition deterrence of the jasmonates to the thrips were not altered by continuous exposure of the thrips to the jasmonates. Habituation was not induced, neither by exposure to the low concentration of the deterrents nor by exposure to the high concentration. These results indicate that the risk of habituation to two volatile deterrent compounds after repeated exposure is not evident in F. occidentalis. This makes the two compounds potential candidates to be integrated in pest management strategies. PMID:26726263

  6. Plants on constant alert: elevated levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonate-induced transcripts in caterpillar resistant maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defense responses against insect herbivores frequently depend on the biosynthesis and action of jasmonic acid (JA) and its conjugates. To better understand JA signaling pathways in maize (Zea mays L.), we have examined two maize genotypes, Mp708 and Tx601. Mp708 is resistant to feeding by le...

  7. Environmentally controlled succession in a late Pleistocene coral reef (Sinai, Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewis, H.; Kiessling, W.

    2013-03-01

    The concept of ecological succession has been frequently applied in the study of ancient reefs. Whereas Paleozoic and Mesozoic reefs are commonly thought to reveal an autogenic primary—climax zonation, patterns in Neogene and Quaternary reefs are much more diverse. Here, we describe a well-preserved late Pleistocene coral reef from Dahab on Sinai Peninsula (Egypt), which shows a distinct zonation that resembles an ecological succession. In contrast to classical examples of ecological successions, species composition, paleoenvironmental conditions, and coral biodiversity of the Dahab reef indicate an allogenic, sea-level controlled community change, from marginal marine to reef slope and back reef. A review of the literature confirms that autogenic, short-term successions are virtually absent in Quaternary reefs. We predict that long generation times of corals make it unlikely that classical autogenic successions develop in reefs at all, unless environmental conditions are unusually stable.

  8. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van Luijn, Marvin M.; Kreft, Karim L.; Jongsma, Marlieke L.; Mes, Steven W.; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F.; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; van der Kant, Rik; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J.; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis

  9. Multiple sclerosis-associated CLEC16A controls HLA class II expression via late endosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Luijn, Marvin M; Kreft, Karim L; Jongsma, Marlieke L; Mes, Steven W; Wierenga-Wolf, Annet F; van Meurs, Marjan; Melief, Marie-José; der Kant, Rik van; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Tan, Rusung; Priatel, John J; Neefjes, Jacques; Laman, Jon D; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2015-06-01

    C-type lectins are key players in immune regulation by driving distinct functions of antigen-presenting cells. The C-type lectin CLEC16A gene is located at 16p13, a susceptibility locus for several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. However, the function of this gene and its potential contribution to these diseases in humans are poorly understood. In this study, we found a strong upregulation of CLEC16A expression in the white matter of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 14) compared to non-demented controls (n = 11), mainly in perivascular leukocyte infiltrates. Moreover, CLEC16A levels were significantly enhanced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of multiple sclerosis patients (n = 69) versus healthy controls (n = 46). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, CLEC16A was most abundant in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, in which it strongly co-localized with human leukocyte antigen class II. Treatment of these professional antigen-presenting cells with vitamin D, a key protective environmental factor in multiple sclerosis, downmodulated CLEC16A in parallel with human leukocyte antigen class II. Knockdown of CLEC16A in distinct types of model and primary antigen-presenting cells resulted in severely impaired cytoplasmic distribution and formation of human leucocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes, as determined by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Mechanistically, CLEC16A participated in the molecular machinery of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosome formation and trafficking to perinuclear regions, involving the dynein motor complex. By performing co-immunoprecipitations, we found that CLEC16A directly binds to two critical members of this complex, RILP and the HOPS complex. CLEC16A silencing in antigen-presenting cells disturbed RILP-mediated recruitment of human leukocyte antigen class II-positive late endosomes to perinuclear regions. Together, we identify CLEC16A as a pivotal gene in multiple sclerosis

  10. Identification of a Bipartite Jasmonate-Responsive Promoter Element in the Catharanthus roseus ORCA3 Transcription Factor Gene That Interacts Specifically with AT-Hook DNA-Binding Proteins1[W

    PubMed Central

    Vom Endt, Débora; Soares e Silva, Marina; Kijne, Jan W.; Pasquali, Giancarlo; Memelink, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant signaling molecules that play key roles in defense against certain pathogens and insects, among others, by controlling the biosynthesis of protective secondary metabolites. In Catharanthus roseus, the APETALA2-domain transcription factor ORCA3 is involved in the jasmonate-responsive activation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic genes. ORCA3 gene expression is itself induced by jasmonate. By loss- and gain-of-function experiments, we located a 74-bp region within the ORCA3 promoter, which contains an autonomous jasmonate-responsive element (JRE). The ORCA3 JRE is composed of two important sequences: a quantitative sequence responsible for a high level of expression and a qualitative sequence that appears to act as an on/off switch in response to methyl jasmonate. We isolated 12 different DNA-binding proteins having one of four different types of DNA-binding domains, using the ORCA3 JRE as bait in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid transcription factor screening. The binding of one class of proteins bearing a single AT-hook DNA-binding motif was affected by mutations in the quantitative sequence within the JRE. Two of the AT-hook proteins tested had a weak activating effect on JRE-mediated reporter gene expression, suggesting that AT-hook family members may be involved in determining the level of expression of ORCA3 in response to jasmonate. PMID:17496112

  11. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  12. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  13. Epidermal jasmonate perception is sufficient for all aspects of jasmonate-mediated male fertility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jeremy B; Browse, John

    2016-03-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signaling is essential for several environmental responses and reproductive development in many plant species. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the most obvious phenotype of JA biosynthetic and perception mutants is profound sporophytic male sterility characterized by failure of stamen filament elongation, severe delay of anther dehiscence and pollen inviability. The site of action of JA in the context of reproductive development has been discussed, but the ideas have not been tested experimentally. To this end we used targeted expression of a COI1-YFP transgene in the coi1-1 mutant background. As COI1 is an essential component of the JA co-receptor complex, the null coi1-1 mutant is male sterile due to lack of JA perception. We show that expression of COI1-YFP in the epidermis of the stamen filament and anther in coi1 mutant plants is sufficient to rescue filament elongation, anther dehiscence and pollen viability. In contrast, filament expression alone or expression in the tapetum do not restore dehiscence and pollen viability. These results demonstrate that epidermal JA perception is sufficient for anther function and pollen viability, and suggest the presence of a JA-dependent non-autonomous signal produced in the anther epidermis to synchronize both anther dehiscence and pollen maturation. PMID:26833563

  14. Late Recovery from Stuttering: The Role of Hand Dominancy, Fine Motor and ‎Inhibition Control

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hiwa; Khazaie, Habibolah; Rezaei, Mansour; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are controversial reports about factors that affect recovery from stuttering. In the ‎present study, the effect of hand dominancy, fine motor and inhibition control on late ‎recovery from stuttering was investigated among a group of Kurdish-Persian children who ‎stuttered in Iran.‎ Method: Twenty-two Kurdish-Persian children aged 7-14 years who stuttered were followed for 6 ‎years. Based on the evaluation of three experienced speech therapists and parental judgments, ‎these children were classified into recovered or persistent groups. Data about fine motor ‎control of hand and inhibition control were obtained, using Purdue Pegboard and Victoria ‎Strop Color Word Tests, respectively. Risk factors including sex, age, and family history of ‎stuttering, handedness, inhibitory control and fine motor control of hand were compared ‎between the groups and modeled to predict recovery from stuttering using logistic regression.‎ Results: From the 22 participants, 5 (22.7%) recovered from stuttering. The recovered and persistent ‎groups did not show significant differences in the interference effect. By dividing the scores ‎of the Purdue Pegboard tests to the right and left hand, we created a new Handedness Index ‎‎(HI). HI was significantly higher in the recovered group. The score of right hand was higher ‎than the left in the recovered group, but no difference was found between the two hands in ‎the persistent group. Among the investigated risk factors, only HI could predict the recovery ‎from or persistency of stuttering with 94% sensitivity and 84% specificity.‎ Conclusion: Handedness Index can predict the recovery from stuttering significantly among children who ‎stutter.‎ PMID:27252769

  15. Hydroclimatic controls on late-summer low flow in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, K.; Moore, R. D.; Allen, D. M.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2009-05-01

    For catchments in the Pacific Northwest of North America the summer period is typically dominated by low flows associated with the relatively warm, dry summers in that region. In recent years streamflow during this period has been critical in terms of water use and fisheries, and there is increasing concern regarding how future climate change with potentially more severe summer droughts may affect late-summer flows. In addition, it is feared that earlier snowmelt timing in spring causes longer recession periods and consequently lower streamflow during summer. This study examined the sensitivity of late summer flows of 153 unregulated rivers over the period 1976-2003 to hydroclimatic influences by fitting regression models using simultaneous and lagged variables of precipitation and timing and magnitude of the snowmelt. To assess potential additional influences of long-term storage changes the residuals were tested for trends and serial correlation. A decrease in September flows across most of the region is broadly consistent with a decline in September precipitation. The most important control on August flows for all streamflow regimes is August precipitation. Lagged variables including July precipitation and the previous winter's precipitation are also positively but more weakly related to August streamflow. Rain-dominated and hybrid catchments tended to have positive trends in their residuals in August, suggesting an increasing trend in groundwater storage. Snow-melt dominated catchments showed no tendency to trends but the runs test detected a substantial number of stations with non-random residuals. This regional study greatly improves the understanding of the hydroclimatic influences on extreme summer low flow in the region. Results suggest that (the less predictable) summer climate is a larger influence than previously assumed. They also help to identify where seasonal snow processes or long- term groundwater storage should be considered in model development

  16. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract.

    PubMed

    Schmiesing, André; Emonet, Aurélia; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Reymond, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  17. Arabidopsis MYC Transcription Factors Are the Target of Hormonal Salicylic Acid/Jasmonic Acid Cross Talk in Response to Pieris brassicae Egg Extract1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schmiesing, André; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants recognize insect eggs and activate the salicylic acid (SA) pathway. As a consequence, expression of defense genes regulated by the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is suppressed and larval performance is enhanced. Cross talk between defense signaling pathways is common in plant-pathogen interactions, but the molecular mechanism mediating this phenomenon is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that egg-induced SA/JA antagonism works independently of the APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factor ORA59, which controls the ERF branch of the JA pathway. In addition, treatment with egg extract did not enhance expression or stability of JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors, and SA/JA cross talk did not involve JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKEs, which are negative regulators of the JA pathway. Investigating the stability of MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, we found that egg extract treatment strongly diminished MYC protein levels in an SA-dependent manner. Furthermore, we identified WRKY75 as a novel and essential factor controlling SA/JA cross talk. These data indicate that insect eggs target the MYC branch of the JA pathway and uncover an unexpected modulation of SA/JA antagonism depending on the biological context in which the SA pathway is activated. PMID:26884488

  18. Deciphering natural to anthropogenic control on sedimentation: the Late Holocene Magdala (Kinneret Lake, Israel) harbour hystory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarti, G.; Rossi, V.; Amorosi, A.; Bertoni, D.; Ribolini, A.; Sammartino, I.; Zanchetta, G.

    2012-04-01

    Using a multidisciplinary approach involving geologists, geomorphologists and archeologists, the late Holocene sedimentary succession buried beneath the ancient Magdala harbour area (Kinneret Lake, Israel) was studied, in order to highlight the strict relationships among harbour evolutive phases (e.g. foundation, siltation, abandonment), natural events (e.g. sea-level variations, climatic changes and earthquakes among the most important) and, obviously, archaeological history. Recent excavations performed within the "Magdala Project" have discovered a harbour structure with late Hellenistic-Roman mooring stones at altitudes of 208.100 m and 208.320 m bsl respectively, suggestive of a higher lake-level (about 212 m bsl) than previously hypothesized. Along the most representative sections of trenches, integrated sedimentological, micropalaeontological (benthic meiofauna and pollen) and geochemical analyses were carried out on sedimentary deposits underlying and overlying the harbour structures, to define the main depositional facies and evolution phases that took place during the last millennia. Spatial variability of coeval palaeoenvironments across the archaeological site allowed to reconstruct a comprehensive picture of the harbour complex, evidencing the occurrence of three main evolution phases, similar to those reported from several Mediterranean Sea harbour systems: 1) a pre-harbor foundation phase; 2) a sin-harbor activity phase and 3) an harbor-abandonment phase. The first phase corresponds to the development of a natural lacustrine sandy beach barren in archaeological remains and containing an ostracod fauna very similar to the one observed within the present-day lake basin at ca. 5 m water depth. The second phase was characterized by the formation of an early Hellenistic sheltered lacustrine basin, recording the first anthropogenic control exerted on coastal sedimentation by the construction of harbour structures ("anthropogenically forced sheltered basin

  19. Jasmonates induce both defense responses and communication in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazunori; Abe, Hiroshi; Arimura, Gen-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives (jasmonates, JAs) are phytohormones with essential roles in plant defense against pathogenesis and herbivorous arthropods. Both the up- and down-regulation of defense responses are dependent on signaling pathways mediated by JAs as well as other stress hormones (e.g. salicylic acid), generally those involving the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors via protein modification and epigenetic regulation. In addition to the typical model plant Arabidopsis (a dicotyledon), advances in genetics research have made rice a model monocot in which innovative pest control traits can be introduced and whose JA signaling pathway can be studied. In this review, we introduce the dynamic functions of JAs in plant defense strategy using defensive substances (e.g. indole alkaloids and terpenoid phytoalexins) and airborne signals (e.g. green leaf volatiles and volatile terpenes) in response to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens as well as above-ground and below-ground herbivores. We then discuss the important issue of how the mutualism of herbivorous arthropods with viruses or bacteria can cause cross-talk between JA and other phytohormones to counter the defense systems. PMID:25378688

  20. Attenuation of the jasmonate burst, plant defensive traits, and resistance to specialist monarch caterpillars on shaded common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca).

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Kearney, Emily E; Hastings, Amy P; Ramsey, Trey E

    2012-07-01

    Plant responses to herbivory and light competition are often in opposing directions, posing a potential conflict for plants experiencing both stresses. For sun-adapted species, growing in shade typically makes plants more constitutively susceptible to herbivores via reduced structural and chemical resistance traits. Nonetheless, the impact of light environment on induced resistance has been less well-studied, especially in field experiments that link physiological mechanisms to ecological outcomes. Accordingly, we studied induced resistance of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca, a sun-adapted plant), and linked hormonal responses, resistance traits, and performance of specialist monarch caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) in varying light environments. In natural populations, plants growing under forest-edge shade showed reduced levels of resistance traits (lower leaf toughness, cardenolides, and trichomes) and enhanced light-capture traits (higher specific leaf area, larger leaves, and lower carbon-to-nitrogen ratio) compared to paired plants in full sun. In a field experiment repeated over two years, only milkweeds growing in full sun exhibited induced resistance to monarchs, whereas plants growing in shade were constitutively more susceptible and did not induce resistance. In a more controlled field experiment, plant hormones were higher in the sun (jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, indole acidic acid) and were induced by herbivory (jasmonic acid and abscisic acid). In particular, the jasmonate burst following herbivory was halved in plants raised in shaded habitats, and this correspondingly reduced latex induction (but not cardenolide induction). Thus, we provide a mechanistic basis for the attenuation of induced plant resistance in low resource environments. Additionally, there appears to be specificity in these interactions, with light-mediated impacts on jasmonate-induction being stronger for latex exudation than cardenolides. PMID:22661306

  1. Acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase influences fertility by regulating lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biogenesis in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wenfeng; Shen, Ying; Hao, Juan; Wu, Jianyong; Ke, Liping; Wu, Caiyun; Huang, Kai; Luo, Binglun; Xu, Mingfeng; Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Xueping; Sun, Jie; Xing, Chaozhu; Sun, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important economic crop and there is obvious heterosis in cotton, fertility has played an important role in this heterosis. However, the genes that exhibit critical roles in anther development and fertility are not well understood. Here, we report an acyl-CoA N-acyltransferase (EC2.3; GhACNAT) that plays a key role in anther development and fertility. Suppression of GhACNAT by virus-induced gene silencing in transgenic cotton (G. hirsutum L. cv. C312) resulted in indehiscent anthers that were full of pollen, diminished filaments and stamens, and plant sterility. We found GhACNAT was involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. The genes differentially expressed in GhACNAT-silenced plants and C312 were mainly involved in catalytic activity and transcription regulator activity in lipid metabolism. In GhACNAT-silenced plants, the expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism and jasmonic acid biosynthesis were significantly changed, the amount of JA in leaves and reproductive organs was significantly decreased compared with the amounts in C312. Treatments with exogenous methyl jasmonate rescued anther dehiscence and pollen release in GhACNAT-silenced plants and caused self-fertility. The GhACNAT gene may play an important role in controlling cotton fertility by regulating the pathways of lipid synthesis and JA biogenesis. PMID:26134787

  2. Biosynthesis of Jasmonic Acid by Several Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmerman, Don C.

    1984-01-01

    Six plant species metabolized 18O-labeled 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (12-oxo-PDA) to short chain cyclic fatty acids. The plant species were corn (Zea mays L.), eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Among the products was jasmonic acid, a natural plant constituent with growth-regulating properties. The pathway is the same as the one recently reported by us for jasmonic acid synthesis in Vicia faba L. pericarp. First, the ring double bond of 12-oxo-PDA is saturated; then β-oxidation enzymes remove six carbons from the carboxyl side chain of the ring. Substrate specificity studies indicated that neither the stereochemistry of the side chain at carbon 13 of 12-oxo-PDA nor the presence of the double bond at carbon 15 was crucial for either enzyme step. The presence of enzymes which convert 12-oxo-PDA to jasmonic acid in several plant species indicates that this may be a general metabolic pathway in plants. PMID:16663643

  3. Jasmonate-dependent depletion of soluble sugars compromises plant resistance to Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ricardo A R; Arce, Carla C M; Ferrieri, Abigail P; Baldwin, Ian T; Erb, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Jasmonates regulate plant secondary metabolism and herbivore resistance. How they influence primary metabolites and how this may affect herbivore growth and performance are not well understood. We profiled sugars and starch of jasmonate biosynthesis-deficient and jasmonate-insensitive Nicotiana attenuata plants and manipulated leaf carbohydrates through genetic engineering and in vitro complementation to assess how jasmonate-dependent sugar accumulation affects the growth of Manduca sexta caterpillars. We found that jasmonates reduce the constitutive and herbivore-induced concentration of glucose and fructose in the leaves across different developmental stages. Diurnal, jasmonate-dependent inhibition of invertase activity was identified as a likely mechanism for this phenomenon. Contrary to our expectation, both in planta and in vitro approaches showed that the lower sugar concentrations led to increased M. sexta growth. As a consequence, jasmonate-dependent depletion of sugars rendered N. attenuata plants more susceptible to M. sexta attack. In conclusion, jasmonates are important regulators of leaf carbohydrate accumulation and this determines herbivore growth. Jasmonate-dependent resistance is reduced rather than enhanced through the suppression of glucose and fructose concentrations, which may contribute to the evolution of divergent resistance strategies of plants in nature. PMID:25704234

  4. CONTROL OF LATE BLIGHT (PHYTOPHTHORA CAPSICI) IN PEPPER PLANT WITH A COMPOST CONTAINING MULTITUDE OF CHITINASE-PRODUCING BACTERIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compost sustaining a multitude of chitinase-producing bacteria was evaluated in a greenhouse study as a soil amendment for the control of late blight (Phytophthora capsici L.) in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). Microbial population and exogenous enzyme activity were measured in the rhizosphere and corr...

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence age controls on late Pleistocene and Holocene coastal lithosomes, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallinson, D.; Burdette, K.; Mahan, S.; Brook, G.

    2008-01-01

    Luminescence ages from a variety of coastal features on the North Carolina Coastal Plain provide age control for shoreline formation and relative sea-level position during the late Pleistocene. A series of paleoshoreline ridges, dating to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5a and MIS 3 have been defined. The Kitty Hawk beach ridges, on the modern Outer Banks, yield ages of 3 to 2??ka. Oxygen-isotope data are used to place these deposits in the context of global climate and sea-level change. The occurrence of MIS 5a and MIS 3 shorelines suggests that glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA) of the study area is large (ca. 22 to 26??m), as suggested and modeled by other workers, and/or MIS 3 sea level was briefly higher than suggested by some coral reef studies. Correcting the shoreline elevations for GIA brings their elevation in line with other sea-level indicators. The age of the Kitty Hawk beach ridges places the Holocene shoreline well west of its present location at ca. 3 to 2??ka. The age of shoreline progradation is consistent with the ages of other beach ridge complexes in the southeast USA, suggesting some regionally contemporaneous forcing mechanism. ?? 2007 University of Washington.

  6. LAPTM4B facilitates late endosomal ceramide export to control cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Blom, Tomas; Li, Shiqian; Dichlberger, Andrea; Bäck, Nils; Kim, Young Ah; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Riezman, Howard; Bittman, Robert; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane-4b (LAPTM4B) associates with poor prognosis in several cancers, but its physiological function is not well understood. Here we use novel ceramide probes to provide evidence that LAPTM4B interacts with ceramide and facilitates its removal from late endosomal organelles (LEs). This lowers LE ceramide in parallel with and independent of acid ceramidase-dependent catabolism. In LAPTM4B-silenced cells, LE sphingolipid accumulation is accompanied by lysosomal membrane destabilization. However, these cells resist ceramide-driven caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents or gene silencing. Conversely, LAPTM4B overexpression reduces LE ceramide and stabilizes lysosomes but sensitizes to drug-induced caspase-3 activation. Together, these data uncover a cellular ceramide export route from LEs and identify LAPTM4B as its regulator. By compartmentalizing ceramide, LAPTM4B controls key sphingolipid-mediated cell death mechanisms and emerges as a candidate for sphingolipid-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:26280656

  7. Controls on high order cyclicity in Late Carnian evaporites in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordecai Bialik, Or; Korngreen, Dorit; Benjamini, Chaim

    2010-05-01

    The early Mesozoic world was warm, dry and unglaciated, but there is evidence that Milankovitch-order cycles exert control on the sedimentary pattern in the Middle and Late Triassic. The Mohilla Formation at the Ramon outcrop of central Israel is of Tuvalian (upper Carnian) age, and contains a carbonate-evaporite-clastic section demonstrating rapid transitions between lithologies and facies at several scales. The high sensitivity of evaporitic sedimentation to changes in precipitation, humidity, and marine input suggests that cyclic behavior observed in the field at high resolution can be attributed to quantitative and qualitative changes in local environmental factors controlled by a cyclic mechanism. We interpreted cycles form field data both by classic analysis of changes in facies and by spectral analysis using FFT to determine wavelength of cycles in terms of thickness and hierarchy. By calculation of applicable rates of sedimentation per lithology, and introducing a decompaction term, the time frame for these phenomena was established, and the temporal resolution of several orders of cyclicity could be resolved. Direct interpretation of relative sea level change derived from boundary criteria yielded 3 orders of cycles with average wavelength calculated at 23 Kyr, 85 Kyr and 245 Kyr. Spectral analysis of changes of all lithofacies components yielded 6 orders, with groups of wavelengths falling at 20 Kyr (±5), 30 Kyr (±3), 40 Kyr (±1), 60 Kyr (±4), 160 Kyr (one peak), and under 10 Kyr, that may be unresolvable noise. The 20 Kyr , 40 Kyr , 85 Kyr and probably the 160 Kyr and 245 Kyr cycles are consistent with Milankovitch cycle bands and their resonance. Orbital control on the sedimentary pattern would be indicated, and have been described in the Dolomites (Italy). Evaporitic systems of the Triassic have not been interpreted this way, but orbital control on precipitation would have a strong effect that could be tracked by stable isotopes; initial data

  8. Higher Education is an Age-Independent Predictor of White Matter Integrity and Cognitive Control in Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S.; Grieve, Stuart M.; Brickman, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is an important predictor of cognitive development and academic achievement. Late adolescence provides a unique opportunity to study how the attainment of socioeconomic status (in the form of years of education) relates to cognitive and neural development, during a time when age-related cognitive and neural development is ongoing. During late adolescence it is possible to disambiguate age- and education-related effects on the development of these processes. Here we assessed the degree to which higher educational attainment was related to performance on a cognitive control task, controlling for age. We then used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess the degree to which white matter microstructure might mediate this relationship. When covarying age, significant associations were found between educational attainment and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and cingulum bundle (CB). Further, when covarying age, FA in these regions was associated with cognitive control. Finally, mediation analyses revealed that the age-independent association between educational attainment and cognitive control was completely accounted for by FA in these regions. The uncinate fasciculus, a late-myelinated control region not implicated in cognitive control, did not mediate this effect. PMID:24033571

  9. Late - Cycle Injection of Air/Oxygen - Enriched Air for Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, Daniel

    2000-08-20

    Reduce the ''Engine Out'' particulates using the ''In Cylinder'' technique of late cycle auxiliary gas injection (AGI). Reduce the ''Engine Out'' NOx by combining AGI with optimization of fuel injection parameters. Maintain or Improve the Fuel Efficiency.

  10. New roles for cis-jasmone as an insect semiochemical and in plant defense

    PubMed Central

    Birkett, Michael A.; Campbell, Colin A. M.; Chamberlain, Keith; Guerrieri, Emilio; Hick, Alastair J.; Martin, Janet L.; Matthes, Michaela; Napier, Johnathan A.; Pettersson, Jan; Pickett, John A.; Poppy, Guy M.; Pow, Eleanor M.; Pye, Barry J.; Smart, Lesley E.; Wadhams, George H.; Wadhams, Lester J.; Woodcock, Christine M.

    2000-01-01

    cis-Jasmone, or (Z)-jasmone, is well known as a component of plant volatiles, and its release can be induced by damage, for example during insect herbivory. Using the olfactory system of the lettuce aphid to investigate volatiles from plants avoided by this insect, (Z)-jasmone was found to be electrophysiologically active and also to be repellent in laboratory choice tests. In field studies, repellency from traps was demonstrated for the damson-hop aphid, and with cereal aphids numbers were reduced in plots of winter wheat treated with (Z)-jasmone. In contrast, attractant activity was found in laboratory and wind tunnel tests for insects acting antagonistically to aphids, namely the seven-spot ladybird and an aphid parasitoid. When applied in the vapor phase to intact bean plants, (Z)-jasmone induced the production of volatile compounds, including the monoterpene (E)-β-ocimene, which affect plant defense, for example by stimulating the activity of parasitic insects. These plants were more attractive to the aphid parasitoid in the wind tunnel when tested 48 h after exposure to (Z)-jasmone had ceased. This possible signaling role of (Z)-jasmone is qualitatively different from that of the biosynthetically related methyl jasmonate and gives a long-lasting effect after removal of the stimulus. Differential display was used to compare mRNA populations in bean leaves exposed to the vapor of (Z)-jasmone and methyl jasmonate. One differentially displayed fragment was cloned and shown by Northern blotting to be up-regulated in leaf tissue by (Z)-jasmone. This sequence was identified by homology as being derived from a gene encoding an α-tubulin isoform. PMID:10900270

  11. Learned control over spinal nociception reduces supraspinal nociception as quantified by late somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Bäumler, Maximilian; Feller, Moritz; Krafft, Stefanie; Sommer, Jens; Straube, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that subjects can learn to use cognitive-emotional strategies to suppress their spinal nociceptive flexor reflex (RIII reflex) under visual RIII feedback and proposed that this reflects learned activation of descending pain inhibition. Here, we investigated whether learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception and whether previous relaxation training increases success. Subjects were trained over 3 sessions to reduce their RIII size by self-selected cognitive-emotional strategies. Two groups received true RIII feedback (with or without previous relaxation training) and a sham group received false feedback (15 subjects per group). RIII reflexes, late somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), and F-waves were recorded and pain intensity ratings collected. Both true feedback groups achieved significant (P < 0.01) but similar RIII suppression (to 79% ± 21% and 70% ± 17% of control). Somatosensory evoked potential amplitude (100-150 milliseconds after stimulation) was reduced in parallel with the RIII size (r = 0.57, P < 0.01). In the sham group, neither RIII size nor SEP amplitude was significantly reduced during feedback training. Pain intensity was significantly reduced in all 3 groups and also correlated with RIII reduction (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). F-wave parameters were not affected during RIII suppression. The present results show that learned RIII suppression also affects supraspinal nociception as quantified by SEPs, although effects on pain ratings were less clear. Lower motor neuron excitability as quantified by F-waves was not affected. Previous relaxation training did not significantly improve RIII feedback training success. PMID:26270584

  12. Risk factors for late recurrent candidaemia. A retrospective matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P; Vena, A; Valerio, M; Álvarez-Uría, A; Guinea, J; Escribano, P; Bouza, E

    2016-03-01

    Incidence, risk factors and clinical significance of late recurrent (LR) candidaemia (>1 month between episodes) remains unclear. The 1219 episodes of candidaemia detected from January 1985 to December 2014 were reviewed. We selected all cases with more than one episode separated by at least 30 days after clinical resolution in the interim (cases) and compared each of them with two controls (patients with single episodes of candidaemia). Clinical strains were genotyped to differentiate relapses from re-infection. Eighteen patients (1.48%) had 36 episodes of LR candidaemia (median 4 months). Independent risk factors for recurrence in the multivariate analysis were: underlying gastrointestinal disease (OR 67.16; 95% CI 5.23-861.71; p 0.001) and fungaemia due to Candida parapsilosis (OR 9.10; 95% 1.33-62.00; p 0.02). All episodes of LR candidaemia diagnosed during the first 3 months were due to an intravascular source of infection, whereas in those occurring after 3 months the main source of the disease was the abdomen, followed by endocarditis, and urinary tract. Molecular typing showed that 42.9% of LR candidaemias were relapses and 57.1% were re-infections. Neither time of recurrence nor clinical origin could predict type of recurrence. LR candidaemia is a relatively rare event that is more frequent in patients who have an initial episode of candidaemia due to C. parapsilosis or an underlying gastrointestinal disease. Episodes of LR candidaemia that occur within the first 3 months should prompt an attempt to exclude an intravascular source of infection, whereas those occurring later point to an intra-abdominal origin. PMID:26548507

  13. Late Proterozoic rift control on the shape of the Appalachians: The Pennsylvania reentrant

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, A.E. New York Geological Survey, Albany, NY ); Valentino, D.W. New York Geological Survey, Albany, NY )

    1991-11-01

    The Pennsylvania reentrant, the most prominent deviation in the trend of the Appalachians, is the product of Late Proterozoic rifting. The Peters Creek Formation, Pennsylvania-Maryland Piedmont, contains rift-generated, deep-water turbidite deposits of Late Proterozoic-Cambrian( ) age. These rocks are an extension of the Westminster terrane and lie well to the northeast of the southern Appalachian Late Proterozoic-Cambrian rift basin (Lynchburg-Chilhowee Group basin). The basin into which the Peters Creek Formation was deposited may have connected the southern rift basin with one to the north. The preservation of the Peters Creek Formation and other age equivalent units within the Pennsylvania reentrant indicates that the New York promontory acted as a buttress to Paleozoic orogenic activity.

  14. Bacterial chemoattraction towards jasmonate plays a role in the entry of Dickeya dadantii through wounded tissues.

    PubMed

    Antunez-Lamas, Maria; Cabrera, Ezequiel; Lopez-Solanilla, Emilia; Solano, Roberto; González-Melendi, Pablo; Chico, Jose Manuel; Toth, Ian; Birch, Paul; Pritchard, Leighton; Prichard, Leighton; Liu, Hui; Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2009-11-01

    Jasmonate is a key signalling compound in plant defence that is synthesized in wounded tissues. In this work, we have found that this molecule is also a strong chemoattractant for the phythopathogenic bacteria Dickeya dadantii (ex-Erwinia chysanthemi). Jasmonic acid induced the expression of a subset of bacterial genes possibly involved in virulence/survival in the plant apoplast and bacterial cells pre-treated with jasmonate showed increased virulence in chicory and Saintpaulia leaves. We also showed that tissue wounding induced bacterial spread through the leaf surface. Moreover, the jasmonate-deficient aos1 Arabidopsis thaliana mutant was more resistant to bacterial invasion by D. dadantii than wild-type plants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensing jasmonic acid by this bacterium helps the pathogen to ingress inside plant tissues. PMID:19818025

  15. Effect of methyl jasmonate application to grapevine leaves on grape amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Santamaría, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    Over the last few years, considerable attention has been paid to the application of elicitors to vineyard. However, research about the effect of elicitors on grape amino acid content is scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of foliar application of methyl jasmonate on must amino acid content. Results revealed that total amino acid content was not modified by the application of methyl jasmonate. However, the individual content of certain amino acids was increased as consequence of methyl jasmonate foliar application, i.e., histidine, serine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, tyrosine, asparagine, methionine, and lysine. Among them, phenylalanine content was considerably increased; this amino acid is precursor of phenolic and aromatic compounds. In conclusion, foliar application of methyl jasmonate improved must nitrogen composition. This finding suggests that methyl jasmonate treatment might be conducive to obtain wines of higher quality since must amino acid composition could affect the wine volatile composition and the fermentation kinetics. PMID:26948648

  16. Identification of jasmonic acid and its methyl ester as gum-inducing factors in tulips.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Edyta; Miyamoto, Kensuke; Saniewski, Marian; Ueda, Junichi

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify endogenous factors that induce gummosis and to show their role in gummosis in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) stems. Using procedures to detect endogenous factors that induce gum in the stem of tulips, jasmonic acid (JA) and methyl jasmonate (JA-Me) were successfully identified using gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total amounts of JA and JA-Me designated as jasmonates in tulip stems were also estimated at about 70-80 ng/g fresh weight, using deuterium-labeled jasmonates as internal standards. The application of JA and JA-Me as lanolin pastes substantially induced gums in tulip stems with ethylene production. The application of ethephon, an ethylene-generating compound, however, induced no gummosis although it slightly affected jasmonate content in tulip stems. These results strongly suggest that JA and JA-Me are endogenous factors that induce gummosis in tulip stems. PMID:15654503

  17. Effect of foot massage to decrease physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Coban, Ayden; Sirin, Ahsen

    2010-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of foot massage for decreasing physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy. Eighty pregnant women were randomly divided into two groups; study group had a 20 min foot massage daily for 5 days whereas the control group did not receive any intervention beyond standard prenatal care. The research was conducted between March and August 2007 in Manisa Province Health Ministry Central Primary Health Care Clinic 1, in Manisa, Western Turkey. Compared with the control group, women in the experimental group had a significantly smaller lower leg circumference (right and left, ankle, instep and metatarsal-phalanges joint) after 5 days of massage. The results obtained from our research show that foot massage was found to have a positive effect on decreasing normal physiological lower leg oedema in late pregnancy. PMID:20854342

  18. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs. PMID:27143046

  19. Induced production of 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate by jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate in sprouts and leaves of pak choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  20. Induced Production of 1-Methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl Glucosinolate by Jasmonic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate in Sprouts and Leaves of Pak Choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  1. Relationships among Social Support, Perceived Control, and Psychological Distress in Late Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemeroff, Robin; Midlarsky, Elizabeth; Meyer, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Social support has been shown to buffer the relationship between life stress and psychological distress in late life. However, little attention has been paid to personality variables that are associated with the capacity to effectively utilize social support. Although the buffering effects of social support were replicated in our sample of 134…

  2. Cognitive Control, Reward Related Decision Making and Outcomes of Late-Life Depression Treated with an Antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, George S.; Manning, Kevin; Kanellopoulos, Dora; McGovern, Amanda; Seirup, Joanna K.; Banerjee, Samprit; Gunning, Faith

    2015-01-01

    Background Executive processes consist of at least two sets of functions: one concerned with cognitive control and the other with reward-related decision making. Abnormal performance in both sets occurs in late-life depression. This study tested the hypothesis that only abnormal performance in cognitive control tasks predicts poor outcomes of late-life depression treated with escitalopram. Methods We studied older subjects with major depression (N=53) and non-depressed subjects (N=30). Executive functions were tested with the Iowa Gambling Test (IGT), Stroop Color/Word test, Tower of London, and Dementia Rating Scale-Initiation/Perseveration Domain (DRS-IP). After a 2-week placebo washout, depressed subjects received escitalopram (target daily dose: 20 mg) for 12 weeks. Results There were no significant differences between depressed and non-depressed subjects on executive function tests. Hierarchical cluster analysis of depressed subjects identified a Cognitive Control Cluster (abnormal Stroop, Tower, DRS-IP), a Reward-Related Cluster (IGT), and an Executively Unimpaired Cluster. Decline in depression was greater in the Executively Unimpaired (t=−2.09, df=331, p=0.0375) and the Reward-Related Cluster (t=−2.33, df=331,p=0.0202) than the Cognitive Control Cluster. The Executively Unimpaired Cluster (t=2.17, df=331, p=0.03) and the Reward-Related Cluster (t=2.03, df=331, p=0.0433) had a higher probability of remission than the Cognitive Control Cluster. Conclusions Dysfunction of cognitive control functions, but not reward-related decision making, may influence the decline of symptoms and the probability of remission of late-life depression treated with escitalopram. If replicated, simple to administer cognitive control tests may be used to select depressed older patients at risk for poor outcomes to SSRIs who may require structured psychotherapy. PMID:26169527

  3. Salicylate-mediated suppression of jasmonate-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis is targeted downstream of the jasmonate biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Van der Does, Dieuwertje; De Lange, Elvira S.; Delker, Carolin; Wasternack, Claus; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.; Ritsema, Tita

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) and salicylic acid (SA) are plant hormones that play pivotal roles in the regulation of induced defenses against microbial pathogens and insect herbivores. Their signaling pathways cross-communicate providing the plant with a regulatory potential to finely tune its defense response to the attacker(s) encountered. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SA strongly antagonizes the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, resulting in the downregulation of a large set of JA-responsive genes, including the marker genes PDF1.2 and VSP2. Induction of JA-responsive marker gene expression by different JA derivatives was equally sensitive to SA-mediated suppression. Activation of genes encoding key enzymes in the JA biosynthesis pathway, such as LOX2, AOS, AOC2, and OPR3 was also repressed by SA, suggesting that the JA biosynthesis pathway may be a target for SA-mediated antagonism. To test this, we made use of the mutant aos/dde2, which is completely blocked in its ability to produce JAs because of a mutation in the ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE gene. Mutant aos/dde2 plants did not express the JA-responsive marker genes PDF1.2 or VSP2 in response to infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola or the herbivorous insect Pieris rapae. Bypassing JA biosynthesis by exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) rescued this JA-responsive phenotype in aos/dde2. Application of SA suppressed MeJA-induced PDF1.2 expression to the same level in the aos/dde2 mutant as in wild-type Col-0 plants, indicating that SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression is targeted at a position downstream of the JA biosynthesis pathway. PMID:20839007

  4. Roles for blue light, jasmonate and nitric oxide in the regulation of dormancy and germination in wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, John V; Barrero, Jose M; Hughes, Trijntje; Julkowska, Magdalena; Taylor, Jennifer M; Xu, Qian; Gubler, Frank

    2013-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) plays a central role in seed dormancy and transcriptional regulation of genes coding for ABA biosynthetic and degradation enzymes is responsible for control of ABA content. However, little is known about signalling both before and after ABA regulation, in particular, how environmental signals are perceived and transduced. We are interested in these processes in cereal grains, particularly in relation to the development of strategies for controlling pre-harvest sprouting in barley and wheat. Our previous studies have indicated possible components of dormancy control and here we present evidence that blue light, nitric oxide (NO) and jasmonate are major controlling elements in wheat grain. Using microarray and pharmacological studies, we have found that blue light inhibits germination in dormant grain and that methyl jasmonate (MJ) and NO counteract this effect by reducing dormancy. We also present evidence that NO and jasmonate play roles in dormancy control in vivo. ABA was reduced by MJ and this was accompanied by reduced levels of expression of TaNCED1 and increased expression of TaABA8'OH-1 compared with dormant grain. Similar changes were caused by after-ripening. Analysis of global gene expression showed that although jasmonate and after-ripening caused important changes in gene expression, the changes were very different. While breaking dormancy, MJ had only a small number of target genes including gene(s) encoding beta-glucosidase. Our evidence indicates that NO and MJ act interdependently in controlling reduction of ABA and thus the demise of dormancy. PMID:23588419

  5. The Late Variscan control on the location and asymmetry of the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmer, J. C.; Ritter, J. R. R.; Eisbacher, G. H.; Fielitz, W.

    2016-05-01

    rocks on the eastern graben shoulder in contrast to the predominantly low-grade metamorphic to unmetamorphosed sedimentary-volcanic rocks exposed on the western shoulder. Although between c. 310 and 270 Ma NE-trending Permocarboniferous volcanic-sedimentary basins of the URG area subsided along upper crustal faults that mimic the trend of Variscan faults, initial broad lithospheric cooling from c. 270-200 Ma led to subsidence of a distinctly NNE- to SSW-oriented embayment that was probably underlain by thinner Palaeozoic crust in the area of the NNE-trending East Rhine Detachment. After re-emergence of the platform above sea level in late Mesozoic times, the deep-reaching W-dipping "extensional defects" of the East Rhine Detachment exerted a primary lithospheric scale control on both location and cross-sectional asymmetry of the Cenozoic graben structure. NE- and NW-striking, strongly altered and more shallow rooted Permocarboniferous or Mesozoic faults exerted secondary upper crustal controls on transfer faults and the accommodation zones near the terminations and segment boundaries of the URG. Deep crustal to upper lithospheric asymmetries continue to influence the neotectonic setting of the URG, such as westward rising earthquake hypocentres. Seismic activity along the URG appears to be part of a >600 km long zone that delimits the trailing edge of a SW-moving lithospheric block. In the URG area, NE-SW-oriented seismic anisotropy at sublithospheric depths of c. 60-80 km suggest active mantle flow in this direction as a possible driving force for the reactivation of pre-graben lithospheric shear zones.

  6. Mosquito odorant receptor for DEET and methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingxi; Choo, Young-Moo; De La Rosa, Alyssa; Leal, Walter S

    2014-11-18

    Insect repellents are important prophylactic tools for travelers and populations living in endemic areas of malaria, dengue, encephalitis, and other vector-borne diseases. DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) is a 6-decade-old synthetic repellent, which is still considered the gold standard of mosquito repellents. Mosquitoes use their sense of smell to detect DEET, but there are currently two hypotheses regarding its mode of action: activation of ionotropic receptor IR40a vs. odorant receptor(s). Here, we demonstrate that DEET, picaridin, insect repellent 3535, and p-menthan-3,8-diol activate the odorant receptor CquiOR136 of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Electrophysiological and behavioral assays showed that CquiIR40a knockdown had no significant effect on DEET detection and repellency. By contrast, reduction of CquiOR136 transcript levels led to a significant decrease in electroantennographic responses to DEET and a complete lack of repellency. Thus, direct activation of an odorant receptor, not an ionotropic receptor, is necessary for DEET reception and repellency in Culex mosquitoes. Interestingly, methyl jasmonate, a repellent derived from the nonvolatile jasmonic acid in the signaling pathway of plant defenses, elicited robust responses in CquiOR136•CquiOrco-expressing Xenopus oocytes, thus suggesting a possible link between natural products with long insect-plant evolutionary history and synthetic repellents. PMID:25349401

  7. Mosquito odorant receptor for DEET and methyl jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pingxi; Choo, Young-Moo; De La Rosa, Alyssa; Leal, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    Insect repellents are important prophylactic tools for travelers and populations living in endemic areas of malaria, dengue, encephalitis, and other vector-borne diseases. DEET (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) is a 6-decade-old synthetic repellent, which is still considered the gold standard of mosquito repellents. Mosquitoes use their sense of smell to detect DEET, but there are currently two hypotheses regarding its mode of action: activation of ionotropic receptor IR40a vs. odorant receptor(s). Here, we demonstrate that DEET, picaridin, insect repellent 3535, and p-menthan-3,8-diol activate the odorant receptor CquiOR136 of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Electrophysiological and behavioral assays showed that CquiIR40a knockdown had no significant effect on DEET detection and repellency. By contrast, reduction of CquiOR136 transcript levels led to a significant decrease in electroantennographic responses to DEET and a complete lack of repellency. Thus, direct activation of an odorant receptor, not an ionotropic receptor, is necessary for DEET reception and repellency in Culex mosquitoes. Interestingly, methyl jasmonate, a repellent derived from the nonvolatile jasmonic acid in the signaling pathway of plant defenses, elicited robust responses in CquiOR136•CquiOrco-expressing Xenopus oocytes, thus suggesting a possible link between natural products with long insect–plant evolutionary history and synthetic repellents. PMID:25349401

  8. The maize transcription factor EREB58 mediates the jasmonate-induced production of sesquiterpene volatiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengyan; Wang, Hai; Li, Fengqi; Chen, Zhongliang; Li, Xiuying; Zhu, Li; Wang, Guirong; Yu, Jingjuan; Huang, Dafang; Lang, Zhihong

    2015-10-01

    Over the past two decades, Zea mays (maize) has been established as a model system for the study of indirect plant defense against herbivores. When attacked by lepidopteran larvae, maize leaves emit a complex blend of volatiles, mainly composed of sesquiterpenes, to attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. This is associated with a swift transcriptional induction of terpene synthases such as TPS10; however, the molecular components controlling the complex transcriptional reprogramming in this process are still obscure. Here, by exploiting the finding that the maize TPS10 promoter retained its full responsiveness to herbivory in Arabidopsis, we identified the region from -300 to -200 of the TPS10 promoter as both necessary and sufficient for its herbivore inducibility through 5' deletion mapping. A high-throughput screening of an Arabidopsis transcription factor library using this promoter region as the bait identified seven AP2/ERF family transcription factors. Among their close homologs in maize, EREB58 was the only gene responsive to herbivory, with a spatiotemporal expression pattern highly similar to that of TPS10. Meanwhile, EREB58 was also responsive to Jasmonate. In vivo and in vitro assays indicated that EREB58 promotes TPS10 expression by directly binding to the GCC-box within the region from -300 to -200 of the TPS10 promoter. Transgenic maize plants overexpressing EREB58 constitutively over-accumulate TPS10 transcript, and also (E)-β-farnesene and (E)-α-bergamotene, two major sesquiterpenes produced by TPS10. In contrast, jasmonate induction of TPS10 and its volatiles was abolished in EREB58-RNAi transgenic lines. In sum, these results demonstrate that EREB58 is a positive regulator of sesquiterpene production by directly promoting TPS10 expression. PMID:26303437

  9. Methyl Jasmonate-Induced Lipidomic and Biochemical Alterations in the Intertidal Macroalga Gracilaria dura (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-10-01

    The role of exogenously added methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a lipid-derived signaling compound, in inducing oxidative stress in the marine red macroalga Gracilaria dura was investigated. MeJA at a concentration of 1-100 µM was a strong stimulant of reactive oxygen species (H(2)O(2), HO· and O(2) (·-)) (P < 0.05) causing considerable oxidative stress in G. dura. This further led to lipid peroxidation and degradation of the pigments Chl a and phycocyanin, with a concomitant increase in phycoerythrin. The MeJA-induced oxidative burst also led to the induction of a fatty acid oxidation cascade, resulting in the synthesis of hydroxy-oxylipins and the up-regulation of the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomic analysis revealed that monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (a chloroplastic glycerolipid) and phosphatidylcholine (extrachloroplastidic phopholipid) were the most affected lipid classes. The degradation of 18:3-fatty acid-containing monogalactosyldiacylglycerol inferred that it provided fatty acyl chains for the biosynthesis of 13-hydroperoxylinolenic acid, which was further directed towards either the jasmonate pathway or other alternative pathways of the fatty acid oxidation cascade, analogous to higher plants. Also, G. dura modulated the lipid acyl chains in such a way that no significant change was observed in the fatty acid profile of the treated thalli as compared with those of the control, except for C16:0, C16:1 (n-9), C20:3 (n-6) and C20:4 (n-6) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MeJA caused the accumulation of phenolic compounds and the up-regulation of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism such as polyphenol oxidase, shikimate dehydrogenase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, indicating a shift towards secondary metabolism as a defense strategy to combat the induced oxidative stress. PMID:26276825

  10. Foliar application of methyl jasmonate induced physio-hormonal changes in Pisum sativum under diverse temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Raheem; Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Hamayun, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-11-01

    Global climate change brings with it unwarranted shifts in both abiotic (heat stress, cold stress, wind, precipitation) and biotic (pathogens, pests) environmental factors, thus posing a threat to agricultural productivity across the world. In plants, lodging due to storms or herbivory causes wounding stress and consequently enhances endogenous jasmonates. In response, the plant growth is arrested as plant defense is prioritized. We pre-treated pea plants with elevated methyl jasmonate (MeJA) levels i.e. 50 μM, 100 μM and 200 μM under controlled growth chamber conditions. The pre-treated plants were then kept at 40 °C (heat stress--HS), 4 °C (cold stress--CS) and 20 °C (optimum/control temperature--OT) for 72 h. The effect of such treatments on plant growth attributes, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, cell death rate, and regulation of endogenous hormones were observed. Elevated MeJA application hindered plant growth attributes under HS, CS and OT conditions. Moreover, elevated MeJA levels lowered the rate of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, induced stomatal closure, caused higher cells mortality in leaves under HS, CS, and OT conditions. Endogenous ABA contents significantly declined in all MeJA treatments under HS and OT, but increased under CS conditions. Exogenous MeJA enhanced endogenous jasmonic acid contents of pea plants, but altered endogenous salicylic acid contents under varying temperatures. Current study shows that higher concentrations of exogenous MeJA strengthen plant defense mechanism by hindering plant growth under stress conditions. PMID:26379199

  11. Late endosomal transport and tethering are coupled processes controlled by RILP and the cholesterol sensor ORP1L.

    PubMed

    van der Kant, Rik; Fish, Alexander; Janssen, Lennert; Janssen, Hans; Krom, Sabine; Ho, Nataschja; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Carette, Jan; Rocha, Nuno; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes are dynamic organelles that constantly move and fuse to acquire cargo from early endosomes, phagosomes and autophagosome. Defects in lysosomal dynamics cause severe neurodegenerative and developmental diseases, such as Niemann-Pick type C disease and ARC syndrome, yet little is known about the regulation of late endosomal fusion in a mammalian system. Mammalian endosomes destined for fusion need to be transported over very long distances before they tether to initiate contact. Here, we describe that lysosomal tethering and transport are combined processes co-regulated by one multi-protein complex: RAB7-RILP-ORP1L. We show that RILP directly and concomitantly binds the tethering HOPS complex and the p150(Glued) subunit of the dynein motor. ORP1L then functions as a cholesterol-sensing switch controlling RILP-HOPS-p150(Glued) interactions. We show that RILP and ORP1L control Ebola virus infection, a process dependent on late endosomal fusion. By combining recruitment and regulation of both the dynein motor and HOPS complex into a single multiprotein complex, the RAB7-RILP-ORP1L complex efficiently couples and regulates the timing of microtubule minus-end transport and fusion, two major events in endosomal biology. PMID:23729732

  12. Spider mites suppress tomato defenses downstream of jasmonate and salicylate independently of hormonal crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Juan M; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Glas, Joris J; Ataide, Livia M S; Pappas, Maria L; Villarroel, Carlos A; Schuurink, Robert C; Sabelis, Maurice W; Kant, Merijn R

    2015-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory by mounting a defense. Some plant-eating spider mites (Tetranychus spp.) have adapted to plant defenses to maintain a high reproductive performance. From natural populations we selected three spider mite strains from two species, Tetranychus urticae and Tetranychus evansi, that can suppress plant defenses, using a fourth defense-inducing strain as a benchmark, to assess to which extent these strains suppress defenses differently. We characterized timing and magnitude of phytohormone accumulation and defense-gene expression, and determined if mites that cannot suppress defenses benefit from sharing a leaf with suppressors. The nonsuppressor strain induced a mixture of jasmonate- (JA) and salicylate (SA)-dependent defenses. Induced defense genes separated into three groups: ‘early’ (expression peak at 1 d postinfestation (dpi)); ‘intermediate’ (4 dpi); and ‘late’, whose expression increased until the leaf died. The T. evansi strains suppressed genes from all three groups, but the T. urticae strain only suppressed the late ones. Suppression occurred downstream of JA and SA accumulation, independently of the JA–SA antagonism, and was powerful enough to boost the reproductive performance of nonsuppressors up to 45%. Our results show that suppressing defenses not only brings benefits but, within herbivore communities, can also generate a considerable ecological cost when promoting the population growth of a competitor. PMID:25297722

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Allene Oxide Synthase 2 Gene Are Associated With Field Resistance to Late Blight in Populations of Tetraploid Potato Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina; Stich, Benjamin; Achenbach, Ute; Ballvora, Agim; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhard; Ilarionova, Evgeniya; Bellin, Diana; Walkemeier, Birgit; Basekow, Rico; Kersten, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans causes late blight, the most relevant disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) worldwide. Field resistance to late blight is a complex trait. When potatoes are cultivated under long day conditions in temperate climates, this resistance is correlated with late plant maturity, an undesirable characteristic. Identification of natural gene variation underlying late blight resistance not compromised by late maturity will facilitate the selection of resistant cultivars and give new insight in the mechanisms controlling quantitative pathogen resistance. We tested 24 candidate loci for association with field resistance to late blight and plant maturity in a population of 184 tetraploid potato individuals. The individuals were genotyped for 230 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 166 microsatellite alleles. For association analysis we used a mixed model, taking into account population structure, kinship, allele substitution and interaction effects of the marker alleles at a locus with four allele doses. Nine SNPs were associated with maturity corrected resistance (P < 0.001), which collectively explained 50% of the genetic variance of this trait. A major association was found at the StAOS2 locus encoding allene oxide synthase 2, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of jasmonates, plant hormones that function in defense signaling. This finding supports StAOS2 as being one of the factors controlling natural variation of pathogen resistance. PMID:19139145

  14. A Late Mitotic Regulatory Network Controlling Cyclin Destruction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jaspersen, Sue L.; Charles, Julia F.; Tinker-Kulberg, Rachel L.; Morgan, David O.

    1998-01-01

    Exit from mitosis requires the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase–cyclin complexes, primarily by ubiquitin-dependent cyclin proteolysis. Cyclin destruction is regulated by a ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, members of a large class of late mitotic mutants, including cdc15, cdc5, cdc14, dbf2, and tem1, arrest in anaphase with a phenotype similar to that of cells expressing nondegradable forms of mitotic cyclins. We addressed the possibility that the products of these genes are components of a regulatory network that governs cyclin proteolysis. We identified a complex array of genetic interactions among these mutants and found that the growth defect in most of the mutants is suppressed by overexpression of SPO12, YAK1, and SIC1 and is exacerbated by overproduction of the mitotic cyclin Clb2. When arrested in late mitosis, the mutants exhibit a defect in cyclin-specific APC activity that is accompanied by high Clb2 levels and low levels of the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Mutant cells arrested in G1 contain normal APC activity. We conclude that Cdc15, Cdc5, Cdc14, Dbf2, and Tem1 cooperate in the activation of the APC in late mitosis but are not required for maintenance of that activity in G1. PMID:9763445

  15. Bortezomib in late antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (BORTEJECT Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in transplant medicine, improvements in long-term kidney allograft survival have not been commensurate with those observed shortly after transplantation. The formation of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and ongoing antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) processes may critically contribute to late graft loss. However, appropriate treatment for late AMR has not yet been defined. There is accumulating evidence that the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may substantially affect the function and integrity of alloantibody-secreting plasma cells. The impact of this agent on the course of late AMR has not so far been systematically investigated. Methods/design The BORTEJECT Study is a randomized controlled trial designed to clarify the impact of intravenous bortezomib on the course of late AMR. In this single-center study (nephrological outpatient service, Medical University Vienna) we plan an initial cross-sectional DSA screening of 1,000 kidney transplant recipients (functioning graft at ≥180 days; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >20 ml/minute/1.73 m2). DSA-positive recipients will be subjected to kidney allograft biopsy to detect morphological features consistent with AMR. Forty-four patients with biopsy-proven AMR will then be included in a double-blind placebo-controlled intervention trial (1:1 randomization stratified for eGFR and the presence of T-cell-mediated rejection). Patients in the active group will receive two cycles of bortezomib (4 × 1.3 mg/m2 over 2 weeks; 3-month interval between cycles). The primary end point will be the course of eGFR over 24 months (intention-to-treat analysis). The sample size was calculated according to the assumption of a 5 ml/minute/1.73 m2 difference in eGFR slope (per year) between the two groups (alpha: 0.05; power: 0.8). Secondary endpoints will be DSA levels, protein excretion, measured glomerular filtration rate, transplant and patient survival, and the development of

  16. Late reactions in food-allergic children and adolescents after double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges.

    PubMed

    Saleh-Langenberg, J; Flokstra-de Blok, B M J; AlAgla, N; Kollen, B J; Dubois, A E J

    2016-07-01

    The time during which children are observed following a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) varies in clinical practice. There are little data on late reactions (LRs) following DBPCFCs. Therefore, we determined the prevalence, severity and clinical characteristics of late reactions in food-allergic children and adolescents after DBPCFC, and ascertained which factors are associated with, and may predict, LRs. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate which factors were associated with LRs and to develop the association and prediction models. A total of 1142 children underwent DBPCFCs (child-test combinations). Of these 1142 child-test combinations, 400 reported LRs following the DBPCFC. LRs in food-allergic children after DBPCFC are poorly predictable and are generally not severe. All LRs, including those on the placebo day, are more frequently reported in younger children. Children who do not experience severe immediate reactions may be safely discharged home 2 h after a DBPCFC. PMID:27121602

  17. Jasmonic acid involves in grape fruit ripening and resistant against Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haifeng; Zhang, Cheng; Pervaiz, Tariq; Zhao, Pengcheng; Liu, Zhongjie; Wang, Baoju; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Lin; Fang, Jinggui; Qian, Jianpu

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex process that is regulated by a signal network. Whereas the regulatory mechanism of abscisic acid has been studied extensively in non-climacteric fruit, little is know about other signaling pathways involved in this process. In this study, we performed that plant hormone jasmonic acid plays an important role in grape fruit coloring and softening by increasing the transcription levels of several ripening-related genes, such as the color-related genes PAL1, DFR, CHI, F3H, GST, CHS, and UFGT; softening-related genes PG, PL, PE, Cell, EG1, and XTH1; and aroma-related genes Ecar, QR, and EGS. Lastly, the fruit anthocyanin, phenol, aroma, and cell wall materials were changed. Jasmonic acid positively regulated its biosynthesis pathway genes LOS, AOS, and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase (OPR) and signal pathway genes COI1 and JMT. RNA interference of grape jasmonic acid pathway gene VvAOS in strawberry fruit appeared fruit un-coloring phenotypes; exogenous jasmonic acid rescued this phenotypes. On the contrary, overexpression of grape jasmonic acid receptor VvCOI1 in the strawberry fruit accelerated the fruit-ripening process and induced some plant defense-related gene expression level. Furthermore, jasmonic acid treatment or strong jasmonic acid signal pathway in strawberry fruit make the fruit resistance against Botrytis cinerea. PMID:26498957

  18. Benefits of jasmonate-dependent defenses against vertebrate herbivores in nature

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Ricardo AR; McClure, Mark; Hervé, Maxime R; Baldwin, Ian T; Erb, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous jasmonates are important regulators of plant defenses. If and how they enable plants to maintain their reproductive output when facing community-level herbivory under natural conditions, however, remains unknown. We demonstrate that jasmonate-deficient Nicotiana attenuata plants suffer more damage by arthropod and vertebrate herbivores than jasmonate-producing plants in nature. However, only damage by vertebrate herbivores translates into a significant reduction in flower production. Vertebrate stem peeling has the strongest negative impact on plant flower production. Stems are defended by jasmonate-dependent nicotine, and the native cottontail rabbit Sylvilagus nuttallii avoids jasmonate-producing N. attenuata shoots because of their high levels of nicotine. Thus, endogenous jasmonates enable plants to resist different types of herbivores in nature, and jasmonate-dependent defenses are important for plants to maintain their reproductive potential when facing vertebrate herbivory. Ecological and evolutionary models on plant defense signaling should aim at integrating arthropod and vertebrate herbivory at the community level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13720.001 PMID:27352734

  19. Jasmonate-Inducible Genes Are Activated in Rice by Pathogen Attack without a Concomitant Increase in Endogenous Jasmonic Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, P.; Buchala, A.; Silverman, P.; Seskar, M.; Raskin, I.; Metraux, J. P.

    1997-05-01

    The possible role of the octadecanoid signaling pathway with jasmonic acid (JA) as the central component in defense-gene regulation of pathogen-attacked rice was studied. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings were treated with JA or inoculated with the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea (Hebert) Barr., and gene-expression patterns were compared between the two treatments. JA application induced the accumulation of a number of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene products at the mRNA and protein levels, but pathogen attack did not enhance the levels of (-)-JA during the time required for PR gene expression. Pathogen-induced accumulation of PR1-like proteins was reduced in plants treated with tetcyclacis, a novel inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis. There was an additive and negative interaction between JA and an elicitor from M. grisea with respect to induction of PR1-like proteins and of an abundant JA-and wound-induced protein of 26 kD, respectively. Finally, activation of the octadecanoid signaling pathway and induction of a number of PR genes by exogenous application of JA did not confer local acquired resistance to rice. The data suggest that accumulation of nonconjugated (-)-JA is not necessary for induction of PR genes and that JA does not orchestrate localized defense responses in pathogen-attacked rice. Instead, JA appears to be embedded in a signaling network with another pathogen-induced pathway(s) and may be required at a certain minimal level for induction of some PR genes. PMID:12223690

  20. Moderate and late preterm infants exhibit widespread brain white matter microstructure alterations at term-equivalent age relative to term-born controls.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Claire E; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Gabra Fam, Lillian; Leemans, Alexander; Seal, Marc L; Doyle, Lex W; Anderson, Peter J; Spittle, Alicia J; Thompson, Deanne K

    2016-03-01

    Despite the many studies documenting cerebral white matter microstructural alterations associated with very preterm birth (<32 weeks' gestation), there is a dearth of similar research in moderate and late preterm infants (born 32-36 weeks' gestation), who experience higher rates of neurodevelopmental delays than infants born at term (≥37 weeks' gestation). We therefore aimed to determine whether whole brain white matter microstructure differs between moderate and late preterm infants and term-born controls at term-equivalent age, as well as to identify potential perinatal risk factors for white matter microstructural alterations in moderate and late preterm infants. Whole brain white matter microstructure was studied in 193 moderate and late preterm infants and 83 controls at term-equivalent age by performing Tract-Based Spatial Statistics analysis of diffusion tensor imaging data. Moderate and late preterm infants had lower fractional anisotropy and higher mean, axial and radial diffusivities compared with controls in nearly 70 % of the brain's major white matter fiber tracts. In the moderate and late preterm group, being born small for gestational age and male sex were associated with lower fractional anisotropy, largely within the optic radiation, corpus callosum and corona radiata. In conclusion, moderate and late preterm infants exhibit widespread brain white matter microstructural alterations compared with controls at term-equivalent age, in patterns consistent with delayed or disrupted white matter microstructural development. These findings may underpin some of the neurodevelopmental delays observed in moderate and late preterm children. PMID:25739350

  1. CYP94-mediated jasmonoyl-isoleucine hormone oxidation shapes jasmonate profiles and attenuates defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Yann; Widemann, Emilie; Miesch, Laurence; Pinot, Franck; Heitz, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea depends on jasmonate metabolism and signalling in Arabidopsis. We have presented here extensive jasmonate profiling in this pathosystem and investigated the impact of the recently reported jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) catabolic pathway mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP94) enzymes. Using a series of mutant and overexpressing (OE) plant lines, we showed that CYP94B3 and CYP94C1 are integral components of the fungus-induced jasmonate metabolic pathway and control the abundance of oxidized conjugated but also some unconjugated derivatives, such as sulfated 12-HSO4-JA. Despite causing JA-Ile overaccumulation due to impaired oxidation, CYP94 deficiency had negligible impacts on resistance, associated with enhanced JAZ repressor transcript levels. In contrast, plants overexpressing (OE) CYP94B3 or CYP94C1 were enriched in 12-OH-JA-Ile or 12-COOH-JA-Ile respectively. This shift towards oxidized JA-Ile derivatives was concomitant with strongly impaired defence gene induction and reduced disease resistance. CYP94B3-OE, but unexpectedly not CYP94C1-OE, plants displayed reduced JA-Ile levels compared with the wild type, suggesting that increased susceptibility in CYP94C1-OE plants may result from changes in the hormone oxidation ratio rather than absolute changes in JA-Ile levels. Consistently, while feeding JA-Ile to seedlings triggered strong induction of JA pathway genes, induction was largely reduced or abolished after feeding with the CYP94 products 12-OH-JA-Ile and 12-COOH-JA-Ile, respectively. This trend paralleled in vitro pull-down assays where 12-COOH-JA-Ile was unable to promote COI1–JAZ9 co-receptor assembly. Our results highlight the dual function of CYP94B3/C1 in antimicrobial defence: by controlling hormone oxidation status for signal attenuation, these enzymes also define JA-Ile as a metabolic hub directing jasmonate profile complexity. PMID:25903915

  2. CYP94-mediated jasmonoyl-isoleucine hormone oxidation shapes jasmonate profiles and attenuates defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Yann; Widemann, Emilie; Miesch, Laurence; Pinot, Franck; Heitz, Thierry

    2015-07-01

    Induced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea depends on jasmonate metabolism and signalling in Arabidopsis. We have presented here extensive jasmonate profiling in this pathosystem and investigated the impact of the recently reported jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) catabolic pathway mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP94) enzymes. Using a series of mutant and overexpressing (OE) plant lines, we showed that CYP94B3 and CYP94C1 are integral components of the fungus-induced jasmonate metabolic pathway and control the abundance of oxidized conjugated but also some unconjugated derivatives, such as sulfated 12-HSO4-JA. Despite causing JA-Ile overaccumulation due to impaired oxidation, CYP94 deficiency had negligible impacts on resistance, associated with enhanced JAZ repressor transcript levels. In contrast, plants overexpressing (OE) CYP94B3 or CYP94C1 were enriched in 12-OH-JA-Ile or 12-COOH-JA-Ile respectively. This shift towards oxidized JA-Ile derivatives was concomitant with strongly impaired defence gene induction and reduced disease resistance. CYP94B3-OE, but unexpectedly not CYP94C1-OE, plants displayed reduced JA-Ile levels compared with the wild type, suggesting that increased susceptibility in CYP94C1-OE plants may result from changes in the hormone oxidation ratio rather than absolute changes in JA-Ile levels. Consistently, while feeding JA-Ile to seedlings triggered strong induction of JA pathway genes, induction was largely reduced or abolished after feeding with the CYP94 products 12-OH-JA-Ile and 12-COOH-JA-Ile, respectively. This trend paralleled in vitro pull-down assays where 12-COOH-JA-Ile was unable to promote COI1-JAZ9 co-receptor assembly. Our results highlight the dual function of CYP94B3/C1 in antimicrobial defence: by controlling hormone oxidation status for signal attenuation, these enzymes also define JA-Ile as a metabolic hub directing jasmonate profile complexity. PMID:25903915

  3. The Jasmonate Pathway Is a Key Player in Systemically Induced Defense against Root Knot Nematodes in Rice1[C

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Kamrun; Kyndt, Tina; De Vleesschauwer, David; Höfte, Monica; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2011-01-01

    Complex defense signaling pathways, controlled by different hormones, are involved in the reaction of plants to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stress factors. We studied the ability of salicylic acid, jasmonate (JA), and ethylene (ET) to induce systemic defense in rice (Oryza sativa) against the root knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola. Exogenous ET (ethephon) and JA (methyl jasmonate) supply on the shoots induced a strong systemic defense response in the roots, exemplified by a major up-regulation of pathogenesis-related genes OsPR1a and OsPR1b, while the salicylic acid analog BTH (benzo-1,2,3-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester) was a less potent systemic defense inducer from shoot to root. Experiments with JA biosynthesis mutants and ET-insensitive transgenics showed that ET-induced defense requires an intact JA pathway, while JA-induced defense was still functional when ET signaling was impaired. Pharmacological inhibition of JA and ET biosynthesis confirmed that JA biosynthesis is needed for ET-induced systemic defense, and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data revealed that ET application onto the shoots strongly activates JA biosynthesis and signaling genes in the roots. All data provided in this study point to the JA pathway to play a pivotal role in rice defense against root knot nematodes. The expression of defense-related genes was monitored in root galls caused by M. graminicola. Different analyzed defense genes were attenuated in root galls caused by the nematode at early time points after infection. However, when the exogenous defense inducers ethephon and methyl jasmonate were supplied to the plant, the nematode was less effective in counteracting root defense pathways, hence making the plant more resistant to nematode infection. PMID:21715672

  4. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis.

  5. Dietary controls on extinction versus survival among avian megafauna in the late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Dobbs, Kena; Stidham, Thomas A.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Emslie, Steven D.; Koch, Paul L.

    2006-08-01

    The late Pleistocene extinction decimated terrestrial megafaunal communities in North America, but did not affect marine mammal populations. In coastal regions, marine megafauna may have provided a buffer that allowed some large predators or scavengers, such as California condors (Gymnogyps californianus), to survive into the Holocene. To track the influence of marine resources on avifaunas we analyzed the carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen isotope composition of collagen from late Pleistocene vultures and raptors, including species that survived the extinction (condor, bald eagle, golden eagle) and extinct species (teratorn, black vulture). At the Rancho La Brea and McKittrick tar pits of southern California, isotope values for extinct teratorns (Teratornis merriami, n = 10) and black vultures (Coragyps occidentalis, n = 8) show that they fed entirely in a terrestrial C3 ecosystem. In contrast, La Brea condors cluster into two groups, one with a terrestrial diet (n = 4), and the other with a strong marine influence (n = 5). At localities in the American southwest, Texas, and Florida, where condors became extinct, they have isotope values indicating entirely terrestrial diets (n = 10). Our results suggest that dependence upon terrestrial megafaunal carrion as a food source led to the extinction of inland California condor populations and coastal populations of teratorns and black vultures at the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary, whereas use of marine foods allowed coastal condor populations to survive.

  6. Climatic and tectonic controls on Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic sedimentation in northeastern Guangdong Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Chong-Jin; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wen, Shu-Nv; Krapež, Bryan

    2016-05-01

    Stratigraphic analyses document climatic and tectonic controls on the filling of a Late Triassic to early Middle Jurassic (T3-J2) basin that developed on top of a young orogenic belt in southeastern South China. About 2700 m of Carnian to Bajocian sedimentary rocks is documented in the Meizhou region, Guangdong Province. The Carnian to Rhaetian sequence is characterized by deltaic facies that are succeeded by Hettangian fluvial, shallow marine and volcaniclastic facies, and by Sinemurian to early Toarcian interdistributary bay and floodplain facies. The late Toarcian to Bajocian sequence comprises proximal alluvial to lacustrine facies that changed upwards to fluvial facies. Fossil assemblages indicate that climatic conditions changed from tropical/subtropical warm humid, to temperate humid, and then to hot arid through the Late Triassic to the Middle Jurassic. Climatically induced changes (e.g., in precipitation, vegetation and erosion) exerted a strong influence on sediment supply, whereas tectonics played a dominant role in stratigraphic evolution, accommodation generation, sedimentation pattern and volcanism. Tectonostratigraphic analysis shows that the T3-J2 basin was initiated on an orogenic belt during late-stage orogeny, and evolved into shallow-marine and volcanic environments and then back to terrestrial facies during the post-orogenic stage. This was followed by regional uplift and the development of a basin-and-range province. The order of these events is similar to that of the central Rocky Mountains, western North America during the Palaeogene. The Mesozoic basin of South China and the Eocene basins of the central Rocky Mountains highlight the importance of subduction-related subsidence above young and broad orogens.

  7. Jasmonate-responsive transcription factors regulating plant secondary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Memelink, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a large variety of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. These compounds play key roles in plant-environment interactions and many of them have pharmacological activity in humans. Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones which induce biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. JAs-responsive transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the JAs-induced accumulation of secondary metabolites belong to different families including AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB and WRKY. Here, we give an overview of the types and functions of TFs that have been identified in JAs-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and highlight their similarities and differences in regulating various biosynthetic pathways. We review major recent developments regarding JAs-responsive TFs mediating secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and provide suggestions for further studies. PMID:26876016

  8. Jasmonate signalling in plants shapes plant-insect interaction ecology.

    PubMed

    Lortzing, Tobias; Steppuhn, Anke

    2016-04-01

    The phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) regulates the induction of direct and indirect defences against herbivores. By now, the biochemical pathway of JA-signalling has been well resolved, allowing the use of an interdisciplinary toolbox and spurring the mechanistic investigation of plant-insect interactions. Recent advances show that JA-mediated plant responses are involved in the competitive and trophic interactions between various organisms throughout at least four trophic levels and therefore likely shape natural communities. Moreover, JA-mediated responses can be primed or suppressed by various environmental factors that are related to herbivory or not. Yet, to integrate the complex interactions at the physiological and ecological levels into community ecology, an examination of the often onetime discoveries for general rules and new bioinformatic approaches are required. PMID:27436644

  9. Diverse roles of jasmonates and ethylene in abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2015-04-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) and ethylene (ET), often acting cooperatively, play essential roles in regulating plant defense against pests and pathogens. Recent research reviewed here has revealed mechanistic new insights into the mode of action of these hormones in plant abiotic stress tolerance. During cold stress, JAs and ET differentially regulate the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) pathway. Major JA and ET signaling hubs such as JAZ proteins, CTR1, MYC2, components of the mediator complex, EIN2, EIN3, and several members of the AP2/ERF transcription factor gene family all have complex regulatory roles during abiotic stress adaptation. Better understanding the roles of these phytohormones in plant abiotic stress tolerance will contribute to the development of crop plants tolerant to a wide range of stressful environments. PMID:25731753

  10. Delay of iris flower senescence by cytokinins and jasmonates.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Wouter G; Çelikel, Fisun G; Pak, Caroline; Harkema, Harmannus

    2013-05-01

    It is not known whether tepal senescence in Iris flowers is regulated by hormones. We applied hormones and hormone inhibitors to cut flowers and isolated tepals of Iris × hollandica cv. Blue Magic. Treatments with ethylene or ethylene antagonists indicated lack of ethylene involvement. Auxins or auxin inhibitors also did not change the time to senescence. Abscisic acid (ABA) hastened senescence, but an inhibitor of ABA synthesis (norflurazon) had no effect. Gibberellic acid (GA3 ) slightly delayed senescence in some experiments, but in other experiments it was without effect, and gibberellin inhibitors [ancymidol or 4-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methylphenyltrimethyl ammonium chloride-1-piperidine carboxylate (AMO-1618)] were ineffective as well. Salicylic acid (SA) also had no effect. Ethylene, auxins, GA3 and SA affected flower opening, therefore did reach the flower cells. Jasmonates delayed senescence by about 2.0 days. Similarly, cytokinins delayed senescence by about 1.5-2.0 days. Antagonists of the phosphatidylinositol signal transduction pathway (lithium), calcium channels (niguldipine and verapamil), calmodulin action [fluphenazine, trifluoroperazine, phenoxybenzamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphtalenesulfonamide hydrochloride (W-7)] or protein kinase activity [1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine hydrochloride (H-7), N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-8) and N-(2-aminoethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H-9)] had no effect on senescence, indicating no role of a few common signal transduction pathways relating to hormone effects on senescence. The results indicate that tepal senescence in Iris cv. Blue Magic is not regulated by endogenous ethylene, auxin, gibberellins or SA. A role of ABA can at present not be excluded. The data suggest the hypothesis that cytokinins and jasmonates are among the natural regulators. PMID:22974423

  11. Early programming of the oocyte epigenome temporally controls late prophase I transcription and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; McCarthy, Alicia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Greer, Christina; Guilgur, Leonardo G; Becker, Jörg D; Secombe, Julie; Rangan, Prashanth; Martinho, Rui G

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes are arrested for long periods of time in the prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I). As chromosome condensation poses significant constraints to gene expression, the mechanisms regulating transcriptional activity in the prophase I-arrested oocyte are still not entirely understood. We hypothesized that gene expression during the prophase I arrest is primarily epigenetically regulated. Here we comprehensively define the Drosophila female germ line epigenome throughout oogenesis and show that the oocyte has a unique, dynamic and remarkably diversified epigenome characterized by the presence of both euchromatic and heterochromatic marks. We observed that the perturbation of the oocyte's epigenome in early oogenesis, through depletion of the dKDM5 histone demethylase, results in the temporal deregulation of meiotic transcription and affects female fertility. Taken together, our results indicate that the early programming of the oocyte epigenome primes meiotic chromatin for subsequent functions in late prophase I. PMID:27507044

  12. Early programming of the oocyte epigenome temporally controls late prophase I transcription and chromatin remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Costa, Paulo; McCarthy, Alicia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Greer, Christina; Guilgur, Leonardo G.; Becker, Jörg D.; Secombe, Julie; Rangan, Prashanth; Martinho, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes are arrested for long periods of time in the prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I). As chromosome condensation poses significant constraints to gene expression, the mechanisms regulating transcriptional activity in the prophase I-arrested oocyte are still not entirely understood. We hypothesized that gene expression during the prophase I arrest is primarily epigenetically regulated. Here we comprehensively define the Drosophila female germ line epigenome throughout oogenesis and show that the oocyte has a unique, dynamic and remarkably diversified epigenome characterized by the presence of both euchromatic and heterochromatic marks. We observed that the perturbation of the oocyte's epigenome in early oogenesis, through depletion of the dKDM5 histone demethylase, results in the temporal deregulation of meiotic transcription and affects female fertility. Taken together, our results indicate that the early programming of the oocyte epigenome primes meiotic chromatin for subsequent functions in late prophase I. PMID:27507044

  13. Perceptions of parental control and the development of indecision among late adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, J R; Olivette, M J

    1993-01-01

    Late adolescent females (N = 86; M age = 19.1 years) completed reliable and valid self-report measures on their perception of both parents' authority style (authoritarian, authoritative, permissive) and their own tendency toward decisional procrastination. Households where daughters perceived both parents as high authoritarian (n = 32) were significantly more likely to raise daughters with strong indecision tendencies than were parents perceived as low authoritarian (n = 23). Mothers and fathers perceived as high (n = 22) or low (n = 22) authoritative, and high (n = 32) or low (n = 24) permissive, did not produce significant differences in daughters' self-reported decisional procrastination. Results suggest that parental authority characterized by stern inflexibility and overcontrol has the greatest influence on daughters who develop chronic indecision tendencies. PMID:8266848

  14. Assessing Timescales and Controls of Floodplain Evolution in Monsoonal Australia during the Late Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J. H.; Preusser, F.

    2014-12-01

    Subtropical and tropical river systems are considered unique and sensitive archives for the detection of past changes in global circulation patterns due to their strategic position between significant atmospheric phenomena. In semi-arid to arid Central Australia, many of the hydrological variations have generally been attributed to variations in monsoon strength and position. While an increasing number of studies has recently addressed the reconstruction of monsoonal variations from high-resolution proxy records in tropical Australasia, very little data is available on the landscape-scale impacts such as weathering, erosion, flooding and sediment transport. Therefore, unraveling the impacts of past changes in monsoonal intensity on fluvial systems in Australia's tropical north - the 'Top End' - will substantially contribute to our understanding of cause and effect of climate change. Our study presents first results from the Adelaide River, one of the major river systems draining the 'Top End'. Here, extensive but currently inactive floodplains have accreted along the middle reaches of the catchment upstream of bedrock constrictions. Virtually no data is so far available from these floodplains although their stratigraphic and sedimentary record should contain valuable information on the late Quaternary evolution of the fluvial system in northern Australia. We have cored a transect of nine sediment profiles across the floodplains and levees associated with the Adelaide River. Based on these profiles, we (i) document their geomorphologic setting based on the analysis of high-resolution (LIDAR) elevation models and remote sensing data, (ii) establish a first stratigraphy for these floodplains based on field description, grain sizes and detailed total element data, (iii) present a chronological framework for the sediments based on luminescence dating, and (iv) discuss the significance of these results in terms of the larger-scale evolution of paleoenvironments and sea

  15. New allocyclic dimensions in a prograding carbonate bank: Evidence for eustatic, tectonic, and paleoceanographic control (late Neogene, Bahamas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, B.H.; McNeill, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    The deep-sea record, examined recently for the first time in a shallow-depocenter setting, has unveiled remarkable evidence for new sedimentary components and allocyclic complexity in a large, well-studied carbonate bank, the western Great Bahama Bank. The evidence is a composite foraminiferal signature - Paleocene to early Miocene (allogenic or reworked) and late Miocene to late Pliocene (host) planktic taxa, and redeposited middle Miocene shallow benthic faunas. Ages of the oldest and youngest planktic groups range from ??? 66 to ??? 2 Ma. The reworked and redeposited taxa are a proxy for significant sediment components that otherwise have no lithofacies or seismic resolution. The composite signature, reinforced by a distinctive distribution of the reworked and redeposited faunas, documents a much more complex late Neogene depositional system than previously known. The system is more than progradational. The source sequences that supplied the constituent bank-margin grains formed at different water depths and over hundreds of kilometers and tens of millions of years apart. New evidence from the literature and from data obtained during Ocean Drilling Program (OOP) Leg 166 in the Santaren Channel (Bahamas) support early interpretations based on the composite fossil record and provide valuable new dimensions to regional allocyclicity. The middle Miocene taxa were confined to the lower part of the section by the latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene(?) lowstand of sea level. An orderly occurrence of the allogenic taxa is unique to the global reworked geologic record and appears to have been controlled by a combination of Paleogene-early Neogene tectonics at the source, eustatic changes, and late Neogene current activity at the source and across the bank. The allogenic taxa expand the spatial and temporal range of information in the northern Bahamas by nearly an order of magnitude. In essence, some of the major processes active in the region during ??? 64 m.y. of the

  16. [Some considerations about the use of carbon sources in jasmonic acid production.].

    PubMed

    Almeida González, G; Klibansky Delgado, M; Altuna Seijas, B; Eng Sánchez, F; Legrá Mora, S; Armenteros Galarraga, S

    1999-09-01

    The effect of different carbon sources as sucrose, fructose, glucose and molasses were studied in relation to jasmonic acid production. The best results were obtained with a simple medium made up by final molasses, potassium nitrate and acid potassium phosphate, without the addition of other salts like Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, etc. This alternative guaranteed a 100% increase in jasmonic acid production, compared to pattern medium, since a concentration of 2.08 g/l was obtained. PMID:18473562

  17. Jasmonate perception by inositol-phosphate-potentiated COI1-JAZ co-receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sheard, Laura B; Tan, Xu; Mao, Haibin; Withers, John; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Hinds, Thomas R; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Sharon, Michal; Browse, John; He, Sheng Yang; Rizo, Josep; Howe, Gregg A; Zheng, Ning

    2011-11-07

    Jasmonates are a family of plant hormones that regulate plant growth, development and responses to stress. The F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) mediates jasmonate signalling by promoting hormone-dependent ubiquitylation and degradation of transcriptional repressor JAZ proteins. Despite its importance, the mechanism of jasmonate perception remains unclear. Here we present structural and pharmacological data to show that the true Arabidopsis jasmonate receptor is a complex of both COI1 and JAZ. COI1 contains an open pocket that recognizes the bioactive hormone (3R,7S)-jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine (JA-Ile) with high specificity. High-affinity hormone binding requires a bipartite JAZ degron sequence consisting of a conserved {alpha}-helix for COI1 docking and a loop region to trap the hormone in its binding pocket. In addition, we identify a third critical component of the jasmonate co-receptor complex, inositol pentakisphosphate, which interacts with both COI1 and JAZ adjacent to the ligand. Our results unravel the mechanism of jasmonate perception and highlight the ability of F-box proteins to evolve as multi-component signalling hubs.

  18. The BLADE-ON-PETIOLE genes of Arabidopsis are essential for resistance induced by methyl jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NPR1 is a gene of Arabidopsis thaliana required for the perception of salicylic acid. This perception triggers a defense response and negatively regulates the perception of jasmonates. Surprisingly, the application of methyl jasmonate also induces resistance, and NPR1 is also suspected to be relevant. Since an allelic series of npr1 was recently described, the behavior of these alleles was tested in response to methyl jasmonate. Results The response to methyl jasmonate of different npr1s alleles and NPR1 paralogs null mutants was measured by the growth of a pathogen. We have also tested the subcellular localization of some npr1s, along with the protein-protein interactions that can be measured in yeast. The localization of the protein in npr1 alleles does not affect the response to methyl jasmonate. In fact, NPR1 is not required. The genes that are required in a redundant fashion are the BOPs. The BOPs are paralogs of NPR1, and they physically interact with the TGA family of transcription factors. Conclusions Some npr1 alleles have a phenotype in this response likely because they are affecting the interaction between BOPs and TGAs, and these two families of proteins are responsible for the resistance induced by methyl jasmonate in wild type plants. PMID:23116333

  19. Cholodny-Went revisited: a role for jasmonate in gravitropism of rice coleoptiles.

    PubMed

    Gutjahr, Caroline; Riemann, Michael; Müller, Axel; Düchting, Petra; Weiler, Elmar W; Nick, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Gravitropism is explained by the Cholodny-Went hypothesis: the basipetal flow of auxin is diverted laterally. The resulting lateral auxin gradient triggers asymmetric growth. However, the Cholodny-Went hypothesis has been questioned repeatedly because the internal auxin gradient is too small to account for the observed growth asymmetry. Therefore, an additional gradient in indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA) sensitivity has been suggested (Brauner and Hager in Planta 51:115-147, 1958). We challenged the Cholodny-Went hypothesis for gravitropism of rice coleoptiles (Oryza sativa L.) and found it to be essentially true. However, we observed, additionally, that the two halves of gravitropically stimulated coleoptiles responded differentially to the same amount of exogenous auxin: the auxin response is reduced in the upper flank but normal in the lower flank. This indicates that the auxin-gradient is amplified by a gradient of auxin responsiveness. Hormone contents were measured across the coleoptile by a GC-MS/MS technique and a gradient of jasmonate was detected opposing the auxin gradient. Furthermore, the total content of jasmonate increased during the gravitropic response. Jasmonate gradient and increase persist even when the lateral IAA gradient is inhibited by 1-N-naphtylphtalamic acid. Flooding with jasmonate delays the onset of gravitropic bending. Moreover, a jasmonate-deficient rice mutant bends more slowly and later than the wild type. We discuss a role of jasmonate as modulator of auxin responsiveness in gravitropism. PMID:16047199

  20. Sea Level and Paleoenvironment Control on Late Ordovician Source Rocks, Hudson Bay Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Hefter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Hudson Bay Basin is one of the largest Paleozoic sedimentary basins in North America, with Southampton Island on its north margin. The lower part of the basin succession comprises approximately 180 to 300 m of Upper Ordovician strata including Bad Cache Rapids and Churchill River groups and Red Head Rapids Formation. These units mainly comprise carbonate rocks consisting of alternating fossiliferous limestone, evaporitic and reefal dolostone, and minor shale. Shale units containing extremely high TOC, and interpreted to have potential as petroleum source rocks, were found at three levels in the lower Red Head Rapids Formation on Southampton Island, and were also recognized in exploration wells from the Hudson Bay offshore area. A study of conodonts from 390 conodont-bearing samples from continuous cores and well cuttings from six exploration wells in the Hudson Bay Lowlands and offshore area (Comeault Province No. 1, Kaskattama Province No. 1, Pen Island No. 1, Walrus A-71, Polar Bear C-11 and Narwhal South O-58), and about 250 conodont-bearing samples collected from outcrops on Southampton Island allows recognition of three conodont zones in the Upper Ordovician sequence, namely (in ascendant sequence) Belodina confluens, Amorphognathus ordovicicus, and Rhipidognathus symmetricus zones. The three conodont zones suggest a cycle of sea level changes of rising, reaching the highest level, and then falling during the Late Ordovician. Three intervals of petroleum potential source rock are within the Rhipidognathus symmetricus Zone in Red Head Rapids Formation, and formed in a restricted anoxic and hypersaline condition during a period of sea level falling. This is supported by the following data: 1) The conodont Rhipidognathus symmetricus represents the shallowest Late Ordovician conodont biofacies and very shallow subtidal to intertidal and hypersaline condition. This species has the greatest richness within the three oil shale intervals to compare other parts of Red

  1. Plant growth hormones suppress the development of Harpophora maydis, the cause of late wilt in maize.

    PubMed

    Degani, Ofir; Drori, Ran; Goldblat, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Late wilt, a severe vascular disease of maize caused by the fungus Harpophora maydis, is characterized by rapid wilting of maize plants before tasseling and until shortly before maturity. The pathogen is currently controlled by resistant maize cultivars, but the disease is constantly spreading to new areas. The plant's late phenological stage at which the disease appears suggests that plant hormones may be involved in the pathogenesis. This work revealed that plant growth hormones, auxin (Indole-3-acetic acid) and cytokinin (kinetin), suppress H. maydis in culture media and in a detached root assay. Kinetin, and even more auxin, caused significant suppression of fungus spore germination. Gibberellic acid did not alter colony growth rate but had a signal suppressive effect on the pathogens' spore germination. In comparison, ethylene and jasmonic acid, plant senescing and defense response regulators, had minor effects on colony growth and spore germination rate. Their associate hormone, salicylic acid, had a moderate suppressive effect on spore germination and colony growth rate, and a strong influence when combined with auxin. Despite the anti-fungal auxin success in vitro, field experiments with dimethylamine salt of  2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (that mimics the influence of auxin) failed to suppress the late wilt. The lines of evidence presented here reveal the suppressive influence of the three growth hormones studied on fungal development and are important to encourage further and more in-depth examinations of this intriguing hormonal complex regulatory and its role in the maize-H. maydis interactions. PMID:25649030

  2. Controls on deposition of the St. Peter Sandstone (Middle-Late Ordovician), Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Nadon, G.C.; Simo, A.; Byers, C.W.; Dott, R.H, Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    The St. Peter Sandstone (Middle-late Ordovician) of the Michigan basin represents an approximately 10-m.y. interval of clastic deposition in an otherwise carbonate-dominated Ordovician succession. This interval, up to 320 m thick, also coincides with a change in basin configuration from the nearly circular depocenter of the underlying Shakopee Formation to an east-west elongate trough situated west to Saginaw Bay. Interpretation of well logs and core from throughout the basin indicates that the clastics are composed of 20-25 sequences upper shoreface to tidal-flat environments. The sequences are interbedded with heavily bioturbated, shaly, lower shoreface sandstones (1-14 m thick) and, in the central and southeastern parts of the basin, with carbonate shales, stromatolites, and oolitic grain-stones (2-39 m thick). The eastern and southeastern margins of the basin contain the thickest carbonate accumulations. Hydrocarbons fields are located over structural highs formed by reactivation of basement structures. Detailed comparison of well logs within field shows that sedimentary cycles thin over the structures as a result of the local reduction in the formation of accommodation space by syndepositional movements on the faults. The presence of thick carbonates along the southeastern margin of the basin is a result of the combination of distance form the clastic source and the episodic formation of accommodation space by syndepositional normal faulting along the basin margin.

  3. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  4. On a Fitzhugh-Nagumo type model for the pulse-like jasmonate defense response in plants.

    PubMed

    Chiangga, S; Pornkaveerat, W; Frank, T D

    2016-03-01

    A mechanistic model of the Fitzhugh-Nagumo type is proposed for the pulse-like jasmonate response in plants. The model is composed of a bistable signaling pathway coupled to a negative feedback loop. The bistable signaling pathway describes a recently discovered positive feedback loop involving jasmonate and the MYC2 transcription factor regulating promoter activity during plant defense. The negative feedback loop is assumed to reflect a second jasmonate-dependent signaling pathway that is also used for ethylene signaling. The impact of the negative feedback loop is to destroy the high-level jasmonate fixed-point of the bistable jasmonate/MYC2 module. As a result, the high-level state becomes a ghost attractor and the jasmonate defense response becomes pulse-like. PMID:26774970

  5. Improvement of grape and wine phenolic content by foliar application to grapevine of three different elicitors: Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Baroja, Elisa; Santamaría, Pilar; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Phenolic compounds play a key role in grape and wine organoleptic properties, being therefore a key parameter in wine quality. Elicitor application constitutes an interesting field of research since it is indirectly involved in the accumulation of phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the application of three different elicitors on both grape and wine phenolic content. Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and a commercial yeast extract were applied to the canopy at veraison and one week later. Results showed that foliar treatments carried out with methyl jasmonate and yeast extract achieved the best results, increasing grape and wine anthocyanin content when compared to the control. Moreover, the application of the yeast elicitor also enhanced grape stilbene content. In contrast, the chitosan treatment did not have a substantial impact on the phenolic compounds. The results of this study indicate that methyl jasmonate and yeast extract applications could be a simple practice to increase grape and wine phenolic content. PMID:26868568

  6. Oceanic-style Subduction Controls Late Cenozoic Deformation of the Northern Pamir and Alai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, E. R.; Chen, J.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Thiede, R. C.; Stockli, D. F.; Sudo, M.; Strecker, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Pamir - Alai represents the preeminent example of an active intracontinental subduction zone in the early stages of continent-continent collision. Such zones are the least understood type of plate boundary because modern examples are few and of limited access, and ancient analogs have been extensively overprinted by subsequent continent-continent collision and erosion processes. In the Pamir, at least 300 km of convergence has apparently occurred between the North Pamir and the South Tien Shan. Published P-wave tomography and earthquake epicenters suggest subduction of a ~300 km-long slab. The MPT and Pamir Frontal Thrusts (PFT) correspond to the updip projection of this subduction zone. We have compiled ca. 260 published and 18 new apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and fission track, and biotite and muscovite Argon cooling ages from basement samples as well as several detrital samples from key areas in the Pamir region. Our synopsis shows that the hanging wall of the MPT experienced relatively minor amounts of late Cenozoic exhumation. This is incompatible with a model of a huge overthrust such as the Himalayan Main Central Thrust. Rather, the bulk of the convergence is apparently accommodated by underthrusting. The Pamir orogen as a whole is an integral part of the overriding plate in a subduction system, while the remnant basin to the north constitutes the downgoing plate. Herein, we demonstrate that the observed deformation of the upper and lower plates within the Pamir-Alai convergence zone resembles highly arcuate oceanic subduction systems characterized by slab rollback, subduction erosion, subduction accretion, and marginal slab-tear faults. We suggest that the curvature of the North Pamir is genetically linked to the short width and rollback of the south-dipping Alai slab; northward motion (indentation) of the Pamir is accommodated by crustal processes related to slab rollback and intracontinental subduction. Our model relates late Oligocene - early Miocene

  7. Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Thomas; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-01-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (T e) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, T e values (2 km < T e < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a T e of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (T e ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low T e model (T e = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  8. Reprint of: Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Tom; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (Te) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, Te values (2 km < Te < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a Te of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (Te ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low Te model (Te = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  9. Eustatic and climatic control on the Upper Muschelkalk Sea (late Anisian/Ladinian) in the Central European Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, M.; Kaiser, S. I.; Fischer, J.; Heunisch, C.; Kustatscher, E.; Luppold, F. W.; Berner, U.; Röhling, H.-G.

    2015-12-01

    The Upper Muschelkalk in the Central European Basin (CEB) is a key example of eustatic and climatic controls on inland seas. The late Anisian rapid transgression from Tethyan waters culminated in a large semi-enclosed inland sea stretching across the CEB. Subsequently, the slow but successive retreat in the early Ladinian resulted in a small remnant sea. The pronounced stratal pattern architectures are translated into a framework of 3rd- and 4th-order T-R sequences. The latest Illyrian 3rd-order maximum flooding surface corresponds to maximum abundances of carbonates and marine phytoplankton. An euryhaline marine ecology is indicated by prasinophycean algae dominating over acritarchs and δ18OP values of 18.9-22.4‰ VSMOW corresponding to Tethyan references. During the 3rd-order regressive phase successive freshening up to hyposaline conditions is indicated by up to 3‰ depleted δ18OP values, shifts to more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios and maximum abundances of terrestrial palynomorphs. Likewise, 4th-order T-R sequences are constrained by commutated stratal pattern architectures, palynofacies and geochemistry. The favourable correlation of middle Triassic 3rd-order sequences of Tethyan and peri-Tethyan basins demonstrate the principle control of circum-Tethyan eustatic cycles. 4th-order sequences are evident and, although not yet correlatable in detail, indicate 106-year scale eustatic cycles which may be attributed to glacioeustatic sea-level changes. The subordinated control of arid to semiarid low latitude and semihumid to humid temperate mid latitude climates affected the Upper Muschelkalk Sea in particular during 4th-order sea-level lowstands. Substantial fresh water input from Scandinavian sources caused temporal stratification leading to stagnant bottom waters and/or sediments as indicated by palynofacies and U/Th and Ni/Co redox indices. The herein reconstructed middle Triassic zonal climates are in agreement to previously published Late Triassic zonal

  10. Biomass, production, and control of heterotrophic bacterioplankton during a late phytoplankton bloom in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Han; Yang, Eun Jin; Choi, Ayeon; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the heterotrophic bacterial biomass and production in February 2012, in four habitats (a polynya, sea-ice zone, ice shelf, and the open sea) in the Amundsen Sea to determine the spatial distribution, controlling factors, and ecological role of the bacteria during a late phytoplankton bloom by Phaeocystis antarctica. Bacterial abundance (BA) and production (BP) were highest at the center of the polynya, and both were significantly correlated with phytoplankton biomass. BP accounted for average 17% of the organic carbon produced by phytoplankton primary production (PP), which is higher than the average BP:PP ratio reported in most open ocean. The abundance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) was correlated with the BA, and the average bacteria:HNF ratio (260) was lower than the values reported in most marine environments (400-1000), including the Ross Sea Polynya (800). Evidence for a tight coupling of bacteria and phytoplankton activities on the one hand and intense HNF grazing on bacteria on the other could be found in the high BP:PP and low bacteria:HNF ratios, respectively. Interestingly, these data were accompanied by low particulate carbon export fluxes measured during the late Phaeocystis bloom. Together, these results indicated that the microbial loop plays a significant role in the biogeochemical carbon cycle and food web processes in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  11. Depression care management for late-life depression in China primary care: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a major public health issue in China and worldwide, late-life depression is associated with physical limitations, greater functional impairment, increased utilization and cost of health care, and suicide. Like other chronic diseases in elders such as hypertension and diabetes, depression is a chronic disease that the new National Health Policy of China indicates should be managed in primary care settings. Collaborative care, linking primary and mental health specialty care, has been shown to be effective for the treatment of late-life depression in primary care settings in Western countries. The primary aim of this project is to implement a depression care management (DCM) intervention, and examine its effectiveness on the depressive symptoms of older patients in Chinese primary care settings. Methods/Design The trial is a multi-site, primary clinic based randomized controlled trial design in Hangzhou, China. Sixteen primary care clinics will be enrolled in and randomly assigned to deliver either DCM or care as usual (CAU) (8 clinics each) to 320 patients (aged ≥ 60 years) with major depression (20/clinic; n = 160 in each treatment condition). In the DCM arm, primary care physicians (PCPs) will prescribe 16 weeks of antidepressant medication according to the treatment guideline protocol. Care managers monitor the progress of treatment and side effects, educate patients/family, and facilitate communication between providers; psychiatrists will provide weekly group psychiatric consultation and CM supervision. Patients in both DCM and CAU arms will be assessed by clinical research coordinators at baseline, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months. Depressive symptoms, functional status, treatment stigma and clients' satisfaction will be used to assess patients' outcomes; and clinic practices, attitudes/knowledge, and satisfaction will be providers' outcomes. Discussion This will be the first trial of the effectiveness of a collaborative care intervention aiming to

  12. The maturation of task-set related activation supports late developmental improvements in inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Velanova, Katerina; Wheeler, Mark E.; Luna, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    The ability to voluntarily inhibit a single response is evident early in development, even as the ability to maintain an inhibitory “task set” continues to improve. To date, functional neuroimaging studies have detailed developmental changes in systems supporting inhibitory control exerted at the single-trial level, but changes underlying the ability to maintain an inhibitory task set remain little understood. Here we present findings from a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that characterizes the development of systems supporting both transient (trial-related) and sustained (task-set-related) activation during performance of the antisaccade (AS) task—an oculomotor test of inhibitory control (Hallett, 1978). Transient activation decreased from childhood to adolescence in regions known to support inhibitory processes and oculomotor control, likely reflecting less effortful response production. In contrast, sustained activation increased to adulthood in regions implicated in control. Our results suggest that development of the ability to maintain a task set is primary to the maturation of inhibitory control, and further, that this ability is still immature in adolescence. PMID:19812330

  13. Systemic jasmonic acid modulation in mycorrhizal tomato plants and its role in induced resistance against Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Nair, A; Kolet, S P; Thulasiram, H V; Bhargava, S

    2015-05-01

    Tomato plants colonised with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum show systemic induced resistance to the foliar pathogen Alternaria alternata, as observed in interactions of other AM-colonised plants with a range of pathogens. The role of jasmonic (JA) and salicylic (SA) acid in expression of this mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR) against A. alternata was studied by measuring: (i) activity of enzymes reported to be involved in their biosynthesis, namely lipoxygenase (LOX) and phenylammonia lyase (PAL); and (ii) levels of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and SA. Transcript abundance of some defence genes associated with JA and SA response pathways were also studied. Both LOX and PAL activity increased twofold in response to pathogen application to control plants. AM-colonised plants had three-fold higher LOX activity compared to control plants, but unlike controls, this did not increase further in response to pathogen application. Higher LOX activity in AM-colonised plants correlated with four-fold higher MeJA in leaves of AM-colonised plants compared to controls. Treatment of plants with the JA biosynthesis inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) led to 50% lower MeJA in both control and AM-colonised plants and correlated with increased susceptibility to A. alternata, suggesting a causal role for JA in expression of MIR against the pathogen. Genes involved in JA biosynthesis (OPR3) and response (COI1) showed six- and 42-fold higher expression, respectively, in leaves of AM-colonised plants compared to controls. AM-colonised plants also showed increased expression of the SA response gene PR1 and that of the wound-inducible polypeptide prosystemin. Our results suggest that the systemic increase in JA in response to AM colonisation plays a key role in expression of MIR against A. alternata. PMID:25327848

  14. Transcriptome changes in Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. roots induced by methyl jasmonate* #

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-chang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Jun-wen; Zhao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome profiling has been widely used to analyze transcriptomic variation in plants subjected to abiotic or biotic stresses. Although gene expression changes induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) have been profiled in several plant species, no information is available on the MeJA-triggered transcriptome response of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., a species with highly valuable medicinal properties. In this study, we used transcriptome profiling to investigate transcriptome changes in roots of P. multiflorum seedlings subjected to a 0.25 mmol/L-MeJA root irrigation treatment. A total of 18 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were induced by MeJA treatment, of which 4535 were up-regulated and 14 142 were down-regulated compared with controls. These DEGs were associated with 125 metabolic pathways. In addition to various common primary and secondary metabolic pathways, several secondary metabolic pathways related to components with significant pharmacological effects were enriched by MeJA, including arachidonic acid metabolism, linoleic acid metabolism, and stilbenoid biosynthesis. The MeJA-induced transcriptome changes uncovered in this study provide a solid foundation for future study of functional genes controlling effective components in secondary metabolic pathways of P. multiflorum. PMID:26642186

  15. Transcriptome changes in Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. roots induced by methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-chang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Jun-wen; Zhao, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Transcriptome profiling has been widely used to analyze transcriptomic variation in plants subjected to abiotic or biotic stresses. Although gene expression changes induced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA) have been profiled in several plant species, no information is available on the MeJA-triggered transcriptome response of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., a species with highly valuable medicinal properties. In this study, we used transcriptome profiling to investigate transcriptome changes in roots of P. multiflorum seedlings subjected to a 0.25 mmol/L-MeJA root-irrigation treatment. A total of 18 677 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were induced by MeJA treatment, of which 4535 were up-regulated and 14 142 were down-regulated compared with controls. These DEGs were associated with 125 metabolic pathways. In addition to various common primary and secondary metabolic pathways, several secondary metabolic pathways related to components with significant pharmacological effects were enriched by MeJA, including arachidonic acid metabolism, linoleic acid metabolism, and stilbenoid biosynthesis. The MeJA-induced transcriptome changes uncovered in this study provide a solid foundation for future study of functional genes controlling effective components in secondary metabolic pathways of P. multiflorum. PMID:26642186

  16. The N400 and Late Positive Complex (LPC) Effects Reflect Controlled Rather than Automatic Mechanisms of Sentence Processing

    PubMed Central

    Daltrozzo, Jérôme; Wioland, Norma; Kotchoubey, Boris

    2012-01-01

    This study compared automatic and controlled cognitive processes that underlie event-related potentials (ERPs) effects during speech perception. Sentences were presented to French native speakers, and the final word could be congruent or incongruent, and presented at one of four levels of degradation (using a modulation with pink noise): no degradation, mild degradation (2 levels), or strong degradation. We assumed that degradation impairs controlled more than automatic processes. The N400 and Late Positive Complex (LPC) effects were defined as the differences between the corresponding wave amplitudes to incongruent words minus congruent words. Under mild degradation, where controlled sentence-level processing could still occur (as indicated by behavioral data), both N400 and LPC effects were delayed and the latter effect was reduced. Under strong degradation, where sentence processing was rather automatic (as indicated by behavioral data), no ERP effect remained. These results suggest that ERP effects elicited in complex contexts, such as sentences, reflect controlled rather than automatic mechanisms of speech processing. These results differ from the results of experiments that used word-pair or word-list paradigms. PMID:24961195

  17. Early detection and late cognitive control of emotional distraction by the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    García-Pacios, Javier; Garcés, Pilar; Del Río, David; Maestú, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Unpleasant emotional distraction can impair the retention of non-emotional information in working memory (WM). Research links the prefrontal cortex with the successful control of such biologically relevant distractors, although the temporal changes in this brain mechanism remain unexplored. We use magnetoencephalography to investigate the temporal dynamics of the cognitive control of both unpleasant and pleasant distraction, in the millisecond (ms) scale. Behavioral results demonstrate that pleasant events do not affect WM maintenance more than neutral ones. Neuroimaging results show that prefrontal cortices are recruited for the rapid detection of emotional distraction, at early latencies of the processing (70-130 ms). Later in the processing (360-450 ms), the dorsolateral, the medial and the orbital sections of the prefrontal cortex mediate the effective control of emotional distraction. In accordance with the behavioral performance, pleasant distractors do not require higher prefrontal activity than neutral ones. These findings extend our knowledge about the brain mechanisms of coping with emotional distraction in WM. In particular, they show for the first time that overriding the attentional capture triggered by emotional distractors, while maintaining task-relevant elements in mind, is based on the early detection of such linked-to-survival information and on its later cognitive control by the prefrontal cortex. PMID:26067780

  18. The Paradoxical Role of Perceived Control in Late Life Health Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chipperfield, Judith G.; Perry, Raymond P.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Barchfeld, Petra; Lang, Frieder R.; Hamm, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    Research has established the health benefits of psychological factors, including the way individuals appraise outcomes. Although many studies confirm that appraising outcomes as controllable is adaptive for health, a paradoxical possibility is largely ignored: Perceived control may be detrimental under some conditions. Our premise was that appraising health as controllable but at the same time ascribing little value to it might signal a dysfunctional psychological mindset that fosters a mistaken sense of invincibility. During face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of older adults (age range = 72–99), we identified individuals with such a potentially maladaptive “invincible” mindset (high perceived control and low health value) and compared them to their counterparts on several outcomes. The findings were consistent with our hypotheses. The invincibles denied future risks, they lacked the activating emotion of fear, and they visited their physicians less often over a subsequent five-year period. Moreover, in contrast to their counterparts, the invincibles did not appear strategic in their approach to seeking care: Even poor health did not prompt them to seek the counsel of a physician. The recognition that psychological appraisals are modifiable highlights the promise of remedial methods to alter maladaptive mindsets, potentially improving quality of life. PMID:26974153

  19. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions. NCEE 2009-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2008-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs are often used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data are often collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  20. The Late Pretest Problem in Randomized Control Trials of Education Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2010-01-01

    Pretest-posttest experimental designs often are used in randomized control trials (RCTs) in the education field to improve the precision of the estimated treatment effects. For logistic reasons, however, pretest data often are collected after random assignment, so that including them in the analysis could bias the posttest impact estimates. Thus,…

  1. The Paradoxical Role of Perceived Control in Late Life Health Behavior.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Pekrun, Reinhard; Barchfeld, Petra; Lang, Frieder R; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Research has established the health benefits of psychological factors, including the way individuals appraise outcomes. Although many studies confirm that appraising outcomes as controllable is adaptive for health, a paradoxical possibility is largely ignored: Perceived control may be detrimental under some conditions. Our premise was that appraising health as controllable but at the same time ascribing little value to it might signal a dysfunctional psychological mindset that fosters a mistaken sense of invincibility. During face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of older adults (age range = 72-99), we identified individuals with such a potentially maladaptive "invincible" mindset (high perceived control and low health value) and compared them to their counterparts on several outcomes. The findings were consistent with our hypotheses. The invincibles denied future risks, they lacked the activating emotion of fear, and they visited their physicians less often over a subsequent five-year period. Moreover, in contrast to their counterparts, the invincibles did not appear strategic in their approach to seeking care: Even poor health did not prompt them to seek the counsel of a physician. The recognition that psychological appraisals are modifiable highlights the promise of remedial methods to alter maladaptive mindsets, potentially improving quality of life. PMID:26974153

  2. Parental Educational Attainment and Sense of Control in Mid-and Late-Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Sense of control is greater among children who grow up in households of higher socioeconomic status. It is unclear if this childhood advantage persists throughout life or if schooling and adulthood experiences override any early childhood advantage. Using data from 2 nationally representative samples of primarily middle-aged (National Survey of…

  3. Temporally Dissociable Mechanisms of Self-Control: Early Attentional Filtering Versus Late Value Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Todd; Rangel, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Optimal decision-making often requires exercising self-control. A growing fMRI literature has implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in successful self-control, but due to the limitations inherent in BOLD measures of brain activity, the neurocomputational role of this region has not been resolved. Here we exploit the high temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage of event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the hypothesis that dlPFC affects dietary self-control through two different mechanisms: attentional filtering and value modulation. Whereas attentional filtering of sensory input should occur early in the decision process, value modulation should occur later on, after the computation of stimulus values begins. Hungry human subjects were asked to make food choices while we measured neural activity using ERP in a natural condition, in which they responded freely and did not exhibit a tendency to regulate their diet, and in a self-control condition, in which they were given a financial incentive to lose weight. We then measured various neural markers associated with the attentional filtering and value modulation mechanisms across the decision period to test for changes in neural activity during the exercise of self-control. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found evidence for top-down attentional filtering early on in the decision period (150–200 ms poststimulus onset) as well as evidence for value modulation later in the process (450–650 ms poststimulus onset). We also found evidence that dlPFC plays a role in the deployment of both mechanisms. PMID:24285897

  4. Temporally dissociable mechanisms of self-control: early attentional filtering versus late value modulation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alison; Hare, Todd; Rangel, Antonio

    2013-11-27

    Optimal decision-making often requires exercising self-control. A growing fMRI literature has implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in successful self-control, but due to the limitations inherent in BOLD measures of brain activity, the neurocomputational role of this region has not been resolved. Here we exploit the high temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage of event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the hypothesis that dlPFC affects dietary self-control through two different mechanisms: attentional filtering and value modulation. Whereas attentional filtering of sensory input should occur early in the decision process, value modulation should occur later on, after the computation of stimulus values begins. Hungry human subjects were asked to make food choices while we measured neural activity using ERP in a natural condition, in which they responded freely and did not exhibit a tendency to regulate their diet, and in a self-control condition, in which they were given a financial incentive to lose weight. We then measured various neural markers associated with the attentional filtering and value modulation mechanisms across the decision period to test for changes in neural activity during the exercise of self-control. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found evidence for top-down attentional filtering early on in the decision period (150-200 ms poststimulus onset) as well as evidence for value modulation later in the process (450-650 ms poststimulus onset). We also found evidence that dlPFC plays a role in the deployment of both mechanisms. PMID:24285897

  5. A late-acting quality control process for mature eukaryotic rRNAs.

    PubMed

    LaRiviere, Frederick J; Cole, Sarah E; Ferullo, Daniel J; Moore, Melissa J

    2006-11-17

    Ribosome biogenesis is a multifaceted process involving a host of trans-acting factors mediating numerous chemical reactions, RNA conformational changes, and RNA-protein associations. Given this high degree of complexity, tight quality control is likely crucial to ensure structural and functional integrity of the end products. We demonstrate that ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) containing individual point mutations, in either the 25S peptidyl transferase center or 18S decoding site, that adversely affect ribosome function are strongly downregulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This downregulation occurs via decreased stability of the mature rRNA contained in fully assembled ribosomes and ribosomal subunits. Thus, eukaryotes possess a quality-control mechanism, nonfunctional rRNA decay (NRD), capable of detecting and eliminating the rRNA component of mature ribosomes. PMID:17188037

  6. The genuine ligand of a jasmonic acid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Daoxin

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA), its metabolites, such as the methyl ester or amino acid conjugates as well as its precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) are lipid-derived signals. JA, OPDA and JA-amino acid conjugates are known to function as signals in plant stress responses and development. More recently, formation of JA-amino acid conjugates and high biological activity of JA-Isoleucine (JA-Ile) were found to be essential in JA signaling. A breakthrough was the identification of JAZ proteins which interact with the F-box protein COI1 if JA-Ile is bound. This interaction leads to proteasomal degradation of JAZs being negative regulators of JA-induced transcription. Surprisingly, a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile, the (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile [(3R,7S) form] is most active. Coronatine, a bacterial phytotoxine with an identical stereochemistry at the cyclopentanone ring, has a similar bioactivity. This was explained by the recent identification of COI1 as the JA receptor and accords well with molecular modeling studies. Whereas over the last two decades JA was quantified to describe any JA dependent process, now we have to take into account a distinct stereoisomer of JA-Ile. Until recently a quantitative analysis of (+)-7-iso-JA-Ile was missing presumable due to its equilibration to (−)-JA-Ile. Now such an analysis was achieved. These aspects will be discussed based on our new knowledge on JA perception and signaling. PMID:20404483

  7. Induced responses to herbivory and jasmonate in three milkweed species.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Johnson, M Daisy; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2009-11-01

    We studied constitutive and induced defensive traits (latex exudation, cardenolides, proteases, and C/N ratio) and resistance to monarch caterpillars (Danaus plexippus) in three closely related milkweed species (Asclepias angustifolia, A. barjoniifolia and A. fascicularis). All traits showed significant induction in at least one of the species. Jasmonate application only partially mimicked the effect of monarch feeding. We found some correspondence between latex and cardenolide content and reduced larval growth. Larvae fed cut leaves of A. angustifolia grew better than larvae fed intact plants. Addition of the cardenolide digitoxin to cut leaves reduced larval growth but ouabain (at the same concentration) had no effect. We, thus, confirm that latex and cardenolides are major defenses in milkweeds, effective against a specialist herbivore. Other traits such as proteases and C/N ratio additionally may be integrated in the defense scheme of those plants. Induction seems to play an important role in plants that have an intermediate level of defense, and we advocate incorporating induction as an additional axis of the plant defense syndrome hypothesis. PMID:20012168

  8. Methyl jasmonate and its potential in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Michael W; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Lingrui

    2015-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJa) is a naturally occurring hydrophobic oxylipin phytohormone. Early findings obtained from cancer cell lines suggest that MeJa is endowed with anticancer capabilities. It has been recently proposed that MeJa represents a novel agent that exhibits direct and selective actions against tumor cells without affecting normal human cells. In a previous study, I reported that MeJa itself is enough to result in the dysfunction of mitochondria and chloroplasts, as well as to activate cell death program (apoptosis), in the normal protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Indeed, this also holds true for other living plant systems in which senescence, hypersensitive response and oxidative stress have been found under MeJa action. Therefore, in this addendum to my previous article, I would like to stress that much more attention should be paid to the potential effect(s) of MeJa, or its derivatives, on healthy cells and tissues before it is used for clinical anticancer drugs, whether being used alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:26208889

  9. Jasmonate-induced biosynthesis of andrographolide in Andrographis paniculata.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shiv Narayan; Jha, Zenu; Sinha, Rakesh Kumar; Geda, Arvind Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Andrographolide is a prominent secondary metabolite found in Andrographis paniculata that exhibits enormous pharmacological effects. In spite of immense value, the normal biosynthesis of andrographolide results in low amount of the metabolite. To induce the biosynthesis of andrographolide, we attempted elicitor-induced activation of andrographolide biosynthesis in cell cultures of A. paniculata. This was carried out by using methyl jasmonate (MeJA) as an elicitor. Among the various concentrations of MeJA tested at different time periods, 5 µM MeJA yielded 5.25 times more andrographolide content after 24 h of treatment. The accumulation of andrographolide was correlated with the expression level of known regulatory genes (hmgs, hmgr, dxs, dxr, isph and ggps) of mevalonic acid (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways. These results established the involvement of MeJA in andrographolide biosynthesis by inducing the transcription of its biosynthetic pathways genes. The coordination of isph, ggps and hmgs expression highly influenced the andrographolide biosynthesis. PMID:25104168

  10. Dynamic versus flexural controls of Late Cretaceous Western Interior Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaofeng; Nummedal, Dag; Gurnis, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The United States Cretaceous Western Interior Basin has long been considered a foreland basin, driven by the Sevier thrust and associated basin sediment loads. However, flexural studies demonstrate that this effect exists only within a narrow band in front of the thrust belt. Most of the basin appears to be due to mantle flow-induced dynamic subsidence associated with Farallon plate subduction. Here we show how the components of evolving long-wavelength dynamic subsidence and flexural subsidence created the accommodation space and controlled the stratigraphy across the western United States, based on a correlated stratigraphic section across central Utah and Colorado. These backstripped subsidence data reveal the dynamic-topography driven nature of the Western Interior Basin. The results seem to support that the depocenters track the trough of dynamic subsidence with ca. 18 Myr cycles through time and space and the stratigraphic patterns of large-scale progradation, eastward migration of depocenter, and regional clinoform-like downlap are related with the dynamic subsidence. Interpretation of these data also provides more insights into the repeated, ca. 2 to 6 Myr cycles of thrust-induced subsidence in front of the thrust belt, which control the local eastward progradation of the sand bodies from the thrust belt. The dynamic, flexural subsidence and eustatic sea level changes interacted and controlled the timing and distribution of unconformities. Our work shows how the stratigraphy precisely records the timing, patterns and position of dynamic versus flexural subsidences, and that combination of such data leads to important geophysical discoveries and supplies strict constraints for geodynamic modeling.

  11. Dynamic versus flexural controls of Late Cretaceous Western Interior Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaofeng; Nummedal, Dag; Gurnis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The United States Cretaceous Western Interior Basin has long been considered a foreland basin, driven by the Sevier thrust and associated basin sediment loads. However, flexural studies demonstrate that this effect exists only within a narrow band in front of the thrust belt. Most of the basin appears to be due to mantle flow-induced dynamic subsidence associated with Farallon plate subduction. Here we show how the components of evolving long-wavelength dynamic subsidence and flexural subsidence created the accommodation space and controlled the stratigraphy across the western United States, based on a correlated stratigraphic section across central Utah and Colorado. These backstripped subsidence data reveal the dynamic-topography driven nature of the Western Interior Basin. The results seem to support the hypothesis that the depocenters track the trough of dynamic subsidence with ca. 18 Myr cycles through time and space and the stratigraphic patterns of large-scale progradation, eastward migration of depocenter, and regional clinoform-like downlap are related with the dynamic subsidence. Interpretation of these data also provides more insights into the repeated, ca. 2 to 6 Myr cycles of thrust-induced subsidence in front of the thrust belt, which control the local eastward progradation of the sand bodies from the thrust belt. The dynamic, flexural subsidence and eustatic sea level changes interacted and controlled the timing and distribution of unconformities. Our work shows how the stratigraphy precisely records the timing, patterns and position of dynamic versus flexural subsidences, and that combination of such data leads to important geophysical discoveries and supplies strict constraints for geodynamic modeling.

  12. Application of an Alcohol Clamp Paradigm to Examine Inhibitory Control, Subjective Responses and Acute Tolerance in Late Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Hendershot, Christian S.; Wardell, Jeffrey D.; Strang, Nicole M.; Markovich, Mike S.D.; Claus, Eric D.; Ramchandani, Vijay A.

    2015-01-01

    Individual differences in acute alcohol effects on cognitive control and subjective responses—and acute tolerance to these effects—are implicated in the risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related harms. Few studies have examined these effects in drinkers under age 21. Additionally, studies of acute tolerance typically involve bolus oral alcohol administration, such that estimates of tolerance are confounded with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limb. The current study examined cognitive control and subjective responses in young heavy drinkers (n = 88, M = 19.8 years old [SD = 0.8]) during a single-session alcohol clamp protocol. Participants completed an intravenous alcohol session comprising an ascending limb (0 to 80mg% in 20 minutes) and a BAC plateau (80mg% for 80 minutes). Serial assessments included a cued go/no-go task and measures of stimulation, sedation and craving. Relevant individual difference factors (ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking) were examined as moderators. Multi-level modeling demonstrated that response inhibition worsened following initial rise in BAC and showed increasing impairment during the BAC plateau. ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking moderated this effect. Significant within-person associations between stimulation and craving were evident on the ascending limb only. Participants with higher ADHD symptoms reported steeper increases in stimulation during the ascending limb. These findings provide initial information about subjective and behavioral responses during pseudo-constant BAC, and potential moderators of these outcomes, in late adolescence. Additional studies with placebo-controlled designs are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26053322

  13. Former male elite athletes have better metabolic health in late life than their controls.

    PubMed

    Laine, M K; Eriksson, J G; Kujala, U M; Kaprio, J; Loo, B-M; Sundvall, J; Bäckmand, H M; Peltonen, M; Jula, A; Sarna, S

    2016-03-01

    Elite-class athletes have longer life expectancy and lower risk for chronic noncommunicable diseases possibly because of physically active and healthier lifestyle. In this study, we assessed former male Finnish elite-class athletes' (n = 392) and their matched controls' (n = 207) body composition, and risk for the metabolic syndrome (MS) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in later life. Compared with the controls, the former athletes had lower body fat percentage (24.8% vs 26.0%, P = 0.021), lower risk for MS [odds ratio (OR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.40-0.81], and NAFLD (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.42-0.88). High volume of current leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was associated with lower body fat percentage (P for trend < 0.001). When current volume of LTPA increased 1 MET h/week, the risk of MS and NAFLD decreased (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98-0.99 and OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.96-0.98, respectively). Although a career as an elite-class athlete during young adulthood may help to protect from developing metabolic syndrome, present exercise levels and volume of LTPA seem equally important as well. PMID:25758211

  14. Rethinking Controls on the Long-Term Cenozoic Carbonate Compensation Depth: Case Studies across Late Paleocene - Early Eocene Warming and Late Eocene - Early Oligocene Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, S. E.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Schmidt, D. N.; Kirtland Turner, S.; Paelike, H.; Thomas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The carbonate compensation depth (CCD) is the depth below which negligible calcium carbonate is preserved in marine sediments. The long-term position of the CCD is often considered to be a powerful constraint on palaeoclimate and atmospheric CO2 concentration due to the requirement that carbonate burial balance riverine weathering over long timescales. The requirement that weathering and burial be in balance is clear, but it is less certain that burial compensates for changes in weathering via shoaling or deepening of the CCD. Because most carbonate burial occurs well above the CCD , changes in weathering fluxes may be primarily accommodated by increasing or decreasing carbonate burial at shallower depths, i.e., at or near the lysocline, the depth range over which carbonate dissolution markedly increases. Indeed, recent earth system modelling studies have suggested that the position of the CCD is relatively insensitive to changes in atmospheric pCO2. Additionally, studies have questioned the nature and strength of the relationship between the CCD, carbonate saturation state in the water column, and lysocline. To test the relationship between palaeoclimate and the location of the CCD, we reconstructed the global, long-term CCD behaviour across major Cenozoic climate transitions: the late Paleocene - early Eocene long-term warming trend (study interval ~58 to 49 Ma) and the late Eocene - early Oligocene cooling and glaciation (study interval ~38 to 27 Ma). We use Earth system modelling (GENIE) to explore the links between atmospheric pCO2 and the CCD, isolating and teasing apart the roles of total dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, circulation, and productivity in determining the CCD.

  15. Transcriptome Analysis in Haematococcus pluvialis: Astaxanthin Induction by Salicylic Acid (SA) and Jasmonic Acid (JA)

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guanxun; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Haifeng; Deng, Suzhen; Shen, Yicheng; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Ruihao; Meng, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is an astaxanthin-rich microalga that can increase its astaxanthin production by salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA) induction. The genetic transcriptome details of astaxanthin biosynthesis were analyzed by exposing the algal cells to 25 mg/L of SA and JA for 1, 6 and 24 hours, plus to the control (no stress). Based on the RNA-seq analysis, 56,077 unigenes (51.7%) were identified with functions in response to the hormone stress. The top five identified subcategories were cell, cellular process, intracellular, catalytic activity and cytoplasm, which possessed 5600 (~9.99%), 5302 (~9.45%), 5242 (~9.35%), 4407 (~7.86%) and 4195 (~7.48%) unigenes, respectively. Furthermore, 59 unigenes were identified and assigned to 26 putative transcription factors (TFs), including 12 plant-specific TFs. They were likely associated with astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcus upon SA and JA stress. In comparison, the up-regulation of differential expressed genes occurred much earlier, with higher transcript levels in the JA treatment (about 6 h later) than in the SA treatment (beyond 24 h). These results provide valuable information for directing metabolic engineering efforts to improve astaxanthin biosynthesis in H. pluvialis. PMID:26484871

  16. Methyl jasmonate, yeast extract and sucrose stimulate phenolic acids accumulation in Eryngium planum L. shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Kikowska, Małgorzata; Kędziora, Izabela; Krawczyk, Aldona; Thiem, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Eryngium planum L. has been reported as a medicinal plant used in traditional medicine in Europe. The tissue cultures may be an alternative source of the biomass rich in desired bioactive compounds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the biotechnological techniques on the selected phenolic acids accumulation in the agitated shoot cultures of E. planum. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of those compounds in 50% aqueous - methanolic extracts from the biomass were conducted by applying the HPLC method. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), yeast extract (YE) and sucrose (Suc) stimulated accumulation of the phenolic acids: rosmarinic (RA), chlorogenic (CGA) and caffeic (CA) in in vitro shoot cultures. Cultivation of shoots in liquid MS media supplemented with 1.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyladenine and 0.1 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid in the presence of 100 µM MeJA for 48h was an optimum condition of elicitation and resulted in approximately 4.5-fold increased content of RA + CGA + CA in plant material compared to the control (19.795 mg g(-1) DW, 4.36 mg g(-1) DW, respectively). The results provide the first evidence that the selected phenolic acids can be synthesized in elicited shoot cultures of flat sea holly in higher amount than in untreated shoots. PMID:25856557

  17. Jasmonate-inducible plant enzymes degrade essential amino acids in the herbivore midgut

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Kuchar, Jason A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2005-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) activates host defense responses against a broad spectrum of herbivores. Although it is well established that JA controls the expression of a large set of target genes in response to tissue damage, very few gene products have been shown to play a direct role in reducing herbivore performance. To test the hypothesis that JA-inducible proteins (JIPs) thwart attack by disrupting digestive processes in the insect gut, we used a MS-based approach to identify host proteins that accumulate in the midgut of Manduca sexta larvae reared on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. We show that two JIPs, arginase and threonine deaminase (TD), act in the M. sexta midgut to catabolize the essential amino acids Arg and Thr, respectively. Transgenic plants that overexpress arginase were more resistant to M. sexta larvae, and this effect was correlated with reduced levels of midgut Arg. We present evidence indicating that the ability of TD to degrade Thr in the midgut is enhanced by herbivore-induced proteolytic removal of the enzyme's C-terminal regulatory domain, which confers negative feedback regulation by isoleucine in planta. Our results demonstrate that the JA signaling pathway strongly influences the midgut protein content of phytophagous insects and support the hypothesis that catabolism of amino acids in the insect digestive tract by host enzymes plays a role in plant protection against herbivores. PMID:16357201

  18. Transcriptome Analysis in Haematococcus pluvialis: Astaxanthin Induction by Salicylic Acid (SA) and Jasmonic Acid (JA).

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengquan; Li, Yan; Wu, Guanxun; Li, Guoqiang; Sun, Haifeng; Deng, Suzhen; Shen, Yicheng; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Ruihao; Meng, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is an astaxanthin-rich microalga that can increase its astaxanthin production by salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA) induction. The genetic transcriptome details of astaxanthin biosynthesis were analyzed by exposing the algal cells to 25 mg/L of SA and JA for 1, 6 and 24 hours, plus to the control (no stress). Based on the RNA-seq analysis, 56,077 unigenes (51.7%) were identified with functions in response to the hormone stress. The top five identified subcategories were cell, cellular process, intracellular, catalytic activity and cytoplasm, which possessed 5600 (~9.99%), 5302 (~9.45%), 5242 (~9.35%), 4407 (~7.86%) and 4195 (~7.48%) unigenes, respectively. Furthermore, 59 unigenes were identified and assigned to 26 putative transcription factors (TFs), including 12 plant-specific TFs. They were likely associated with astaxanthin biosynthesis in Haematococcus upon SA and JA stress. In comparison, the up-regulation of differential expressed genes occurred much earlier, with higher transcript levels in the JA treatment (about 6 h later) than in the SA treatment (beyond 24 h). These results provide valuable information for directing metabolic engineering efforts to improve astaxanthin biosynthesis in H. pluvialis. PMID:26484871

  19. Jasmonic acid protects etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana against herbivorous arthropods.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; Von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Seed predators can cause mass ingestion of larger seed populations. As well, herbivorous arthropods attempt to attack etiolated seedlings and chose the apical hook for ingestion, aimed at dropping the cotyledons for later consumption. Etiolated seedlings, as we show here, have established an efficient mechanism of protecting their Achilles' heel against these predators, however. Evidence is provided for a role of jasmonic acid (JA) in this largely uncharacterized plant-herbivore interaction during skotomorphogenesis and that this comprises the temporally and spatially tightly controlled synthesis of a cysteine protease inhibitors of the Kunitz family. Interestingly, the same Kunitz protease inhibitor was found to be expressed in flowers of Arabidopsis where endogenous JA levels are high for fertility. Because both the apical hook and inflorescences were preferred isopod targets in JA-deficient plants that could be rescued by exogenously administered JA, our data identify a JA-dependent mechanism of plant arthropod deterrence that is recalled in different organs and at quite different times of plant development. PMID:27485473

  20. The influence of the number of fractions and of overall treatment time on local control and late complication rate in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, B.; Preuss-Bayer, G.; Trott, K.

    1983-03-01

    Three hundred and ten patients with T/sub 3//T/sub 4/, N/sub 0/, M/sub 0/ squamous cell carcinoma were irradiated with 200 kV X rays with total doses ranging from 4,900 to 6,200 rad, given in 21 to 35 fractions in 32-63 days. After a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, the local control rate was 50%; 21 severe late complications were observed among the patients. The dependence of local control rate and of late complication rate on the dose per fraction and on overall treatment time was analyzed by various statistical methods. Whereas the late complication rate depended significantly on dose per fraction, local tumor control depended strongly on overall treatment time.

  1. Methyl jasmonate affects phenolic metabolism and gene expression in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum).

    PubMed

    Cocetta, Giacomo; Rossoni, Mara; Gardana, Claudio; Mignani, Ilaria; Ferrante, Antonio; Spinardi, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a fruit very much appreciated by consumers for its antioxidant potential and health-promoting traits. Its beneficial potential properties are mainly due to a high content of anthocyanins and their amount can change after elicitation with methyl jasmonate. The aim of this work is to evaluate the changes in expression of several genes, accumulation of phenolic compounds and alterations in antioxidant potential in two different blueberry cultivars ('Duke' and 'Blueray') in response to methyl jasmonate (0.1 mM). Results showed that 9 h after treatment, the expression of phenylalanine ammonium lyase, chalcone synthase and anthocyanidin synthase genes was stimulated more in the 'Blueray' variety. Among the phenols measured an increase was recorded also for epicatechin and anthocyanin concentrations. 'Duke' is a richer sourche of anthocyanins compared to 'Blueray', treatment with methyl jasmonate promoted in 'Blueray' an increase in pigments as well as in the antioxidant potential, especially in fully ripe berries, but treated 'Duke' berries had greater levels, which were not induced by methyl jasmonate treatment. In conclusion, methyl jasmonate was, in some cases, an effective elicitor of phenolic metabolism and gene expression in blueberry, though with different intensity between cultivars. PMID:24943920

  2. Jasmonates trigger prey-induced formation of 'outer stomach' in carnivorous sundew plants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoko; Reichelt, Michael; Mayer, Veronika E; Mithöfer, Axel

    2013-05-22

    It has been widely accepted that the growth-related phytohormone auxin is the endogenous signal that initiates bending movements of plant organs. In 1875, Charles Darwin described how the bending movement of leaves in carnivorous sundew species formed an 'outer stomach' that allowed the plants to enclose and digest captured insect prey. About 100 years later, auxin was suggested to be the factor responsible for this movement. We report that prey capture induces both leaf bending and the accumulation of defence-related jasmonate phytohormones. In Drosera capensis fed with fruitflies, within 3 h after prey capture and simultaneous with leaf movement, we detected an increase in jasmonic acid and its isoleucine conjugate. This accumulation was spatially restricted to the bending segment of the leaves. The application of jasmonates alone was sufficient to trigger leaf bending. Only living fruitflies or the body fluids of crushed fruitflies induced leaf curvature; neither dead flies nor mechanical treatment had any effect. Our findings strongly suggest that the formation of the 'outer stomach' in Drosera is a chemonastic movement that is triggered by accumulation of endogenous jasmonates. These results suggest that in carnivorous sundew plants the jasmonate cascade might have been adapted to facilitate carnivory rather than to defend against herbivores. PMID:23516244

  3. Jasmonates elicit different sets of stilbenes in Vitis vinifera cv. Negramaro cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Marco; Ingrosso, Ilaria; D'amico, Leone; De Domenico, Stefania; Nicoletti, Isabella; Corradini, Danilo; Santino, Angelo; Giovinazzo, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The plant phenol trans-resveratrol, which is mainly found in grape, displays a wide range of biological effects. A cell suspension culture was developed from calli of grape leaves of Vitis vinifera cv. Negramaro in order to study the bioproduction of resveratrol. The effects of a number of secondary plant metabolism elicitors, namely chitosan, methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, coronatine, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, were tested on this cell suspension culture. The identification and quantification of stilbenes was achieved with high performance liquid chromatography, with both spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric detection. Of the tested elicitors, methyl jasmonate was the most effective in inducing the biosynthesis of approximately 4 mg g(-1) dry weight (about 60 mg L(-1)) of resveratrol. Conversely, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, jasmonic acid, and coronatine were able to trigger the synthesis of approximately 20 mg g(-1) dry weight (200-210 mg L(-1)) of viniferins. Taken together, our results show for the first time different modulatory effects of closely-related jasmonates on stilbene biosynthesis. PMID:25674504

  4. Separation of Changes in Hydroclimatic and Basin Controls on Late-Summer Low Flow in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, K.; Moore, R. D.; Allen, D. M.; Whitfield, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    For catchments in the Pacific Northwest of North America with minimal or no glacier cover, the summer period is typically dominated by low flows associated with the relatively warm, dry summers in that region. In recent years summer low flow has become more critical in terms of water use and fisheries, and there is increasing concern regarding effects of future climate change. In particular, it is expected that earlier snowmelt timing in spring causes longer recession periods and consequently lower streamflow during late summer. This study examined the sensitivity of late summer flows of 153 ‘unregulated’ rivers over the period 1976-2003 to hydroclimatic influences using trend tests accounting for exogenous variables by regression. Regression models were fitted using simultaneous and lagged variables of precipitation and timing and magnitude of snowmelt. The residuals were tested for trends and serial correlation to assess potential secondary influences such as long-term groundwater storage changes or mid-term changes in evapotranspiration. The decrease in September flows found across most of the region is broadly consistent with a decline in September precipitation. The most important control on August flows for all streamflow regimes is August precipitation. The influence of lagged variables including snowmelt timing varies. Rain-dominated and hybrid catchments along the coast tended to have positive trends in their residuals in August, suggesting an increasing trend in groundwater storage. Snowmelt dominated catchments show varied trends but the runs test detected a substantial number of stations with non-random residuals, suggesting mid-term secondary influences possibly associated with evapotranspiration changes due to progressive forest harvesting. This regional study greatly improves the understanding of the hydroclimatic influences on extreme summer low flow in the region. Results suggest that (the less predictable) summer climate is a larger influence

  5. Locomotor control of limb force switches from minimal intervention principle in early adaptation to noise reduction in late adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Selgrade, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    During movement, errors are typically corrected only if they hinder performance. Preferential correction of task-relevant deviations is described by the minimal intervention principle but has not been demonstrated in the joints during locomotor adaptation. We studied hopping as a tractable model of locomotor adaptation of the joints within the context of a limb-force-specific task space. Subjects hopped while adapting to shifted visual feedback that induced them to increase peak ground reaction force (GRF). We hypothesized subjects would preferentially reduce task-relevant joint torque deviations over task-irrelevant deviations to increase peak GRF. We employed a modified uncontrolled manifold analysis to quantify task-relevant and task-irrelevant joint torque deviations for each individual hop cycle. As would be expected by the explicit goal of the task, peak GRF errors decreased in early adaptation before reaching steady state during late adaptation. Interestingly, during the early adaptation performance improvement phase, subjects reduced GRF errors by decreasing only the task-relevant joint torque deviations. In contrast, during the late adaption performance maintenance phase, all torque deviations decreased in unison regardless of task relevance. In deadaptation, when the shift in visual feedback was removed, all torque deviations decreased in unison, possibly because performance improvement was too rapid to detect changes in only the task-relevant dimension. We conclude that limb force adaptation in hopping switches from a minimal intervention strategy during performance improvement to a noise reduction strategy during performance maintenance, which may represent a general control strategy for locomotor adaptation of limb force in other bouncing gaits, such as running. PMID:25475343

  6. Effects of Acute Ozone Exposure and Methyl Jasmonate Treatment on White Pine Monoterpene and Sesquiterpene Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Wagner, D.; Allwine, E.; Harley, P. C.; Vanreken, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are produced by plants and include monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are one of the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions, and impact both ozone concentration and secondary organic aerosol formation. Under unstressed conditions, the release of BVOCs to the atmosphere is primarily controlled by the vapor pressure of the relevant compounds within the plant tissue, which is in turn dependent on temperature as well as complex biochemical production processes. However, various natural and anthropogenic stressors can alter both the quantity and composition of the BVOCs emitted by plants. Many potential stressors are expected to become stronger as climate change effects escalate. The impacts of most stressors on BVOC emissions have not been well characterized, particularly in a field setting where changes in BVOC emissions could have influential feedbacks with climate. This study investigated the effects of two stressors on monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission rates at a field site in northern Michigan: acute ozone exposure and treatment with methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. The study included six repetitions of the same experiment, each time using a new set of sub-canopy eastern white pine specimens. For each experiment, dynamic branch enclosures were simultaneously used on three specimens for sample collection: one ozone treatment tree, one methyl jasmonate treatment tree, and one control tree. Sampling lines were placed in each enclosure and VOCs were collected onto cartridges packed with Tenax GR adsorbent. Samples were collected several times per day for at least two days before treatment and for five days after treatment. Cartridges were analyzed via thermodesorption with an Agilent GC/MS/FID. This analysis allowed the identification and quantification of several monoterpene and sesquiterpene species in the samples

  7. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Feussner, Ivo; Havaux, Michel; Riefler, Michael; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  8. Circadian Stress Regimes Affect the Circadian Clock and Cause Jasmonic Acid-Dependent Cell Death in Cytokinin-Deficient Arabidopsis Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nitschke, Silvia; Cortleven, Anne; Iven, Tim; Havaux, Michel; Schmülling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock helps plants measure daylength and adapt to changes in the day-night rhythm. We found that changes in the light-dark regime triggered stress responses, eventually leading to cell death, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with reduced cytokinin levels or defective cytokinin signaling. Prolonged light treatment followed by a dark period induced stress and cell death marker genes while reducing photosynthetic efficiency. This response, called circadian stress, is also characterized by altered expression of clock and clock output genes. In particular, this treatment strongly reduced the expression of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Intriguingly, similar changes in gene expression and cell death were observed in clock mutants lacking proper CCA1 and LHY function. Circadian stress caused strong changes in reactive oxygen species- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related gene expression. The activation of the JA pathway, involving the accumulation of JA metabolites, was crucial for the induction of cell death, since the cell death phenotype was strongly reduced in the jasmonate resistant1 mutant background. We propose that adaptation to circadian stress regimes requires a normal cytokinin status which, acting primarily through the AHK3 receptor, supports circadian clock function to guard against the detrimental effects of circadian stress. PMID:27354555

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy vs. Tai Chi for Late Life Insomnia and Inflammatory Risk: A Randomized Controlled Comparative Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Yokomizo, Megumi; Lavretsky, Helen; Carroll, Judith E.; Motivala, Sarosh J.; Bootzin, Richard; Nicassio, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the comparative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Tai Chi Chih (TCC), and sleep seminar education control (SS) on the primary outcome of insomnia diagnosis, and secondary outcomes of sleep quality, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and inflammation in older adults with insomnia. Design: Randomized controlled, comparative efficacy trial. Setting: Los Angeles community. Patients: 123 older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. Interventions: Random assignment to CBT, TCC, or SS for 2-hour group sessions weekly over 4 months with follow-up at 7 and 16 months. Measurements: Insomnia diagnosis, patient-reported outcomes, polysomnography (PSG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Results: CBT performed better than TCC and SS in remission of clinical insomnia as ascertained by a clinician (P < 0.01), and also showed greater and more sustained improvement in sleep quality, sleep parameters, fatigue, and depressive symptoms than TCC and SS (all P values < 0.01). As compared to SS, CBT was associated with a reduced risk of high CRP levels (> 3.0 mg/L) at 16 months (odds ratio [OR], 0.26 [95% CI, 0.07–0.97] P < 0.05). Remission of insomnia was associated with lower levels of CRP (P < 0.05) at 16 months. TCC was associated with improvements in sleep quality, fatigue, and depressive symptoms as compared to SS (all P's < 0.05), but not insomnia remission. PSG measures did not change. Conclusions: Treatment of late-life insomnia is better achieved and sustained by cognitive behavioral therapies. Insomnia treatment and remission reduces a marker of inflammatory risk, which has implications for cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes observed with sleep disturbance in epidemiologic surveys. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00280020 Citation: Irwin MR, Olmstead R, Carrillo C, Sadeghi N, Breen EC, Witarama T, Yokomizo M, Lavretsky H, Carroll JE, Motivala SJ, Bootzin R, Nicassio P. Cognitive behavioral

  10. Application of high pressure processing for controlling Clostridium tyrobutyricum and late blowing defect on semi-hard cheese.

    PubMed

    Ávila, Marta; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Delgado, David; Gaya, Pilar; Garde, Sonia

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the application of different high pressure (HP) treatments (200-500 MPa at 14 °C for 10 min) to industrial sized semi-hard cheeses on day 7, with the aim of controlling two Clostridium tyrobutyricum strains causing butyric acid fermentation and cheese late blowing defect (LBD). Clostridium metabolism and LBD appearance in cheeses were monitored by sensory (cheese swelling, cracks/splits, off-odours) and instrumental analyses (organic acids by HPLC and volatile compounds by SPME/GC-MS) after 60 days. Cheeses with clostridial spores HP-untreated and HP-treated at 200 MPa showed visible LBD symptoms, lower concentrations of lactic, citric and acetic acids, and higher levels of pyruvic, propionic and butyric acids and of 1-butanol, ethyl and methyl butanoate, and ethyl pentanoate than cheeses without spores. However, cheeses with clostridial spores and HP-treated at ≥ 300 MPa did not show LBD symptoms and their organic acids and volatile compounds profiles were comparable to those of their respective HP-treated control cheeses, despite HP treatments caused a low spore reduction. A decrease in C. tyrobutyricum spore counts was observed after curd pressing, which seems to indicate an early spore germination, suggesting that HP treatments ≥300 MPa were able to inactivate the emerged C. tyrobutyricum vegetative cells and, thereby, prevent LBD. PMID:27554159

  11. Synthetic cis-jasmone exposure induces wheat and barley volatiles that repel the pest cereal leaf beetle, Oulema melanopus L

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant semiochemical cis-jasmone primes/induces plant resistance to deter herbivores and attract natural enemies. We studied the induction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in winter wheat and spring barley after exposure of plants to three synthetic cis-jasmone doses (50 ml containing 1, 100,...

  12. Beyond the Canon: Within-Plant and Population-Level Heterogeneity in Jasmonate Signaling Engaged by Plant-Insect Interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Baldwin, Ian T; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated communication and defense systems with which they interact with insects. Jasmonates are synthesized from the oxylipin pathway and act as pivotal cellular orchestrators of many of the metabolic and physiological processes that mediate these interactions. Many of these jasmonate-dependent responses are tissue-specific and translate from modulations of the canonical jasmonate signaling pathway. Here we provide a short overview of within-plant heterogeneities in jasmonate signaling and dependent responses in the context of plant-insect interactions as illuminated by examples from recent work with the ecological model, Nicotiana attenuata. We then discuss means of manipulating jasmonate signaling by creating tissue-specific jasmonate sinks, and the micrografting of different transgenic plants. The metabolic phenotyping of these manipulations provides an integrative understanding of the functional significance of deviations from the canonical model of this hormonal pathway. Additionally, natural variation in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling both among and within species can explain polymorphisms in resistance to insects in nature. In this respect, insect-guided explorations of population-level variations in jasmonate metabolism have revealed more complexity than previously realized and we discuss how different "omic" techniques can be used to exploit the natural variation that occurs in this important signaling pathway. PMID:27135234

  13. Beyond the Canon: Within-Plant and Population-Level Heterogeneity in Jasmonate Signaling Engaged by Plant-Insect Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dapeng; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gaquerel, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated communication and defense systems with which they interact with insects. Jasmonates are synthesized from the oxylipin pathway and act as pivotal cellular orchestrators of many of the metabolic and physiological processes that mediate these interactions. Many of these jasmonate-dependent responses are tissue-specific and translate from modulations of the canonical jasmonate signaling pathway. Here we provide a short overview of within-plant heterogeneities in jasmonate signaling and dependent responses in the context of plant-insect interactions as illuminated by examples from recent work with the ecological model, Nicotiana attenuata. We then discuss means of manipulating jasmonate signaling by creating tissue-specific jasmonate sinks, and the micrografting of different transgenic plants. The metabolic phenotyping of these manipulations provides an integrative understanding of the functional significance of deviations from the canonical model of this hormonal pathway. Additionally, natural variation in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling both among and within species can explain polymorphisms in resistance to insects in nature. In this respect, insect-guided explorations of population-level variations in jasmonate metabolism have revealed more complexity than previously realized and we discuss how different “omic” techniques can be used to exploit the natural variation that occurs in this important signaling pathway. PMID:27135234

  14. Methyl Jasmonate- and Light-Induced Glucosinolate and Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Radish Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Kim, Sun Ju; RomijUddin, Md; Park, Woo Tae; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2015-07-01

    Radish sprouts and young seedlings are considered important dietary vegetables in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated the levels of glucosinolate and anthocyanin accumulation in radish seedlings in response to light and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatments. MeJA facilitated the accumulation of glucosinolate and anthocyanins under light conditions. The glucosinolate and anthocyanin contents in the radish seedlings that were exposed to light after MeJA treatment were higher than those of the seedlings that were grown in the dark without MeJA. At a concentration of 100 μM, MeJA led to the greatest accumulation of the most glucosinolates under both light and dark conditions. Under light conditions, the levels of glucoraphenin, glucoerucin, and glucotropaeolin accumulation were 1.53-, 1.60-, and 1.30-fold higher, respectively, than those of the control. Remarkable accumulations of glucobrassicin were observed under light conditions (4.4-, 6.7-, and 7.8-fold higher than that of the control following the application of 100, 300, and 500 μM MeJA, respectively). The level of cyanidin in the 300 μM MeJA-treated seedlings was double of that in the control without MeJA treatment. The highest level of pelargonidin was observed after treatment with 500 μM MeJA under light conditions; this level was 1.73 times higher than that in the control. A similar trend of anthocyaninaccumulation was observed in the radish seedlings following MeJA treatment under dark conditions, but the levels of anthocyanins were considerably lower in the seedlings that were grown in the dark. Our findings suggest that light and low concentrations of MeJA enhance the accumulations of glucosinolates and anthocyanins during the development of radish seedlings. PMID:26411013

  15. Jasmonates: biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and action in plant stress response, growth and development. An update to the 2007 review in Annals of Botany

    PubMed Central

    Wasternack, C.; Hause, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Jasmonates are important regulators in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses as well as in development. Synthesized from lipid-constituents, the initially formed jasmonic acid is converted to different metabolites including the conjugate with isoleucine. Important new components of jasmonate signalling including its receptor were identified, providing deeper insight into the role of jasmonate signalling pathways in stress responses and development. Scope The present review is an update of the review on jasmonates published in this journal in 2007. New data of the last five years are described with emphasis on metabolites of jasmonates, on jasmonate perception and signalling, on cross-talk to other plant hormones and on jasmonate signalling in response to herbivores and pathogens, in symbiotic interactions, in flower development, in root growth and in light perception. Conclusions The last few years have seen breakthroughs in the identification of JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins and their interactors such as transcription factors and co-repressors, and the crystallization of the jasmonate receptor as well as of the enzyme conjugating jasmonate to amino acids. Now, the complex nature of networks of jasmonate signalling in stress responses and development including hormone cross-talk can be addressed. PMID:23558912

  16. Design and synthesis of biotin-tagged photoaffinity probes of jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Yan, Jianbin; Bai, Zhiyan; Chen, Yue-Ting; Lu, Wei; Tang, Jie; Duan, Liusheng; Xie, Daoxin; Nan, Fa-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are a class of oxylipin compounds that play diverse roles in plant defense and development. The F-box protein coronatine insensitive 1 (COI1) plays a crucial role in the JA signaling pathway. To determine whether COI1 binds directly to jasmonates, three biotin-tagged photoaffinity probes for JAs, a jasmonic acid photoaffinity probe (PAJA), a JAIle photoaffinity probe (PAJAIle), and a coronatine photoaffinity probe (PACOR), were designed and synthesized based on analysis of JA structure-activity relationships and molecular modeling of the interaction between COI1 and JAs. Among them, PACOR exhibited the most significant biological activity in inhibiting root growth, promoting accumulation of JA-responsive proteins, and triggering COI1-JAZ1 interaction in Arabidopsis seedlings. PACOR is an effective tool for elucidating the interaction between COI1 and JA. PMID:20395151

  17. Methyl jasmonate foliar application to Tempranillo vineyard improved grape and wine phenolic content.

    PubMed

    Portu, Javier; Santamaría, Pilar; López-Alfaro, Isabel; López, Rosa; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    The importance of phenolic compounds for grape and wine quality has drawn attention to studying different practices with the aim of increasing their content. Cluster application of elicitors is a viticultural practice that has shown promising results in recent years. However, cluster application requires a previous defoliation, which is time-consuming and expensive. In the present study, methyl jasmonate was foliar applied to Tempranillo grapevines in order to study its effect on grape and wine phenolic composition. Methyl jasmonate foliar application increased anthocyanin and stilbene content in both grape and wine, besides enhancing wine flavonol content. This treatment induced the synthesis of 3-O-glucosides of petunidin and peonidin and trans-p-coumaroyl derivatives of cyanidin and peonidin. For stilbenes, trans-piceid content was considerably increased in both grape and wine. The results obtained suggest that methyl jasmonate foliar application could be a simple and accessible practice to enhance grape and wine quality. PMID:25672964

  18. Chronology and tectonic controls of late tertiary deposition in the southwestern Tian Shan foreland, NW China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heermance, R.V.; Chen, J.; Burbank, D.W.; Wang, C.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetostratigraphy from the Kashi foreland basin along the southern margin of the Tian Shan in Western China defines the chronology of both sedimentation and the structural evolution of this collisional mountain belt. Eleven magnetostratigraphic sections representing ???13 km of basin strata provide a two- and three-dimensional record of continuous deposition since ???18 Ma. The distinctive Xiyu conglomerate makes up the uppermost strata in eight of 11 magnetostratigraphic sections within the foreland and forms a wedge that thins southward. The basal age of the conglomerate varies from 15.5??0.5 Ma at the northernmost part of the foreland, to 8.6??0.1 Ma in the central (medial) part of the foreland and to 1.9??0.2, ???1.04 and 0.7??0.1 Ma along the southern deformation front of the foreland basin. These data indicate the Xiyu conglomerate is highly time-transgressive and has prograded south since just after the initial uplift of the Kashi Basin Thrust (KBT) at 18.9??3.3 Ma. Southward progradation occurred at an average rate of ???3 mm year -1 between 15.5 and 2 Ma, before accelerating to ???10 mm year-1. Abrupt changes in sediment-accumulation rates are observed at 16.3 and 13.5 Ma in the northern part of the foreland and are interpreted to correspond to southward stepping deformation. A subtle decrease in the sedimentation rate above the Keketamu anticline is determined at ???4.0 Ma and was synchronous with an increase in sedimentation rate further south above the Atushi Anticline. Magnetostratigraphy also dates growth strata at <4.0, 1.4??0.1 and 1.4??0.2 Ma on the southern flanks the Keketamu, Atushi and Kashi anticlines, respectively. Together, sedimentation rate changes and growth strata indicate stepped migration of deformation into the Kashi foreland at least at 16.3, 13.5, 4.0 and 1.4 Ma. Progressive reconstruction of a seismically controlled cross-section through the foreland produces total shortening of 13-21 km and migration of the deformation front at

  19. Targeted and Untargeted Approaches Unravel Novel Candidate Genes and Diagnostic SNPs for Quantitative Resistance of the Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Phytophthora infestans Causing the Late Blight Disease.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Teresa; Alvarez, Maria Fernanda; Jiménez-Gómez, José M; Muktar, Meki Shehabu; Paulo, Maria João; Steinemann, Sebastian; Li, Jinquan; Draffehn, Astrid; Hofmann, Andrea; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhardt; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, which can completely destroy the crop. Therefore, for the past 160 years, late blight has been the most important potato disease worldwide. The identification of cultivars with high and durable field resistance to P. infestans is an objective of most potato breeding programs. This type of resistance is polygenic and therefore quantitative. Its evaluation requires multi-year and location trials. Furthermore, quantitative resistance to late blight correlates with late plant maturity, a negative agricultural trait. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of quantitative resistance to late blight not compromised by late maturity is very limited. It is however essential for developing diagnostic DNA markers that facilitate the efficient combination of superior resistance alleles in improved cultivars. We used association genetics in a population of 184 tetraploid potato cultivars in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with maturity corrected resistance (MCR) to late blight. The population was genotyped for almost 9000 SNPs from three different sources. The first source was candidate genes specifically selected for their function in the jasmonate pathway. The second source was novel candidate genes selected based on comparative transcript profiling (RNA-Seq) of groups of genotypes with contrasting levels of quantitative resistance to P. infestans. The third source was the first generation 8.3k SolCAP SNP genotyping array available in potato for genome wide association studies (GWAS). Twenty seven SNPs from all three sources showed robust association with MCR. Some of those were located in genes that are strong candidates for directly controlling quantitative resistance, based on functional annotation. Most important were: a lipoxygenase (jasmonate pathway), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (mevalonate pathway), a P450 protein (terpene biosynthesis

  20. Targeted and Untargeted Approaches Unravel Novel Candidate Genes and Diagnostic SNPs for Quantitative Resistance of the Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Phytophthora infestans Causing the Late Blight Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Gómez, José M.; Muktar, Meki Shehabu; Paulo, Maria João; Steinemann, Sebastian; Li, Jinquan; Draffehn, Astrid; Hofmann, Andrea; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhardt; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, which can completely destroy the crop. Therefore, for the past 160 years, late blight has been the most important potato disease worldwide. The identification of cultivars with high and durable field resistance to P. infestans is an objective of most potato breeding programs. This type of resistance is polygenic and therefore quantitative. Its evaluation requires multi-year and location trials. Furthermore, quantitative resistance to late blight correlates with late plant maturity, a negative agricultural trait. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of quantitative resistance to late blight not compromised by late maturity is very limited. It is however essential for developing diagnostic DNA markers that facilitate the efficient combination of superior resistance alleles in improved cultivars. We used association genetics in a population of 184 tetraploid potato cultivars in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with maturity corrected resistance (MCR) to late blight. The population was genotyped for almost 9000 SNPs from three different sources. The first source was candidate genes specifically selected for their function in the jasmonate pathway. The second source was novel candidate genes selected based on comparative transcript profiling (RNA-Seq) of groups of genotypes with contrasting levels of quantitative resistance to P. infestans. The third source was the first generation 8.3k SolCAP SNP genotyping array available in potato for genome wide association studies (GWAS). Twenty seven SNPs from all three sources showed robust association with MCR. Some of those were located in genes that are strong candidates for directly controlling quantitative resistance, based on functional annotation. Most important were: a lipoxygenase (jasmonate pathway), a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (mevalonate pathway), a P450 protein (terpene biosynthesis

  1. Application of an alcohol clamp paradigm to examine inhibitory control, subjective responses, and acute tolerance in late adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Christian S; Wardell, Jeffrey D; Strang, Nicole M; Markovich, Mike S D; Claus, Eric D; Ramchandani, Vijay A

    2015-06-01

    Individual differences in acute alcohol effects on cognitive control and subjective responses--and acute tolerance to these effects--are implicated in the risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related harms. Few studies have examined these effects in drinkers under age 21. Additionally, studies of acute tolerance typically involve bolus oral alcohol administration, such that estimates of tolerance are confounded with blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limb. The current study examined cognitive control and subjective responses in young heavy drinkers (n = 88; M = 19.8 years old, SD = 0.8) during a single-session alcohol clamp protocol. Participants completed an intravenous alcohol session comprising an ascending limb (0 to 80 mg% in 20 min) and a BAC plateau (80 mg% for 80 min). Serial assessments included a cued go/no-go task and measures of stimulation, sedation, and craving. Relevant individual difference factors (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] symptoms and sensation seeking) were examined as moderators. Multilevel modeling demonstrated that response inhibition worsened following initial rise in BAC and showed increasing impairment during the BAC plateau. ADHD symptoms and sensation seeking moderated this effect. Significant within-person associations between stimulation and craving were evident on the ascending limb only. Participants with higher ADHD symptoms reported steeper increases in stimulation during the ascending limb. These findings provide initial information about subjective and behavioral responses during pseudoconstant BAC, and potential moderators of these outcomes, in late adolescence. Additional studies with placebo-controlled designs are necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:26053322

  2. Climate and Fuel Controls on North American Paleofires: Smoldering to Flaming in the Late-glacial-Holocene Transition.

    PubMed

    Han, Y M; Peteet, D M; Arimoto, R; Cao, J J; An, Z S; Sritrairat, S; Yan, B Z

    2016-01-01

    Smoldering and flaming fires, which emit different proportions of organic (OC) and black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot), have long been recognized in modern wildfire observations but never in a paleo-record, and little is known about their interactions with climate. Here we show that in the late glacial-early Holocene transition period, when the climate was moist, relatively high quantities of char were deposited in Linsley Pond, Connecticut, USA while soot was more abundant during the warmer and drier early Holocene interval. The highest soot mass accumulation rates (MARs) occurred at the beginning of the Holocene as fuel availability increased through the climatic transition when boreal forests were locally extirpated. These variations with time are related to the different formation pathways of char and soot, which are governed by combustion efficiency. This study provides an approach for differentiating smoldering from flaming combustion in paleo-wildfire reconstructions. Our results suggest that climate and fuel loads control the occurrence of different wildfire types and precipitation may play a key role. PMID:26860820

  3. Climate and Fuel Controls on North American Paleofires: Smoldering to Flaming in the Late-glacial-Holocene Transition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y.M.; Peteet, D.M.; Arimoto, R.; Cao, J.J.; An, Z.S.; Sritrairat, S.; Yan, B.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Smoldering and flaming fires, which emit different proportions of organic (OC) and black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot), have long been recognized in modern wildfire observations but never in a paleo-record, and little is known about their interactions with climate. Here we show that in the late glacial-early Holocene transition period, when the climate was moist, relatively high quantities of char were deposited in Linsley Pond, Connecticut, USA while soot was more abundant during the warmer and drier early Holocene interval. The highest soot mass accumulation rates (MARs) occurred at the beginning of the Holocene as fuel availability increased through the climatic transition when boreal forests were locally extirpated. These variations with time are related to the different formation pathways of char and soot, which are governed by combustion efficiency. This study provides an approach for differentiating smoldering from flaming combustion in paleo-wildfire reconstructions. Our results suggest that climate and fuel loads control the occurrence of different wildfire types and precipitation may play a key role. PMID:26860820

  4. Climate and Fuel Controls on North American Paleofires: Smoldering to Flaming in the Late-glacial-Holocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. M.; Peteet, D. M.; Arimoto, R.; Cao, J. J.; An, Z. S.; Sritrairat, S.; Yan, B. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Smoldering and flaming fires, which emit different proportions of organic (OC) and black carbon (BC, in the form of char and soot), have long been recognized in modern wildfire observations but never in a paleo-record, and little is known about their interactions with climate. Here we show that in the late glacial-early Holocene transition period, when the climate was moist, relatively high quantities of char were deposited in Linsley Pond, Connecticut, USA while soot was more abundant during the warmer and drier early Holocene interval. The highest soot mass accumulation rates (MARs) occurred at the beginning of the Holocene as fuel availability increased through the climatic transition when boreal forests were locally extirpated. These variations with time are related to the different formation pathways of char and soot, which are governed by combustion efficiency. This study provides an approach for differentiating smoldering from flaming combustion in paleo-wildfire reconstructions. Our results suggest that climate and fuel loads control the occurrence of different wildfire types and precipitation may play a key role.

  5. Factors controlling late Cenozoic continental margin growth from the Ebro Delta to the western Mediterranean deep sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, C.H.; Maldonado, A.

    1990-01-01

    The Ebro continental margin sedimentation system originated with a Messinian fluvial system. This system eroded both a major subaerial canyon cutting the margin southeastward from the present Ebro Delta and an axial valley that drained northeastward down Valencia Trough. Post-Messinian submergence of this topography and the Pliocene regime of high sea levels resulted in a marine hemipelagic drape over the margin. Late Pliocene to Pleistocene glacial climatic cycles, drainagebasin deforestation, and sea-level lowstands combined to increase sediment supply, cause the margin to prograde, and create a regime of lowstand sediment-gravity flows in the deeper margin. The depositional patterns of regressive, transgressive and highstand sea-level regimes suggest that location of the sediment source near the present Ebro Delta throughout the late Cenozoic, southward current advection of sediment, and greater subsidence in the southern margin combined to cause generally asymmetric progradation of the margin to the southeast. Thicker, less stable deposits filling the Messinian subaerial canyon underwent multiple retrograde failures, eroded wide gullied canyons and formed unchanneled base-of-slope sediment aprons in the central margin area; other margin areas to the north and south developed a series of channel-levee complexes. On the basin floor, the formation of Valencia Valley over the Messinian subaerial valley and earlier faults led to draining of about 20% of the Ebro Pleistocene sediment from channel-levee complexes through the valley to prograde Valencia Fan as much as 500 km northeast of the margin. Thus, the Ebro margin has two growth directions, mainly southeastward during higher sea levels, and eastward to northeastward during lower sea levels. The northeastward draining of turbidity currents has produced unusually thin and widely dispersed turbidite systems compared to those on ponded basin floors. During the past few centuries, man's impact has exceeded natural

  6. Paleoclimate controls on late paleozoic sedimentation and peat formation in the central appalachian basin (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cecil, C.B.; Stanton, R.W.; Neuzil, S.G.; Dulong, F.T.; Ruppert, L.F.; Pierce, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    In the central Appalachian basin, at least two major climate changes affected sedimentation during the late Paleozoic. Stratigraphically, these two changes are indicated by the distribution of coal beds, the variation in coal quality, and the variation in rock lithologies. In latest Mississippian or earliest Pennsylvanian time, the climate changed from dry-seasonal tropical to ever-wet (equable) tropical. The equable climate prevailed into the Middle Pennsylvanian, influencing the morphology and geochemistry in peat-forming environments. Many of the peat deposits, which formed under the equable climate, were probably domed (raised bogs); low concentrations of dissolved solids in peat formation water resulted in low buffering capacity. Organic acids caused acidic (pH < 4), antiseptic conditions that resulted in intense leaching of mineral matter, minimal degradation of organic matter, and low-ash and low-sulfur peat deposits; the resulting coal beds are also low in ash and sulfur. Associated rocks are noncalcareous and consist of sequences of interbedded shale, siltstone, and sandstone including quartz arenite. Another climate change occurred in late Middle Pennsylvanian time when evapopation periodically exceeded rainfall resulting in an increase of both dissolved solids and pH (4 to ??? 7) in surface and near-surface water. Throughout the remainder of the Pennsylvanian, the surfaces of peat deposits were probably planar (not domed); water in peat-forming and other depositional environments became more nearly neutral. The coal beds derived from these peats are highly variable in both ash and sulfur contents. Drier or more seasonal climates are also indicated by sequences of (1) calcareous sandstone and shale, (2) nonmarine limestone that shows shallow-water and subaerial exposure features, and (3) calcareous paleosols that have caliche characteristics. Our data and observations indicate that physical depositional environment models for the origin of coal do not

  7. Controlling the Emotional Bias: Performance, Late Positive Potentials, and the Effect of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Faehling, Florian; Plewnia, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive control of emotional processing is essential for adaptive human behavior. Biased attention toward emotionally salient information is critically linked with affective disorders and is discussed as a promising treatment target. Anodal (activity enhancing) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to increase healthy and impaired cognitive control over emotional distraction and is therefore widely used for the investigation and experimental treatment of this disorder. In this study, event-related potential (ERP) were recorded parallel to tDCS to track its online effects. Healthy volunteers (n = 87) performed a delayed working memory paradigm with emotional salient and neutral distractors during stimulation with different intensities (sham, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mA). Measuring the late positive potential (LPP), an ERP that indexes attention allocation, we found that a valence-specific increase of the early portion of the LPP (eLPP, 250–500 ms) was associated with less emotional distraction in the sham group. Of note, stimulation with tDCS exerted an intensity related effect on this correlation. The later part of the LPP (lLPP, 500–1000 ms) was found to be correlated with reaction time, regardless of valence. General effect of tDCS on LPPs and task performance were not observed. These findings demonstrate that ERP recordings parallel to tDCS are feasible to investigate the neuronal underpinnings of stimulation effects on executive functions. Furthermore, they support the notion that the LPP induced by a distractive stimulus during a working memory task mirrors the additional allocation of neuronal resources with a specific sensitivity of the early LPP for highly arousing negative stimuli. Finally, together with the variable magnitude and direction of the emotional bias, the lack of systematic modulations of LPPs and behavior by tDCS further underlines the important influence of the individual brain activity patterns on stimulation effects both on

  8. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  9. New insights into the early biochemical activation of jasmonic acid biosynthesis in leaves.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Gustavo; Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-03-01

    In plants, herbivore attack elicits the rapid accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) which results from the activation of constitutively expressed biosynthetic enzymes. The molecular mechanisms controlling the activation of JA biosynthesis remain largely unknown however new research has elucidated some of the early regulatory components involved in this process. Nicotiana attenuata plants, a wild tobacco species, responds to fatty acid amino acid conjuguates (FAC) elicitors in the oral secretion of its natural herbivore, Manduca sexta, by triggering specific defense and tolerance responses against it; all of the defense responses known to date require the amplification of the wound-induced JA increase. We recently demonstrated that this FAC-elicited JA burst requires an increased flux of free linolenic acid (18:3) likely originating from the activation of a plastidial glycerolipase (GLA1) which is activated by an abundant FAC found in insect oral secretions, N-linolenoyl-glutamate (18:3-Glu). The lack of accumulation of free 18:3 after elicitation suggests a tight physical association between GLA1 and LOX3 in N. attenuata leaves. In addition, the salicylate-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and the nonexpressor of PR-1 (NPR1) participate in this activation mechanism that controls the supply of 18:3. In contrast, the wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) does not but instead regulates the conversion of 13(S)-hydroperoxy-18:3 into 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). These results open new perspectives on the complex network of signals and regulatory components inducing the JA biosynthetic pathway. PMID:20037473

  10. The protective effects of methyl jasmonate against adriamycin--induced hepatic and renal toxicities.

    PubMed

    Kosoko, A M; Molokwu, C J; Farombi, E O; Ademowo, O G

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective effect of methyl jasmonate (MJ) in adriamycin (ADR) induced hepatic and renal toxicities. 36 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control, ADR (20 mg/kg), MJ (50 mg/kg) only, MJ (100 mg/kg) only, MJ (50 mg/ kg) + ADR, MJ (100 mg/kg) + ADR groups (n = 6). The 2 doses of MJ was administered for 7 days in MJ only groups, ADR was administered intraperitoneally on the 8th day after pretreatment with the 2 different doses of MJ while ADR was administered on the 8th day only for the ADR only group. The malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), H2O2 generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea and creatinine in the liver, kidneys and serum samples as applicable were estimated. Tissue MDA, H2O2 generation, and GST activity were markedly elevated while GSH content, CAT and SOD activities were significantly reduced in the tissues when compared to the control (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with MJ ameliorated ADR toxicities, with a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, ALT activity, MDA level, H2O2 generation, GST activity and a significant elevation in GSH content, CAT and SOD activities in the organ tissues. MJ induced significant reduction in MDA level and increase of GSH content in liver and kidney tissues. This study suggests that MJ may play an overall protective effect on ADR-induced toxicities in liver and kidneys and the inhibition of tissue peroxidative damage might contribute to this beneficial effect. PMID:23678646

  11. Arabidopsis WRKY57 functions as a node of convergence for jasmonic acid- and auxin-mediated signaling in jasmonic acid-induced leaf senescence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjuan; Liang, Gang; Yang, Shizhuo; Yu, Diqiu

    2014-01-01

    Leaf senescence is regulated by diverse developmental and environmental factors. Exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) can induce leaf senescence, whereas auxin suppresses this physiological process. Crosstalk between JA and auxin signaling has been well studied, but not during JA-induced leaf senescence. Here, we found that upon methyl jasmonate treatment, Arabidopsis thaliana wrky57 mutants produced typical leaf senescence symptoms, such as yellowing leaves, low chlorophyll content, and high cell death rates. Further investigation suggested that senescence-associated genes were upregulated in the wrky57 mutants. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that WRKY57 directly binds to the promoters of SENESCENCE4 and SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE12 and represses their transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments suggested that WRKY57 interacts with JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN4/8 (JAZ4/8) and the AUX/IAA protein IAA29, repressors of the JA and auxin signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with the opposing functions of JA and auxin in JA-induced leaf senescence, JAZ4/8 and IAA29 also displayed opposite functions in JA-induced leaf senescence and competitively interacted with WRKY57. Our results suggested that the JA-induced leaf senescence process can be antagonized by auxin via WRKY57. Moreover, WRKY57 protein levels were downregulated by JA but upregulated by auxin. Therefore, as a repressor in JA-induced leaf senescence, WRKY57 is a common component of the JA- and auxin-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24424094

  12. Temporal transcriptome changes induced by methyl jasmonate in Salvia sclarea.

    PubMed

    Hao, Da Cheng; Chen, Shi Lin; Osbourn, Anne; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Liu, Li Wei; Jordán, Maria J

    2015-03-01

    Salvia sclarea is a traditional medicinal and aromatic plant that grows in Europe and produces various economically important compounds, including phenylpropanoid derivatives and terpenoids. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) is commonly used to elicit plant stress responses. However, how MeJA enhances production of secondary metabolites in S. sclarea is not well understood. We performed a genome-wide analysis of temporal gene expression in S. sclarea leaves and roots. The transcriptome profiles 0, 10 and 26 h after MeJA treatment were analyzed by Illumina RNA-Seq. A total of 16,142 isogenes (average length 866bp; N50 1035bp) were obtained by de novo assembly of 35,757,567 raw sequencing reads. When these sequencing reads were mapped onto the assembled Unigenes, 3236, 2792 and 798 Unigenes were found to be expressed differentially between 0 and 10h, 0 and 26 h, and 10 and 26h, respectively. These included many secondary metabolite biosynthesis, stress and defense-related genes. A qRT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression profiles of selected differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed by RNA-Seq data, and also extended our analysis of differential gene expression to 73 h. Our investigations revealed temporal differences in the responses of S. sclarea to MeJA treatment. MeJA treatment induced the expression of a large number of genes involved in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, especially between 0 and 10h, and 0 and 26 h. Additionally, many genes encoding transcription factors, cytochrome P450s, glycosyltransferases, methyltransferases and transporters were shown to respond to MeJA elicitation. DEGs related to structural molecule activity and cell death showed a significant temporal variation. A chromatographic analysis of metabolites at 26h, 73h and six days after MeJA treatment indicated that these transcriptomic changes precede MeJA-induced changes in secondary metabolite content. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of MeJA elicitation and is helpful in

  13. Jasmonic acid is a downstream component in the modulation of somatic embryogenesis by Arabidopsis Class 2 phytoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Mira, Mohamed M.; Wally, Owen S. D.; Elhiti, Mohamed; El-Shanshory, Adel; Reddy, Dhadi S.; Hill, Robert D.; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the beneficial effect of suppression of the Arabidopsis phytoglobin 2 gene, PGB2, on somatic embryogenesis occurs through the accumulation of nitric oxide (NO) within the embryogenic cells originating from the cultured explant. NO activates the expression of Allene oxide synthase (AOS) and Lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2), genes encoding two key enzymes of the jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthetic pathway, elevating JA content within the embryogenic tissue. The number of embryos in the single aos1-1 mutant and pgb2-aos1-1 double mutant declined, and was not rescued by increasing levels of NO stimulating embryogenesis in wild-type tissue. NO also influenced JA responses by up-regulating PLANT DEFENSIN 1 (PDF1) and JASMONATE-ZIM-PROTEIN (JAZ1), as well as down-regulating MYC2. The NO and JA modulation of MYC2 and JAZ1 controlled embryogenesis. Ectopic expression of JAZ1 or suppression of MYC2 promoted the formation of somatic embryos, while repression of JAZ1 and up-regulation of MYC2 reduced the embryogenic performance. Sustained expression of JAZ1 induced the transcription of several indole acetic acid (IAA) biosynthetic genes, resulting in higher IAA levels in the embryogenic cells. Collectively these data fit a model integrating JA in the PGB2 regulation of Arabidopsis embryogenesis. Suppression of PGB2 increases JA through NO. Elevated levels of JA repress MYC2 and induce JAZ1, favoring the accumulation of IAA in the explants and the subsequent production of somatic embryos. PMID:26962208

  14. Concurrent changes in methyl jasmonate emission and the expression of its biosynthesis-related genes in Cymbidium ensifolium flowers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingkun; Ma, Cuiping; Yu, Rangcai; Mu, Lanling; Hou, Jia; Yu, Yunyi; Fan, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) is one of most abundant scent compounds in Cymbidium ensifolium flowers. In this study, the emission of MeJA and its regulation mechanism were investigated. Our results showed that emission of MeJA in C. ensifolium flowers was controlled developmentally and rhythmically. It occurred in a tissue-specific manner, and high MeJA emission was found in sepals and petals. A group of vital genes involved in the MeJA biosynthesis via the octadecanoid pathway were isolated from C. ensifolium flowers, including CeLOX, CeAOS, CeAOC and CeJMT. MeJA emission was at very low levels in unopened or half-opened C. ensifolium flowers and reached its maximal level between day 4 and 6 and declined from day 7 to 10 postanthesis. The expression of CeLOX, CeAOS, CeAOC and CeJMT increased from day 1 to day 6, and then declined from day 7 to 10 postanthesis, corresponding to the change in MeJA emission. Moreover, the expression of CeLOX, CeAOS, CeAOC and CeJMT oscillated in a rhythmic manner could reach the maximum level between 8:00 h and 16:00 h, which coincided with the MeJA emission. The high level of MeJA emission in sepals and petals coincided with the high transcript levels. The results suggest that MeJA emission in C. ensifolium flower might be directly regulated at the transcription levels. Moreover, the recombinant protein of CeJMT could specifically catalyze the jasmonic acid to form the corresponding ester MeJA. PMID:25214235

  15. The Juvenile Phase of Maize Sees Upregulation of Stress-Response Genes and Is Extended by Exogenous Jasmonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Beydler, Benjamin; Osadchuk, Krista; Cheng, Chi-Lien; Manak, J Robert; Irish, Erin E

    2016-08-01

    As maize (Zea mays) plants undergo vegetative phase change from juvenile to adult, they both exhibit heteroblasty, an abrupt change in patterns of leaf morphogenesis, and gain the ability to produce flowers. Both processes are under the control of microRNA156 (miR156), whose levels decline at the end of the juvenile phase. Gain of the ability to flower is conferred by the expression of miR156 targets that encode SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING transcription factors, which, when derepressed in the adult phase, induce the expression of MADS box transcription factors that promote maturation and flowering. How gene expression, including targets of those microRNAs, differs between the two phases remains an open question. Here, we compare transcript levels in primordia that will develop into juvenile or adult leaves to identify genes that define these two developmental states and may influence vegetative phase change. In comparisons among successive leaves at the same developmental stage, plastochron 6, three-fourths of approximately 1,100 differentially expressed genes were more highly expressed in primordia of juvenile leaves. This juvenile set was enriched in photosynthetic genes, particularly those associated with cyclic electron flow at photosystem I, and in genes involved in oxidative stress and retrograde redox signaling. Pathogen- and herbivory-responsive pathways including salicylic acid and jasmonic acid also were up-regulated in juvenile primordia; indeed, exogenous application of jasmonic acid delayed both the appearance of adult traits and the decline in the expression of miR156-encoding loci in maize seedlings. We hypothesize that the stresses associated with germination promote juvenile patterns of differentiation in maize. PMID:27307257

  16. Priming of jasmonate-mediated anti-herbivore defense responses in rice by silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the function of silicon (Si) in plant physiology has long been debated, its beneficial effects on plant resistance against abiotic and biotic stresses, ¬including insect herbivory, have been well-documented. In addition, the jasmonate (JA) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in mediating an...

  17. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  18. A combination of hot air and methyl jasmonate vapor treatment alleviates chilling injury of peach fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peaches were harvested at firm-mature stage and treated with various combinations of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and hot air. Severity of internal browning and flesh mealiness, firmness, extractable juice rate, total soluble solids (TSS), total acid, vitamin C and total phenolic contents were measured a...

  19. Methyl jasmonate deficiency alters cellular metabolome including the aminome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) catalyzes oxidation of C-13 atom of C:18 polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces jasmonic acid and other oxylipins that have important biological relevance. However, the role of these important molecules in cellular metabolism is barely understood. We have used a transgenic appro...

  20. Genome-wide identification of jasmonate biosynthetic genes and their expression profiles during apple fruit maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant hormones regulate many physiological processes including apple fruit ripening by integrating diverse developmental cues and environmental signals. In addition to the well-characterized role of ethylene, jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives have also been suggested to play an important ro...

  1. Wound and insect-induced jasmonate accumulation in carnivorous Drosera capensis: two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Mithöfer, A; Reichelt, M; Nakamura, Y

    2014-09-01

    Carnivorous sundew plants catch and digest insect prey for their own nutrition. The sundew species Drosera capensis shows a pronounced leaf bending reaction upon prey capture in order to form an 'outer stomach'. This formation is triggered by jasmonates, phytohormones typically involved in defence reactions against herbivory and wounding. Whether jasmonates still have this function in D. capensis in addition to mediating the leaf bending reaction was investigated here. Wounded, insect prey-fed and insect-derived oral secretion-treated leaves of D. capensis were analysed for jasmonates (jasmonic acid, JA; jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate, JA-Ile) using LC-MS/MS. Prey-induced jasmonate accumulation in D. capensis leaves was persistent, and showed high levels of JA and JA-Ile (575 and 55.7 pmol · g · FW(-1) , respectively), whereas wounding induced a transient increase of JA (maximum 500 pmol · g · FW(-1) ) and only low (3.1 pmol · g · FW(-1) ) accumulation of JA-Ile. Herbivory, mimicked with a combined treatment of wounding plus oral secretion (W+OS) obtained from Spodoptera littoralis larvae induced both JA (4000 pmol · g · FW(-1) ) and JA-Ile (25 pmol · g · FW(-1) ) accumulation, with kinetics similar to prey treatment. Only prey and W+OS, but not wounding alone or OS, induced leaf bending. The results indicate that both mechanical and chemical stimuli trigger JA and JA-Ile synthesis. Differences in kinetics and induced jasmonate levels suggest different sensing and signalling events upon injury and insect-dependent challenge. Thus, in Drosera, jasmonates are still part of the response to wounding. Jasmonates are also employed in insect-induced reactions, including responses to herbivory and carnivory. PMID:24499476

  2. Tectonic controls on late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting, volcanism, and landscape development in the Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dokka, R.K.; Travis, C.J.; Ross, T.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent studies of the late Cenozoic tectonics of the Mojave Desert Block suggest that strain is regionally heterogeneous and has been partitioned into six domains that are separated by major strike-slip faults and extensional zones. Tectonic rotation of these domains as well as their internal deformation by strike-slip faulting have occurred as the result of broadly distributed regional right shear. Sixty-five kilometers of total right slip is reckoned to have occurred along faults of the southern half of the province (between the Helendale and Granite Mountains faults). The broad network of faults of the Mojave, along with kinematically and temporally similar strike-slip faults of the Death Valley region (Furnace Creek and Southern Death Valley fault zones), constitute a regional, through going zone of right shear named the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). This zone of intracontinental shear also likely includes the Walker Lane belt of western Nevada. Because of its physical connection to faults the southern portion of the San Andreas fault system, the ECSZ must have also accommodated a portion of Pacific-North American transform motion. In addition to imparting the strong NW structural grain to the region, the tectonic regime has had a profound effect on Neogene paleogeography and has apparently facilitated local magmatism. Faulting and block rotations have created a series of structurally controlled basins and uplifts of many geometries. Extension in several basins has also been accompanied by young basaltic magmatism. These include surface flows such as at Mt. Pisgah (shield volcano) and subsurface dike emplacement beneath Troy Lake.

  3. Enhancement of broccoli indole glucosinolates by methyl jasmonate treatment and effects on prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ann G; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Clinton, Steven K; Erdman, John W

    2014-11-01

    Broccoli is rich in bioactive components, such as sulforaphane and indole-3-carbinol, which may impact cancer risk. The glucosinolate profile of broccoli can be manipulated through treatment with the plant stress hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Our objective was to produce broccoli with enhanced levels of indole glucosinolates and determine its impact on prostate carcinogenesis. Brassica oleracea var. Green Magic was treated with a 250 μM MeJA solution 4 days prior to harvest. MeJA-treated broccoli had significantly increased levels of glucobrassicin, neoglucobrassicin, and gluconasturtiin (P < .05). Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice (n = 99) were randomized into three diet groups at 5-7 weeks of age: AIN-93G control, 10% standard broccoli powder, or 10% MeJA broccoli powder. Diets were fed throughout the study until termination at 20 weeks of age. Hepatic CYP1A was induced with MeJA broccoli powder feeding, indicating biological activity of the indole glucosinolates. Following ∼ 15 weeks on diets, neither of the broccoli treatments significantly altered genitourinary tract weight, pathologic score, or metastasis incidence, indicating that broccoli powder at 10% of the diet was ineffective at reducing prostate carcinogenesis in the TRAMP model. Whereas broccoli powder feeding had no effect in this model of prostate cancer, our work demonstrates the feasibility of employing plant stress hormones exogenously to stimulate changes in phytochemical profiles, an approach that may be useful for optimizing bioactive component patterns in foods for chronic-disease-prevention studies. PMID:24983303

  4. cis-Jasmone induces accumulation of defence compounds in wheat, Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Maria C Blassioli; Birkett, Michael A; Gordon-Weeks, Ruth; Smart, Lesley E; Martin, Janet L; Pye, Barry J; Bromilow, Richard; Pickett, John A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid phase extraction (LPE) and vapor phase extraction (VPE) methodologies were used to evaluate the impact of the plant activator, cis-jasmone, on the secondary metabolism of wheat, Triticum aestivum, var. Solstice. LPE allowed the measurement of benzoxazinoids, i.e. 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), 2-hydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one (HMBOA) and 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2-one (MBOA), and phenolic acids such as trans-p-coumaric acid, syringic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid and cis- and trans-ferulic acid. Using LPE, a significantly higher level of DIMBOA was found in aerial parts and roots of T. aestivum following treatment with cis-jasmone, when compared with untreated plants. Similar results were obtained for phenolic acids, such as trans-ferulic acid and vanillic acid in roots. Using VPE, it was possible to measure levels of 2-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (HBOA), benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA), ferulic acid, syringic acid and coumaric acid. The levels of HBOA in aerial parts and roots were significantly greater in cis-jasmone treated plants compared to untreated plants. cis-Jasmone is known to be a plant activator in terms of production of defence-related volatile semiochemicals that repel aphids and increase the foraging activity of aphid parasitoids. These results show, for the first time, that cis-jasmone also induces selective production of secondary metabolites that are capable of directly reducing development of pests, diseases and weeds. PMID:17681563

  5. Exploring Jasmonates in the Hormonal Network of Drought and Salinity Responses.

    PubMed

    Riemann, Michael; Dhakarey, Rohit; Hazman, Mohamed; Miro, Berta; Kohli, Ajay; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation, and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signaling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signaling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance. PMID:26648959

  6. Exploring Jasmonates in the Hormonal Network of Drought and Salinity Responses

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Michael; Dhakarey, Rohit; Hazman, Mohamed; Miro, Berta; Kohli, Ajay; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Present and future food security is a critical issue compounded by the consequences of climate change on agriculture. Stress perception and signal transduction in plants causes changes in gene or protein expression which lead to metabolic and physiological responses. Phytohormones play a central role in the integration of different upstream signals into different adaptive outputs such as changes in the activity of ion-channels, protein modifications, protein degradation, and gene expression. Phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, and recently also phytohormone crosstalk have been investigated intensively, but the function of jasmonates under abiotic stress is still only partially understood. Although most aspects of jasmonate biosynthesis, crosstalk and signal transduction appear to be similar for biotic and abiotic stress, novel aspects have emerged that seem to be unique for the abiotic stress response. Here, we review the knowledge on the role of jasmonates under drought and salinity. The crosstalk of jasmonate biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways with those of abscisic acid (ABA) is particularly taken into account due to the well-established, central role of ABA under abiotic stress. Likewise, the accumulating evidence of crosstalk of jasmonate signaling with other phytohormones is considered as important element of an integrated phytohormonal response. Finally, protein post-translational modification, which can also occur without de novo transcription, is treated with respect to its implications for phytohormone biosynthesis, signaling and crosstalk. To breed climate-resilient crop varieties, integrated understanding of the molecular processes is required to modulate and tailor particular nodes of the network to positively affect stress tolerance. PMID:26648959

  7. Arabidopsis CYP94B3 encodes jasmonyl-L-isoleucine 12-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Matsubara, Takuya; Sato, Michio; Takahashi, Kosaku; Wakuta, Shinji; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu; Nabeta, Kensuke; Matsuura, Hideyuki

    2011-10-01

    The hormonal action of jasmonate in plants is controlled by the precise balance between its biosynthesis and catabolism. It has been shown that jasmonyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is the bioactive form involved in the jasmonate-mediated signaling pathway. However, the catabolism of JA-Ile is poorly understood. Although a metabolite, 12-hydroxyJA-Ile, has been characterized, detailed functional studies of the compound and the enzyme that produces it have not been conducted. In this report, the kinetics of wound-induced accumulation of 12-hydroxyJA-Ile in plants were examined, and its involvement in the plant wound response is described. Candidate genes for the catabolic enzyme were narrowed down from 272 Arabidopsis Cyt P450 genes using Arabidopsis mutants. The candidate gene was functionally expressed in Pichia pastoris to reveal that CYP94B3 encodes JA-Ile 12-hydroxylase. Expression analyses demonstrate that expression of CYP94B3 is induced by wounding and shows specific activity toward JA-Ile. Plants grown in medium containing JA-Ile show higher sensitivity to JA-Ile in cyp94b3 mutants than in wild-type plants. These results demonstrate that CYP94B3 plays a major regulatory role in controlling the level of JA-Ile in plants. PMID:21849397

  8. Arabidopsis ASA1 Is Important for Jasmonate-Mediated Regulation of Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport during Lateral Root Formation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaqiang; Xu, Yingxiu; Ye, Songqing; Jiang, Hongling; Chen, Qian; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Wenkun; Chen, Rong; Li, Xugang; Tietz, Olaf; Wu, Xiaoyan; Cohen, Jerry D.; Palme, Klaus; Li, Chuanyou

    2009-01-01

    Plant roots show an impressive degree of plasticity in adapting their branching patterns to ever-changing growth conditions. An important mechanism underlying this adaptation ability is the interaction between hormonal and developmental signals. Here, we analyze the interaction of jasmonate with auxin to regulate lateral root (LR) formation through characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, jasmonate-induced defective lateral root1 (jdl1/asa1-1). We demonstrate that, whereas exogenous jasmonate promotes LR formation in wild-type plants, it represses LR formation in jdl1/asa1-1. JDL1 encodes the auxin biosynthetic gene ANTHRANILATE SYNTHASE α1 (ASA1), which is required for jasmonate-induced auxin biosynthesis. Jasmonate elevates local auxin accumulation in the basal meristem of wild-type roots but reduces local auxin accumulation in the basal meristem of mutant roots, suggesting that, in addition to activating ASA1-dependent auxin biosynthesis, jasmonate also affects auxin transport. Indeed, jasmonate modifies the expression of auxin transport genes in an ASA1-dependent manner. We further provide evidence showing that the action mechanism of jasmonate to regulate LR formation through ASA1 differs from that of ethylene. Our results highlight the importance of ASA1 in jasmonate-induced auxin biosynthesis and reveal a role for jasmonate in the attenuation of auxin transport in the root and the fine-tuning of local auxin distribution in the root basal meristem. PMID:19435934

  9. Assessment of a Standardized Pre-Operative Telephone Checklist Designed to Avoid Late Cancellation of Ambulatory Surgery: The AMBUPROG Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Baron, Gabriel; Douard, Richard; Béthoux, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a standardized pre-operative telephone checklist on the rate of late cancellations of ambulatory surgery (AMBUPROG trial). Design Multicenter, two-arm, parallel-group, open-label randomized controlled trial. Setting 11 university hospital ambulatory surgery units in Paris, France. Participants Patients scheduled for ambulatory surgery and able to be reached by telephone. Intervention A 7-item checklist designed to prevent late cancellation, available in five languages and two versions (for children and adults), was administered between 7 and 3 days before the planned date of surgery, by an automated phone system or a research assistant. The control group received standard management alone. Main Outcome Measures Rate of cancellation on the day of surgery or the day before. Results The study population comprised 3900 patients enrolled between November 2012 and September 2013: 1950 patients were randomized to the checklist arm and 1950 patients to the control arm. The checklist was administered to 68.8% of patients in the intervention arm, 1002 by the automated phone system and 340 by a research assistant. The rate of late cancellation did not differ significantly between the checklist and control arms (109 (5.6%) vs. 113 (5.8%), adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 0.91 [0.65–1.29], (p = 0.57)). Checklist administration revealed that 355 patients (28.0%) had not undergone tests ordered by the surgeon or anesthetist, and that 254 patients (20.0%) still had questions concerning the fasting state. Conclusions A standardized pre-operative telephone checklist did not avoid late cancellations of ambulatory surgery but enabled us to identify several frequent causes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01732159 PMID:26829478

  10. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors JASMONATE-ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3 Are Negative Regulators of Jasmonate Responses in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Obayashi, Takeshi; Saito, Hikaru; Masuda, Shinji; Kamiya, Yuji; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Shirasu, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonates regulate transcriptional reprogramming during growth, development, and defense responses. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine, an amino acid conjugate of jasmonic acid (JA), is perceived by the protein complex composed of the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins, leading to the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of JAZ proteins. This activates basic helix-loop-helix-type MYC transcription factors to regulate JA-responsive genes. Here, we show that the expression of genes encoding other basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, JASMONATE ASSOCIATED MYC2-LIKE1 (JAM1), JAM2, and JAM3, is positively regulated in a COI1- and MYC2-dependent manner in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, contrary to myc2, the jam1jam2jam3 triple mutant exhibited shorter roots when treated with methyl jasmonate (MJ), indicating enhanced responsiveness to JA. Our genome-wide expression analyses revealed that key jasmonate metabolic genes as well as a set of genes encoding transcription factors that regulate the JA-responsive metabolic genes are negatively regulated by JAMs after MJ treatment. Consistently, loss of JAM genes resulted in higher accumulation of anthocyanin in MJ-treated plants as well as higher accumulation of JA and 12-hydroxyjasmonic acid in wounded plants. These results show that JAMs negatively regulate the JA responses in a manner that is mostly antagonistic to MYC2. PMID:23852442

  11. Higher Education Is an Age-Independent Predictor of White Matter Integrity and Cognitive Control in Late Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S.; Grieve, Stuart M.; Brickman, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is an important predictor of cognitive development and academic achievement. Late adolescence provides a unique opportunity to study how the attainment of socioeconomic status (in the form of years of education) relates to cognitive and neural development, during a time when age-related cognitive and neural development is…

  12. Dynamics of Jasmonate Metabolism upon Flowering and across Leaf Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Widemann, Emilie; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Aubert, Yann; Miesch, Laurence; Heitz, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway plays important roles in adaptation of plants to environmental cues and in specific steps of their development, particularly in reproduction. Recent advances in metabolic studies have highlighted intricate mechanisms that govern enzymatic conversions within the jasmonate family. Here we analyzed jasmonate profile changes upon Arabidopsis thaliana flower development and investigated the contribution of catabolic pathways that were known to turnover the active hormonal compound jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) upon leaf stress. We report a rapid decline of JA-Ile upon flower opening, concomitant with the massive accumulation of its most oxidized catabolite, 12COOH-JA-Ile. Detailed genetic analysis identified CYP94C1 as the major player in this process. CYP94C1 is one out of three characterized cytochrome P450 enzymes that define an oxidative JA-Ile turnover pathway, besides a second, hydrolytic pathway represented by the amido-hydrolases IAR3 and ILL6. Expression studies combined with reporter gene analysis revealed the dominant expression of CYP94C1 in mature anthers, consistent with the established role of JA signaling in male fertility. Significant CYP94B1 expression was also evidenced in stamen filaments, but surprisingly, CYP94B1 deficiency was not associated with significant changes in JA profiles. Finally, we compared global flower JA profiles with those previously reported in leaves reacting to mechanical wounding or submitted to infection by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. These comparisons revealed distinct dynamics of JA accumulation and conversions in these three biological systems. Leaf injury boosts a strong and transient JA and JA-Ile accumulation that evolves rapidly into a profile dominated by ω-oxidized and/or Ile-conjugated derivatives. In contrast, B. cinerea-infected leaves contain mostly unconjugated jasmonates, about half of this content being ω-oxidized. Finally, developing flowers present an

  13. Enhanced daidzin production from jasmonic and acetyl salicylic acid elicited hairy root cultures of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Mohd; Reddy, Vudem Dashavantha; Giri, Charu Chandra

    2016-07-01

    Daidzin (7-O-glucoside of daidzein) has several pharmacological benefits in herbal remedy, as antioxidant and shown antidipsotropic activity. Hairy root culture of Psoralea corylifolia L. was developed for biomass and enhanced daidzin production using signalling compounds such as jasmonic acid (JA) and acetyl salicylic acid (ASA). Best response of 2.8-fold daidzin (5.09% DW) with 1 μM JA treatment after second week and 7.3-fold (3.43% DW) with 10 μM JA elicitation after 10th week was obtained from hairy roots compared to untreated control. ASA at 10 μM promoted 1.7-fold increase in daidzin (1.49% DW) content after seventh week compared to control (0.83% DW). Addition of 25 μM ASA resulted in 1.44% DW daidzin (1.5-fold increase) with 0.91% DW in control after fifth week and 1.44% DW daidzin (2.3-fold increase) after eighth week when compared to untreated control (0.62% DW). Reduced biomass with increased daidzin content was facilitated by elicited hairy root cultures. PMID:26156378

  14. The Role of the Jasmonate Response in Plant Susceptibility to Diverse Pathogens with a Range of Lifestyles1[w

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Jennifer S.; Owen, Blythe; Higgins, Verna J.

    2004-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack from insects and pathogens with various resistance strategies. The jasmonate and salicylate signaling pathways are two induced responses that protect plants against these attackers. Knowledge of the range of organisms that are affected by each response is important for understanding how plants coordinate their defenses against multiple attackers and the generality of effect of different resistance mechanisms. The jasmonate response is known to protect plants against a wide range of insect herbivores; in this study, we examined the role of the jasmonate response in susceptibility to eight pathogens with diverse lifestyles in the laboratory and field. Recent biochemical models suggest that the lifestyle of the pathogen (necrotroph versus biotroph) should predict whether the jasmonate response will be involved in resistance. We tested this by examining the susceptibility of wild-type (cv Castlemart with no known genes for resistance to the pathogens used) and jasmonate-deficient mutant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants (def1) and by employing rescue treatments of the mutant. Plant susceptibility to five of the eight pathogens we examined was reduced by the jasmonate response, including two bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas campestris), two fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), and an oomycete (Phytophthora infestans). Susceptibility to three fungi was unaffected (Cladosporium fulvum, Oidium neolycopersici, and Septoria lycopersici). Our results indicate that the jasmonate response reduces damage by a wide range of pathogens from different lifestyles, a result that contrasts with the emerging picture of diseases on Arabidopsis. Thus, the generality of jasmonate-based resistance of tomato challenges the view that ecologically distinct plant parasites are resisted via different mechanisms. PMID:15133157

  15. The role of the jasmonate response in plant susceptibility to diverse pathogens with a range of lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Jennifer S; Owen, Blythe; Higgins, Verna J

    2004-05-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack from insects and pathogens with various resistance strategies. The jasmonate and salicylate signaling pathways are two induced responses that protect plants against these attackers. Knowledge of the range of organisms that are affected by each response is important for understanding how plants coordinate their defenses against multiple attackers and the generality of effect of different resistance mechanisms. The jasmonate response is known to protect plants against a wide range of insect herbivores; in this study, we examined the role of the jasmonate response in susceptibility to eight pathogens with diverse lifestyles in the laboratory and field. Recent biochemical models suggest that the lifestyle of the pathogen (necrotroph versus biotroph) should predict whether the jasmonate response will be involved in resistance. We tested this by examining the susceptibility of wild-type (cv Castlemart with no known genes for resistance to the pathogens used) and jasmonate-deficient mutant tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants (def1) and by employing rescue treatments of the mutant. Plant susceptibility to five of the eight pathogens we examined was reduced by the jasmonate response, including two bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas campestris), two fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici), and an oomycete (Phytophthora infestans). Susceptibility to three fungi was unaffected (Cladosporium fulvum, Oidium neolycopersici, and Septoria lycopersici). Our results indicate that the jasmonate response reduces damage by a wide range of pathogens from different lifestyles, a result that contrasts with the emerging picture of diseases on Arabidopsis. Thus, the generality of jasmonate-based resistance of tomato challenges the view that ecologically distinct plant parasites are resisted via different mechanisms. PMID:15133157

  16. Sp1 Sites in the Noncoding Control Region of BK Polyomavirus Are Key Regulators of Bidirectional Viral Early and Late Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bethge, Tobias; Hachemi, Helen A.; Manzetti, Julia; Gosert, Rainer; Schaffner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In kidney transplant patients with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) nephropathy, viral variants arise bearing rearranged noncoding control regions (rr-NCCRs) that increase viral early gene expression, replicative fitness, and cytopathology. rr-NCCRs result from various deletions and duplications of archetype NCCR (ww-NCCR) sequences, which alter transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). However, the role of specific TFBS is unclear. We inactivated 28 TFBS in the archetype NCCR by selective point mutations and examined viral gene expression in bidirectional reporter constructs. Compared to the archetype, group 1 mutations increased viral early gene expression similar to rr-NCCR and resulted from inactivating one Sp1 or one Ets1 TFBS near the late transcription start site (TSS). Group 2 mutations conferred intermediate early gene activation and affected NF1, YY1, and p53 sites between early and late TSS. Group 3 mutations decreased early and late gene expression and included two other Sp1 sites near the early TSS. Recombinant viruses bearing group 1 NCCRs showed increased replication in human renal epithelial cells similar to clinical rr-NCCR variants. Group 2 and 3 viruses showed intermediate or no replication, respectively. A literature search revealed unnoticed group 1 mutations in BKPyV nephropathy, hemorrhagic cystitis, and disseminated disease. IMPORTANCE The NCCRs of polyomaviruses mediate silent persistence of the viral genome as well as the appropriately timed (re)activation of the viral life cycle. This study indicates that the basal BKPyV NCCR is critically controlled by a hierarchy of single TFBS in the archetype NCCR that direct, modulate, and execute the bidirectional early and late viral gene expression. The results provide new insights into how BKPyV NCCR functions as a viral sensor of host cell signals and shed new light on how transcription factors like Sp1 control bidirectional viral gene expression and contribute to replication and pathology

  17. Jasmonate-based wound signal transduction requires activation of WIPK, a tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Seo, S; Sano, H; Ohashi, Y

    1999-01-01

    A gene encoding a tobacco mitogen-activated protein kinase (WIPK) is transcriptionally activated in response to wounding. Transgenic tobacco plants, in which expression of endogenous wipk was suppressed, did not accumulate jasmonic acid or its methyl ester when wounded, suggesting that WIPK is involved in jasmonate-mediated wound signal transduction. Here, we demonstrate that activation of WIPK is required for triggering the jasmonate-mediated signal transduction cascade that occurs when wild-type tobacco plants are wounded. We also show that when plants are wounded, WIPK is rapidly and transiently activated, whereas the quantity of WIPK protein is maintained at a constant level. A transgenic tobacco plant in which the wipk gene was constitutively expressed at a high level showed constitutive enzymatic activation of WIPK and exhibited three- to fourfold higher levels of jasmonate than did its wild-type counterpart. This plant also showed constitutive accumulation of jasmonate-inducible proteinase inhibitor II transcripts. These results show that WIPK is activated in response to wounding, which subsequently causes an increase in jasmonate synthesis. PMID:9927645

  18. Late paternities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean

    2007-06-01

    Late paternities are frequent. Very often these couples ask for medically assisted procreation. In general, it is considered that the couple should not be treated differently from the couple where the father is younger. Recent studies show a certain number of specific risks linked to the late paternities. Doctors and society do not act in the same way towards men and women: a 'sensible age' for women to no longer attempt pregnancy has been set in many countries at 42 years of age, whereas men aged 80 can benefit from IVF attempts and be reimbursed by the state or insurance companies. This is an obvious inequity. PMID:17579995

  19. A 33 million-year record of Late Triassic pCO2 reflects fundamental control of the carbon-cycle by changes in continental distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, M. F.; Wright, J. D.; Kent, D. V.

    2012-12-01

    A ~33 My continuous record of pCO2 spanning the Late Triassic to Earliest Jurassic, based on paleosols from the eastern North American Newark rift basin, shows high pCO2 values near 4500 ± 1400 ppm (at S(z) = 3000 ± 1000 ppm) in the late Carnian, decreasing to ~2000 ± 700 ppm by the late Rhaetian, just before the eruption of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. These data are consistent with the model results of Godderis et al. (2008), who predict falling pCO2 through the Late Triassic as a result of the progressive increase in continental area in the tropical humid belt due to Pangea's slow northward transect. In detail, pCO2 in the Newark corresponds closely to the rate of Northward movement of the Pangean supercontinent, as determined from paleolatitude reconstructions on the Newark Basin Coring Project Cores (Kent and Tauxe, Science, 2005). These observations are more consistent with a weathering-forced driver for long-term variability in atmospheric pCO2 than with the results of simpler mass-balance models (e.g., GEOCARB, and others based on the BLAG hypothesis), wherein trends in pCO2 are forced by changes in the rate of ocean crust production and do not incorporate the effects of dynamical continental geography and lithology. Therefore, we contend that continental weathering rates, which are fundamental expressions of the composition and changing distribution of continental surface area, tightly control the 10^7-year secular changes in pCO2 observed in the Late Triassic. These findings therefore indicate that paleogeography and the rates of change in continental distributions (and lithology) could be the primary driver of Earth's climate on long timescales.

  20. Jasmonates and Tetrahydrojasmonic Acid: A Novel Class of Anti-Aging Molecules.

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Macrene

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonates are plant-derived hormones from linoleic acid that were originally isolated from jasmine, and which are involved in plant stress regulation, wound repair and defense. They have been demonstrated through in vitro and in vivo studies to possess anti-neoplastic properties. Most recently, a novel jasmonate analog was developed, tetrahydrojasmonic acid (LR2412), which possesses favorable characteristics for cutaneous application and which induces improvements in epidermal hyaluronic acid and thickness. Clinical application of LR2412 to facial skin has been demonstrated to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and photoaging. In this issue, a clinical trial is published demonstrating the results of topical application of this agent for th cosmetic treatment of wrinkle appearance, poor texture and large pores. PMID:26885789

  1. Response of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Leaf Surface Defenses to Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Heather C.; Ro, Dae-kyun; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Helianthus annuus, the common sunflower, produces a complex array of secondary compounds that are secreted into glandular trichomes, specialized structures found on leaf surfaces and anther appendages of flowers. The primary components of these trichome secretions are sesquiterpene lactones (STL), a diverse class of compounds produced abundantly by the plant family Compositae and believed to contribute to plant defense against herbivory. We treated wild and cultivated H. annuus accessions with exogenous methyl jasmonate, a plant hormone that mediates plant defense against insect herbivores and certain classes of fungal pathogens. The wild sunflower produced a higher density of glandular trichomes on its leaves than the cultivar. Comparison of the profiles of glandular trichome extracts obtained by liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) showed that wild and cultivated H. annuus were qualitatively similar in surface chemistry, although differing in the relative size and proportion of various compounds detected. Despite observing consistent transcriptional responses to methyl jasmonate treatment, we detected no significant effect on glandular trichome density or LC-MS profile in cultivated or wild sunflower, with wild sunflower exhibiting a declining trend in overall STL production and foliar glandular trichome density of jasmonate-treated plants. These results suggest that glandular trichomes and associated compounds may act as constitutive defenses or require greater levels of stimulus for induction than the observed transcriptional responses to exogenous jasmonate. Reduced defense investment in domesticated lines is consistent with predicted tradeoffs caused by selection for increased yield; future research will focus on the development of genetic resources to explicitly test the ecological roles of glandular trichomes and associated effects on plant growth and fitness. PMID:22623991

  2. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Yao, Jianzhuang; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Li, Guanglin; Guan, Ju; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Guo, Hong; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

  3. Methyl jasmonate and yeast extract stimulate mitragynine production in Mitragyna speciosa (Roxb.) Korth. shoot culture.

    PubMed

    Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip; Choo-Malee, Jutarat; Charoonratana, Tossaton; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2012-10-01

    Mitragynine is a pharmacologically-active terpenoid indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa leaves. Treatment with methyl jasmonate (10 μM) for 24 h and yeast extract (0.1 mg/ml) for 12 h were the optimum conditions of elicitation of mitragynine accumulation in a M. speciosa shoot culture. The former elicitor gave 0.11 mg mitragynine/g dry wt. Tryptophan decarboxylase and strictosidine synthase mRNA levels were enhanced in accordance with mitragynine accumulation. PMID:22714271

  4. Controls of late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic extension in the British Isles: evidence from seismic reflection data in the Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; Cameron, T. D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Controls of late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic extension in the British Isles: evidence from seismic reflection data in the Central North Sea. Kevin Smith (1) and Don Cameron (2) (1) British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA. (ksm@bgs.ac.uk). (2) British Geological Survey, 376 Gilmerton Road, Edinburgh, EH17 7QS. In the area of the British Isles during the late Devonian and early Carboniferous, the oblique convergence of Laurentia and Gondwana imposed a torque on the adjoining terranes of Baltica and Avalonia. Their resulting clockwise rotation was accommodated by widely distributed N-S extension in the intervening zones previously formed by Caledonian and Acadian convergence. South of Laurentia and Baltica, late Palaeozoic extension was focused (1) at terrane margins, (2) in areas of limited Caledonian-Acadian plutonism, and (3) in places where the western (Iapetus) and eastern (Tornquist) convergence zones intersect at a high angle. One of these latter areas lies in Central England immediately north of the Midland Microcraton (part of Eastern Avalonia), where thermal subsidence associated with early Carboniferous extension gave rise to the late Carboniferous Pennine Basin. Interpretation of an extensive set of 3D and 2D long-offset seismic reflection data suggests that a similar area of enhanced extension at a fold belt intersection lies to north of the Mid North Sea High in the middle of the Central North Sea. Variscan uplift and inversion of the late Palaeozoic basins began to predominate in mid-Carboniferous times as final amalgamation of all the different terranes to form Pangaea curtailed the initial episode of extension and thermal subsidence. This change in the tectonic regime was associated with the onset of tholeiitic volcanism within the convergence zones, and was followed by localised extension during the earliest Permian. Evidence obtained from seismic interpretation of the deep structure of the UK sector of the Central

  5. Jasmonate is involved in the induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and tocopherol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sandorf, Iris; Holländer-Czytko, Heike

    2002-11-01

    Coronatine-inducible tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT), which catalyses the transamination from tyrosine to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, is the first enzyme of a pathway leading via homogentisic acid to plastoquinone and tocopherols, the latter of which are known to be radical scavengers in plants. TAT can be also induced by the octadecanoids methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and methyl-12-oxophytodienoic acid (MeOPDA), as well as by wounding, high light, UV light and the herbicide oxyfluorfen. In order to elucidate the role of octadecanoids in the process of TAT induction in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the jasmonate-deficient mutant delayed dehiscence (dde1) was used, in which the gene for 12-oxophytodienoic acid reductase 3 is disrupted. The amount of immunodetectable TAT was low. The enzyme was still fully induced by coronatine as well as by MeJA although induction by the latter was to a lesser extent and later than in the wild type. Treatment with MeOPDA, wounding and UV light, however, had hardly any effects. Tocopherol levels that showed considerable increases in the wild type after some treatments were much less affected in the mutant. However, starting levels of tocopherol were higher in non-induced dde1 than in the wild type. We conclude that jasmonate plays an important role in the signal transduction pathway regulating TAT activity and the biosynthesis of its product tocopherol. PMID:12430028

  6. Rewiring of jasmonate and phytochrome B signalling uncouples plant growth-defense tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Campos, Marcelo L; Yoshida, Yuki; Major, Ian T; de Oliveira Ferreira, Dalton; Weraduwage, Sarathi M; Froehlich, John E; Johnson, Brendan F; Kramer, David M; Jander, Georg; Sharkey, Thomas D; Howe, Gregg A

    2016-01-01

    Plants resist infection and herbivory with innate immune responses that are often associated with reduced growth. Despite the importance of growth-defense tradeoffs in shaping plant productivity in natural and agricultural ecosystems, the molecular mechanisms that link growth and immunity are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that growth-defense tradeoffs mediated by the hormone jasmonate are uncoupled in an Arabidopsis mutant (jazQ phyB) lacking a quintet of Jasmonate ZIM-domain transcriptional repressors and the photoreceptor phyB. Analysis of epistatic interactions between jazQ and phyB reveal that growth inhibition associated with enhanced anti-insect resistance is likely not caused by diversion of photoassimilates from growth to defense but rather by a conserved transcriptional network that is hardwired to attenuate growth upon activation of jasmonate signalling. The ability to unlock growth-defense tradeoffs through relief of transcription repression provides an approach to assemble functional plant traits in new and potentially useful ways. PMID:27573094

  7. De novo characterization of Larix gmelinii (Rupr.) Rupr. transcriptome and analysis of its gene expression induced by jasmonates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Larix gmelinii is a dominant tree species in China’s boreal forests and plays an important role in the coniferous ecosystem. It is also one of the most economically important tree species in the Chinese timber industry due to excellent water resistance and anti-corrosion of its wood products. Unfortunately, in Northeast China, L. gmelinii often suffers from serious attacks by diseases and insects. The application of exogenous volatile semiochemicals may induce and enhance its resistance against insect or disease attacks; however, little is known regarding the genes and molecular mechanisms related to induced resistance. Results We performed de novo sequencing and assembly of the L. gmelinii transcriptome using a short read sequencing technology (Illumina). Chemical defenses of L. gmelinii seedlings were induced with jasmonic acid (JA) or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) for 6 hours. Transcriptomes were compared between seedlings induced by JA, MeJA and untreated controls using a tag-based digital gene expression profiling system. In a single run, 25,977,782 short reads were produced and 51,157 unigenes were obtained with a mean length of 517 nt. We sequenced 3 digital gene expression libraries and generated between 3.5 and 5.9 million raw tags, and obtained 52,040 reliable reference genes after removing redundancy. The expression of disease/insect-resistance genes (e.g., phenylalanine ammonialyase, coumarate 3-hydroxylase, lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase and allene oxide cyclase) was up-regulated. The expression profiles of some abundant genes under different elicitor treatment were studied by using real-time qRT-PCR. The results showed that the expression levels of disease/insect-resistance genes in the seedling samples induced by JA and MeJA were higher than those in the control group. The seedlings induced with MeJA elicited the strongest increases in disease/insect-resistance genes. Conclusions Both JA and MeJA induced seedlings of L. gmelinii showed

  8. Jasmonate regulates the inducer of cbf expression-C-repeat binding factor/DRE binding factor1 cascade and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanru; Jiang, Liqun; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-08-01

    The inducer of cbf expression (ICE)-C-repeat binding factor/DRE binding factor1 (CBF/DREB1) transcriptional pathway plays a critical role in modulating cold stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Dissecting crucial upstream regulatory signals or components of the ICE-CBF/DREB1 cascade will enhance our understanding of plant cold-tolerance mechanisms. Here, we show that jasmonate positively regulates plant responses to freezing stress in Arabidopsis. Exogenous application of jasmonate significantly enhanced plant freezing tolerance with or without cold acclimation. By contrast, blocking endogenous jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling rendered plants hypersensitive to freezing stress. Consistent with the positive role of jasmonate in freezing stress, production of endogenous jasmonate was triggered by cold treatment. In addition, cold induction of genes acting in the CBF/DREB1 signaling pathway was upregulated by jasmonate. Further investigation revealed that several jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins, the repressors of jasmonate signaling, physically interact with ICE1 and ICE2 transcription factors. JAZ1 and JAZ4 repress the transcriptional function of ICE1, thereby attenuating the expression of its regulon. Consistent with this, overexpression of JAZ1 or JAZ4 represses freezing stress responses of Arabidopsis. Taken together, our study provides evidence that jasmonate functions as a critical upstream signal of the ICE-CBF/DREB1 pathway to positively regulate Arabidopsis freezing tolerance. PMID:23933884

  9. Jasmonate Regulates the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION–C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR/DRE BINDING FACTOR1 Cascade and Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanru; Jiang, Liqun; Wang, Fang; Yu, Diqiu

    2013-01-01

    The INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION (ICE)–C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR/DRE BINDING FACTOR1 (CBF/DREB1) transcriptional pathway plays a critical role in modulating cold stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Dissecting crucial upstream regulatory signals or components of the ICE-CBF/DREB1 cascade will enhance our understanding of plant cold-tolerance mechanisms. Here, we show that jasmonate positively regulates plant responses to freezing stress in Arabidopsis. Exogenous application of jasmonate significantly enhanced plant freezing tolerance with or without cold acclimation. By contrast, blocking endogenous jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling rendered plants hypersensitive to freezing stress. Consistent with the positive role of jasmonate in freezing stress, production of endogenous jasmonate was triggered by cold treatment. In addition, cold induction of genes acting in the CBF/DREB1 signaling pathway was upregulated by jasmonate. Further investigation revealed that several JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins, the repressors of jasmonate signaling, physically interact with ICE1 and ICE2 transcription factors. JAZ1 and JAZ4 repress the transcriptional function of ICE1, thereby attenuating the expression of its regulon. Consistent with this, overexpression of JAZ1 or JAZ4 represses freezing stress responses of Arabidopsis. Taken together, our study provides evidence that jasmonate functions as a critical upstream signal of the ICE-CBF/DREB1 pathway to positively regulate Arabidopsis freezing tolerance. PMID:23933884

  10. [Studies on the effects of carbon:nitrogen ratio, inoculum type and yeast extract addition on jasmonic acid production by Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. strain RC1].

    PubMed

    Eng Sánchez, Felipe; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Mariano; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2008-09-30

    Jasmonic acid is a native plant growth regulator produced by algae, microorganisms and higher plants. This regulator is involved in the activation of defence mechanisms against pathogens and wounding in plants. Studies concerning the effects of carbon: nitrogen ratio (C/Nr: 17, 35 and 70), type of inoculum (spores or mycelium) and the yeast extract addition in the media on jasmonic acid production by Botryodiplodia theobromae were evaluated. Jasmonic acid production was stimulated at the carbon: nitrogen ratio of 17. Jasmonic acid productivity was higher in the media inoculated with mycelium and in the media with yeast extract 1.7 and 1.3 times, respectively. PMID:18785793